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Sample records for strength training self-efficacy

  1. The Relationship between Sources of Self-Efficacy in Classroom Environments and the Strength of Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisupawong, Yuwarat; Koul, Ravinder; Neanchaleay, Jariya; Murphy, Elizabeth; Francois, Emmanuel Jean

    2018-01-01

    Motivation and success in computer-science courses are influenced by the strength of students' self-efficacy (SE) beliefs in their learning abilities. Students with weak SE may struggle to be successful in a computer-science course. This study investigated the factors that enhance or impede the computer self-efficacy (CSE) of computer-science…

  2. SELF-EFFICACY OF FORMALLY AND NON-FORMALLY TRAINED PUBLIC SECTOR TEACHERS

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    Muhammad Nadeem ANWAR

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to compare the formally and non-formally trained in-service public sector teachers’ Self-efficacy. Five hypotheses were developed describing no difference in the self-efficacy of formally and non-formally trained teachers to influence decision making, influence school resources, instructional self-efficacy, disciplinary self-efficacy and create positive school climate. Teacher Efficacy Instrument (TSES developed by Bandura (2001 consisting of thirty 9-point items was used in the study. 342 formally trained and 255 non-formally trained respondents’ questionnaires were received out of 1500 mailed. The analysis of data revealed that the formally trained public sector teachers are high in their self-efficacy on all the five categories: to influence decision making, to influence school resources, instructional self-efficacy, disciplinary self-efficacy and self-efficacy to create positive school climate.

  3. The role of sports training and recreation at self-efficacy perception of adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Ivančič, Hani

    2013-01-01

    In the following diploma the role of a sports training and a sports recreation for the perception of adolescents’ self-efficacy is presented. In the theoretical part the self-efficacy theory and its placement into adolescence are described as well as all three kinds of sports workout (sports training, sports recreation and sports education), connection between sport and adolescence and sport’s influence on the self-efficacy. In the empirical part the role of the sports training and recreat...

  4. Interprofessional clinical training improves self-efficacy of health care students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Draborg, Eva; Vestergaard, Poul Erik

    2013-01-01

    study (ICS) unit including students from nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, laboratory technology and radiography. Data on students' perceived self-efficacy were collected through web-based questionnaires. Aspects of self-efficacy measured were: (1) collaboration with other...... teamwork. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an interprofessional training programme on students' perceived self-efficacy. Methods: A quasi-experimental study with an intervention group (239 students) and a control group (405 students). The intervention was an interprofessional clinical...... students' perception of self-efficacy more than traditional clinical training....

  5. Self-Control Strength Depletion Reduces Self-Efficacy and Impairs Exercise Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey D; Bray, Steven R

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of task self-efficacy as a psychological factor involved in the relationship between self-control depletion and physical endurance. Participants (N = 37) completed two isometric handgrip endurance trials, separated by a Stroop task, which was either congruent (control) or incongruent (causing depletion). Task self-efficacy for the second endurance trial was measured following the Stroop task. Participants in the depletion condition reported lower task self-efficacy and showed a greater reduction in performance on the second endurance trial when compared with controls. Task self-efficacy also mediated the relationship between self-control depletion and endurance performance. The results of this study provide evidence that task self-efficacy is negatively affected following self-control depletion. We recommend that task self-efficacy be further investigated as a psychological factor accounting for the negative change in self-control performance of physical endurance and sport tasks following self-control strength depletion.

  6. Analysis System for Self-Efficacy Training (ASSET). Assessing treatment fidelity of self-management interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinken, Katarzyna M.; Cradock, Sue; Skinner, T. Chas

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The paper presents the development of a coding tool for self-efficacy orientated interventions in diabetes self-management programmes (Analysis System for Self-Efficacy Training, ASSET) and explores its construct validity and clinical utility. Methods: Based on four sources of self-eff...

  7. Strength and sources of self-efficacy beliefs by physical education student teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tadeu Iaochite

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the teaching domain, self-efficacy (SE is related to teachers' judgment about their own ability to achieve learning outcomes and student engagement. SE is formed by four sources of information: mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasion, and psychophysiological states. We measured and analyzed SE and its sources for teaching physical education. Student teachers (n = 114 from three universities responded to two Likert scales - Physical Education Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale and Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale Sources - and a social demographic questionnaire. SE for teaching was classified as moderate, and vicarious experiences and social persuasion were the main sources of information. Results were discussed for future researches related to teaching practices in undergraduate programs as well as in-service teacher training.

  8. Outcomes of a Character Strengths-Based Intervention on Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy of Psychiatrically Hospitalized Youths.

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    Toback, Rebecca L; Graham-Bermann, Sandra A; Patel, Paresh D

    2016-05-01

    Mental health treatment approaches based on character strengths can be used to complement the traditional focus on functional impairment. The study tested use of a character strengths-based intervention to enhance the self-esteem and self-efficacy of psychiatrically hospitalized youths. Eighty-one hospitalized adolescents were randomly assigned to intervention or comparison groups. The intervention used the Values in Action Inventory of Strengths for Youth to discover character strengths and incorporate them into coping skills. Self-efficacy and self-esteem were measured at baseline, postintervention, two weeks, and three months. Self-esteem and self-efficacy initially increased in both groups, but only the intervention group showed sustained improvement. The intervention was associated with increased self-efficacy at two weeks and increased self-efficacy and self-esteem at three months. A brief, easily administered character strengths-based intervention may be an adjunctive tool in the treatment of psychiatrically hospitalized youths.

  9. Analysis System for Self-Efficacy Training (ASSET). Assessing treatment fidelity of self-management interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinken, Katarzyna M; Cradock, Sue; Skinner, T Chas

    2008-08-01

    The paper presents the development of a coding tool for self-efficacy orientated interventions in diabetes self-management programmes (Analysis System for Self-Efficacy Training, ASSET) and explores its construct validity and clinical utility. Based on four sources of self-efficacy (i.e., mastery experience, role modelling, verbal persuasion and physiological and affective states), published self-efficacy based interventions for diabetes care were analysed in order to identify specific verbal behavioural techniques. Video-recorded facilitating behaviours were evaluated using ASSET. The reliability between four coders was high (K=0.71). ASSET enabled assessment of both self-efficacy based techniques and participants' response to those techniques. Individual patterns of delivery and shifts over time across facilitators were found. In the presented intervention we observed that self-efficacy utterances were followed by longer patient verbal responses than non-self-efficacy utterances. These detailed analyses with ASSET provide rich data and give the researcher an insight into the underlying mechanism of the intervention process. By providing a detailed description of self-efficacy strategies ASSET can be used by health care professionals to guide reflective practice and support training programmes.

  10. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S. M.; Ng, Shamay S. M.; Liu, Karen P. Y.; Pang, Marco Y. C.; Lee, H. W.; Chung, Joanne W. Y.; Lam, Priscillia L.; Guo, X.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P < 0.05), greater lower limb muscular strength (P = 0.001), better functional balance performance (P = 0.003), and greater balance confidence (P < 0.001) than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r = −0.575,  P = 0.013). Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly. PMID:25530782

  11. Musculoskeletal Strength, Balance Performance, and Self-Efficacy in Elderly Ving Tsun Chinese Martial Art Practitioners: Implications for Fall Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S. M. Fong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To (1 compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2 identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS, the Berg balance scale (BBS, and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P<0.05, greater lower limb muscular strength (P=0.001, better functional balance performance (P=0.003, and greater balance confidence (P<0.001 than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r=-0.575, P=0.013. Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly.

  12. Musculoskeletal strength, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly ving tsun chinese martial art practitioners: implications for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Liu, Karen P Y; Pang, Marco Y C; Lee, H W; Chung, Joanne W Y; Lam, Priscillia L; Guo, X

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To (1) compare the bone strength, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy between Ving Tsun (VT) martial art practitioners and nonpractitioners and (2) identify the associations between lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy among the VT-trained participants. Methods. Thirty-five VT practitioners (mean age ± SD = 62.7 ± 13.3 years) and 49 nonpractitioners (mean age ± SD = 65.9 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. The bone strength of the distal radius, lower limb muscular strength, functional balance performance, and balance self-efficacy were assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer, the five times sit-to-stand test (FTSTS), the Berg balance scale (BBS), and the Chinese version of the activities-specific balance confidence scale, respectively. A multivariate analysis of covariance was performed to compare all the outcome variables between the two groups. Results. Elderly VT practitioners had higher radial bone strength on the dominant side (P < 0.05), greater lower limb muscular strength (P = 0.001), better functional balance performance (P = 0.003), and greater balance confidence (P < 0.001) than the nonpractitioners. Additionally, only the FTSTS time revealed a significant association with the BBS score (r = -0.575,  P = 0.013). Conclusions. VT may be a suitable health-maintenance exercise for the elderly. Our findings may inspire the development of VT fall-prevention exercises for the community-dwelling healthy elderly.

