WorldWideScience

Sample records for stress waves produced

  1. Finite element method (FEM) model of the mechanical stress on phospholipid membranes from shock waves produced in nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald; Roth, Caleb C.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Beier, Hope; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation of phospholipid membranes by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsEP) remains unknown. The passage of a high electric field through a conductive medium creates two primary contributing factors that may induce poration: the electric field interaction at the membrane and the shockwave produced from electrostriction of a polar submersion medium exposed to an electric field. Previous work has focused on the electric field interaction at the cell membrane, through such models as the transport lattice method. Our objective is to model the shock wave cell membrane interaction induced from the density perturbation formed at the rising edge of a high voltage pulse in a polar liquid resulting in a shock wave propagating away from the electrode toward the cell membrane. Utilizing previous data from cell membrane mechanical parameters, and nsEP generated shockwave parameters, an acoustic shock wave model based on the Helmholtz equation for sound pressure was developed and coupled to a cell membrane model with finite-element modeling in COMSOL. The acoustic structure interaction model was developed to illustrate the harmonic membrane displacements and stresses resulting from shockwave and membrane interaction based on Hooke's law. Poration is predicted by utilizing membrane mechanical breakdown parameters including cortical stress limits and hydrostatic pressure gradients.

  2. The role of stress waves and cavitation in stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Songlin; Cocks, Franklin H; Preminger, Glenn M; Zhong, Pei

    2002-05-01

    Using an experimental system that mimics stone fragmentation in the renal pelvis, we have investigated the role of stress waves and cavitation in stone comminution in shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL). Spherical plaster-of-Paris stone phantoms (D = 10 mm) were exposed to 25, 50, 100, 200, 300 and 500 shocks at the beam focus of a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter operated at 20 kV and a pulse repetition rate of 1 Hz. The stone phantoms were immersed either in degassed water or in castor oil to delineate the contribution of stress waves and cavitation to stone comminution. It was found that, while in degassed water there is a progressive disintegration of the stone phantoms into small pieces, the fragments produced in castor oil are fairly sizable. From 25 to 500 shocks, clinically passable fragments (stones with a primary composition of calcium oxalate monohydrate. After 200 shocks, 89% of the fragments of the kidney stones treated in degassed water became passable, but only 22% of the fragments of the kidney stones treated in castor oil were less than 2 mm in size. This apparent size limitation of the stone fragments produced primarily by stress waves (in castor oil) is likely caused by the destructive superposition of the stress waves reverberating inside the fragments, when their sizes are less than half of the compressive wavelength in the stone material. On the other hand, if a stone is only exposed to cavitation bubbles induced in SWL, the resultant fragmentation is much less effective than that produced by the combination of stress waves and cavitation. It is concluded that, although stress wave-induced fracture is important for the initial disintegration of kidney stones, cavitation is necessary to produce fine passable fragments, which are most critical for the success of clinical SWL. Stress waves and cavitation work synergistically, rather than independently, to produce effective and successful disintegration of renal calculi in SWL

  3. Roles Played by Electrostatic Waves in Producing Radio Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    Processes in which electromagnetic radiation is produced directly or indirectly via intermediate waves are reviewed. It is shown that strict theoretical constraints exist for electrons to produce nonthermal levels of radiation directly by the Cerenkov or cyclotron resonances. In contrast, indirect emission processes in which intermediary plasma waves are converted into radiation are often favored on general and specific grounds. Four classes of mechanisms involving the conversion of electrostatic waves into radiation are linear mode conversion, hybrid linear/nonlinear mechanisms, nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle processes, and radiation from localized wave packets. These processes are reviewed theoretically and observational evidence summarized for their occurrence. Strong evidence exists that specific nonlinear wave processes and mode conversion can explain quantitatively phenomena involving type III solar radio bursts and ionospheric emissions. On the other hand, no convincing evidence exists that magnetospheric continuum radiation is produced by mode conversion instead of nonlinear wave processes. Further research on these processes is needed.

  4. Stress wave propagation on standing trees. Part 2, Formation of 3D stress wave contour maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Su; Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang

    2009-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of wood quality in standing trees is an important procedure in the forest operational value chain worldwide. The goal of this paper is to investigate how a stress wave travel in a tree stem as it is introduced into the tree through a mechanical impact. Experimental stress wave data was obtained on freshly cut red pine logs in the...

  5. Stress wave analysis: applied to rotating machines; Stress wave analysis: aplicado a maquinas rotativas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Paulo Garcia de [Invensys Brasil Ltda., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-11-01

    Stress wave analysis is the technology of data analysis (stress profile - ultrasound spectrum) collected by high-frequency acoustic sensors. Monitoring and analysis of rotating equipment, is a crucial element in predictive maintenance and condition based maintenance projects and, in a broader context, of performance management and optimization of assets. This article discusses the application of stress wave analysis to rotating machines in the context of assets optimization and CBM. (author)

  6. A simplified method of evaluating the stress wave environment of internal equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, J. D.; Desmond, T. P.

    1979-01-01

    A simplified method called the transfer function technique (TFT) was devised for evaluating the stress wave environment in a structure containing internal equipment. The TFT consists of following the initial in-plane stress wave that propagates through a structure subjected to a dynamic load and characterizing how the wave is altered as it is transmitted through intersections of structural members. As a basis for evaluating the TFT, impact experiments and detailed stress wave analyses were performed for structures with two or three, or more members. Transfer functions that relate the wave transmitted through an intersection to the incident wave were deduced from the predicted wave response. By sequentially applying these transfer functions to a structure with several intersections, it was found that the environment produced by the initial stress wave propagating through the structure can be approximated well. The TFT can be used as a design tool or as an analytical tool to determine whether a more detailed wave analysis is warranted.

  7. influence of electromagnetic waves produced by an amplitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    This article presents a one dimensional modeling of the influence of electromagnetic waves on the electric power delivered by a silicon solar cell under monochromatic illumination in steady state. The electromagnetic waves are produced by an amplitude modulation radio antenna of 2MW power of radiation and located at a ...

  8. Influence of electromagnetic waves produced by an amplitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article presents a one dimensional modeling of the influence of electromagnetic waves on the electric power delivered by a silicon solar cell under monochromatic illumination in steady state. The electromagnetic waves are produced by an amplitude modulation radio antenna of 2MW power of radiation and located at a ...

  9. Analysis of gravity-waves produced by intense tropical cyclones

    OpenAIRE

    Chane Ming, F.; Chen, Z.; Roux, F.

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Conventional and wavelet methods are combined to characterize gravity-waves (GWs) produced by two intense tropical cyclones (TCs) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) from GPS winsonde data. Analyses reveal large contribution of GWs induced by TCs to wave energy densities in the UT/LS. An increase in total energy density of about 30% of the climatological energy density in austral summer was estimated in the LS above Tromelin during TC Dina. Four dis...

  10. Waves in nonlinear pre-stressed materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Wilhelm; Saccomandi, G

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book provide a unique state-of-the-art multidisciplinary overview on the subject of waves in pre-stressed materials through the interaction of several topics, ranging from the mathematical modelling of incremental material response (elastic and inelastic), to the analysis of the governing differential equations and boundary-value problems, and to computational methods for the solution to these problems, with particular reference to industrial, geophysical, and biomechanical applications. A complete view on the title subject is proposed, including: The basic and fundamental theoretical issues (mechanical modelling, exact solutions, asymptotic methods, numerical treatment); A unified introduction to wave propagation (small on large and large on large); A look toward classical (such as geophysics and the mechanics of rubber-like solids) and emergent (such as biomechanics) applications.

  11. Existence of longitudinal waves in pre-stressed anisotropic elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium, three types of quasi-waves propagate along an arbi- trary direction. In general, none of the waves is truly longitudinal. The present study finds the specific directions in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium along which longitudinal waves may propagate. This paper ...

  12. Investigation into stress wave propagation in metal foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate stress wave propagation in metal foams under high-speed impact loading. Three-dimensional Voronoi model is established to represent real closed-cell foam. Based on the one-dimensional stress wave theory and Voronoi model, a numerical model is developed to calculate the velocity of elastic wave and shock wave in metal foam. The effects of impact velocity and relative density of metal foam on the stress wave propagation in metal foams are explored respectively. The results show that both elastic wave and shock wave propagate faster in metal foams with larger relative density; with increasing the impact velocity, the shock wave propagation velocity increase, but the elastic wave propagation is not sensitive to the impact velocity.

  13. Stress in recombinant protein producing yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattanovich, Diethard; Gasser, Brigitte; Hohenblum, Hubertus; Sauer, Michael

    2004-09-30

    It is well established today that heterologous overexpression of proteins is connected with different stress reactions. The expression of a foreign protein at a high level may either directly limit other cellular processes by competing for their substrates, or indirectly interfere with metabolism, if their manufacture is blocked, thus inducing a stress reaction of the cell. Especially the unfolded protein response (UPR) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (as well as some other yeasts) is well documented, and its role for the limitation of expression levels is discussed. One potential consequence of endoplasmatic reticulum folding limitations is the ER associated protein degradation (ERAD) involving retrotranslocation and decay in the cytosol. High cell density fermentation, the typical process design for recombinant yeasts, exerts growth conditions that deviate far from the natural environment of the cells. Thus, different environmental stresses may be exerted on the host. High osmolarity, low pH and low temperature are typical stress factors. Whereas the molecular pathways of stress responses are well characterized, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the impact of stress responses on industrial production processes. Accordingly, most metabolic engineering approaches conducted so far target at the improvement of protein folding and secretion, whereas only few examples of cell engineering against general stress sensitivity were published. Apart from discussing well-documented stress reactions of yeasts in the context of heterologous protein production, some more speculative topics like quorum sensing and apoptosis are addressed.

  14. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stress and magnetic field on the reflection coef- ficients and energy ratios of reflected waves in a perfectly conducting initially stressed transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space. The present work is supposed to be useful in further studies of wave propagation in the more realistic models which have been extensively ...

  15. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium. M D Sharma ... Modified Christoffel equations are derived for three-dimensional wave propagation in a general anisotropic medium under initial stress.The three roots of a ... Department of Mathematics, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119, India. UIET ...

  16. Nondestructive evaluation of standing trees with a stress wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Michael McClellan; R. James Barbour; John R. Erickson; John W. Forsman; Gary D. McGinnis

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the usefulness of a stress wave technique for evaluating wood strength and stiffness of young-growth western hemlock and Sitka spruce in standing trees. A secondary objective was to determine if the effects of silvicultural practices on wood quality can be identified using this technique. Stress wave measurements...

  17. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, to obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented. 10 references, 11 figures.

  18. Stresses in a submarine topography under ocean waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, C.C.; McTigue, D.F.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of submarine slope stability is of interest to both offshore engineering and geology. In an uneven topography, the weight above a horizontal plane induces two-dimensional variation in the static stress field. The action of wave pressure, which changes with depth, further introduces excess pore pressure and dynamic stresses in the sea bottom. In the present paper, we combine a simple analytical theory for the static stress by the present authors, and the recent solution by Mei and Foda for wave-induced stresses in a plane poro-elastic sea bed to account for mild bottom slope and wave shoaling, and obtain the effective stress field in a submarine topography under sea waves. Sample results are given for a ridge and a canyon. In particular, the dynamic pore pressure and the combined static and dynamic effective stresses are presented.

  19. Analysis of gravity-waves produced by intense tropical cyclones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Chane Ming

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional and wavelet methods are combined to characterize gravity-waves (GWs produced by two intense tropical cyclones (TCs in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS from GPS winsonde data. Analyses reveal large contribution of GWs induced by TCs to wave energy densities in the UT/LS. An increase in total energy density of about 30% of the climatological energy density in austral summer was estimated in the LS above Tromelin during TC Dina. Four distinct periods in GW activity in relation with TC Faxai stages is observed in the UT. Globally, GWs have periods of 6 h–2.5 days, vertical wavelenghts of 1–3 km and horizontal wavelengths <1000 km in the UT during the evolution of TCs. Horizontal wavelengths are longer in the LS and about 2200 km during TCs. Convective activity over the basin and GW energy density were modulated by mixed equatorial waves of 3–4 days, 6–8 days and 10–13 days confirmed by Hövmöller diagram, Fourier and wavelet analyses of OLR data. Moreover, location of GW sources is below the tropopause height when TCs are intense otherwise varies at lower tropospheric heights depending on the strength of convection. Finally, the maximum surface wind speeds of TCs Dina and Faxai can be linearly estimated with total energy densities.

  20. Analysis of gravity-waves produced by intense tropical cyclones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chane Ming, F. [La Reunion Univ. (France). Lab. de l' Atmosphere et des Cyclones; Chen, Z. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Atmospheric; Roux, F. [UMR CNRS Paul Sabatier Univ., Toulouse (France). Lab. d' Aerologie

    2010-07-01

    Conventional and wavelet methods are combined to characterize gravity-waves (GWs) produced by two intense tropical cyclones (TCs) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) from GPS winsonde data. Analyses reveal large contribution of GWs induced by TCs to wave energy densities in the UT/LS. An increase in total energy density of about 30% of the climatological energy density in austral summer was estimated in the LS above Tromelin during TC Dina. Four distinct periods in GW activity in relation with TC Faxai stages is observed in the UT. Globally, GWs have periods of 6 h-2.5 days, vertical wavelengths of 1-3 km and horizontal wavelengths <1000 km in the UT during the evolution of TCs. Horizontal wavelengths are longer in the LS and about 2200 km during TCs. Convective activity over the basin and GW energy density were modulated by mixed equatorial waves of 3-4 days, 6-8 days and 10-13 days confirmed by Hoevmoeller diagram, Fourier and wavelet analyses of OLR data. Moreover, location of GW sources is below the tropopause height when TCs are intense otherwise varies at lower tropospheric heights depending on the strength of convection. Finally, the maximum surface wind speeds of TCs Dina and Faxai can be linearly estimated with total energy densities. (orig.)

  1. Surface Wave Velocity-Stress Relationship in Uniaxially Loaded Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shokouhi, Parisa; Zoëga, Andreas; Wiggenhauser, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    loading cycles revealed that the velocities show a stress-memory effect in good agreement with the Kaiser effect. Comparing the velocities measured during loading and unloading, the effects of stress and damage on the measured velocities could be differentiated. Moreover, the stress dependency of surface......The sonic surface wave (or Rayleigh wave) velocity measured on prismatic concrete specimens under uniaxial compression was found to be highly stress-dependent. At low stress levels, the acoustoelastic effect and the closure of existing microcracks results in a gradual increase in surface wave...... velocities. At higher stress levels, concrete suffers irrecoverable damage: the existing microcracks widen and coalesce and new microcracks form. This progressive damage process leads first to the flattening and eventually the drop in the velocity-stress curves. Measurements on specimens undergoing several...

  2. Producing Lexical Stress in Second Language German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczuga, Paulina; O'Brien, Mary Grantham; Knaus, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Lexical stress assignment plays a central role in being understood in a second language. In fact, research has shown that it may be more important for the comprehensibility of second language learners' speech than, for example, grammatical correctness (Trofimovich & Isaacs, 2012). Nonetheless, its production poses challenges for second…

  3. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of differential stress environment in the sediments. In the problems of foundation engineering, the influence of initial stress appears in a buoyancy effect which amounts to floating a building on its foundation. The theory of elastic wave propaga- tion in pre-stressed solids has a nearly two-century long history. In perhaps, the ...

  4. Theoretical Studies of Stress Wave Propagation in Laterally Confined Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohani, Behzad

    1999-01-01

    .... A considerable body of scientific literature on one-dimensional stress wave propagation for such models has been published in recent years by various researchers, both in the United States and abroad...

  5. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy.

  6. Reflection of plane waves in an initially stressed perfectly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reflection of plane waves is studied at a free surface of a perfectly conducting transversely isotropic elastic solid half-space with initial stress. The governing equations are solved to obtain the velocity equation which indicates the existence of two quasi planar waves in the medium. Reflection coefficients and energy ratios ...

  7. Stress Wave Propagation in Larch Plantation Trees-Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenglu Liu; Fang Jiang; Xiping Wang; Houjiang Zhang; Wenhua Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we attempted to simulate stress wave propagation in virtual tree trunks and construct two dimensional (2D) wave-front maps in the longitudinal-radial section of the trunk. A tree trunk was modeled as an orthotropic cylinder in which wood properties along the fiber and in each of the two perpendicular directions were different. We used the COMSOL...

  8. Wave velocities in a pre-stressed anisotropic elastic medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modified Christoffel equations are derived for three-dimensional wave propagation in a general anisotropic medium under initial stress.The three roots of a cubic equation define the phase velocities of three quasi-waves in the medium.Analytical expressions are used to calculate the directional derivatives of phase ...

  9. Relationship between ultrasonic Rayleigh waves and surface residual stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, L.; Cook, K.V.; Dewey, B.R.; King, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    Local variations of Rayleigh (surface) circumferential ultrasonic wave velocity near a pipe-girth weld in large-diameter thin-wall type 316H stainless steel pipe were measured. The weldment was similar to those anticipated for the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) piping systems. The residual stress distribution was estimated independently from shell theory for an elastic, infinite, thin shell with circumferential line loading. An upper bound on the magnitude of the residual stresses was estimated assuming the deformation of the shell was entirely elastic. The pattern of surface wave velocity variations matches the theoretical residual stress pattern closely. It is suggested that the monitoring of surface wave velocity variations might be used for characterizing residual stress patterns near critical welds in piping, aiding in design calculations, and for in-service monitoring of the state of stress of weldments

  10. Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldis, H.A.; Labaune, C.; Renard, N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 10 13 Wcm -2

  11. Stress-wave experiments on selected crustal rocks and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, D. E.

    1983-09-01

    Large amplitude compressive stress wave experiments on selected crustal rocks and minerals was performed. The materials studied included Vermont marble, Blair dolomite, Oakhall limestone, z-cut calcite and oil shale. In each case specific constitutive features were studied. Features include interrelation of plastic yielding and phase transformation, rate dependent plastic flow, dilatency under dynamic loading conditions, and energy dissipation at stress amplitudes below measured Hugoniot elastic limits. A new experimental method using inmaterial mutual inductance magnetic gauges is also described.

  12. Stress wave emission: a bibliographical survey No 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucia, A.C.; Galli, M.

    1976-01-01

    This report gives an inventory of papers and publications which deal with stress wave emission (ultrasonic emission). This bibliography is up date until end of 1974. It contains also titles of papers published before 1973 but not contained in our first bibliographical report (EUR--5616e)

  13. Measurement and modeling of bed shear stress under solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Guard, P.A.; Baldock, T.E.

    Direct measurements of bed shear stresses (using a shear cell apparatus) generated by non-breaking solitary waves are presented. The measurements were carried out over a smooth bed in laminar and transitional flow regimes (~ 10 sup (4) < R sub (e...

  14. Electromagnetic signals produced by elastic waves in the Earth's crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrigna, V.; Buzzi, A.; Conti, L.; Guglielmi, A. V.; Pokhotelov, O. A.

    2004-03-01

    The paper describes the excitation of geoelectromagnetic-field oscillations caused by elastic waves propagating in the Earth's crust and generated by natural and anthropogenic phenomena, such as earthquakes, explosions, etc. Two mechanisms of electromagnetic signal generation, i.e. induction and electrokinetics ones, are considered and a comparative analysis between them is carried out. The first mechanism is associated with the induction of Foucault currents due to movements of the Earth's crust in the core geomagnetic field. The second mechanism is connected with movements of liquids filling pores and cracks of rocks. An equation is derived for describing in a uniform way these two manifestations of seismomagnetism. The equation is solved for body and surface waves. The study shows that a magnetic precursor signal is moving in the front of elastic waves.

  15. Gravity waves from quantum stress tensor fluctuations in inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Ford, L. H.; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the effects of the quantum stress tensor fluctuations of a conformal field in generating gravity waves in inflationary models. We find a nonscale invariant, non-Gaussian contribution which depends upon the total expansion factor between an initial time and the end of inflation. This spectrum of gravity wave perturbations is an illustration of a negative power spectrum, which is possible in quantum field theory. We discuss possible choices for the initial conditions. If the initial time is taken to be sufficiently early, the fluctuating gravity waves are potentially observable both in the CMB radiation and in gravity wave detectors, and could offer a probe of trans-Planckian physics. The fact that they have not yet been observed might be used to constrain the duration and energy scale of inflation. However, this conclusion is contingent upon including the contribution of modes which were trans-Planckian at the beginning of inflation.

  16. Gravity waves from quantum stress tensor fluctuations in inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-Hsien; Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Ford, L. H.; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2011-11-01

    We consider the effects of the quantum stress tensor fluctuations of a conformal field in generating gravity waves in inflationary models. We find a nonscale invariant, non-Gaussian contribution which depends upon the total expansion factor between an initial time and the end of inflation. This spectrum of gravity wave perturbations is an illustration of a negative power spectrum, which is possible in quantum field theory. We discuss possible choices for the initial conditions. If the initial time is taken to be sufficiently early, the fluctuating gravity waves are potentially observable both in the CMB radiation and in gravity wave detectors, and could offer a probe of trans-Planckian physics. The fact that they have not yet been observed might be used to constrain the duration and energy scale of inflation. However, this conclusion is contingent upon including the contribution of modes which were trans-Planckian at the beginning of inflation.

  17. Analyzing Sound Waves Produced by Musical Notes & Chords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Michael

    This project description is designed to show how graphing calculators and calculator-based laboratories (CBL) can be used to explore topics in the physics of sound. The activities address topics such as sound waves, musical notes, and chords. Teaching notes, calculator instructions, and blackline masters are included. (MM)

  18. Studies on the propagation of relativistic plasma waves in high density plasmas produced by hypersonic ionizing shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.L.; Johnson, J.A. III

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using an ionizing shock wave to produce high density plasmas suitable for the propagation large amplitude relativistic plasma waves is being investigated. A 20 kv arc driven shock tube of coaxial geometry produces a hypersonic shock wave (10 p > 10 17 cm -3 ). The shock can be made to reflect off the end of the tube, collide with its wake, and thus increase the plasma density further. After reflecting, the plasma is at rest. The shock speed is measured using piezoelectric pressure probes and the ion density is measured using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques on argon 488.0 nm and 422.8 nm lines. The future plans are to excite large amplitude relativistic plasma waves in this plasma by either injecting a short pulse laser (Laser Wake Field Scheme), two beating lasers (Plasma Beat Wave Scheme), or a short bunch of relativistic electrons (Plasma Wake Field Scheme). Results of recent computational and theoretical studies, as well as initial experimental measurements on the plasma using LIF, are reported. Implications for the application of high density plasmas produced in this way to such novel schemes as the plasma wave accelerator, photon accelerator, plasma wave undulator, and also plasma lens, are discussed. The effect of plasma turbulence is also discussed

  19. Characterization of Residual Stress in Shot Peened Al 7075 Alloy Using Surface Acoustic Wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chung Seok; Kwun, Sook In; Kim, Yong Kwon; Park, Ik Keun

    2006-01-01

    The residual stress in shot-peened Al 7075 alloy was evaluated using surface acoustic wave (SAW). Shot peening was conducted to produce a variation in the residual stress with the depth below the surface under a shot velocity of 30 m/s. The SAW velocity was measured from the V(z) curve using a scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM). The Vickers hardness profile from the surface showed a significant work hardening near the surface layer with a thickness of about 0.25 mm. As the residual stress became more compressive, the SAW velocity increased, whereas as the residual stress became more tensile, the SAW velocity decreased. The variation in the SAW velocity through the shot peened surface layer was in good agreement with the distribution of the residual stress measured by X-ray diffraction technique

  20. Transient Stress Waves in Study of Coconut Physical Properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2010), s. 19-25 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA201990701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : stress waves * double-pulse holography * coconut * exploding wires Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.505, year: 2010 http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/121567342/PDFSTART

  1. Slow waves moving near the openings in highly stressed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzev, Michail; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    In situ experiments have shown the unusual deformation waves near the openings on high depth of the construction. Process of the wave spreading is beginning after the mining and has two stages of the zonal mesocracking structure formation and development [1]. Extending in a radial direction, the wave poorly fades with distance. For phenomenon modelling the theoretical decision for non-Eucledian models about opening of round cross-section in strongly compressed rock massif is used [2]. The decision qualitatively repeats behaviour of a wave in a rock mass, adjustment of phenomenological parametres is executed. References [1] Vladimir V. Makarov, Mikhail A. Guzev, Vladimir N. Odintsev, Lyudmila S. Ksendzenko (2016) Periodical zonal character of damage near the openings in highly-stressed rock mass conditions. Journal of Rock Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering. Volume 8, Issue 2, pp. 164-169. [2] M.A. Guzev, V.V. Makarov, 2007. Deforming and failure of the high stressed rocks around the openings, RAS Edit., Vladivostok, 2007, P. 232 (in Russian).

  2. Quasielectrostatic whistler wave radiation from the hot electron emission of a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincena, Stephen; Gekelman, Walter; Maggs, James; Collette, Andrew; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements are presented of radiated wave electric fields which result from the creation of a dense, laser-produced plasma within a large, uniform background magnetoplasma. The radiated field patterns are consistent for waves propagating along the quasielectrostatic branch of the whistler wave dispersion curve calculated from the background plasma parameters. The energy source of these waves coincides with an observed energetic tail electron population escaping the laser-produced plasma. A prominent feature of the radiated electric fields is a bipolar spike in both time and space, with a cross-field size near that of the initial escaping electron burst and a duration equivalent to one oscillation at the lower hybrid frequency within the background plasma. Additionally, time-windowed snapshots of the whistler wave radiation patterns are shown to provide a remote diagnostic of the cross-field speed of the laser-produced plasma.

  3. Numerical simulation of stress wave propagation from underground nuclear explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, J.T.; Petersen, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of stress wave propagation (SOC) which uses material properties data from a preshot testing program to predict the stress-induced effects on the rock mass involved in a Plowshare application. SOC calculates stress and particle velocity history, cavity radius, extent of brittle failure, and the rock's efficiency for transmitting stress. The calculations are based on an equation of state for the rock, which is developed from preshot field and laboratory measurements of the rock properties. The field measurements, made by hole logging, determine in situ values of the rock's density, water content, and propagation velocity for elastic waves. These logs also are useful in judging the layering of the rock and in choosing which core samples to test in the laboratory. The laboratory analysis of rock cores includes determination of hydrostatic compressibility to 40 kb, triaxial strength data, tensile strength, Hugoniot elastic limit, and, for the rock near the point of detonation, high-pressure Hugoniot data. Equation-of-state data are presented for rock from three sites subjected to high explosive or underground nuclear shots, including the Hardhat and Gasbuggy sites. SOC calculations of the effects of these two shots on the surrounding rock are compared with the observed effects. In both cases SOC predicts the size of the cavity quite closely. Results of the Gasbuggy calculations indicate that useful predictions of cavity size and chimney height can be made when an adequate preshot testing program is run to determine the rock's equation of state. Seismic coupling is very sensitive to the low-pressure part of the equation of state, and its successful prediction depends on agreement between the logging data and the static compressibility data. In general, it appears that enough progress has been made in calculating stress wave propagation to begin looking at derived numbers, such as number of cracks per zone, for some insight into the

  4. Wave-induced stresses and pore pressures near a mudline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Sawicki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for the determination of water-wave induced stresses inseabeds composed of granular soils are based on Biot-type models, in which the soilskeleton is treated as an elastic medium. Such methods predict effective stressesin the soil that are unacceptable from the physical point of view, as they permittensile stresses to occur near the upper surface of the seabed. Therefore, in thispaper the granular soil is assumed to behave as an elastic-ideally plastic material,with the Coulomb-Mohr yield criterion adopted to bound admissible stress states inthe seabed. The governing equations are solved numerically by a~finite differencemethod. The results of simulations, carried out for the case of time-harmonicwater waves, illustrate the depth distributions of the excess pore pressures and theeffective stresses in the seabed, and show the shapes of zones of soil in the plastic state.~In particular, the effects on the seabed behaviour of suchparameters as the degree of pore water saturation, the soil permeability, and theearth pressure coefficient, are illustrated.

  5. Stress analyses of pump gears produced by powder metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetinel, Hakan [Celal Bayar Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept. (Turkey); Yilmaz, Burak

    2013-06-01

    In this study, trochoidal type (gerotor) hydraulic pump gears were produced by powder metallurgy (P/M) technique. Several gears with different mechanical properties have been obtained by changing process variables. The tooth contact stresses were calculated analytically under particular operation conditions of the hydraulic pump. The 3D models have been obtained from real gears by using Capability Maturity Model (CMM, 3D scanning) operation and SOLIDWORKS software. Stress analyses were conducted on these 3D models by using ANSYS WORKBENCH software. It was found that the density increases by the increase of sintering duration and mechanical properties were positively affected by the increase of density. Maximum deformation takes place in the region of the outer gear where failure generally occurs with the minimum cross-section area.

  6. Stress wave velocity patterns in the longitudinal-radial plane of trees for defect diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghui Li; Xiang Weng; Xiaocheng Du; Xiping Wang; Hailin Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic tomography for urban tree inspection typically uses stress wave data to reconstruct tomographic images for the trunk cross section using interpolation algorithm. This traditional technique does not take into account the stress wave velocity patterns along tree height. In this study, we proposed an analytical model for the wave velocity in the longitudinal–...

  7. Nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves for stress monitoring in prestressing tendons for post-tensioned concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Ivan; Nucera, Claudio; Srivastava, Ankit; Salamone, Salvatore; Phillips, Robert; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Coccia, Stefano; Sikorsky, Charles S.

    2009-03-01

    Many bridges, including 90% of the California inventory, are post-tensioned box-girders concrete structures. Prestressing tendons are the main load-carrying components of these and other post-tensioned structures. Despite their criticality, much research is needed to develop and deploy techniques able to provide real-time information on the level of prestress in order to detect dangerous stress losses. In collaboration with Caltrans, UCSD is investigating the combination of ultrasonic guided waves and embedded sensors to provide both prestress level monitoring and defect detection capabilities in concrete-embedded PS tendons. This paper presents a technique based on nonlinear ultrasonic guided waves in the 100 kHz - 2 MHz range for monitoring prestress levels in 7-wire PS tendons. The technique relies on the fact that an axial stress on the tendon generates a proportional radial stress between adjacent wires (interwire stress). In turn, the interwire stress modulates nonlinear effects in ultrasonic wave propagation through both the presence of finite strains and the interwire contact. The nonlinear ultrasonic behavior of the tendon under changing levels of prestress is monitored by tracking higher-order harmonics at (nω) arising under a fundamental guided-wave excitation at (ω). Experimental results will be presented to identify (a) ranges of fundamental excitations at (ω) producing maximum nonlinear response, and (b) optimum lay-out of the transmitting and the receiving transducers within the test tendons. Compared to alternative methods based on linear ultrasonic features, the proposed nonlinear ultrasonic technique appears more sensitive to prestress levels and more robust against changing excitation power at the transmitting transducer or changing transducer/tendon bond conditions.

  8. Wave-induced stress and breaking of sea ice in a coupled hydrodynamic discrete-element wave-ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a coupled sea ice-wave model is developed and used to analyze wave-induced stress and breaking in sea ice for a range of wave and ice conditions. The sea ice module is a discrete-element bonded-particle model, in which ice is represented as cuboid grains floating on the water surface that can be connected to their neighbors by elastic joints. The joints may break if instantaneous stresses acting on them exceed their strength. The wave module is based on an open-source version of the Non-Hydrostatic WAVE model (NHWAVE). The two modules are coupled with proper boundary conditions for pressure and velocity, exchanged at every wave model time step. In the present version, the model operates in two dimensions (one vertical and one horizontal) and is suitable for simulating compact ice in which heave and pitch motion dominates over surge. In a series of simulations with varying sea ice properties and incoming wavelength it is shown that wave-induced stress reaches maximum values at a certain distance from the ice edge. The value of maximum stress depends on both ice properties and characteristics of incoming waves, but, crucially for ice breaking, the location at which the maximum occurs does not change with the incoming wavelength. Consequently, both regular and random (Jonswap spectrum) waves break the ice into floes with almost identical sizes. The width of the zone of broken ice depends on ice strength and wave attenuation rates in the ice.

  9. Interaction of laser-induced stress waves with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of high intensity laser induced stress waves on the hardness and tensile strength of 2024 and 7075 aluminum and on the fatigue properties of 7075 aluminum were investigated. Laser shocking increases the hardness of the underaged 2024-T351 but has little or no effect on the peak aged 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 or the overaged 7075-T73. The fretting fatigue life of fastener joints of 7075-T6 was increased by orders of magnitude by laser shocking the region around the fastener hole; the fatigue crack propagation rates were decreased by laser shocking.

  10. Simulating photoacoustic waves produced by individual biological particles with spheroidal wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Fang, Hui; Min, Changjun; Yuan, Xiaocong

    2015-10-01

    Under the usual approximation of treating a biological particle as a spheroidal droplet, we consider the analysis of its size and shape with the high frequency photoacoustics and develop a numerical method which can simulate its characteristic photoacoustic waves. This numerical method is based on the calculation of spheroidal wave functions, and when comparing to the finite element model (FEM) calculation, can reveal more physical information and can provide results independently at each spatial points. As the demonstration, red blood cells (RBCs) and MCF7 cell nuclei are studied, and their photoacoustic responses including field distribution, spectral amplitude, and pulse forming are calculated. We expect that integrating this numerical method with the high frequency photoacoustic measurement will form a new modality being extra to the light scattering method, for fast assessing the morphology of a biological particle.

  11. Determination of the Stress State From Transverse Wave Speeds in Isotropic Inelastic Solids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scheidler, Mike

    1997-01-01

    For a transverse acceleration wave propagating along a principal axis of strain in a nonlinear isotropic elastic solid, a simple formula due to Ericksen relates the wave speed to the stress and strain...

  12. Producing accurate wave propagation time histories using the global matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenchain, Matthew B; Cesnik, Carlos E S

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a reliable method for producing accurate displacement time histories for wave propagation in laminated plates using the global matrix method. The existence of inward and outward propagating waves in the general solution is highlighted while examining the axisymmetric case of a circular actuator on an aluminum plate. Problems with previous attempts to isolate the outward wave for anisotropic laminates are shown. The updated method develops a correction signal that can be added to the original time history solution to cancel the inward wave and leave only the outward propagating wave. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of the new method for circular and square actuators bonded to the surface of isotropic laminates, and these results are compared with exact solutions. Results for circular actuators on cross-ply laminates are also presented and compared with experimental results, showing the ability of the new method to successfully capture the displacement time histories for composite laminates. (paper)

  13. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, C1510, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  14. Double shock front formation in cylindrical radiative blast waves produced by laser irradiation of krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I.; Quevedo, H. J.; Feldman, S.; Bang, W.; Serratto, K.; McCormick, M.; Aymond, F.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative blast waves were created by irradiating a krypton cluster source from a supersonic jet with a high intensity femtosecond laser pulse. It was found that the radiation from the shock surface is absorbed in the optically thick upstream medium creating a radiative heat wave that travels supersonically ahead of the main shock. As the blast wave propagates into the heated medium, it slows and loses energy, and the radiative heat wave also slows down. When the radiative heat wave slows down to the transonic regime, a secondary shock in the ionization precursor is produced. This paper presents experimental data characterizing both the initial and secondary shocks and numerical simulations to analyze the double-shock dynamics.

  15. Feasibility of Residual Stress Nondestructive Estimation Using the Nonlinear Property of Critical Refraction Longitudinal Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress has significant influence on the performance of mechanical components, and the nondestructive estimation of residual stress is always a difficult problem. This study applies the relative nonlinear coefficient of critical refraction longitudinal (LCR wave to nondestructively characterize the stress state of materials; the feasibility of residual stress estimation using the nonlinear property of LCR wave is verified. The nonlinear ultrasonic measurements based on LCR wave are conducted on components with known stress state to calculate the relative nonlinear coefficient. Experimental results indicate that the relative nonlinear coefficient monotonically increases with prestress and the increment of relative nonlinear coefficient is about 80%, while the wave velocity only decreases about 0.2%. The sensitivity of the relative nonlinear coefficient for stress is much higher than wave velocity. Furthermore, the dependence between the relative nonlinear coefficient and deformation state of components is found. The stress detection resolution based on the nonlinear property of LCR wave is 10 MPa, which has higher resolution than wave velocity. These results demonstrate that the nonlinear property of LCR wave is more suitable for stress characterization than wave velocity, and this quantitative information could be used for residual stress estimation.

  16. Results of fatigue tests and prediction of fatigue life under superposed stress wave and combined superposed stress wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasugi, Shunji; Horikawa, Takeshi; Tsunenari, Toshiyasu; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1983-01-01

    In order to examine fatigue life prediction methods at high temperatures where creep damage need not be taken into account, fatigue tests were carried out on plane bending specimens of alloy steels (SCM 435, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo) under superposed and combined superposed stress waves at room temperature and 500 0 C. The experimental data were compared with the fatigue lives predicted by using the cycle counting methods (range pair, range pair mean and zero-cross range pair mean methods), the modified Goodman's equation and the modified Miner's rule. The main results were as follows. (1) The fatigue life prediction method which is being used for the data at room temperature is also applicable to predict the life at high temperatures. The range pair mean method is especially better than other cycle counting methods. The zero-cross range pair mean method gives the estimated lives on the safe side of the experimental lives. (2) The scatter bands of N-bar/N-barsub(es) (experimental life/estimated life) becomes narrower when the following equation is used instead of the modified Goodman's equation for predicting the effect of mean stress on fatigue life. σ sub(t) = σ sub(a) / (1 - Sigma-s sub(m) / kσ sub(B)) σ sub(t); stress amplitude at zero mean stress (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(B); tensile strength (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(m); mean stress (kg/mm 2 ) σ sub(a); stress amplitude (kg/mm 2 ) k; modified coefficient of σ sub(B) (author)

  17. Analysis of stress wave propagation in an elasto-viscoplastic plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Noritoshi; Kawai, Ryoji; Urushi, Norio.

    1986-01-01

    Stress waves which propagate in the body are reflected at the boundary, and due to the interaction of the reflected stress waves, the focussing of stress waves will take place and a high stress level can be caused. The focussing of stress waves due to the reflection from the boundary may bring about fracture of the body, so that this is an important problem from a viewpoint of dynamic strength of structures. In this paper the process of stress wave focussing and the strain-rate dependence of constitutive equation in elastic and plastic regions are investigated. In the case where an in-plane step load uniformly acts on the straight edge of the plate with a semi-circular boundary, the propagation of stress waves in the plate was numerically analyzed by the finite element method, applying viscoelastic, elasto-plastic and elasto-viscoplastic constitutive equations. As the result, the process of focussing of stress waves due to reflection from the semi-circular boundary was observed and the difference in propagation behaviour of stress waves was discussed in materials represented by some kinds of constitutive equations. (author)

  18. Stress Wave E-Rating of Structural Timber—Size and Moisture Content Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the influence of cross sectional size and moisture content on stress wave properties of structural timber in various sizes and evaluate the feasibility of using stress wave method to E-rate timber in green conditions. Four different sizes of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) square timbers were...

  19. 3D time-domain spectral elements for stress waves modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, P; Ostachowicz, W

    2009-01-01

    Elastic stress waves induced by piezoelectric transducers are extensively used for damage detection purposes. Induced high frequency impulse signals cause that stress wave modelling by the finite element method is inefficient. Instead, numerical model based on the time-domain spectral element method has been developed to simulate stress wave propagation in metallic structures induced by the piezoelectric transducers. The model solves the coupled electromechanical field equations simultaneously in three-dimensional case. Visualisation of the propagating elastic waves generated by the actuator of different shapes and properties has been performed.

  20. Effect of Stress on Energy Flux Deviation of Ultrasonic Waves in Ultrasonic Waves in GR/EP Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis fiber axis) and the x1 axis for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  1. Magneto-thermo-visco-elastic waves in an initially stressed conducting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakshit, Amit Kumar; Sengupta, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate magneto-thermo-visco-elastic surface waves in electrically and thermally conducting layers involving time rates of strain and stress of order n, the media being under an initial stress in the nature of hydrostatic tension or compression. The theory of magneto-thermo-visco-elastic surface waves in the conducting medium involving strain rate and stress rate of nth order is derived under initial stress. This theory is then employed to obtain wave velocity equations in specific cases. Results obtained in the above cases reduce to well-known classical results when additional fields are absent. (author)

  2. Stress relaxation of compacts produced from viscoelastic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarschalk, KVDV; Zuurman, K; Vromans, H; Bolhuis, GK; Lerk, CF

    1997-01-01

    Stress relaxation of tablets is a phenomenon that is known to be related to elastic deformation of particles. Expressions of stress relaxation are tablet expansion and capping. It has been shown that there is a direct relation between the changes in volume of the tablet and the amount of stored

  3. Critical shear stress produced by interaction of edge dislocation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    According to the Mott and Nabarro's model, the contribution to the critical shear stress of the material caused by the interaction between edge dislocations and nanoscale cylindrical inhomogeneities with interface stresses is obtained. The influence of the radius and the volume fraction of the inhomogeneity as well as the ...

  4. On elastic waves in an thinly-layered laminated medium with stress couples under initial stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pal Roy

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with a simple transformation rule in finding out the composite elastic coefficients of a thinly layered laminated medium whose bulk properties are strongly anisotropic with a microelastic bending rigidity. These elastic coefficients which were not known completely for a layered laminated structure, are obtained suitably in terms of initial stress components and Lame's constants λi, μi of initially isotropic solids. The explicit solutions of the dynamical equations for a prestressed thinly layered laminated medium under horizontal compression in a gravity field are derived. The results are discussed specifying the effects of hydrostatic, deviatoric and couple stresses upon the characteristic propagation velocities of shear and compression wave modes.

  5. Non-uniform temperature gradients and thermal stresses produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    induced stress distributions in a hollow steel sphere heated by a moving uniform heat source applied on a certain zenithal segment (the heated zenithal segment, Θ H ) of its outer surface (the processed surface) under stagnant ambient ...

  6. Critical shear stress produced by interaction of edge dislocation with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    that due to inhomogeneities; that due to atoms solved in the matrix; and so on. In the present paper, the contribution to the critical shear stress caused by the interaction between edge dislocations and inhomogeneities is only considered. According to the work of Mott and Nabarro (1940), consider the composites containing ...

  7. Non-uniform temperature gradients and thermal stresses produced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This work presents numerical analyses of transient temperature and thermally-induced stress distributions in a hollow steel sphere heated by a moving uniform heat source applied on a certain zenithal segment (the heated zenithal segment, H ) of its outer surface (the processed surface) under stagnant ambient.

  8. Controlling Technically Produced Noise to Reduce Psychological Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlestam, Gosta

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the causes and problems associated with increasing levels of noise pollution in urban societies. Particular attention is given to noise emanating from aircraft and to possible means of reducing this problem and its resulting psychological stress and social strain. (JR)

  9. Suitability of tunneling ionization produced plasmas for the plasma beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeman, W.P.; Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Dyson, A.; Joshi, C.

    1991-01-01

    Tunneling ionization can be thought of as the high intensity, low frequency limit of multi-photon ionization (MPI). Extremely uniform plasmas were produced by the latter process at Rutherford lab for beat wave excitation experiments using a 0.5 μm laser. Plasmas with 100% ionization were produced with densities exceeding 10 17 cm -3 . The experiment uses a CO 2 laser (I max ∼ 5 x 10 14 W/cm 2 ) which allows the formation of plasmas via the tunneling process. For the experiments the authors need plasmas with densities in the range of 5 to 10 x 10 16 cm -3 . Using Thomson scattering as a diagnostic they have explored the density and temperature regime of tunneling ionization produced plasmas. They find that plasmas with densities up to 10 16 cm -3 can indeed be produced and that these plasmas are hot. Beyond this density strong refraction of laser radiation occurs due to the radial profile of the plasma. Implications of this work to the Beat Wave Accelerator program will be discussed

  10. Lateralization of spike and wave complexes produced by hallucinogenic compounds in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, C M; Dorantes, M E; Mexicano, G; Guzmán-Flores, C

    1986-06-01

    The ability of four hallucinogenic compounds--ketamine, phencyclidine, quipazine, and SKF-10 047--to produce some specific electrical pattern in portions of the limbic system and the hemispheric lateralization of such effects were studied in cats with permanently implanted electrodes. Electronic frequency and area integrators were used to analyze the results, and the percentage change in electrographic alterations was calculated. All compounds studied produced trains of spike and wave complexes in the cingulum, rapid discharges in the amygdala complex, and slow-wave synchronous activity in the septal nucleus. Those changes predominated in the left hemisphere. At small but hallucinatory concentrations of these drugs, the cortical EEG was not affected. Exploratory movements directed toward nonexistent objects, classified as hallucinatory-like behavior, appeared simultaneous with these changes in the EEG recordings. We concluded that there could exist a relationship between the appearance of spike and wave complexes in the limbic system without epileptic signs (twitching or myoclonus) and the presence of hallucinations, and that there is a left side hemispheric lateralization of the electrographic effects, viewing cerebral dominance phenomena as a functional and fluctuating state.

  11. Stress analysis applications to service failures of the traveling wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, H.-Y.

    By utilizing the mathematical analogy between the electrostatic fields and the elastic stress fields, the electrostatic stresses in high voltage electronic devices such as Traveling Wave Tubes (TWT) can be obtained from finite element technique. A new point of view about the vacuum electrical breakdown from the theory of elastic stress concentration has been proposed. The elastic stress concentration factors may be used as a good reference figure for TWT design works.

  12. STRESS RELAXATION CHARACTERISTICS OF SELECTED COMMERCIALLY PRODUCED GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chocholoušek J.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a quantitative method of stress relaxation measurement in prismatic glass samples during two different time-temperature regimes using the Sénarmont compensator. Four types of glass (Barium crystal glass, Eutal, Simax, and Container glass were subjected to observation in an assembled measuring device. Results will be used for parameterization of the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Mazurin model and consequently implemented in a finite element method code.

  13. Determination of relationship between Rayleigh wave velocity and stress with laser Doppler velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingfeng; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    2002-05-01

    A non-contact measurement technique of Rayleigh wave velocity is proposed. In the non-contact measurement system, a laser Doppler velocimeter is used to determine wave motions. With above technique, the relationship between Rayleigh wave velocity and stress for an aluminum alloy 5052 and steel SS400 is determined, and the results are in good agreement with that obtained by contact measurement method.

  14. Polyurea/Fused-silica interfacial decohesion induced by impinging tensile stress-waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mica Grujicic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available All-atom non-equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are used to investigate the problems of polyurea-borne tensile-stress waves interacting with a polyurea/fused-silica interface and fused-silica tensile-stress waves interacting with a fused-silica/polyurea interface, and the potential for the accompanying interfacial decohesion. To predict the outcome of the interactions of stress-waves with the material-interfaces in question, at the continuum level, previously determined material constitutive relations for polyurea and fused-silica are used within an acoustic-impedance-matching procedure. These continuum-level predictions pertain solely to the stress-wave/interface interaction aspects resulting in the formation of transmitted and reflected stress- or release-waves, but do not contain any information regarding potential interfacial decohesion. Present direct molecular-level simulations confirmed some of these continuum-level predictions, but also provided direct evidence of the nature and the extent of interfacial decohesion. In the molecular-level simulations, reactive force-field potentials are utilized to properly model the initial state of interfacial cohesion and its degradation during stress-wave-loading. Examination of the molecular-level interfacial structure before the stress-wave has interacted with the given interface, revealed local changes in the bonding structure, suggesting the formation of an “interphase.” This interphase was subsequently found to greatly affect the polyurea/fused-silica decohesion strength and the likelihood for interfacial decohesion during the interaction of the stress-wave with the interface.

  15. Estimation of Peak Wave Stresses in Slender Complex Concrete Armor Units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, G.L.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rhee, Joon R

    1991-01-01

    Recent methods for the structural design of concrete armor units divide the forces into static loads, impact loads, and wave or pulsating loads. Physical model technology is being developed at several laboratories to measure wave loads on model armor units. While this technology represents...... significant progress, structural designers require a maximum stress value to design armor units....

  16. Drug Delivery and Cell Transfection Using Shock Waves Produced by Nanothermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2009-06-01

    Shock waves have non-destructive life science applications in cell transfection and drug delivery. Based on molecular dynamics simulations, the shockwave causes transient compression of the cell membrane, which causes the hydrophobic interior of the lipid bilayer to become thinner. This allows diffusion of water molecules across the membrane. Recently, the nanothermite composition consisting of CuO nanorods and Al nanoparticles was shown to propagate at velocities in the same range as metallic azides and fulminates; however, the CuO/Al mixture produces lower pressure levels. An in vitro testing system was developed to deliver shock waves produced by nanothermites into cell suspensions and/or tissues. The plasmid encoded for production of green-fluorescent protein was delivered into cells including, among other types, chicken cardiomyocytes, cell lines (T47-D and Ins-1), and Arabidopsis plant cells. It was found that the nanothermite pressure impulses induced transfection resulting in production of green fluorescent protein in 99% of the cardiomyocytes. Additionally, transfected cell survival was evaluated, and the pressure impulses did not produce any elevated levels of cell death compared with control cell suspensions.

  17. Local stimulation of cultured myocyte cells by femtosecond laser-induced stress wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-En; Wu, Cheng-Chi; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Okano, Kazunori; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2010-12-01

    When an 800 nm femtosecond laser is tightly focused into cell culture medium a stress wave is generated at the laser focal point. Since the stress wave localizes in a few tens of μm, it is possible to locally stimulate single cells in vitro. In this work, several kinds of cultured mammalian cells, HeLa, PC12, P19CL6, and C2C12, were stimulated by the stress wave and the cell growth after the stress loading with the laser irradiation was investigated. In comparison with the control conditions, cell growth after the laser irradiation was enhanced for the cells of C2C12 and P19CL6, which can differentiate into myocytes, and suppressed for PC12 and HeLa cell lines. These results suggest a possibility of cell growth enhancement due to myogenic cells response to the femtosecond laser-induced stress.

  18. Allelopathic Stress Produced by Bitter Gourd (Momordica charantia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with in vitro effects of allelochemicals present in leaf and fruit leachate of Momordica charantia in vitro on plant growth and metabolism of Lycopersicon esculentum. Momordica was selected as a donor plant and tomato as recipient. Seeds of tomato were shown in pots and after germination different concentrations viz. 25, 50, 75 and 100% of leaf and fruit leachates were applied as treatment. Twenty days old seedlings were harvested for biophysical and biochemical analyses. The root and shoot length, fresh and dry weight of the seedlings decreased in dose dependent manner. The reduction in pigment and protein contents and nitrate reductase activity was concentration dependent. Membrane leakage increased as the concentration of leachates increased. Activities of antioxidant enzymes viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and peroxidase (POX activities significantly enhanced under allelopathic stress. Inhibition of various metabolic activities under allelopathic stress resulted in decreased plant growth and development. The fruit leachate of Momordica was more inhibitory than leaf leachate.

  19. Visualization of the cavitation bubbles produced by a clinical shock wave field using a micropulse LED light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gwansuk; Huh, Jung Sik; Choi, Min Joo

    2017-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy employs intense shock waves that produce cavitation bubbles understood to play an important role in therapeutic effects. This study considers shock-wave-induced cavitation bubbles, expected to be closely associated with treated therapeutic regions. A simple optical method was devised to visualize the cavitation bubbles under micropulse LED light illumination and to capture an afterimage of the bubbles for their entire lifetime from formation to collapse. The optical images of the cavitation bubbles produced by a clinical shock wave therapeutic device were shown to preserve the characteristics of the focusing shock wave field. The similarity of the characteristics may enable the cavitation cloud image to provide the intensity and location of shock wave irradiation for the clinical quality assurance of therapeutic devices. Further research that includes the dynamic effects in the static images of cavitation bubbles is suggested.

  20. Digging Deeper: Observing Primordial Gravitational Waves below the Binary-Black-Hole-Produced Stochastic Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regimbau, T; Evans, M; Christensen, N; Katsavounidis, E; Sathyaprakash, B; Vitale, S

    2017-04-14

    The merger rate of black hole binaries inferred from the detections in the first Advanced LIGO science run implies that a stochastic background produced by a cosmological population of mergers will likely mask the primordial gravitational wave background. Here we demonstrate that the next generation of ground-based detectors, such as the Einstein Telescope and Cosmic Explorer, will be able to observe binary black hole mergers throughout the Universe with sufficient efficiency that the confusion background can potentially be subtracted to observe the primordial background at the level of Ω_{GW}≃10^{-13} after 5 years of observation.

  1. Study of discharges produced by surface waves under medium and high pressure: application to chemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laye epouse Granier, Agnes

    1986-01-01

    This report deals with the study of microwave discharges produced in argon gas by surface waves in the 20-760 Torr pressure range. Application to chemical analysis by emission optical spectroscopy is also investigated. First of all we study the propagation of a surface wave in a bounded plasma in which the effective collision frequency for momentum transfer ν is higher than the excitation one. The axial electron density profile is determined from two diagnostic techniques, i.e., phase variations of the wave field and Stark broadening of H β line. Then we deduce the discharge characteristics ν, θ (maintaining power of an electron-ion pair) and E eff (effective electric field for discharge sustaining) from the electron density profile. Then an energy balance of the discharge is developed. It explains the change of operating conditions in the 20-50 Torr range. At low pressure the discharge is governed by ambipolar diffusion whereas at high pressure, the electrons are mainly lost by volume recombination of Ar 2 + . Finally, we report on chemical analysis experiment of gases (optimum sensibility in found near 100 Torr) and of metallic solutions sprayed by a graphite oven. Performances of such a design and ICP plasma torches are compared. (author) [fr

  2. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The disturbance and propagation of SH-type waves in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space by a moving stress discontinuity is considered. Stress discontinuity moves with non-uniform velocity and is impulsive in nature. The displacements are obtained in exact form by themethod due to ...

  3. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The disturbance and propagation of SH-type waves in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space by a moving stress discontinuity is considered. Stress discontinuity moves with non-uniform velocity and is impulsive in nature. The displacements are obtained in exact form by the method ...