  13. Self-efficacy perception in high school students with mild intellectual disability in practical training

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    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to determine how students with mild intellectual disability perceive self-efficacy in practical training, with regard to the intellectual level, gender, work field and professional level for which they are being trained. The sample consists of 120 students with mild intellectual disability, of both genders, undergoing vocational training in five work fields for the second and third level professions. Adapted Self-Efficacy to Regulate Training Scale (Bandura, 2006 was used to assess the influence of negative internal and external factors on the students' efficacy at performing tasks in practical training. It was determined that there is a statistically significant difference among the examinees of the same disability category, but different level of intellectual functioning. Girls with lower and higher levels of intellectual functioning were found to perceive self-efficacy in practical training with lower level of confidence than boys with the same levels of intellectual functioning. The examinees undergoing the third level vocational training are more confident in their abilities to coordinate knowledge and skills in training regardless of different distracting factors. There we no statistically significant differences determined with regard to the work field. Assessing self-efficacy in training can direct the development of self-efficacy, help individuals gain a sense of control over their career development, and for professionals involved in finding jobs for persons with intellectual disability provide a predictive success/failure role at work.

  14. Research Training, Institutional Support, and Self-Efficacy: Their Impact on Research Activity of Social Workers

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    Mark Thomas Lynch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available While the expectations for social work practitioners to do research have increased, their involvement is still limited. We know little about what factors influence involvement in research. The present study proposes a theoretical model that hypothesizes research training and institutional support for research as the exogenous variables, research self-efficacy as an intervening variable, and research activity as the endogenous variable. The study tests the model using data collected from a random sample of social workers. To a large degree the data support the model. Research self-efficacy has a significant effect on research activity. It is also an important mediating variable for the effect of institutional support on research activity. Although institutional support for research has no direct effect, it has an indirect effect via self-efficacy on research activity. However, research training has no effect on research activity and self-efficacy in research. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Memory self-efficacy predicts responsiveness to inductive reasoning training in older adults.

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    Payne, Brennan R; Jackson, Joshua J; Hill, Patrick L; Gao, Xuefei; Roberts, Brent W; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, we assessed the relationship between memory self-efficacy at pretest and responsiveness to inductive reasoning training in a sample of older adults. Participants completed a measure of self-efficacy assessing beliefs about memory capacity. Participants were then randomly assigned to a waitlist control group or an inductive reasoning training intervention. Latent change score models were used to examine the moderators of change in inductive reasoning. Inductive reasoning showed clear improvements in the training group compared with the control. Within the training group, initial memory capacity beliefs significantly predicted change in inductive reasoning such that those with higher levels of capacity beliefs showed greater responsiveness to the intervention. Further analyses revealed that self-efficacy had effects on how trainees allocated time to the training materials over the course of the intervention. Results indicate that self-referential beliefs about cognitive potential may be an important factor contributing to plasticity in adulthood.

  16. The Moderating Role of Self-Efficacy in the Organizational Culture-Training Transfer Relationship

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    Simosi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine the combined effects of self-efficacy and organizational culture on employees' transfer of knowledge/skills acquired through training. The questionnaires were distributed to 252 newly hired employees working in a service organization in Greece. Each of the independent variables examined added incrementally to the…

  17. Teacher Training and Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

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    Velthuis, Chantal; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Jules

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive science teaching efficacy beliefs may be useful for…

  18. Teacher Training and Pre-service Primary Teachers’ Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, C.H.; Fisser, Petra; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the improvement of pre-service teachers’ self-efficacy for teaching science by including science courses within the teacher training program. Knowing how efficacy beliefs change over time and what factors influence the development by pre-service primary teachers of positive

  19. Self-Efficacy and Outcome Expectancy in Beginning Weight Training Class: Their Relations to Students' Behavioral Intention and Actual Behavior

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    Gao, Zan; Xiang, Ping; Lee, Amelia M.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This study was an initial attempt to investigate the relationships among self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, behavioral intention, and actual behavior over time in a beginning weight training class. A total of 109 participants completed questionnaires assessing their self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and intentions for future weight training.…

  20. Examining the Relationship between the Research Training Environment, Course Experiences, and Graduate Students’ Research Self-Efficacy Beliefs

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    Steven Chesnut

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between graduate students’ research training environment, course experience, and research self-efficacy beliefs. The findings of the descriptive and regression analyses suggest that graduate students’ (n = 161 general research, quantitative, and qualitative research self-efficacy beliefs varied and that these beliefs were related to different aspects of the research training environment and course experiences, including their own personal research experiences. While course experience variables were significant predictors of quantitative and qualitative research self-efficacy, they were not predictive of general research methods self-efficacy. Also, while mentorship was a significant predictor of general research methods self-efficacy, it was not a significant predictor of quantitative and qualitative research self-efficacy. The implications of this study for research and graduate education are discussed.

  1. Video Game Self-efficacy and its Effect on Training Performance

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    Skilan A. Ortiz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of using serious games for training on task performance and declarative knowledge outcomes. The purpose was to determine if serious games are more effective training tools than traditional methods. Self-efficacy, expectations for training, and engagement were considered as moderators of the relationship between type of training and task performance as well as type of training and declarative knowledge. Results of the study offered support for the potential of serious games to be more effective than traditional methods of training when it comes to task performance.

  2. Effects of augmented reality on student achievement and self-efficacy in vocational education and training

    OpenAIRE

    Sirakaya, Mustafa; Kilic Cakmak, Ebru

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to test the impact of augmented reality (AR) use on student achievement and self-efficacy in vocational education and training. For this purpose, a marker-based AR application, called HardwareAR, was developed. HardwareAR provides information about characteristics of hardware components, ports and assembly. The research design was quasi experimental with pre-test post-test that included a control group. The study was conducted with 46 undergraduate students in the Computer Ha...

  3. Effects of Augmented Reality on Student Achievement and Self-Efficacy in Vocational Education and Training

    OpenAIRE

    Sirakaya, Mustafa

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to test the impact of augmented reality (AR) use on student achievement and self-efficacy in vocational education and training. For this purpose, a marker-based AR application, called HardwareAR, was developed. HardwareAR provides information about characteristics of hardware components, ports and assembly. The research design was quasi experimental with pre-test post-test that included a control group. The study was conducted with 46 undergraduate students in the Computer Ha...

  4. Communication skills training increases self-efficacy of health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training...... course for all staff members expecting an increase in patient-centeredness in communication and more respectful intercollegial communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of this training course on participants' self-efficacy with a focus on communication with both colleagues...

  5. Coach training can improve the self-efficacy of neonatal nurses. A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we have investigated the impact of coach training offered to neonatal nurses on their assessment of their ability to meet the needs of the mothers and fathers. METHODS: The effect of a 3-day coaching training offered to neonatal nurses was investigated...... significant. CONCLUSION: Coaching can improve nurses' self-efficacy in relation to meet the needs of the mothers and fathers. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Coaching could be a method that can maximize the personal and professional potential of the staff, and prepare them for the mindful being-in-relation approach...

  6. Summer research training for medical students: impact on research self-efficacy.

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    Black, Michelle L; Curran, Maureen C; Golshan, Shahrokh; Daly, Rebecca; Depp, Colin; Kelly, Carolyn; Jeste, Dilip V

    2013-12-01

    There is a well-documented shortage of physician researchers, and numerous training programs have been launched to facilitate development of new physician scientists. Short-term research training programs are the most practical form of research exposure for most medical students, and the summer between their first and second years of medical school is generally the longest period they can devote solely to research. The goal of short-term training programs is to whet the students' appetite for research and spark their interest in the field. Relatively little research has been done to test the effectiveness of short-term research training programs. In an effort to examine short-term effects of three different NIH-funded summer research training programs for medical students, we assessed the trainees' (N = 75) research self-efficacy prior to and after the programs using an 11-item scale. These hands-on training programs combined experiential, didactic, and mentoring elements. The students demonstrated a significant increase in their self-efficacy for research. Trainees' gender, ranking of their school, type of research, and specific content of research project did not predict improvement. Effect sizes for different types of items on the scale varied, with the largest gain seen in research methodology and communication of study findings. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association of learning styles with research self-efficacy: study of short-term research training program for medical students.