  4. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  5. Experimental Study of the Effect of Internal Defects on Stress Waves during Automated Fiber Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Han

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection technique of component defects is currently only realized to detect offline defects and online surface defects during automated fiber placement (AFP. The characteristics of stress waves can be effectively applied to identify and detect internal defects in material structure. However, the correlation mechanism between stress waves and internal defects remains unclear during the AFP process. This paper proposes a novel experimental method to test stress waves, where continuous loading induced by process itself is used as an excitation source without other external excitation. Twenty-seven groups of thermosetting prepreg laminates under different processing parameters are manufactured to obtain different void content. In order to quantitatively estimate the void content in the prepreg structure, the relation model between the void content and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient is revealed using an A-scan ultrasonic flaw detector and photographic methods by optical microscope. Furthermore, the high-frequency noises of stress waves are removed using Haar wavelet transform. The peaks, the Manhattan distance and mean stress during the laying process are analyzed and evaluated. Partial conclusions in this paper could provide theoretical support for online real-time detection of internal defects based on stress wave characteristics.

  6. Torsional Wave Propagation in a Pre-Stressed Structure with Corrugated and Loosely Bonded Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manoj K.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model is presented to study the behaviour of propagation of torsional surface waves in initially stressed porous layer, sandwiched between an orthotropic half-space with initial stress and pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic half-space. The boundary surfaces of the layer and halfspaces are taken as corrugated, as well as loosely bonded. The heterogeneity of the lower half-space is due to trigonometric variation in elastic parameters of the pre-stressed inhomogeneous anisotropic medium. Expression for dispersion relation has been obtained in closed form for the present analytical model to observe the effect of undulation parameter, flatness parameter and porosity on the propagation of torsional surface waves. The obtained dispersion relation is found to be in well agreement with classical Love wave equation for a particular case. The cases of ideally smooth interface and welded interface have also been analysed. Numerical example and graphical illustrations are made to demonstrate notable effect of initial stress, wave number, heterogeneity parameter and initial stress on the phase velocity of torsional surface waves.

  7. Anisotropic stress as a signature of nonstandard propagation of gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltas, Ippocratis D; Sawicki, Ignacy; Amendola, Luca; Kunz, Martin

    2014-11-07

    We make precise the heretofore ambiguous statement that anisotropic stress is a sign of a modification of gravity. We show that in cosmological solutions of very general classes of models extending gravity-all scalar-tensor theories (Horndeski), Einstein-aether models, and bimetric massive gravity-a direct correspondence exists between perfect fluids apparently carrying anisotropic stress and a modification in the propagation of gravitational waves. Since the anisotropic stress can be measured in a model-independent manner, a comparison of the behavior of gravitational waves from cosmological sources with large-scale-structure formation could, in principle, lead to new constraints on the theory of gravity.

  8. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress....... The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered...

  9. Effect of stress on energy flux deviation of ultrasonic waves in GR/EP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, William H.; Kriz, R. D.; Fitting, Dale W.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves suffer energy flux deviation in graphite/epoxy because of the large anisotropy. The angle of deviation is a function of the elastic coefficients. For nonlinear solids, these coefficients and thus the angle of deviation is a function of stress. Acoustoelastic theory was used to model the effect of stress on flux deviation for unidirectional T300/5208 using previously measured elastic coefficients. Computations were made for uniaxial stress along the x3 axis (fiber axis) and the x1 for waves propagating in the x1x3 plane. These results predict a shift as large as three degrees for the quasi-transverse wave. The shift in energy flux offers a new nondestructive technique of evaluating stress in composites.

  10. A Comparison of Brain Wave Patterns of High and Low Grade Point Average Students During Rest, Problem Solving, and Stress Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montor, Karel

    The purpose of this study was to compare brain wave patterns produced by high and low grade point average students, while they were resting, solving problems, and subjected to stress situations. The study involved senior midshipmen at the United States Naval Academy. The high group was comprised of those whose cumulative grade point average was…

  11. THE GENERATION OF THERMOELASTIC STRESS WAVES BY IMPULSIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION , ABSORPTION), (*STRESSES, ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ), SURFACE PROPERTIES, INTERACTIONS, HEAT TRANSFER, ELASTIC PROPERTIES, ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES, LASERS, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS, SOLIDS

  12. Numerical investigations of internal stresses on carbon steel based on ultrasonic LCR waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, R.; Ibrahim, Z.; Chai, H. K.

    2017-10-01

    Internal stresses or residual stresses in the structural elements are very crucial in carrying out in-service evaluations and fitness-for-purpose assessments. The generation of these internal stresses can occur as result of the fabrication of the steel members, installation sequence or other ad-hoc events such as accidents or impact. The accurate prediction of the internal stresses will contribute towards estimating the integrity state of the structural elements, with respect to their material allowable stresses. This paper investigates the explicit FE based numerical modelling of the ultrasonic based non-destructive technique, utilising the measurable longitudinal critical refracted wave (LCR) and relating these to the internal stresses within the structural elements by the evaluation of the material dependent acoustoelastic factors. The subsurface travel path of the LCR wave inside the structural elements makes it a sub-surface stress measurement technique and the linearised relationship with corresponding internal stresses can be systematically applied repeatedly. The numerical results are compared against laboratory tests data to correlate the findings and to establish modelling feasibility for future proof-of-concepts. It can be concluded from this numerical investigation, that the subsurface ultrasonic LCR wave has great potential to be implemented for in-situ structural residual stress measurements, as compared to other available surface measurements such as strain gauges or x-ray diffraction.

  13. Stress Wave Propagation due to a Moving Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the performance of two numerical methods of solving the problem of a time dependent moving force on the surface of an elastic continuum will be evaluated. One method is the finite element method (FEM) formulated in convected coordinates coupled with an absorbing boundary condition...... of the impedance type. The other method to be considered is the boundary element method (BEM), where a new formulation using Green's functions transformed to a moving coordinate system is introduced. The methods are tested by the classic wave propagation problem of a Ricker Pulse propagating from the surface...... of an elastic halfspace. The time integral net impulse of the considered loading must be null for the considered FEM to work. Further, the FEM is unable to absorb Rayleigh waves, since the considered impedance condition has been tuned P- and S-waves. By contrast the BEM is able to handle also these cases...

  14. Softening of stressed granular packings with resonant sound waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, C J Olson; Lopatina, L M; Jia, X; Johnson, P A

    2015-08-01

    We perform numerical simulations of a two-dimensional bidisperse granular packing subjected to both a static confining pressure and a sinusoidal dynamic forcing applied by a wall on one edge of the packing. We measure the response experienced by a wall on the opposite edge of the packing and obtain the resonant frequency of the packing as the static or dynamic pressures are varied. Under increasing static pressure, the resonant frequency increases, indicating a velocity increase of elastic waves propagating through the packing. In contrast, when the dynamic amplitude is increased for fixed static pressure, the resonant frequency decreases, indicating a decrease in the wave velocity. This occurs both for compressional and for shear dynamic forcing and is in agreement with experimental results. We find that the average contact number Zc at the resonant frequency decreases with increasing dynamic amplitude, indicating that the elastic softening of the packing is associated with a reduced number of grain-grain contacts through which the elastic waves can travel. We image the excitations created in the packing and show that there are localized disturbances or soft spots that become more prevalent with increasing dynamic amplitude. Our results are in agreement with experiments on glass bead packings and earth materials such as sandstone and granite and may be relevant to the decrease in elastic wave velocities that has been observed to occur near fault zones after strong earthquakes, in surficial sediments during strong ground motion, and in structures during earthquake excitation.

  15. What can we learn from the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by oscillons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antusch, Stefan; Cefalà, Francesco; Orani, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    The stochastic gravitational wave (GW) background provides a fascinating window to the physics of the very early universe. Beyond the nearly scale-invariant primordial GW spectrum produced during inflation, a spectrum with a much richer structure is typically generated during the preheating phase after inflation (or after some other phase transition at lower energies). This raises the question of what one can learn from a future observation of the stochastic gravitational wave background spectrum about the underlying physics during preheating. Recently, it has been shown that during preheating non-perturbative quasi-stable objects like oscillons can act as strong sources for GW, leading to characteristic features such as distinct peaks in the spectrum. In this paper, we study the GW production from oscillons using semi-analytical techniques. In particular, we discuss how the GW spectrum is affected by the parameters that characterise a given oscillon system, e.g. by the background cosmology, the asymmetry of the oscillons and the evolution of the number density of the oscillons. We compare our semi-analytic results with numerical lattice simulations for a hilltop inflation model and a KKLT scenario, which differ strongly in some of these characteristics, and find very good agreement.

  16. Partial-Wave Analysis of the Centrally Produced $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ System in pp Reactions at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. During nine weeks in 2008 and 2009, a 190 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target was used in order to study the production of exotic mesons and glueball candidates at central rapidities. As no bias on the production mechanism was introduced by the trigger system, the contribution from diffractive dissociation of the beam proton poses a challenge. We select a centrally produced sample by kinematic cuts and introduce a model to describe the data in terms of partial waves. Preliminary fits are presented, which are consistent with results from previous experiments. Particular attention is paid to the ambiguities in the amplitude analysis of the two-pseudoscalar final state.

  17. Detection of Ultrasonic Stress Waves in Structures Using 3D Shaped Optic Fiber Based on a Mach-Zehnder Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chengming; Zhou, Wensong; Xie, Yawen

    2018-04-16

    This work proposes a 3D shaped optic fiber sensor for ultrasonic stress waves detection based on the principle of a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. This sensor can be used to receive acoustic emission signals in the passive damage detection methods and other types of ultrasonic signals propagating in the active damage detection methods, such as guided wave-based methods. The sensitivity of an ultrasonic fiber sensor based on the Mach–Zehnder interferometer mainly depends on the length of the sensing optical fiber; therefore, the proposed sensor achieves the maximum possible sensitivity by wrapping an optical fiber on a hollow cylinder with a base. The deformation of the optical fiber is produced by the displacement field of guided waves in the hollow cylinder. The sensor was first analyzed using the finite element method, which demonstrated its basic sensing capacity, and the simulation signals have the same characteristics in the frequency domain as the excitation signal. Subsequently, the primary investigations were conducted via a series of experiments. The sensor was used to detect guided wave signals excited by a piezoelectric wafer in an aluminum plate, and subsequently it was tested on a reinforced concrete beam, which produced acoustic emission signals via impact loading and crack extension when it was loaded to failure. The signals obtained from a piezoelectric acoustic emission sensor were used for comparison, and the results indicated that the proposed 3D fiber optic sensor can detect ultrasonic signals in the specific frequency response range.

  18. Propagation behavior of the stress wave in a hollow Hopkinson transmission bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, G.; Shen, X.; Guo, C.; Vecchio, K. S.; Jiang, F.

    2018-03-01

    In order to investigate the stress wave propagation behavior through a hollow elastic bar that is used in a Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture testing system, three-point bending fracture experiments were performed in such a system. The effects of sample span and diameter and wall thickness of the hollow elastic bar on the stress wave propagation behavior were studied numerically using the software of ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The experimental results demonstrated that the incident, reflected, and transmitted pulses calculated by the finite element method are coincident with those obtained from the Hopkinson-bar-loaded fracture tests. Compared to the solid transmission bar, the amplitude of the transmitted pulse is relatively larger in the hollow transmission bar under the same loading conditions and decreases with increasing wall thickness. On the other hand, when the inside diameter is fixed, the effect of the wall thickness on the stress wave characteristics is more obvious.

  19. Stress wave communication in concrete: I. Characterization of a smart aggregate based concrete channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Sam; Ji, Qing; Wu, Wenhao; Song, Gangbing; Ding, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore the characteristics of a concrete block as a communication medium with piezoelectric transducers. Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) is a piezoceramic material used in smart materials intended for structural health monitoring (SHM). Additionally, a PZT based smart aggregate (SA) is capable of implementing stress wave communications which is utilized for investigating the properties of an SA based concrete channel. Our experiments characterize single-input single-output and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) concrete channels in order to determine the potential capacity limits of SAs for stress wave communication. We first provide estimates and validate the concrete channel response. Followed by a theoretical upper bound for data rate capacity of our two channels, demonstrating a near-twofold increase in channel capacity by utilizing multiple transceivers to form an MIMO system. Our channel modeling techniques and results are also helpful to researchers using SAs with regards to SHM, energy harvesting and stress wave communications.

  20. Neonatal Handling Produces Sex Hormone-Dependent Resilience to Stress-Induced Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Pedro; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2018-02-09

    Neonatal handling (NH) of male rat pups strongly attenuates stress response and stress-induced persistent muscle hyperalgesia in adults. Because female sex is a well established risk factor for stress-induced chronic muscle pain, we explored whether NH provides resilience to stress-induced hyperalgesia in adult female rats. Rat pups underwent NH, or standard (control) care. Muscle mechanical nociceptive threshold was assessed before and after water avoidance (WA) stress, when they were adults. In contrast to male rats, NH produced only a modest protection against WA stress-induced muscle hyperalgesia in female rats. Gonadectomy completely abolished NH-induced resilience in male rats but produced only a small increase in this protective effect in female rats. The administration of the antiestrogen drug fulvestrant, in addition to gonadectomy, did not enhance the protective effect of NH in female rats. Finally, knockdown of the androgen receptor by intrathecal antisense treatment attenuated the protective effect of NH in intact male rats. Together, these data indicate that androgens play a key role in NH-induced resilience to WA stress-induced muscle hyperalgesia. NH induces androgen-dependent resilience to stress-induced muscle pain. Therefore, androgens may contribute to sex differences observed in chronic musculoskeletal pain and its enhancement by stress. Copyright © 2018 The American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  2. Stress Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic-Plastic Rock-Like Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rock-like materials are composites that can be regarded as a mixture composed of elastic, plastic, and viscous components. They exhibit viscoelastic-plastic behavior under a high-strain-rate loading according to element model theory. This paper presents an analytical solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials under a high-strain-rate loading and verifies the solution through an experimental test. A constitutive equation of viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was first established, and then kinematic and kinetic equations were then solved to derive the analytic solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials. An experimental test using the SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for a concrete specimen was conducted to obtain a stress-strain curve under a high-strain-rate loading. Inverse analysis based on differential evolution was conducted to estimate undetermined variables for constitutive equations. Finally, the relationship between the attenuation factor and the strain rate in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was investigated. According to the results, the frequency of the stress wave, viscosity coefficient, modulus of elasticity, and density play dominant roles in the attenuation of the stress wave. The attenuation decreases with increasing strain rate, demonstrating strongly strain-dependent attenuation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials.

  3. Wave Induced Stresses Measured at the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corona, L.; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2006-01-01

    for this paper, first to verify the FEM results obtained by Niras, Danish society in charge of the finite element modelling and structural design, and then to make a first experimental fatigue analysis of a particular part of the Wave Dragon. This last part shall be considered as an exercise for the further work...

  4. Determination of stress glut moments of total degree 2 from teleseismic surface wave amplitude spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukchin, B. G.

    1995-08-01

    A special case of the seismic source, where the stress glut tensor can be expressed as a product of a uniform moment tensor and a scalar function of spatial coordinates and time, is considered. For such a source, a technique of determining stress glut moments of total degree 2 from surface wave amplitude spectra is described. The results of application of this technique for the estimation of spatio-temporal characteristics of the Georgian earthquake, 29.04.91 are presented.

  5. Direct bed stress measurements under solitary tsunami-type waves and breaking tsunami wave fronts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    steepen and eventually break, thereby generating large pressure gradients that could enhance the likelihood of liquefaction of the seabed. In the drawdown, high shear stresses could trigger debris flow in submarine canyons and on steep ridges. Therefore...

  6. Soil Liquefaction Resulting from Blast-Induced Spherical Stress Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    investigate or improve construction sites. Queiroz, et al. (1967) reported on a program to densify a sandy foundation at the Rio Casca III, Brazil , dam site...8217. calc~lacm6 peak value &mg WOWp UUW’U 0Nk vika far S1Uf 101 10 Figure 8.6 Peak total stress in sand. LI ew mbt~ O E caug I"M sabi VA low Figure 8.7

  7. Existence of longitudinal waves in pre-stressed anisotropic elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the absence of pre-stresses, i.e., taking. S11 = S22 = S33 = 0, all the expressions, derived in this section, will reduce to the results which are same as in Ting (2006). 4. Triclinic materials. A triclinic material is the most general anisotropic medium, and the elastic compliance b11(N) in this medium is as defined by equation ...

  8. Stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity of yellow-poplar ranging from 100 to 10 percent moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jody D. Gray; Shawn T. Grushecky; James P. Armstrong

    2008-01-01

    Moisture content has a significant impact on mechanical properties of wood. In recent years, stress wave velocity has been used as an in situ and non-destructive method for determining the stiffness of wooden elements. The objective of this study was to determine what effect moisture content has on stress wave velocity and dynamic modulus of elasticity. Results...

  9. Stress-wave velocity of wood-based panels: effect of moisture, product type, and material direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangping Han; Qinglin Wu; Xiping Wang

    2006-01-01

    The effect of moisture on longitudinal stress-wave velocity (SWV), bending stiffness. and bending strength of commercial oriented strandboard, plywood. particleboard. and southern pine lumber was evaluated. It was shown that the stress-wave verocity decreased in general with increases in panel moisture content (MC). At a given MC level. SWV varied with panel type and...

  10. Stress wave analysis of an object having coating layer using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Young Doo; Kwon, Hyok Chun; Lee, Sang Tae; Seo, Byung Chul

    2005-01-01

    Generally, as objects impact each other, coating layer is regarded as little affecting transmission and reflection of shock wave. However, we thought that material properties and thickness of coating layer would actually affect objects. So this paper was performed by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for transmission and reflection of stress wave propagation at two bars having different material properties. Also, as coating layer having different material properties was inserted between bars, we looked into the behavior of stress wave propagation and compared the result of FEA and theoretical result. As using them, FEA for actual piezo electric ceramic was performed. The damaged cause of piezo electric ceramic was confirmed by the effect of reflected wave. To decrease the effect of reflected wave, we analyzed it as changing thickness and material of coating layer and the shape of piezo electric ceramic. Afterwards, we inquired thickness and material of coating layer and the shape of piezo electric ceramic being able to minimize the effect of reflected wave

  11. Optical interferometry methods used to study stress wave propagetion in a human skull

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Dvořáková, Pavla; Veselý, Eduard

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2004), s. 29-34 ISSN 0732-8818 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2076904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : double-pulse * holo-interferometry * stress waves Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.322, year: 2004

  12. Stress Induced Phononic Properties and Surface Waves in 2D Model of Auxetic Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trzupek, D.; Twarog, D.; Zielinski, P.

    2009-01-01

    Elastic stiffness parameters are determined in a 2D model system of rigid rods interacting by harmonic force constants. Any positive ('' normal '' crystal) or negative (auxetic crystal) Poisson ratio can be obtained in this model as a function of the external stress. Conditions for opening an absolute stop band (phononic crystal) and for various kinds of surface waves are obtained. (authors)

  13. Condition assessment of timber bridges. 2, Evaluation of several stress-wave tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Brashaw; Robert J. Vatalaro; James P. Wacker; Robert J. Ross

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of several stress-wave devices widely used for locating deteriorated areas in timber bridge members. Bridge components containing different levels of natural decay were tested using various devices. The specimens were then sawn (along their length) into slabs to expose their interior condition. The...

  14. Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Disturbance of SH-type waves due to moving stress discontinuity in an anisotropic soil layer overlying an inhomogeneous elastic half-space. D MANDAL1,2∗, P C PAL2 and S KUMAR2. 1Government Engineering College, Chaibasa 833 215, India. 2Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines,. Dhanbad ...

  15. Stress Wave Propagation in Soils Modelled by the Boundary Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.

    This thesis deals with different aspects of the boundary element method (BEM) applied to stress wave propagation problems in soils. Among other things BEM formulations for coupled FEM and BEM, moving loads, direct BEM and indirect BEM are presented. For all the formulations both analytical...

  16. THE BASIS OF MATHEMATICAL DESCRIPTION FOR WAVE MODEL OF STRESSES PROPAGATION IN RAILWAY TRACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kurhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Modern scientific research has repeatedly cited practical examples of the dynamic effects of railway track operation that go beyond the static calculation schemes. For the track sections where the train speed is approaching to the velocity of wave propagation in the slab track layers such issues are of particular relevance. An adequate tool for the study of such issues can be the use of the wave theory of stress propagation. The purpose of the article is the creation of a mathematical description of the basic principles of the stress propagation wave model in the railway track, which can be used as a basis for the practical development of the relevant calculation system. Methodology. The model of stress-strain states of the railway track on the basis of the stress wave propagation theory is to bring together the equations of the geometry of the outline of the space systems that is involved in the interaction at a given time, and the dynamic equilibrium equations of deformation. The solution is based on the use of the laws of the theory of elasticity. The wave front is described by an ellipsoid equation. When determining the variation in time of the surface position of the ellipsoid a vector approach is used. Findings. The geometry equations of the wave motion determine the volumes of material layers of the slab track involved in the interaction at a given time. The dynamic equilibrium determination of the deformed condition of the space bounded by the wave front makes it possible to calculate both the stresses and strains, and their changes during the time of the load perception. Thus, mathematical descriptions of the processes that occur in the perception of the load by the elements of railway track at high speeds were obtained. Originality. The simulation tasks of the track and rolling stock interaction, in particular taking into account the dynamic deflection of slab track were further developed. For the first time the article

  17. Determination of Stress-Acoustic Coefficients of Rayleigh Wave by Use of Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lingfeng; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    In the present paper, 1) a new non-contact ultrasonic stress measurement technique is proposed based on acoustoelasticity, in which ultrasonic wave motion is detected by use of a laser Doppler velocimeter, and 2) the stress-acoustic coefficients of Rayleigh wave for aluminum alloy and structural steel are determined by the technique. In the measurement system, Rayleigh waves are emitted into the specimen by a wedge-type piezoelectric transducer and vertical velocities of the surface motions of the traveling Rayleigh waves are detected by the laser Doppler velocimeter at two points of 4 cm apart. In order to measure the traveling time of the wave between the two points, the converted voltage signals are supplied both to i) a sing-around unit and ii) to a digital oscilloscope. The time-of-flight over the distance between the two points is obtained either by subtracting the sing-around periods measured at the two points or by direct reading at zero-cross of the overlapped images of the two waves on the CR display of the oscilloscope. Both measurements are made at the same time under increasing or decreasing loads. The stress-acoustic coefficients obtained are -1.2×10-5/MPa and -0.21×10-5/MPa for aluminum alloy 5052 and structural steel SS400, respectively. These results are in good agreement with those determined using two knife-edge contact piezoelectric transducers. This study shows that the proposed non-contact measuring technique by use of laser velocimetry is applicable to determining the stress-acoustic coefficients.

  18. Features of propagation and recordingof the stress waves in plates of finite thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherednichenko Rostislav Andreevich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out to study at the same time the dynamics of wave propagation in plane and axisymmetric plates by finite-difference numerical calculation and by the method of dynamic photoelasticity.In many cases it is possible to carry out the investigation of the dynamic stressed state of solid structures under the impact of seismic waves in plane statement, observing the foundation and the building itself in the conditions of plane deformation. Such problems in structural mechanics are usually investigated on plates providing the conditions of generalized plane stressed condition and accounting for the necessity of the known substitution of elastic constants. In case of applying the model of generalized plane stressed state for investigating two-dimensional waves’ propagation in three-dimensional elastic medium it may be necessary to observe certain additional conditions, which for example limit the class of external impacts of high frequencies (short waves. The use of candling for wave recording in plane models explored with the method of dynamic photoelasticity in the observed cases of impulse loading of the plates with finite thickness gives satisfactory results.

  19. Distortion and Residual Stress Control in Integrally Stiffened Structure Produced by Direct Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yung; Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2007-01-01

    2-D thermo-mechanical model developed to characterize distortion and residual stresses in integral structure produced by DMD. Demonstrated as a tool to guide experimental development of DMD fabrication process for aero structures. Distortion and residual stresses are local to deposit. Most distortion develops during deposition of the first few layers; Little change in distortion or residual stresses after fifth deposit layer Most of distortion is localized just beneath the build. Thicker build plates and the use of build lands results in greatest decrease in levels of distortion. Pre-straining shown to reduce distortion. Difficult to implement, particularly for complex stiffener arrays. Clamp position has complex effect on distortion and stresses. Overall distortion reduced with decreasing clamp clearance. Larger clamp clearances induce bending. Use of pre-heat and active cooling show minor influence on panel distortion. Generate changes in thermal gradients in the build plate.

  20. Neutron measurements of stresses in a test artifact produced by laser-based additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Slotwinski, John; Moylan, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    A stainless steel test artifact produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering and similar to a proposed standardized test artifact was examined using neutron diffraction. The artifact contained a number of structures with different aspect ratios pertaining to wall thickness, height above base plate, and side length. Through spatial resolutions of the order of one millimeter the volumetric distribution of stresses in several was measured. It was found that the stresses peak in the tensile region around 500 MPa near the top surface, with balancing compressive stresses in the interior. The presence of a support structure (a one millimeter high, thin walled, hence weaker, lattice structure deposited on the base plate, followed by a fully dense AM structure) has only minor effects on the stresses

  1. Neutron measurements of stresses in a test artifact produced by laser-based additive manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Slotwinski, John; Moylan, Shawn

    2014-02-01

    A stainless steel test artifact produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering and similar to a proposed standardized test artifact was examined using neutron diffraction. The artifact contained a number of structures with different aspect ratios pertaining to wall thickness, height above base plate, and side length. Through spatial resolutions of the order of one millimeter the volumetric distribution of stresses in several was measured. It was found that the stresses peak in the tensile region around 500 MPa near the top surface, with balancing compressive stresses in the interior. The presence of a support structure (a one millimeter high, thin walled, hence weaker, lattice structure deposited on the base plate, followed by a fully dense AM structure) has only minor effects on the stresses.

  2. Frictional response of simulated faults to normal stresses perturbations probed with ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreedharan, S.; Riviere, J.; Marone, C.

    2017-12-01

    We report on a suite of laboratory friction experiments conducted on saw-cut Westerly Granite surfaces to probe frictional response to step changes in normal stress and loading rate. The experiments are conducted to illuminate the fundamental processes that yield friction rate and state dependence. We quantify the microphysical frictional response of the simulated fault surfaces to normal stress steps, in the range of 1% - 600% step increases and decreases from a nominal baseline normal stress. We measure directly the fault slip rate and account for changes in slip rate with changes in normal stress and complement mechanical data acquisition by continuously probing the faults with ultrasonic pulses. We conduct the experiments at room temperature and humidity conditions in a servo controlled biaxial testing apparatus in the double direct shear configuration. The samples are sheared over a range of velocities, from 0.02 - 100 μm/s. We report observations of a transient shear stress and friction evolution with step increases and decreases in normal stress. Specifically, we show that, at low shear velocities and small increases in normal stress ( 5% increases), the shear stress evolves immediately with normal stress. We show that the excursions in slip rate resulting from the changes in normal stress must be accounted for in order to predict fault strength evolution. Ultrasonic wave amplitudes which first increase immediately in response to normal stress steps, then decrease approximately linearly to a new steady state value, in part due to changes in fault slip rate. Previous descriptions of frictional state evolution during normal stress perturbations have not adequately accounted for the effect of large slip velocity excursions. Here, we attempt to do so by using the measured ultrasonic amplitudes as a proxy for frictional state during transient shear stress evolution. Our work aims to improve understanding of induced and triggered seismicity with focus on

  3. Impact of inhomogeneity on SH-type wave propagation in an initially stressed composite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, S.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Singh, A. K.

    2018-02-01

    The present analysis has been made on the influence of distinct form of inhomogeneity in a composite structure comprised of double superficial layers lying over a half-space, on the phase velocity of SH-type wave propagating through it. Propagation of SH-type wave in the said structure has been examined in four distinct cases of inhomogeneity viz. when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to exponential variation in density only (Case I); when inhomogeneity in double superficial layers is due to exponential variation in rigidity only (Case II); when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to exponential variation in rigidity, density and initial stress (Case III) and when inhomogeneity in double superficial layer is due to linear variation in rigidity, density and initial stress (Case IV). Closed-form expression of dispersion relation has been accomplished for all four aforementioned cases through extensive application of Debye asymptotic analysis. Deduced dispersion relations for all the cases are found in well-agreement to the classical Love-wave equation. Numerical computation has been carried out to graphically demonstrate the effect of inhomogeneity parameters, initial stress parameters as well as width ratio associated with double superficial layers in the composite structure for each of the four aforesaid cases on dispersion curve. Meticulous examination of distinct cases of inhomogeneity and initial stress in context of considered problem has been carried out with detailed analysis in a comparative approach.

  4. Evidence of "hidden hearing loss" following noise exposures that produce robust TTS and ABR wave-I amplitude reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobarinas, Edward; Spankovich, Christopher; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2017-06-01

    In animals, noise exposures that produce robust temporary threshold shifts (TTS) can produce immediate damage to afferent synapses and long-term degeneration of low spontaneous rate auditory nerve fibers. This synaptopathic damage has been shown to correlate with reduced auditory brainstem response (ABR) wave-I amplitudes at suprathreshold levels. The perceptual consequences of this "synaptopathy" remain unknown but have been suggested to include compromised hearing performance in competing background noise. Here, we used a modified startle inhibition paradigm to evaluate whether noise exposures that produce robust TTS and ABR wave-I reduction but not permanent threshold shift (PTS) reduced hearing-in-noise performance. Animals exposed to 109 dB SPL octave band noise showed TTS >30 dB 24-h post noise and modest but persistent ABR wave-I reduction 2 weeks post noise despite full recovery of ABR thresholds. Hearing-in-noise performance was negatively affected by the noise exposure. However, the effect was observed only at the poorest signal to noise ratio and was frequency specific. Although TTS >30 dB 24-h post noise was a predictor of functional deficits, there was no relationship between the degree of ABR wave-I reduction and degree of functional impairment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex Rayleigh Waves Produced by Shallow Sedimentary Basins and their Potential Effects on Mid-Rise Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, M. D.; Castillo, J.; Massari, A.; Clayton, R. W.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake-induced motions recorded by spatially dense seismic arrays in buildings located in the northern Los Angeles basin suggest the presence of complex, amplified surface wave effects on the seismic demand of mid-rise buildings. Several moderate earthquakes produced large-amplitude, seismic energy with slow shear-wave velocities that cannot be explained or accurately modeled by any published 3D seismic velocity models or by Vs30 values. Numerical experiments are conducted to determine if sedimentary basin features are responsible for these rarely modeled and poorly documented contributions to seismic demand computations. This is accomplished through a physics-based wave propagation examination of the effects of different sedimentary basin geometries on the nonlinear response of a mid-rise structural model based on an existing, instrumented building. Using two-dimensional finite-difference predictive modeling, we show that when an earthquake focal depth is near the vertical edge of an elongated and relatively shallow sedimentary basin, dramatically amplified and complex surface waves are generated as a result of the waveguide effect introduced by this velocity structure. In addition, for certain source-receiver distances and basin geometries, body waves convert to secondary Rayleigh waves that propagate both at the free-surface interface and along the depth interface of the basin that show up as multiple large-amplitude arrivals. This study is motivated by observations from the spatially dense, high-sample-rate acceleration data recorded by the Community Seismic Network, a community-hosted strong-motion network, currently consisting of hundreds of sensors located in the southern California area. The results provide quantitative insight into the causative relationship between a sedimentary basin shape and the generation of Rayleigh waves at depth, surface waves at the free surface, scattered seismic energy, and the sensitivity of building responses to each of

  6. Solitary waves on inclined films: their characteristics and the effects on wall shear stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tihon, J. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V. [University of Thessaly, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Volos (Greece)

    2006-07-15

    The properties of solitary waves, developing from inlet disturbances of controlled frequency along an inclined film flow, are systematically studied experimentally and computationally. Time-variations of film height and wall shear stress are measured, using respectively a capacitance probe and an electrodiffusion sensor. Computational data are provided from simulations performed by a Galerkin finite element scheme. The height and spacing of solitary humps, their phase velocity and the wavelength of the preceding capillary ripples are reported as functions of the Reynolds number (10stress modulation imposed by the passage of solitary waves is studied experimentally and computationally as a function of Re. Distinct nonlinear characteristics are noted, including a steep maximum and a negative minimum, with the effects intensifying at intermediate Re. All computer predictions are found to be in good quantitative agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  7. A study of the stress wave factor technique for the characterization of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govada, A. K.; Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    This study has investigated the potential of the Stress Wave Factor as an NDT technique for thin composite laminates. The conventional SWF and an alternate method for quantifying the SWF were investigated. Agreement between the initial SWF number, ultrasonic C-scan, inplane displacements as obtained by full field moire interferometry, and the failure location have been observed. The SWF number was observed to be the highest when measured along the fiber direction and the lowest when measured across the fibers. The alternate method for quantifying the SWF used square root of the zeroth moment (square root of M sub o) of the frequency spectrum of the received signal as a quantitative parameter. From this study it therefore appears that the stress wave factor has an excellent potential to monitor damage development in thin composite laminates.

  8. Nondestructive evaluation of adhesive bond strength using the stress wave factor technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Henrique L. M.; Krautz, Harold E.

    1986-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation has been conducted to evaluate the adhesive bond strength between rubber and steel plates using the stress wave factor (SWF) measurement technique. Specimens with different bond strength were manufactured and tested using the SWF technique. Two approaches were used to define the SWF. One approach defines the SWF as the signal energy and the other approach defines the SWF as the square root of the zero moment of the frequency spectrum of the received signal. The strength of the rubber-steel adhesive joint was then evaluated using the destructive peel strength test method. It was observed that in both approaches higher values of the SWF measurements correspond to higher values of the peel strength test data. Therefore, these results show that the stress wave factor technique has the potential of being used in quality assurance of the adhesive bond strength between rubber and steel substrates.

  9. Quantum fields interacting with colliding plane waves: the stress-energy tensor and backreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorca, M.; Verdaguer, E.

    1997-01-01

    Following a previous work on the quantization of a massless scalar field in a space-time representing the head on collision of two plane waves which focus into a Killing-Cauchy horizon, we compute the renormalized expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of the quantum field near that horizon in the physical state which corresponds to the Minkowski vacuum before the collision of the waves. It is found that for minimally coupled and conformally coupled scalar fields the respective stress-energy tensors are unbounded in the horizon. The specific form of the divergences suggests that when the semiclassical Einstein equations describing the backreaction of the quantum fields on the space-time geometry are taken into account, the horizon will acquire a curvature singularity. Thus the Killing-Cauchy horizon which is known to be unstable under ''generic'' classical perturbations is also unstable by vacuum polarization. The calculation is done following the point-splitting regularization technique. The dynamical colliding wave space-time has four quite distinct space-time regions, namely, one flat region, two single plane wave regions, and one interaction region. Exact mode solutions of the quantum field equation cannot be found exactly, but the blueshift suffered by the initial modes in the plane wave and interaction regions makes the use of the WKB expansion a suitable method of solution. To ensure the correct regularization of the stress-energy tensor, the initial flat modes propagated into the interaction region must be given to a rather high adiabatic order of approximation. (orig.)

  10. Solitary Waves on Inclined Films: Their Characteristics and the Effect on Wall Shear Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tihon, Jaroslav; Serifi, K.; Argyriadi, K.; Bontozoglou, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2006), s. 79-89 ISSN 0723-4864 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072914 Grant - others:HPMT(XE) CT/2000/00074 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : wavy film flow * solitary waves * wall shear stress Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.112, year: 2006

  11. Stress waves generated in thin metallic films by a Q-switched ruby laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation results on stress waves generated by Q-switched ruby laser irradiated thin metal films under confinement, studied over a wide range of film materials and film thicknesses, are reviewed. The results indicate that the dependence on these parameters is much weaker than is predicted by heat transfer estimations commonly used to describe the interaction of laser irradiation with unconfined bulk-solid surfaces.

  12. A Study of Stress Wave Propagation in Thin Plate Loaded by an Oblique Impact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trnka, Jan; Kolman, Radek; Dvořáková, Pavla; Veselý, Eduard

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2009), s. 322-331 ISSN 1970-8734 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/0588; GA ČR GA101/06/0914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : Stress wave propagation * Thin-wall structures * Double-pulse holointerferometry * Finite Element Method Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  13. a Quadratic Layer Element for Analyzing Stress Waves in Fgms and its Application in Material Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAN, X.; LIU, G. R.; LAM, K. Y.; OHYOSHI, T.

    2000-09-01

    A novel method is presented for investigating elastic waves in functionally graded material (FGM) plates excited by plane pressure waves. The FGM plate is first divided into quadratic layer elements (QLEs). A general solution for the equation of motion governing the QLE has been derived. The general solution is then used together with the boundary and continuity conditions to obtain the displacement and stress in the frequency domain for an arbitrary FGM plate. The response of the plate to an incident pressure wave is obtained using the Fourier transform techniques. Results obtained by the present method are compared with an existing method using homogeneous layer elements. Numerical examples are presented to investigate stress waves in FGM plates. The relationship between the surface displacement response and the material property of quadratic FGM plates has been analytically obtained for the material characterization. A computational inverse technique is also presented for characterizing material property of an arbitrary FGM plate from the surface displacement response data, using present QLE method as forward solver and genetic algorithm as the inverse operator. This technique is utilized to reconstruct the material property of an actual SiC-C FGM.

  14. Three-dimensional wave-induced current model equations and radiation stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua-yong

    2017-08-01

    After the approach by Mellor (2003, 2008), the present paper reports on a repeated effort to derive the equations for three-dimensional wave-induced current. Via the vertical momentum equation and a proper coordinate transformation, the phase-averaged wave dynamic pressure is well treated, and a continuous and depth-dependent radiation stress tensor, rather than the controversial delta Dirac function at the surface shown in Mellor (2008), is provided. Besides, a phase-averaged vertical momentum flux over a sloping bottom is introduced. All the inconsistencies in Mellor (2003, 2008), pointed out by Ardhuin et al. (2008) and Bennis and Ardhuin (2011), are overcome in the presently revised equations. In a test case with a sloping sea bed, as shown in Ardhuin et al. (2008), the wave-driving forces derived in the present equations are in good balance, and no spurious vertical circulation occurs outside the surf zone, indicating that Airy's wave theory and the approach of Mellor (2003, 2008) are applicable for the derivation of the wave-induced current model.

  15. Neutral gas and impurity ion flow produced by a plasma sound wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, T.; Miller, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed to launch an ion sound wave near the divertor plate of a tokamak plasma to direct the flow of impurities and neutrals in the divertor region. By exciting the ion sound wave with a properly phased second harmonic component, nonlinear effects in the collisional drag of neutrals and impurities can be exploited to yield a time-averaged flow of both hydrogen gas and impurities towards the divertor plate. Thus impurities can be restrained from entering the plasma interior, and an increased neutral density in the divertor region can reduce recycling and enhance radiative cooling there. (Author)

  16. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) is endogenously produced in arabidopsis peroxisomes and is overproduced under cadmium stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Peroxisomes are subcellular compartments involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) is a nitric oxide-derived molecule which is a nitrating species that causes nitration of proteins. This study used cell biology techniques to explore the potential presence of peroxynitrite in peroxisomes and evaluated its content under stress conditions (excess cadmium). Methods Peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and superoxide anion were studied using cell-permeable specific fluorescent probes by confocal laser scanning microscopy in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic plants expressing cyan fluorescent protein through the addition of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which enables peroxisomes to be visualized in vivo. Key Results When no stress was applied, peroxynitrite was clearly localized in the peroxisomes of roots and stomatal guard cells. Under cadmium (150 μm) stress, the generation of peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and the superoxide anion (O2·–) increased and was localized in peroxisomes and the cytosol, participating in the generation of nitro-oxidative stress. Conclusions The results show that peroxisomes are an endogenous source of peroxynitrite, which is over-produced under cadmium stress, suggesting that the metabolism of reactive nitrogen species in peroxisomes could participate in the mechanism of the response to this heavy metal. PMID:24232384

  17. Dispersion relations of elastic waves in one-dimensional piezoelectric/piezomagnetic phononic crystal with initial stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao; Wei, Peijun

    2016-03-01

    The dispersion relations of elastic waves in a one-dimensional phononic crystal formed by periodically repeating of a pre-stressed piezoelectric slab and a pre-stressed piezomagnetic slab are studied in this paper. The influences of initial stress on the dispersive relation are considered based on the incremental stress theory. First, the incremental stress theory of elastic solid is extended to the magneto-electro-elasto solid. The governing equations, constitutive equations, and boundary conditions of the incremental stresses in a magneto-electro-elasto solid are derived with consideration of the existence of initial stresses. Then, the transfer matrices of a pre-stressed piezoelectric slab and a pre-stressed piezomagnetic slab are formulated, respectively. The total transfer matrix of a single cell in the phononic crystal is obtained by the multiplication of two transfer matrixes related with two adjacent slabs. Furthermore, the Bloch theorem is used to obtain the dispersive equations of in-plane and anti-plane Bloch waves. The dispersive equations are solved numerically and the numerical results are shown graphically. The oblique propagation and the normal propagation situations are both considered. In the case of normal propagation of elastic waves, the analytical expressions of the dispersion equation are derived and compared with other literatures. The influences of initial stresses, including the normal initial stresses and shear initial stresses, on the dispersive relations are both discussed based on the numerical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Reynolds-Stress Budgets in an Impinging Shock Wave/Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Manan A.; Yoder, Dennis A.; Gaitonde, Datta V.

    2018-01-01

    Implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) of a shock wave/boundary-layer interaction (SBLI) was performed. Comparisons with experimental data showed a sensitivity of the current prediction to the modeling of the sidewalls. This was found to be common among various computational studies in the literature where periodic boundary conditions were used in the spanwise direction, as was the case in the present work. Thus, although the experiment was quasi-two-dimensional, the present simulation was determined to be two-dimensional. Quantities present in the exact equation of the Reynolds-stress transport, i.e., production, molecular diffusion, turbulent transport, pressure diffusion, pressure strain, dissipation, and turbulent mass flux were calculated. Reynolds-stress budgets were compared with past large-eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation datasets in the undisturbed portion of the turbulent boundary layer to validate the current approach. The budgets in SBLI showed the growth in the production term for the primary normal stress and energy transfer mechanism was led by the pressure strain term in the secondary normal stresses. The pressure diffusion term, commonly assumed as negligible by turbulence model developers, was shown to be small but non-zero in the normal stress budgets, however it played a key role in the primary shear stress budget.

  19. Low Velocity Seismic Waves Produced by Stick-Slip Processes During the Drainage of Two Supraglacial Lakes in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, P. M.; Orantes, E. J.; Grynewize, S.; Tedesco, M.

    2016-12-01

    The drainage of supraglacial lakes over the Greenland ice sheet has been shown to have a significant impact on ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology. As supraglacial lakes drain, they produce seismic waves that can be detected on both local and regional scales. Studying such waves and the originating phenomena has the potential to advance our understanding of the subglacial processes involved. Here we present the results of an analysis of high frequency seismic waves generated during the drainage of two supraglacial lakes in southwestern Greenland. The two lakes drained by contrasting mechanisms. One (Lake Half Moon) drained slowly by overflow into an existing moulin. Here GPS data, recorded during the drainage, show an increase in ice sheet velocity that begins well before the time of maximum lake depth. The other lake (Lake Ponting) drained suddenly by hydrofracture through the lake bed. In this case, the GPS data show an increase in velocity that is essentially simultaneous with the maximum lake depth. In both cases, vertical component seismograms were obtained from the Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network (GLISN) for several hours before and after the lake drainage. Arrival times were picked manually, using the criterion that an arrival must have a minimum amplitude of twice the noise level. The arrivals were then plotted on graphs of time versus distance from the lake in question. Several linear trends are visible on each graph. The velocities calculated from the slopes of these trends are unexpectedly low. We suggest that one explanation for this might be that the waves are traveling in a layer of till at the base of the ice sheet, that forms a low velocity channel. When compared with GPS and lake depth data, the origin times of the waves coincide with the velocity increase in both cases. Therefore, we conclude that the waves are being generated by stick-slip processes involving the slippage of the ice sheet on an underlying layer of till.

  20. The immobility produced by intermittent swim stress is not mediated by serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Rabbett, Sarah; Lyckland, Jennifer; Drugan, Robert C

    2008-05-01

    Exposure to uncontrollable stressors such as intermittent swim stress (ISS) produces a behavioral syndrome that resembles behavioral depression including immobility in a Forced Swim Test (FST) and escape learning deficits. The results of previous studies suggest that stress causes a temporary sensitization of the brain serotonin (5-HT) system that is necessary and sufficient for producing behavioral depression. If this hypothesis is true in the ISS paradigm, then enhancing or inhibiting 5-HT transmission during stress should exacerbate or block the development of behavioral depression, respectively. The selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine (FLX) was administered prior to ISS or confinement; 24 h later the FST was used to detect behavioral immobility. ISS, but not FLX, significantly increased immobility in the FST. The purported 5-HT uptake enhancer tianeptine (TPT) was administered in place of FLX. Again ISS increased immobility in the FST, but TPT had no effect. These results suggested that 5-HT is not a critical mediator of ISS induced behavioral depression. However, some authors have raised concern that TPT does not act directly on 5-HT. Therefore, the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, para-chlorophenylaline (PCPA) was administered to deplete central 5-HT before stress. PCPA did not alter immobility in the FST. Finally, a sub-chronic regimen of FLX given after ISS, but before the FST, was without effect on reversing the ISS-induced immobility. Taken together, these experiments indicate that ISS produces a significant behavioral depression manifested as increased immobility but offer no support of the hypothesis that 5-HT is a critical mediator of these effects.

  1. Cross-cutting planetary waves producing crater chains, grids and square craters are ubiquitous features of cosmic bodies well pronounced on the icy satellites surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2012-09-01

    The wave planetology [1-3 & others] states that along with tectonic segmentation (dichotomy, 2πRs tructure) and s ectoring (πR-structure) cosmic bodies display tectonic granulations caused by warping waves lengths of which are inversely proportional to orbital frequencies. The warping waves (and their overtones) appear due to movements of all bodies in non-circular orbits with changing accelerations. Arising warping waves have stationary character and 4 crossing interfering directions (ortho- and diagonal, Fig. 1). Produced by this interference tectonic granules (craters) dispose themselves in grids, alignments, often spoiled by superposed impacts, but nevertheless distinguished in many cases. An alignment of square shaped craters shows their wave origin. Wave produced craters and ring forms must be taken out of the crater size-frequency statistics to make it real [3]. Below are some examples of the wave woven forms proving their ubiquities (Fig. 2- 10). Remark various classes of cosmic bodies.

  2. CMB B-mode auto-bispectrum produced by primordial gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Hiroaki W. H.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2018-01-01

    Gravitational waves from inflation induce polarization patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It is known that there are only two types of non-Gaussianities of the gravitational waves in the most general covariant scalar field theory having second-order field equations, namely, generalized G-inflation. One originates from the inherent non-Gaussianity in general relativity, and the other from a derivative coupling between the Einstein tensor and the scalar field. We calculate polarization bispectra induced by these non-Gaussianities by transforming them into separable forms by virtue of the Laplace transformation. It is shown that future experiments can constrain the new one but cannot detect the general relativistic one.

  3. Stress Wave Attenuation in Aluminum Alloy and Mild Steel Specimens Under SHPB Tensile Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothnis, J. R.; Ravikumar, G.; Arya, H.; Yerramalli, Chandra S.; Naik, N. K.

    2018-02-01

    Investigations on the effect of intensity of incident pressure wave applied through the striker bar on the specimen force histories and stress wave attenuation during split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tensile testing are presented. Details of the tensile SHPB along with Lagrangian x- t diagram of the setup are included. Studies were carried out on aluminum alloy 7075 T651 and IS 2062 mild steel. While testing specimens using the tensile SHPB setup, it was observed that the force calculated from the transmitter bar strain gauge was smaller than the force obtained from the incident bar strain gauge. This mismatch between the forces in the incident bar and the transmitter bar is explained on the basis of stress wave attenuation in the specimens. A methodology to obtain force histories using the strain gauges on the specimen during SHPB tensile testing is also presented. Further, scanning electron microscope images and photomicrographs are given. Correlation between the microstructure and mechanical properties is explained. Further, uncertainty analysis was conducted to ascertain the accuracy of the results.

  4. Heavy Metal Stress and Its Consequences on Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-Producing Pantoea agglomerans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Bhavana V; Koli, Sunil H; Patil, Satish V

    2018-03-19

    Currently, the heavy metal pollution is of grave concern, and the part of microorganism for metal bioremediation should take into account as an efficient and economic strategy. On this framework, the heavy metal stress consequences on exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing agricultural isolate, Pantoea agglomerans, were studied. The EPS production is a protective response to stress to survive and grow in the metal-contaminated environment. P. agglomerans show tolerance and mucoid growth in the presence of heavy metals, i.e., mercury, copper, silver, arsenic, lead, chromium, and cadmium. EDX first confirmed the metal accumulation and further, FTIR determined the functional groups involved in metal binding. The ICP-AES identified the location of cell-bound and intracellular metal accumulation. Metal deposition on cell surface has released more Ca 2+ . The effect on bacterial morphology investigated with SEM and TEM revealed the sites of metal accumulation, as well as possible structural changes. Each heavy metal caused distinct change and accumulated on cell-bound EPS with some intracellular deposits. The metal stress caused a decrease in total protein content and increased in total carbohydrate with a boost in EPS. Thus, the performance of P. agglomerans under metal stress indicated a potential candidate for metal bioremediation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Comparison Between the Effects of Hypergravity and Photomechanical Stress on Cells Producing ECM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Venere; Romano, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Monici, Monica

    2009-01-01

    In the body, connective tissues have a major function in sustaining mechanical stresses. On the other hand, mechanical forces are important factors for connective tissue homeostasis. Connective tissues dynamically interact with mechanical and gravitational stimuli, changing their mechanical properties through the continuous modification of their composition, and thus improving their function. In connective tissues, mechanical forces are major regulators of extracellular matrix turnover, strongly affecting the production of extracellular matrix proteins. On the contrary, unloading conditions, such as bed rest or space flight, have a negative effect on these tissues, with loss of mass and impairment of mechanical properties. Here we describe the effect of photomechanical stress, supplied by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser, on extracellular matrix production by fibroblasts and chondrocytes, and compare it with the effect produced by hypergravity conditions. Cell morphology and structure, extracellular matrix production, cell adhesion, cell energy metabolism have been studied in treated human fibroblasts and chondrocytes by using immunocytochemistry, fluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy. The results show that photomechanical stress induce cytoskeleton remodelling, redistribution of membrane integrins, increase in production of ECM molecules, changes in cell energy metabolism. The effects are similar to those observed in the same cells exposed to cyclic hypergravitational stress (10× g).

  6. Stress Wave Scattering: Friend or Enemy of Non Destructive Testing of Concrete?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggelis, Dimitrios G.; Shiotani, Tomoki; Philippidis, Theodore P.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    Cementitious materials are by definition inhomogeneous containing cement paste, sand, aggregates as well as air voids. Wave propagation in such a material is characterized by scattering phenomena. Damage in the form of micro or macro cracks certainly enhances scattering influence. Its most obvious manifestation is the velocity variation with frequency and excessive attenuation. The influence becomes stronger with increased mis-match of elastic properties of constituent materials and higher crack content. Therefore, in many cases of large concrete structures, field application of stress waves is hindered since attenuation makes the acquisition of reliable signals troublesome. However, measured wave parameters, combined with investigation with scattering theory can reveal much about the internal condition and supply information that cannot be obtained in any other way. The size and properties of the scatterers leave their signature on the dispersion and attenuation curves making thus the characterization more accurate in case of damage assessment, repair evaluation as well as composition inspection. In this paper, three indicative cases of scattering influence are presented. Namely, the interaction of actual distributed damage, as well as the repair material injected in an old concrete structure with the wave parameters. Other cases are the influence of light plastic inclusions in hardened mortar and the influence of sand and water content in the examination of fresh concrete. In all the above cases, scattering seems to complicate the propagation behavior but also offers the way for a more accurate characterization of the quality of the material.

  7. TROTT computer program for two-dimensional stress wave propagation, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, L.; Curran, D. R.

    1980-04-01

    TROTT is a Lagrangian finite-difference computer program for calculating two dimensional stress wave propagation through solid, porous, and composite materials. The stress waves may be caused by impact, detonation of an explosive, or a prescribed velocity. The calculational procedure is the standard leapfrog method of von Neumann and Richtmyer, using artificial viscosity to smooth shock fronts. Quadrilateral or triangular cells are used. The momentum relations are derived by treating the cells as finite elements. Axisymmetric or planar flow can be handled. The constitutive relations include the standard Mie-Gruneisen equation-of-state and elastic-plastic, work-hardening deviator stress relations. A polytropic gas and detonating flow relations are provided for explosives. Ductile and brittle fracture and shear banding are provided by nucleation and growth models. Porous materials can be represented by a cap plasticity model. A model for layered composites is also present. The code is constructed for easy insertion of additional material models. The number of extra variables required for each cell for a material model can be specified on an input card. This manual includes many sample problems, a derivation of the flow equations, and a discussion of material models.

  8. Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Impulsive Stress Waves Propagating from the Greater Trochanter of the Femur by a Sideways Fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarai, Takaaki; Tokumoto, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Fall accidents are a common cause of femoral fracture in the elderly. The greater trochanter of the femur is often subjected to impact loading by a sideways fall, and thus it is worth studying the impulsive stress waves propagating in the femur. In this study, the impulsive stress was analyzed by the dynamic finite element method using a 3-dimensional model of the femur, and the influence of the fall configuration on the stress was discussed. The stress was concentrated around the femoral neck during the propagation of the stress wave, and the tensile maximum principal stress changed into compressive minimum principle stress on the anterior and medial sides of the neck. On the other hand, the compressive minimum principal stress changed into tensile maximum principle stress on the lateral side of the neck. The largest maximum principal stress during the impact loading was always larger in the neck than in the impact region. The largest absolute value of the minimum principal stress was found in the neck or the impact region depending on the fall configuration. The largest absolute values of the maximum and minimum principal stress were nearly equal, indicating that the bone fracture due to the tensile stress may occur around the femoral neck.