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    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A; Winegarden, Babbi; Jeste, Dilip V

    2014-12-01

    With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short-term research training programs, were associated with research self-efficacy, a potential predictor of research career success. Seventy-five first-year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH-supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self-efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual-verbal, sequential-global, sensing-intuitive, and active-reflective) with students' gender, ranking of medical school, and research self-efficacy. Research self-efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self-efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self-efficacy from baseline to posttraining. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students' gender or ranking of their medical school. Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician-scientists. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Self-efficacy, disability level and physical strength in the injured workers: findings from a major factory disaster in Bangladesh.

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    Villanueva, Gabriela; Fitch, Taylor; Quadir, Mohammad Morshedul; Raju Sagiraju, Hari Krishna; Alamgir, Hasanat

    2017-04-01

    In 24 April 2013, Rana Plaza - a high-rise building in Bangladesh where garments were being made for the Western markets collapsed. In this study, we report on the surviving workers' physical strength, self-efficacy, and disability level one year after the disaster. This cross-sectional study took place at the Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP) which provided care for more than 600 victims. For this study, upper extremity strength among the survivors was assessed by dynamometer hand grip (HG) and lower extremity strength by five time sit to stand test (FTSST). The WHODAS tool measured level of disability and General Self-Efficacy questionnaire measured self-efficacy. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) prevalence was determined by the PCL-scale. The study recruited 181 injured workers. The mean disability score among them was 49.8 (SD 17.5) and mean self-efficacy score was 24.9 (SD 6.9). In multivariate models, after adjusting for age, gender, education, injury profile, employment, marital status and job category, self-efficacy was found to be higher among those who scored above median HG test score [β= -2.32 (95% CI: -4.63, -0.01)] and FTSST performance score [β= -2.69 (95% CI: -4.93, -0.46)]. The disability level was found to be significantly associated with PTSD score [β = 0.84 (95% CI: 0.62, 1.06)] and self-efficacy score [β= -0.45 (95% CI: -0.78, -0.13)]. There is an immense need to develop and deliver effective post-injury recovery, rehabilitation and return-to-work programs for injured workers in resource poor countries. Implications for Rehabilitation The study findings suggest that one year after the factory disaster in Bangladesh, the injured workers are suffering from a high degree of disability, low physical performance and reporting low self-efficacy. The national and international stakeholders including Western buyers, aid agencies, NGOs, worker advocacy groups, consumer associations and the government of Bangladesh

  9. U.S. health professionals' views on obesity care, training, and self-efficacy.

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    Bleich, Sara N; Bandara, Sachini; Bennett, Wendy L; Cooper, Lisa A; Gudzune, Kimberly A

    2015-04-01

    Despite emphasis of recent guidelines on multidisciplinary teams for collaborative weight management, little is known about non-physician health professionals' perspectives on obesity, their weight management training, and self-efficacy for obesity care. To evaluate differences in health professionals' perspectives on (1) the causes of obesity; (2) training in weight management; and (3) self-efficacy for providing obesity care. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional Internet-based survey of 500 U.S. health professionals from nutrition, nursing, behavioral/mental health, exercise, and pharmacy (collected from January 20 through February 5, 2014). Inferences were derived using logistic regression adjusting for age and education (analyzed in 2014). Nearly all non-physician health professionals, regardless of specialty, cited individual-level factors, such as overconsumption of food (97%), as important causes of obesity. Nutrition professionals were significantly more likely to report high-quality training in weight management (78%) than the other professionals (nursing, 53%; behavioral/mental health, 32%; exercise, 50%; pharmacy, 47%; pobese patients achieve clinically significant weight loss (88%) than the other professionals (nursing, 61%; behavioral/mental health, 51%; exercise, 52%; pharmacy, 61%; pobesity achieve clinically significant weight loss (nutrition, 81%; nursing, behavioral/mental health, exercise, and pharmacy, all health, exercise, and pharmacy professionals may need additional training in weight management and obesity care to effectively participate in collaborative weight management models. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Autogenic Training on Self-Efficacy, Anxiety, and Performance on Nursing Student Simulation.

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    Holland, Brian; Gosselin, Kevin; Mulcahy, Angela

    The increased anxiety experienced by nursing students during simulations can serve as a significant barrier to learning. The use of anxiety-reducing techniques such as autogenic training (AT) can mitigate the negative effects of anxiety and improve the overall learning experience. The investigators in this study sought to understand the effect of AT on student performance and self-efficacy during simulation experiences. The use of AT was an effective technique to decrease anxiety and increase performance among nursing students during nursing simulations. Reducing anxiety during simulations can improve the student learning experience.

  11. Effects of Augmented Reality on Student Achievement and Self-Efficacy in Vocational Education and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sirakaya

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to test the impact of augmented reality (AR use on student achievement and self-efficacy in vocational education and training. For this purpose, a marker-based AR application, called HardwareAR, was developed. HardwareAR provides information about characteristics of hardware components, ports and assembly. The research design was quasi experimental with pre-test post-test that included a control group. The study was conducted with 46 undergraduate students in the Computer Hardware Course. Computer hardware course achievement test, motherboard assembly self-efficacy questionnaire and unstructured observation form were used in the study for data collection purposes. The control group learned the theoretical and applied information about motherboard assembly by using their textbooks (print material while students in the experimental group used HardwareAR application for the same purpose. It was found that the use of AR had a positive impact on student achievement in motherboard assembly whereas it had no impact on students’ self-efficacy related to theoretical knowledge and assembly skills. On the other hand use of AR helped learners to complete the assembly process in a shorter time with less support. It is concluded that compared to control group students, experimental group students were more successful in computer hardware courses. This result shows that AR application can be effective in increasing achievement. It was concluded that AR application had no effect on students’ motherboard assembly theoretical knowledge self-efficacy and motherboard assembly skills self-efficacy. This result may have been affected from the fact that students had high levels of theoretical knowledge and assembly skills before the implementation. Observations showed that AR application enabled students to assemble motherboard in a shorter time with less support. It is thought that simultaneous interaction between virtual objects and real world

  12. Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training experience and self-efficacy of age and gender group: a nationwide community survey.

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    Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Sung Ok; Kim, Young Taek; Cho, Sung-Il

    2016-08-01

    We hypothesized that recent hands-on practice for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) would be strongly associated with a higher likelihood of self-efficacy in bystander CPR among laypersons according to age and gender group. We used the National Korean Community Health Survey database of 228921 representatively sampled responders from 253 counties in 2012. Laypersons who had previous CPR training were eligible. Exposure variables were having had CPR training with hands-on practice session with a manikin (Practical-CPR-Training) and CPR training within the last 2 years (Recent-CPR-Training). Primary outcome was self-efficacy in bystander CPR. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed. The final model with an interaction term was evaluated to compare the effects of CPR training across different age and gender groups. Of 62425 eligible respondents who have had CPR training, 20213 (32.4%) had Practical-CPR-Training. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for self-efficacy were 4.08 (3.78-4.41) in Practical-CPR-Training, 2.61 (2.50-2.73) in male, 1.26 (1.16-1.36) in good self-rated health, 1.19 (1.10-1.29) in high school graduate, 1.19 (1.01-1.39) in persons living with stroke patients in household, and 1.17 (1.10-1.24) in Recent-CPR-Training. In interaction models, Practical-CPR-Training showed higher self-efficacy in all age and gender groups, whereas Recent-CPR-Training was not associated with better self-efficacy in elderly group, male (AOR, 0.90 [0.69-1.18]) and female (AOR, 0.94 [0.72-1.23]). Self-efficacy in bystander CPR was higher in person with recent CPR training with hands-on practice with a manikin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of a Self-Instruction Communication Skills Training on Skills, Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommes, Mark A.; Van der Molen, Henk T.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a study on the effects of a self-instruction training programme in communication skills for psychology students at the Open University of the Netherlands in comparison to a fully supervised training. We expected both training programmes to increase students' knowledge and skills, as well as their self-efficacy and motivation…

  14. Effectiveness of Meta-Cognitive Skills Training on Self-Handicapping and Self-Efficacy of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrbanou Javidan

    2018-03-01

    Discussion: Findings of the present study suggest that meta-cognitive skills training- as an effective training program- could be used for decreasing students’ self-handicapping. But with regards to the effectiveness of meta-cognitive skills training on self-efficacy, it is revealed that more variables are involved, and it needs further investigation.