  9. The producing of an ECR plasma using 2450MHz Whistler Wave and the investigating of its parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yude; Zhang Jiande; Fu Keming; Lu Xiangyu; Liu Dengcheng; Wang Xianyu; Xie Weidong; Bao Dinghua; Yin Xiejin

    1988-12-01

    A stable ECR plasma was produced and sustained in HER mirror using 2450MHz Whistler wave. The parameters of the ECR plasma and their chaining characters were studied in detail and were compared with those of the DC discharge plasmas. The conclusion is that the ECR plasma is a high ionizability, low temperature, middle density plasma, its peak density may much exceed the cutoff density of the pump wave (when ω = ω pe ) and arrive at the order of 10 12 cm -3 . The ECR plasma includes some high energy hot electrons (20Kev-200Kev) and middle energy warm electrons (< 20Kev). Those two kinds of electron created some strong X-ray emissions in a wide frequency range. The ECR plasma has higher edge density and can strongly interact with the wall. (author). 9 refs, 17 figs

  10. Finnish physicians' stress related to information systems keeps increasing: a longitudinal three-wave survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heponiemi, Tarja; Hyppönen, Hannele; Vehko, Tuulikki; Kujala, Sari; Aalto, Anna-Mari; Vänskä, Jukka; Elovainio, Marko

    2017-10-17

    Poorly functioning, time-consuming, and inadequate information systems are among the most important work-related psychosocial factors causing stress in physicians. The present study examined the trend in the perceived stress that was related to information systems (SRIS) among Finnish physicians during a nine-year follow-up. In addition, we examined the associations of gender, age, employment sector, specialization status, leadership position, on-call burden, and time pressure with SRIS change and levels. A longitudinal design with three survey data collection waves (2006, 2010 and 2015) based on a random sample of Finnish physicians in 2006 was used. The study sample included 1095 physicians (62.3% women, mean age 54.4 years) who provided data on SRIS in every wave. GLM repeated measures analyses were used to examine the associations between independent variables and the SRIS trend during the years 2006, 2010, and 2015. SRIS increased during the study period. The estimated marginal mean of SRIS in 2006 was 2.80 (95% CI = 2.68-2.92) and the mean increase was 0.46 (95% CI = 0.30-0.61) points from 2006 to 2010 and 0.25 (95% CI = 0.11-0.39) points from 2010 to 2015. Moreover, our results show that the increase was most pronounced in primary care, whereas in hospitals SRIS did not increase between 2010 and 2015. SRIS increased more among those in a leadership position. On-call duties and high time-pressures were associated with higher SRIS levels during all waves. Changing, difficult, and poorly functioning information systems (IS) are a prominent source of stress among Finnish physicians and this perceived stress continues to increase. Organizations should implement arrangements to ease stress stemming from IS especially for those with a high workload and on-call or leadership duties. To decrease IS-related stress, it would be important to study in more detail the main IS factors that contribute to SRIS. Earlier studies indicate that the usability and stability

  11. Effect of initial stress on Love waves in a piezoelectric structure carrying a functionally graded material layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Lu, Tianjian; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Hirose, Sohichi

    2010-01-01

    The effect of initial stress on the propagation behavior of Love waves in a piezoelectric half-space of polarized ceramics carrying a functionally graded material (FGM) layer is analytically investigated in this paper from the three-dimensional equations of linear piezoelectricity. The analytical solutions are obtained for the dispersion relations of Love wave propagating in this kind of structure with initial stress for both electrical open case and electrical short case, respectively. One numerical example is given to graphically illustrate the effect of initial stress on dispersive curve, phase velocity and electromechanical coupling factor of the Love wave propagation. The results reported here are meaningful for the design of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices with high performance.

  12. Polyamine modification by acrolein exclusively produces 1,5-diazacyclooctanes: a previously unrecognized mechanism for acrolein-mediated oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Ayumi; Imamaki, Rie; Kitazume, Shinobu; Hanashima, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Kaneda, Masato; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Kurbangalieva, Almira; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2014-07-28

    Acrolein, a toxic unsaturated aldehyde generated as a result of oxidative stress, readily reacts with a variety of nucleophilic biomolecules. Polyamines, which produced acrolein in the presence of amine oxidase, were then found to react with acrolein to produce 1,5-diazacyclooctane, a previously unrecognized but significant downstream product of oxidative stress. Although diazacyclooctane formation effectively neutralized acrolein toxicity, the diazacyclooctane hydrogel produced through a sequential diazacyclooctane polymerization reaction was highly cytotoxic. This study suggests that diazacyclooctane formation is involved in the mechanism underlying acrolein-mediated oxidative stress.

  13. Wave Stresses in the Anvil Hammer Rods under Impact Including Ram Mass and Deformation Force of Forgings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Sinitskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When operating the anvil hammers there occur impacts of die tooling and as a consequence, virtually instantaneous impact stops of motion of drop hammer parts. Such operating conditions come with accelerated failures of the anvil hammer rods because of emerging significant wave stresses. Engineering practice widely uses variation, difference, and integral methods to calculate wave stresses. However, to use them a researcher has to acquire certain skills, and the special programs should be available. The paper considers a method for estimating the wave stress changes in the anvil hammer rods, which is based on the wave equation of the Laplace transform. It presents a procedure for generating differential equations and their solution using the operator method. These equations describe the wave processes of strain and stress propagation in the anvil hammer rod under non-rigid impact with the compliance obstacle of the drop hammer parts. The work defines how the piston and rod mass and also the mechanical and geometric parameters of the rod influence on the stress level in the rod sealing of the hammer ram. Analysis of the results shows that the stresses in the rod sealing are proportional to the total amount of wave stresses caused by the rod and piston impact included in the total weight of the system. The piston influence on the stresses in the rod under impact is in direct proportion to the ratio of its mass to the mass of the rod. Geometric parameters of the rod and speed of drop parts before the impact influence on the stress value as well. It was found that if the time of impact is less than the time of the shock wave running in forward and backward direction, the impact with a compliance obstacle is equivalent to that of with a rigid obstacle, and the dependence of the wave stresses follows the Zhukovsky formula of direct pressure shock. The presented method of stress calculation can be successfully used to select the optimal mass and the rod

  14. Shape of shock wave produced by a concentrated impact on a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, G.; Klein, L.

    1981-01-01

    An approximate similarity solution, derived by Raizer, of a concentrated impact (or intense explosion) at the boundary of a semi-infinite volume of a perfect gas is used to determine the propagation velocity of the shock front as a function of its position. This velocity function is then used to obtain the shape of the propagating shock wave. It is shown that dish-shaped shock fronts are formed when the movement of the gas at the surface is into the gas region and that cup-shaped shock fronts are formed when the movement is out of the gas region. Comparison of these results with the shapes of explosions and meteorite craters are discussed

  15. Stress and deformation of ceramic rolls to produce high quality zinc coated steel sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiromasa; Noda, Nao-Aki; Sano, Yoshikazu; Takase, Yasushi; Zhang, Guowei

    2017-05-01

    Several ceramic rolls can be used efficiently to produce high quality zinc coated steel sheet used for automobiles. Those ceramics rolls may provide a longer life and reduce the cost for the maintenance because of its large heat resistance and large wear resistance. One example may be seen in sink rolls used in molten zinc bath to manufacture zinc coated steel sheet. Since the rolls are subjected to large thermal stress and mechanical loading, care should be taken for the risk of fracture due to the ceramic brittleness. Moreover, since the sleeve and shafts can be connected only by using small shrink fitting ratio, another failure risk should be considered for the separation of those components [25, 26]. In this paper, therefore, the mechanical and thermal stress and separation condition will be investigated considering the separation of the connected portion. Here, by using the finite volume method the heat transfer coefficient is discussed and by using the finite element method the thermal stress is considered.

  16. An acoustical study of English word stress produced by Americans and Koreans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byunggon

    2002-05-01

    Acoustical correlates of stress can be divided into duration, intensity, and fundamental frequency. This study examined the acoustical difference in the first two syllables of stressed English words produced by ten American and Korean speakers. The Korean subjects scored very high in TOEFL. They read, at a normal speed, a fable from which the acoustical parameters of eight words were analyzed. In order to make the data comparison meaningful, each parameter was collected at 100 dynamic time points proportional to the total duration of the two syllables. Then, the ratio of the parameter sum of the first rime to that of the second rime was calculated to determine the relative prominence of the syllables. Results showed that the durations of the first two syllables were almost comparable between the Americans and Koreans. However, statistically significant differences showed up in the diphthong pronunciations and in the words with the second syllable stressed. Also, remarkably high r-squared values were found between pairs of the three acoustical parameters, which suggests that either one or a combination of two or more parameters may account for the prominence of a syllable within a word. [Work supported by Korea Science Foundation R01-1999-00229.

  17. The Analysis of Stress Waves at a Junction of Beam and String

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the bridge engineering, there are some problems about the dynamics that traditional theory cannot solve. So, the theory about stress waves is introduced to solve the related problems. This is a new attempt that the mechanic theory is applied to practical engineering. The stress wave at a junction of the structure composed of beams and strings is investigated in this paper. The structure is studied because the existence of a soft rope makes the transmission of the force in the bridge structure different from the traditional theory, and it is the basis for further research. The equilibrium equations of the displacement and the internal force are built based on the hypothesis. The fast Fourier transform (FFT numerical algorithm is used to express an incident pulse of arbitrary shape. The analytical solutions are substantiated by comparing with the finite element programs. The conclusion that if the cross section of the string is relatively small, then the energy density of the structure is relatively large, which is disadvantageous to the structure, can be obtained from this paper.

  18. Guided ultrasonic waves for non-destructive monitoring of the stress levels in prestressed steel strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaki, S; Bourse, G

    2009-02-01

    The safety of prestressed civil structures such as bridges, dams, nuclear power plants, etc. directly involves the security of both environment and users. Health monitoring of the tensioning components, such as strands, tendons, bars, anchorage bolts, etc. is an important research topic and a challenging task bringing together the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and civil engineering communities. This paper deals with a guided ultrasonic wave procedure for monitoring the stress levels in seven-wire steel strands (15.7 mm in diameter). The mechanical and geometrical characteristics of the prestressed strands were taken into account for optimizing the measurement configuration and then the choice of the guided ultrasonic mode at a suitable frequency. Simplified acoustoelastic formulations were derived from the acoustoelasticity theory according to either calibration test or in situ measurement. The results from acoustoelastic measurements on the seven-wire steel strands are presented and discussed in the case of calibration tests and industrially prestressed strands. They show the potential and the suitability of the proposed guided wave method for evaluating the stress levels in the tested seven-wire steel strands.

  19. A Partial-Wave Analysis of Centrally Produced Two-Pseudoscalar Final States in pp Reactions at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, A

    2013-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the data taking in 2008 and 2009. A world-leading data set was collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study the central production of glueball candidates. In this report, we motivate double-Pomeron exchange as a relevant production process for mesons without valence quark content. We select a centrally produced sample from the COMPASS data set recorded with a proton beam and introduce a decomposition into partial waves. Particular attention is paid to inherent mathematical ambiguities in the amplitude analysis of two-pseudoscalar final states. Furthermore, we show a simple parametrisation for the centrally produced K+K- system which can describe the mass dependence of the fit results with sensible Breit-Wigner parameters.

  20. Research on Formation Mechanism of Dynamic Response and Residual Stress of Sheet Metal Induced by Laser Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aixin; Cao, Yupeng; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Zhengang

    2018-01-01

    In order to reveal the quantitative control of the residual stress on the surface of metal materials, the relevant theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to investigate the dynamic response of metal thin plates and the formation mechanism of residual stress induced by laser shock wave. In this paper, the latest research trends on the surface residual stress of laser shock processing technology were elaborated. The main progress of laser shock wave propagation mechanism and dynamic response, laser shock, and surface residual stress were discussed. It is pointed out that the multi-scale characterization of laser and material, surface residual stress and microstructure change is a new hotspot in laser shock strengthening technology.

  1. The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Shen, Y P; Du, J K

    2008-01-01

    The effect of inhomogeneous initial stress on Love wave propagation in layered magneto-electro-elastic structures is investigated in this paper. The coupled magneto-electro-elastic field equations are solved by adopting the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) approximate approach. Then the phase velocity can be calculated by applying boundary and continuity conditions. A specific example of a structure consisting of a CoFe 2 O 4 layer and a BaTiO 3 substrate is used to illustrate the influence of inhomogeneous initial stress on the phase velocity, corresponding coupled magneto-electric factor and stress fields. The different influence between constant initial stress and inhomogeneous initial stress is discussed and the results are expected to be helpful for the preparation and application of Love wave sensors

  2. Shock wave produced by hadron-quark phase transition in neutron star

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavo de Almeida, Luis, E-mail: lgalmeida@cbpf.br [Universidade Federal do Acre – Campus Floresta, Estrada do Canela Fina, km 12, CEP 69980-000, Cruzeiro do Sul, AC (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, CEP 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, Sérgio José Barbosa, E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, CEP 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues, Hilário, E-mail: harg.astrophys@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica Celso Suckow da Fonseca Av. Maracanã, 229, CEP 20271-110, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present a schematic description of the detonation wave in hadronic matter inside a neutron star core. We have used a simplified two shells model where the inner shell medium is initially composed of a small lump of strange quark matter surrounded by a large outer shell composed of hadronic matter. We have utilized an equation of state (EOS) based on Relativistic Mean Field Theory with the parameter set NL3 to describe the nuclear and subnuclear phases. We use the MIT bag model to describe the strange quark matter. The hadron-quark phase transition actually induces highly non equilibrium modes, which may become a detonation process (faster) or a burning process (slower). The main purpose of the work is to study the formation of a remnant quark star and the possibility of mass ejection caused by the hadron-quark phase transition. We have found that the total amount of ejected mass is dependant of the bag constant utilized in the strange matter description.

  3. Stress time-dependently influences the acquisition and retrieval of unrelated information by producing a memory of its own

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea E Cadle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stress induces several temporally-guided waves of psychobiological responses that differentially influence learning and memory. One way to understand how the temporal dynamics of stress influence these cognitive processes is to consider stress, itself, as a learning experience that influences additional learning and memory. Indeed, research has shown that stress results in electrophysiological and biochemical activity that is remarkably similar to the activity observed as a result of learning. In this mini review, we will present the idea that when a stressful episode immediately precedes or follows learning, such learning is enhanced because the learned information becomes a part of the stress context and is tagged by the emotional memory being formed. In contrast, when a stressful episode is temporally separated from learning or is experienced prior to retrieval, such learning or memory is impaired because the learning or memory is experienced outside the context of the stress episode or subsequent to a saturation of synaptic plasticity, which renders the retrieval of information improbable. The temporal dynamics of emotional memory formation, along with the neurobiological correlates of the stress response, are discussed to support these hypotheses.

  4. Copper-complexing ligands produced by an intact estuarine microbial community in response to copper stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, J.; Dryden, C.; Gordon, A.

    2002-12-01

    Copper is both an important nutrient and a pollutant in the marine environment. By studying the interactions between microorganisms and copper in the Elizabeth River (VA), home to a major Naval Base, we field tested the hypothesis that picoplankton and/or bacterioplankton produce strong, copper-complexing ligands in response to elevated copper concentrations. A simple light/ dark test was used to distinguish between heterotrophic and phototrophic ligand production. Samples were bottled and moored, submerged one meter, for a week. Direct counts using DAPI stain and epiflourescence were conducted to find concentrations of picoplankton and bacterioplankton. Using cathodic stripping voltammetry, we found the total copper concentrations, and then from a titration of the ligands by copper, the ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants were obtained. The Elizabeth River naturally had between 10-20 nM total dissolved copper concentrations. However when copper complexation was considered we found that the levels of bio-available Cu(II) ions were much lower. In fact in the natural samples the levels were not high enough to affect the relative reproductive rates of several microorganisms. Naturally there was a 50 nM "buffer zone" of ligand to total dissolved copper concentration. Furthermore, when stressed with excess copper, healthy picoplankton produced enough ligand to alleviate toxicity, and rebuild the buffer zone. However bacterioplankton only produced enough ligand so that they were no longer affected. Therefore, intact estuarine communities regulate copper bioavailability and toxicity with ligand production.

  5. Previous Ketamine Produces an Enduring Blockade of Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects of Uncontrollable Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Jose; Dolzani, Samuel D; Tilden, Scott; Christianson, John P; Kubala, Kenneth H; Bartholomay, Kristi; Sperr, Katherine; Ciancio, Nicholas; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2016-01-06

    Recent interest in the antidepressant and anti-stress effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has identified mechanisms whereby ketamine reverses the effect of stress, but little is known regarding the prophylactic effect ketamine might have on future stressors. Here we investigate the prophylactic effect of ketamine against neurochemical and behavioral changes that follow inescapable, uncontrollable tail shocks (ISs) in Sprague Dawley rats. IS induces increased anxiety, which is dependent on activation of serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons that project to the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h, 1 week, or 2 weeks before IS prevented the increased extracellular levels of 5-HT in the BLA typically produced by IS. In addition, ketamine administered at these time points blocked the decreased juvenile social investigation produced by IS. Microinjection of ketamine into the prelimbic (PL) region of the medial prefrontal cortex duplicated the effects of systemic ketamine, and, conversely, systemic ketamine effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of the PL. Although IS does not activate DRN-projecting neurons from the PL, IS did so after ketamine, suggesting that the prophylactic effect of ketamine is a result of altered functioning of this projection. The reported data show that systemic ketamine, given up to 2 weeks before a stressor, blunts behavioral and neurochemical effects of the stressor. The study also advances understanding of the mechanisms involved and suggests that ketamine acts at the prelimbic cortex to sensitize neurons that project to and inhibit the DRN. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/360153-09$15.00/0.

  6. Previous Ketamine Produces an Enduring Blockade of Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects of Uncontrollable Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzani, Samuel D.; Tilden, Scott; Christianson, John P.; Kubala, Kenneth H.; Bartholomay, Kristi; Sperr, Katherine; Ciancio, Nicholas; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in the antidepressant and anti-stress effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has identified mechanisms whereby ketamine reverses the effect of stress, but little is known regarding the prophylactic effect ketamine might have on future stressors. Here we investigate the prophylactic effect of ketamine against neurochemical and behavioral changes that follow inescapable, uncontrollable tail shocks (ISs) in Sprague Dawley rats. IS induces increased anxiety, which is dependent on activation of serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons that project to the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h, 1 week, or 2 weeks before IS prevented the increased extracellular levels of 5-HT in the BLA typically produced by IS. In addition, ketamine administered at these time points blocked the decreased juvenile social investigation produced by IS. Microinjection of ketamine into the prelimbic (PL) region of the medial prefrontal cortex duplicated the effects of systemic ketamine, and, conversely, systemic ketamine effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of the PL. Although IS does not activate DRN-projecting neurons from the PL, IS did so after ketamine, suggesting that the prophylactic effect of ketamine is a result of altered functioning of this projection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The reported data show that systemic ketamine, given up to 2 weeks before a stressor, blunts behavioral and neurochemical effects of the stressor. The study also advances understanding of the mechanisms involved and suggests that ketamine acts at the prelimbic cortex to sensitize neurons that project to and inhibit the DRN. PMID:26740657

  7. Social subordination produces distinct stress-related phenotypes in female rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Higgins, Melinda; Toufexis, Donna; Wilson, Mark E

    2012-07-01

    Social subordination in female macaques is imposed by harassment and the threat of aggression and produces reduced control over one's social and physical environment and a dysregulation of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis resembling that observed in people suffering from psychopathologies. These effects support the contention that this particular animal model is an ethologically relevant paradigm in which to investigate the etiology of stress-induced psychological illness related to women. Here, we sought to expand this model by performing a discriminate analysis (DA) on 33 variables within three domains; behavioral, metabolic/anthropomorphic, and neuroendocrine, collected from socially housed female rhesus monkeys in order to assess whether exposure to social subordination produces a distinct phenotype. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was also calculated to determine each domain's classification accuracy. DA found significant markers within each domain that differentiated dominant and subordinate females. Subordinate females received more aggression, showed more submissive behavior, and received less of affiliation from others than did dominant females. Metabolic differences included increased leptin, and reduced adiponectin in dominant compared to subordinate females. Dominant females exhibited increased sensitivity to hormonal stimulation with higher serum LH in response to estradiol, cortisol in response to ACTH, and increased glucocorticoid negative feedback. Serum oxytocin, CSF DOPAC and serum PACAP were all significantly higher in dominant females. ROC curve analysis accurately predicted social status in all three domains. Results suggest that socially house rhesus monkeys represent a cogent animal model in which to study the physiology and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stress in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many...

  9. Dissipation of Impact Stress Waves within the Artificial Blasting Damage Zone in the Surrounding Rocks of Deep Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianguo Ning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial explosions are commonly used to prevent rockburst in deep roadways. However, the dissipation of the impact stress wave within the artificial blasting damage zone (ABDZ of the rocks surrounding a deep roadway has not yet been clarified. The surrounding rocks were divided into the elastic zone, blasting damage zone, plastic zone, and anchorage zone in this research. Meanwhile, the ABDZ was divided into the pulverizing area, fractured area, and cracked area from the inside out. Besides, the model of the normal incidence of the impact stress waves in the ABDZ was established; the attenuation coefficient of the amplitude of the impact stress waves was obtained after it passed through the intact rock mass, and ABDZ, to the anchorage zone. In addition, a numerical simulation was used to study the dynamic response of the vertical stress and impact-induced vibration energy in the surrounding rocks. By doing so, the dissipation of the impact stress waves within the ABDZ of the surrounding rocks was revealed. As demonstrated in the field application, the establishment of the ABDZ in the surrounding rocks reduced the effect of the impact-induced vibration energy on the anchorage support system of the roadway.

  10. Numerical Results for a Polytropic Cosmology Interpreted as a Dust Universe Producing Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, J.; Cervantes-Cota, J.; Chauvet, P.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. A nivel cosmol6gico pensamos que se ha estado prodticiendo radiaci6n gravitacional en cantidades considerables dentro de las galaxias. Si los eventos prodnctores de radiaci6n gravitatoria han venido ocurriendo desde Ia epoca de Ia formaci6n de las galaxias, cuando menos, sus efectos cosmol6gicos pueden ser tomados en cuenta con simplicidad y elegancia al representar la producci6n de radiaci6n y, por consiguiente, su interacci6n con materia ordinaria fenomenol6gicamente a trave's de una ecuaci6n de estado politr6pica, como lo hemos mostrado en otros trabajos. Presentamos en este articulo resultados nunericos de este modelo. ABSTRACT A common believe in cosmology is that gravitational radiation in considerable quantities is being produced within the galaxies. Ifgravitational radiation production has been running since the galaxy formation epoch, at least, its cosmological effects can be assesed with simplicity and elegance by representing the production of radiation and, therefore, its interaction with ordinary matter phenomenologically through a polytropic equation of state as shown already elsewhere. We present in this paper the numerical results of such a model. K words: COSMOLOGY - GRAVITATION

  11. Inversion of residual stress profiles from ultrasonic Rayleigh wave dispersion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P.; Spies, M.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate theoretically and with synthetic data the performance of several inversion methods to infer a residual stress state from ultrasonic surface wave dispersion data. We show that this particular problem may reveal in relevant materials undesired behaviors for some methods that could be reliably applied to infer other properties. We focus on two methods, one based on a Taylor-expansion, and another one based on a piecewise linear expansion regularized by a singular value decomposition. We explain the instabilities of the Taylor-based method by highlighting singularities in the series of coefficients. At the same time, we show that the other method can successfully provide performances which only weakly depend on the material.

  12. A study of the stress wave factor technique for evaluation of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Kiernan, M. T.; Grosskopf, P. P.

    1989-01-01

    The acousto-ultrasonic approach for nondestructive evaluation provides a measurement procedure for quantifying the integrated effect of globally distributed damage characteristic of fiber reinforced composite materials. The evaluation procedure provides a stress wave factor that correlates closely with several material performance parameters. The procedure was investigated for a variety of materials including advanced composites, hybrid structure bonds, adhesive bonds, wood products, and wire rope. The research program focused primarily on development of fundamental understanding and applications advancements of acousto-ultrasonics for materials characterization. This involves characterization of materials for which detection, location, and identification of imperfections cannot at present be analyzed satisfactorily with mechanical performance prediction models. In addition to presenting definitive studies on application potentials, the understanding of the acousto-ultrasonic method as applied to advanced composites is reviewed.

  13. Controlled release of drugs from cellulose acetate matrices produced from sugarcane bagasse: monitoring by square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Filho, Guimes; Almeida, Flávia; Ribeiro, Sabrina D; Tormin, Thiago F; Muñoz, Rodrigo A A; Assunção, Rosana M N; Barud, Hernane

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, cellulose triacetate (CTA) was produced from sugarcane bagasse and used as matrices for controlled release of paracetamol. Symmetric and asymmetric membranes were obtained by formulations of CTA/dichloromethane/drug and CTA/dichloromethane/water/drug, respectively, and they were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Different morphologies of membranes were observed by SEM, and the incorporation of paracetamol was confirmed by lowering of the glass transition temperature (Tg) in the DSC curves. This indicates the existence of interactions between the matrix and the drug. The evaluation of drug release was based on the electrochemical monitoring of paracetamol through its oxidation at a glassy carbon electrode surface using square-wave voltammetry (SWV), which provides fast, precise and accurate in situ measurements. The studies showed a content release of 27% and 45% by the symmetric and asymmetric membranes, respectively, during 8 h.

  14. Partial-Wave Analysis of Centrally Produced Two-Pseudoscalar Final States in pp Reactions at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Austregesilo, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS which focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the data taking periods in 2008 and 2009. A world-leading data set was collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target in order to study, inter alia, the central exclusive production of glueball candidates in the light-meson sector. Especially the double-Pomeron exchange mechanism is well suited for the production of mesons without valence quark content. We select centrally produced systems with two pseudo-scalar mesons in the final state from the COMPASS data set recorded with an incoming proton. The decay of this system is decomposed in terms of partial waves, where particular attention is paid to the inherent mathematical ambiguities of the amplitude analysis. Furthermore, we show that simple parametrisations are able to describe the mass dependence of the fit results with sensible Breit-Wigner parameters.

  15. Increased sensitivity of prolonged P-wave during exercise stress test in detection of angiographically documented coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wsol, Agnieszka; Wydra, Wioletta; Chmielewski, Marek; Swiatowiec, Andrzej; Kuch, Marek

    2017-01-01

    A retrospective study was designed to investigate P-wave duration changes in exercise stress test (EST) for the prediction of angiographically documented substantial coronary artery disease (CAD). We analyzed 265 cases of patients, who underwent EST and subsequently coronary angiography. Analysis of P-wave duration was performed in leads II, V5 at rest, and in the recovery period. The sensitivity and specificity for the isolated ST-segment depression were only 31% and 76%, respectively. The combination of ST-depression with other exercise-induced clinical and electrocardio-graphic abnormalities (chest pain, ventricular arrhythmia, hypotension, left bundle branch block) was characterized by 41% sensitivity and 69% specificity. The combination of abnormal recovery P-wave duration (≥ 120 ms) with ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 83% sensitivity but only 20% specificity. Combined analysis of increased delta P-wave duration, ST-depression and other exercise-induced abnormalities had 69% sensitivity and 42% specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of the increase in delta P-wave duration for left CAD was 69% and 47%, respectively, and for 3-vessel CAD 70% and 50%, respectively. The presence of arterial hypertension negatively influenced the prog-nostic value of P-wave changes in the stress test. The results of the study show that an addition of P-wave duration changes assessment to ST-depression analysis and other exercise-induced abnormalities increase sensitivity of EST, especially for left CAD and 3-vessel coronary disease. We have also provided evidence for the negative influence of the presence of arterial hypertension on the predictive value of P-wave changes in the stress test. (Cardiol J 2017; 24, 2: 159-166).

  16. Exciting (and detecting) gravitational waves from the tidally produced f-modes in highly eccentric neutron star binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirenti, Cecilia; Gold, Roman; Miller, M. Coleman

    2017-08-01

    After the first recent detections of gravitational waves from binary black holes, we expect to observe next gravitational radiation from neutron stars in the near future. Most interestingly, the signal from neutron star binaries could also carry information about the equation of state of cold, catalyzed, dense matter in the interior of neutron stars, which is in a regime not accessible to nuclear and particle physics experiments on Earth. For analyzing this information, more advanced gravitational wave detectors will be needed, such as third-generation detectors like the Einstein Telescope or the Cosmic Explorer. Besides the gravitational wave signal produced by the orbital motion and merger of the binary, a rich spectrum of characteristic fluid oscillations is expected to be produced with low amplitude in the ringdown. The frequencies and physical properties of these modes have been extensively studied in linear perturbation theory (both Newtonian and relativistic) and they have already been found in numerical relativity simulations of isolated neutron stars and of hypermassive remnants of double neutron star mergers. Due to the high frequency of the fundamental (f-)modes, of the order of 1-2 kHz, the resonant excitation of these modes is not expected to be detectable in circular binaries. However, highly eccentric binaries could have the potential for exciting f-modes in their close passages, and recent numerical relativity simulations indicate that the energy deposited in the f-modes could be up to two orders of magnitude greater than predicted in the linear theory. The merger of highly eccentric neutron star binaries will be rare events, but we estimate that up to several tens could be detected per year out to the redshifts ~2-6 accessible with third-generation instruments. Finally, we note that the information from the amplitude, frequency and damping time of the f-modes can be used for simultaneously measuring the masses, moments of inertia and tidal Love

  17. Brain functional integration: an epidemiologic study on stress-producing dissociative phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Giovanni; Carotenuto, Marco; Maldonato, Nelson Mauro; Moretto, Enrico; Leone, Elena; De Luca, Vincenzo; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Antonietta

    2018-01-01

    Dissociative phenomena are common among psychiatric patients; the presence of these symptoms can worsen the prognosis, increasing the severity of their clinical conditions and exposing them to increased risk of suicidal behavior. Personality disorders as long duration stressful experiences may support the development of dissociative phenomena. In 933 psychiatric outpatients consecutively recruited, presence of dissociative phenomena was identified with the Dissociative Experience Scale (DES). Dissociative phenomena were significantly more severe in the group of people with mental disorders and/or personality disorders. All psychopathologic traits detected with the symptom checklist-90-revised had a significant correlation with the total score on the DES. Using total DES score as the dependent variable, a linear regression model was constructed. Mental and personality disorders which were associated with greater severity of dissociative phenomena on analysis of variance were included as predictors; scores from the nine scales of symptom checklist-90-revised, significantly correlated to total DES score, were used as covariates. The model consisted of seven explanatory variables (four factors and three covariates) explaining 82% of variance. The four significant factors were the presence of borderline and narcissistic personality disorder, substance abuse disorders and psychotic disorders. Significant covariates were psychopathologic traits of anger, psychoticism and obsessiveness. This study, confirming Janet’s theory, explains that, mental disorders and psychopathologic experiences of patients can configure the chronic stress condition that produces functional damage to the adaptive executive system. The symptoms of dissociative depersonalization/derealization and dissociative amnesia can be explained, in large part, through their current and previous psychopathologic experiences. PMID:29296086

  18. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengfeng Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stress wave theory. Influence law on shock wave attenuation by vibration-isolation slot was studied by numerical simulation. Simulation results agree with the theoretical analysis roughly. The results of this study put forward a method for blast-induced vibration near blasting source and provide a certain theoretical basis.

  19. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in large zirconia based refractory bricks produced by electro-fusion and casting

    OpenAIRE

    ÖRS , Taylan; Gouraud , Fanny; Guinebretière , René; HUGER , Marc; Michel , Vincent; Castelnau , Olivier

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Electro-fusion and casting is used to produce large refractory bricks (∼250 kg) containing a high amount of ZrO2. These bricks are used in glass-making furnaces where good mechanical performance is required at very high temperatures (>1500 °C). During the manufacturing procedure, they develop large residual stresses as a result of the cooling conditions and structural phase transformations they underwent. This leads to stress concentration and crack formation at differ...

  20. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in large zirconia based refractory bricks produced by electro-fusion and casting

    OpenAIRE

    ÖRS, Taylan; GOURAUD, Fanny; GUINEBRETIÈRE, René; HUGER, Marc; MICHEL, Vincent; CASTELNAU, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Electro-fusion and casting is used to produce large refractory bricks (∼250 kg) containing a high amount of ZrO2. These bricks are used in glass-making furnaces where good mechanical performance is required at very high temperatures (>1500 °C). During the manufacturing procedure, they develop large residual stresses as a result of the cooling conditions and structural phase transformations they underwent. This leads to stress concentration and crack formation at different length scales. In or...

  1. [UV, visible and infrared light. Which wavelengths produce oxidative stress in human skin?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, L; Groth, N; Klein, F; Kockott, D; Lademann, J; Ferrero, L

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that the creation of free radicals--mainly reactive oxygen species (ROS)--is the common photobiological answer to the skin-sunlight interaction. The free radical action spectrum (wavelength dependency) for ultraviolet and visible light (280-700 nm) has been determined by quantitative ESR spectroscopy. Visible light produces around 50% of the total oxidative stress caused by sunlight. Reactive species like *O(-)(2), *OH and *CHR are generated by visible light. The amount of ROS correlates with the visible light intensity (illuminance). We demonstrated the creation of excess free radicals by near-infrared light (NIR, 700-1600 nm). Free radical generation does not depend exclusively on the NIR irradiance, but also on the NIR initiated skin temperature increase. The temperature dependence follows the physiological fever curve. Our results indicate that the complex biological system skin creates the same type of free radicals over the entire active solar spectrum. This general response will make it possible to define the beneficial or deleterious action of sunlight on human skin by introduction of a free radical threshold value.

  2. A Study of the use of a Crystal as a `Quarter-Wave Plate' to Produce High Energy Circularly Polarized Photons

    CERN Multimedia

    Kononets, I

    2002-01-01

    %NA59 %title\\\\ \\\\We present a proposal to study the use of a crystal as a `quarter-wave plate' to produce high energy circularly polarized photons, starting from unpolarized electrons. The intention is to generate linearly polarized photons by letting electrons pass a crystalline target, where they interact coherently with the lattice nuclei. The photon polarization is subsequently turned into circular polarization after passing another crystal, which acts as a `quarter-wave plate'.

  3. Chronic juvenile stress produces corticolimbic dendritic architectural remodeling and modulates emotional behavior in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiland, Lisa; Ramroop, Johnny; Hill, Matthew N; Manley, Jasmine; McEwen, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    Nearly 12% of US children are exposed to intense adverse experiences. Research has demonstrated that these experiences can negatively impact adult health, often resulting in psychopathology. Less attention, however, is given to the impact of childhood adverse experiences on childhood health and wellbeing. Using a rodent model of chronic juvenile stress (restraint 6 h daily from postnatal day 20 to 41), we report that chronic stress has significant immediate morbidities in both males and females during this developmental window. Specifically, we demonstrate that chronic juvenile stress produces depressive-like behavior and significant neuronal remodeling of brain regions likely involved in these behavioral alterations: the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala. Chronically stressed males and females exhibit anhedonia, increased locomotion when exposed to novelty, and altered coping strategies when exposed to acute stress. Coincident with these behavioral changes, we report simplification of dendrites in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and concurrent hypertrophy of dendrites in the amygdala. Taken together, these results demonstrate that chronically stressed juveniles exhibit aberrant behavioral responses to acute challenges that occur in conjunction with stress-induced remodeling of brain regions intimately involved in regulating emotionality and stress reactivity. Further, the absence of sex differences in our reported stress responses, likely speaks to the decreased sensitivity of immature HPA regulating brain regions to sex hormones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Moderate Childhood Stress Buffers Against Depressive Response to Proximal Stressors: A Multi-Wave Prospective Study of Early Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapero, Benjamin G; Hamilton, Jessica L; Stange, Jonathan P; Liu, Richard T; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-11-01

    Although the majority of research in the field has focused on childhood stressors as a risk factor for psychopathology, a burgeoning body of literature has focused on the possible steeling effect of moderate types of stressful events. The current study investigated the effects of proximal life stressors on prospective changes in depressive symptoms, and whether a history of moderate childhood adversity would moderate this relationship in a multi-wave study of a diverse community sample of early adolescents (N = 163, 52 % female, 51 % Caucasian). Hierarchical linear modeling was run with four waves of data. Adolescents with greater moderately severe early life events evinced a blunted depressive symptom response to changes in proximal stressful events in the previous 9 months, compared to those with fewer early moderately severe experiences of adversity. These results held after controlling for between-subject factors such as race, gender, severe early life stress, and average stress over the four waves of data. Findings indicate that greater exposure to moderate childhood stressors may buffer against the negative effects of subsequent stressors, suggesting the importance of a nuanced developmental approach to studying the effects of early life stress.

  5. Integration of stress and leptin signaling by CART producing neurons in the rodent midbrain centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eXu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leptin targets the brain to regulate feeding, neuroendocrine function and metabolism. The leptin receptor is present in hypothalamic centers controlling energy metabolism as well as in the centrally projecting Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EWcp, a region implicated in the stress response and in various aspects of stress-related behaviors. We hypothesized that the stress response by cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART-producing EWcp-neurons would depend on the animal’s energy state. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effects of changes in energy state (mimicked by low, normal and high leptin levels, which were achieved by 24h fasting, normal chow and leptin injection, respectively on the response of CART neurons in the EWcp of rats subjected or not to acute restraint stress. Our data show that leptin treatment alone significantly increases CART mRNA expression in the rat EWcp and that in leptin receptor deficient (db/db mice, the number of CART producing neurons in this nucleus is reduced. This suggests that leptin has a stimulatory effect on the production of CART in the EWcp under non-stressed condition. Under stressed condition, however, leptin blunts stress-induced activation of EWcp neurons and decreases their CART mRNA expression. Interestingly, fasting, does not influence the stress-induced activation of EWcp-neurons, and specifically EWcp-CART neurons are not activated. These results suggest that the stress response by the EWcp depends to some degree on the animal’s energy state, a mechanism that may contribute to a better understanding of the complex interplay between obesity and stress.

  6. Heat stress related dairy cow mortality during heat waves and control periods in rural Southern Ontario from 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop-Williams, Katherine E; Berke, Olaf; Pearl, David L; Hand, Karen; Kelton, David F

    2015-11-27

    Heat stress is a physiological response to extreme environmental heat such as heat waves. Heat stress can result in mortality in dairy cows when extreme heat is both rapidly changing and has a long duration. As a result of climate change, heat waves, which are defined as 3 days of temperatures of 32 °C or above, are an increasingly frequent extreme weather phenomenon in Southern Ontario. Heat waves are increasing the risk for on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Heat stress indices (HSIs) are generally based on temperature and humidity and provide a relative measure of discomfort which can be used to predict increased risk of on-farm dairy cow mortality. In what follows, the heat stress distribution was described over space and presented with maps. Similarly, on-farm mortality was described and mapped. The goal of this study was to demonstrate that heat waves and related HSI increases during 2010-2012 were associated with increased on-farm dairy cow mortality in Southern Ontario. Mortality records and farm locations for all farms registered in the CanWest Dairy Herd Improvement Program in Southern Ontario were retrieved for 3 heat waves and 6 three-day control periods from 2010 to 2012. A random sample of controls (2:1) was taken from the data set to create a risk-based hybrid design. On-farm heat stress was estimated using data from 37 weather stations and subsequently interpolated across Southern Ontario by geostatistical kriging. A Poisson regression model was applied to assess the on-farm mortality in relation to varying levels of the HSI. For every one unit increase in HSI the on-farm mortality rate across Southern Ontario increases by 1.03 times (CI95% (IRR) = (1.025,1.035); p = ≤ 0.001). With a typical 8.6 unit increase in HSI from a control period to a heat wave, mortality rates are predicted to increase by 1.27 times. Southern Ontario was affected by heat waves, as demonstrated by high levels of heat stress and increased on-farm mortality

  7. Controlled Low-Pressure Blast-Wave Exposure Causes Distinct Behavioral and Morphological Responses Modelling Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Comorbid Mild Traumatic Brain Injury-Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Amitai; Ram, Omri; Ifergane, Gal; Matar, Michael A; Sagi, Ram; Ostfeld, Ishay; Hoffman, Jay R; Kaplan, Zeev; Sadot, Oren; Cohen, Hagit

    2017-01-01

    The intense focus in the clinical literature on the mental and neurocognitive sequelae of explosive blast-wave exposure, especially when comorbid with post-traumatic stress-related disorders (PTSD) is justified, and warrants the design of translationally valid animal studies to provide valid complementary basic data. We employed a controlled experimental blast-wave paradigm in which unanesthetized animals were exposed to visual, auditory, olfactory, and tactile effects of an explosive blast-wave produced by exploding a thin copper wire. By combining cognitive-behavioral paradigms and ex vivo brain MRI to assess mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) phenotype with a validated behavioral model for PTSD, complemented by morphological assessments, this study sought to examine our ability to evaluate the biobehavioral effects of low-intensity blast overpressure on rats, in a translationally valid manner. There were no significant differences between blast- and sham-exposed rats on motor coordination and strength, or sensory function. Whereas most male rats exposed to the blast-wave displayed normal behavioral and cognitive responses, 23.6% of the rats displayed a significant retardation of spatial learning acquisition, fulfilling criteria for mTBI-like responses. In addition, 5.4% of the blast-exposed animals displayed an extreme response in the behavioral tasks used to define PTSD-like criteria, whereas 10.9% of the rats developed both long-lasting and progressively worsening behavioral and cognitive "symptoms," suggesting comorbid PTSD-mTBI-like behavioral and cognitive response patterns. Neither group displayed changes on MRI. Exposure to experimental blast-wave elicited distinct behavioral and morphological responses modelling mTBI-like, PTSD-like, and comorbid mTBI-PTSD-like responses. This experimental animal model can be a useful tool for elucidating neurobiological mechanisms underlying the effects of blast-wave-induced mTBI and PTSD and comorbid mTBI-PTSD.

  8. Brain functional integration: an epidemiologic study on stress-producing dissociative phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperandeo R

    2017-12-01

    , significantly correlated to total DES score, were used as covariates. The model consisted of seven explanatory variables (four factors and three covariates explaining 82% of variance. The four significant factors were the presence of borderline and narcissistic personality disorder, substance abuse disorders and psychotic disorders. Significant covariates were psychopathologic traits of anger, psychoticism and obsessiveness. This study, confirming Janet’s theory, explains that, mental disorders and psychopathologic experiences of patients can configure the chronic stress condition that produces functional damage to the adaptive executive system. The symptoms of dissociative depersonalization/derealization and dissociative amnesia can be explained, in large part, through their current and previous psychopathologic experiences. Keywords: mental disorders, personality disorders, amnesia, depersonalization/derealization 

  9. Protection of the lung from blast overpressure by stress wave decouplers, buffer plates or sandwich panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedman, Andrew; Hepper, A

    2018-03-19

    This paper outlines aspects of UK Ministry of Defence's research and development of blast overpressure protection technologies appropriate for use in body armour, with the aim of both propagating new knowledge and updating existing information. Two simple models are introduced not only to focus the description of the mechanism by which the lungs can be protected, but also to provide a bridge between fields of research that may hold the key to further advances in protection technology and related body armour. Protection can be provided to the lungs by decoupling the stress wave transmission into the thorax by managing the blast energy imparted through the protection system. It is proposed that the utility of the existing 'simple decoupler' blast overpressure protection is reviewed in light of recent developments in the treatment of those sustaining both overpressure and fragment injuries. It is anticipated that further advances in protection technology may be generated by those working in other fields on the analogous technologies of 'buffer plates' and 'sandwich panels'. © Crown copyright (2018), Dstl. This material is licensed under the terms of the Open Government Licence except where otherwise stated. To view this licence, visit http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence/version/3 or write to the Information Policy Team, The National Archives, Kew, London TW9 4DU, or email: psi@nationalarchives.gsi.gov.uk.

  10. Molecular mechanisms and new strategies to fight stresses in egg-producing birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Shatskikh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Commercial egg production is associated with various stresses decreasing productive and reproductive performance of layers. A growing body of evidence indicates that most of stresses in poultry production at the cellular level are associated with oxidative stress due to excess of free radical production or inadequate antioxidant protection. Recently, a concept of the cellular antioxidant defence has been revised with a special attention paid to cell signalling. Indeed, in animals, redox signalling pathways use reactive oxygen species (ROS to transfer signals from different sources to the nucleus to regulate a number of various functions including growth, differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. The vitagene concept of fighting stresses emerged as a new direction in a nutritional research. Indeed, by improving the adaptive ability of animals to stress it is possible tosubstantially decrease negative consequences of various stresses in poultry and farm animal production. The analysis of recently published data clearly showed that the anti-stress composition developed on the vitagene concept and supplied with drinking water is an effective means in fighting stresses in poultry production.

  11. Improved Drought Stress Response in Alfalfa Plants Nodulated by an IAA Over-producing Rhizobium Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Defez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The drought–stress response in plant involves the cross-talk between abscisic acid (ABA and other phytohormones, such as jasmonates and ethylene. The auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA plays an integral part in plant adaptation to drought stress. Investigation was made to see how the main auxin IAA interacted with other plant hormones under water stress, applied through two different growth conditions (solid and hydroponic. Medicago sativa plants nodulated by the Ensifer meliloti wild type 1021 (Ms-1021 and its IAA-overproducing RD64 derivative strains (Ms-RD64 were subjected to drought stress, comparing their response. When the expression of nifH gene and the activity of the nitrogenase enzyme were measured after stress treatments, Ms-RD64 plants recorded a significantly weaker damage. These results were correlated with a lower biomass reduction, and a higher Rubisco protein level measured for the Ms-RD64-stressed plants as compared to the Ms-1021-stressed ones. It has been verified that the stress response observed for Ms-RD64-stressed plants was related to the production of greater amount of low-molecular-weight osmolytes, such as proline and pinitol, measured in these plants. For the Ms-RD64 plants the immunoblotting analysis of thylakoid membrane proteins showed that some of the photosystem proteins increased after the stress. An increased non-photochemical quenching after the stress was also observed for these plants. The reduced wilting signs observed for these plants were also connected to the significant down-regulation of the MtAA03 gene involved in the ABA biosynthesis, and with the unchanged expression of the two genes (Mt-2g006330 and Mt-8g095330 of ABA signaling. When the expression level of the ethylene-signaling genes was evaluated by qPCR analysis no significant alteration of the key positive regulators was recorded for Ms-RD64-stressed plants. Coherently, these plants accumulated 40% less ethylene as compared to Ms-1021-stressed

  12. Dynamic Stress Concentration at the Boundary of an Incision at the Plate Under the Action of Weak Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Olena

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the novel technique for analysis of dynamic stress state of multi-connected infinite plates under the action of weak shock waves. For solution of the problem it uses the integral and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculation of transformed dynamic stresses at the incisions of plates is held using the boundary-integral equation method and the theory of complex variable functions. The numerical implementation of the developed algorithm is based on the method of mechanical quadratures and collocation technique. For calculation of originals of the dynamic stresses it uses modified discrete Fourier transform. The algorithm is effective in the analysis of the dynamic stress state of defective plates.

  13. Experimental evaluation of residual stresses produced by plain dents in pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascotto, Jorge [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Marques, Altino; Fonseca, Maria Cindra [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    A dent means a permanent plastic deformation of the circular cross-section of the pipe. Dents are potentially danger for structural integrity of onshore and offshore pipelines, because it causes a local stress and strain concentration. It is also expected that residual stresses are introduced by the non-uniform plastic deformation. A plain dent is a dent which causes a smooth change in the curvature of the pipe wall that contains no wall thickness reductions (such as a gouge or a crack) or other defects or imperfections (such as a weld). This work presents an experimental evaluation of residual stresses intensification due to plain dents introduced through the same indentation process, in samples made of the same steel line pipe, commonly used in the pipeline industry. The residual stresses were measured in the longitudinal and circumferential directions in preselected points by X-ray diffraction technique, before indentation. After the samples have been dented, the residual stresses were measured once more at the same points, for comparison. All samples presented a similar behavior of the residual stresses due to induced plain dents, and the X-ray diffraction technique shows itself as an efficient methodology of stress measurement in pipelines. (author)

  14. Simulation of Stress Distribution in a Thick- Walled Bushing Produced by Die-Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisarek B.P.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallographic investigations and a computer simulation of stresses in a gravity die-casting bushing were performed. Simulation of the casting process, solidification of the thick-walled bushing and calculations of the stress was performed using MAGMA5.3 software. The size variability of phases κII affecting the formation of phase stresses σf, depending on the location of the metallographic test area, was identified. The distribution of thermal σt and shrinkage stresses σs, depending on the location of the control point SC in the bushing's volume, was estimated. Probably the nature of these stresses will change slightly even after machining. This can cause variations in operating characteristics (friction coefficient, wear. Due to the strong inhomogeneity of the stress distribution in the bushing's casting, it is necessary to perform further tests of the possibility to conduct thermal treatment guaranteeing homogenization of the internal stresses in the casting, as well as to introduce changes in the bushing' s construction and the casting technology. The paper presents the continuation of the results of research aimed at identifying the causes of defects in the thick-walled bushing, die-casting made of CuAl10Fe5Ni5Cr aluminium bronze.

  15. Analysis and Numerical Simulation on the Reduction Effect of Stress Waves Caused by Water Jet Slotting Near Blasting Source

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dengfeng; Kang, Yong; Li, Dongyang; Wang, Xiaochuan; Yan, Fuwen

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most serious “side effects” of blast excavation, blast-induced vibration must be controlled for existing buildings and human beings. This paper proposes a method for blast-induced vibration reduction with water jet assistance according to the cutting characters of low-noised, environment-friendly water jet. The mechanism of vibration-isolation with water jet assistance was analyzed, and the stress wave energy attenuation models were established based on blasting theory and stres...

  16. Experimental Confirmation of the Persistence of Ponderomotively Driven Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) Waves in Laser Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, J.; Afeyan, B.; Bertsche, W.; Kurnit, N.; Montgomery, D.; Savchenko, V.; Won, K.

    2004-11-01

    Vlasov-Poisson simulations using ponderomotively driven excitations have discovered the existence of stable, nonlinear, multimode coherent structures in plasmas named Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Nonlinear (KEEN) waves.^1 For a given wave number drive, they seem to form and persist for any drive frequency in a band around the electron acoustic^2 frequency. An experiment was recently conducted on Trident jointly by Polymath Research Inc. and LANL to verify these findings. The two lasers used had 527 and 600 nm wavelengths which is predicted to drive waves in the proper KEEN wave excitation band.^1 A Raman cell was developed and fielded on the TRIDENT Laser to convert a 527 nm laser beam to 600 or 697 nm as needed via first or second Stokes emission in N2 gas. Using two beams at these wavelengths, KEEN waves were driven and detected with 263 nm Thomson scattering in a Nitrogen plus Hydrogen gas jet plasma. This presentation will cover experimental conditions and diagnostic attributes associated with the detection of KEEN waves. **Supported by DOE Academic Alliance Grant DE-FG03-03NA00059 and LANL ^1Afeyan et al., Optical Mixing Generated KEEN Waves, IFSA Conference Proceedings, 2003; Invited paper at this conference and to be published. ^2Montgomery et al., PRL 87, 155001 (2001)

  17. Stress modulation in desiccating crack networks for producing effective templates for patterning metal network based transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankush; Pujar, Rajashekhar; Gupta, Nikita; Tarafdar, Sujata; Kulkarni, Giridhar U.

    2017-07-01

    A drying layer of a colloidal dispersion tends to produce cracks, often in a network, due to internal stress arising from the rearrangement of particles while the substrate adhesion resists such movements. The stress can be modulated using experimental agents such as electric field, humidity, and surface structuring. In this work, repeated wet-drying cycles of the cracking layer have been used as stress modulating agents taking an aqueous dispersion of acrylic resin nanoparticles as the colloidal layer, offering cracks with widths in the sub-ten micrometer range. With increasing wet-drying cycles, the colloidal layer is seen to develop higher crack density and connectivity, as well as a well-defined hierarchy of formation. Thus developed crack layers have been used as templates for depositing metals (Cu and Au) to realize fine metal wire meshes. The latter serve as transparent conductors with excellent optoelectronic properties.

  18. Acute and delayed restraint stress-induced changes in nitric oxide producing neurons in limbic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry, M B; Guimarães, F S; Del Bel, E A

    2004-01-01

    Microinjection into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, induces antinociceptive effect 5 days after a single restraint episode. The mechanisms of this stress-antinociceptive modulatory effect have not been investigated but may involve plastic changes in the hippocampal formation (HF). The objective of the present study was to investigate possible mechanisms of the stress-modulating effect on antinociception induced by NOS inhibition in the hippocampus. We analyzed the effects of restraint stress on neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemical activity (NADPH-d) in the HF and related brain regions. Male Wistar rats (n=6-11/group) were submitted to a single (acute stress) or repeated (5 days) episodes of 2-h restraint. Control animals remained in their home cages being all animals daily handled during this period. In the fifth day, animals received unilateral microinjection of l-NAME (150 nmol/0.2 microl) or saline (control) into the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus (DG). Immediately before and after drug microinjection tail-flick reflex latency or hotplate licking reaction was measured. Animals were killed i. immediately; ii. 5 days after acute stress; or iii. after repeated stress. NADPH-d and nNOS expression were quantified in the HF, caudate-putamen, secondary somatosensorial, entorhinal and piriform cortices and amygdaloid complex. Five days after one or five restraint episodes l-NAME microinjection into the DG elicited antinociceptive effect (analysis of variance [ANOVA], Psomatosensorial cortex. The results confirm that the dorsal hippocampus participates in the modulation of stress consequences. They also show that a single stress episode causes acute changes in nitric oxide system in the amygdala complex and delayed modifications in the HF. The delayed (5 days) antinociceptive effect of

  19. Effects of stresses on the growth and Cytotoxicity of Shiga-Toxin producing Escherichia coli in ground beef and spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effect of stresses on the growth and cytotoxicity of pathogenic Escherichia coli in beef and spinach. A mixture of three strains of Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) O157:H7 or four strains of non-O157 STEC O26:H11, O103:H1, O104:H4, and O145:NM wa...

  20. Spectral tunability of two-photon states generated by spontaneous four-wave mixing: fibre tapering, temperature variation and longitudinal stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Ricardo, E.; Bertoni-Ocampo, C.; Ibarra-Borja, Z.; Ramirez-Alarcon, R.; Cruz-Delgado, D.; Cruz-Ramirez, H.; Garay-Palmett, K.; U'Ren, A. B.

    2017-09-01

    We explore three different mechanisms designed to controllably tune the joint spectrum of photon pairs produced by the spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) process in optical fibres. The first of these is fibre tapering, which exploits the modified optical dispersion resulting from reducing the core radius. We have presented a theory of SFWM for tapered fibres, as well as experimental results for the SFWM coincidence spectra as a function of the reduction in core radius due to tapering. The other two techniques that we have explored are temperature variation and application of longitudinal stress. While the maximum spectral shift observed with these two techniques is smaller than for fibre tapering, they are considerably simpler to implement and have the important advantage that they are based on the use of a single, suitably controlled, fibre specimen.

  1. The response of high and low polyamine producing cell lines to aluminum and calcium stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridev Mohapatra; Smita Cherry; Rakesh Minocha; Rajtilak Majumdar; Palaniswamy Thangavel; Stephanie Long; Subhash C. Minocha

    2010-01-01

    The diamine putrescine (Put) has been shown to accumulate in tree leaves in response to high Al and low Ca in the soil, leading to the suggestion that this response may provide a physiological advantage to leaf cells under conditions of Al stress. The increase in Put is reversed by Ca supplementation in the soil. Using two cell lines of poplar (Populus nigra...

  2. Effect of heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Dobrá, Jana; Martincová, Olga; Prášil, I.T.; Gubiš, J.; Vaňková, Radomíra

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 182, Sp.Issue (2012), s. 49-58 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC08013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Heat stress * Polyamines * Proline Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.922, year: 2012

  3. Vitamin C protects rat cerebellum and encephalon from oxidative stress following exposure to radiofrequency wave generated by a BTS antenna model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Abolfazl; Jelodar, Gholamali; Nazifi, Saeed

    2014-06-01

    Radio frequency wave (RFW) generated by base transceiver station has been reported to produce deleterious effects on the central nervous system function, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFW-induced oxidative stress in the cerebellum and encephalon and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on theses tissues by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity, including: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and malondialdehyde (MDA). Thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four equal groups. The control group; the control-vitamin C group received L-ascorbic acid (200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage) for 45 days. The RFW group was exposed to RFW and the RFW+ vitamin C group was exposed to RFW and received vitamin C. At the end of the experiment, all groups were killed and encephalon and cerebellum of all rats were removed and stored at -70 °C for measurement of antioxidant enzymes activity and MDA. The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p < 0.05). The protective role of vitamin C in the treated group improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared with the test group (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in the brain and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  4. Differences of hormones involved in adipose metabolism and lactation between high and low producing Holstein cows during heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzi Qu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate hormonal involvement in the adipose metabolism and lactation between high and low producing dairy cows in a hot environment. Forty Holstein healthy cows with a similar parity were used and assigned into high producing group (average production 41.44 ± 2.25 kg/d and low producing group (average production 29.92 ± 1.02 kg/d with 20 cows in each group. Blood samples were collected from caudal vein to determine the difference of hormones related to adipose metabolism and lactation. The highest, lowest, and average temperature humidity index (THI, recorded as 84.02, 79.35 and 81.89, respectively, indicated that cows were at the state of high heat stress. No significant differences between high and low producing groups were observed in the levels of nonestesterified fatty acid (NEFA, β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB, total cholesterol (TCHO, and insulin (INS (P > 0.05. However, the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, apolipoprotein B100 (apoB-100, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and estrogen (E2 concentrations in high producing group were significantly higher than those of low producing group (P  0.05, whereas high producing group had a rise in the insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 level compared with low producing group (P < 0.05. These results indicated that, during summer, high and low producing dairy cows have similar levels of lipid catabolism, but high producing dairy cows have advantages in outputting hepatic triglyceride (TG.

  5. Propagation of the Stress Wave Through the Filled Joint with Linear Viscoelastic Deformation Behavior Using Time-Domain Recursive Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hu, Zhiping; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qiyao

    2017-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of filled joints is mostly controlled by the filled medium. In addition to nonlinear elastic behavior, viscoelastic behavior of filled joints is also of great significance. Here, a theoretical study of stress wave propagation through a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior has been carried out using a modified time-domain recursive method (TDRM). A displacement discontinuity model was extended to form a displacement and stress discontinuity model, and the differential constitutive relationship of viscoelastic model was adopted to introduce the mass and viscoelastic behavior of filled medium. A standard linear solid model, which can be degenerated into the Kelvin and Maxwell models, was adopted in deriving this method. Transmission and reflection coefficients were adopted to verify this method. Besides, the effects of some parameters on wave propagation across a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior were discussed. Then, a comparison of the time-history curves calculated by the present method with those by frequency-domain method (FDM) was performed. The results indicated that change tendencies of the transmission and reflection coefficients for these viscoelastic models versus incident angle were the same as each other but not frequency. The mass and viscosity coupling of filled medium did not fundamentally change wave propagation. The modified TDRM was found to be more efficient than the FDM.

  6. Stress vs sputtering effects in the propagation of surface ripples produced by ion-beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Barrado, A. [Instituto de Investigación Tecnológica (IIT) and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Castro, M. [GISC and Grupo de Dinámica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Muñoz-García, J. [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain); Cuerno, R., E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.es [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Under low energy ion irradiation, periodic features (ripples) can develop on the surfaces of semiconductor materials, with typical sizes in the nanometric range. Recently, a theory of pattern formation has been able to account for the variability with the ion/target combination of the critical angle value separating conditions on ion incidence that induce the presence or the absence of ripples. Such a theory is based in the accumulation of stress in the damaged irradiated layer and its relaxation via surface-confined viscous flow. Here we explore the role of stress, and its competition with purely erosive mechanisms, to determine the sign of the velocity with which the ripple pattern moves across the target plane. Based on this theory, we discuss different situations and make specific testable predictions for the change of sign in that velocity.

  7. Stress responses of the oil-producing green microalga Botryococcus braunii Race B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivette Cornejo-Corona

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Plants react to biotic and abiotic stresses with a variety of responses including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which may result in programmed cell death (PCD. The mechanisms underlying ROS production and PCD have not been well studied in microalgae. Here, we analyzed ROS accumulation, biomass accumulation, and hydrocarbon production in the colony-forming green microalga Botryococcus braunii in response to several stress inducers such as NaCl, NaHCO3, salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonate, and acetic acid. We also identified and cloned a single cDNA for the B. braunii ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene defender against cell death 1 (DAD1, a gene that is directly involved in PCD regulation. The function of B. braunii DAD1 was assessed by a complementation assay of the yeast knockout line of the DAD1 ortholog, oligosaccharyl transferase 2. Additionally, we found that DAD1 transcription was induced in response to SA at short times. These results suggest that B. braunii responds to stresses by mechanisms similar to those in land plants and other  organisms.

  8. Significance of T wave normalization in the electrocardiogram during exercise stress test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.J.; Heng, M.K.; Sevrin, R.; Udhoji, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    Although normalization of previously inverted T waves in the ECG is not uncommon during exercise treadmill testing, the clinical significance of this finding is still unclear. This was investigated in 45 patients during thallium-201 exercise testing. Patients with secondary T wave abnormalities on the resting ECG and ischemic exercise ST segment depression were excluded. On the thallium-201 scans, the left ventricle was divided into anterior-septal and inferior-posterior segments; these were considered equivalent to T wave changes in leads V1 and V5, and aVF, respectively. A positive thallium-201 scan was found in 43 of 45 (95%) patients and in 49 of 52 (94%) cardiac segments that showed T wave normalization. When thallium scans and T wave changes were matched to sites of involvement, 76% of T wave normalization in lead aV, was associated with positive thallium scans in the inferior-posterior segments, and 77% of T wave normalization in V1 and V5 was associated with positive thallium scans in the anterior-septal segments. These site correlations were similar for reversible and fixed thallium defects, and for patients not on digoxin therapy. Similar correlations were noted for the sites of T wave changes and coronary artery lesions in 12 patients who had angiography. In patients with a high prevalence for coronary artery disease, exercise T wave normalization is highly specific for the presence of the disease. In addition, it represents predominantly either previous injury or exercise-induced ischemic changes over the site of ECG involvement, rather than reciprocal changes of the opposite ventricular wall

  9. S-wave propagating in an anisotropic inhomogeneous elastic medium under the influence of gravity, initial stress, electric and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakar Rajneesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of gravity, initial stress, non-homogeneity, electric and magnetic field on the propagation of shear waves in an anisotropic incompressible medium. Various graphs are plotted to show the effect of direction of propagation, the anisotropy, magnetic field, electric field, non-homogeneity of the medium and the initial stress on shear waves. The dispersion equations for shear waves are obtained and discussed for different cases. In fact, in the absence of various material parameters, these equations are in agreement with the classical results for isotropic medium.

  10. A linear model for rotors produced by trapped lee waves with a simple representation of boundary layer friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel A. C.

    2017-04-01

    A linear model is used to diagnose the onset of rotors in flow over 2D ridges, for atmospheres that are neutrally stratified near the surface and stably stratified aloft, with a sharp temperature inversion in between, where trapped lee waves may propagate. This is achieved by coupling an inviscid two-layer mountain-wave model with a bulk boundary-layer model. The full model shows some ability to detect flow stagnation as a function of key input parameters, such as the Froude number and the height of the inversion, by comparison with results from numerical simulations and laboratory experiments carried out by previous authors. The effect of a boundary layer is essential to correctly predict flow stagnation, as the inviscid version of the model severely overestimates the dimensionless critical mountain height necessary for stagnation to occur. An improved model that includes only the effects of mean flow deceleration and amplification of the velocity perturbation within the boundary layer predicts flow stagnation much better in the most non-hydrostatic cases treated here, where waves appear to be directly forced by the orography. However, in the most hydrostatic case, only the full model, taking into account the feedback of the boundary layer on the inviscid flow, satisfactorily predicts flow stagnation, although the corresponding stagnation condition is unable to discriminate between rotors and hydraulic jumps. This is due to the fact that the trapped lee waves associated with the rotors are not forced directly by the orography in this case, but rather seem to be generated indirectly by nonlinear processes. This mechanism is, to a certain extent, mimicked by the modified surface boundary condition adopted in the full model, where an "effective orography" that differs from the real one forces the trapped lee waves. Versions of the model not including this feedback severely underestimate the amplitude of the trapped lee waves in the most hydrostatic case, partly

  11. Wave-induced abiotic stress shapes phenotypic diversity in a coral reef fish across a geographical cline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, C. J.; Binning, S. A.; Wainwright, P. C.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    While morphological variation across geographical clines has been well documented, it is often unclear whether such changes enhance individual performance to local environments. We examined whether the damselfish Acanthochromis polyacanthus display functional changes in swimming phenotype across a 40-km cline in wave-driven water motion on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. A. polyacanthus populations displayed strong intraspecific variation in swimming morphology and performance that matched local levels of water motion: individuals on reefs subject to high water motion displayed higher aspect-ratio fins and faster swimming speeds than conspecifics on sheltered reefs. Remarkably, intraspecific variation within A. polyacanthus spanned over half the diversity seen among closely related damselfish species from the same region. We find that local selection driven by wave-induced abiotic stress is an overarching ecological mechanism shaping the inter- and intraspecific locomotor diversity of coral reef fishes.

  12. Rod and cone photoreceptor cells produce ROS in response to stress in a live retinal explant system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bhatt, Lavinia

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to oxidative stress, which is a strong contributory factor to many ocular diseases. In this study, the removal of trophic factors is used as a model system to investigate the effects of stress in the retina. The aims were to determine if both rod and cone photoreceptor cells produce ROS when they are deprived of trophic factor support and to demonstrate if the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) enzymes are responsible for this ROS production. METHODS: Retinas were explanted from mice aged between postnatal days 8-10 and cultured overnight. The following morning, confocal microscopy combined with various fluorescent probes was used to detect the production of ROS. Each time peanut agglutinin (PNA), a cone photoreceptor marker, was used to facilitate orientation of the retina. Dihydroethidium and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123) were used to determine which cells produce ROS. Subsequently, western blots of retinal serial sections were used to detect the presence of Noxs in the different retinal layers. The Nox inhibitor apocynin was then tested to determine if it altered the production of ROS within these cells. RESULTS: Live retinal explants, viewed at high magnifications using confocal microscopy, displayed an increase in the fluorescent products of dihydroethidium and DHR123 upon serum removal when compared to controls. DHR123 fluorescence, once oxidized, localized to mitochondria and was found in the same focal plane as the PNA staining. This showed that cones and rods produced ROS when stressed. Retinal serial sectioning established that the photoreceptor layer expressed Nox4, dual oxidase (Duox) 1, and Duox2 at varying levels. Finally, the Nox inhibitor apocynin decreased the burst stimulated by the stress of serum removal. CONCLUSIONS: Confocal microscopy and PNA staining allowed differentiation of cell types within the outermost layers of the retina, demonstrating

  13. Biochemistry and genetics of ACC deaminase: a weapon to “stress ethylene” produced in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajnish P.; Shelke, Ganesh M.; Kumar, Anil; Jha, Prabhat N.

    2015-01-01

    1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, is widespread in diverse bacterial and fungal species. Owing to ACCD activity, certain plant associated bacteria help plant to grow under biotic and abiotic stresses by decreasing the level of “stress ethylene” which is inhibitory to plant growth. ACCD breaks down ACC, an immediate precursor of ethylene, to ammonia and α-ketobutyrate, which can be further metabolized by bacteria for their growth. ACC deaminase is an inducible enzyme whose synthesis is induced in the presence of its substrate ACC. This enzyme encoded by gene AcdS is under tight regulation and regulated differentially under different environmental conditions. Regulatory elements of gene AcdS are comprised of the regulatory gene encoding LRP protein and other regulatory elements which are activated differentially under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The role of some additional regulatory genes such as AcdB or LysR may also be required for expression of AcdS. Phylogenetic analysis of AcdS has revealed that distribution of this gene among different bacteria might have resulted from vertical gene transfer with occasional horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Application of bacterial AcdS gene has been extended by developing transgenic plants with ACCD gene which showed increased tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Moreover, distribution of ACCD gene or its homolog's in a wide range of species belonging to all three domains indicate an alternative role of ACCD in the physiology of an organism. Therefore, this review is an attempt to explore current knowledge of bacterial ACC deaminase mediated physiological effects in plants, mode of enzyme action, genetics, distribution among different species, ecological role of ACCD and, future research avenues to develop transgenic plants expressing foreign AcdS gene to cope with biotic and abiotic stressors. Systemic identification of regulatory circuits

  14. An optimal method for producing low-stress fibre optic cables for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Graham; Tamura, Naoyuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Ekpenyong, Paul; Jenkins, Daniel; Leeson, Kim; Trezise, Shaun; Butterley, Timothy; Gunn, James; Ferreira, Decio; Oliveira, Ligia; Sodre, Laerte

    2017-09-01

    An increasing number of astronomical spectrographs employ optical fibres to collect and deliver light. For integral-field and high multiplex multi-object survey instruments, fibres offer unique flexibility in instrument design by enabling spectrographs to be located remotely from the telescope focal plane where the fibre inputs are deployed. Photon-starved astronomical observations demand optimum efficiency from the fibre system. In addition to intrinsic absorption loss in optical fibres, another loss mechanism, so-called focal ratio degradation (FRD) must be considered. A fundamental cause of FRD is stress, therefore low stress fibre cables that impart minimum FRD are essential. The FMOS fibre instrument for Subaru Telescope employed a highly effective cable solution developed at Durham University. The method has been applied again for the PFS project, this time in collaboration with a company, PPC Broadband Ltd. The process, planetary stranding, is adapted from the manufacture of large fibre-count, large diameter marine telecommunications cables. Fibre bundles describe helical paths through the cable, incorporating additional fibre per unit length. As a consequence fibre stress from tension and bend-induced `race-tracking' is minimised. In this paper stranding principles are explained, covering the fundamentals of stranded cable design. The authors describe the evolution of the stranding production line and the numerous steps in the manufacture of the PFS prototype cable. The results of optical verification tests are presented for each stage of cable production, confirming that the PFS prototype performs exceptionally well. The paper concludes with an outline of future on-telescope test plans.

  15. Short-term regular aerobic exercise reduces oxidative stress produced by acute in the adipose microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Austin T; Fancher, Ibra S; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Bian, Jing Tan; Cook, Marc D; Mahmoud, Abeer M; Ali, Mohamed M; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Brown, Michael D; Fukai, Tohru; Phillips, Shane A

    2017-05-01

    High blood pressure has been shown to elicit impaired dilation in the vasculature. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms through which high pressure may elicit vascular dysfunction and determine the mechanisms through which regular aerobic exercise protects arteries against high pressure. Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 2 wk of voluntary running (~6 km/day) for comparison with sedentary controls. Hindlimb adipose resistance arteries were dissected from mice for measurements of flow-induced dilation (FID; with or without high intraluminal pressure exposure) or protein expression of NADPH oxidase II (NOX II) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Microvascular endothelial cells were subjected to high physiological laminar shear stress (20 dyn/cm 2 ) or static condition and treated with ANG II + pharmacological inhibitors. Cells were analyzed for the detection of ROS or collected for Western blot determination of NOX II and SOD. Resistance arteries from exercised mice demonstrated preserved FID after high pressure exposure, whereas FID was impaired in control mouse arteries. Inhibition of ANG II or NOX II restored impaired FID in control mouse arteries. High pressure increased superoxide levels in control mouse arteries but not in exercise mouse arteries, which exhibited greater ability to convert superoxide to H 2 O 2 Arteries from exercised mice exhibited less NOX II protein expression, more SOD isoform expression, and less sensitivity to ANG II. Endothelial cells subjected to laminar shear stress exhibited less NOX II subunit expression. In conclusion, aerobic exercise prevents high pressure-induced vascular dysfunction through an improved redox environment in the adipose microvasculature. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We describe potential mechanisms contributing to aerobic exercise-conferred protection against high intravascular pressure. Subcutaneous adipose microvessels from exercise mice express less NADPH oxidase (NOX) II and more superoxide

  16. Ocean Current and Wave Effects on Wind Stress Drag Coefficient Over the Global Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kara, A. B; Metzger, E. J; Bourassa, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    ...%), but the notable impact of the latter is only evident in the tropical Pacific Ocean; (2) the presence of waves generally makes winds weaker and C0 lower almost everywhere over the global ocean; (3...

  17. Layering Concept for Wave Shaping and Lateral Distribution of Stresses During Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ding, J

    2001-01-01

    .... Numerical simulations were carried out to address the research objectives. To explore the layering concept, we first used numerical simulations to demonstrate the feasibility of load spreading and wave shaping by layered structures...

  18. Multi-Wave Prospective Examination of the Stress-Reactivity Extension of Response Styles Theory of Depression in High-Risk Children and Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R. Z.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Sheshko, Dana M.; Fishman, Michael B.; Stolow, Darren

    2012-01-01

    The current study tested the stress-reactivity extension of response styles theory of depression (Nolen-Hoeksema "Journal of Abnormal Psychology" 100:569-582, 1991) in a sample of high-risk children and early adolescents from a vulnerability-stress perspective using a multi-wave longitudinal design. In addition, we examined whether obtained…

  19. Spatially localized particle energization by Landau damping in current sheets produced by strong Alfvén wave collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Gregory G.; McCubbin, Andrew J.; Klein, Kristopher G.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the removal of energy from turbulent fluctuations in a magnetized plasma and the consequent energization of the constituent plasma particles is a major goal of heliophysics and astrophysics. Previous work has shown that nonlinear interactions among counterpropagating Alfvén waves - or Alfvén wave collisions - are the fundamental building block of astrophysical plasma turbulence and naturally generate current sheets in the strongly nonlinear limit. A nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of a strong Alfvén wave collision is used to examine the damping of the electromagnetic fluctuations and the associated energization of particles that occurs in self-consistently generated current sheets. A simple model explains the flow of energy due to the collisionless damping and the associated particle energization, as well as the subsequent thermalization of the particle energy by collisions. The net particle energization by the parallel electric field is shown to be spatially localized, and the nonlinear evolution is essential in enabling spatial non-uniformity. Using the recently developed field-particle correlation technique, we show that particles resonant with the Alfvén waves in the simulation dominate the energy transfer, demonstrating conclusively that Landau damping plays a key role in the spatially localized damping of the electromagnetic fluctuations and consequent energization of the particles in this strongly nonlinear simulation.

  20. Experimental analysis on stress wave in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yun Ho; Ham, Hyo Sick

    1998-01-01

    The guided wave propagation in inhomogeneous multi-layered structures is experimentally explored based on theoretical dispersion curves. It turns out that proper selection of incident angle and frequency is critical for guided wave generation in multi-layered structures. Theoretical dispersion curves greatly depend on adhesive zone thickness, layer thickness and material properties. It was possible to determine the adhesive zone thickness of an inhomogeneous multi-layered structure by monitoring experimentally the change of dispersion curves.

  1. Modelling of stress development and fault slip in and around a producing gas reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, F.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Many gas fields are currently being produced in the northern Netherlands. Induced seismicity related to gas production has become a growing problem in the Netherlands in the past two decades. To date, a few hundred induced seismic events occurred. Induced seismicity is generally assumed to be the

  2. Effect of environmental stresses on the survival and cytotoxicity of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes serious illnesses leading to hospitalizations in the United States. Since bacteria exposed to sub-lethal treatment during food processing may exhibit enhanced virulence and resistance to subsequent processing, the present study attempts to investi...

  3. Do physiological and pathological stresses produce different changes in heart rate variability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBravi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although physiological (e.g. exercise and pathological (e.g. infection stress affecting the cardiovascular system have both been documented to be associated with a reduction in overall heart rate variability (HRV, it remains unclear if loss of HRV is ubiquitously similar across different domains of variability analysis or if distinct patterns of altered HRV exist depending on the stressor. Using Continuous Individualized Multiorgan Variability Analysis (CIMVATM software, heart rate (HR and four selected measures of variability were measured over time (windowed analysis from two datasets, a set (n=13 of patients who developed systemic infection (i.e. sepsis after bone marrow transplant, and a matched set of healthy subjects undergoing physical exercise under controlled conditions. HR and the four HRV measures showed similar trends in both sepsis and exercise. The comparison through Wilcoxon sign-rank test of the levels of variability at baseline and during the stress (i.e. exercise or after days of sepsis development showed similar changes, except for LF/HF, ratio of power at low and high frequencies (associated with sympathovagal modulation, which was affected by exercise but did not show any change during sepsis. Furthermore, HRV measures during sepsis showed a lower level of correlation with each other, as compared to HRV during exercise. In conclusion, this exploratory study highlights similar responses during both exercise and infection, with differences in terms of correlation and inter-subject fluctuations, whose physiologic significance merits further investigation.

  4. Potential applicability of stress wave velocity method on pavement base materials as a non-destructive testing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahedi, Masrur

    Aggregates derived from natural sources have been used traditionally as the pavement base materials. But in recent times, the extraction of these natural aggregates has become more labor intensive and costly due to resource depletion and environmental concerns. Thus, the uses of recycled aggregates as the supplementary of natural aggregates are increasing considerably in pavement construction. Use of recycled aggregates such as recycled crushed concrete (RCA) and recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) reduces the rate of natural resource depletion, construction debris and cost. Although recycled aggregates could be used as a viable alternative of conventional base materials, strength characteristics and product variability limit their utility to a great extent. Hence, their applicability is needed to be evaluated extensively based on strength, stiffness and cost factors. But for extensive evaluation, traditionally practiced test methods are proven to be unreasonable in terms of time, cost, reliability and applicability. On the other hand, rapid non-destructive methods have the potential to be less time consuming and inexpensive along with the low variability of test results; therefore improving the reliability of estimated performance of the pavement. In this research work, the experimental program was designed to assess the potential application of stress wave velocity method as a non-destructive test in evaluating recycled base materials. Different combinations of cement treated recycled concrete aggregate (RAP) and recycled crushed concrete (RCA) were used to evaluate the applicability of stress wave velocity method. It was found that, stress wave velocity method is excellent in characterizing the strength and stiffness properties of cement treated base materials. Statistical models, based on P-wave velocity were derived for predicting the modulus of elasticity and compressive strength of different combinations of cement treated RAP, Grade-1 and Grade-2 materials. Two

  5. Comparison of an empirical S-wave velocity model and a calculated stress-strain model for a rock mass disturbed by mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Krzysztof; Czarny, Rafał

    2017-11-01

    In the article a comparison analysis is presented between a numerical model of the stress and deformation state in a rock mass and an S-wave velocity model obtained as a result of in situ measurement. The research was conducted using data from the Jastrzębie and Moszczenica coal mines. The part of the rock mass examined was strongly disturbed by multi-seam exploitation of coal. To obtain the S-wave velocity model 6 hours of ambient seismic noise data were recorded using 11 seismometers. The propagation of the Rayleigh surface wave between the seismometers was reconstructed utilising the seismic interferometry and the cross correlation technique. Estimation of a two dimensional model of the Swave velocity field was performed on the basis of dispersion curves of the Rayleigh wave phase velocity. The stress and deformation field were calculated assuming a plane state of stress with the use of the elastic-plastic Coulomb-Mohr strength criterion. Images of the vertical stress, horizontal stress, vertical strain and horizontal strain as well as the subsidence profile on the model surface were obtained as a result of the calculation. Analysis of the results shows correlation between the field of S-wave velocity and the modelled field of stress and strain.

  6. Comparative study of finite element method, isogeometric analysis, and finite volume method in elastic wave propagation of stress discontinuities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Berezovski, A.; Kolman, Radek; Blažek, Jiří; Kopačka, Ján; Gabriel, Dušan; Plešek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 12 (2014) ISSN 1435-4934. [European Conference on Non-Destructive Testing (ECNDT 2014) /11./. Praha, 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/11/0288; GA ČR(CZ) GAP101/12/2315 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : elastic wave propagation * finite element method * isogeometric analysis * finite volume method * stress discontinuities * spurious oscillations Subject RIV: JR - Other Machinery http://www.ndt.net/events/ECNDT2014/app/content/Paper/25_Berezovski_Rev1.pdf

  7. Stress depended changes in activityof gp red blood cells receptors and its correction by therahertz waves at nitric oxide frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichuk V.F.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electromagnetic radiation in the terahertz range frequencies of molecular spectrum of emission and absorption of nitric oxide 150.176–150.664 GHz for the restoration of the impaired carbohydrate component and functional activity glikoproteid receptors of erythrocytes of white rats in a state of acute imm obilization stress. Shown that exposure to electromagnetic waves at these frequencies is the normalization of the increased content of b-D-galactose in the carbohydrate component and the restoration of the impaired activity of the receptors glikoproteid erythrocytes

  8. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  9. Metabolic stress responses in Drosophila are modulated by brain neurosecretory cells that produce multiple neuropeptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lily Kahsai

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, neurosecretory cells that release peptide hormones play a prominent role in the regulation of development, growth, metabolism, and reproduction. Several types of peptidergic neurosecretory cells have been identified in the brain of Drosophila with release sites in the corpora cardiaca and anterior aorta. We show here that in adult flies the products of three neuropeptide precursors are colocalized in five pairs of large protocerebral neurosecretory cells in two clusters (designated ipc-1 and ipc-2a: Drosophila tachykinin (DTK, short neuropeptide F (sNPF and ion transport peptide (ITP. These peptides were detected by immunocytochemistry in combination with GFP expression driven by the enhancer trap Gal4 lines c929 and Kurs-6, both of which are expressed in ipc-1 and 2a cells. This mix of colocalized peptides with seemingly unrelated functions is intriguing and prompted us to initiate analysis of the function of the ten neurosecretory cells. We investigated the role of peptide signaling from large ipc-1 and 2a cells in stress responses by monitoring the effect of starvation and desiccation in flies with levels of DTK or sNPF diminished by RNA interference. Using the Gal4-UAS system we targeted the peptide knockdown specifically to ipc-1 and 2a cells with the c929 and Kurs-6 drivers. Flies with reduced DTK or sNPF levels in these cells displayed decreased survival time at desiccation and starvation, as well as increased water loss at desiccation. Our data suggest that homeostasis during metabolic stress requires intact peptide signaling by ipc-1 and 2a neurosecretory cells.

  10. Experimental and numerical analysis of stress wave propagation in polymers and the role of interfaces in armour systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwade, Chandragupt V.; Ashcroft, Ian A.; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Hughes, Foz T. R.; Swallowe, Gerry M.

    2012-12-01

    Advanced polymeric materials are finding an increasing range of industrial and defence applications. These materials have the potential to improve combat survivability, whilst reducing the cost and weight of armour systems. In this paper the results from a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) test of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) sample involving multiple stress waves is discussed with aid of a finite element model of the test. It is seen that the phenomenon of impedance mismatch at interfaces plays an important role in the levels of stress and deformation seen in the sample. A multi-layer armour system is then investigated using the finite element model. This case study illustrates the role of impedance mismatch and interface engineering in the design and optimisation of armour solutions.

  11. Influence of High Speed Repetition of Pulsed Streamer Discharge Produced by Polarity-Reversed Traveling Wave on NO Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Eiji; Kadowaki, Kazunori; Nishimoto, Sakae; Kitani, Isamu

    This paper describes experimental results of NO removal from a simulated exhausted gas using a barrier-type plasma reactor subjected to reciprocal traveling wave voltage pulses. A pulse-forming cable was charged and then grounded at one end without any resistance, so that a traveling wave reciprocated along the cable with a change in its polarity because the traveling wave was negatively reflected at the grounded-end. Transient discharge light between point-plane electrodes with a glass barrier was observed using a gated image-intensifier. Photographs of the transient discharge light indicated that many streamer channels extended widely in the gap at the initial stage in the voltage oscillation, while only an intense discharge channel was observed at the latter stage. NO removal tests were carried out using the reciprocal pulse generator and a coaxial plasma reactor with a cylindrical glass-barrier. Results indicated that the discharges at the first and the second polarity reversals contributed largely to the oxidation reaction from NO into NO2, whereas the contribution of the subsequent discharges in the latter stage to NO removal was small.

  12. Hyperspectral imaging of oil producing microalgae under thermal and nutritional stress.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Davis, Ryan W.; Ricken, James Bryce; Powell, Amy Jo; Keenan, Michael Robert

    2008-09-01

    This short-term, late-start LDRD examined the effects of nutritional deprivation on the energy harvesting complex in microalgae. While the original experimental plan involved a much more detailed study of temperature and nutrition on the antenna system of a variety of TAG producing algae and their concomitant effects on oil production, time and fiscal constraints limited the scope of the study. This work was a joint effort between research teams at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico and California. Preliminary results indicate there is a photosystem response to silica starvation in diatoms that could impact the mechanisms for lipid accumulation.

  13. Bone morphogenic protein 4 produced in endothelial cells by oscillatory shear stress stimulates an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorescu, George P.; Sykes, Michelle; Weiss, Daiana; Platt, Manu O.; Saha, Aniket; Hwang, Jinah; Boyd, Nolan; Boo, Yong C.; Vega, J. David; Taylor, W. Robert; hide

    2003-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is now viewed as an inflammatory disease occurring preferentially in arterial regions exposed to disturbed flow conditions, including oscillatory shear stress (OS), in branched arteries. In contrast, the arterial regions exposed to laminar shear (LS) are relatively lesion-free. The mechanisms underlying the opposite effects of OS and LS on the inflammatory and atherogenic processes are not clearly understood. Here, through DNA microarrays, protein expression, and functional studies, we identify bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) as a mechanosensitive and pro-inflammatory gene product. Exposing endothelial cells to OS increased BMP4 protein expression, whereas LS decreased it. In addition, we found BMP4 expression only in the selective patches of endothelial cells overlying foam cell lesions in human coronary arteries. The same endothelial patches also expressed higher levels of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) protein compared with those of non-diseased areas. Functionally, we show that OS and BMP4 induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion by a NFkappaB-dependent mechanism. We suggest that BMP4 is a mechanosensitive, inflammatory factor playing a critical role in early steps of atherogenesis in the lesion-prone areas.

  14. Mild traumatic brain injury does not produce post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbordone, R J; Liter, J C

    1995-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that patients who sustain mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) or post-concussive syndrome develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in response to their cognitive difficulties, diminished coping skills, or other losses. This study examined 70 patients who had previously been diagnosed as having either PTSD or MTBI. Each patient was asked to provide a highly detailed chronological history of the events which preceded, followed, and occurred during the traumatic event, to indicate whether they were rendered unconscious or had amnesia for the event, and to describe the various symptoms they developed. All (100.0%) of the PTSD patients were able to provide a highly detailed and emotionally charged recollection of the events which occurred within 15 minutes of the traumatic event in comparison to none (0.0%) of the MTBI patients. None of the MTBI patients reported symptoms such as intrusive recollections of the traumatic event, nightmares, hypervigilance, phobic or startle reactions, or became upset when they were asked to describe the traumatic event or were exposed to stimuli associated with it. These data suggest that PTSD and MTBI are two mutually exclusive disorders, and that it is highly unlikely that MTBI patients develop PTSD symptoms. Furthermore, these findings suggest that clinicians should exercise considerable caution in ruling out PTSD prior to making the diagnosis of MTBI.

  15. Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 produces the exopolysaccharide materials that determine colony morphology, stress resistance, and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, S N; Mizunoe, Y; Takade, A; Kawabata, S I; Yoshida, S I

    1998-10-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 strain TSI-4 (El Tor, Ogawa) can shift to a rugose colony morphology from its normal translucent colony morphology in response to nutrient starvation. We have investigated differences between the rugose and translucent forms of V. cholerae O1 strain TSI-4. Electron microscopic examination of the rugose form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/R) revealed thick, electron-dense exopolysaccharide materials surrounding polycationic ferritin-stained cells, while the ferritin-stained material was absent around the translucent form of TSI-4 (TSI-4/T). The exopolysaccharide produced by V. cholerae TSI-4/R was found to have a composition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, D-mannose, 6-deoxy-D-galactose, and D-galactose (7.4:10.2:2.4:3.0). The expression of an amorphous exopolysaccharide promotes biofilm development under static culture conditions. Biofilm formation by the rugose strain was determined by scanning electron microscopy, and most of the surface of the film was colonized by actively dividing rod cells. The corresponding rugose and translucent strains were compared for stress resistance. By having exopolysaccharide materials, the rugose strains acquired resistance to osmotic and oxidative stress. Our data indicated that an exopolysaccharide material on the surface of the rugose strain promoted biofilm formation and resistance to the effects of two stressing agents.

  16. Pressure-induced forces and shear stresses on rubble mound breakwater armour layers in regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental investigation of the pressure-induced forces in the core material below the main armour layer and shear stresses on the armour layer for a porous breakwater structure. Two parallel experiments were performed which both involved pore pressure...... measurements in the core material: (1) core material with an idealized armour layer made out of spherical objects that also allowed for detailed velocity measurements between and above the armour, and (2) core material with real rock armour stones. The same core material was applied through the entire...... and turbulence measurements showed that the large outward directed pressure gradients in general coincide, both in time and space, with the maximum bed-shear stresses on the armour layer based on the Reynolds-stresses. The bed-shear stresses were found to result in a Shields parameter in the same order...

  17. Amelioration of radiation induced oxidative stress using water soluble chitosan produced by Aspergillus niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Sonbaty, S.M.; Swailam, H.M.; Noaman, E.

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide synthesized by a great number of living organisms and considered as a source of potential bioactive material and has many biological applications which are greatly affected by its solubility in neutral ph. In this study low molecular weight water soluble chitosan was prepared by chemical degradation of chitosan produced by Aspergillus niger using H 2 O 2 . Chitosan chemical structure was detected before and after treatment using FTIR spectrum, and its molecular weight was determined by its viscosity using viscometer. Its antioxidant activity against gamma radiation was evaluated in vivo using rats. Rats were divided into 4 groups; group 1: control, group 2: exposed to acute dose of gamma radiation (6 Gy), group 3: received water soluble chitosan, group 4: received water soluble chitosan then exposed to gamma radiation as group 2. Gamma radiation significantly increased malonaldehyde, decreased glutathione concentration, activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutatione peroxidase, while significantly increase the activity of alanine transferase, aspartate transferase, urea and creatinine concentration. Administration of water soluble chitosan has ameliorated induced changes caused by gamma radiation. It could be concluded that water soluble chitosan by scavenging free radicals directly or indirectly may act as a potent radioprotector against ionizing irradiation.

  18. Epicardial distribution of ST segment and T wave changes produced by stimulation of intrathoracic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, P; Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R A; Armour, J A

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three ventricular epicardial electrograms were recorded simultaneously in 8 atropinized dogs during stimulation of acutely decentralized intrathoracic autonomic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves. Three variables were measured: (1) isochronal maps representing the epicardial activation sequence, (2) maps depicting changes in areas under the QRS complex and T wave (regional inhomogeneity of repolarization), and (3) local and total QT intervals. Neural stimulations did not alter the activation sequence but induced changes in the magnitude and polarity of the ST segments and T waves as well as in QRST areas. Stimulation of the same neural structure in different dogs induced electrical changes with different amplitudes and in different regions of the ventricles, except for the ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerve which usually affected the dorsal wall of the left ventricle. Greatest changes occurred when the right recurrent, left intermediate medial, left caudal pole, left ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerves and stellate ganglia were stimulated. Local QT durations either decreased or did not change, whereas total QT duration as measured using a root-mean-square signal did not change, indicating the regional nature of repolarization changes. Taken together, these data indicate that intrathoracic efferent sympathetic neurons can induce regional inhomogeneity of repolarization without prolonging the total QT interval.

  19. Relativistic electron dynamics produced by azimuthally localized poloidal mode ULF waves: Boomerang-shaped pitch angle evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Rankin, R.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, Y.; Fu, S. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.

    2017-08-01

    We present an analysis of "boomerang-shaped" pitch angle evolutions of outer radiation belt relativistic electrons observed by the Van Allen Probes after the passage of an interplanetary shock on 7 June 2014. The flux at different pitch angles is modulated by Pc5 waves, with equatorially mirroring electrons reaching the satellite first. For 90° pitch angle electrons, the phase change of the flux modulations across energy exceeds 180° and increasingly tilts with time. Using estimates of the arrival time of particles of different pitch angles at the spacecraft location, a scenario is investigated in which shock-induced ULF waves interact with electrons through the drift resonance mechanism in a localized region westward of the spacecraft. Numerical calculations on particle energy gain with the modified ULF wavefield reproduce the observed boomerang stripes and modulations in the electron energy spectrogram. The study of boomerang stripes and their relationship to drift resonance taking place at a location different from the observation point adds new understanding of the processes controlling the dynamics of the outer radiation belt.

  20. On the partial-wave analysis of mesonic resonances decaying to multiparticle final states produced by polarized photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Carlos W.; Weygand, Dennis P.

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) using photon beams. In particular this report broadens this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  1. On the Partial-Wave Analysis of Mesonic Resonances Decaying to Multiparticle Final States Produced by Polarized Photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, Carlos W. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States) and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Weygand, Dennis P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Meson spectroscopy is going through a revival with the advent of high statistics experiments and new advances in the theoretical predictions. The Constituent Quark Model (CQM) is finally being expanded considering more basic principles of field theory and using discrete calculations of Quantum Chromodynamics (lattice QCD). These new calculations are approaching predictive power for the spectrum of hadronic resonances and decay modes. It will be the task of the new experiments to extract the meson spectrum from the data and compare with those predictions. The goal of this report is to describe one particular technique for extracting resonance information from multiparticle final states. The technique described here, partial wave analysis based on the helicity formalism, has been used at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) using pion beams, and Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) using photon beams. In particular this report broaden this technique to include production experiments using linearly polarized real photons or quasi-real photons. This article is of a didactical nature. We describe the process of analysis, detailing assumptions and formalisms, and is directed towards people interested in starting partial wave analysis.

  2. Oceanographic, Air-sea Interaction, and Environmental Aspects of Artificial Upwelling Produced by Wave-Inertia Pumps for Potential Hurricane Intensity Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, A.; Dean, C.

    2017-12-01

    The artificial upwelling system consisting of the wave-inertia pumps driven by surface waves can produce flow of cold deep water to the surface. One of the recently proposed potential applications of the artificial upwelling system is the hurricane intensity mitigation. Even relatively small reduction of intensity may provide significant benefits. The ocean heat content (OHC) is the "fuel" for hurricanes. The OHC can be reduced by mixing of the surface layer with the cold water produced by wave-inertia pumps. Implementation of this system for hurricane mitigation has several oceanographic and air-sea interaction aspects. The cold water brought to the surface from a deeper layer has higher density than the surface water and, therefore, tends to sink back down. The mixing of the cold water produced by artificial upwelling depends on environmental conditions such as stratification, regional ocean circulation, and vertical shear. Another aspect is that as the sea surface temperature drops below the air temperature, the stable stratification develops in the atmospheric boundary layer. The stable atmospheric stratification suppresses sensible and latent heat air-sea fluxes and reduces the net longwave irradiance from the sea surface. As a result, the artificial upwelling may start increasing the OHC (though still reducing the sea surface temperature). In this work, the fate of the cold water in the stratified environment with vertical shear has been studied using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. A 3D large eddy simulation model is initialized with observational temperature, salinity, and current velocity data from a sample location in the Straits of Florida. A periodic boundary condition is set along the direction of the current, which allows us to simulate infinite fetch. The model results indicate that the cold water brought to the sea surface by a wave-inertia pump forms a convective jet. This jet plunges into the upper ocean mixed layer and penetrates the

  3. Transient stresses al Parkfield, California, produced by the M 7.4 Landers earthquake of June 28, 1992: implications for the time-dependence of fault friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Fletcher

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available he M 7.4 Landers earthquake triggered widespread seismicity in the Western U.S. Because the transient dynamic stresses induced at regional distances by the Landers surface waves are much larger than the expected static stresses, the magnitude and the characteristics of the dynamic stresses may bear upon the earthquake triggering mechanism. The Landers earthquake was recorded on the UPSAR array, a group of 14 triaxial accelerometers located within a 1-square-km region 10 km southwest of the town of Parkfield, California, 412 km northwest of the Landers epicenter. We used a standard geodetic inversion procedure to determine the surface strain and stress tensors as functions of time from the observed dynamic displacements. Peak dynamic strains and stresses at the Earth's surface are about 7 microstrain and 0.035 MPa, respectively, and they have a flat amplitude spectrum between 2 s and 15 s period. These stresses agree well with stresses predicted from a simple rule of thumb based upon the ground velocity spectrum observed at a single station. Peak stresses ranged from about 0.035 MPa at the surface to about 0.12 MPa between 2 and 14 km depth, with the sharp increase of stress away from the surface resulting from the rapid increase of rigidity with depth and from the influence of surface wave mode shapes. Comparison of Landers-induced static and dynamic stresses at the hypocenter of the Big Bear aftershock provides a clear example that faults are stronger on time scales of tens of seconds than on time scales of hours or longer.

  4. Internal structural changes in keratin fibres resulting from combined hair waving and stress relaxation treatments: a Raman spectroscopic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, A

    2016-04-01

    The objective of our research was to investigate the influence of chemical treatments (reduction, stress relaxation and oxidation) on hair keratin fibres. The structure of cross-sections at various depths of virgin white human hair resulting from permanent waving treatments with stress relaxation process was directly analysed at a molecular level using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, the three disulphide (-SS-) conformations in human hair were compared by S-S band analysis. The gauche-gauche-gauche (GGG) and gauche-gauche-trans (GGT) contents of -SS- groups remarkably decreased, while the trans-gauche-trans (TGT) content was not changed by performing the reduction process with thioglycolic acid. In addition, the high-temperature stress relaxation process after reduction accelerated the disconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups in the human hair, while the low-temperature stress relaxation process after reduction accelerated the reconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups. Moreover, the S-O band intensity at 1042 cm(-1) , assigned to cysteic acid, existing in the cuticle region and the surface of the cortex region increased, while the GGG content significantly decreased by performing the oxidation process after the reduction and the high-temperature stress relaxation processes. The author concluded that the high-temperature relaxation process after reduction accelerated the disconnection of -SS- (GGG and GGT) groups, thereby leading to the remarkable local molecular disorganization (an increase in the cysteic acid content and a decrease in the GGG content) on the cuticle and cortex cells during the oxidation process. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  5. Acoustic and Perceptual Correlates of Stress in Nonwords Produced by Children with Suspected Developmental Apraxia of Speech and Children with Phonological Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Benjamin; Bjorum, Elissa M.; Windsor, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    This study examined whether accuracy in producing linguistic stress reliably distinguished between five children with suspected developmental apraxia of speech (sDAS) and five children with phonological disorder (PD). No group differences in the production of stress were found; however, listeners judged that nonword repetitions of the children…

  6. Stress Wave Propagation in Cracked Geological Solids Using Finite Difference Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavas, P. A.; Kalapodis, N. A.

    The aim of this study is the numerical computation of the wave propagation in crack geological solids. The finite difference method was applied to solve the differential equations involved in the problem. Since the problem is symmetric, we prefer to use this technique instead of the finite element method and/or boundary elements technique. A comparison of the numerical results with analytical solutions is provided.

  7. Rear surface light emission measurements from laser-produced shock waves in clear and Al-coated polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, E. A.; Deniz, A. V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Stamper, J. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Lehecka, T.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J.

    1999-08-01

    The Nike KrF laser, with its very uniform focal distributions, has been used at intensities near 10 14 W/cm 2 to launch shock waves in polystyrene targets. The rear surface visible light emission differed between clear polystyrene (CH) targets and targets with a thin (125 nm) Al coating on the rear side. The uncoated CH targets showed a relatively slowly rising emission followed by a sudden fall when the shock emerges, while the Al-coated targets showed a rapid rise in emission when the shock emerges followed by a slower fall, allowing an unambiguous determination of the time the shock arrived at the rear surface. A half-aluminized target allowed us to observe this difference in a single shot. The brightness temperature of both the aluminized targets and the non-aluminized targets was slightly below but close to rear surface temperature predictions of a hydrodynamic code. A discussion of preheat effects is given.

  8. Heuristic approximations for sound fields produced by spherical waves incident on locally and non-locally reacting planar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai Ming; Tao, Hongdan

    2014-01-01

    The classic Weyl-van der Pol (WVDP) formula is a well-known asymptotic solution for accurately predicting sound fields above a locally reacting ground surface. However, the form of the WVDP formula is inadequate for predicting sound fields in the vicinity of non-locally reacting surfaces; a correction term is often required in the formula to provide accurate numerical solutions. Even with this correction, there is a singularity in the diffraction wave term when the source is located directly above or below the receiver. This paper explores a heuristic method to remove this singularity and suggests an analytical form comparable to the WVDP formula. This improved formula offers a physically interpretable solution and allows for accurate predictions of the total sound field above locally and non-locally reacting surfaces for all geometrical configurations.

  9. SPECTRA OF MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS AND RELATIVISTIC PARTICLES PRODUCED BY A NONRESONANT WAVE INSTABILITY IN SUPERNOVA REMNANT SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, Andrey E.; Ellison, Donald C.; Bykov, Andrei M.

    2009-01-01

    We model strong forward shocks in young supernova remnants with efficient particle acceleration where a nonresonant instability driven by the cosmic ray current amplifies magnetic turbulence in the shock precursor. Particle injection, magnetic field amplification (MFA), and the nonlinear feedback of particles and fields on the bulk flow are derived consistently. The shock structure depends critically on the efficiency of turbulence cascading. If cascading is suppressed, MFA is strong, the shock precursor is stratified, and the turbulence spectrum contains several discrete peaks. These peaks, as well as the amount of MFA, should influence synchrotron X-rays, allowing observational tests of cascading and other assumptions intrinsic to the nonlinear model of nonresonant wave growth.

  10. Time-domain Simulations of the Acoustic Streaming Produced by a Propagating Wave Radiated by a Circular Piston

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco

    2013-01-01

    Results of numerical simulations of the sound field produced by a circular piston in a rigid baffled are presented. The aim was to calculate the acoustic streaming and the flow of mass generated by the sound field. For this purpose, the classical finite-difference time-domain method was implemented...

  11. Plasma parameters in the vicinity of the quartz window of a low pressure surface wave discharge produced in O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakao, S.; Stamate, Eugen; Sugai, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma parameters in the vicinity of the dielectric window of a low density, microwave discharge produced in 0, at 915 N/FHz are investigated by a spherical probe and optical emission spectroscopy while the microwave field distribution is measured by a spectrum analyzer. The electron energy distr...... from the dielectric. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  12. Hypoxia-induced force increase (HIFI) is a novel mechanism underlying the strengthening of labor contractions, produced by hypoxic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan

    2015-08-04

    For successful birth, contractions need to become progressively stronger. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, however. We have found that a novel mechanism, hypoxia-induced force increase (HIFI), is switched on selectively, at term, and is essential to strengthening contractions. HIFI is initiated as contractions cyclically reduce blood flow and produce repeated hypoxic stresses, with associated metabolic and transcriptomic changes. The increases in contractility are a long-lasting, oxytocin-independent, intrinsic mechanism present only in the full-term pregnant uterus. HIFI is inhibited by adenosine receptor antagonism and blockade of cyclooxygenase-2 signaling, and partially reproduced by brief episodes of acidic (but not alkalotic) pH. HIFI explains how labor can progress despite paradoxical metabolic challenge, and provides a new mechanistic target for the 1 in 10 women suffering dysfunctional labor because of poor contractions.

  13. Spread and change in stress resistance of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 on fungal colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ken-Ichi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Watanabe, Maiko; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Tsubone, Hirokazu; Kumagai, Susumu; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    To elucidate the effect of fungal hyphae on the behaviour of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157, the spread and change in stress resistance of the bacterium were evaluated after coculture with 11 species of food-related fungi including fermentation starters. Spread distances of STEC O157 varied depending on the co-cultured fungal species, and the motile bacterial strain spread for longer distances than the non-motile strain. The population of STEC O157 increased when co-cultured on colonies of nine fungal species but decreased on colonies of Emericella nidulans and Aspergillus ochraceus. Confocal scanning microscopy visualization of green fluorescent protein-tagged STEC O157 on fungal hyphae revealed that the bacterium colonized in the water film that existed on and between hyphae. To investigate the physiological changes in STEC O157 caused by co-culturing with fungi, the bacterium was harvested after 7 days of co-culturing and tested for acid resistance. After co-culture with eight fungal species, STEC O157 showed greater acid resistance compared to those cultured without fungi. Our results indicate that fungal hyphae can spread the contamination of STEC O157 and can also enhance the stress resistance of the bacteria. © 2013 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Atom Wave Interferometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritchard, David

    1999-01-01

    Matter wave interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and then recombined to produce interference fringes, have opened exciting new possibilities for precision and fundamental...

  15. Direct measurements of mean Reynolds stress and ripple roughness in the presence of energetic forcing by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Malcolm; Trowbridge, John; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Jones, Katie R.; Traykovski, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Direct covariance observations of the mean flow Reynolds stress and sonar images of the seafloor collected on a wave‐exposed inner continental shelf demonstrate that the drag exerted by the seabed on the overlying flow is consistent with boundary layer models for wave‐current interaction, provided that the orientation and anisotropy of the bed roughness are appropriately quantified. Large spatial and temporal variations in drag result from nonequilibrium ripple dynamics, ripple anisotropy, and the orientation of the ripples relative to the current. At a location in coarse sand characterized by large two‐dimensional orbital ripples, the observed drag shows a strong dependence on the relative orientation of the mean current to the ripple crests. At a contrasting location in fine sand, where more isotropic sub‐orbital ripples are observed, the sensitivity of the current to the orientation of the ripples is reduced. Further, at the coarse site under conditions when the currents are parallel to the ripple crests and the wave orbital diameter is smaller than the wavelength of the relic orbital ripples, the flow becomes hydraulically smooth. This transition is not observed at the fine site, where the observed wave orbital diameter is always greater than the wavelength of the observed sub‐orbital ripples. Paradoxically, the dominant along‐shelf flows often experience lower drag at the coarse site than at the fine site, despite the larger ripples, highlighting the complex dynamics controlling drag in wave‐exposed environments with heterogeneous roughness.

  16. Determination of the thermal stress wave propagation in orthotropic hollow cylinder based on classical theory of thermoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahani, Amir Reza; Sharifi Torki, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    The thermoelasticity problem in a thick-walled orthotropic hollow cylinder is solved analytically using finite Hankel transform and Laplace transform. Time-dependent thermal and mechanical boundary conditions are applied on the inner and the outer surfaces of the cylinder. For solving the energy equation, the temperature itself is considered as boundary condition to be applied on both the inner and the outer surfaces of the orthotropic cylinder. Two different cases are assumed for solving the equation of motion: traction-traction problem (tractions are prescribed on both the inner and the outer surfaces) and traction-displacement (traction is prescribed on the inner surface and displacement is prescribed on the outer surface of the hollow orthotropic cylinder). Due to considering uncoupled theory, after obtaining temperature distribution, the dynamical structural problem is solved and closed-form relations are derived for radial displacement, radial and hoop stress. As a case study, exponentially decaying temperature with respect to time is prescribed on the inner surface of the cylinder and the temperature of the outer surface is considered to be zero. Owing to solving dynamical problem, the stress wave propagation and its reflections were observed after plotting the results in both cases.

  17. Use of simple finite elements for mechanical systems impact analysis based on stereomechanics, stress wave propagation, and energy method approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Michael L.; Moradi, Rasoul; Lankarani, Hamid M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of analyzing impact events in mechanical systems for design purposes using simple or low ordered finite elements. Traditional impact dynamics analyses of mechanical systems namely stereomechanics, energy method, stress-wave propagation and contact mechanics approaches are limited to very simplified geometries and provide basic analyses in making predictions and understanding the dominant features of the impact in a mechanical system. In engineering practice, impacted systems present a complexity of geometry, stiffness, mass distributions, contact areas and impact angles that are impossible to analyze and design with the traditional impact dynamics methods. In real cases, the effective tool is the finite element (FE) method. The high-end FEA codes though may be not available for typical engineer/designer. This paper provides information on whether impact events of mechanical systems can be successfully modeled using simple or low-order finite elements. FEA models using simple elements are benchmarked against theoretical impact problems and published experimental impact results. As a case study, an FE model using simple plastic beam elements is further tested to predict stresses and deflections in an experimental structural impact

  18. Stress- and Structure-Induced Anisotropy in Southern California From Two Decades of Shear Wave Splitting Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zefeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2017-10-01

    We measure shear wave splitting (SWS) parameters (i.e., fast direction and delay time) using 330,000 local earthquakes recorded by more than 400 stations of the Southern California Seismic Network (1995-2014). The resulting 232,000 SWS measurements (90,000 high-quality ones) provide a uniform and comprehensive database of local SWS measurements in Southern California. The fast directions at many stations are consistent with regional maximum compressional stress σHmax. However, several regions show clear deviations from the σHmax directions. These include linear sections along the San Andreas Fault and the Santa Ynez Fault, geological blocks NW to the Los Angeles Basin, regions around the San Jacinto Fault, the Peninsular Ranges near San Diego, and the Coso volcanic field. These complex patterns show that regional stresses and active faults cannot adequately explain the upper crustal anisotropy in Southern California. Other types of local structures, such as local rock types or tectonic features, also play significant roles.