  15. Effect of a self-efficacy promotion training programme on the body weight changes in patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliasgharpour, Mansooreh; Shomali, Maryam; Moghaddam, Masoumeh Zakeri; Faghihzadeh, Sograt

    2012-09-01

    Haemodialysis is the most common form of medical management of patients affected by end-stage renal disease (ESRD). For haemodialysis to be successful, strict fluid and weight control is recommended. Education, in terms of self-care activities, is an important intervention for improving patients' outcomes. A self-efficacy promotion training programme can be an effective strategy to bring about behavioural change. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a self-efficacy promotion training programme on the body weight changes in patients undergoing haemodialysis. In this single-blind quasi-experimental study, we recruited a convenience sample of 63 patients undergoing haemodialy-sis from two teaching hospitals and allocated them randomly to the experimental or control group. Patients in the experimental group received a six-session self-efficacy promotion training programme while the control group received the routine care of the institute. Mean body weight gain and self-efficacy were measured before, immediately and two months after the study. The groups did not differ significantly regarding the study variable before the study. However, immediately and two months after the study, the mean body weight gain and self-efficacy in the experimental group were significantly lower and higher, respectively, than the control group (p training programme is effective in decreasing weight gain and increasing self-efficacy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Nurses in haemodialysis units can use self-efficacy promotion training programmes as an effective intervention for improving patients' outcomes. © 2012 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  16. The Effect of Modified "Aggression Replacement Training" Program on Self-efficacy of Adolescents with Insulin-dependent Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-efficacy is a crucial factor in controlling adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM. Subsequently the negative behavioral reactions such as aggression adversely affect on self-efficacy. Therefore, interventions are essential to reduce the aggression and to improve the self- efficacy in these patients. Aim: To determine the efficacy of the modified "aggression replacement training" program on self-efficacy of adolescents with insulin-dependent diabetes. Methods: In this clinical trial, 70 adult subjects with IDDM who were referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014 were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The intervention program, including three aspects including: anger control training, social skills training and moral reasoning training was performed in five sessions, each 1.5-2 hours. A five-day interval was between the sessions and each group consisted of 8-10 individuals. The self-management standard questionnaire of “insulin-dependent diabetes management self-efficacy scale (IDMSE” was filled before the intervention and two months afterwards. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 11.5 with paired and Independent t-tests. Results: In this study, 38.5 and 61.5 percent of the subjects were boys and girls, respectively with total mean age of 15.9±2. The self-efficacy of the subjects before the intervention was not significantly different within the groups (p=0/57. Nevertheless in post-intervention assessment, the self-efficacy of the Intervention group significantly increased (49.0±11.1 compared to the control group (33.7±5.5 (p

  17. Effects of Ving Tsun Chinese martial art training on musculoskeletal health, balance performance, and self-efficacy in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Ryan W T; Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Liu, Karen P Y; Guo, X

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Ving Tsun (VT) Chinese martial art training on radial bone strength, upper- and lower-limb muscular strength, shoulder joint mobility, balance performance, and self-efficacy in elderly participants. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve seniors voluntarily joined the VT training group, and twenty-seven seniors voluntarily joined the control group. The VT group received VT training for three months, while the control group received no training. The bone strength of the distal radius was assessed using an ultrasound bone sonometer. Muscular strength in the limbs was evaluated using a Jamar handgrip dynamometer and the five times sit-to-stand test. Shoulder joint mobility was examined using a goniometer. Balance performance and self-efficacy were evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale and the Chinese version of the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, respectively. [Results] The results revealed a nonsignificant group-by-time interaction effect, group effect, and time effect for all outcome variables. However, general trends of maintenance or improvement in all outcome parameters were observed to a greater extent in the VT group than in the control group. [Conclusion] VT training might be a potential fall-prevention exercise that can be used to maintain general physique, balance, and confidence in the elderly population. A further randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm this postulation.

  18. The relationship between maternal self-efficacy and parenting practices: implications for parent training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, M R; Woolley, M L

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between maternal self-efficacy, dysfunctional discipline practices and child conduct problems. Specifically, three levels of self-efficacy, global, domain and task-specific self-efficacy, were assessed in mothers of 2- to 8-year-old children with conduct problems (clinic group, n=45) and non-clinic mothers from the community (non-clinic group, n=79). Measures of global, domain and task-specific self-efficacy were completed by mothers. Clinic mothers reported significantly lower self-efficacy than non-clinic mothers for all but one of the parenting tasks assessed. Both groups of mothers reported lowest self-efficacy for similar parenting tasks. In the sample as a whole self-efficacy measures were significant predictors of maternal discipline style after controlling for other parent, child and risk factors. Of the self-efficacy variables behavioural self-efficacy was the best predictor of mothers discipline style. The findings support the importance of developing parenting strategies that enable parents to generalize their parenting skills to a diverse range of diverse parenting contexts both in the home and in the community.

  19. Change in Self-Efficacy as a Measure of Training Effectiveness at Squadron Officer School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Note: Low scores indicate high self-efficacy SExt Sat E Sat ---X-- No Opin -0 Dissat • Ext Dissat Figure O.10.b Profile Plot for TALJOB 0-46...efficacy SExt Sat - Sat --X No Opin -& Dissat Ext Dissat Figure O.10.c Profile Plot for TALJOB 0-47 Communication Skills SATISFACTION WITH TALENT USE...PRE-TEST) Mean 35 Low Self-Efficacy 30 - 25l 20 ... . . 15 High Self-Efficacy 10 Before After Note: Low scores indicate high self-efficacy SExt Sat E

  20. Outcome results of self-efficacy in children with sickle disease pain who were trained to use guided imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Cassandra

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe self-efficacy as a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments such as the management of SCD pain. The participants were prepared to self-initiate the GI for 5 to 10 minutes three times each day regardless of pain and also during each pain episode. As part of the GI training a tape or CD with guided imagery messages was provided. Participants were monitored for 4 weeks pre and 4 weeks post intervention (GI training). Children kept a daily record of pain episodes. During this time, children continued to record as before in their personal study diary: pain episodes (intensity and treatment), school attendance, and also the frequency of GI use. At the conclusion of this 4-week period, usual pain patterns (PAT), visual imagery ability (KIAQ), and disease specific self-efficacy scale were measured again. The Sickle Cell Self-Efficacy Scale (SCSES) is a new nine-item scale measuring disease-specific perceptions of self-efficacy. The instrument's developers established internal consistency by Cronbach's alpha of 0.89. H1: Children with SCD who are trained in guided imagery will have greater disease-specific self-efficacy following the training than they had prior to learning guided imagery; the hypothesis was tested and supported using t-tests of mean interval-level scores on the SCSES. Eighteen children had positive gained scores and sixteen children raised their scores more than one standard deviation above the mean score for this sample distribution. Greater self-efficacy scores are associated with better physical and psychological functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Time-Management Training on Test-Anxiety and Self-Efficacy of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Biook; Jenani, Shalaleh; Ahangari, Saeideh

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to examine the effect of time-management training on Iranian EFL learners' test-anxiety and self-efficacy. A quasi-experimental design was used. The study was carried out in Tabriz Azad University and University of Applied Sciences and Technology. Thirty-eight BA students majoring in TEFL who enrolled in the above mentioned…

  2. A Longitudinal Examination of the Effects of Computer Self-Efficacy Growth on Performance during Technology Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James P.; Kher, Hemant V.

    2015-01-01

    Technology training in the classroom is critical in preparing students for upper level classes as well as professional careers, especially in fields such as technology. One of the key enablers to this process is computer self-efficacy (CSE), which has an extensive stream of empirical research. Despite this, one of the missing pieces is how CSE…

  3. Social Media Self-Efficacy of Health Education Specialists: Training and Organizational Development Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Julia M; Paige, Samantha; Stellefson, Michael; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2016-11-01

    A growing number of public health organizations are applying the power of social media (SM) for health promotion and behavior change. This cross-sectional study of health education specialists (n = 353) examined which demographic and occupational factors were associated with SM self-efficacy, and evaluated SM self-efficacy related to each of the Seven Areas of Responsibility. A series of one-way analyses of variance were conducted to determine whether differences in SM self-efficacy existed by sex, age, years of work experience, and SM access at work. A multiple linear regression examined the relationship between SM self-efficacy and SM experience when controlling for demographic and occupational factors. Statistically significant differences in SM self-efficacy existed by age, F(2, 289) = 6.54, p = .002. SM experience (β = 1.43, t = 11.35, p education research and practice. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  4. The effect of time-management training on test-anxiety and self-efficacy of Iranian intermediate EFL learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biook Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the effect of time-management training on Iranian EFL learners' test-anxiety and self-efficacy. A quasi-experimental design was used. The study was carried out in Tabriz Azad University and University of Applied Sciences and Technology. Thirty-eight BA students majoring in TEFL who enrolled in the above mentioned context in the academic year 1390-1391 participated in the study. The instruments used in the study were Time-Management Behavior Scale constructed by Macan, Shahani, Dipboye, et al. (1990, General Self-Efficacy Scale constructed by Jerusalem and Schwarzer (1992 and Westside Test-Anxiety Scale constructed by Driscoll (2007.The results indicated that there was a significant difference between the mean scores of experimental group's test-anxiety before and after time-management training and also there was a significant difference between the mean scores of experimental group and control group's test-anxiety after intervention. These findings also apply to the mean scores of self-efficacy. Therefore, it can be concluded that time-management training affects EFL learners' test-anxiety and self-efficacy. The findings of this study have some implications for researchers, teachers, universities and institutions.