  19. Modeling of the propagation and reception of elastic waves emitted by a crack under stress. Application to the simulation of non-destructive testing by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Khalifa, Warida

    2013-01-01

    AE Non-destructive testing is used in many fields such as nuclear energy, oil and gas, civil engineering or mechanical engineering to check the integrity of structures under stress. Depending on the ratio of structure thickness to wavelength, the energy released by a crack under stress can propagate either as guided waves (in thin structures) or as Rayleigh wave (in thick structures). The analysis of signals resulting from this ultrasonic 'passive' method is particularly difficult due to the complexity of typically measured signals. The objective of this thesis is to develop models to enable the simulation of AE testing experiments in the case of thick or thin structure. The developed models rely on the coupling between an AE source model, wave propagation models and an AE Sensor model. In the case of thick structures two 2D models (for plane and cylindrical surfaces) and a 3D model (for plane surface) have been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the Rayleigh wave emitted by a crack under stress. In the case of thin structures, a 2D model has been developed to predict the signal corresponding to the guided modes emitted by a crack under stress. Several parametric studies have been conducted to determine the influence of the different model input data on the AE signals and thus help to interpret AE testing results. (author) [fr

  20. Prediction of Compressional Wave Velocity Using Regression and Neural Network Modeling and Estimation of Stress Orientation in Bokaro Coalfield, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Suman; Ali, Muhammad; Chatterjee, Rima

    2018-01-01

    Velocity of compressional wave ( V P) of coal and non-coal lithology is predicted from five wells from the Bokaro coalfield (CF), India. Shear sonic travel time logs are not recorded for all wells under the study area. Shear wave velocity ( Vs) is available only for two wells: one from east and other from west Bokaro CF. The major lithologies of this CF are dominated by coal, shaly coal of Barakar formation. This paper focuses on the (a) relationship between Vp and Vs, (b) prediction of Vp using regression and neural network modeling and (c) estimation of maximum horizontal stress from image log. Coal characterizes with low acoustic impedance (AI) as compared to the overlying and underlying strata. The cross-plot between AI and Vp/ Vs is able to identify coal, shaly coal, shale and sandstone from wells in Bokaro CF. The relationship between Vp and Vs is obtained with excellent goodness of fit ( R 2) ranging from 0.90 to 0.93. Linear multiple regression and multi-layered feed-forward neural network (MLFN) models are developed for prediction Vp from two wells using four input log parameters: gamma ray, resistivity, bulk density and neutron porosity. Regression model predicted Vp shows poor fit (from R 2 = 0.28) to good fit ( R 2 = 0.79) with the observed velocity. MLFN model predicted Vp indicates satisfactory to good R2 values varying from 0.62 to 0.92 with the observed velocity. Maximum horizontal stress orientation from a well at west Bokaro CF is studied from Formation Micro-Imager (FMI) log. Breakouts and drilling-induced fractures (DIFs) are identified from the FMI log. Breakout length of 4.5 m is oriented towards N60°W whereas the orientation of DIFs for a cumulative length of 26.5 m is varying from N15°E to N35°E. The mean maximum horizontal stress in this CF is towards N28°E.

  1. Reduced levels of SCD1 accentuate palmitate-induced stress in insulin-producing β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovsepyan Meri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1 is an ER resident enzyme introducing a double-bond in saturated fatty acids. Global knockout of SCD1 in mouse increases fatty acid oxidation and insulin sensitivity which makes the animal resistant to diet-induced obesity. Inhibition of SCD1 has therefore been proposed as a potential therapy of the metabolic syndrome. Much of the work has focused on insulin target tissue and very little is known about how reduced levels of SCD1 would affect the insulin-producing β-cell, however. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate how reduced levels of SCD1 affect the β-cell. Results Insulin-secreting MIN6 cells with reduced levels of SCD1 were established by siRNA mediated knockdown. When fatty acid oxidation was measured, no difference between cells with reduced levels of SCD1 and mock-transfected cells were found. Also, reducing levels of SCD1 did not affect insulin secretion in response to glucose. To investigate how SCD1 knockdown affected cellular mechanisms, differentially regulated proteins were identified by a proteomic approach. Cells with reduced levels of SCD1 had higher levels of ER chaperones and components of the proteasome. The higher amounts did not protect the β-cell from palmitate-induced ER stress and apoptosis. Instead, rise in levels of p-eIF2α and CHOP after palmitate exposure was 2-fold higher in cells with reduced levels of SCD1 compared to mock-transfected cells. Accordingly, apoptosis rose to higher levels after exposure to palmitate in cells with reduced levels of SCD1 compared to mock-transfected cells. Conclusions In conclusion, reduced levels of SCD1 augment palmitate-induced ER stress and apoptosis in the β-cell, which is an important caveat when considering targeting this enzyme as a treatment of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-producing Lactobacillus Strain on Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Serum Enzyme Activity in Hy-Line Brown Hens under Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y Z; Cheng, J L; Ren, M; Yin, L; Piao, X S

    2015-07-01

    Heat-stress remains a costly issue for animal production, especially for poultry as they lack sweat glands, and alleviating heat-stress is necessary for ensuring animal production in hot environment. A high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producer Lactobacillus strain was used to investigate the effect of dietary GABA-producer on laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed Hy-line brown hens. Hy-Line brown hens (n = 1,164) at 280 days of age were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the amount of freeze-dried GABA-producer added to the basal diet as follows: i) 0 mg/kg, ii) 25 mg/kg, iii) 50 mg/kg, and iv) 100 mg/kg. All hens were subjected to heat-stress treatment through maintaining the temperature and the relative humidity at 28.83±3.85°C and 37% to 53.9%, respectively. During the experiment, laying rate, egg weight and feed intake of hens were recorded daily. At the 30th and 60th day after the start of the experiment, biochemical parameters, enzyme activity and immune activity in serum were measured. Egg production, average egg weight, average daily feed intake, feed conversion ratio and percentage of speckled egg, soft shell egg and misshaped egg were significantly improved (phens fed GABA-producing strain supplemented diet was significantly higher (phens fed the basal diet, whereas cholesterol level was decreased. Compared with the basal diet, GABA-producer strain supplementation increased serum level of glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.009) and superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, GABA-producer played an important role in alleviating heat-stress, the isolated GABA-producer strain might be a potential natural and safe probiotic to use to improve laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed hens.

  3. Characterization and study of the thermodynamic equilibrium departure of an argon plasma flame produced by a surface-wave sustained discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, M. D.; Sáez, M.; García, M. C.

    2000-07-01

    Surface wave induced plasma (SWP) is a particular class of microwave induced plasma. It is used in atomic emission and mass spectrometry as a source of excitation for the elemental analysis of samples in analytical chemistry. This discharge is mainly used at powers less than 300 W. At such low power, an efficient process of desolvation, atomization, excitation and ionization of the analyte can only be reached provided the density of power absorbed in the discharge is large. This requires a plasma whose volume increases very little with increasing absorbed power. At atmospheric pressure in the SWP, such a volume limitation can be achieved by having the plasma extending into ambient air in the form of a flame (open air discharge). This article presents the results of the experimental characterization and study of the degree of thermodynamic equilibrium of an argon plasma flame produced by a surfatron. The values of the plasma parameters and b(p) (departure from equilibrium) parameter for the ArI levels show that the discharge is a two-temperature plasma. By comparing the results with those obtained for a classical surface-wave plasma column, it can be concluded that the plasma in flame is more suited to be used as a source of excitation in analytical chemistry, due to its higher electronic density and temperatures values.

  4. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Zhao, Qi; Qi, Shengwen; Xia, Kaiwen; Grasselli, Giovanni; Chen, Xuguang

    2016-12-27

    This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM). A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i) initial compaction stage; (ii) crushing stage; and (iii) crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV), of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  5. Numerical Simulation on Seismic Response of the Filled Joint under High Amplitude Stress Waves Using Finite-Discrete Element Method (FDEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Huang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper numerically investigates the seismic response of the filled joint under high amplitude stress waves using the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM. A thin layer of independent polygonal particles are used to simulate the joint fillings. Each particle is meshed using the Delaunay triangulation scheme and can be crushed when the load exceeds its strength. The propagation of the 1D longitude wave through a single filled joint is studied, considering the influences of the joint thickness and the characteristics of the incident wave, such as the amplitude and frequency. The results show that the filled particles under high amplitude stress waves mainly experience three deformation stages: (i initial compaction stage; (ii crushing stage; and (iii crushing and compaction stage. In the initial compaction stage and crushing and compaction stage, compaction dominates the mechanical behavior of the joint, and the particle area distribution curve varies little. In these stages, the transmission coefficient increases with the increase of the amplitude, i.e., peak particle velocity (PPV, of the incident wave. On the other hand, in the crushing stage, particle crushing plays the dominant role. The particle size distribution curve changes abruptly with the PPV due to the fragments created by the crushing process. This process consumes part of wave energy and reduces the stiffness of the filled joint. The transmission coefficient decreases with increasing PPV in this stage because of the increased amount of energy consumed by crushing. Moreover, with the increase of the frequency of the incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases and fewer particles can be crushed. Under the same incident wave, the transmission coefficient decreases when the filled thickness increases and the filled particles become more difficult to be crushed.

  6. Melatonin treatment at dry-off improves reproductive performance postpartum in high-producing dairy cows under heat stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ispierto, I; Abdelfatah, A; López-Gatius, F

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of melatonin treatment during the early dry-off period on subsequent reproductive performance and milk production in high-producing dairy cows under heat stress conditions. In experiment I, addressing the pharmacokinetics of melatonin treatment in lactating dairy cows, doses of untreated, 3, 6, 9 or 12 implants/animal (18-mg melatonin each implant) were given as subcutaneous implants on gestation day 120-20 multiparous lactating dairy cows (four cows/dose group). Experiment II was performed during the warm season on 25 heifers and 114 high milk-producing Holstein-Friesian cows. Animals were randomly assigned to a control (C) or melatonin group (M). Animals in the M group received nine implants (heifers) or 12 (cows) of melatonin on day 220 of gestation. In experiment I, cows in the 12 implants group showed a higher maximum melatonin concentration (Cmax ) and area under the concentration curve from treatment day 0 to day 49 (AUC0-49d ) than those in the remaining groups, among which there were no significant differences in this variable. In experiment II, the likelihood of repeat breeding syndrome (pregnancy loss (first trimester) were 0.36 and 0.19 times lower in treated than control animals, respectively. Plasma prolactin levels decreased significantly (p = 0.01) after melatonin treatment and recovered during the postpartum compared to control cows. No significant effects on milk production were observed in the subsequent lactation. Significant differences in days open between groups (means 123 ± 71.9 and 103 ± 43, respectively, for C and M; p = 0.02) were registered. In conclusion, melatonin treatment in the early dry-off period improves the reproductive performance of dairy cattle, reducing the number of days open, repeat breeding syndrome and pregnancy loss. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Hydrogen-producing Escherichia coli strains overexpressing lactose permease: FT-IR analysis of the lactose-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Mara; Dimanta, Ilze; Gavare, Marita; Strazdina, Inese; Liepins, Janis; Juhna, Talis; Kalnenieks, Uldis

    2014-01-01

    The lactose permease gene (lacY) was overexpressed in the septuple knockout mutant of Escherichia coli, previously engineered for hydrogen production from glucose. It was expected that raising the lactose transporter activity would elevate the intracellular lactose concentration, inactivate the lactose repressor, induce the lactose operon, and as a result stimulate overall lactose consumption and conversion. However, overexpression of the lactose transporter caused a considerable growth delay in the recombinant strain on lactose, resembling to some extent the "lactose killing" phenomenon. Therefore, the recombinant strain was subjected to selection on lactose-containing media. Selection on plates with 3% lactose yielded a strain with a decreased content of the recombinant plasmid but with an improved ability to grow and produce hydrogen on lactose. Macromolecular analysis of its biomass by means of Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that increase of the cellular polysaccharide content might contribute to the adaptation of E. coli to lactose stress. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Heavy metals produce toxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis in the marine teleost fish SAF-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Patricia; Esteban, María Á; Cuesta, Alberto

    2016-02-01

    The use of cell lines to test the toxicity of aquatic pollutants is a valuable alternative to fish bioassays. In this study, fibroblast SAF-1 cells from the marine gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) were exposed for 24 h to the heavy metals Cd, Hg, MeHg (Methylmercury), As or Pb and the resulting cytotoxicity was assessed. Neutral red (NR), MTT-tetrazolio (MTT), crystal violet (CV) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) viability tests showed that SAF-1 cells exposed to the above heavy metals produced a dose-dependent reduction in the number of viable cells. Methylmercury showed the highest toxicity (EC50 = 0.01 mM) followed by As, Cd, Hg and Pb. NR was the most sensitive method followed by MTT, CV and LDH. SAF-1 cells incubated with each of the heavy metals also exhibited an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis cell death. Moreover, the corresponding gene expression profiles pointed to the induction of the metallothionein protective system, cellular and oxidative stress and apoptosis after heavy metal exposure for 24 h. This report describes and compares tools for evaluating the potential effects of marine contamination using the SAF-1 cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fine Structure of Self-reversed Thermo-remanent Magnetization: Effects of Composition Waves Produced by Ordering During Quench and Annealing of Metastable Ferri-ilmenite Solid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnroe, Suzanne; Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; Harrison, Richard; Thomas, Chris; Mukai, Hiroki; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Putnis, Andrew; Svendby, Kathrine

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic experiments on synthetic ferri-ilmenite samples in the bulk composition range Ilm 60-70, quenched and annealed at high temperatures (T), well above any magnetization temperature, throw new light on metastable chemical phenomena leading to fine-structure in the acquisition of thermoremanent magnetization. Growth of Fe-Ti -ordered domains in a disordered host, or growth and shrinking of adjacent Fe-Ti ordered domains against each other in the process of coarsening, lead to Fe-enrichment in some domains relative to others, influencing magnetization temperature. However, additional Fe-enrichment along domain boundaries during these processes produces Fe-enriched waves on the boundaries, where ferrimagnetic material near the wave crests, magnetizes at a higher T than the bulk of the sample. Because the boundaries are antiphase domain boundaries with opposite Fe-Ti ordering, opposite sides must acquire opposite magnetic moments during cooling, at a temperature above that where bulk normal magnetization begins. This is the "magnetic predestination T" or "TPD", because it sets the stage for normal and self-reversed magnetization on opposite sides of the phase domain boundary. The Fe-enrichment waves are not uniform in different parts of a sample; neither are the compositions along the domain walls. This means "TPD" is generally not a single temperature, but a T range, but reflecting only a small volume of the sample. With further cooling in a positive field, slightly less Fe-enriched but more voluminous ferrimagnetic regions begin to magnetize, leading to a positive magnetic peak, "TMAX". Already here, even less Fe-enriched but still more voluminous ferrimagnetic material, influenced by the domain wall, begins to acquire self-reversed magnetization. This dominates in cooling below "TMAX", eventually leading to totally self-reversed magnetization at "TFR". A Curie temperature obviously cannot be measured meaningfully from a cooling curve in this material of varied

  10. Three-dimensional coupled thermoelastodynamic stress and flux induced wave propagation for isotropic half-space with scalar potential functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Yazdan; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza

    2018-02-01

    An asymmetric three-dimensional thermoelastodynamic wave propagation with scalar potential functions is presented for an isotropic half-space, in such a way that the wave may be originated from an arbitrary either traction or heat flux applied on a patch at the free surface of the half-space. The displacements, stresses and temperature are presented within the framework of Biot's coupled thermoelasticity formulations. By employing a complete representation for the displacement and temperature fields in terms of two scalar potential functions, the governing equations of coupled thermoelasticity are uncoupled into a sixth- and a second-order partial differential equation in cylindrical coordinate system. By virtue of Fourier expansion and Hankel integral transforms, the angular and radial variables are suppressed respectively, and a 6{th}- and a 2{nd}-order ordinary differential equation in terms of depth are received, which are solved readily, from which the displacement, stresses and temperature fields are derived in transformed space by satisfying both the regularity and boundary conditions. By applying the inverse Hankel integral transforms, the displacements and temperature are numerically evaluated to determine the solutions in the real space. The numerical evaluations are done for three specific cases of vertical and horizontal time-harmonic patch traction and a constant heat flux passing through a circular disc on the surface of the half-space. It has been previously proved that the potential functions used in this paper are applicable from elastostatics to thermoelastodynamics. Thus, the analytical solutions presented in this paper are verified by comparing the results of this study with two specific problems reported in the literature, which are an elastodynamic problem and an axisymmetric quasi-static thermoelastic problem. To show the accuracy of numerical results, the solution of this study is also compared with the solution for elastodynamics exists in

  11. Six years after the wave. Trajectories of posttraumatic stress following a natural disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Kerstin Bergh; Arinell, Hans; Arnberg, Filip K

    2015-12-01

    The characteristics of long-term trajectories of distress after disasters are unclear, since few studies include a comparison group. This study examines trajectories of recovery among survivors in comparison to individuals with indirect exposure. Postal surveys were sent to Swedish tourists, repatriated from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami (n=2268), at 1, 3, and 6 years after the tsunami to assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) and poor mental health. Items were used to ascertain high and moderate disaster exposure groups and an indirect exposure comparison group. Long-term PTS trajectories were best characterized by a resilient (72.3%), a severe chronic (4.6%), a moderate chronic (11.2%) and a recovering (11.9%) trajectory. Trajectories reported higher levels of PTS than the comparison group. Exposure severity and bereavement were highly influential risk factors. These findings have implications regarding anticipation of long-term psychological adjustment after natural disasters and need for interventions after a single traumatic event with few secondary stressors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-iterative determination of the stress-density relation from ramp wave data through a window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Evan; Fratanduono, Dayne; Swift, Damian

    2017-06-01

    In the canonical ramp compression experiment, a smoothly-increasing load is applied the surface of the sample, and the particle velocity history is measured at interfaces two or more different distances into the sample. The velocity histories are used to deduce a stress-density relation by correcting for perturbations caused by reflected release waves, usually via the iterative Lagrangian analysis technique of Rothman and Maw. We previously described a non-iterative (recursive) method of analysis, which was more stable and orders of magnitude faster than iteration, but was subject to the limitation that the free surface velocity had to be sampled at uniform intervals. We have now developed more general recursive algorithms suitable for analyzing ramp data through a finite-impedance window. Free surfaces can be treated seamlessly, and the need for uniform velocity sampling has been removed. These calculations require interpolation of partially-released states using the partially-constructed isentrope, making them slower than the previous free-surface scheme, but they are still much faster than iterative analysis. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  13. In vitro gene transfer by the application of laser-induced stress wave: effect of cellular heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Shunichi; Ogura, Makoto; Nakanishi, Kuniaki; Masaki, Yoshinori; Uenoyama, Maki; Wakisaka, Hitoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2004-07-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that simultaneous application of laser-induced stress wave (LISW) and cellular heating enhanced the uptake of the probe molecule into the cytoplasm. The idea was based on the fact that heating can increase the fluidity of the plasma membrane. In this study, we attempted to apply this technique to in vitro gene transfer. Delivery of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression vectors to NIH-3T3 cells was investigated. The cultured cells in a well were kept in a temperature-controlled water bath at temperatures of 310K and 316K. LISW was generated by irradiation of a polymer target attached to the back of the well with a 532-nm, nanosecond single laser pulse from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The maximum laser energy used was 140 mJ, the corresponding laser fluence on the target being ~ 2 J/cm2. Twenty-four hours after laser irradiation, we observed expression of EGFP in the cells with a confocal laser scanning microscope. In the cells exposed to LISW at 316K, we observed gene expression, while gene expression was very limited in the cells treated at 310K, indicating the effect of cellular heating on the gene permeability.

  14. A Data-Driven Noise Reduction Method and Its Application for the Enhancement of Stress Wave Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Lin Feng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD has been recently used to recover a signal from observed noisy data. Typically this is performed by partial reconstruction or thresholding operation. In this paper we describe an efficient noise reduction method. EEMD is used to decompose a signal into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs. The time intervals between two adjacent zero-crossings within the IMF, called instantaneous half period (IHP, are used as a criterion to detect and classify the noise oscillations. The undesirable waveforms with a larger IHP are set to zero. Furthermore, the optimum threshold in this approach can be derived from the signal itself using the consecutive mean square error (CMSE. The method is fully data driven, and it requires no prior knowledge of the target signals. This method can be verified with the simulative program by using Matlab. The denoising results are proper. In comparison with other EEMD based methods, it is concluded that the means adopted in this paper is suitable to preprocess the stress wave signals in the wood nondestructive testing.

  15. Stress time-dependently influences the acquisition and retrieval of unrelated information by producing a memory of its own

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadle, Chelsea E.; Zoladz, Phillip R.

    2015-01-01

    Stress induces several temporally guided “waves” of psychobiological responses that differentially influence learning and memory. One way to understand how the temporal dynamics of stress influence these cognitive processes is to consider stress, itself, as a learning experience that influences additional learning and memory. Indeed, research has shown that stress results in electrophysiological and biochemical activity that is remarkably similar to the activity observed as a result of learning. In this review, we will present the idea that when a stressful episode immediately precedes or follows learning, such learning is enhanced because the learned information becomes a part of the stress context and is tagged by the emotional memory being formed. In contrast, when a stressful episode is temporally separated from learning or is experienced prior to retrieval, such learning or memory is impaired because the learning or memory is experienced outside the context of the stress episode or subsequent to a saturation of synaptic plasticity, which renders the retrieval of information improbable. The temporal dynamics of emotional memory formation, along with the neurobiological correlates of the stress response, are discussed to support these hypotheses. PMID:26175712

  16. Measurements in a container ship of wave-induced hull girder stresses in excess of design values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes full-scale measurements of the wave-induced vertical bending moment amidships a 9400 TEU container carrier and focuses on the effect of the hydro-elastic high-frequency vibration on the extreme hogging wave bending moment. One extreme event, where the vertical wave-induced ho...

  17. Effect of γ-Aminobutyric Acid-producing Strain on Laying Performance, Egg Quality and Serum Enzyme Activity in Hy-Line Brown Hens under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Z. Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat-stress remains a costly issue for animal production, especially for poultry as they lack sweat glands, and alleviating heat-stress is necessary for ensuring animal production in hot environment. A high γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-producer Lactobacillus strain was used to investigate the effect of dietary GABA-producer on laying performance and egg quality in heat-stressed Hy-line brown hens. Hy-Line brown hens (n = 1,164 at 280 days of age were randomly divided into 4 groups based on the amount of freeze-dried GABA-producer added to the basal diet as follows: i 0 mg/kg, ii 25 mg/kg, iii 50 mg/kg, and iv 100 mg/kg. All hens were subjected to heat-stress treatment through maintaining the temperature and the relative humidity at 28.83±3.85°C and 37% to 53.9%, respectively. During the experiment, laying rate, egg weight and feed intake of hens were recorded daily. At the 30th and 60th day after the start of the experiment, biochemical parameters, enzyme activity and immune activity in serum were measured. Egg production, average egg weight, average daily feed intake, feed conversion ratio and percentage of speckled egg, soft shell egg and misshaped egg were significantly improved (p<0.05 by the increasing supplementation of the dietary GABA-producer. Shape index, eggshell thickness, strength and weight were increased linearly with increasing GABA-producer supplementation. The level of calcium, phosphorus, glucose, total protein and albumin in serum of the hens fed GABA-producing strain supplemented diet was significantly higher (p<0.05 than that of the hens fed the basal diet, whereas cholesterol level was decreased. Compared with the basal diet, GABA-producer strain supplementation increased serum level of glutathione peroxidase (p = 0.009 and superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, GABA-producer played an important role in alleviating heat-stress, the isolated GABA-producer strain might be a potential natural and safe probiotic to use to

  18. A Comuputerized DRBEM model for generalized magneto-thermo-visco-elastic stress waves in functionally graded anisotropic thin film/substrate structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdelsabour Fahmy

    Full Text Available A numerical computer model, based on the dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM for studying the generalized magneto-thermo-visco-elastic stress waves in a rotating functionally graded anisotropic thin film/substrate structure under pulsed laser irradiation is established. An implicit-implicit staggered algorithm was proposed and implemented for use with the DRBEM to get the solution for the temperature, displacement components and thermal stress components through the structure thickness. A comparison of the results for different theories is presented in the presence and absence of rotation. Some numerical results that demonstrate the validity of the proposed method are also presented.

  19. Effect of drought and combined drought and heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Martincová, Olga; Vanková, Radomira

    2013-12-01

    The roles of proline and polyamines (PAs) in the drought stress responses of tobacco plants were investigated by comparing the responses to drought alone and drought in combination with heat in the upper and lower leaves and roots of wild-type tobacco plants and transformants that constitutively over-express a modified gene for the proline biosynthetic enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase (P5CSF129A; EC 2.7.2.11/1.2.1.41). In both genotypes, drought stress coincided with a decrease in relative water content (RWC) that was much less severe in the upper leaves than elsewhere in the plant. The drought also increased proline levels in both genotypes. A brief period of heat stress (2 h at 40 °C) at the end of the drought period did not significantly influence the proline levels in the upper leaves and roots but caused a further increase in the lower leaves of both genotypes. The rate at which these elevated proline levels returned to normal during the post-stress recovery period was slower in the transformants and plants that had been subjected to the combined stress. In both genotypes, drought stress significantly reduced the levels of spermidine (Spd) and putrescine (Put) in the leaves and roots relative to those for controls, and increased the levels of spermine (Spm) and diaminopropane (Dap, formed by the oxidative deamination of Spd and Spm). Spd levels may have declined due to its consumption in Spm biosynthesis and/or oxidation by polyamine oxidase (PAO; EC 1.5.3.11) to form Dap, which became more abundant during drought stress. During the rewatering period, the plants' Put and Spd levels recovered quickly and the activity of the PA biosynthesis enzymes in their leaves and roots increased substantially; this increase was more pronounced in transformants than WT plants. The high levels of Spm observed in drought stressed plants persisted even after the 24 h recovery and rewatering phase. The malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the lower leaves of WTs

  20. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Maqshoof; Zahir, Zahir A; Nazli, Farheen; Akram, Fareeha; Arshad, Muhammad; Khalid, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m(-1) under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean.

  1. Effectiveness of halo-tolerant, auxin producing Pseudomonas and Rhizobium strains to improve osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maqshoof Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Halo-tolerant, auxin producing bacteria could be used to induce salt tolerance in plants. A number of Rhizobium and auxin producing rhizobacterial strains were assessed for their ability to tolerate salt stress by conducting osmoadaptation assay. The selected strains were further screened for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean seedlings under salt-stressed axenic conditions in growth pouch/jar trials. Three most effective strains of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas containing ACC-deaminase were evaluated in combination, for their ability to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean at original, 4, and 6 dS m-1 under axenic conditions. Results showed that sole inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains improved the total dry matter up to 1.4, and 1.9 fold, respectively, while the increase in salt tolerance index was improved up to 1.3 and 2.0 fold by the Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains, respectively. However, up to 2.2 fold increase in total dry matter and salt tolerance index was observed due to combined inoculation of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains. So, combined application of Rhizobium and Pseudomonas strains could be explored as an effective strategy to induce osmotic stress tolerance in mung bean.

  2. Chronic Juvenile Stress Produces Corticolimbic Dendritic Architectural Remodeling and Modulates Emotional Behavior in Male and Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Eiland, Lisa; Ramroop, Johnny; Hill, Matthew N.; Manley, Jasmine; McEwen, Bruce S.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 12% of US children are exposed to intense adverse experiences. Research has demonstrated that these experiences can negatively impact adult health, often resulting in psychopathology. Less attention, however, is given to the impact of childhood adverse experiences on childhood health and wellbeing. Using a rodent model of chronic juvenile stress (restraint 6h daily from postnatal day 20–41), we report that chronic stress has significant immediate morbidities in both males and females d...

  3. Operationalizing cognitive vulnerability and stress from the perspective of the hopelessness theory: a multi-wave longitudinal study of children of affectively ill parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, John R Z; McGirr, Alexander

    2007-11-01

    The current study tested the diathesis-stress component of the hopelessness theory (HT) in a sample of youth using (1) a weakest link approach towards operationalizing cognitive vulnerability (e.g. a child's degree of vulnerability is determined by his/her most depressogenic inferential style; DIS) and (2) an idiographic approach towards operationalizing high stress (e.g. high stress is when a child is experiencing a level of stress that is higher than his/her own average level of stress). We also examined whether the association between within-subject fluctuations in hassles and depressive symptoms in cognitively vulnerable youth was moderated by absolute stress levels (the between-subject effect of stress). A multi-wave longitudinal design was used to examine whether the association between within-subject fluctuations in hassles and depressive symptoms was moderated by a depressogenic weakest link. At Time 1, 140 children (between 6 and 14 years of age) of parents with a history of major depressive episodes completed measures assessing DISs and depressive symptoms. Every 6 weeks, for the subsequent year, children completed measures assessing depressive symptoms and hassles. The results of hierarchical linear modelling analyses indicated that a depressogenic weakest link was associated with greater elevations in depressive symptoms following elevations in hassles in girls but not in boys. Results provide partial support for the applicability of the diathesis-stress component of the HT to youth. Integration of the current findings with those obtained in past research examining the diathesis-stress component of the hopelessness theory in youth suggests the utilization of an idiographic approach to examining vulnerability-stress theories may potentially lead to an increased understanding of gender differences in depression.

  4. Extra virgin olive oil reduces liver oxidative stress and tissue depletion of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids produced by a high saturated fat diet in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, B.R.; Hernandez Rodas, M.C.; Espinosa, A.; Rincon Cervera, M.A.; Romero, N.; Barrera Vazquez, C.; Marambio, M.; Vivero, J.; Valenzuela, B.A.

    2016-07-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) which are synthesized mainly in the liver have relevant functions in the organism. A diet high in fat (HFD) generates an increase in the levels of fat and induces oxidative stress (lipo-peroxidation) in the liver, along with a reduction in tissue n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA. Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is rich in anti-oxidants (polyphenols and tocopherols) which help to prevent the development of oxidative stress. This study evaluated the role of EVOO in preventing the induction of fat deposition and oxidative stress in the liver and in the depletion of LCPUFA in the liver, erythrocytes and brain generated by a HFD in C57BL/6J mice. Four experimental groups (n = 10/group) were fed a control diet (CD) or a HFD for 12 weeks and were respectively supplemented with EVOO (100 mg/day). The group fed HFD showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) in fat accumulation and oxidative stress in the liver, accompanied by a reduction in the levels of n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA in the liver, erythrocytes and brain. Supplementation with EVOO mitigated the increase in fat and oxidative stress produced by HFD in the liver, along with a normalization of LCPUFA levels in the liver, erythrocytes and brain. It is proposed that EVOO supplementation protects against fat accumulation, and oxidative stress and normalizes n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA depletion induced in mice fed a HFD. (Author)

  5. Stress by noise produces differential effects on the proliferation rate of radial astrocytes and survival of neuroblasts in the adult subgranular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Chavez-Casillas, Oscar; Jauregui-Huerta, Fernando; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Guzman-Muniz, Jorge; Moy-Lopez, Norma; Gonzalez-Castaneda, Rocio E; Luquin, Sonia

    2011-07-01

    The subgranular zone (SGZ) in the dentate gyrus contains radial astrocytes, known as Type-1 or Type-B cells, which generate neuroblasts (Type-2 cells or Type-D cells) that give rise to granular neurons. Stress increases glucocorticoid levels that target SGZ and modify the proliferation and apoptosis of hippocampal cells. Yet, it is not well-known whether stress differentially affects SGZ progenitors. We investigated the effects of noise-induced stress on the rate of proliferation and apoptosis of the Type-1 cells, Type-2 cells and newly generated granular neurons in the SGZ. We exposed Balb/C mice to noise using a standardized rodents' audiogram-fitted adaptation of a human noisy environment. We measured corticosterone serum levels at different time points. Animals received BrdU injections for 3 days and sequential sacrifices were done to carry out double-immunohistochemical analyses. We found that a 24-h noise exposure did not produce adaptative response in the curve of corticosterone as compared to a 12-h noise exposure. The percentage of BrdU+/GFAP+ cells was significantly reduced in the stress group as compared to controls. A high proportion of CASP-3+/GFAP+ radial astrocytes were found in the stress group. The percentage of BrdU+/doublecortin+ cells was higher in controls than in the stress group. Interestingly, the apoptosis rate of doublecortin-expressing cells in the stress group was slightly lesser than in controls. Remarkably, we did not find significant differences in the number of BrdU+/NeuN+ and CASP-3+/NeuN+ neurons. These data indicate that stress differentially affects the rate of proliferation and apoptosis in SGZ progenitors and suggest a possible compensatory mechanism to keep the net number of granular neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Shear wave elastography using ultrasound: effects of anisotropy and stretch stress on a tissue phantom and in vivo reactive lymph nodes in the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ha Young [Dept. of Radiology, University of Inha College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, So Yeon; Shin, Hee Jung; Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwa [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Seon [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate how the anisotropy and the static stretch stress of the cervical musculature influence the measured shear modulus in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in cervical lymph nodes in vivo by using shear wave elastography (SWE). SWE was performed on a phantom using a pig muscle and on the middle jugular cervical lymph nodes in six volunteers. Tissue elasticity was quantified using the shear modulus and a supersonic shear wave imaging technique. For the phantom study, first, the optimal depth for measurement was determined, and then, SWE was performed in parallel and perpendicular to the muscle fiber orientation with and without strain stress. For the in vivo study, SWE was performed on the cervical lymph nodes in parallel and perpendicular to the sternocleidomastoid muscle fiber direction with and without neck stretching. The mean values of the shear modulus (meanSM) were then analyzed. In the phantom study, the measured depth significantly influenced the meanSM with a sharp decrease at the depth of 1.5 cm (P<0.001). Strain stress increased the meanSM, irrespective of the muscle fiber orientation (P<0.001). In the in vivo study, the meanSM values obtained in parallel to the muscle fiber orientation were greater than those obtained perpendicular to the fiber orientation, irrespective of the stretch stress (P<0.001). However, meanSM was affected significantly by the stretch stress parallel to the muscle fiber orientation (P<0.001). The anisotropic nature of the cervical musculature and the applied stretch stress explain the variability of the SWE measurements and should be identified before applying Swee for the interpretation of the measured shear modulus values.

  7. Residual stress, mechanical and microstructure properties of multilayer Mo{sub 2}N/CrN coating produced by R.F Magnetron discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaouina, B., E-mail: b.bouaouina@gmail.com [Department of physic, research unite UR-MPE, Boumerdes University 35000 (Algeria); Besnard, A. [Arts et Metiers ParisTech—LaBoMaP, 71250 Cluny (France); Abaidia, S.E. [Department of physic, research unite UR-MPE, Boumerdes University 35000 (Algeria); Haid, F. [CDTA, Plasma discharges Group, Baba hassen, Algers (Algeria)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Depositing of crystallized molybdenum nitride and chromium nitride multilayer at room temperature. • Correlation between stress measurement and the shift of the XRD diffraction peak (1 1 1) of Mo{sub 2}N. • Studied the effect of the bi-layer thickness on the mechanical properties. - Abstract: We have investigated the effect of the period thickness of the multilayer Mo{sub 2}N/CrN deposited on Si substrate produced by reactive magnetron sputtering. Mo{sub 2}N presents a face centered cubic structure and CrN an orthorhombic one. The residual stress of the coatings was determined by the measurement of the substrate curvature. The microstructure of the multilayer was investigated from the X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (cross section images). The residual stresses resulting from the deposition of the different bi-layer thickness were measured and correlated to the structural properties of the coating as well as the nanoindentation analysis of the coating. The stresses are compressive and tensile for the individual Mo{sub 2}N and CrN layer respectively. The result shows that an increase of the multilayer coatings Mo{sub 2}N/CrN thicknesses induce an increase of the hardness and the elastic modulus, in the other hand the tensile stress increases. The shift of the XRD diffraction peak (1 1 1) of Mo{sub 2}N at high angle which means the reduction of the residual stress is in good agreement with the residual stresses measurements.

  8. The Prophylactic Effect of Vitamin C on Oxidative Stress Indexes Following Exposure to Radio Frequency Wave Generated by a BTS Antenna Model in Rat Liver and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Jelodar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Radio frequency wave (RFW generated by base transceiver station (BTS has been reported to make deleterious effects on liver and kidney, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency wave (RFW-induced oxidative stress in the liver and kidney and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on this organs by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity including: glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups and treated daily for 45 days as follows: control, vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid 200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage, test (exposed to 900MHz RFW and the treated group (received vitamin C in addition to exposure to RFW. At the end of the experiment all animals were sacrificed and their liver and kidney were removed and were used for measurement of antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity. Results: The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p<0.05. In the treated group vitamin C improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared to the test group (p<0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in liver and kidney, and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  9. Prenatal Stress Produces Sex Specific Changes in Depression-like Behavior in Rats: Implications for Increased Vulnerability in Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Arentzen, Tine S; Dyrby, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Stress during rat gestation can elicit depression-like physiological and behavioral responses in the offspring. However, human clinical depression is more prevalent among females than males. Accordingly, we examined how repeated variable prenatal stress (PS) alters rat anxiety- and depression...... stressor (elevated platform) before EPM testing. Dams exposed to the stressor battery had increased plasma corticosterone levels compared with controls. Male PS offspring displayed changes in locomotor and rearing/climbing activity relative to controls. Additionally, anxiety measures in the EPM were...... affected in control animals after acute stressor exposure, however, this response was blunted in PS offspring. Moreover, FST immobility, as an indicator of depressive-like behavior, was increased in female but not male PS rats. Altogether, our results identify both sex- and circadian phase-specific effects...

  10. Improvement in accuracy of the measurements of residual stresses due to circumferential welds in thin-walled pipe using Rayleigh wave method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhshik, Siamak; Moharrami, Rasool

    2009-01-01

    To achieve an acceptable safety in many industrial applications such as nuclear power plants and power generation, it is extremely important to gain an understanding of the magnitudes and distributions of the residual stresses in a pipe formed by joining two sections with a girth butt weld. Most of the methods for high-accuracy measurement of residual stress are destructive. These destructive measurement methods cannot be applied to engineering systems and structures during actual operation. In this paper, we present a method based on the measurement of ultrasonic Rayleigh wave velocity variations versus the stress state for nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in dissimilar pipe welded joint. We show some residual stress profile obtained by this method. These are then compared with other profiles determined using a semi-destructive technique (hole-drilling) that makes it possible to check our results. According to the results, we also present a new method for adjusting the ultrasonic measurements to improve the agreement with the results obtained from other techniques.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Air-Sea Turbulent Flow of A Progressive Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xianyun

    2013-04-01

    The turbulence flow in the coupled water and air of a progressive wave is simulated. The Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stockes equations are used to produce the turbulence velocity and pressure distributions in the water and air. The turbulence Reynolds stress is modelled by the turbulence RNG (Re-Normalization Group) model. The numerical simulation is compared with the laboratory wave.

  12. Usefulness of pulse-wave doppler tissue sampling and dobutamine stress echocardiography for identification of false positive inferior wall defects in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altinmakas, S.; Dagdeviren, B.; Turkmen, M.; Gursurer, M.; Say, B.; Tezel, T.; Ersek, B.

    2000-01-01

    False positive inferior wall perfusion defects restrict the accuracy of SPECT in diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Pulse-Wave Tissue Doppler (PWTD) has been recently proposed to assess regional wall motion velocities. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of CAD by using PWTD during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) in patients with an inferior perfusion defect detected by SPECT and compare PWTD parameters of normal cases with patients who had inferior perfusion defect and CAD. Sixty-five patients (mean age 58±8 years, 30 men) with a normal LV systolic function at rest according to echocardiographic evaluation with an inferior ischemia determined by SPECT and a control group (CG) of 34 normal cases (mean age 56±7 years, 16 men) were included in this study. All patients underwent a standard DSE (up to 40 μg/kg/min with additional atropine during sub-maximum heart rate responses). Pulse-wave Doppler tissue sampling of inferior wall was performed in the apical 2-chamber view at rest and stress. The coronary angiography was performed within 24 hours. The results were evaluated for the prediction of significant right coronary artery (RCA) and/or left circumflex coronary artery (CX) with narrowing (≥50% diameter stenosis, assessed by quantitative coronary angiography). It was observed that the peak stress mean E/A ratio was lower in patients with CAD when compared to patients without CAD (0.78±0.2 versus 1.29±0.11 p<0.0001). Also the peak stress E/A ratio of normal cases was significantly higher than patients who had CAD (1.19±0.3 versus 0.78±0.2 p<0.0001). When the cut off point for the E/A ratio was determined as 1, the sensitivity and specificity of dobutamine stress PWTD E/A were 89% and 86%, respectively. The peak stress E/A ratio was higher than 1 in all patients with a false positive perfusion defect. Systolic S velocity increase during DSE was significantly lower in patients with CAD (54%±17 versus 99%±24 p=0

  13. Effect of footshock stress on place conditioning produced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol and the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor, URB597, in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVuono, Marieka V; Wills, Kiri L; MacPherson, Danielle V; Hrelja, Kelly M; Parker, Linda A

    2017-11-01

    Unlike other drugs of abuse, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocanabinol (THC) is generally aversive in rodent conditioned place preference models, but little is known about how stress may modify THC affective properties. We evaluate the potential of footshock stress to enhance the rewarding effects of THC and the fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor, URB597, as it has been shown to enhance their anxiolytic effects. The effect of footshock stress 24 h prior to each conditioning trial on the rewarding/aversive effects of THC (1, 0.1, 0.5 mg/kg, ip) and URB597 (0.3 mg/kg, ip) was evaluated in an unbiased place conditioning procedure in rats. Subsequently, the same stressor was given immediately prior to conditioning with THC (1 and 0.1 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was also measured during conditioning. A dose of 1 mg/kg THC, but not 0.1-0.5 mg/kg, produced a conditioned place aversion (CPA) that was not modified by footshock delivered 24 h prior to conditioning trials; however, footshock delivered immediately prior to conditioning trials prevented that CPA. Lower doses of THC and URB597 produced no place conditioning regardless of footshock conditions. A dose of 1 mg/kg THC produced locomotor suppression during conditioning trials that was prevented by footshock delivered 24 h before and reversed to locomotor activation by footshock delivered immediately before conditioning. Unlike the effect of footshock on THC- and URB597-induced anxiolytic effects, footshock does not promote THC or URB597-induced reward in a conditioned place preference paradigm. However, footshock stress reverses the sedative effects of 1 mg/kg THC.

  14. Atom Wave Interferometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pritchard, David

    2000-01-01

    Long-term research objective: Matter wave interferometers, in which de Broglie waves are coherently split and then recombined to produce interference fringes, have opened exciting new possibilities for precision and fundamental...

  15. Energy of plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, G.

    1975-01-01

    A new definition of the sign of wave energy is given, which is valid where the old definition based on an expansion procedure breaks down. It is shown that a beam-plasma wave does not produce explosive instabilities

  16. Engineered strains of Streptococcus macedonicus towards an osmotic stress resistant phenotype retain their ability to produce the bacteriocin macedocin under hyperosmotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Rania; Driessche, Gonzalez Van; Boutou, Effrossyni; Kazou, Maria; Alexandraki, Voula; Vorgias, Constantinos E; Devreese, Bart; Tsakalidou, Effie; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos

    2015-10-20

    Streptococcus macedonicus ACA-DC 198 produces the bacteriocin macedocin in milk only under low NaCl concentrations (<1.0%w/v). The thermosensitive plasmid pGh9:ISS1 was employed to generate osmotic stress resistant (osmr) mutants of S. macedonicus. Three osmr mutants showing integration of the vector in unique chromosomal sites were identified and the disrupted loci were characterized. Interestingly, the mutants were able to grow and to produce macedocin at considerably higher concentrations of NaCl compared to the wild-type (up to 4.0%w/v). The production of macedocin under hyperosmotic conditions solely by the osmr mutants was validated by the well diffusion assay and by mass spectrometry analysis. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated that the macedocin biosynthetic regulon was transcribed at high salt concentrations only in the mutants. Mutant osmr3, the most robust mutant, was converted in its markerless derivative (osmr3f). Co-culture of S. macedonicus with spores of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in milk demonstrated that only the osmr3f mutant and not the wild-type inhibited the growth of the spores under hyperosmotic conditions (i.e., 2.5%w/v NaCl) due to the production of macedocin. Our study shows how genetic manipulation of a strain towards a stress resistant phenotype could improve bacteriocin production under conditions of the same stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Taurine: A Potential Ergogenic Aid for Preventing Muscle Damage and Protein Catabolism and Decreasing Oxidative Stress Produced by Endurance Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Flávia G. De Carvalho; Bryan S. M. Galan; Priscila C. Santos; Kelly Pritchett; Karina Pfrimer; Eduardo Ferriolli; Marcelo Papoti; Júlio S. Marchini; Ellen C. de Freitas; Ellen C. de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of taurine and chocolate milk supplementation on oxidative stress and protein metabolism markers, and aerobic parameters in triathletes.Methods: A double-blind, crossover study was conducted with 10 male triathletes, aged 30.9 ± 1.3 year, height 1.79 ± 0.01 m and body weight 77.45 ± 2.4 kg. Three grams of taurine and 400 ml of chocolate milk (TAUchoc), or a placebo (chocolate milk) (CHOC) was ingested post exercise for 8 weeks. Oxidative stres...

  18. Taurine: A Potential Ergogenic Aid for Preventing Muscle Damage and Protein Catabolism and Decreasing Oxidative Stress Produced by Endurance Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    De Carvalho, Flávia G.; Galan, Bryan S. M.; Santos, Priscila C.; Pritchett, Kelly; Pfrimer, Karina; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Papoti, Marcelo; Marchini, Júlio S.; de Freitas, Ellen C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of taurine and chocolate milk supplementation on oxidative stress and protein metabolism markers, and aerobic parameters in triathletes. Methods: A double-blind, crossover study was conducted with 10 male triathletes, aged 30.9 ± 1.3 year, height 1.79 ± 0.01 m and body weight 77.45 ± 2.4 kg. Three grams of taurine and 400 ml of chocolate milk (TAUchoc), or a placebo (chocolate milk) (CHOC) was ingested post exercise for 8 weeks. Oxidative s...

  19. Use of anabolic androgenic steroids produces greater oxidative stress responses to resistance exercise in strength-trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arazi, Hamid; Mohammadjafari, Heidar; Asadi, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) use on oxidative stress responses to a single session of resistance exercise in strength-trained men. Twenty-three strength trained men, with 11 self-reporting regular AAS use and 12 self-reporting never taking AAS (NAAS) volunteered to participate in this study. Blood draws were obtained pre and post resistance exercise in order to evaluate changes in oxidative stress biomarkers levels (i.e., 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG], malondialdehyde [MDA], and nitric oxide [NO]), antioxidant defense systems (i.e., glutathione peroxidase [GPx] and catalase [CAT]), and glucose (GLU) levels. The AAS users had higher level of 8-OHdG (77.3 ± 17 vs. 57.7 ± 18.2 ng/mg), MDA (85.6 ± 17.8 vs. 52.3 ± 15.1 ng/mL), and GPx (9.1 ± 2.3 vs. 7.1 ± 1.3 mu/mL) compared to NAAS at pre exercise (p < 0.05). Both the experimental groups showed increases in 8-OHdG (p = 0.001), MDA (p = 0.001), GPx (p = 0.001), NO (p = 0.04), CAT (p = 0.02) and GLU (p = 0.001) concentrations after resistance exercise, and the AAS group indicated significant differences in 8-OHdG (p = 0.02) and MDA (p = 0.05) concentrations compared with NAAS users at post exercise. In conclusion, use of AAS is associated with alterations in immune function resulting in oxidative stress, and cell damage; however, high-intensity resistance exercise could increase greater oxidative stress biomarkers in strength-trained men.

  20. Use of anabolic androgenic steroids produces greater oxidative stress responses to resistance exercise in strength-trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Arazi

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS use on oxidative stress responses to a single session of resistance exercise in strength-trained men. Twenty-three strength trained men, with 11 self-reporting regular AAS use and 12 self-reporting never taking AAS (NAAS volunteered to participate in this study. Blood draws were obtained pre and post resistance exercise in order to evaluate changes in oxidative stress biomarkers levels (i.e., 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG], malondialdehyde [MDA], and nitric oxide [NO], antioxidant defense systems (i.e., glutathione peroxidase [GPx] and catalase [CAT], and glucose (GLU levels. The AAS users had higher level of 8-OHdG (77.3 ± 17 vs. 57.7 ± 18.2 ng/mg, MDA (85.6 ± 17.8 vs. 52.3 ± 15.1 ng/mL, and GPx (9.1 ± 2.3 vs. 7.1 ± 1.3 mu/mL compared to NAAS at pre exercise (p < 0.05. Both the experimental groups showed increases in 8-OHdG (p = 0.001, MDA (p = 0.001, GPx (p = 0.001, NO (p = 0.04, CAT (p = 0.02 and GLU (p = 0.001 concentrations after resistance exercise, and the AAS group indicated significant differences in 8-OHdG (p = 0.02 and MDA (p = 0.05 concentrations compared with NAAS users at post exercise. In conclusion, use of AAS is associated with alterations in immune function resulting in oxidative stress, and cell damage; however, high-intensity resistance exercise could increase greater oxidative stress biomarkers in strength-trained men. Keywords: ROS, Strength exercise, Anabolic

  1. Effect of drought and combined drought and heat stress on polyamine metabolism in proline-over-producing tobacco plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Gemperlová, Lenka; Martincová, Olga; Vaňková, Radomíra

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2013 (2013), s. 7-15 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC08013; GA ČR GA206/09/2062 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Drought * Heat stress * Polyamines Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2013 http://gateway.isiknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord&UT=000329007000002

  2. Stress !!!

    OpenAIRE

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten. Opvallend is dat mannelijke studenten uit Twente zich veel minder druk lijken te maken over hun studie. Onder vrouwen ligt de stress juist erg hoog ten opzichte van het landelijk gemiddelde.

  3. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  4. Endophytes from medicinal plants and their potential for producing indole acetic acid, improving seed germination and mitigating oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Gilani, Syed Abdullah; Waqas, Muhammad; Al-Hosni, Khadija; Al-Khiziri, Salima; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Ali, Liaqat; Kang, Sang-Mo; Asaf, Sajjad; Shahzad, Raheem; Hussain, Javid; Lee, In-Jung; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    Medicinal plants have been used by marginal communities to treat various ailments. However, the potential of endophytes within these bio-prospective medicinal plants remains unknown. The present study elucidates the endophytic diversity of medicinal plants (Caralluma acutangula, Rhazya stricta, and Moringa peregrina) and the endophyte role in seed growth and oxidative stress. Various organs of medicinal plants yielded ten endophytes, which were identified as Phoma sp. (6 isolates), Alternaria sp. (2), Bipolaris sp. (1), and Cladosporium sp. (1) based on 18S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The culture filtrates (CFs; 25%, 50%, and 100% concentrations) from these endophytes were tested against the growth of normal and dwarf mutant rice lines. Endophytic CF exhibited dose-dependent growth stimulation and suppression effects. CF (100%) of Phoma sp. significantly increased rice seed germination and growth compared to controls and other endophytes. This growth-promoting effect was due to the presence of indole acetic acid in endophytic CF. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis showed the highest indole acetic acid content ((54.31±0.21) µmol/L) in Bipolaris sp. In addition, the isolate of Bipolaris sp. exhibited significantly higher radical scavenging and anti-lipid peroxidation activity than the other isolates. Bipolaris sp. and Phoma sp. also exhibited significantly higher flavonoid and phenolic contents. The medicinal plants exhibited the presence of bio-prospective endophytic strains, which could be used for the improvement of crop growth and the mitigation of oxidative stresses.

  5. Endophytes from medicinal plants and their potential for producing indole acetic acid, improving seed germination and mitigating oxidative stress* #

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Gilani, Syed Abdullah; Waqas, Muhammad; Al-Hosni, Khadija; Al-Khiziri, Salima; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Ali, Liaqat; Kang, Sang-Mo; Asaf, Sajjad; Shahzad, Raheem; Hussain, Javid; Lee, In-Jung; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Medicinal plants have been used by marginal communities to treat various ailments. However, the potential of endophytes within these bio-prospective medicinal plants remains unknown. The present study elucidates the endophytic diversity of medicinal plants (Caralluma acutangula, Rhazya stricta, and Moringa peregrina) and the endophyte role in seed growth and oxidative stress. Various organs of medicinal plants yielded ten endophytes, which were identified as Phoma sp. (6 isolates), Alternaria sp. (2), Bipolaris sp. (1), and Cladosporium sp. (1) based on 18S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The culture filtrates (CFs; 25%, 50%, and 100% concentrations) from these endophytes were tested against the growth of normal and dwarf mutant rice lines. Endophytic CF exhibited dose-dependent growth stimulation and suppression effects. CF (100%) of Phoma sp. significantly increased rice seed germination and growth compared to controls and other endophytes. This growth-promoting effect was due to the presence of indole acetic acid in endophytic CF. The gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis showed the highest indole acetic acid content ((54.31±0.21) µmol/L) in Bipolaris sp. In addition, the isolate of Bipolaris sp. exhibited significantly higher radical scavenging and anti-lipid peroxidation activity than the other isolates. Bipolaris sp. and Phoma sp. also exhibited significantly higher flavonoid and phenolic contents. The medicinal plants exhibited the presence of bio-prospective endophytic strains, which could be used for the improvement of crop growth and the mitigation of oxidative stresses. PMID:28124841

  6. Partial-wave analysis of the {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system produced in the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n at 18 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manak, J. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Adams, T. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Bishop, J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Cason, N. M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Ivanov, E. I. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); LoSecco, J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Sanjari, A. H. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Shephard, W. D. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Stienike, D. L. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Taegar, S. A. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)] (and others)

    2000-07-01

    A partial-wave analysis of 9082 {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events produced in the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n at 18.3 GeV/c has been carried out using data from experiment 852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The data are dominated by J{sup PC}=0{sup -+} partial waves consistent with observation of the {eta}(1295) and the {eta}(1440). The mass and width of the {eta}(1295) were determined to be 1282{+-}5 MeV and 66{+-}13 MeV, respectively, while the {eta}(1440) was observed with a mass of 1404{+-}6 MeV and a width of 80{+-}21 MeV. Other partial waves of importance include the 1{sup ++} and the 1{sup +-} waves. Results of the partial wave analysis are combined with results of other experiments to estimate f{sub 1}(1285) branching fractions. These values are considerably different from current values determined without the aid of amplitude analyses. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Collision of two shock waves as a hypothetical mechanism of producing drifting radio bursts in the 400-500 MHz range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlicky, M.