  5. Changes in self-efficacy, collective efficacy and patient outcome following interprofessional simulation training on postpartum haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egenberg, Signe; Øian, Pål; Eggebø, Torbjørn Moe; Arsenovic, Mirjana Grujic; Bru, Lars Edvin

    2017-10-01

    To examine whether interprofessional simulation training on management of postpartum haemorrhage enhances self-efficacy and collective efficacy and reduces the blood transfusion rate after birth. Postpartum haemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide, although it is preventable in most cases. Interprofessional simulation training might help improve the competence of health professionals dealing with postpartum haemorrhage, and more information is needed to determine its potential. Multimethod, quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention design. Interprofessional simulation training on postpartum haemorrhage was implemented for midwives, obstetricians and auxiliary nurses in a university hospital. Training included realistic scenarios and debriefing, and a measurement scale for perceived postpartum haemorrhage-specific self-efficacy, and collective efficacy was developed and implemented. Red blood cell transfusion was used as the dependent variable for improved patient outcome pre-post intervention. Self-efficacy and collective efficacy levels were significantly increased after training. The overall red blood cell transfusion rate did not change, but there was a significant reduction in the use of ≥5 units of blood products related to severe bleeding after birth. The study contributes to new knowledge on how simulation training through mastery and vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion and psychophysiological state might enhance postpartum haemorrhage-specific self-efficacy and collective efficacy levels and thereby predict team performance. The significant reduction in severe postpartum haemorrhage after training, indicated by reduction in ≥5 units of blood transfusions, corresponds well with the improvement in collective efficacy, and might reflect the emphasis on collective efforts to counteract severe cases of postpartum haemorrhage. Interprofessional simulation training in teams may contribute to enhanced prevention and

  6. Multimedia Exercise Training Program Improves Distance Walked, Heart Rate Recovery, and Self-efficacy in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Wei; Ou, Shu-Hua; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chang, Yue-Cune; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Patient education has been shown to be more effective when delivered using multimedia than written materials. However, the effects of using multimedia to assist patients in cardiac rehabilitation have not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of an inpatient multimedia exercise training program on distance walked in the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), heart rate recovery, and walking self-efficacy of patients who had undergone heart surgery. For this longitudinal quasi-experimental study, 60 consecutive patients were assigned to an experimental (n = 20; inpatient multimedia exercise training program) or control (n = 40; routine care) group. Data were collected at 3 times (before surgery, 1 to 2 days before hospital discharge, and 1 month after hospital discharge) and analyzed with the generalized estimating equation approach. Most subjects were men (66.7%), had a mean age of 61.32 ± 13.4 years and left ventricular ejection fraction of 56.96% ± 13.28%, and underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n = 34, 56.7%). Subjects receiving the exercise training program showed significantly greater improvement than those in the control group in the 6MWT walking distance (P self-efficacy (P = .002) at hospital discharge. Furthermore, the intervention effects on 6MWT distance (P self-efficacy (P exercise training program safely improved distance walked in the 6MWT, heart rate recovery, and self-efficacy at hospital discharge in patients after heart surgery and maintained their improvement in 6MWT and self-efficacy 1 month later.

  7. Effect of Verbal Feedback in Twelve Weeks Handball Training on Self-Efficacy and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toros, Turhan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was investigate the effect of verbal feedback on self-efficacy and life satisfaction. A total of 30 students as experimental group (n=15, mean age= 20.13±1.79) and control group (n=15, mean age=20.57±1.62) with similar characteristics were included in the study. Self-efficacy scale that originally developed by Riggs "et…

  8. How a Multidimensional View of Perceived Organizational Support Impacts Self-Efficacy and Task Understanding during Training for Boundary Spanning Tasks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, Ronald S

    2008-01-01

    ...: corporate headquarters, the home office, or the training environment. These dimensions of POS were tested to discover their effect on the self-efficacy and task understanding of individuals training for boundary-spanning tasks...

  9. The Impact of a Direct Care Training Program on the Self-Efficacy of Newly Hired Direct Care Employees at State Mental Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Marcus Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been shown to be an important element in the success of individuals in a variety of different settings. This research examined the impact of a two week new employee orientation training program on the general and social self-efficacy of newly hired direct care employees at state mental health facilities. The research showed that…

  10. Dealing with School Violence: The Effect of School Violence Prevention Training on Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Dealing with Violent Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Shayovitz, Revital

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the relationship between school violence prevention training and teachers' perceived self-efficacy in handling violent events. Three indicators were used to examine teachers' self-efficacy: personal teaching efficacy (PTE), teachers' efficacy in the school as an organisation (TESO), and teachers' outcome efficacy (TOE). Data…

  11. Reliability and responsiveness of the Self-Efficacy in Assessing, Training and Spotting wheelchair skills (SEATS) outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Paula W; Smith, Emma M; Miller, William C; Kirby, R Lee; Daoust, Geneviève

    2018-01-31

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the internal consistency, test-retest reliability and responsiveness of the Self-Efficacy in Assessing, Training and Spotting manual wheelchair skills (SEATS-M) and Self-Efficacy in Assessing, Training and Spotting power wheelchair skills (SEATS-P). A 2-week test-retest design was used with a convenience sample of occupational and physical therapists who worked at a provincial rehabilitation centre (inpatient and outpatient services). Sixteen participants completed the SEATS-M and 18 participants completed the SEATS-P. For the SEATS-M assessment, training, spotting and documentation sections, Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.90 to 0.97, the 2-week intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 1,1 ) ranged from 0.81 to 0.95, the standard error of measurements (SEM) ranged from 5.06 to 8.70 and the smallest real differences (SRD) ranged from 6.24 to 8.18. For the SEATS-P assessment, training, spotting and documentation sections, Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged from 0.83 to 0.92, the ICCs ranged from 0.72 to 0.86, the SEMs ranged from 4.54 to 8.91 and the SRDs ranged from 5.90 to 8.27. There is preliminary evidence that both the SEATS-M and the SEATS-P have high internal consistency, good test-retest reliability and support for responsiveness. These tools can be used in evaluating clinician self-efficacy with assessing, training, spotting and documenting wheelchair skills included on the Wheelchair Skills Test. Implications for Rehabilitation There is preliminary evidence that the SEATS-M and SEATS-P are reliable and responsive outcome measures that can be used to evaluate the self-efficacy of clinicians to administer the Wheelchair Skills Program. Measurement of clinicians' self-efficacy in this area of practice may enable an enhanced understanding of the areas in which clinicians lack self-efficacy, thereby informing the development of improved knowledge translation interventions.

  12. The effects of scenario-based communication training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy and myocardial infarction knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Huang, Ya-Hsuan; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of a simulated communication training course on nurses' communication competence, self-efficacy, communication performance, myocardial infarction knowledge, and general satisfaction with their learning experience. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a pre-test and two post-tests. The experimental group underwent simulated communication training course and the control group received a case-based communication training course. The experimental group made more significant improvement in competence and self-efficacy in communication from pre-test to the second post-test than the control group. Although both groups' satisfaction with their learning experience significantly increased from the first post-test to the second post-test, the experimental group was found to be more satisfied with their learning experience than the control group. No significant differences in communication performance and myocardial infarction knowledge between the two groups were identified. Scenario-based communication training can be more fully incorporated into in-service education for nurses to boost their competence and self-efficacy in communication and enhance their communication performance in myocardial infarction patient care. Introduction of real-life communication scenarios through multimedia in communication education could make learners more motivated to practice communication, hence leading to improved communication capacity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy in the Connections between Strength-Based Parenting, Happiness and Psychological Distress in Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Loton

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies of strength-based parenting (SBP, a style of parenting that seeks to build strengths knowledge and strengths use in one’s child, have reported benefits such as higher life satisfaction, subjective wellbeing, and positive emotions together with lower stress in children and teens. Two proximal mediators conveying these effects have been identified: teen’s own use of strengths and strength-based coping, along with a small moderating effect of growth mindsets relating to strengths. The current study tests the potential mediating effect of self-efficacy, a sense of agency in life, in the relationship between SBP and mental health (wellbeing and illbeing in teens. Self efficacy has been linked to wellbeing and strengths processes in past studies and is classed as a basic human need and form of eudaimonic happiness. This study reconfirmed the adaptive benefits of SBP in a large sample of Australian adolescents (N = 11,368; 59% male; Mage = 14.04, SDage = 1.99 sourced from 28 schools. Using structural equation modeling, SBP significantly and directly predicted higher happiness and lower depression, with direct effects falling into the 85th and 95th percentile of meta-analytically derived individual differences effect sizes. In addition, self-efficacy was a significant partial mediator, accounting for 40.0% of the total effect on happiness and 52.7% of the total effect on distress. Self-efficacy was also a full mediator in the case of anxiety, with a strong indirect effect. Results suggest that building strengths in teens can also build self-efficacy, and given the large effect sizes, that SBP is a promising leverage point for increasing teen wellbeing.

  14. The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy in the Connections between Strength-Based Parenting, Happiness and Psychological Distress in Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loton, Daniel J; Waters, Lea E

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary studies of s trength-based parenting (SBP), a style of parenting that seeks to build strengths knowledge and strengths use in one's child, have reported benefits such as higher life satisfaction, subjective wellbeing, and positive emotions together with lower stress in children and teens. Two proximal mediators conveying these effects have been identified: teen's own use of strengths and strength-based coping, along with a small moderating effect of growth mindsets relating to strengths. The current study tests the potential mediating effect of self-efficacy, a sense of agency in life, in the relationship between SBP and mental health (wellbeing and illbeing) in teens. Self efficacy has been linked to wellbeing and strengths processes in past studies and is classed as a basic human need and form of eudaimonic happiness. This study reconfirmed the adaptive benefits of SBP in a large sample of Australian adolescents ( N = 11,368; 59% male; M age = 14.04, SD age = 1.99) sourced from 28 schools. Using structural equation modeling, SBP significantly and directly predicted higher happiness and lower depression, with direct effects falling into the 85th and 95th percentile of meta-analytically derived individual differences effect sizes. In addition, self-efficacy was a significant partial mediator, accounting for 40.0% of the total effect on happiness and 52.7% of the total effect on distress. Self-efficacy was also a full mediator in the case of anxiety, with a strong indirect effect. Results suggest that building strengths in teens can also build self-efficacy, and given the large effect sizes, that SBP is a promising leverage point for increasing teen wellbeing.

  15. Training Peer Sexual Health Educators: Changes in Knowledge, Counseling Self-Efficacy, and Sexual Risk Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Britt L.; Krumboltz, John D.; Koopman, Cheryl

    2007-01-01

    Peer sexual health education programs are widespread on college campuses, but little research has assessed the effect of these programs on the peer educators. This study employed a repeated measures design to examine changes over the academic quarter in the knowledge, counseling self-efficacy, and sexual behavior of 70 college students enrolled in…

  16. Virtual Reality (VR) as a Source for Self-Efficacy in Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Yonit; Weissblueth, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    The current study sought to explore the experiences of pre-service student teachers in a teaching unit in VR within a special course framework which was intended to enhance student-teacher's 21st century skills and growth processes. In particular, how their experiences working with VR affected their self-efficacy. The research population comprised…

  17. Training Counseling Students to Develop Group Leadership Self-Efficacy and Multicultural Competence through Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgett, Aida; Hausheer, Robin; Doumas, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a service-learning project designed to increase student group leadership self-efficacy and multicultural competence. Students facilitated debriefing groups for campus and community members after they participated in a theater production aimed at increasing awareness of oppression, power, and privilege. Students completed…

  18. A Longitudinal Examination of the Effects of Computer Self-efficacy Growth on Performance during Technology Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Downey

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Technology training in the classroom is critical in preparing students for upper level classes as well as professional careers, especially in fields such as technology. One of the key enablers to this process is computer self-efficacy (CSE, which has an extensive stream of empirical research. Despite this, one of the missing pieces is how CSE actually changes during training, and how such change is related to antecedents and performance outcomes. Measuring change requires repeated data gathering and the use of latent growth modeling, a relatively new statistical technique. This study examines CSE (specifically general CSE or GCSE growth over time during training, and how this growth is influenced by anxiety and gender and influences performance, using a semester-long lab course covering three applications. The use of GCSE growth more accurately models how students actually learn in a technology classroom. It provides novel clarity in the interaction of gender, anxiety, GCSE, specific CSEs, and performance during training. The study finds that the relationship between anxiety and self-efficacy decreases over time during training, becoming non-significant; it clarifies the significant role gender plays in influencing GCSE at the start of and during training. It finds GCSE influences application performance only through specific CSEs.

  19. Introduction of leadership training based on PM theory at a nuclear power plant. An analysis of leadership, morale and self-efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Michio [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Yoshiyama, Naohiro; Misumi, Emiko; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Misumi, Jyuji; Hiraki, Tadao; Sakurai, Yukihiro

    1997-09-01

    PM leadership training(PMT) course was introduced into three nuclear power plants for the purpose of accident prevention. PMT is a six-month training course consisting of three parts, i.e., lecture, PM survey, and participants` practice at their workplace. The major aim of PMT is to change participants` leadership behavior into PM-type that is the most desirable for group effectiveness. In this study, we examined the effects of PMT on participants` leadership, subordinates` morale and participants` self-efficacy. Participants were fifty-six supervisors working in operation or maintenance in each nuclear power plant. The supervisors have eight hundred forty five subordinates in all. The major results were as follows: (1) Not only participants` leadership Performance(P) and Maintenance(M) behavior was strengthened, but also their subordinates` morale increased during PMT`s 6-month course. (2) Strengthening both P and M behavior was the most effective in building up subordinates` morale, especially in teamwork, meeting satisfaction, and communication. (3) Participants` self-efficacy was related with the strength of their P behavior and subordinates` group morale. These results show that PMT course is effective in accident prevention in nuclear power plants. Finally, we discuss some future problems of the development of PMT in nuclear power plants. (author)

  20. Introduction of leadership training based on PM theory at a nuclear power plant. An analysis of leadership, morale and self-efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Michio; Yoshiyama, Naohiro; Misumi, Emiko; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Misumi, Jyuji; Hiraki, Tadao; Sakurai, Yukihiro.

    1997-01-01

    PM leadership training(PMT) course was introduced into three nuclear power plants for the purpose of accident prevention. PMT is a six-month training course consisting of three parts, i.e., lecture, PM survey, and participants' practice at their workplace. The major aim of PMT is to change participants' leadership behavior into PM-type that is the most desirable for group effectiveness. In this study, we examined the effects of PMT on participants' leadership, subordinates' morale and participants' self-efficacy. Participants were fifty-six supervisors working in operation or maintenance in each nuclear power plant. The supervisors have eight hundred forty five subordinates in all. The major results were as follows: (1) Not only participants' leadership Performance(P) and Maintenance(M) behavior was strengthened, but also their subordinates' morale increased during PMT's 6-month course. (2) Strengthening both P and M behavior was the most effective in building up subordinates' morale, especially in teamwork, meeting satisfaction, and communication. (3) Participants' self-efficacy was related with the strength of their P behavior and subordinates' group morale. These results show that PMT course is effective in accident prevention in nuclear power plants. Finally, we discuss some future problems of the development of PMT in nuclear power plants. (author)

  1. Modeling the Longitudinal Direct and Indirect Effects of Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, and Behavioral Intentions on Practice Behavior Outcomes of Suicide Intervention Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip; Frey, Jodi M; Woods, MaKenna N; Ko, Jungyai; Shipe, Stacey

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a longitudinal path analysis to test attitudes toward suicide prevention, self-efficacy, and behavioral intentions as mediators/moderators of clinical skill development over time following suicide intervention training. Results support a direct effect of attitudes on practice behaviors and self-efficacy, but no moderating effect. Self-efficacy performed as a mediator of practice behaviors over time. Behavioral intention had a direct effect on practice behaviors and mediated the relationship between attitudes and practice behaviors. Implications for research and practice are discussed. © 2016 The American Association of Suicidology.