    1978-01-01

    After the proton flare of July 3, 1974 a hitherto unclassified phenomenon with a diffusion ''banner'' and with a considerably decelerating drift within the type II and III burst drifts range was observed in the radio dynamic spectrum between 410 and 470 MHz. The hypothesis is presented that the phenomenon is due to the collision of two shock waves, propagating against one another, during which the flux of electromagnetic radiation is considerably enhanced relative to the sum of the fluxes of the electromagnetic radiation of the individual shock waves. The Newkirk 4-density model of the corona is used to describe the phenomenon, the mechanism of plasmon-plasmon conversion in electromagnetic radiation with a double plasma frequency is considered and, according to the parameters derived from the dynamic spectrum, the velocities, radii of curvature and direction of propagation of the anticipated shock waves are analysed in a simplifed symmetric case. (author)

  8. Taurine: A Potential Ergogenic Aid for Preventing Muscle Damage and Protein Catabolism and Decreasing Oxidative Stress Produced by Endurance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Flávia G; Galan, Bryan S M; Santos, Priscila C; Pritchett, Kelly; Pfrimer, Karina; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Papoti, Marcelo; Marchini, Júlio S; de Freitas, Ellen C

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of taurine and chocolate milk supplementation on oxidative stress and protein metabolism markers, and aerobic parameters in triathletes. Methods: A double-blind, crossover study was conducted with 10 male triathletes, aged 30.9 ± 1.3 year, height 1.79 ± 0.01 m and body weight 77.45 ± 2.4 kg. Three grams of taurine and 400 ml of chocolate milk (TAUchoc), or a placebo (chocolate milk) (CHOC) was ingested post exercise for 8 weeks. Oxidative stress marker levels, and 24 h urinary nitrogen, creatinine, and urea excretion were measured before and after 8 weeks of training and supplementation with TAUchoc or CHOC. A maximal incremental running test on a treadmill was performed in order to evaluate aerobic parameters: V max , heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE). Results: TAUchoc treatment during the 8 weeks resulted in increased taurine plasma levels (PRE 201.32 ± 29.03 μmol/L and POST 234.36 ± 35.51 μmol/L, p = 0.01), decreased malondialdehyde levels (19.4%, p = 0.03) and urinary nitrogen excretion (-33%, p = 0.03), and promoted positive nitrogen balance ( p = 0.01). There were no changes in reduced glutathione (TAUchoc PRE 0.72 ± 0.08 mmol/L and POST 0.83 ± 0.08 mmol/L; CHOC PRE 0.69 ± 0.08 mmol/L and POST 0.81 ± 0.06 mmol/L), vitamin E plasma levels (TAUchoc PRE 33.99 ± 2.52 μmol/L and 35.95 ± 2.80 μmol/L and CHOC PRE 31.48 ± 2.12 μmol/L and POST 33.77 ± 3.64 μmol/L), or aerobic parameters, which were obtained in the last phase of the maximal incremental running test (V max TAUchoc PRE 13 ± 1.4 km/h and POST 13.22 ± 1.34 km/h; CHOC PRE 13.11 ± 2.34 km/h and POST 13.11 ± 2.72 km/h), the heart rate values were TAUchoc PRE 181.89 ± 24.18 bpm and POST 168.89 ± 46.56 bpm; CHOC PRE 181.56 ± 2.14 bpm and POST 179.78 ± 3.4 bpm, and the RPE were TAUchoc PRE 8.33 ± 2.4 AU and POST 9.1 ± 2.1 AU; CHOC PRE 8.11 ± 4.94 AU and POST 8.78 ± 2.78 AU). Conclusion: Taurine supplementation did

  9. Taurine: A Potential Ergogenic Aid for Preventing Muscle Damage and Protein Catabolism and Decreasing Oxidative Stress Produced by Endurance Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia G. De Carvalho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of taurine and chocolate milk supplementation on oxidative stress and protein metabolism markers, and aerobic parameters in triathletes.Methods: A double-blind, crossover study was conducted with 10 male triathletes, aged 30.9 ± 1.3 year, height 1.79 ± 0.01 m and body weight 77.45 ± 2.4 kg. Three grams of taurine and 400 ml of chocolate milk (TAUchoc, or a placebo (chocolate milk (CHOC was ingested post exercise for 8 weeks. Oxidative stress marker levels, and 24 h urinary nitrogen, creatinine, and urea excretion were measured before and after 8 weeks of training and supplementation with TAUchoc or CHOC. A maximal incremental running test on a treadmill was performed in order to evaluate aerobic parameters: Vmax, heart rate (HR and rate of perceived exertion (RPE.Results: TAUchoc treatment during the 8 weeks resulted in increased taurine plasma levels (PRE 201.32 ± 29.03 μmol/L and POST 234.36 ± 35.51 μmol/L, p = 0.01, decreased malondialdehyde levels (19.4%, p = 0.03 and urinary nitrogen excretion (−33%, p = 0.03, and promoted positive nitrogen balance (p = 0.01. There were no changes in reduced glutathione (TAUchoc PRE 0.72 ± 0.08 mmol/L and POST 0.83 ± 0.08 mmol/L; CHOC PRE 0.69 ± 0.08 mmol/L and POST 0.81 ± 0.06 mmol/L, vitamin E plasma levels (TAUchoc PRE 33.99 ± 2.52 μmol/L and 35.95 ± 2.80 μmol/L and CHOC PRE 31.48 ± 2.12 μmol/L and POST 33.77 ± 3.64 μmol/L, or aerobic parameters, which were obtained in the last phase of the maximal incremental running test (Vmax TAUchoc PRE 13 ± 1.4 km/h and POST 13.22 ± 1.34 km/h; CHOC PRE 13.11 ± 2.34 km/h and POST 13.11 ± 2.72 km/h, the heart rate values were TAUchoc PRE 181.89 ± 24.18 bpm and POST 168.89 ± 46.56 bpm; CHOC PRE 181.56 ± 2.14 bpm and POST 179.78 ± 3.4 bpm, and the RPE were TAUchoc PRE 8.33 ± 2.4 AU and POST 9.1 ± 2.1 AU; CHOC PRE 8.11 ± 4.94 AU and POST 8.78 ± 2.78 AU.Conclusion: Taurine supplementation

  10. Interdigital Piezopolymer Transducers for Time of Flight Measurements with Ultrasonic Lamb Waves on Carbon-Epoxy Composites under Pure Bending Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bulletti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interdigital transducers fabricated with piezopolymer film have been realized to excite ultrasonic Lamb waves in a composite laminate subjected to pure bending stresses. Lamb waves were generated and detected in a cross-ply [0°/90°] 4 mm thick carbon-fiber composite, by using two interdigital transducers in pitch-catch configuration. We demonstrate that the choice of the piezopolymer transducer technology is suitable for this type of investigation and the advantages of the proposed transducer assembly and bonding are described. A full set-up is described to determine the relationship between the time of flight of the recorded signals and the applied bending moment. Interdigital transducers were designed according to simulations of the dispersion curves, in order to operate at a central frequency of 450 kHz. This frequency corresponds to a central wavelength of 16 mm and to a group velocity of about 6000 m/s for the first symmetric guided wave mode. The variations in the time of flight of ultrasonic recorded signals were measured as a function of the variations in the bending moment. The static and dynamic load tests were in good agreement with strain gage measurements performed in the micro deformation range (0–1400 µm/m.

  11. Guided waves in pre-stressed hyperelastic plates and tubes: Application to the ultrasound elastography of thin-walled soft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo-Yang; He, Qiong; Mangan, Robert; Xu, Guoqiang; Mo, Chi; Luo, Jianwen; Destrade, Michel; Cao, Yanping

    2017-05-01

    In vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of thin-walled soft tissues (e.g., mitral valve, artery and bladder) and in situ mechanical characterization of thin-walled artificial soft biomaterials in service are of great challenge and difficult to address via commonly used testing methods. Here we investigate the properties of guided waves generated by focused acoustic radiation force in immersed pre-stressed plates and tubes, and show that they can address this challenge. To this end, we carry out both (i) a theoretical analysis based on incremental wave motion in finite deformation theory and (ii) finite element simulations. Our analysis leads to a novel method based on the ultrasound elastography to image the elastic properties of pre-stressed thin-walled soft tissues and artificial soft materials in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner. To validate the theoretical and numerical solutions and demonstrate the usefulness of the corresponding method in practical measurements, we perform (iii) experiments on polyvinyl alcohol cryogel phantoms immersed in water, using the Verasonics V1 System equipped with a L10-5 transducer. Finally, potential clinical applications of the method have been discussed.

  12. Alteration in Memory and Electroencephalogram Waves with Sub-acute Noise Stress in Albino Rats and Safeguarded by Scoparia dulcis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Sundareswaran; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2016-01-01

    Noise stress has different effects on memory and novelty and the link between them with an electroencephalogram (EEG) has not yet been reported. To find the effect of sub-acute noise stress on the memory and novelty along with EEG and neurotransmitter changes. Eight-arm maze (EAM) and Y-maze to analyze the memory and novelty by novel object test. Four groups of rats were used: Control, control treated with Scoparia dulcis extract, noise exposed, and noise exposed which received Scoparia extract. The results showed no marked difference observed between control and control treated with Scoparia extract on EAM, Y-maze, novel object test, and EEG in both prefrontal and occipital region, however, noise stress exposed rats showed significant increase in the reference memory and working memory error in EAM and latency delay, triad errors in Y-maze, and prefrontal and occipital EEG frequency rate with the corresponding increase in plasma corticosterone and epinephrine, and significant reduction in the novelty test, and significant reduction in the novelty test, amplitude of prefrontal, occipital EEG, and acetylcholine. These noise stress induced changes in EAM, Y-maze, novel object test, and neurotransmitters were significantly prevented when treated with Scoparia extract and these changes may be due to the normalizing action of Scoparia extract on the brain, which altered due to noise stress. Noise stress exposure causes EEG, behavior, and neurotransmitter alteration in the frontoparietal and occipital regions mainly involved in planning and recognition memoryOnly the noise stress exposed animals showed the significant alteration in the EEG, behavior, and neurotransmittersHowever, these noise stress induced changes in EEG behavior and neurotransmitters were significantly prevented when treated with Scoparia extractThese changes may be due to the normalizing action of Scoparia dulcis (adoptogen) on the brain which altered by noise stress. Abbreviations used: EEG

  13. Stress !!!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, M.

    2012-01-01

    Twee op de vijf UT-studenten hebben last van ernstige studiestress, zo erg zelfs dat het ze in hun privéleven belemmert. Die cijfers komen overeen met het landelijk beeld van stress onder studenten. Samen met 14 andere universiteits- en hogeschoolbladen enquêteerde UT Nieuws bijna 5500 studenten.

  14. THE TOXIC CYANOBACTERIUM NOSTOC SP. STRAIN 152 PRODUCES HIGHEST AMOUNTS OF MICROCYSTIN AND NOSTOPHYCIN UNDER STRESS CONDITIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmayer, Rainer

    2011-02-01

    The understanding of how environmental factors regulate toxic secondary metabolite production in cyanobacteria is important to guarantee water quality. Very little is known on the regulation of toxic secondary metabolite production in benthic cyanobacteria. In this study the physiological regulation of the production of the toxic heptapeptide microcystin (MC) and the non-toxic related peptide nostophycin (NP) in the benthic cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain 152 was studied under contrasting environmental conditions. I used a 2(k) levels factorial design, where k is the number of four factors that have been tested: Reduction in temperature (20 vs. 12°C), irradiance (50 vs. 1 μmol · m(-2) · s(-1)), P-PO(4) (144 vs. 0.14 μM P-PO(4)), N-NO(3) (5.88 mM vs. N-NO(3) free). While the growth rate was reduced more than hundred fold under most severe conditions of temperature, irradiance, and phosphate reduction the production of MC and NP never ceased. The MC and NP contents per cell varied at maximum 5- and 10.6-fold each, however the physiological variation did not outweigh the highly significant linear relationship between the daily cell division rate and the MC and NP net production rates. Surprisingly the MC and NP contents per cell showed a maximum under P-PO(4) reduced and irradiance reduced conditions. Both intra- and extracellular MC and NP concentrations were negatively related to P-PO(4) and irradiance. It is concluded that the proximate factor behind maximal cellular MC and NP contents is physiological stress.

  15. Near-field tsunami edge waves and complex earthquake rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of distributed coseismic slip on progressive, near-field edge waves is examined for continental shelf tsunamis. Detailed observations of edge waves are difficult to separate from the other tsunami phases that are observed on tide gauge records. In this study, analytic methods are used to compute tsunami edge waves distributed over a finite number of modes and for uniformly sloping bathymetry. Coseismic displacements from static elastic theory are introduced as initial conditions in calculating the evolution of progressive edge-waves. Both simple crack representations (constant stress drop) and stochastic slip models (heterogeneous stress drop) are tested on a fault with geometry similar to that of the M w = 8.8 2010 Chile earthquake. Crack-like ruptures that are beneath or that span the shoreline result in similar longshore patterns of maximum edge-wave amplitude. Ruptures located farther offshore result in reduced edge-wave excitation, consistent with previous studies. Introduction of stress-drop heterogeneity by way of stochastic slip models results in significantly more variability in longshore edge-wave patterns compared to crack-like ruptures for the same offshore source position. In some cases, regions of high slip that are spatially distinct will yield sub-events, in terms of tsunami generation. Constructive interference of both non-trapped and trapped waves can yield significantly larger tsunamis than those that produced by simple earthquake characterizations.

  16. Lattice dynamics approach to determine the dependence of the time-of-flight of transversal polarized acoustic waves on external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarar, K. S.; Pluta, M.; Amjad, U.; Grill, W.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the lattice dynamics approach the dependence of the time-of-flight (TOF) on stress has been modeled for transversal polarized acoustic waves. The relevant dispersion relation is derived from the appropriate mass-spring model together with the dependencies on the restoring forces including the effect of externally applied stress. The lattice dynamics approach can also be interpreted as a discrete and strictly periodic lumped circuit. In that case the modeling represents a finite element approach. In both cases the properties relevant for wavelengths large with respect to the periodic structure can be derived from the respective limit relating also to low frequencies. The model representing a linear chain with stiffness to shear and additional stiffness introduced by extensional stress is presented and compared to existing models, which so far represent each only one of the effects treated here in combination. For a string this effect is well known from musical instruments. The counteracting effects are discussed and compared to experimental results.

  17. Alteration in Memory and Electroencephalogram Waves with Sub-acute Noise Stress in Albino Rats and Safeguarded by Scoparia dulcis

    OpenAIRE

    Loganathan, Sundareswaran; Rathinasamy, Sheeladevi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Noise stress has different effects on memory and novelty and the link between them with an electroencephalogram (EEG) has not yet been reported. Objective: To find the effect of sub-acute noise stress on the memory and novelty along with EEG and neurotransmitter changes. Materials and Methods: Eight-arm maze (EAM) and Y-maze to analyze the memory and novelty by novel object test. Four groups of rats were used: Control, control treated with Scoparia dulcis extract, noise exposed, a...

  18. Specific carotenoid pigments in the diet and a bit of oxidative stress in the recipe for producing red carotenoid-based signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de Blas, Esther; Mateo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Colorful ornaments have been the focus of sexual selection studies since the work of Darwin. Yellow to red coloration is often produced by carotenoid pigments. Different hypotheses have been formulated to explain the evolution of these traits as signals of individual quality. Many of these hypotheses involve the existence of a signal production cost. The carotenoids necessary for signaling can only be obtained from food. In this line, carotenoid-based signals could reveal an individual’s capacity to find sufficient dietary pigments. However, the ingested carotenoids are often yellow and became transformed by the organism to produce pigments of more intense color (red ketocarotenoids). Biotransformation should involve oxidation reactions, although the exact mechanism is poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that carotenoid biotransformation could be costly because a certain level of oxidative stress is required to correctly perform the conversion. The carotenoid-based signals could thus reveal the efficiency of the owner in successfully managing this challenge. In a bird with ketocarotenoid-based ornaments (the red-legged partridge; Alectoris rufa), the availability of different carotenoids in the diet (i.e. astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein) and oxidative stress were manipulated. The carotenoid composition was analyzed and quantified in the ornaments, blood, liver and fat. A number of oxidative stress biomarkers were also measured in the same tissues. First, we found that color and pigment levels in the ornaments depended on food levels of those carotenoids used as substrates in biotransformation. Second, we found that birds exposed to mild levels of a free radical generator (diquat) developed redder bills and deposited higher amounts of ketocarotenoids (astaxanthin) in ornaments. Moreover, the same diquat-exposed birds also showed a weaker resistance to hemolysis when their erythrocytes were exposed to free radicals, with females also enduring higher oxidative

  19. Specific carotenoid pigments in the diet and a bit of oxidative stress in the recipe for producing red carotenoid-based signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de Blas, Esther; Mateo, Rafael; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Colorful ornaments have been the focus of sexual selection studies since the work of Darwin. Yellow to red coloration is often produced by carotenoid pigments. Different hypotheses have been formulated to explain the evolution of these traits as signals of individual quality. Many of these hypotheses involve the existence of a signal production cost. The carotenoids necessary for signaling can only be obtained from food. In this line, carotenoid-based signals could reveal an individual's capacity to find sufficient dietary pigments. However, the ingested carotenoids are often yellow and became transformed by the organism to produce pigments of more intense color (red ketocarotenoids). Biotransformation should involve oxidation reactions, although the exact mechanism is poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that carotenoid biotransformation could be costly because a certain level of oxidative stress is required to correctly perform the conversion. The carotenoid-based signals could thus reveal the efficiency of the owner in successfully managing this challenge. In a bird with ketocarotenoid-based ornaments (the red-legged partridge; Alectoris rufa), the availability of different carotenoids in the diet (i.e. astaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein) and oxidative stress were manipulated. The carotenoid composition was analyzed and quantified in the ornaments, blood, liver and fat. A number of oxidative stress biomarkers were also measured in the same tissues. First, we found that color and pigment levels in the ornaments depended on food levels of those carotenoids used as substrates in biotransformation. Second, we found that birds exposed to mild levels of a free radical generator (diquat) developed redder bills and deposited higher amounts of ketocarotenoids (astaxanthin) in ornaments. Moreover, the same diquat-exposed birds also showed a weaker resistance to hemolysis when their erythrocytes were exposed to free radicals, with females also enduring higher oxidative

  20. Pulmonary artery wave propagation and reservoir function in conscious man: impact of pulmonary vascular disease, respiration and dynamic stress tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Junjing; Manisty, Charlotte; Simonsen, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    and dynamic stress tests. Right heart catheterization was performed using a pressure and Doppler flow sensor tipped guidewire to obtain simultaneous pressure and flow velocity measurements in the pulmonary artery in control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) at rest. In controls...

  1. Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself.

  2. Effects on growth and oxidative stress status of rice plants (Oryza sativa) exposed to two extracts of toxin-producing cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon ovalisporum and Microcystis aeruginosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Ana; Campos, Alexandre; Cameán, Ana; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2011-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria are considered emerging world threats, being responsible for the degradation of the aquatic ecosystems. Aphanizomenon ovalisporum produces the toxin Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) being a concern in fresh water habitats. This work aims to increase our knowledge on the effects of this toxic cyanobacterium in plants by studying the alterations in growth parameters and oxidative stress status of rice (Oriza sativa) exposed to the cyanobacteria cell extracts containing CYN. Significant increases in glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were detected in the different experiments performed. The roots showed to be more sensitive than leaves regarding the enzyme activities. A reduction in the leaf tissue fresh weight was observed after 9 days of plant treatment suggesting a major physiological stress. The exposure of rice plants to a mixture of A. ovalisporum and Microcystis aeruginosa cell extracts containing CYN and microcystins including microcystin-LR, resulted in a significant increase in the GST and GPx activities, suggesting a synergistic effect of both extracts. Together these results point out the negative effects of cyanotoxins on plant growth and oxidative status, induced by A. ovalisporum cell extracts, raising also concerns in the accumulation of CYN. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Melatonin-producing endophytic bacteria from grapevine roots promote the abiotic stress-induced production of endogenous melatonin in their hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Jiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endophytes form symbiotic relationships with plants and constitute an important source of phytohormones and bioactive secondary metabolites for their hosts. To date, most studies of endophytes have focused on the influence of these microorganisms on plant growth and physiology and their role in plant defenses against biotic and abiotic stressors; however, to the best of our knowledge, the ability of endophytes to produce melatonin has not been reported. In the present study, we isolated and identified root-dwelling bacteria from three grapevine varieties and found that, when cultured under laboratory conditions, some of the bacteria strains secreted melatonin and tryptophan-ethyl ester. The endophytic bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SB-9 exhibited the highest level of in vitro melatonin secretion and also produced three intermediates of the melatonin biosynthesis pathway: 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, and N-acetylserotonin. After B. amyloliquefaciens SB-9 colonization, the plantlets exhibited increased plant growth. Additionally, we found that, in grapevine plantlets exposed to salt or drought stress, colonization by B. amyloliquefaciens SB-9 increased the upregulation of melatonin synthesis, as well as that of its intermediates, but reduced the upregulation of grapevine tryptophan decaboxylase genes (VvTDCs and a serotonin N-acetyltransferase gene (VvSNAT transcription, when compared to the un-inoculated control. Colonization by B. amyloliquefaciens SB-9 was also able to counteract the adverse effects of salt- and drought-induced stress by reducing the production of malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2− in roots. Therefore, our findings demonstrate the occurrence of melatonin biosynthesis in endophytic bacteria and provide evidence for a novel form of communication between beneficial endophytes and host plants via melatonin.

  4. The prophylactic effect of vitamin C on oxidative stress indexes in rat eyes following exposure to radiofrequency wave generated by a BTS antenna model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelodar, Gholamali; Akbari, Abolfazl; Nazifi, Saeed

    2013-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of radiofrequency wave (RFW)-induced oxidative stress in the eye and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C on this organ by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity including: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA). Thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups and treated daily for 45 days as follows: Control, vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid 200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage), test (exposed to 900 MHz RFW) and the treated group (received vitamin C in addition to exposure to RFW). At the end of the experiment all animals were sacrificed, their eyes were removed and were used for measurement of antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity. The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (P < 0.05). In the treated group vitamin C improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared to the test group (P < 0.05). It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in the eyes and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  5. Stress-driven discovery of a cryptic antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. WU20 from Kueishantao hydrothermal vent with an integrated metabolomics strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yutong; Pan, Chengqian; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Xuegang; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Wang, Kuiwu; Wu, Xiaodan; Ye, Ying; Wu, Bin

    2017-02-01

    Marine hydrothermal microorganisms respond rapidly to the changes in the concentrations and availability of metals within hydrothermal vent microbial habitats which are strongly influenced by elevated levels of heavy metals. Most hydrothermal vent actinomycetes possess a remarkable capability for the synthesis of a broad variety of biologically active secondary metabolites. Major challenges in the screening of these microorganisms are to activate the expression of cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters and the development of technologies for efficient dereplication of known compounds. Here, we report the identification of a novel antibiotic produced by Streptomyces sp. WU20 isolated from the metal-rich hydrothermal vents in Taiwan Kueishantao, following a strategy based on metal induction of silent genes combined with metabolomics analytical methods. HPLC-guided isolation by tracking the target peak resulted in the characterization of the novel compound 1 with antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis. The stress metabolite 1 induced by nickel is structurally totally different compared with the normally produced compounds. This study underlines the applicability of metal induction combined with metabolic analytical techniques in accelerating the exploration of novel antibiotics and other medically relevant natural products.

  6. Association between work-related psychological stress and arterial stiffness measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity in young Japanese males from an information service company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Karita, Kanae; Nishikitani, Mariko; Yano, Eiji

    2005-10-01

    This study examined the relationship between work-related psychological stress and arterial stiffness in young Japanese workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 396 Japanese male workers, aged 24 to 39 years, employed in a Japanese information service company. Work-related psychological stress was measured by the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job-strain index was defined as the ratio of job demand to job-control scores. The outcome of the study was the degree of arteriosclerosis as assessed by brachial pulse-wave velocity (baPWV). The cardiovascular risk factors analyzed were age, heart rate, blood pressure, body mass index, serum lipid, blood sugar levels, catecholamine levels, ethanol consumption, smoking, and overtime. In addition, psychological responses were assessed by tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scales in the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The baPWV was positively (P<0.05) associated with physiological variables including age, heart rate, body mass index, and serum levels of total cholesterol, fasting glucose, and noradrenaline, but negatively (P<0.01) associated with the job-strain index. Significant associations were not found on the POMS tension-anxiety and anger-hostility scale scores. The negative correlation between baPWV and the job-strain index was consistent even after control for the effects of significant physiological variables. The association between job stress and baPWV was found to be inconsistent with the results of previous western studies, and it may require further investigation while taking into account occupation, cardiovascular risk factors, and Japanese culture.

  7. Pre-event trajectories of mental health and health-related disabilities, and post-event traumatic stress symptoms and health: A 7-wave population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Peter G; Bosmans, Mark W G; van der Meulen, Erik; Vermunt, Jeroen K

    2016-12-30

    It is unknown to what extent classes of trajectories of pre-event mental health problems (MHP) and health-related disabilities (HRD), predict post-event traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), MHP and HRD. Aim of the present 7-wave study was to assess the predictive values using a representative sample of adult Dutch (N=4052) participating in three health-surveys in November-December 2009 (T1), 2010 (T2), 2011 (T3). In total, 2988 out of 4052 also participated in trauma-surveys in April(T4), August(T5) and December(T6) 2012 and a fourth health-survey in November-December 2012 (T7). About 10% (N=314) was confronted with potentially traumatic events (PTE) in the 4 months before T4 or T5. Latent class analyses among 4052 respondents identified four classes of pre-event MHP and HRD. Series of multivariate logistic regression analyses with class membership, peri-traumatic stress, type of event, gender, age and education as predictors, showed that classes with high levels of MHP or HRD, were more at risk for high levels of PTSS at baseline and follow-ups at 4 and 8 months, than classes with low levels of MHP or HRD. These classes were very strong predictors for high levels of post-event MHP and HRD: no differences were found between non-affected and affected respondents with different levels of peri-traumatic stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vapors produced by electronic cigarettes and e-juices with flavorings induce toxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response in lung epithelial cells and in mouse lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Lerner

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS may be inhaled directly into the lung during a "vaping" session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used, and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292 in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that

  10. Evaluation of T-wave alternans activity under stress conditions after 5 d and 21 d of sedentary head-down bed rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Yebra, A; Caiani, E G; Pellegrini, A; Monasterio, V; Laguna, P; Martínez, J P

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that prolonged microgravity leads to cardiovascular deconditioning, inducing significant changes in autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. This may adversely influence cardiac repolarization, and provoke cardiac rhythm disturbances. T-wave alternans (TWA), reflecting temporal and spatial repolarization heterogeneity, could be affected. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that 5 d and 21 d head-down (−6°) bed rest (HDBR) increases TWA, thus suggesting a higher underlying electrical instability and related arrhythmogenic risk.Forty-four healthy male volunteers were enrolled in the experiments as part of the European Space Agency’s HDBR studies. High-fidelity ECG was recorded during orthostatic tolerance (OT) and aerobic power (AP) tests, before (PRE) and after HDBR (POST). A multilead scheme for TWA amplitude estimation was used, where non-normalized and T-wave amplitude normalized TWA indices were computed. In addition, spectral analysis of heart rate variability during OT was assessed.Both 5 d and 21 d HDBR induced a reduction in orthostatic tolerance time (OTT), as well as a decrease in maximal oxygen uptake and reserve capacity, thus suggesting cardiovascular deconditioning. However, TWA indices were found not to increase. Interestingly, subjects with lower OTT after 5 d HDBR also showed higher TWA during recovery after OT testing, associated with unbalanced sympathovagal response, even before the HDBR. In contrast with previous observations, augmented ventricular heterogeneity related to 5 d and 21 d HDBR was not sufficient to increase TWA under stress conditions. (paper)

  11. Surfing surface gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Nick

    2017-11-01

    A simple criterion for water particles to surf an underlying surface gravity wave is presented. It is found that particles travelling near the phase speed of the wave, in a geometrically confined region on the forward face of the crest, increase in speed. The criterion is derived using the equation of John (Commun. Pure Appl. Maths, vol. 6, 1953, pp. 497-503) for the motion of a zero-stress free surface under the action of gravity. As an example, a breaking water wave is theoretically and numerically examined. Implications for upper-ocean processes, for both shallow- and deep-water waves, are discussed.

  12. Hard-to-cook bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) proteins hydrolyzed by alcalase and bromelain produced bioactive peptide fractions that inhibit targets of type-2 diabetes and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oseguera-Toledo, Miguel E; Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira; Amaya-Llano, Silvia L

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effect of bioactive peptide fractions from de-hulled hard-to-cook (HTC) bean on enzyme targets of type-2 diabetes and oxidative stress. Protein isolates from Pinto Durango and Negro 8025 beans were hydrolyzed (120min) with either alcalase® or bromelain and separated into five peptide fractions (10kDa) using an ultrafiltration membrane system. The alcalase fraction inhibited both, α-glucosidase (76.4±0.5%), and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, 55.3±1.6%). Peptides LLSL, QQEG and NEGEAH were present in the most potent fractions. Hydrolysates and peptide fractions showed antioxidant capacity (ORAC: 159.6±2.9 to 932.6±1.1mmolTE/g) and nitric oxide inhibition (57.5±0.9 to 68.3±4.2%). Hydrolysates and fractions <1 and 1-3kDa were able to increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from iNS-1E cells up to 57% compared to glucose control. Hydrolysates from HTC beans inhibited enzymes related to diabetes management, being the smallest peptides (<1kDa) the most potent. HTC bean could be a source of protein to produce bioactive peptides with potential antidiabetic properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of hydraulic flowback and produced water on gill morphology, oxidative stress and antioxidant response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, Tamzin A.; Weinrauch, Alyssa M.; Delompré, Perrine L. M.; Goss, Greg G.

    2017-04-01

    Hydraulic fracturing fluid are complex mixtures containing high concentrations of salts (up to 330,000 ppm), organic, and metal contaminants. However, little data exist on the potential mechanisms of toxicity of these flowback and produced wastewaters (FPW) on aquatic biota. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed to either control, FPW (2.5 or 7.5%), FPW that had been treated with activated charcoal (AC), or a custom salt-matched control (SW; replicating only the salt content of FPW) for 48 hours. Gill histology revealed decreases in interlamellar cell mass (ILCM) and mean lamellar length in all treatments (FPW, AC and SW) compared to control, indicative of hyperosmotic stress. Liver CYP1A1 activity was significantly elevated by 7.5-fold in the FPW 7.5% treatment only, indicative of Phase I metabolism. Superoxide dismutase activity significantly decreased in the gills to all treatments with the lowest activity occurring in the 7.5% FPW group. Catalase activity increased in liver with the highest values noted in fish exposed to 7.5% FPW. No changes were observed with respect to glutathione-S-transferase, while increased lipid peroxidation was only observed in both FPW treatments (2.5, 7.5%). These data suggest a characteristic signature of FPW impact which may help in risk assessment and biomonitoring of FPW spills.

  14. IAA-producing Penicillium sp. NICS01 triggers plant growth and suppresses Fusarium sp.-induced oxidative stress in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ramalingam; Shim, Kang-Bo; Lee, Byeong-Won; Hwang, Chung-Dong; Pae, Suk-Bok; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Up; Lee, Choon-Ki; Baek, In-Youl

    2013-06-28

    Application of rhizospheric fungi is an effective and environmentally friendly method of improving plant growth and controlling many plant diseases. The current study was aimed to identify phytohormone-producing fungi from soil, to understand their roles in sesame plant growth, and to control Fusarium disease. Three predominant fungi (PNF1, PNF2, and PNF3) isolated from the rhizospheric soil of peanut plants were screened for their growth-promoting efficiency on sesame seedlings. Among these isolates, PNF2 significantly increased the shoot length and fresh weight of seedlings compared with controls. Analysis of the fungal culture filtrate showed a higher concentration of indole acetic acid in PNF2 than in the other isolates. PNF2 was identified as Penicillium sp. on the basis of phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequence similarity. The in vitro biocontrol activity of Penicillium sp. against Fusarium sp. was exhibited by a 49% inhibition of mycelial growth in a dual culture bioassay and by hyphal injuries as observed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, greenhouse experiments revealed that Fusarium inhibited growth in sesame plants by damaging lipid membranes and reducing protein content. Co-cultivation with Penicillium sp. mitigated Fusarium-induced oxidative stress in sesame plants by limiting membrane lipid peroxidation, and by increasing the protein concentration, levels of antioxidants such as total polyphenols, and peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase activities. Thus, our findings suggest that Penicillium sp. is a potent plant growthpromoting fungus that has the ability to ameliorate damage caused by Fusarium infection in sesame cultivation.

  15. L-carnitine Mediated Reduction in Oxidative Stress and Alteration in Transcript Level of Antioxidant Enzymes in Sheep Embryos Produced In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A; Reddy, I J; Gupta, P S P; Mondal, S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the effect of L-carnitine on oocyte maturation and subsequent embryo development, with L-carnitine-mediated alteration if any in transcript level of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) and Mn-SOD (SOD2) in oocytes and developing sheep embryos produced in vitro. Different concentrations of L-carnitine (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm, 7.5 mm and 10 mm) were used in maturation medium. Oocytes matured with 10 mm L-carnitine showed significantly (p embryos than control group. Antioxidant effect of L-carnitine was proved by culturing oocytes and embryos with H2O2 in the presence of L-carnitine which could be able to protect oocytes and embryos from H2O2-induced oxidative damage. L-carnitine supplementation significantly (p embryos. It was concluded from the study that L-carnitine supplementation during in vitro maturation reduces oxidative stress-induced embryo toxicity by decreasing intracellular ROS and increasing intracellular GSH that in turn improved developmental potential of oocytes and embryos and alters transcript level of antioxidant enzymes. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy ameliorates cyclophosphamide-induced rat acute interstitial cystitis though inhibiting inflammation and oxidative stress-in vitro and in vivo experiment studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ta; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ling; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Huang, Tein-Hung; Chang, Chia-Lo; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2014-01-01

    Background: We investigated whether extracorporeal shock wave (ECSW) therapy can attenuate cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced acute interstitial cystitis (AIC) in rats. Methods and Results: Eighteen male-adult Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into group 1 (sham control), group 2 (AIC induced by 150 mg/kg CYP by intra-peritoneal injection) and group 3 (AIC + ECSW 200 impulses at 0.11 mJ/mm2 to the urinary bladder at 3 and 24 h after CYP treatment). Smooth-muscle cells co-culture with menadione (25 µM) with and without ECSW treatment was performed. Western-blot results demonstrated that ECSW significant attenuated oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions in this in-vitro studies (all p < 0.001). 24-hour urine amount and microscopic findings of red-blood-cell count (i.e., hematuria) were higher in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3, and significantly higher in group 3 than in group 1 (all p < 0.001). The urine levels of albumin and interleukin-6 showed an identical pattern of hematuria among all three groups (all p < 0.001). The cellular and mRNA expressions of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)+, CD74+, CD68+, substance p+, and Cox-2+ cells in the bladder tissue exhibited an identical pattern of hematuria among all groups (all p < 0.0001). The integrity of epithelial layer and collagen-deposition area as stained by Sirius red displayed an opposite pattern of hematuria among the three groups (p < 0.0001). The protein expression of IL-12, iNOS, TNF-α, NF-κB, MMP-9, NOX-1, NOX-2, RANTES, and Oxyblot displayed an identical pattern of hematuria among all groups (all p < 0.01). Conclusion: ECSW therapy markedly attenuated CYP-induced AIC through inhibitions of the inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:25628776

  17. Deep sleep after social stress: NREM sleep slow-wave activity is enhanced in both winners and losers of a conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Meerlo, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Sleep is considered to be a recovery process of prior wakefulness. Not only duration of the waking period affects sleep architecture and sleep EEG, the quality of wakefulness is also highly important. Studies in rats have shown that social defeat stress, in which experimental animals are attacked and defeated by a dominant conspecific, is followed by an acute increase in NREM sleep EEG slow wave activity (SWA). However, it is not known whether this effect is specific for the stress of social defeat or a result of the conflict per se. In the present experiment, we examined how sleep is affected in both the winners and losers of a social conflict. Sleep-wake patterns and sleep EEG were recorded in male wild-type Groningen rats that were subjected to 1h of social conflict in the middle of the light phase. All animals were confronted with a conspecific of similar aggression level and the conflict took place in a neutral arena where both individuals had an equal chance to either win or lose the conflict. NREM sleep SWA was significantly increased after the social conflict compared to baseline values and a gentle stimulation control condition. REM sleep was significantly suppressed in the first hours after the conflict. Winners and losers did not differ significantly in NREM sleep time, NREM sleep SWA and REM sleep time immediately after the conflict. Losers tended to have slightly more NREM sleep later in the recovery period. This study shows that in rats a social conflict with an unpredictable outcome has quantitatively and qualitatively largely similar acute effects on subsequent sleep in winners and losers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A study of the interaction of x-rays and acoustic, stress and shock waves in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, Allan A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1976-11-01

    The primary emphasis of this thesis involves an investigation of techniques for the control and modulation of x-ray radiation through acoustic perturbation of solids. The use of x-ray diffraction and x-ray optical techniques for the study of acoustic fields and atomic motion was also investigated. Analysis of the basic properties of x-ray propagation in solids reveals that practical methods for x-ray control or modulation must involve changes in the spatial configuration of x-ray scatterers. Numerical methods for the study of x-ray propagation in acoustically perturbated crystals are formulated. In developing these methods special emphasis has been placed on Borrmann transmission in thick crystals. Modulation and shuttering (on a micro-second timescale) of x-rays are experimentally demonstrated. A quantitative investigation of the basic interactions used to produce modulation and shuttering is presented. Agreement between the experimental observations and the theoretical predictions is within experimental error. An analytical investigation of the basic potential and limitations of x-ray modulation shuttering and control devices is presented. Basic design criteria for x-ray modulation devices is formulated and applied to practical configurations.

  19. Effects of cumulative stressful and acute variation episodes of farm climate conditions on late embryo/early fetal loss in high producing dairy cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, Pilar; López-Gatius, Fernando; García-Ispierto, Irina; Bech-Sàbat, Gregori; Angulo, Eduardo; Carretero, Teresa; Sánchez-Nadal, Jóse Antonio; Yániz, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible relationships between farm climate conditions, recorded from day 0 to day 40 post-artificial insemination (AI), and late embryo/early fetal loss in high producing dairy cows. Pregnancy was diagnosed by rectal ultrasonography between 28 and 34 days post-AI. Fetal loss was registered when a further 80- to 86-day diagnosis proved negative. Climate variables such as air temperature and relative humidity (RH) were monitored in the cubicles area for each 30-min period. Temperature-humidity indices (THI); cumulative stressful values and episodes of acute change (defined as the mean daily value 1.2 times higher or lower than the mean daily values of the 10 previous days) of the climate variables were calculated. The data were derived from 759 cows in one herd. A total of 692 pregnancies (91.2%) carried singletons and 67 (8.8%) carried twins. No triplets were recorded. Pregnancy loss was recorded in 6.7% (51/759) of pregnancies: 5.6% (39/692) in single and 17.9% (12/67) in twin pregnancies. Using logistic regression procedures, a one-unit increase in the daily cumulative number of hours for the THI values higher than 85 during days 11-20 of gestation caused a 1.57-fold increase in the pregnancy loss, whereas the likelihood of fetal loss increased by a factor of 1.16 for each additional episode of acute variation for the maximum THI values during gestation days 0-40. THI values higher than 85 and episodes of acute variation for the maximum THI values were only recorded during the warm and cool periods, respectively. The presence of twins led to a 3.98-fold increase in pregnancy loss. In conclusion, our findings show that cumulative stressful and episodes of acute variation of climatic conditions can compromise the success of gestation during both the cool and warm periods of the year. Twin pregnancy was confirmed as a main factor associated with pregnancy loss.

  20. Lasing from the domain of collision of ionisation waves produced due to electric field concentration at electrodes with a small radius of curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasenko, Viktor F; Tel'minov, A E; Burachenko, A G; Rybka, D V; Baksht, E Kh; Lomaev, Mikhail I; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Vil'tovskii, P O

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of UV lasing in nitrogen and of diffusive discharge produced without an additional ionisation source were experimentally investigated in a nonuniform electric field formed by electrodes with different profiles. High-voltage nanosecond pulses were applied to the blade- and cylinder-shaped electrodes. It was determined that the gap breakdown at elevated pressure was caused by diffusive jets which propagate from the electrodes with a small radius of curvature. The electric field increased in the intersection of counter-propagating jets, with the effect that the threshold of lasing in the C 3 Π u - B 3 Π g (λ = 337.1 nm) molecular nitrogen band was attained for low average electric fields (below 60 V cm -1 Torr -1 ) and at pressures of 760 Torr and above. With lowering the pressure from 760 to 20 Torr, the voltage of gap breakdown in the nonuniform electric field was observed to increase for a voltage pulse rise time of ∼300 ps and to decrease for a pulse rise time of ∼2 ns.

  1. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  2. Investigation on possible risks to human health by exposure to the radiation of electromagnetic waves produced by the radio communications; Investigacion sobre posibles riesgos a la salud humana por exposicion a la radiacion de ondas electromagneticas producidas por las radiocomunicaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Hernandez, Carlos Felipe; Ibarguengoytia Gonzalez, Pablo Hector; Flores Garcia, Andres; Franco Campos, Laura Elena [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2011-06-13

    This verification procedure is based on a research work on the possible risks to human health by exposure to the radiation of electromagnetic waves produced by the radio communications, cases of study: cellular telephony, radio digital troncalized and wireless telephony IP of Voice on IP (wireless local area network). The revision of all the international standards and the applicable national standardization was included, as well as the verification of fulfillment. [Spanish] Este procedimiento de verificacion esta basado en un trabajo de investigacion sobre posibles riesgos a la salud humana por exposicion a la radiacion de ondas electromagneticas producidas por la radiocomunicaciones, casos de estudio: telefonia celular, radio troncalizado digital y telefonia IP inalambrica de Voz sobre IP (red de area local inalambrica). Se incluyo la revision de todos los estandares internacionales y de la normatividad nacional aplicable, asi como la verificacion de cumplimiento.

  3. Morphodynamics of Disequilibrium Wave Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, K. L.; Koss, A.; Perron, T.; Myrow, P. M.; Southard, J. B.; Wickert, A. D.

    2011-12-01

    Sand ripples, one of the most commonly observed patterns in sedimentary environments, record the complex interplay between fluid flow and sediment transport in aeolian and hydrodynamic systems. Because of a well-known relationship between the wavelength of orbital ripples and the amplitude of wave-generated oscillatory flow, wave ripple patterns preserved in sedimentary rock are important paleoenvironmental indicators used to infer ancient wave conditions. Many previous studies have focused on the development of equilibrium ripple fields, in which the ripples have adjusted to a steady-state wavelength under the imposed flow conditions. However, natural ripple fields are often in disequilibrium because ripples typically evolve over time scales of minutes to hours, and wave conditions rarely remain constant over longer intervals. A complete theory of wave ripple morphodynamics therefore requires an understanding of transient dynamics, but the mechanisms by which two-dimensional ripple fields adjust to changed flow conditions are poorly understood. We performed a series of experiments in a field-scale laboratory wave tank to study the disequilibrium dynamics of orbital ripples. In each experiment, we subjected a level sand bed with small perturbations to constant wave forcing to establish an initial ripple field, and then imposed an abrupt change in wave conditions that would produce a different final ripple wavelength. To control for the influence of boundary shear stress on ripple adjustment rates or mechanisms, the final wave conditions were the same in all experiments. A variety of ripple defects emerged in our experiments during both the formation of an initial ripple field and its adjustment to changed wave conditions, though defects were generally more abundant during the adjustment stage. Different types of defects accommodated lengthening and shortening of the ripple wavelength. When the amplitude of the oscillatory flow was lengthened, cup-like depressions

  4. Avaliação não destrutiva de painéis de partículas de média densidade pelo método Stress Wave Timer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefânia Lima Oliveira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a eficiência da avaliação não destrutiva de propriedades mecânicas de painéis de madeira, pelo método de emissão de ondas de tensão (stress wave timer. Foram avaliados painéis MDP industriais, sendo cinco de eucalipto e cinco de pinus, ambos provindos de empresas nacionais, e outros cinco painéis de bagaço de cana importados da China. Para a avaliação não destrutiva dos painéis, foi utilizado o equipamento Metriguard, que utiliza o método de emissão de ondas de tensão Stress Wave Timer. O módulo de elasticidade (MOEd obtido pelo método de stress wave timer foi confrontado com os valores determinados por meio de ensaios convencionais destrutivos de MOE e módulo de ruptura (MOR à flexão estática. Em cada painel foram realizadas leituras nas direções longitudinal e transversal dos painéis. O método não destrutivo stress wave timer apresentou eficiência apenas para a utilização em painéis de bagaço de cana, podendo ser utilizado para predição do MOE e MOR desse tipo de painel.

  5. Gravitational waves: Stellar palaeontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Ilya; Farmer, Alison

    2017-07-01

    A third gravitational-wave signal has been detected with confidence, produced again by the merger of two black holes. The combined data from these detections help to reveal the histories of the stars that left these black holes behind.

  6. Comparison of myocardial ischemia during intense mental stress using flight simulation in airline pilots with coronary artery disease to that produced with conventional mental and treadmill exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorey, Andrew; Denenberg, Barry; Sagar, Vidya; Hanna, Tracy; Newman, Jack; Stone, Peter H

    2011-09-01

    Mental stress increases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although laboratory mental stress often causes less myocardial ischemia than exercise stress (ES), it is unclear whether mental stress is intrinsically different or differences are due to less hemodynamic stress with mental stress. We sought to evaluate the hemodynamic and ischemic response to intense realistic mental stress created by modern flight simulators and compare this response to that of exercise treadmill testing and conventional laboratory mental stress (CMS) testing in pilots with coronary disease. Sixteen airline pilots with angiographically documented coronary disease and documented myocardial ischemia during ES were studied using maximal treadmill ES, CMS, and aviation mental stress (AMS) testing. AMS testing was done in a sophisticated simulator using multiple system failures as stressors. Treadmill ES testing resulted in the highest heart rate, but AMS caused a higher blood pressure response than CMS. Maximal rate-pressure product was not significantly different between ES and AMS (25,646 vs 23,347, p = 0.08), although these were higher than CMS (16,336, p stress induced by ES and AMS, AMS resulted in significantly less ST-segment depression and nuclear ischemia than ES. Differences in induction of ischemia by mental stress compared to ES do not appear to be due to the creation of less hemodynamic stress. In conclusion, even with equivalent hemodynamic stress, intense realistic mental stress induced by flight simulators results in significantly less myocardial ischemia than ES as measured by ST-segment depression and nuclear ischemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Forces and stress in second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for condensed phase systems within the resolution-of-identity Gaussian and plane waves approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-01-01

    The forces acting on the atoms as well as the stress tensor are crucial ingredients for calculating the structural and dynamical properties of systems in the condensed phase. Here, these derivatives of the total energy are evaluated for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energy (MP2) in the framework of the resolution of identity Gaussian and plane waves method, in a way that is fully consistent with how the total energy is computed. This consistency is non-trivial, given the different ways employed to compute Coulomb, exchange, and canonical four center integrals, and allows, for example, for energy conserving dynamics in various ensembles. Based on this formalism, a massively parallel algorithm has been developed for finite and extended system. The designed parallel algorithm displays, with respect to the system size, cubic, quartic, and quintic requirements, respectively, for the memory, communication, and computation. All these requirements are reduced with an increasing number of processes, and the measured performance shows excellent parallel scalability and efficiency up to thousands of nodes. Additionally, the computationally more demanding quintic scaling steps can be accelerated by employing graphics processing units (GPU’s) showing, for large systems, a gain of almost a factor two compared to the standard central processing unit-only case. In this way, the evaluation of the derivatives of the RI-MP2 energy can be performed within a few minutes for systems containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions. With good time to solution, the implementation thus opens the possibility to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in various ensembles (microcanonical ensemble and isobaric-isothermal ensemble) at the MP2 level of theory. Geometry optimization, full cell relaxation, and energy conserving MD simulations have been performed for a variety of molecular crystals including NH 3 , CO 2 , formic acid, and benzene

  8. Forces and stress in second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory for condensed phase systems within the resolution-of-identity Gaussian and plane waves approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ben, Mauro; Hutter, Jürg; VandeVondele, Joost

    2015-09-01

    The forces acting on the atoms as well as the stress tensor are crucial ingredients for calculating the structural and dynamical properties of systems in the condensed phase. Here, these derivatives of the total energy are evaluated for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation energy (MP2) in the framework of the resolution of identity Gaussian and plane waves method, in a way that is fully consistent with how the total energy is computed. This consistency is non-trivial, given the different ways employed to compute Coulomb, exchange, and canonical four center integrals, and allows, for example, for energy conserving dynamics in various ensembles. Based on this formalism, a massively parallel algorithm has been developed for finite and extended system. The designed parallel algorithm displays, with respect to the system size, cubic, quartic, and quintic requirements, respectively, for the memory, communication, and computation. All these requirements are reduced with an increasing number of processes, and the measured performance shows excellent parallel scalability and efficiency up to thousands of nodes. Additionally, the computationally more demanding quintic scaling steps can be accelerated by employing graphics processing units (GPU's) showing, for large systems, a gain of almost a factor two compared to the standard central processing unit-only case. In this way, the evaluation of the derivatives of the RI-MP2 energy can be performed within a few minutes for systems containing hundreds of atoms and thousands of basis functions. With good time to solution, the implementation thus opens the possibility to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in various ensembles (microcanonical ensemble and isobaric-isothermal ensemble) at the MP2 level of theory. Geometry optimization, full cell relaxation, and energy conserving MD simulations have been performed for a variety of molecular crystals including NH3, CO2, formic acid, and benzene.

  9. Physical Health Conditions Associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in U.S. Older Adults: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objectives Trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may increase risk for medical conditions in older adults. We present findings on past-year medical conditions associated with lifetime trauma exposure, and full and partial PTSD, in a nationally representative sample of U.S. older adults. Design, Setting, Participants, and Measurements Face-to-face diagnostic interviews were conducted with 9,463 adults aged 60 and older in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic regression analyses adjusting for sociodemographics and psychiatric comorbidity evaluated associations between PTSD status and past-year medical disorders; linear regression models evaluated associations with past-month physical functioning. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid lifetime mood, anxiety, substance use, attention-deficit/hyperactivity, and personality disorders, respondents with lifetime PTSD were more likely than trauma controls to report being diagnosed by a healthcare professional with hypertension, angina pectoris, tachycardia, other heart disease, stomach ulcer, gastritis, and arthritis (odds ratios [ORs]=1.3–1.8); they also scored lower on a measure of physical functioning than controls and respondents with partial PTSD. Respondents with lifetime partial PTSD were more likely than controls to report past-year diagnoses of gastritis (OR=1.7), angina pectoris (OR=1.5), and arthritis (OR=1.4), and reported worse physical functioning. Number of lifetime traumatic event types was associated with most of the medical conditions assessed; adjustment for these events reduced the magnitudes of and rendered non-significant most associations between PTSD status and medical conditions. Conclusion Older adults with lifetime PTSD have elevated rates of several physical health conditions, many of which are chronic disorders of aging, and poorer physical functioning. Older adults with lifetime

  10. Medical Comorbidity of Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in United States Adults: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined associations between lifetime trauma exposures, PTSD and partial PTSD, and past-year medical conditions in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 34,653 participants in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic regression analyses evaluated associations of trauma exposure, PTSD and partial PTSD with respondent-reported medical diagnoses. Results After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbid Axis I and II disorders, respondents with full PTSD were more likely than traumatized respondents without full or partial PTSD (comparison group) to report diagnoses of diabetes mellitus, noncirrhotic liver disease, angina pectoris, tachycardia, hypercholesterolemia, other heart disease, stomach ulcer, HIV seropositivity, gastritis, and arthritis (odds ratios [ORs]=1.2-2.5). Respondents with partial PTSD were more likely than the comparison group to report past-year diagnoses of stomach ulcer, angina pectoris, tachycardia, and arthritis (ORs=1.3-1.6). Men with full and partial PTSD were more likely than controls to report diagnoses of hypertension (both ORs=1.6), and both men and women with PTSD (ORs=1.8 and 1.6, respectively), and men with partial PTSD (OR=2.0) were more likely to report gastritis. Total number of lifetime traumatic event types was associated with many assessed medical conditions (ORs=1.04-1.16), reducing the magnitudes and rendering non-significant some of the associations between PTSD status and medical conditions. Conclusions Greater lifetime trauma exposure and PTSD are associated with numerous medical conditions, many of which are stress-related and chronic, in U.S. adults. Partial PTSD is associated with intermediate odds of some of these conditions. PMID:21949429

  11. Evaluation of surface residual stresses VIA X-Ray diffraction in bars of AISI 1045 steel produced by combined cold drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, Rafael Menezes; Rocha, Alexandre da Silva

    2010-01-01

    The residual stresses represent one of the main potentials for the appearance of distortions, like bending and dimensional changes in mechanical components during the manufacturing process. This work accomplished an evaluation of the surface residual stresses from bars of AISI1045. The samples were removed from five steps of a combined cold-drawing process: pre-straightening, shot-blasting, cold-drawing with 15° and 20°, straightening and polishing by crossed rolls ('PERC') with 16° and 18°. Starting from obtained deformation values the level of surface longitudinal residual stresses for each accomplished point was estimated. (author)

  12. Energy in a String Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2010-01-01

    When one end of a taut horizontal elastic string is shaken repeatedly up and down, a transverse wave (assume sine waveform) will be produced and travel along it. College students know this type of wave motion well. They know when the wave passes by, each element of the string will perform an oscillating up-down motion, which in mechanics is termed…

  13. Stress Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    The following types of forces contribute to the stresses in a Dolos in a pack exposed to waves: 1)Gravity forces Compaction forces (mainly due to settlements, gravity and flow forces) 2) Flow forces 3) Impact forces (impacts between moving concrete blocks)......The following types of forces contribute to the stresses in a Dolos in a pack exposed to waves: 1)Gravity forces Compaction forces (mainly due to settlements, gravity and flow forces) 2) Flow forces 3) Impact forces (impacts between moving concrete blocks)...