  2. Learning how to recover from job stress: effects of a recovery training program on recovery, recovery-related self-efficacy, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Verena C; Binnewies, Carmen; Sonnentag, Sabine; Mojza, Eva J

    2011-04-01

    This quasi-experimental study evaluated the effects of a recovery training program on recovery experiences (psychological detachment from work, relaxation, mastery experiences, and control during off-job time), recovery-related self-efficacy, and well-being outcomes. The training comprised two sessions held one week apart. Recovery experiences, recovery-related self-efficacy, and well-being outcomes were measured before the training (T1) and one week (T2) and three weeks (T3) after the training. A training group consisting of 48 individuals and a waitlist control group of 47 individuals were compared (N = 95). Analyses of covariance revealed an increase in recovery experiences at T2 and T3 (for mastery only at T2). Recovery-related self-efficacy and sleep quality increased at T2 and T3, perceived stress and state negative affect decreased at T3. No training effects were found for emotional exhaustion.

  3. MUD and Self Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwan Min

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a theoretical framework for analyzing the effect of MUD (Multi-User Dungeons) playing on users' self-efficacy by applying Bandura's social learning theory, and introduces three types of self-efficacy: computer self-efficacy; social self-efficacy; and generalized self-efficacy. Considers successful performance, vicarious experience,…

  4. Explaining Research Utilization Among 4-H Faculty, Staff, and Volunteers: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Learning Goal Orientation, Training, and Previous Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Tillman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of factors that facilitate the utilization of research evidence among faculty, staff, and volunteers in the 4-H Youth Development Program is presented in this paper. Participants (N= 368; 86 4-H faculty, 153 staff, and 129 volunteers represented 35 states; structural equation modeling was utilized in the analyses. Results of the path analysis explained 56% of variance in research utilization and 28% in research utilization self-efficacy. Among the factors impacting research utilization, self-efficacy played the most important role. In turn, self-efficacy for research utilization was positively influenced by participants’ learning goal orientation, frequency of 4-H training during the last 12 months, education in research-related areas, and investigative career interests. In addition, 4-H staff who were exposed to research at higher levels reported higher research utilization self-efficacy. The findings reinforce the importance of fostering research utilization self-efficacy among 4-H faculty, staff, and volunteers. Among the suggestions presented are regular 4-H training opportunities and on-going exposure to program evaluation and program improvement experiences.

  5. Resistance training and older adults' beliefs about psychological benefits: the importance of self-efficacy and social interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Rylee

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived psychological benefits and explore the mechanisms underlying the link between exercise and psychological well-being for a group of older adults (65-72 years; 6 women; 4 men) who participated in a 12-week program of moderate-to-high intensity resistance training. They were interviewed in-depth at 1 week preintervention, 1 month after commencement, and 1 week after completion. The participants believed that resistance training enhanced their well-being, and they gave various physical, mental, and social reasons to explain this link. In particular, self-efficacy and social interaction were found to be key mechanisms underlying this relationship. This study exposed meaningful perceived improvements in psychological wellbeing that have not been uncovered in quantitative studies of healthy older people undertaking resistance training. The findings highlight the importance of using qualitative methods to enrich understandings of the positive effect of exercise on psychological well-being. The findings also have implications for designing effective resistance training interventions for older people.

  6. Work engagement, organizational commitment, self efficacy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Work engagement, organizational commitment and self-efficacy will create a positive ... effective training, counseling, effective communication and leadership skills.

  7. Strength Training: For Overall Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness Strength training is an important part of an overall fitness program. Here's what strength training can do for ... is a key component of overall health and fitness for everyone. Lean muscle mass naturally diminishes with ...

  8. The Role of Practitioner Self-Efficacy, Training, Program and Workplace Factors on the Implementation of an Evidence-Based Parenting Intervention in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Karen M. T.; Nicholson, Jan M.; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting the implementation by primary care practitioners (nursing, education, allied health, and medical) of a brief parenting and family support intervention (the Primary Care Triple P--Positive Parenting Program) following professional training. It assesses the impact of prior experience, self-efficacy, program…

  9. The Effects of an Equine Assisted Learning Supervision Intervention on Counselors'-in-Training Performance Anxiety, Counseling Self-Efficacy, and Supervisory Working Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Cheryl C.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the counseling process, counselors-in-training often experience performance anxiety when entering the counseling profession. Research shows that higher counseling self-efficacy (the belief in oneself to perform counseling skills successfully) helps decrease performance anxiety. Further, a strong supervisory working…

  10. Effectiveness of Parental Skills Training on Worry, Anxiety and Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Single-Child and Multi-Child Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hajigholami Yazdi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Each family utilizes specific methods for personal and social education of their children. These methods that are called “Parenting style” are affected by various factors such as biological, cultural, social, political, and economic factors. The present study intends to investigate the effectiveness of parental skills training on worry, anxiety and self-efficacy beliefs of single-child and multi-child parents. Methods: In this experimental study, two private girls' school located in the city of Karaj, were randomly selected as the control and experimental groups. Parents of experimental group’s students (54 couples with a voluntary assignment participated in 8 training sessions. Data were obtained by General Self-efficacy Beliefs Questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ which were then analyzed by t-test and ANOVA. Results: Results showed that there was not any significant difference in the pretest between single-child and multi-child parents. Regarding control and experimental groups, a significant difference has been detected between the pretest and posttest between two groups. Multifactor ANOVA test results also showed that the effect of parental skills training is significant on fear, anxiety and self-efficacy. But the number of children does not have any significant effect on the fear, anxiety and self-efficacy. Conclusion: Findings emphasize the necessity and importance of parental skills training to facilitate children nurture, decrease stress and worry resulting from parenting responsibility.

  11. [Effects of Self-management Program applying Dongsasub Training on Self-efficacy, Self-esteem, Self-management Behavior and Blood Pressure in Older Adults with Hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsuk; Song, Misoon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a self-management program applying Dongsasub training based on self-efficacy theory, and to verify the program effectiveness on self-esteem as well as self-efficacy, self-management behaviors, and blood pressure. The study design was a non-equivalent, pre-post controlled quasi-experiment study. Thirty-eight patients aged 65 and older from a senior welfare center in Seoul participated in this study (20 patients in the experimental group and 18 patients in the control group). The self-management program applying Dongsasub training consisted of eight sessions. After development was complete the program was used with the experimental group. Outcome variables included self-efficacy, self-esteem, self-management behaviors measured by questionnaires, and blood pressure measured by electronic manometer. Self-efficacy (t=2.42, p=.021), self-esteem (t=2.57, p=.014) and self-management behaviors (t=2.21, p=.034) were significantly higher and systolic blood pressure (t=-2.14, p=.040) was significantly lower in the experimental group compared to the control group. However, diastolic blood pressure (t=-.85, p=.400) was not significantly different between the two groups. The results indicate that the self-management program applying Dongsasub training can be used as a nursing intervention in community settings for improving self-management behaviors for older adults with hypertension.

  12. Communication Skills Training Increases Self-Efficacy of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Birgitte; Ammentorp, Jette; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the knowledge of good communication as a precondition for optimal care and treatment in health care, serious communication problems are still experienced by patients as well as by health care professionals. An orthopedic surgery department initiated a 3-day communication skills training course for all staff members expecting…

  13. Hope, Interpreter Self-efficacy, and Social Impacts: Assessment of the NNOCCI Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J.; Swim, J.

    2012-12-01

    Conservation educators at informal science learning centers are well-positioned to teach climate science and motivate action but have resisted the topic. Our research demonstrates their resist is due to self-doubt about climate science facts and the belief they will encounter negative audience feedback. Further, this self-doubt and self-silencing is emotional taxing. As a result we have developed a National Network for Ocean Climate Change Interpretation's (NNOCCI) program that addresses educators' needs for technical training and emotional scaffolding to help them fully engage with this work. The evaluation of this program sought to understand how to support educators interested in promoting public literacy on climate change through engagement with a structured training program aimed at increased the efficacy of interpreters through teaching strategic framing strategies. The program engaged educator dyads from informal science learning sites to attend an online and in-person program that initiated a new community of practice focused on sharing techniques and tools for ocean climate change interpretation. The presentation will summarize a model for embedded assessment across all aspects of a program and how social vectors, based upon educators' interpersonal and professional relationships, impact the understanding of an educator's work across their life-world. This summary will be followed by results from qualitative front-end research that demonstrated the psychologically complex emotional conditions that describe the experience of being an environmental educator. The project evaluators will then present results from their focus groups and social network analysis to demonstrate how training impacted in-group relationships, skill development, and the layered social education strategies that help communities engage with the content. Results demonstrated that skill training increased educator's hope--in the form of increased perceived agency and plans for educational

  14. Effects of smoking cues and argument strength of antismoking advertisements on former smokers' self-efficacy, attitude, and intention to refrain from smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungkyoung; Cappella, Joseph N; Lerman, Caryn; Strasser, Andrew A