  14. Gravitational wave astronomy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    In the past year, the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration announced the first secure detection of gravitational waves. This discovery heralds the beginning of gravitational wave astronomy: the use of gravitational waves as a tool for studying the dense and dynamical universe. In this talk, I will describe the full spectrum of gravitational waves, from Hubble-scale modes, through waves with periods of years, hours and milliseconds. I will describe the different techniques one uses to measure the waves in these bands, current and planned facilities for implementing these techniques, and the broad range of sources which produce the radiation. I will discuss what we might expect to learn as more events and sources are measured, and as this field matures into a standard part of the astronomical milieu.

  15. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2006-01-01

    from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57!27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world’s first offshore wave energy...... converter. The prototype is fully equipped with hydro turbines and automatic control systems, and is instrumented in order to monitor power production, wave climate, forces in mooring lines, stresses in the structure and movements of the Wave Dragon. In the period May 2003 to January 2005 an extensive...

  16. Prototype Testing of the Wave Energy Converter Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter Bak; Friis-Madsen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    from 1998 to 2001 extensive wave tank testing on a scale model was carried at Aalborg University. Then, a 57 x 27 m wide and 237 tonnes heavy (incl. ballast) prototype of the Wave Dragon, placed in Nissum Bredning, Denmark, was grid connected in May 2003 as the world's first offshore wave energy...... converter. The prototype is fully equipped with hydro turbines and automatic control systems, and is instrumented in order to monitor power production, wave climate, forces in mooring lines, stresses in the structure and movements of the Wave Dragon. During the last months, extensive testing has started...

  17. Finite element modelling of radial shock wave therapy for chronic plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamaali, Zaied K; Crocombe, Andrew D; Solan, Matthew C; Cirovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of high-amplitude pressure waves, or shock wave therapy (SWT), is emerging as a popular method for treating musculoskeletal disorders. However, the mechanism(s) through which this technique promotes healing are unclear. Finite element models of a shock wave source and the foot were constructed to gain a better understanding of the mechanical stimuli that SWT produces in the context of plantar fasciitis treatment. The model of the shock wave source was based on the geometry of an actual radial shock wave device, in which pressure waves are generated through the collision of two metallic objects: a projectile and an applicator. The foot model was based on the geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a volunteer and it comprised bones, cartilage, soft tissue, plantar fascia, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic simulations were conducted of a single and of two successive shock wave pulses administered to the foot. The collision between the projectile and the applicator resulted in a stress wave in the applicator. This wave was transmitted into the soft tissue in the form of compression-rarefaction pressure waves with an amplitude of the order of several MPa. The negative pressure at the plantar fascia reached values of over 1.5 MPa, which could be sufficient to generate cavitation in the tissue. The results also show that multiple shock wave pulses may have a cumulative effect in terms of strain energy accumulation in the foot.

  18. Effects of Induced Stress on Seismic Forward Modelling and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Jeroen; Trampert, Jeannot

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate how effects of induced stress may be incorporated in seismic modelling and inversion. Our approach is motivated by the accommodation of prestress in global seismology. Induced stress modifies both the equation of motion and the constitutive relationship. The theory predicts that induced pressure linearly affects the unstressed isotropic moduli with a slope determined by their adiabatic pressure derivatives. The induced deviatoric stress produces anisotropic compressional and shear wavespeeds; the latter result in shear-wave splitting. For forward modelling purposes, we determine the weak form of the equation of motion under induced stress. In the context of the inverse problem, we determine induced stress sensitivity kernels, which may be used for adjoint tomography. The theory is illustrated by considering 2D propagation of SH waves and related Fréchet derivatives based on a spectral-element method.

  19. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  20. Sporothrix brasiliensis produces the highest levels of oxidative stress in a murine model among the species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Nunes Mario

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: We compared indicators of oxidative stress in the tissue of mice infected with strains from Sporothrix schenckii complex. METHODS: Mice were inoculated with Sporothrix brasiliensis, Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto, Sporothrix globosa, Sporothrix mexicana or Sporothrix albicans. The activity of catalase and glutathione were accessed in the liver and spleen. RESULTS: Animals infected with S. brasiliensis exhibited splenomegaly and significant decrease in catalase activity, and protein and non-protein thiol content compared to animals infected with the other species. CONCLUSIONS: Sporothrix brasiliensis exhibits higher pathogenicity compared to other species of the Sporothrix schenckii complex by increasing oxidative stress in animal tissue.

  1. IGFBP2 Produces Rapid-Acting and Long-Lasting Effects in Rat Models of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder via a Novel Mechanism Associated with Structural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Colechio, Elizabeth M; Ghoreishi-Haack, Nayereh; Gross, Amanda L; Rex, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Stanton, Patric K; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2017-06-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is an anxiety disorder characterized by deficits in the extinction of aversive memories. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is the only growth factor that has shown anxiolytic and antidepressant properties in human clinical trials. In animal studies, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) shows both IGF1-dependent and IGF1-independent pharmacological effects, and IGFBP2 expression is upregulated by rough-and-tumble play that induces resilience to stress. IGFBP2 was evaluated in Porsolt, contextual fear conditioning, and chronic unpredictable stress models of posttraumatic stress disorder. The dependence of IGFBP2 effects on IGF1- and AMPA-receptor activation was tested using selective receptor antagonists. Dendritic spine morphology was measured in the dentate gyrus and the medial prefrontal cortex 24 hours after in vivo dosing. IGFBP2 was 100 times more potent than IGF1 in the Porsolt test. Unlike IGF1, effects of IGFBP2 were not blocked by the IGF1-receptor antagonist JB1, or by the AMPA-receptor antagonist 2,3-Dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4 tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX) in the Porsolt test. IGFBP2 (1 µg/kg) and IGF1 (100 µg/kg i.v.) each facilitated contextual fear extinction and consolidation. Using a chronic unpredictable stress paradigm, IGFBP2 reversed stress-induced effects in the Porsolt, novelty-induced hypophagia, sucrose preference, and ultrasonic vocalization assays. IGFBP2 also increased mature dendritic spine densities in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus 24 hours postdosing. These data suggest that IGFBP2 has therapeutic-like effects in multiple rat models of posttraumatic stress disorder via a novel IGF1 receptor-independent mechanism. These data also suggest that the long-lasting effects of IGFBP2 may be due to facilitation of structural plasticity at the dendritic spine level. IGFBP2 and mimetics may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder

  2. Two Dimensional Finite Element Analysis for the Effect of a Pressure Wave in the Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce L., Ernesto; Ponce S., Daniel

    2008-11-01

    Brain injuries in people of all ages is a serious, world-wide health problem, with consequences as varied as attention or memory deficits, difficulties in problem-solving, aggressive social behavior, and neuro degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Brain injuries can be the result of a direct impact, but also pressure waves and direct impulses. The aim of this work is to develop a predictive method to calculate the stress generated in the human brain by pressure waves such as high power sounds. The finite element method is used, combined with elastic wave theory. The predictions of the generated stress levels are compared with the resistance of the arterioles that pervade the brain. The problem was focused to the Chilean mining where there are some accidents happen by detonations and high sound level. There are not formal medical investigation, however these pressure waves could produce human brain damage.

  3. Magnetospheric plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawhan, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    A brief history of plasma wave observations in the Earth's magnetosphere is recounted and a classification of the identified plasma wave phenomena is presented. The existence of plasma waves is discussed in terms of the characteristic frequencies of the plasma, the energetic particle populations and the proposed generation mechanisms. Examples are given for which plasmas waves have provided information about the plasma parameters and particle characteristics once a reasonable theory has been developed. Observational evidence and arguments by analogy to the observed Earth plasma wave processes are used to identify plasma waves that may be significant in other planetary magnetospheres. The similarities between the observed characteristics of the terrestrial kilometric radiation and radio bursts from Jupiter, Saturn and possibly Uranus are stressed. Important scientific problems concerning plasma wave processes in the solar system and beyond are identified and discussed. Models for solar flares, flare star radio outbursts and pulsars include elements which are also common to the models for magnetospheric radio bursts. Finally, a listing of the research and development in terms of instruments, missions, laboratory experiments, theory and computer simulations needed to make meaningful progress on the outstanding scientific problems of plasma wave research is given. (Auth.)

  4. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. Part 1: Pressure distribution. Part 2: Wall shear stress. Part 3: Simplified formulas for the prediction of surface pressures and skin friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, T. C., Jr.; Liou, M. S.; Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    An asymptotic description is derived for the interaction between a shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer in transonic flow, for a particular limiting case. The dimensionless difference between the external flow velocity and critical sound speed is taken to be much smaller than one, but large in comparison with the dimensionless friction velocity. The basic results are derived for a flat plate, and corrections for longitudinal wall curvature and for flow in a circular pipe are also shown. Solutions are given for the wall pressure distribution and the shape of the shock wave. Solutions for the wall shear stress are obtained, and a criterion for incipient separation is derived. Simplified solutions for both the wall pressure and skin friction distributions in the interaction region are given. These results are presented in a form suitable for use in computer programs.

  5. Electron-Cyclotron Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1994-01-01

    The essential elements of the theory of electron cyclotron waves are reviewed, The two main electro-magnetic modes of propagation are identified and their dispersion and absorption properties are discussed. The importance of the use of the relativistic resonance condition is stressed.

  6. Visual expression analysis of the responses of the alternative oxidase gene (aox1) to heat shock, oxidative, and osmotic stresses in conidia of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Yuki; Hattori, Takasumi; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2012-03-01

    The citric acid-producing filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger WU-2223L shows cyanide-insensitive respiration catalyzed by alternative oxidase in addition to the cytochrome pathway. Sequence analysis of the 5' flanking region of the alternative oxidase gene (aox1) revealed a potential heat shock element (HSE) and a stress response element (STRE). We have previously confirmed aox1 expression in conidia. In this study, to confirm whether the upstream region of aox1 responds to various stresses, we used a visual expression analysis system for single-cell conidia of the A. niger strain AOXEGFP-1. This strain harbored a fusion gene comprising aox1 and egfp, which encodes the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The fluorescence intensity of EGFP increased in conidia of A. niger AOXEGFP-1 that were subjected to heat shock at 35-45 °C, oxidative stress by exposure to 5mM paraquat or 1 mM t-butylhydroperoxide, or osmotic stresses by exposure to 0.5 M KCl or 1.0 M mannitol. These results indicate that the putative HSE and STRE in the upstream region of aox1 directly or indirectly respond to heat shock, oxidative, and osmotic stresses. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  8. Novel Insights into the Global Proteome Responses of Insulin-Producing INS-1E Cells To Different Degrees of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Hertog, W.; Maris, M.; Ferreira, G.B.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of insulin-secreting beta-cells to inflammatory cytokines or high concentrations of free fatty acids, factors involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, beta-cell dysfunction, and eventually apoptotic beta-cell death. The aim...... led to the discovery of a clear pattern of defense pathways, with post-translational modifications playing a crucial role. Key alterations included inhibition of insulin translation and post-translational modifications in ER chaperones HYOU1 and HSPA5. Also, a central role for 14-3-3 proteins...... is suggested. In conclusion, INS-1E cells are highly sensitive to ER stress, leading to important post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications that may contribute to beta-cell dysfunction and death....

  9. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  10. Square-wave voltammetric determination of fungicide fenfuram in real samples on bare boron-doped diamond electrode, and its corrosion properties on stainless steels used to produce agricultural tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brycht, Mariola; Skrzypek, Sławomira; Kaczmarska, Kinga; Burnat, Barbara; Leniart, Andrzej; Gutowska, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • A bare boron-doped diamond electrode was first used to determine fenfuram. • A sensitive voltammetric procedure for the determination of fenfuram was developed. • The sensor showed high sensitivity, selectivity, and wide linear range. • The procedure was successfully applied to detect fenfuram in real samples. • The effect of fenfuram on the uniform and pitting corrosion of steel was stated. -- Abstract: A simple, selective, and sensitive electroanalytical method for the determination of a novel fungicide, fenfuram (Fnf), on a bare boron-doped diamond electrode (BDDE) using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) was developed. For the first time, the electrochemical oxidation of Fnf at BDDE at about 1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode in 0.35 mol L −1 sulfuric acid was investigated. To select the optimum experimental conditions, the effects of the supporting electrolyte, pH, frequency, amplitude, and step potential were studied. The developed method allowed the determination of Fnf in the concentration range of 2.4 × 10 −5 to 2.6 × 10 −4 mol L −1 (LOD = 6.3 × 10 −6 mol L −1 , LOQ = 2.1 × 10 −5 mol L −1 ). The validation of the method was carried out. The proposed procedure was successfully applied to determine Fnf in the spiked natural water samples collected from Polish rivers and in the spiked triticale seed samples by the standard addition method. To understand the Fnf electrode mechanism, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique was applied. The oxidation mechanism was also confirmed using mass spectrometry with the electrospray ionization (ESI-MS) technique. Using electrochemical techniques, the effect of Fnf on the corrosion properties of stainless steel which is used to produce agricultural tools was studied

  11. Gravitational waves from inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzzetti, M.C.; Bartolo, N.; Liguori, M.; Matarrese, S.

    2016-01-01

    The production of a stochastic background of gravitational waves is a fundamental prediction of any cosmological inflationary model. The features of such a signal encode unique information about the physics of the Early Universe and beyond, thus representing an exciting, powerful window on the origin and evolution of the Universe. We review the main mechanisms of gravitational-wave production, ranging from quantum fluctuations of the gravitational field to other mechanisms that can take place during or after inflation. These include e.g. gravitational waves generated as a consequence of extra particle production during inflation, or during the (p)reheating phase. Gravitational waves produced in inflation scenarios based on modified gravity theories and second-order gravitational waves are also considered. For each analyzed case, the expected power spectrum is given. We discuss the discriminating power among different models, associated with the validity/violation of the standard consistency relation between tensor-to-scalar ratio r and tensor spectral index ηT. In light of the prospects for (directly/indirectly) detecting primordial gravitational waves, we give the expected present-day gravitational radiation spectral energy-density, highlighting the main characteristics imprinted by the cosmic thermal history, and we outline the signatures left by gravitational waves on the Cosmic Microwave Background and some imprints in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe. Finally, current bounds and prospects of detection for inflationary gravitational waves are summarized.

  12. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Denne rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af forskellige flydergeometrier for bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  13. Generation and Analysis of Random Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Frigaard, Peter

    Sea waves are the most important phenomenon to be considered in the design of coastal and offshore structures. It should be stressed that, even though all contents in the book are related to sea waves, they have a broader application in practice. For example, the extreme theory has also been......-requirement for the book is the knowledge of linear wave theory....

  14. Gravitational Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jonah Maxwell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-18

    This report has slides on Gravitational Waves; Pound and Rebka: A Shocking Fact; Light is a Ruler; Gravity is the Curvature of Spacetime; Gravitational Waves Made Simple; How a Gravitational Wave Affects Stuff Here; LIGO; This Detection: Neutron Stars; What the Gravitational Wave Looks Like; The Sound of Merging Neutron Stars; Neutron Star Mergers: More than GWs; The Radioactive Cloud; The Kilonova; and finally Summary, Multimessenger Astronomy.

  15. Properties of information carrying waves in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recently we studied the effects of information carrying waves propagating through isotropic cosmologies. By information carrying we mean that the waves have an arbitrary dependence on a function. We found that the waves introduce shear and anisotropic stress into the universe. We then constructed explicit examples of pure gravity wave perturbations for which the presence of this anisotropic stress is essential and the null hypersurfaces playing the role of the histories of the wavefronts in the background space-time are shear free. Motivated by this result we now prove that these two properties are true for all information carrying waves in isotropic cosmologies

  16. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter; Sørensen, H. C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper concerns with the development of the wave energy converter (WEC) Wave Dragon. This WEC is based on the overtopping principle. An overview of the performed research done concerning the Wave Dragon over the past years is given, and the results of one of the more comprehensive studies...

  17. Wave phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Towne, Dudley H

    1988-01-01

    This excellent undergraduate-level text emphasizes optics and acoustics, covering inductive derivation of the equation for transverse waves on a string, acoustic plane waves, boundary-value problems, polarization, three-dimensional waves and more. With numerous problems (solutions for about half). ""The material is superbly chosen and brilliantly written"" - Physics Today. Problems. Appendices.

  18. Electromagnetic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book is dedicated to various aspects of electromagnetic wave theory and its applications in science and technology. The covered topics include the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves, theory of electromagnetic wave propagation and scattering, methods of computational analysis......, material characterization, electromagnetic properties of plasma, analysis and applications of periodic structures and waveguide components, etc....

  19. Formation of the Ni3Nb δ-Phase in Stress-Relieved Inconel 625 Produced via Laser Powder-Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Eric A.; Stoudt, Mark R.; Williams, Maureen E.; Katz, Michael B.; Levine, Lyle E.; Phan, Thien Q.; Gnaeupel-Herold, Thomas H.; Ng, Daniel S.

    2017-11-01

    The microstructural evolution of laser powder-bed additively manufactured Inconel 625 during a post-build stress-relief anneal of 1 hour at 1143 K (870 °C) is investigated. It is found that this industry-recommended heat treatment promotes the formation of a significant fraction of the orthorhombic D0a Ni3Nb δ-phase. This phase is known to have a deleterious influence on fracture toughness, ductility, and other mechanical properties in conventional, wrought Inconel 625; and is generally considered detrimental to materials' performance in service. The δ-phase platelets are found to precipitate within the inter-dendritic regions of the as-built solidification microstructure. These regions are enriched in solute elements, particularly Nb and Mo, due to the micro-segregation that occurs during solidification. The precipitation of δ-phase at 1073 K (800 °C) is found to require up to 4 hours. This indicates a potential alternative stress-relief processing window that mitigates δ-phase formation in this alloy. Ultimately, a homogenization heat treatment is recommended for additively manufactured Inconel 625 because the increased susceptibility to δ-phase precipitation increases the possibility for significant degradation of materials' properties in service.

  20. Merging Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This talk will focus on simulations of binary black hole mergers and the gravitational wave signals they produce. Applications to gravitational wave detection with LISA, and electronagnetic counterparts, will be highlighted.

  1. Mechanism of merging of torsional Alfven and slow magnetosonic waves produced by train of laser pulses upon irradiation of a target located in a space plasma with a magnetic field. Laboratory modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischenko, V. N.; Zakharov, Yu. P.; Posukh, V. G.; Berezutsky, A. G.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Melekhov, A. V.; Miroshnichenko, I. B.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.

    2017-10-01

    Experimentally, conditions under which a train of periodic laser plasma bunches creates a train of Alfven and a single slow magnetosonic waves which propagate in a tube of the geomagnetic field in the ionosphere were determined.

  2. The role of coral reef rugosity in dissipating wave energy and coastal protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Casella, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    Coral reefs are the most effective natural barrier in dissipating wave energy through breaking and bed friction. The attenuation of wave energy by coral reef flats is essential in the protection and stability of coral reef aligned coasts and reef islands. However, the effectiveness of wave energy dissipation by coral reefs may be diminished under future climate change scenarios with a potential reduction of coral reef rugosity due to increased stress environmental stress on corals. The physical roughness or rugosity of coral reefs is directly related to ecological diversity, reef health, and hydrodynamic roughness. However, the relationship between physical roughness and hydrodynamic roughness is not well understood despite the crucial role of bed friction in dissipating wave energy in coral reef aligned coasts. We examine the relationship between wave energy dissipation across a fringing reef in relation to the cross-reef ecological zonation and the benthic hydrodynamic roughness. Waves were measured by pressure transducers in a cross-reef transect on the reefs flats and post processed on a wave by wave basis to determine wave statistics such as significant wave height and wave period. Results from direct wave measurement were then used to calibrate a 1D wave dissipation model that incorporates dissipation functions due to bed friction and wave breaking. This model was used to assess the bed roughness required to produce the observed wave height dissipation during propagation from deep water and across the coral reef flats. Changes in wave dissipation was also examined under future scenarios of sea level rise and reduced bed roughness. Three dimensional models of the benthic reef structure were produced through structure-from-motion photogrammetry surveys. Reef rugosity was then determined from these surveys and related to the roughness results from the calibrated model. The results indicate that applying varying roughness coefficients as the benthic ecological

  3. Sensitivity of growth characteristics of tidal sand ridges and long bed waves to formulations of bed shear stress, sand transport and tidal forcing : A numerical model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Bing; de Swart, Huib E.; Panadès, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Tidal sand ridges and long bed waves are large-scale bedforms that are observed on continental shelves. They differ in their wavelength and in their orientation with respect to the principal direction of tidal currents. Previous studies indicate that tidal sand ridges appear in areas where tidal

  4. The generation of internal waves on the continental shelf by Hurricane Andrew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Timothy R.; Allen, Susan E.

    2000-11-01

    Observed currents, temperature, and salinity from moored instruments on the Louisiana continental slope and shelf reveal multiple baroclinic oscillations during Hurricane Andrew in August 1992. These measurements are supplemented by numerical models in order to identify possible internal wave generation mechanisms. The Princeton Ocean Model is run with realistic topography, stratification, and wind forcing to extend the observations to Mississippi Canyon and other areas on the shelf. A two-layer isopycnal model is used with idealized topography and spatially uniform winds to isolate internal waves generated in and around the canyon. The combination of the observations and the results from the numerical models indicates several possible mechanisms for generating long internal waves: (1) near-inertial internal waves were generated across the slope and shelf by dislocation of the thermocline by the wind stress; (2) interaction of inertial flow with topography generated internal waves along the shelf break, which bifurcated into landward and seaward propagating phases; (3) downwelling along the coast depressed the thermocline; after downwelling relaxes, an internal wave front propagates as a Kelvin wave; and (4) Poincaré waves generated within Mississippi Canyon propagate seaward while being advected westward over the continental slope. These processes interact to produce a three-dimensional internal wave field, which was only partly captured by the observations.

  5. Extra virgin olive oil reduces liver oxidative stress and tissue depletion of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids produced by a high saturated fat diet in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenzuela, R.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA which are synthesized mainly in the liver have relevant functions in the organism. A diet high in fat (HFD generates an increase in the levels of fat and induces oxidative stress (lipo-peroxidation in the liver, along with a reduction in tissue n-3 and n-6 LCPUFA. Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO is rich in anti-oxidants (polyphenols and tocopherols which help to prevent the development of oxidative stress. This study evaluated the role of EVOO in preventing the induction of fat deposition and oxidative stress in the liver and in the depletion of LCPUFA in the liver, erythrocytes and brain generated by a HFD in C57BL/6J mice. Four experimental groups (n = 10/group were fed a control diet (CD or a HFD for 12 weeks and were respectively supplemented with EVOO (100 mg/day. The group fed HFD showed a significant increase (p Los ácidos grasos poliinsaturados de cadena larga (AGPICL sintetizados principalmente por el hígado, cumplen funciones relevantes en el organismo. Una dieta alta en grasa (DAG genera un incremento en los niveles de grasa y estrés oxidativo (lipoperoxidación en hígado y una reducción en los niveles de AGPICL n-3 y n-6 en diferentes tejidos. El aceite de oliva extra virgen (AOEV es rico en antioxidantes (polifenoles y tocoferoles que ayudan a prevenir el desarrollo del estrés oxidativo. Este trabajo evaluó el rol del AOEV en la prevención del depósito de grasa, estrés oxidativo hepático y reducción de los AGPICL n-3 y n-6 en diferentes tejidos generado por una DAG en ratones C57BL/6J. Cuatro grupos experimentales (n=10/grupo fueron alimentados (12 semanas con dieta control (DC o DAG y suplementados con AOEV (100 mg/día. El grupo alimentado con DAG presentó un incremento (p < 0,05 en la acumulación de grasa y estrés oxidativo hepático, acompañado de una reducción en los niveles de AGPICL n-3 y n-6 en hígado, eritrocitos y cerebro. La suplementación con AOEV logr

  6. Evaluation of optical data gained by ARAMIS-measurement of abdominal wall movements for an anisotropic pattern design of stress-adapted hernia meshes produced by embroidery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, A.; Bittrich, L.; Hahn, J.; Spickenheuer, A.

    2017-10-01

    For the sustainable repair of abdominal wall hernia the application of hernia meshes is required. One reason for the relapse of hernia after surgery is seen in an inadequate adaption of the mechanical properties of the mesh to the movements of the abdominal wall. Differences in the stiffness of the mesh and the abdominal tissue cause tension, friction and stress resulting in a deficient tissue response and subsequently in a recurrence of a hernia, preferentially in the marginal area of the mesh. Embroidery technology enables a targeted influence on the mechanical properties of the generated textile structure by a directed thread deposition. Textile parameters like stitch density, alignment and angle can be changed easily and locally in the embroidery pattern to generate a space-resolved mesh with mechanical properties adapted to the requirement of the surrounding tissue. To determine those requirements the movements of the abdominal wall and the resulting distortions need to be known. This study was conducted to gain optical data of the abdominal wall movements by non-invasive ARAMIS-measurement on 39 test persons to estimate direction and value of the major strains.

  7. The prophylactic effect of vitamin C on induced oxidative stress in rat testis following exposure to 900 MHz radio frequency wave generated by a BTS antenna model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelodar, Gholamali; Nazifi, Saeed; Akbari, Abolfazl

    2013-09-01

    Radio frequency wave (RFW) generated by base transceiver station (BTS) has been reported to make deleterious effects on reproduction, possibly through oxidative stress. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFW generated by BTS on oxidative stress in testis and the prophylactic effect of vitamin C by measuring the antioxidant enzymes activity, including glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, and malondialdehyde (MDA). Thirty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four experimental groups and treated daily for 45 days as follows: sham, sham+vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid 200 mg/kg of body weight/day by gavage), RFW (exposed to 900 MHz RFW) 'sham' and 'RFW' animals were given the vehicle, i.e., distilled water and the RFW+vitamin C group (received vitamin C in addition to exposure to RFW). At the end of the experiment, all the rats were sacrificed and their testes were removed and used for measurement of antioxidant enzymes and MDA activity. The results indicate that exposure to RFW in the test group decreased antioxidant enzymes activity and increased MDA compared with the control groups (p < 0.05). In the treated group, vitamin C improved antioxidant enzymes activity and reduced MDA compared with the test group (p < 0.05). It can be concluded that RFW causes oxidative stress in testis and vitamin C improves the antioxidant enzymes activity and decreases MDA.

  8. Analytic model of the stress waves propagation in thin wall tubes, seeking the location of a harmonic point source in its surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boaratti, Mario Francisco Guerra

    2006-01-01

    Leaks in pressurized tubes generate acoustic waves that propagate through the walls of these tubes, which can be captured by accelerometers or by acoustic emission sensors. The knowledge of how these walls can vibrate, or in another way, how these acoustic waves propagate in this material is fundamental in the detection and localization process of the leak source. In this work an analytic model was implemented, through the motion equations of a cylindrical shell, with the objective to understand the behavior of the tube surface excited by a point source. Since the cylindrical surface has a closed pattern in the circumferential direction, waves that are beginning their trajectory will meet with another that has already completed the turn over the cylindrical shell, in the clockwise direction as well as in the counter clockwise direction, generating constructive and destructive interferences. After enough time of propagation, peaks and valleys in the shell surface are formed, which can be visualized through a graphic representation of the analytic solution created. The theoretical results were proven through measures accomplished in an experimental setup composed of a steel tube finished in sand box, simulating the condition of infinite tube. To determine the location of the point source on the surface, the process of inverse solution was adopted, that is to say, known the signals of the sensor disposed in the tube surface , it is determined through the theoretical model where the source that generated these signals can be. (author)

  9. Reliability of Wave Energy Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Simon

    There are many different working principles for wave energy converters (WECs) which are used to produce electricity from waves. In order for WECs tobecome successful and more competitive to other renewable electricity sources,the consideration of the structural reliability of WECs is essential.St...

  10. Gravitation Waves

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We will present a brief introduction to the physics of gravitational waves and their properties. We will review potential astrophysical sources of gravitational waves, and the physics and astrophysics that can be learned from their study. We will survey the techniques and technologies for detecting gravitational waves for the first time, including bar detectors and broadband interferometers, and give a brief status report on the international search effort, with special emphasis on the LIGO detectors and search results.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Adapts to Oxidative Stress by Producing H2O2-Resistant Small-Colony Variants via the SOS Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Kimberley L.; Strange, Elizabeth; Bamford, Kathleen B.; Armstrong-James, Darius

    2015-01-01

    The development of chronic and recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections is associated with the emergence of slow-growing mutants known as small-colony variants (SCVs), which are highly tolerant of antibiotics and can survive inside host cells. However, the host and bacterial factors which underpin SCV emergence during infection are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that exposure of S. aureus to sublethal concentrations of H2O2 leads to a specific, dose-dependent increase in the population frequency of gentamicin-resistant SCVs. Time course analyses revealed that H2O2 exposure caused bacteriostasis in wild-type cells during which time SCVs appeared spontaneously within the S. aureus population. This occurred via a mutagenic DNA repair pathway that included DNA double-strand break repair proteins RexAB, recombinase A, and polymerase V. In addition to triggering SCV emergence by increasing the mutation rate, H2O2 also selected for the SCV phenotype, leading to increased phenotypic stability and further enhancing the size of the SCV subpopulation by reducing the rate of SCV reversion to the wild type. Subsequent analyses revealed that SCVs were significantly more resistant to the toxic effects of H2O2 than wild-type bacteria. With the exception of heme auxotrophs, gentamicin-resistant SCVs displayed greater catalase activity than wild-type bacteria, which contributed to their resistance to H2O2. Taken together, these data reveal a mechanism by which S. aureus adapts to oxidative stress via the production of a subpopulation of H2O2-resistant SCVs with enhanced catalase production. PMID:25690100

  12. Modeling and experiments with low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelland, C; Bjarnø, Leif

    1992-01-01

    A model for wave propagation in a liquid-filled viscoelastic tube with arrays of receivers inside, is being used to analyze the influence of noise generated by in-line vibrational noise sources. In this model, distensibility is of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid....... The dispersion and attenuation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall. The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in stress wave transfer function experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion...... relations and frequency-dependent attenuation. A 12-m-long, liquid-filled tube with interior stress members and connectors in each end is hanging vertically from an upper fixture. The lower end connector is excited by a power vibrator to generate the relevant wave modes. Measurements with reference...

  13. Wave propagation in an initially stressed elastic half-space solids under time-fractional order two-temperature magneto-thermoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, N.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the magneto-thermoelastic disturbances in a homogeneous isotropic perfectly conducting thermoelastic semi-infinite medium caused by the hydrostatic initial stress is investigated. The theory of fractional order two-temperature generalized thermoelasticity associated with one relaxation time parameter is used. The normal mode analysis technique together with the method of displacement potentials are used to obtain the exact formulas of the two temperatures, displacement components, and stresses. Arbitrary application is chosen to enable us to get the complete solution. The considered field variables are presented graphically for a hypothetical material and then discussions are made for the obtained numerical results.

  14. GEODYNAMIC WAVES AND GRAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vikulin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available  Gravity phenomena related to the Earth movements in the Solar System and through the Galaxy are reviewed. Such movements are manifested by geological processes on the Earth and correlate with geophysical fields of the Earth. It is concluded that geodynamic processes and the gravity phenomena (including those of cosmic nature are related.  The state of the geomedium composed of blocks is determined by stresses with force moment and by slow rotational waves that are considered as a new type of movements [Vikulin, 2008, 2010]. It is shown that the geomedium has typical rheid properties [Carey, 1954], specifically an ability to flow while being in the solid state [Leonov, 2008]. Within the framework of the rotational model with a symmetric stress tensor, which is developed by the authors [Vikulin, Ivanchin, 1998; Vikulin et al., 2012a, 2013], such movement of the geomedium may explain the energy-saturated state of the geomedium and a possibility of its movements in the form of vortex geological structures [Lee, 1928]. The article discusses the gravity wave detection method based on the concept of interactions between gravity waves and crustal blocks [Braginsky et al., 1985]. It is concluded that gravity waves can be recorded by the proposed technique that detects slow rotational waves. It is shown that geo-gravitational movements can be described by both the concept of potential with account of gravitational energy of bodies [Kondratyev, 2003] and the nonlinear physical acoustics [Gurbatov et al., 2008]. Based on the combined description of geophysical and gravitational wave movements, the authors suggest a hypothesis about the nature of spin, i.e. own moment as a demonstration of the space-time ‘vortex’ properties.  

  15. Geometry of wave electromagnetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarshan, E. C.G.

    1980-10-27

    A challenge to the commonly held view of light as a wave phenomenon is presented. An exact realization of light as generalized pencils or rays is constructed, with stress placed on using pencils of rays rather than single rays. Exact equations of motion are presented for the rays in the pencil, and these rays tend to travel in straight lines in empty space (not too near the edge of the beam). (GHT)

  16. Deep sleep after social stress : NREM sleep slow-wave activity is enhanced in both winners and losers of a conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Lancel, Marike; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Meerlo, Peter

    Sleep is considered to be a recovery process of prior wakefulness. Not only duration of the waking period affects sleep architecture and sleep EEG, the quality of wakefulness is also highly important. Studies in rats have shown that social defeat stress, in which experimental animals are attacked

  17. Longitudinal Linkages between Depressive and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Adolescent Survivors Following the Wenchuan Earthquake in China: A Three-Wave, Cross-Lagged Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Liu-Hua; Wu, Xin-Chun; Lin, Chong-De

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationships between depressive and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of adolescent survivors following the Wenchuan earthquake in China. Two-hundred adolescent survivors were reviewed at 12, 18 and 24-months post-earthquake. Depression and PTSD were assessed by two self-report…

  18. Determinação do módulo de elasticidade em madeira laminada colada por meio de ensaio não destrutivo (''stress wave timer'' Determination of the elasticity module in glulam through a non destructive assay (stress wave timer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Bayestorff da Cunha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available As vigas estruturais de madeira são formas racionais do emprego da madeira na construção de estruturas, sendo obtidas pela associação de peças serradas e permitindo a utilização de tábuas com seções e comprimentos variados, além de combinações com madeira de qualidade diferenciada. Para atingir a resistência máxima de uma viga de madeira laminada colada, pode-se utilizar a classificação mecânica das peças por meio dinâmico. O objetivo deste estudo foi estabelecer correlação entre os métodos estático e dinâmico de classificação de vigas de madeira laminada. O trabalho foi desenvolvido com o emprego de peças de madeira serrada de Pinus taeda e adesivo resorcina fenolformaldeído. O processo de fabricação das vigas envolveu a classificação das peças, usinagem de emendas, formação das lamelas, montagem e prensagem das vigas. Já os ensaios envolveram a determinação do módulo de elasticidade por meio do ''stress wave method'' e de uma máquina universal de ensaios. Os resultados foram analisados pela análise de regressão do estabelecimento da equação de ajuste de correlação. O sistema de classificação visual utilizado na seleção de peças foi insuficiente para se atingirem os valores máximos de módulo de elasticidade; o posicionamento correto das lamelas por meio do método dinâmico de classificação teve como consequência direta o aumento do módulo de elasticidade da viga, e houve baixa correlação entre as formas de obtenção do módulo de elasticidade das vigas, não sendo possível a elaboração de equação adequada entre os métodos testados.Structural wood beams are a form of rational use of wood in construction of structures; being obtained through the association of sawn pieces, and allowing the use of boards with various sections and lengths, as well as combinations with a differentiated quality wood. To achieve the maximum strength of a Glulam, you can use the mechanical

  19. Avaliação não destrutiva de painéis de partículas de média densidade pelo método Stress Wave Timer

    OpenAIRE

    Stefânia Lima Oliveira; Rafael Farinassi Mendes; Lourival Marin Mendes; Carolina Rezende Pinto Narciso; Débora Pereira Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a eficiência da avaliação não destrutiva de propriedades mecânicas de painéis de madeira, pelo método de emissão de ondas de tensão (stress wave timer). Foram avaliados painéis MDP industriais, sendo cinco de eucalipto e cinco de pinus, ambos provindos de empresas nacionais, e outros cinco painéis de bagaço de cana importados da China. Para a avaliação não destrutiva dos painéis, foi utilizado o equipamento Metriguard, que utiliza o método de emissão de...

  20. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver numeriske beregninger af den hydrodynamiske interaktion mellem 5 flydere i bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  1. Bedforms induced by solitary waves: laboratory studies on generation and migration rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Forgia, Giovanni; Adduce, Claudia; Falcini, Federico; Paola, Chris

    2017-04-01

    This study presents experiments on the formation of sandy bedforms, produced by surface solitary waves (SSWs) in shallow water conditions. The experiments were carried out in a 12.0 m long, 0.15 m wide and 0.5 m high flume, at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory in Minneapolis. The tank is filled by fresh water and a removable gate, placed at the left hand-side of the tank, divides the flume in two regions: the lock region and the ambient fluid region. The standard lock-release method generates SSWs by producing a displacement between the free surfaces that are divided by the gate. Wave amplitude, wavelength, and celerity depend on the lock length and on the water level difference between the two regions. Natural sand particles (D50=0.64) are arranged on the bottom in order to form a horizontal flat layer with a thickness of 2 cm. A digital pressure gauge and a high-resolution acoustic velocimeter allowed us to measure, locally, both pressure and 3D water velocity induced on the bottom by each wave. Image analysis technique is then used to obtain the main wave features: amplitude, wavelength, and celerity. Dye is finally used as vertical tracer to mark the horizontal speed induced by the wave. For each experiment we generated 400 waves, having the same features and we analyzed their action on sand particles placed on the bottom. The stroke, induced by each wave, entails a shear stress on the sand particles, causing sediment transport in the direction of wave propagation. Immediately after the wave passage, a back flow occurs near the bottom. The horizontal pressure gradient and the velocity field induced by the wave cause the boundary layer separation and the consequent reverse flow. Depending on the wave features and on the water depth, the boundary shear stress induced by the reverse flow can exceed the critical value inducing the back motion of the sand particles. The experiments show that the particle back motion is localized at particular cross sections along the

  2. NONLINEAR GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE MEMORY FROM BINARY BLACK HOLE MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favata, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Some astrophysical sources of gravitational waves can produce a 'memory effect', which causes a permanent displacement of the test masses in a freely falling gravitational-wave detector. The Christodoulou memory is a particularly interesting nonlinear form of memory that arises from the gravitational-wave stress-energy tensor's contribution to the distant gravitational-wave field. This nonlinear memory contributes a nonoscillatory component to the gravitational-wave signal at leading (Newtonian-quadrupole) order in the waveform amplitude. Previous computations of the memory and its detectability considered only the inspiral phase of binary black hole coalescence. Using an 'effective-one-body' (EOB) approach calibrated to numerical relativity simulations, as well as a simple fully analytic model, the Christodoulou memory is computed for the inspiral, merger, and ringdown. The memory will be very difficult to detect with ground-based interferometers, but is likely to be observable in supermassive black hole mergers with LISA out to redshifts z ∼< 2. Detection of the nonlinear memory could serve as an experimental test of the ability of gravity to 'gravitate'.

  3. Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Knapp, W.

    2006-01-01

    power of the device. The project development team has gained much soft experience from working in the harsh offshore environment. In particular the effect of marine growth in the draft tubes of the turbines has been investigated. The control of the device has been a focus for development as is operates......Wave Dragon is a floating wave energy converter working by extracting energy principally by means of overtopping of waves into a reservoir. A 1:4.5 scale prototype has been sea tested for 20 months. This paper presents results from testing, experiences gained and developments made during...

  4. Prevalence and Axis I Comorbidity of Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the United States: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2010-01-01

    The present study used data from the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (n=34,653) to examine lifetime Axis I psychiatric comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Lifetime prevalences±standard errors of PTSD and partial PTSD were 6.4%±0.18 and 6.6%±0.18, respectively. Rates of PTSD and partial PTSD were higher among women (8.6%±0.26 and 8.6%±0.26) than men (4.1%±0.19 and 4.5%±0.21). Respondents with both PTSD and partial PTSD most commonly reported unexpected death of someone close, serious illness or injury to someone close, and sexual assault as their worst stressful experiences. PTSD and partial PTSD were associated with elevated lifetime rates of mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders, and suicide attempts. Respondents with partial PTSD generally had intermediate odds of comorbid Axis I disorders and psychosocial impairment relative to trauma controls and full PTSD. PMID:21168991

  5. Physiological, biochemical, and genome-wide transcriptional analysis reveals that elevated CO2 mitigates the impact of combined heat wave and drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana at multiple organizational levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinta, Gaurav; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Domagalska, Malgorzata A; Vergauwen, Lucia; Knapen, Dries; Nijs, Ivan; Janssens, Ivan A; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Asard, Han

    2014-12-01

    Climate changes increasingly threaten plant growth and productivity. Such changes are complex and involve multiple environmental factors, including rising CO2 levels and climate extreme events. As the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying plant responses to realistic future climate extreme conditions are still poorly understood, a multiple organizational level analysis (i.e. eco-physiological, biochemical, and transcriptional) was performed, using Arabidopsis exposed to incremental heat wave and water deficit under ambient and elevated CO2 . The climate extreme resulted in biomass reduction, photosynthesis inhibition, and considerable increases in stress parameters. Photosynthesis was a major target as demonstrated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. In contrast, the climate extreme treatment induced a protective effect on oxidative membrane damage, most likely as a result of strongly increased lipophilic antioxidants and membrane-protecting enzymes. Elevated CO2 significantly mitigated the negative impact of a combined heat and drought, as apparent in biomass reduction, photosynthesis inhibition, chlorophyll fluorescence decline, H2 O2 production, and protein oxidation. Analysis of enzymatic and molecular antioxidants revealed that the stress-mitigating CO2 effect operates through up-regulation of antioxidant defense metabolism, as well as by reduced photorespiration resulting in lowered oxidative pressure. Therefore, exposure to future climate extreme episodes will negatively impact plant growth and production, but elevated CO2 is likely to mitigate this effect. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  7. Unidirectional Transition Waves in Bistable Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Neel; Arrieta, Andres F; Chong, Christopher; Kochmann, Dennis M; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-06-17

    We present a model system for strongly nonlinear transition waves generated in a periodic lattice of bistable members connected by magnetic links. The asymmetry of the on-site energy wells created by the bistable members produces a mechanical diode that supports only unidirectional transition wave propagation with constant wave velocity. We theoretically justify the cause of the unidirectionality of the transition wave and confirm these predictions by experiments and simulations. We further identify how the wave velocity and profile are uniquely linked to the double-well energy landscape, which serves as a blueprint for transition wave control.

  8. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quickly. - Drink plenty of water regularly and often. - Eat small meals and eat more often. - Avoid using salt tablets ... plenty of water during a heat wave and eat smaller, more frequent meals. Text from "Are You Prepared?" by the Cass ( ...

  9. Efficient Wave Energy Amplification with Wave Reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Frigaard, Peter Bak

    2002-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WEC's) extract wave energy from a limited area, often a single point or line even though the wave energy is generally spread out along the wave crest. By the use of wave reflectors (reflecting walls) the wave energy is effectively focused and increased to approximately 130...... for different geometries of the wave reflectors and optimal geometrical design parameters are specified. On this basis inventors of WEC's can evaluate whether a specific WEC possible could benefit from wave reflectors....

  10. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, A.J.; Fisch, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided

  11. Strain Imaging Using Terahertz Waves and Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    polarization of incident EM waves by favoring the transmission of waves of a particular polarization. The interaction of some materials with incident...polarization of the waves after they have passed through the test material or object. Using the measured transmission intensity values, the...resolution. Shorter wavelength EM waves , such as visual light , have poor penetration ability but produce high-resolution images. However, the

  12. Psychiatric Comorbidity of Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Older Adults in the United States: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To present findings on the prevalence, correlates, and psychiatric comorbidity of DSM-IV posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and partial PTSD in a nationally representative sample of U.S. older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants Face-to-face interviews with 9,463 adults aged 60 years and older in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Measurements Sociodemographic correlates, worst stressful experiences, comorbid lifetime mood, anxiety, substance use, and personality disorders, psychosocial functioning, and suicide attempts. Results Lifetime prevalences±standard errors of PTSD and partial PTSD were 4.5%±0.25 and 5.5%±0.27, respectively. Rates were higher in women (5.7%±0.37 and 6.5%±0.39) than men (3.1%±0.31 and 4.3%±0.37). Older adults with PTSD most frequently identified unexpected death of someone close, serious illness or injury to someone close, and own serious or life-threatening illness as their worst stressful events. Older adults exposed to trauma but without full or partial PTSD and respondents with partial PTSD most often identified unexpected death of someone close, serious illness or injury to someone close, and indirect experience of 9/11 as their worst events. PTSD was associated with elevated odds of lifetime mood, anxiety, drug use, and borderline and narcissistic personality disorders, and decreased psychosocial functioning. Partial PTSD was associated with elevated odds of mood, anxiety, and narcissistic and schizotypal personality disorders, and poorer psychosocial functioning relative to older adults exposed to trauma but without full or partial PTSD. Conclusions PTSD among older adults in the United States is slightly more prevalent than previously reported and associated with considerable psychiatric comorbidity and psychosocial dysfunction. Partial PTSD is associated with significant psychiatric comorbidity, particularly with mood and other anxiety disorders. PMID:22522959

  13. Explosion-produced ground motion: technical summary with respect to seismic hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodean, Howard C.

    1970-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present technical knowledge, experimental and theoretical, of how underground nuclear explosions produce seismic motion that may be a hazard at distances measured in tens of kilometers. The effects of explosion yield and rock properties (at the explosion, along the signal propagation path, and at the site where a hazard may exist) on the ground motion are described in detail, and some consideration is given to the relation between ground motion and damage criteria. The energy released in a nuclear explosion is sufficient to vaporize the explosive and to generate an intense shock wave that is propagated outward into the surrounding rock. Part of the energy transported by the shock wave is dissipated in the shocked material. The shock wave strength decreases with distance from the center of the explosion as a consequence of this energy loss and because of geometric (approximately spherical) divergence. The dissipated energy fraction ranges from over 95% (for competent rocks like granite) to over 99% (for crushable, porous rocks like alluvium) of the explosion yield. Therefore, the energy fraction that is radiated in the form of seismic waves ranges from a few percent down to a few tenths of a percent. This is consistent with the observation that explosions in granite produce more severe ground motion than corresponding explosions in alluvium. The effects of explosion yield and rock properties on the frequency spectrum of the seismic source function are demonstrated by both experimental measurements and theoretical analysis. The characteristics of an ideal elastic medium are such that its frequency response is that of a low-pass filter, with its cutoff frequency being a function of the elastic properties of the material and the radius at which the explosion-produced stress wave becomes elastic. There is further frequency- and distance-dependent attenuation (especially of the higher frequencies) of the seismic waves, because rocks are not

  14. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Byggeri og Anlæg med bølgeenergianlæget Wave Star....

  15. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star.......Nærværende rapport beskriver modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star....

  16. Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this text is to document many of the lessons that have been learned during the author’s more than forty years in the field of blast and shock. The writing therefore takes on an historical perspective, in some sense, because it follows the author’s experience. The book deals with blast waves propagating in fluids or materials that can be treated as fluids. It begins by distinguishing between blast waves and the more general category of shock waves. It then examines several ways of generating blast waves, considering the propagation of blast waves in one, two and three dimensions as well as through the real atmosphere. One section treats the propagation of shocks in layered gases in a more detailed manner. The book also details the interaction of shock waves with structures in particular reflections, progressing from simple to complex geometries, including planar structures, two-dimensional structures such as ramps or wedges, reflections from heights of burst, and three-dimensional st...

  17. Disruption of rcsB by a duplicated sequence in a curli-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 results in differential gene expression in relation to biofilm formation, stress responses and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Bayles, D O; Alt, D P; Looft, T; Brunelle, B W; Stasko, J A

    2017-03-08

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (O157) strain 86-24, linked to a 1986 disease outbreak, displays curli- and biofilm-negative phenotypes that are correlated with the lack of Congo red (CR) binding and formation of white colonies (CR - ) on a CR-containing medium. However, on a CR medium this strain produces red isolates (CR + ) capable of producing curli fimbriae and biofilms. To identify genes controlling differential expression of curli fimbriae and biofilm formation, the RNA-Seq profile of a CR + isolate was compared to the CR - parental isolate. Of the 242 genes expressed differentially in the CR + isolate, 201 genes encoded proteins of known functions while the remaining 41 encoded hypothetical proteins. Among the genes with known functions, 149 were down- and 52 were up-regulated. Some of the upregulated genes were linked to biofilm formation through biosynthesis of curli fimbriae and flagella. The genes encoding transcriptional regulators, such as CsgD, QseB, YkgK, YdeH, Bdm, CspD, BssR and FlhDC, which modulate biofilm formation, were significantly altered in their expression. Several genes of the envelope stress (cpxP), heat shock (rpoH, htpX, degP), oxidative stress (ahpC, katE), nutrient limitation stress (phoB-phoR and pst) response pathways, and amino acid metabolism were downregulated in the CR + isolate. Many genes mediating acid resistance and colanic acid biosynthesis, which influence biofilm formation directly or indirectly, were also down-regulated. Comparative genomics of CR + and CR - isolates revealed the presence of a short duplicated sequence in the rcsB gene of the CR + isolate. The alignment of the amino acid sequences of RcsB of the two isolates showed truncation of RcsB in the CR + isolate at the insertion site of the duplicated sequence. Complementation of CR + isolate with rcsB of the CR - parent restored parental phenotypes to the CR + isolate. The results of this study indicate that RcsB is a global regulator affecting bacterial survival in

  18. Stress analysis of magnetically controlled reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Tong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To provide technique references for vibration reduction of magnetically controlled reactors (MCRs, stress, which is the inherent reason of vibration and noise, should be investigated. Stresses in reactor cores are produced due to the magnetostriction deformation of silicon steel and electromagnetic force between the core discs. So far, stress analysis on reactor cores was based on one-way coupled numerical method, which did not consider the influence of the stress on magnetic properties of the core material. Thus, multi-group magnetization and magnetostriction characteristics curves of silicon steel under different tensile stresses are measured firstly to support the computation. From the experiment results, it can be seen that magnetic properties of silicon steel change with stress. Then an electromagneto-mechanical two-way coupled numerical model for MCRs considering magnetostrictive effect and electromagnetic force effect is proposed. Stress distribution of MCR cores under the combination excitation of the sinusoidal wave current and different direct currents are calculated. From the computed results, it can be seen that a larger direct current has greater influence on MCRs vibration, which provides a theory basis for further analysis of vibration and noise reduction.

  19. Attosecond electron wave packet interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remetter, T.; Ruchon, T.; Johnsson, P.; Varju, K.; Gustafsson, E.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. The well controlled generation and characterization of attosecond XUV light pulses provide an unprecedented tool to study electron wave packets (EWPs). Here a train of attosecond pulses is used to create and study the phase of an EWP in momentum space. There is a clear analogy between electronic wave functions and optical fields. In optics, methods like SPIDER or wave front shearing interferometry, allow to measure the spectral or spatial phase of a light wave. These two methods are based on the same principle: an interferogram is produced when recombining two sheared replica of a light pulse, spectrally (SPIDER) or spatially (wave front shearing interferometry). This enables the comparison of two neighbouring different spectral or spatial slices of the original wave packet. In the experiment, a train of attosecond pulses is focused in an Argon atomic gas jet. EWPs are produced from the single XUV photon ionization of Argon atoms. If an IR beam is synchronized to the EWPs, it is possible to introduce a shear in momentum space between two consecutive s wave packets. A Velocity Map Imaging Spectrometer (VMIS) enables us to detect the interference pattern. An analysis of the interferograms will be presented leading to a conclusion about the symmetry of the studied wave packet.

  20. Measurement and modelling of bed shear induced by solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.

    horizontal continental shelf. Measurements of bed shear stress, surface elevation and flow velocities were carried out. Periodic waves were also generated and the bed shear stresses measured over a horizontal bed were found to be comparable with the earlier...

  1. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  2. Wave Generation Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Høgedal, Michael; Christensen, Morten

    The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered.......The intention of this manual is to provide some formulas and techniques which can be used for generating waves in hydraulic laboratories. Both long crested waves (2-D waves) and short crested waves (3-D waves) are considered....

  3. Failure waves in shock-compressed glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanel, Gennady I.

    2005-07-01

    The failure wave is a network of cracks that are nucleated on the surface and propagate into the elastically stressed body. It is a mode of catastrophic fracture in an elastically stressed media whose relevance is not limited to impact events. In the presentation, main properties of the failure waves are summarized and discussed. It has been shown that the failure wave is really a wave process which is characterized by small increase of the longitudinal stress and corresponding increments of the particle velocity and the density. The propagation velocity of the failure wave is less than the sound speed; it is not directly related to the compressibility but is determined by the crack growth speed. Transformation of elastic compression wave followed by the failure wave in a thick glass plate into typical two-wave configuration in a pile of thin glass plates confirms crucial role of the surfaces. The latter, as well as specific kinematics of the process distinguishes the failure wave from a time-dependent inelastic compressive behavior of brittle materials. The failure wave is steady if the stress state ahead of it is supported unchanging. Mechanism of this self-supporting propagation of compressive fracture is not quite clear as yet. On the other hand, collected data about its kinematics allow formulating phenomenological models of the phenomenon. In some sense the process is similar to the diffusion of cracks from a source on the glass surface. However, the diffusion-like models contradict to observed steady propagation of the failure wave. Analogy with a subsonic combustion wave looks more fruitful. Computer simulations based on the phenomenological combustion-like model reproduces well all kinematical aspects of the phenomenon.

  4. On the Energy of Rotating Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Mashhoon, Bahram; McClune, James C.; Chavez, Enrique; Quevedo, Hernando

    1996-01-01

    A class of solutions of the gravitational field equations describing vacuum spacetimes outside rotating cylindrical sources is presented. A subclass of these solutions corresponds to the exterior gravitational fields of rotating cylindrical systems that emit gravitational radiation. The properties of these rotating gravitational wave spacetimes are investigated. In particular, we discuss the energy density of these waves using the gravitational stress-energy tensor.

  5. Laboratory observations of flow and sediment transport induced by plunging regular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Güner, Anil; Hansen, Nilas Mandrup

    2013-01-01

    of pore-water pressures as well as observation of sediment suspension and bed morphological changes. Both experiments utilize the same initial bed profile and wave forcing. The experiments show that the mean bed shear stresses experienced onshore of incipient breaking are amplified by nearly a factor of 2...... can significantly enhance peaks in the offshoredirected bed shear stresses. Moreover, near-bed pore pressure measurements indicate that these vortices cause large upward-directed pressure gradients, which in turn produce a corresponding series of suspended sediment plumes shoreward of the initial...

  6. Holographic magnetisation density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donos, Aristomenis [Centre for Particle Theory and Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University,Stockton Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Pantelidou, Christiana [Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica & Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC),Universitat de Barcelona,Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-10

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D=4 Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two U(1) gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to d=3 CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the U(1)’s. Below a critical temperature the system’s magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  7. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    plitude waves and finite amplitude waves. This article provides a brief introduction to finite amplitude wave theories. Some of the general characteristics of waves as well as the importance of finite amplitude wave theories are touched upon. 2. Small Amplitude Waves. The topmost and the lowest levels of the waves are re-.

  8. Mechanisms of realization of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence physiological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, there is generalized material of many experimental researches in interaction of THz-waves molecular emission and absorption spectrum (MEAS of nitrogen oxide occurrence with bioobjects. Thrombocytes and experimental animals were used as bioobjects. The experiments let indicate changes caused by THz-waves: at the cellular, tissular, system, organismic levels. There are all data of changes in physiological mechanisms of reglations at all levels: autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and nervous. There is a complex overview of experimental material firstly performed in the article. There had been shown that the effect of THz-waves of the given occurrence is realized by the changed activity of nitroxidergic system. It had been proved that THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence can stimulate nitrogen oxide producing in organs and tissues in condition of its low concentration. Possible mechanisms of antiaggregative effect of the given waves had been described. There had been shown the possibility of regulating of vascular tone and system hemodynamics with the help of the studying these frequencies. The represented data of lipid peroxidation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic components of organism system under the influence of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence in stress conditions. Besides, there were shown changes of stress-regulating system activity and in concentration of important mediators - catecholamines and glucocorticosteroids. These data let characterize mechanism of realization of THz-waves basic effects. The research had shown the possibility of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence usage as a method of natural physiological noninvasive regulation of significant organism functions.

  9. Partial wave analysis of the low-mass Kππ systems produced diffractively and by charge-exchange in 4.2 GeV/c K-p interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergeest, J.S.M.

    1979-01-01

    In this thesis the author studies the (antiKππ) - system diffractively produced in the reactions K - p → K - π - π + p and K - p → anti K 0 π - π 0 p as well as the (anti Kππ) 0 system produced by charge-exchange: K - p → anti K 0 π + π - n. The data are obtained in a high statistics experiment with incident K - mesons at 4.2 GeV/c, using the CERN 2-metre hydrogen bubble chamber. (Auth.)

  10. Near-perfect conversion of a propagating plane wave into a surface wave using metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcvetkova, S. N.; Kwon, D.-H.; Díaz-Rubio, A.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper theoretical and numerical studies of perfect/nearly perfect conversion of a plane wave into a surface wave are presented. The problem of determining the electromagnetic properties of an inhomogeneous lossless boundary which would fully transform an incident plane wave into a surface wave propagating along the boundary is considered. An approximate field solution which produces a slowly growing surface wave and satisfies the energy conservation law is discussed and numerically demonstrated. The results of the study are of great importance for the future development of such devices as perfect leaky-wave antennas and can potentially lead to many novel applications.

  11. Biomarkers involved in energy metabolism and oxidative stress response in the liver of Goodea gracilis Hubbs and Turner, 1939 exposed to the microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa LB85 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Rubio, Hugo F; Martínez-Torres, M Lysset; Nájera-Martínez, Minerva; Dzul-Caamal, Ricardo; Domínguez-López, María Lilia; García-Latorre, Ethel; Vega-López, Armando

    2015-09-01

    Goodea gracilis is an endemic fish that only habitats in some water bodies of Central Mexico that are contaminated with cyanobacteria-producing microcystins (MC); however, a lack of information on this topic prevails. With the aim to generate the first approximation about the physiological changes elicited by cyanobacterium that produce MC congeners in this fish species, specimens born in the laboratory was exposed for 96 h to cell densities of 572.5, 1145, 2290, 4580, and 9160 × 10(6) cells of Microcystis aeruginosa strain LB85/L, and a set of novel endpoint related to hepatic gluconeogenesis (ADH/LDH) and pro-oxidant forces O2., H2 O2 ) in addition to biomarkers of oxidative damage and antioxidant response was evaluated in the liver. Results suggest that high inhibition of protein serine/threonine phosphatase (PP) may trigger many metabolic processes, such as those related to hepatic gluconeogenesis (ADH/LDH) and pro-oxidant O2⋅, H2 O2 , TBARS, ROOH, RC=O) as well as antioxidant (SOD, CAT, GPx) response to oxidative stress. Particularly, we observed that inhibition of LDH and PP, and H2 O2 increase and TBARS production were the key damages induced by high densities of M. aeruginosa. However, changes between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism related with ROS metabolism and ADH/LDH balance are apparently an acclimation of this fish species to exposure to cyanobacteria or their MCs. Fish species living in environments potentially contaminated with cyanobacteria or their MCs possess mechanisms of acclimation that allow them to offset the damage induced, even in the case of fish that have never been exposed to MCs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Earth is considered as an initially stressed body with a layered ... Keywords. Torsional wave; anisotropy; initial stress; irregularity; non-homogeneity. J. Earth Syst. Sci., DOI 10.1007/s12040-016-0689-7, 125, No. 4, June 2016, pp. 885–895 ...... wave dispersion in a finitely prestrained hollow sandwich circular cylinder; J.

  13. Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of irregularity on torsional surface waves in an initially stressed anisotropic porous layer sandwiched between homogeneous and non-homogeneous half- ... Torsional wave; anisotropy; initial stress; irregularity; non-homogeneity ... Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad 826 004, India.

  14. Calculation of surface acoustic waves in a multilayered piezoelectric structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zuwei; Wen Zhiyu; Hu Jing

    2013-01-01

    The propagation properties of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) in a ZnO—SiO 2 —Si multilayered piezoelectric structure are calculated by using the recursive asymptotic method. The phase velocities and the electromechanical coupling coefficients for the Rayleigh wave and the Love wave in the different ZnO—SiO 2 —Si structures are calculated and analyzed. The Love mode wave is found to be predominantly generated since the c-axis of the ZnO film is generally perpendicular to the substrate. In order to prove the calculated results, a Love mode SAW device based on the ZnO—SiO 2 —Si multilayered structure is fabricated by micromachining, and its frequency responses are detected. The experimental results are found to be mainly consistent with the calculated ones, except for the slightly larger velocities induced by the residual stresses produced in the fabrication process of the films. The deviation of the experimental results from the calculated ones is reduced by thermal annealing. (semiconductor physics)

  15. Novel wave power analysis linking pressure-flow waves, wave potential, and the forward and backward components of hydraulic power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Smolich, Joseph J

    2016-04-15

    Wave intensity analysis provides detailed insights into factors influencing hemodynamics. However, wave intensity is not a conserved quantity, so it is sensitive to diameter variations and is not distributed among branches of a junction. Moreover, the fundamental relation between waves and hydraulic power is unclear. We, therefore, propose an alternative to wave intensity called "wave power," calculated via incremental changes in pressure and flow (dPdQ) and a novel time-domain separation of hydraulic pressure power and kinetic power into forward and backward wave-related components (ΠP±and ΠQ±). Wave power has several useful properties:1) it is obtained directly from flow measurements, without requiring further calculation of velocity;2) it is a quasi-conserved quantity that may be used to study the relative distribution of waves at junctions; and3) it has the units of power (Watts). We also uncover a simple relationship between wave power and changes in ΠP±and show that wave reflection reduces transmitted power. Absolute values of ΠP±represent wave potential, a recently introduced concept that unifies steady and pulsatile aspects of hemodynamics. We show that wave potential represents the hydraulic energy potential stored in a compliant pressurized vessel, with spatial gradients producing waves that transfer this energy. These techniques and principles are verified numerically and also experimentally with pressure/flow measurements in all branches of a central bifurcation in sheep, under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. The proposed "wave power analysis," encompassing wave power, wave potential, and wave separation of hydraulic power provides a potent time-domain approach for analyzing hemodynamics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Gravitational wave propagation in isotropic cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, P.A.; O'Shea, E.M.

    2002-01-01

    We study the propagation of gravitational waves carrying arbitrary information through isotropic cosmologies. The waves are modeled as small perturbations of the background Robertson-Walker geometry. The perfect fluid matter distribution of the isotropic background is, in general, modified by small anisotropic stresses. For pure gravity waves, in which the perturbed Weyl tensor is radiative (i.e. type N in the Petrov classification), we construct explicit examples for which the presence of the anisotropic stress is shown to be essential and the histories of the wave fronts in the background Robertson-Walker geometry are shear-free null hypersurfaces. The examples derived in this case are analogous to the Bateman waves of electromagnetic theory

  17. Shock Wave Structure in Polyurethane Foam

    OpenAIRE

    ONODERA, Hideki; TAKAYAMA, Kazuyoshi

    1994-01-01

    Shock wave propagation in polyurethane (PU(R)) foam was experimentally studied. The experiment was conducted in a shock tube by measuring pressure along the PU(R) foam in a shock tube, by means of holographic interferometry and streak camera recording. It was found that the stress-strain curve of PU(R) has an inflection point. When the pressure behind the incident shock wave was below the inflection-point pressure P_c, the wave impedance ratio of the incident shock wave and transmitted pressu...

  18. Impact of Wave Dragon on Wave Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Tedd, James; Kramer, Morten

    This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator.......This report is an advisory paper for use in determining the wave dragon effects on hydrography, by considering the effect on the wave climate in the region of a wave dragon. This is to be used in the impact assessment for the Wave Dragon pre-commercial demonstrator....

  19. Langmuir wave turbulence generated by electromagnetic waves in the laboratory and the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.C.; Riddolls, R.J.; Moriarty, D.T.; Dalrymple, N.E.; Rowlands, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors will present some recent results of the laboratory experiments at MIT, using a large plasma device known as the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF). These experiments are aimed at cross-checking the ionospheric plasma heating experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico using an HF heating facility (heater). The plasma phenomenon under investigation is the spectral characteristic of Langmuir wave turbulence produced by ordinary (o-mode) electromagnetic pump waves. The Langmuir waves excited by o-mode heaters waves at Arecibo have both a frequency-upshifted spectrum and a frequency-downshifted (viz., cascading) spectrum. While the cascading spectrum can be well explained in terms of the parametric decay instability (PDI), the authors have interpreted the frequency-upshifted Langmuir waves to be anti-Stokes Langmuir waves produced by a nonlinear scattering process as follows. Lower hybrid waves creates presumably by lightning-induced whistler waves can scatter nonlinearly the PDI-excited mother langmuir waves, yielding obliquely propagating langmuir waves with frequencies as the summation of the mother Langmuir wave frequencies and the lower hybrid wave frequencies. This suggested process has been confirmed in the laboratory experiments, that can reproduce the characteristic spectra of Langmuir wave turbulence observed in the Arecibo experiments

  20. Gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Moschella, U; Fre, P

    2001-01-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) are a hot topic and promise to play a central role in astrophysics, cosmology, and theoretical physics. Technological developments have led us to the brink of their direct observation, which could become a reality in the coming years. The direct observation of GWs will open an entirely new field: GW astronomy. This is expected to bring a revolution in our knowledge of the universe by allowing the observation of previously unseen phenomena, such as the coalescence of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes), the fall of stars into supermassive black holes, stellar core collapses, big-bang relics, and the new and unexpected.With a wide range of contributions by leading scientists in the field, Gravitational Waves covers topics such as the basics of GWs, various advanced topics, GW detectors, astrophysics of GW sources, numerical applications, and several recent theoretical developments. The material is written at a level suitable for postgraduate students entering the field.

  1. Wave Star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten; Frigaard, Peter; Brorsen, Michael

    Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004.......Nærværende rapport beskriver foreløbige hovedkonklusioner på modelforsøg udført på Aalborg Universitet, Institut for Vand, Jord og Miljøteknik med bølgeenergianlægget Wave Star i perioden 13/9 2004 til 12/11 2004....

  2. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  3. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  4. The Protective Role of Carbon Monoxide (CO) Produced by Heme Oxygenases and Derived from the CO-Releasing Molecule CORM-2 in the Pathogenesis of Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions: Evidence for Non-Involvement of Nitric Oxide (NO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magierowska, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Surmiak, Marcin; Adamski, Juliusz; Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka Irena; Pajdo, Robert; Sliwowski, Zbigniew; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) produced by heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and HO-2 or released from the CO-donor, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimer (CORM-2) causes vasodilation, with unknown efficacy against stress-induced gastric lesions. We studied whether pretreatment with CORM-2 (0.1–10 mg/kg oral gavage (i.g.)), RuCl3 (1 mg/kg i.g.), zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)), hemin (1–10 mg/kg i.g.) and CORM-2 (1 mg/kg i.g.) combined with NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA, 20 mg/kg i.p.), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 mg/kg i.p.), indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.p.), SC-560 (5 mg/kg i.g.), and celecoxib (10 mg/kg i.g.) affects gastric lesions following 3.5 h of water immersion and restraint stress (WRS). Gastric blood flow (GBF), the number of gastric lesions and gastric CO and nitric oxide (NO) contents, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level and the gastric expression of HO-1, HO-2, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) were determined. CORM-2 (1 mg/kg i.g.) and hemin (10 mg/kg i.g.) significantly decreased WRS lesions while increasing GBF, however, RuCl3 was ineffective. The impact of CORM-2 was reversed by ZnPP, ODQ, indomethacin, SC-560 and celecoxib, but not by l-NNA. CORM-2 decreased NO and increased HO-1 expression and CO and COHb content, downregulated HIF-1α, as well as WRS-elevated COX-2 and iNOS mRNAs. Gastroprotection by CORM-2 and HO depends upon CO’s hyperemic and anti-inflammatory properties, but is independent of NO. PMID:27023525

  5. The Protective Role of Carbon Monoxide (CO Produced by Heme Oxygenases and Derived from the CO-Releasing Molecule CORM-2 in the Pathogenesis of Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions: Evidence for Non-Involvement of Nitric Oxide (NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Magierowska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO produced by heme oxygenase (HO-1 and HO-2 or released from the CO-donor, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II dimer (CORM-2 causes vasodilation, with unknown efficacy against stress-induced gastric lesions. We studied whether pretreatment with CORM-2 (0.1–10 mg/kg oral gavage (i.g., RuCl3 (1 mg/kg i.g., zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p., hemin (1–10 mg/kg i.g. and CORM-2 (1 mg/kg i.g. combined with NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA, 20 mg/kg i.p., 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 mg/kg i.p., indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.p., SC-560 (5 mg/kg i.g., and celecoxib (10 mg/kg i.g. affects gastric lesions following 3.5 h of water immersion and restraint stress (WRS. Gastric blood flow (GBF, the number of gastric lesions and gastric CO and nitric oxide (NO contents, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb level and the gastric expression of HO-1, HO-2, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 and inducible NO synthase (iNOS were determined. CORM-2 (1 mg/kg i.g. and hemin (10 mg/kg i.g. significantly decreased WRS lesions while increasing GBF, however, RuCl3 was ineffective. The impact of CORM-2 was reversed by ZnPP, ODQ, indomethacin, SC-560 and celecoxib, but not by l-NNA. CORM-2 decreased NO and increased HO-1 expression and CO and COHb content, downregulated HIF-1α, as well as WRS-elevated COX-2 and iNOS mRNAs. Gastroprotection by CORM-2 and HO depends upon CO’s hyperemic and anti-inflammatory properties, but is independent of NO.

  6. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  7. Types of Stresses Experienced by Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; And Others

    This study was conducted to examine the types of stresses experienced by professionals. Subjects were 56 persons enrolled in graduate classes who completed the Tennessee Stress Scale-L, Work Related Stress Inventory for Professionals. Besides the Total stress score, the instrument produced three subscale scores: Stress Producers, Coping…

  8. Assimilation of Wave Imaging Radar Observations for Real-time Wave-by-Wave Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Alexandra [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Haller, Merrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Civil & Construction Engineering; Walker, David [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lynett, Pat [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This project addressed Topic 3: “Wave Measurement Instrumentation for Feed Forward Controls” under the FOA number DE-FOA-0000971. The overall goal of the program was to develop a phase-resolving wave forecasting technique for application to the active control of Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) devices. We have developed an approach that couples a wave imaging marine radar with a phase-resolving linear wave model for real-time wave field reconstruction and forward propagation of the wave field in space and time. The scope of the project was to develop and assess the performance of this novel forecasting system. Specific project goals were as follows: Develop and verify a fast, GPU-based (Graphical Processing Unit) wave propagation model suitable for phase-resolved computation of nearshore wave transformation over variable bathymetry; Compare the accuracy and speed of performance of the wave model against a deep water model in their ability to predict wave field transformation in the intermediate water depths (50 to 70 m) typical of planned WEC sites; Develop and implement a variational assimilation algorithm that can ingest wave imaging radar observations and estimate the time-varying wave conditions offshore of the domain of interest such that the observed wave field is best reconstructed throughout the domain and then use this to produce model forecasts for a given WEC location; Collect wave-resolving marine radar data, along with relevant in situ wave data, at a suitable wave energy test site, apply the algorithm to the field data, assess performance, and identify any necessary improvements; and Develop a production cost estimate that addresses the affordability of the wave forecasting technology and include in the Final Report. The developed forecasting algorithm (“Wavecast”) was evaluated for both speed and accuracy against a substantial synthetic dataset. Early in the project, performance tests definitively demonstrated that the system was capable of

  9. Stem breakage of salt marsh vegetation under wave forcing: A field and model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuik, Vincent; Suh Heo, Hannah Y.; Zhu, Zhenchang; Borsje, Bas W.; Jonkman, Sebastiaan N.

    2018-01-01

    One of the services provided by coastal ecosystems is wave attenuation by vegetation, and subsequent reduction of wave loads on flood defense structures. Therefore, stability of vegetation under wave forcing is an important factor to consider. This paper presents a model which determines the wave load that plant stems can withstand before they break or fold. This occurs when wave-induced bending stresses exceed the flexural strength of stems. Flexural strength was determined by means of three-point-bending tests, which were carried out for two common salt marsh species: Spartina anglica (common cord-grass) and Scirpus maritimus (sea club-rush), at different stages in the seasonal cycle. Plant stability is expressed in terms of a critical orbital velocity, which combines factors that contribute to stability: high flexural strength, large stem diameter, low vegetation height, high flexibility and a low drag coefficient. In order to include stem breakage in the computation of wave attenuation by vegetation, the stem breakage model was implemented in a wave energy balance. A model parameter was calibrated so that the predicted stem breakage corresponded with the wave-induced loss of biomass that occurred in the field. The stability of Spartina is significantly higher than that of Scirpus, because of its higher strength, shorter stems, and greater flexibility. The model is validated by applying wave flume tests of Elymus athericus (sea couch), which produced reasonable results with regards to the threshold of folding and overall stem breakage percentage, despite the high flexibility of this species. Application of the stem breakage model will lead to a more realistic assessment of the role of vegetation for coastal protection.

  10. Secondary current properties generated by wind-induced water waves in experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Sanjou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary currents such as the Langmuir circulation are of high interest in natural rivers and the ocean because they have striking impacts on scour, sedimentation, and mass transport. Basic characteristics have been well-studied in straight open-channel flows. However, little is known regarding secondary circulation induced by wind waves. The presented study describes the generation properties of wind waves observed in the laboratory tank. Wind-induced water waves are known to produce large scale circulations. The phenomenon is observed together with high-speed and low-speed streaks, convergence and divergence zones, respectively. Therefore, it is important to determine the hydrodynamic properties of secondary currents for wind-induced water waves within rivers and lakes. In this study, using two high-speed CMOS cameras, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV measurements were conducted in order to reveal the distribution of all three components of velocity vectors. The experiments allowed us to investigate the three-dimensional turbulent structure under water waves and the generation mechanism of large-scale circulations. Additionally, a third CMOS camera was used to measure the spanwise profile of thefree-surface elevation. The time-series of velocity components and the free-surface were obtained simultaneously. From our experiments, free-surface variations were found to influence the instantaneous velocity distributions of the cross-sectional plane. We also considered thegeneration process by the phase analysis related to gravity waves and compared the contribution of the apparent stress.

  11. Generation of Shock-Wave Disturbances at Plasma-Vapor Bubble Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, N. S.; Yudin, A. S.; Voitenko, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    The complex physical and mathematical model describing all steps of plasma-vapor bubble evolution in the system of the water-ground condensed media is presented. Discharge circuit operation, discharge plasma channel expansion, its transformation into the vapor-plasma bubble and its pulsation, pressure wave generation and propagation of the mechanical stress waves in the ground are self-consistently considered in the model. The model allows investigation of the basic laws of stored energy transformation into the discharge plasma channel, next to the plasma-vapor bubble and transformation of this energy to the energy of pressure wave compressing the surrounding ground. Power characteristics of wave disturbances generated by gas-vapor bubble oscillation in liquid depending on the circuit parameters are analyzed for the prediction of the ground boundary displacement. The dynamics of the shock-wave propagation in water-ground condensed media depending on the rate of the plasma channel energy release is investigated. Simulation of the shock-wave phenomena at a plasma-vapor bubble oscillation in condensed media consecutively describes the physical processes underlying technology for producing piles by electro-discharge stuffing. The quantitative model verified by physical experimental tests will allow optimization of pulse generator parameters and electrode system construction of high-voltage equipment.

  12. Development of a wave-induced forcing threshold for nearshore impact of Wave Energy Converter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.

    2016-02-01

    Wave-induced forcing is a function of spatial gradients in the wave radiation stresses and is the main driver of alongshore currents, rip currents, and nearshore sediment transport. The installation of nearshore Wave Energy Converter (WEC) arrays may cause significant changes in the surf zone radiation stresses and could therefore impact nearshore littoral processes. In the first part of this study, a new threshold for nearshore hydrodynamic impact due to the presence of WEC devices is established based on changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients shoreward of WEC arrays. The threshold is defined based on the relationship between nearshore radiation stresses and alongshore currents as observed in field data. Next, we perform a parametric study of the nearshore impact of WEC arrays using the SWAN wave model. Trials are conducted on an idealized, alongshore-uniform beach with a range of WEC array configurations, locations, and incident wave conditions, and conditions that generate radiation stress gradients above the impact threshold are identified. Finally, the same methodology is applied to two wave energy test sites off the coast of Newport, OR with more complicated bathymetries. Although the trends at the field sites are similar to those seen in the parametric study, the location and extent of the changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients appear to be heavily influenced by the local bathymetry.

  13. Stress Management: Job Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Job stress can be all-consuming — but it doesn't have to be. Address your triggers, keep perspective and know when ... effects of stress at work. Effectively coping with job stress can benefit both your professional and personal ...

  14. Internal Ocean Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Internal waves are waves that travel within the interior of a fluid. The waves propagate at the interface or boundary between two layers with sharp density differences, such as temperature. They occur wherever strong tides or currents and stratification occur in the neighborhood of irregular topography. They can propagate for several hundred kilometers. The ASTER false-color VNIR image off the island of Tsushima in the Korea Strait shows the signatures of several internal wave packets, indicating a northern propagation direction. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. Size: 60 by 120 kilometers (37.2 by 74.4 miles) Location: 34.6 degrees North latitude, 129.5 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 90

  15. Techniques for studying gravity waves and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity waves and their associated breaking into turbulence are very important in producing the overall picture of middle atmosphere global dynamics and associated transport. It is shown in this research that MST radars represent a most powerful technique for obtaining the needed parameters for gravity-wave-induced drag and diffusion effects as well as measuring wave accelerations and diffusion directly. A mathematical solution to this problem is that of radiative equilibrium with a balanced thermal wind.

  16. Making Waves: Seismic Waves Activities and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braile, S. J.; Braile, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The nature and propagation of seismic waves are fundamental concepts necessary for understanding the exploration of Earth's interior structure and properties, plate tectonics, earthquakes, and seismic hazards. Investigating seismic waves is also an engaging approach to learning basic principles of the physics of waves and wave propagation. Several effective educational activities and demonstrations are available for teaching about seismic waves, including the stretching of a spring to demonstrate elasticity; slinky wave propagation activities for compressional, shear, Rayleigh and Love waves; the human wave activity to demonstrate P- and S- waves in solids and liquids; waves in water in a simple wave tank; seismic wave computer animations; simple shake table demonstrations of model building responses to seismic waves to illustrate earthquake damage to structures; processing and analysis of seismograms using free and easy to use software; and seismic wave simulation software for viewing wave propagation in a spherical Earth. The use of multiple methods for teaching about seismic waves is useful because it provides reinforcement of the fundamental concepts, is adaptable to variable classroom situations and diverse learning styles, and allows one or more methods to be used for authentic assessment. The methods described here have been used effectively with a broad range of audiences, including K-12 students and teachers, undergraduate students in introductory geosciences courses, and geosciences majors.

  17. Personality Disorders Associated with Full and Partial Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the U.S. Population: Results from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Robert H.; Goldstein, Risë B.; Southwick, Steven M.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2010-01-01

    Background While it is well known that personality disorders are associated with trauma exposure and PTSD, limited nationally representative data are available on DSM-IV personality disorders that co-occur with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and partial PTSD. Methods Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 34,653 adults participating in the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Logistic regression analyses controlling for sociodemographics and additional psychiatric comorbidity evaluated associations of PTSD and partial PTSD with personality disorders. Results Prevalence rates of lifetime PTSD and partial PTSD were 6.4% and 6.6%, respectively. After adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics and additional psychiatric comorbidity, respondents with full PTSD were more likely than trauma controls to meet criteria for schizotypal, narcissistic, and borderline personality disorders (ORs=2.1–2.5); and respondents with partial PTSD were more likely than trauma controls to meet diagnostic criteria for borderline (OR=2.0), schizotypal (OR=1.8), and narcissistic (OR=1.6) PDs. Women with PTSD were more likely than controls to have obsessive-compulsive PD. Women with partial PTSD were more likely than controls to have antisocial PD; and men with partial PTSD were less likely than women with partial PTSD to have avoidant PD. Conclusions PTSD and partial PTSD are associated with borderline, schizotypal, and narcissistic personality disorders. Modestly higher rates of obsessive-compulsive PD were observed among women with full PTSD, and of antisocial PD among women with partial PTSD. PMID:20950823

  18. Improving coastal wave hindcasts by combining offshore buoy observations with global wave models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, S. C.; O'Reilly, W. C.; Guza, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    Waves conditions in southern California are sensitive to offshore wave directions. Due to blocking by coastal islands and refraction across complex bathymetry, a transform incident offshore swell-spectra to shallow water buoy locations. A nearly continuous 10 yr data set of approximately 14 buoys is used. Comparisons include standard bulk parameters (e.g. significant wave height, peak period), the frequency-dependent energy spectrum (needed for run-up estimation) and radiation stress component Sxy (needed for alongshore current and sediment transport estimation). Global wave model uncertainties are unknown, complicating the formulation of optimum assimilation constraints. Several plausible models for estimating offshore waves are tested. Future work includes assimilating nearshore buoy observations, with the long-term objective of accurate regional wave hindcasts using an efficient mix of global wave models and buoys. This work is supported by the California Department of Parks and Recreation, Division of Boating and Waterways Oceanography Program.

  19. Wave Tank Studies of Strong Modulation of Wind Ripples Due To Long Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Modulation of wind capillary-gravity ripples due to long waves has been studied in wave tank experiment at low wind speeds using Ka-band radar. The experiments were carried out both for clean water and the water surface covered with surfactant films. It is obtained that the modulation of radar signals is quite strong and can increase with surfactant concentration and fetch. It is shown that the hydrodynamic Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) calculated for free wind ripples and taking into account the kinematic (straining) effect, variations of the wind stress and variations of surfactant concentration strongly underestimates experimental MTF-values. The effect of strong modulation is assumed to be connected with nonlinear harmonics of longer dm-cm- scale waves - bound waves ("parasitic ripples"). The intensity of bound waves depends strongly on the amplitude of decimetre-scale waves, therefore even weak modulation of the dm-scale waves due to long waves results to strong ("cascade") modulation of bound waves. Modulation of the system of "free/bound waves" is estimated using results of wave tank studies of bound waves generation and is shown to be in quali- tative agreement with experiment. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  20. African Easterly Wave Climatology, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AEWC dataset was created using a new algorithm developed by researchers at Georgia Tech and represents the first attempt to produce a standard easterly wave...

  1. Extreme winds and waves for offshore turbines: Coupling atmosphere and wave modeling for design and operation in coastal zones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, Rodolfo; Du, Jianting

    modeling for oshore wind farms. This modeling system consists of the atmospheric Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the wave model SWAN and an interface the Wave Boundary Layer Model WBLM, within the framework of coupled-ocean-atmosphere-wave-sediment transport modeling system COAWST...... (Hereinafter the WRF-WBLM-SWAN model). WBLM is implemented in SWAN, and it calculates stress and kinetic energy budgets in the lowest atmospheric layer where the wave-induced stress is introduced to the atmospheric modeling. WBLM ensures consistent calculation of stress for both the atmospheric and wave......, which can aect the choice of the off-shore wind turbine type. X-WiWa examined various methodologies for wave modeling. The offline coupling system using atmospheric data such as WRF or global reanalysis wind field to the MIKE 21 SW model has been improved with considerations of stability, air density...

  2. Transmission problem for waves with frictional damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar D. Bastos

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider the transmission problem, in one space dimension, for linear dissipative waves with frictional damping. We study the wave propagation in a medium with a component with attrition and another simply elastic. We show that for this type of material, the dissipation produced by the frictional part is strong enough to produce exponential decay of the solution, no matter how small is its size.

  3. Springing response due to bidirectional wave excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidic-Perunovic, Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Springing is a two-node high frequency resonant vibration of the hull induced by unsteady wave pressure field on the hull. The excitation force may be rather complex - any wave activity (or their combination) in the Ocean matching the two-node natural hull vibration frequency. With some ship......-domain procedures, the structural damping coefficient uncertainty or some purely numerical details in the programme execution. Comparison with full-scale measurements clearly shows that in some cases all the presented computer programmes strongly underestimate the level of springing stresses in the hull. Not only...... because, to the author's knowledge, this is the first time that the wave data were collected simultaneously with stress records on the deck of the ship. This is highly appreciated because one can use the precise input and not only the most probable sea state statistics. The actual picture of the sea waves...

  4. Finite Amplitude Ocean Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    are known as intermediate or transitional water waves and if the depth of the water column is less than 1/20 of wavelength, they are called shallow water waves. In the case of both these waves, the particle motion is elliptical. Particle motions are shown in Figure 1. The velocity of waves is generally referred to as wave.

  5. Surface wave propagation over sinusoidally varying topography: Theory and observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.; Heathershaw, A. D.

    Linear perturbation theory is used to show that the reflection coefficient of a patch of sinusoidal ripples on an otherwise flat bed is oscillatory in the quotient of the length of the patch and the surface wave length, and strongly dependent upon the quotient of the surface and bed wave numbers. Resonant interaction between the surface waves and the ripples if the surface wavenumber is half the ripple wavenumber is demonstrated. Few ripples, of relatively small steepness, are required to produce a substantial reflected wave. In resonant cases, the partially standing wave on the up-wave side of the ripple patch gives way, in an almost linear manner over the the ripple patch itself, to a progressive (transmitted) wave on the down-wave side. Wave tank data agree well with predictions, and suggest coupling between wave reflection and ripple growth on an erodible bed.

  6. Wave propagation and instabilities in monolithic and periodically structured elastomeric materials undergoing large deformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertoldi, Katia; Boyce, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Wave propagation in elastomeric materials undergoing large deformations is relevant in numerous application areas, including nondestructive testing of materials and ultrasound techniques, where finite deformations and corresponding stress states can influence wave propagation and hence

  7. Comparison of bed shear under non-breaking and breaking solitary waves

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    JayaKumar, S.; Baldock, T.E.

    New experimental measurements of bed shear under solitary waves and solitary bores that represent tsunamis are presented. The total bed shear stress was measured directly using a shear cell apparatus. The solitary wave characteristics were measured...

  8. WAVE TECTONICS OF THE EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Yu. Tveretinova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Earth's lithosphere, wavy alternation of positive and negative heterochronous structures is revealed; such structures are variable in ranks and separated by vergence zones of fractures and folds. In the vertical profile of the lithosphere, alternating are layers characterized by relatively plastic or fragile rheological properties and distinguished by different states of stress. During the Earth’s evolution, epochs of compression and extension are cyclically repeated, including planetary-scale phenomena which are manifested by fluctuating changes of the planet’s volume. Migration of geological and geophysical (geodynamic processes takes place at the Earth's surface and in its interior. The concept of the wave structure and evolution of the Earth's lithosphere provides explanations to the abovementioned regularities. Wavy nature of tectonic structures of the lithosphere, the cyclic recurrence of migration and geological processes in space and time can be described in terms of the multiple-order wave geodynamics of the Earth's lithosphere that refers to periodical variations of the state of stress. Effects of structure-forming tectonic forces are determined by «interference» of tangential and radial stresses of the Earth. The tangential stresses, which occur primarily due to the rotational regime of the planet, cause transformations of the Earth’s shape, redistributions of its substance in depths, the westward drift of the rock mass in its upper levels, and changes of structural deformation plans. The radial stresses, which are largely impacted by gravity, determine the gravitational differentiation of the substance, vertical flattening and sub-horizontal flow of the rock masses, and associated fold-rupture deformation. Under the uniform momentum geodynamic concept proposed by [Vikulin, Tveritinova, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008], it is possible to provide consistent descriptions of seismic and volcanic, tectonic and geological processes

  9. Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress basics Stress is a normal psychological and physical ... of life. Start practicing stress management techniques today. Stress relief The pace and challenges of modern life ...

  10. Childhood Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Childhood Stress KidsHealth / For Parents / Childhood Stress What's in this ... and feel stress to some degree. Sources of Stress Stress is a function of the demands placed ...

  11. Urban Heat Wave Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Jedlovec, G.; Crane, D. L.; Meyer, P. J.; LaFontaine, F.

    2016-12-01

    Heat waves are one of the largest causes of environmentally-related deaths globally and are likely to become more numerous as a result of climate change. The intensification of heat waves by the urban heat island effect and elevated humidity, combined with urban demographics, are key elements leading to these disasters. Better warning of the potential hazards may help lower risks associated with heat waves. Moderate resolution thermal data from NASA satellites is used to derive high spatial resolution estimates of apparent temperature (heat index) over urban regions. These data, combined with demographic data, are used to produce a daily heat hazard/risk map for selected cities. MODIS data are used to derive daily composite maximum and minimum land surface temperature (LST) fields to represent the amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle and identify extreme heat days. Compositing routines are used to generate representative daily maximum and minimum LSTs for the urban environment. The limited effect of relative humidity on the apparent temperature (typically 10-15%) allows for the use of modeled moisture fields to convert LST to apparent temperature without loss of spatial variability. The daily max/min apparent temperature fields are used to identify abnormally extreme heat days relative to climatological values in order to produce a heat wave hazard map. Reference to climatological values normalizes the hazard for a particular region (e.g., the impact of an extreme heat day). A heat wave hazard map has been produced for several case study periods and then computed on a quasi-operational basis during the summer of 2016 for Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, St. Louis, MO, and Huntsville, AL. A hazard does not become a risk until someone or something is exposed to that hazard at a level that might do harm. Demographic information is used to assess the urban risk associated with the heat wave hazard. Collectively, the heat wave hazard product can warn people in urban

  12. Gravitational-wave astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, W. H.; Thorne, K. S.

    1972-01-01

    The significance of experimental evidence for gravitational waves is considered for astronomy. Properties, generation, and astrophysical sources of the waves are discussed. Gravitational wave receivers and antennas are described. A review of the Weber experiment is presented.

  13. Electron Rydberg wave packets in one-dimensional atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transient phase-space localization of the wave packet produced ... that the atom undergoes a free evolution from a classical, to a nonclassical, and back to ... for the weight factors in superposing energy eigenstates to construct the wave packet for a 1D atom. In terms of these transition amplitudes the Rydberg wave packet.

  14. Occurrence of submarine canyons, sediment waves and mass ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For example, frontally confined slide complexes could have been influenced by high sedimentation rates and high pore pressures. A series of very large subaqueous sediment waves, which record wavelengths of 1.4–2 km and wave heights of 30–50 m, were likely produced by interactions between internal solitary waves ...

  15. Hydrodynamic Forces from Steep Waves in Rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevoll, A.

    1996-01-01

    The reservoir behind a hydroelectric power production dam has an enormous potential for destruction in case of a dam break. The present doctoral thesis evaluates the hydrodynamic forces from steep waves in rivers. In the laboratory, forces on a structure shaped as a vertical cylinder of rectangular cross section were measured, and the threshold condition for the bed sediment was investigated. A wave parameter α is introduced to describe the gradient of a wave front. The flow condition in the flume was reproduced by a 3-D numerical model. For various values of the wave parameter the forces were measured and compared to the drag force calculated from measured depth and velocity. From these comparisons the hydrodynamic force can be calculated as drag only, even in the case of a breaking wave front. The contribution from inertia relative to drag depends on the size of the structure. For larger structures the contributions may be important in steep waves. To study the initiation of motion (of sediments) under unsteady flow, waves of various parameter values were passed over a gravel covered bed. The initiation of motion starts before the peak of the wave, and is given by Shield's relation if the friction slope is applied. No dependence upon the wave gradient was found. A relation was established which gives the critical shear stress if the friction slope is estimated by the bottom slope. 65 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Hydrodynamic Forces from Steep Waves in Rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevoll, A.

    1996-12-31

    The reservoir behind a hydroelectric power production dam has an enormous potential for destruction in case of a dam break. The present doctoral thesis evaluates the hydrodynamic forces from steep waves in rivers. In the laboratory, forces on a structure shaped as a vertical cylinder of rectangular cross section were measured, and the threshold condition for the bed sediment was investigated. A wave parameter {alpha} is introduced to describe the gradient of a wave front. The flow condition in the flume was reproduced by a 3-D numerical model. For various values of the wave parameter the forces were measured and compared to the drag force calculated from measured depth and velocity. From these comparisons the hydrodynamic force can be calculated as drag only, even in the case of a breaking wave front. The contribution from inertia relative to drag depends on the size of the structure. For larger structures the contributions may be important in steep waves. To study the initiation of motion (of sediments) under unsteady flow, waves of various parameter values were passed over a gravel covered bed. The initiation of motion starts before the peak of the wave, and is given by Shield`s relation if the friction slope is applied. No dependence upon the wave gradient was found. A relation was established which gives the critical shear stress if the friction slope is estimated by the bottom slope. 65 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Detecting Gravitational Wave Memory without Parent Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Lucy O; Thrane, Eric; Lasky, Paul D

    2017-05-05

    Gravitational-wave memory manifests as a permanent distortion of an idealized gravitational-wave detector and arises generically from energetic astrophysical events. For example, binary black hole mergers are expected to emit memory bursts a little more than an order of magnitude smaller in strain than the oscillatory parent waves. We introduce the concept of "orphan memory": gravitational-wave memory for which there is no detectable parent signal. In particular, high-frequency gravitational-wave bursts (≳kHz) produce orphan memory in the LIGO/Virgo band. We show that Advanced LIGO measurements can place stringent limits on the existence of high-frequency gravitational waves, effectively increasing the LIGO bandwidth by orders of magnitude. We investigate the prospects for and implications of future searches for orphan memory.

  18. Waves from Propulsion Systems of Fast Ferries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taatø, Søren Haugsted; Aage, Christian; Arnskov, Michael M.

    1998-01-01

    generated by the ship hulls alone. Whereas this assumption may be reasonable for conventional ships with large hulls and limited propulsive power, the situation is different for fast ferries with their smaller hulls and very large installed power. A simple theoretical model and a series of model tests......Waves from fast ferries have become an environmental problem of growing concern to the public. Fast ferries produce not only higher waves than conventional ships but also fundamentally different wave systems when they sail at supercritical speeds. Hitherto, ship waves have been considered as being...... on a monohull fast ferry seem to indicate that a substantial part of the wave-making can be directly attributed to the propulsion system itself. Thus, two wave systems are created with different phases, but with similar frequency contents, which means that they merge into one system behind the ship, very...

  19. Helicons in uniform fields. I. Wave diagnostics with hodograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. M.; Stenzel, R. L.

    2018-03-01

    The wave equation for whistler waves is well known and has been solved in Cartesian and cylindrical coordinates, yielding plane waves and cylindrical waves. In space plasmas, waves are usually assumed to be plane waves; in small laboratory plasmas, they are often assumed to be cylindrical "helicon" eigenmodes. Experimental observations fall in between both models. Real waves are usually bounded and may rotate like helicons. Such helicons are studied experimentally in a large laboratory plasma which is essentially a uniform, unbounded plasma. The waves are excited by loop antennas whose properties determine the field rotation and transverse dimensions. Both m = 0 and m = 1 helicon modes are produced and analyzed by measuring the wave magnetic field in three dimensional space and time. From Ampère's law and Ohm's law, the current density and electric field vectors are obtained. Hodograms for these vectors are produced. The sign ambiguity of the hodogram normal with respect to the direction of wave propagation is demonstrated. In general, electric and magnetic hodograms differ but both together yield the wave vector direction unambiguously. Vector fields of the hodogram normal yield the phase flow including phase rotation for helicons. Some helicons can have locally a linear polarization which is identified by the hodogram ellipticity. Alternatively the amplitude oscillation in time yields a measure for the wave polarization. It is shown that wave interference produces linear polarization. These observations emphasize that single point hodogram measurements are inadequate to determine the wave topology unless assuming plane waves. Observations of linear polarization indicate wave packets but not plane waves. A simple qualitative diagnostics for the wave polarization is the measurement of the magnetic field magnitude in time. Circular polarization has a constant amplitude; linear polarization results in amplitude modulations.

  20. Local Tensor Radiation Conditions For Elastic Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2001-01-01

    A local boundary condition is formulated, representing radiation of elastic waves from an arbitrary point source. The boundary condition takes the form of a tensor relation between the stress at a point on an arbitrarily oriented section and the velocity and displacement vectors at the point....... The tensor relation generalizes the traditional normal incidence impedance condition by accounting for the angle between wave propagation and the surface normal and by including a generalized stiffness term due to spreading of the waves. The effectiveness of the local tensor radiation condition...

  1. Wave fields in real media wave propagation in anisotropic, anelastic, porous and electromagnetic media

    CERN Document Server

    Carcione, José M

    2014-01-01

    Authored by the internationally renowned José M. Carcione, Wave Fields in Real Media: Wave Propagation in Anisotropic, Anelastic, Porous and Electromagnetic Media examines the differences between an ideal and a real description of wave propagation, starting with the introduction of relevant stress-strain relations. The combination of this relation and the equations of momentum conservation lead to the equation of motion. The differential formulation is written in terms of memory variables, and Biot's theory is used to describe wave propagation in porous media. For each rheology, a plane-wave analysis is performed in order to understand the physics of wave propagation. This book contains a review of the main direct numerical methods for solving the equation of motion in the time and space domains. The emphasis is on geophysical applications for seismic exploration, but researchers in the fields of earthquake seismology, rock acoustics, and material science - including many branches of acoustics of fluids and ...

  2. Experiments with Point Absorber Type Wave Energy Converters in a Large-Scale Wave Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratigaki, Vasiliki; Troch, Peter; Stallard, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Wave Energy Converters (WECs) extract energy from ocean waves and have the potential to produce a significant contribution of electricity from renewable sources. However, large "WEC farms" or "WEC arrays" are expected to have "WEC array effects", expressed as the impact of the WECs on the wave...... climate at an installation site, as well as on the overall power absorption of the WEC array. Experiments have been performed in the Shallow Water Wave Basin of DHI (Denmark) to study such "WEC array effects". Large arrays of up to 25 heaving point absorber type WECs have been tested for a range...... of geometric layout configurations and wave conditions. WEC response, wave induced forces on the WECs and wave field modifications have been measured. Each WEC consists of a buoy with diameter of 0.315 m. Power take-off is modeled by realizing friction based energy dissipation through damping of the WECs...

  3. Middle Atmosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Interactions in the Numerical Spectral Model: Tides and Planetary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Huang, F. T.

    2010-01-01

    As Lindzen (1981) had shown, small-scale gravity waves (GW) produce the observed reversals of the zonal-mean circulation and temperature variations in the upper mesosphere. The waves also play a major role in modulating and amplifying the diurnal tides (DT) (e.g., Waltersheid, 1981; Fritts and Vincent, 1987; Fritts, 1995a). We summarize here the modeling studies with the mechanistic numerical spectral model (NSM) with Doppler spread parameterization for GW (Hines, 1997a, b), which describes in the middle atmosphere: (a) migrating and non-migrating DT, (b) planetary waves (PW), and (c) global-scale inertio gravity waves. Numerical experiments are discussed that illuminate the influence of GW filtering and nonlinear interactions between DT, PW, and zonal mean variations. Keywords: Theoretical modeling, Middle atmosphere dynamics, Gravity wave interactions, Migrating and non-migrating tides, Planetary waves, Global-scale inertio gravity waves.

  4. Hemodynamic changes induced by preventive exposure to terahertz radiation at a frequency range corresponding to molecular emission and absorption spectrum of nitric oxide in animals under conditions of acute stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichuck, V F; Velikanova, T S; Ivanov, A N

    2011-06-01

    We studied the influence of preventive irradiation with terahertz electromagnetic waves at frequencies corresponding to nitric oxide emission and absorption molecular spectrum (150,176-150,664 GHz) on hemodynamic parameters in arteries of albino rats upon acute immobilization stress. We showed that exposure to the specified frequencies can produce adaptogenic effect manifesting in the absence of post-stress changes in the linear, systolic, and diastolic blood flow velocities and pressure gradient in various blood vessels of experimental animals.

  5. Relic gravitational waves and extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.; Wilczek, F.

    1990-08-01

    In extended inflation, a new version of inflation where the transition from the false-vacuum phase to a radiation-dominated Universe is accomplished by bubble nucleation and percolation, bubble collisions supply a potent-and potentially detectable-source of gravitational waves. The present energy density in relic gravity waves from bubble collisions is expected to be about 10(exp -5) of closure density-many orders of magnitude greater than that of the gravity waves produced by quantum fluctuations. Their characteristic wavelength depends upon the reheating temperature T(sub RH): lambda is approximately 10(exp 4) cm (10(exp 14) GeV/T(sub RH)). If large numbers of black holes are produced, a not implausible outcome, they will evaporate producing comparable amounts of shorter wavelength waves, lambda is approximately 10(exp -6) cm (T(sub RH)/10(exp 14) GeV)

  6. Breaking wave impacts on offshore wind turbine foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredmose, Henrik; Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl

    2010-01-01

    Extreme wave loads from breaking waves on a monopile foundation are computed within a 3D CFD model. The wave impacts are obtained by application of focused wave groups. For a fixed position of the monopile, the focus location of the wave group is varied to produce impacts with front shapes...... that for the impacts of spilling breakers the peak force gets smaller the more developed the breaking is. This is in qualitative agreement with a finding from shallow water impacts on vertical walls: the strongest wave loads are associated with breakers that hit the structure with slightly overturning front...

  7. Chiral primordial gravitational waves from a Lifshitz point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tomohiro; Soda, Jiro

    2009-06-12

    We study primordial gravitational waves produced during inflation in quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point proposed by Horava. Assuming power-counting renormalizability, foliation-preserving diffeomorphism invariance, and the condition of detailed balance, we show that primordial gravitational waves are circularly polarized due to parity violation. The chirality of primordial gravitational waves is a quite robust prediction of quantum gravity at a Lifshitz point which can be tested through observations of cosmic microwave background radiation and stochastic gravitational waves.

  8. An approach to quantify the heat wave strength and price a heat derivative for risk hedging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Samuel S. P.; Kramps, Benedikt; Sun, Shirley X.; Bailey, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Mitigating the heat stress via a derivative policy is a vital financial option for agricultural producers and other business sectors to strategically adapt to the climate change scenario. This study has provided an approach to identifying heat stress events and pricing the heat stress weather derivative due to persistent days of high surface air temperature (SAT). Cooling degree days (CDD) are used as the weather index for trade. In this study, a call-option model was used as an example for calculating the price of the index. Two heat stress indices were developed to describe the severity and physical impact of heat waves. The daily Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN-D) SAT data from 1901 to 2007 from the southern California, USA, were used. A major California heat wave that occurred 20-25 October 1965 was studied. The derivative price was calculated based on the call-option model for both long-term station data and the interpolated grid point data at a regular 0.1°×0.1° latitude-longitude grid. The resulting comparison indicates that (a) the interpolated data can be used as reliable proxy to price the CDD and (b) a normal distribution model cannot always be used to reliably calculate the CDD price. In conclusion, the data, models, and procedures described in this study have potential application in hedging agricultural and other risks.

  9. Stresses in Dolosse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou; Howell, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Failures of rubble mound breakwaters armoured with complex types of unreinforced concrete armour units are often due to breakage. This happens when the stresses exceed the material strength. Sufficient parametric studies of the stresses are not yet available to produce design diagrams...

  10. An experimental and numerical investigation on wave-mud interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, W. Y.; Hwung, H. H.; Hsu, T. J.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.; Yang, R. Y.

    2013-03-01

    Wave attenuation over a mud (kaolinite) layer is investigated via laboratory experiments and numerical modeling. The rheological behavior of kaolinite exhibits hybrid properties of a Bingham and pseudoplastic fluid. Moreover, the measured time-dependent velocity profiles in the mud layer reveal that the shear rate under wave loading is highly phase dependent. The measured shear rate and rheological data allow us to back-calculate the time-dependent viscosity of the mud layer under various wave loadings, which is also shown to fluctuate up to 1 order of magnitude during one wave period. However, the resulting time-dependent bottom stress is shown to only fluctuate within 25% of its mean. The back-calculated wave-averaged bottom stress is well correlated with the wave damping rate in the intermediate-wave energy condition. The commonly adopted constant viscosity assumption is then evaluated via linear and nonlinear wave-mud interaction models. When driving the models with measured wave-averaged mud viscosity (forward modeling), the wave damping rate is generally overpredicted under the low wave energy condition. On the other hand, when a constant viscosity is chosen to match the observed wave damping rate (inverse modeling), the predicted velocity profiles in the mud layer are not satisfactory and the corresponding viscosity is lower than the measured value. These discrepancies are less pronounced when waves become more energetic. Differences between the linear and nonlinear model results become significant under low-energy conditions, suggesting an amplification of wave nonlinearity due to non-Newtonian rheology. In general, the constant viscosity assumption for modeling wave-mud interaction is only appropriate for more energetic wave conditions.

  11. Financial Rogue Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Zhenya

    2010-01-01

    We analytically give the financial rogue waves in the nonlinear option pricing model due to Ivancevic, which is nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes model. These rogue wave solutions may he used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for rogue wave phenomenon in financial markets and related fields.

  12. Finsler p p -waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Andrea; Pabst, Cornelia

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present Finsler gravitational waves. These are a Finslerian version of the well-known p p -waves, generalizing the very special relativity line element. Our Finsler p p -waves are an exact solution of Finslerian Einstein's equations in vacuum and describe gravitational waves propagating in an anisotropic background.

  13. Waves in inhomogeneous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, S.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we study wave propagation in inhomogeneous media. Examples of the classical (massless) waves we consider are acoustic waves (sound) and electromagnetic waves (light, for example). Interaction with inhomogeneities embedded in a reference medium alter the propagation direction, velocity

  14. Waves in the seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Not all sea waves look alike in form. Scientists, in fact, classify all waves into definite groups, which can be simulated on a computer using specific models. Thus there are many types of wave forms on the sea surface like regular sinusoidal waves...

  15. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  16. Wave Data Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alikhani, Amir; Frigaard, Peter; Burcharth, Hans F.

    1998-01-01

    The data collected over the course of the experiment must be analysed and converted into a form suitable for its intended use. Type of analyses range from simple to sophisticated. Depending on the particular experiment and the needs of the researcher. In this study three main part of irregular wave...... data analyses are presented e.g. Time Domain (Statistical) Analyses, Frequency Domain (Spectral) Analyses and Wave Reflection Analyses. Random wave profile and definitions of representative waves, distributions of individual wave height and wave periods and spectra of sea waves are presented....

  17. Studies on Shock Attenuation in Plastic Materials and Applications in Detonation Wave Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Ritu; Gautam, P. C.; Rai, Rajwant; Kumar, Anil; Sharma, A. C.; Singh, Manjit, Dr

    2012-07-01

    Pressure in plastic materials attenuates due to change of impedance, phase change in the medium and plastic deformation. A lot of theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted to the attenuation of shock wave produced by the impact of explosive driven flyer plate. However comparatively less work has been done on the attenuation of shock waves due to contact explosive detonation. Present studies deal with the attenuation of explosive driven shock waves in various plastic materials and its applications in design of Hybrid Detonation Wave Generator In present work shock attenuating properties of different polymers such as Perspex, Teflon, nylon, polypropylene and viton has been studied experimentally using rotating mirror streak camera and electrical position pins. High explosive RDX/TNT and OCTOL of diameter 75-100mm and thickness 20 to 50mm were detonated to induce shock wave in the test specimens. From experimental determined shock velocity at different locations the attenuation in shock pressure was calculated. The attenuation of shock velocity with thickness in the material indicates exponential decay according to relation US = UOexp(-ax). In few of the experiments manganin gauge of resistance 50 ohms was used to record stress time profile across shock wave. The shock attenuation data of Viton has successfully been used in the design of hybrid detonation wave generator using Octol as high explosive. While selecting a material it was ensured that the attenuated shock remains strong enough to initiate an acceptor explosive. Theoretical calculation were supported by Autodyne 2D hydro-code simulation which were validated with the experiments conducted using high speed streak photography and electrical shock arrival pins. Shock attenuation data of Perspex was used to establishing card gap test and wedge test in which test items is subjected to known pressure pulse by selecting the thickness of the plastic material.

  18. Wave disc engine apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Norbert; Piechna, Janusz; Sun, Guangwei; Parraga, Pablo-Francisco

    2018-01-02

    A wave disc engine apparatus is provided. A further aspect employs a constricted nozzle in a wave rotor channel. A further aspect provides a sharp bend between an inlet and an outlet in a fluid pathway of a wave rotor, with the bend being spaced away from a peripheral edge of the wave rotor. A radial wave rotor for generating electricity in an automotive vehicle is disclosed in yet another aspect.

  19. Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Chronic stress can wreak havoc on your mind and body. Take steps to control your stress. By Mayo Clinic ... your life. Your reaction to a potentially stressful event is different from anyone else's. How you react ...

  20. Stress Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress incontinence Overview Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such ... coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related ...