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the impact of smoking cues employed in antismoking advertisements on former smokers. Previous findings indicate that visual smoking cues in antismoking advertisements with weak antismoking arguments can elicit smoking urges in smokers and undermine message effectiveness. This study extends these observations to former smokers asking whether smoking cues in antismoking advertisements influence former smokers' self-efficacy, attitudes, and intention to refrain from smoking, along with smoking urges and perceived message effectiveness. The study was a mixed 2 (smoking cues; present vs. absent) × 2 (argument strength [AS]; high vs. low) design where smoking cue was a between-subject factor and AS was a within-subject factor. Potential participants recruited via online ads were screened in a phone interview for their eligibility. A total of 105 former smokers (aged 21-65) participated in the study, which was conducted in a laboratory setting. Repeated measure ANOVA and MANOVA were used for the analyses. The results showed that the presence of smoking cues in antismoking ads undermines former smokers' behavioral self-efficacy, attitude, and intention about smoking abstinence, which increased as AS for the ads increased. Former smokers' reports of smoking urge were not affected by smoking cues or AS. However, consistent with previous findings for smokers, the presence of cues weakened perceived message effectiveness of antismoking ads rated by former smokers. The effect of smoking cues on former smokers' self-efficacy, attitude, and intention to refrain from smoking is problematic. Inclusion of smoking cues in antismoking ads should be undertaken only when accompanied by strong arguments.

  15. Effects of Smoking Cues and Argument Strength of Antismoking Advertisements on Former Smokers’ Self-efficacy, Attitude, and Intention to Refrain From Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sungkyoung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This study examines the impact of smoking cues employed in antismoking advertisements on former smokers. Previous findings indicate that visual smoking cues in antismoking advertisements with weak antismoking arguments can elicit smoking urges in smokers and undermine message effectiveness. This study extends these observations to former smokers asking whether smoking cues in antismoking advertisements influence former smokers’ self-efficacy, attitudes, and intention to refrain from smoking, along with smoking urges and perceived message effectiveness. Methods: The study was a mixed 2 (smoking cues; present vs. absent) × 2 (argument strength [AS]; high vs. low) design where smoking cue was a between-subject factor and AS was a within-subject factor. Potential participants recruited via online ads were screened in a phone interview for their eligibility. A total of 105 former smokers (aged 21–65) participated in the study, which was conducted in a laboratory setting. Repeated measure ANOVA and MANOVA were used for the analyses. Results: The results showed that the presence of smoking cues in antismoking ads undermines former smokers’ behavioral self-efficacy, attitude, and intention about smoking abstinence, which increased as AS for the ads increased. Former smokers’ reports of smoking urge were not affected by smoking cues or AS. However, consistent with previous findings for smokers, the presence of cues weakened perceived message effectiveness of antismoking ads rated by former smokers. Conclusions: The effect of smoking cues on former smokers’ self-efficacy, attitude, and intention to refrain from smoking is problematic. Inclusion of smoking cues in antismoking ads should be undertaken only when accompanied by strong arguments. PMID:22949578

  16. The effects of scenario-based simulation course training on nurses' communication competence and self-efficacy: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Chang, Wen-Hui; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that an underappreciation of the importance of person-centered communication and inappropriate communication training could result in unsatisfactory communication performance from nurses. There are a large number of studies about communication training for nurses, but not so many about communication training in early stages of nursing career. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of a traditional course versus scenario-based simulation training on nurses' communication competency, communication self-efficacy, and communication performance in discharge planning Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). A randomized controlled trial was used with a pretest and two posttests. The experimental group underwent the scenario-based simulation course, whereas the control group received the traditional course. A convenience sample of 116 nurses with qualifications ranging from N0 level (novice nurses) to N2 level (competent nurses) in Taiwan's clinical nursing ladder system was recruited from a medical center in northern Taiwan. Analysis of covariance was used to determine between-subjects effects on communication competency and self-efficacy, whereas independent t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine between-subjects effects on learner satisfaction and discharge planning communication performance. Paired t test was used to determine communication self-efficacy. In this study, the nurses and independent raters found scenario-based simulation training more effective than traditional communication course. However, standardized patients reported no significant difference in communication performance between the two groups of nurses. Despite that traditional classroom lectures and simulation-based communication training could both produce enhanced communication competency and self-efficacy among nurses, this study has established that the latter may be better than the former in terms of learner satisfaction and communication

  17. The Effectiveness of Group Training of CBT-Based Stress Management on Anxiety, Psychological Hardiness and General Self-Efficacy Among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molla Jafar, Hamdam; Salabifard, Seddigheh; Mousavi, Seyedeh Maryam; Sobhani, Zahra

    2015-09-28

    Admission to university is a very sensitive period of life for efficient, active, and young workforces in any country, and it is mostly associated with many changes in social and human relationships. These changes lead to anxiety in students. Moreover, humans need certain functions in order to adaptively deal with different life situations and challenges. By training stress management, these functions can help human acquire the required abilities. The present study was aimed at investigating the effectiveness of stress management training in anxiety, psychological hardiness, and general self-efficacy among university students. The study was a quasi-experimental intervention (pretest-posttest-follow-up) including a control group, it was a fundamental applied study. The statistical population consisted of all students of Islamic Azad University, Karaj, Iran. Convenient sampling was employed to select 30 students who were divided into an experimental group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). Before stress management training, both groups filled out Beck Anxiety Inventory, Long and Goulet scale of psychological hardiness, and General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE-10). Afterwards, the experimental group was provided with stress management training. And after the experiment, the abovementioned questionnaires and scales were responded by the two groups. Finally the collected data were analyzed and compared using one-way MANOVA. The results of MANOVA indicated that there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of anxiety, hardiness, and general self-efficacy (pstress management among university students cause anxiety to drop; moreover, it enhances their psychological hardiness and self-efficacy. In regard with the role and importance of stress management, training this skill should be included in educational plans of university.

  18. Strength Training. A Key to Athletic Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Patricia W.

    Characteristics of an effective strength training program are analyzed and descriptions are offered of different kinds of weight training activities. Comparisons are made between concentric, isometric, eccentric, and isokinetic training methods. The fundamentals and techniques of an exemplary training program are outlined and the organization and…

  19. A Study of the Effectiveness of Group Spiritual Intelligence Training on Self-Efficacy and Social Responsibility of Secondary School Girls in Shahrekord

    OpenAIRE

    Katayoun Safa Chaleshtari; Tayebe Sharifi; Mohammad Ghasemi Pirbalooti

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group spiritual intelligence training on self-efficacy and social responsibility of high school secondary school students in Shahrekord. Methods: The parallel intervention research method was used in this study. The statistical population included all female secondary school students in Shahrekord during the academic year 1393 - 1394. Random cluster sampling was used to select the samples. Then, schools were rand...

  20. Measuring School Psychology Trainee Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Adam B.; Mcclure, John; Sealander, Karen; Baker, Courtney N.

    2017-01-01

    There is an ever-increasing need for school psychology training programs to demonstrate their ability to produce competent practitioners. One method of addressing this need is through the assessment of self-efficacy. However, little research on self-efficacy in school psychology exists likely due to the lack of a psychometrically sound measure of…

  1. The effects of 10 weeks Integrated Neuromuscular Training on fundamental movement skills and physical self-efficacy in 6-7 year old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Eyre, Emma L J; Oxford, Samuel W

    2017-03-23

    Integrated neuromuscular training (INT) has been suggested as an effective means to enhance athletic potential in children. However, few studies have reported the effects of school based INT programs. This study examined the effect of INT on process and product fundamental movement skill measures and physical self-efficacy in 6-7 year old children. Ninety-four children from 2 primary schools were randomised into either a 10 week INT program or a control group CON (n =41) group. Results indicated significantly greater increases in process FMS scores in INT vs CON (P = 0.001). For product measures of FMS, 10m sprint time, counter movement jump, seated medicine ball throw and standing long jump (all P = 0.001), all significantly increased to a greater extent in the INT group vs CON. A significant group (INT vs CON) X time (pre vs post) X gender interaction for physical self-efficacy revealed increased physical self-efficacy pre to post INT, compared to CON but only for boys (P = 0.001). For girls, physical self-efficacy was not significantly different pre to post the 10 week period for INT and CON groups. The results of this study suggest that replacing 1 of the 2 weekly statutory PE lessons with an integrated neuromuscular training programme over a 10 week period results in positive improvements in fundamental movement skill quality and outcomes in 6-7 year old children. INT also appears to increase physical self-esteem to a greater extent than statutory PE but only in boys.

  2. Strength training for the warfighter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, William J; Szivak, Tunde K

    2012-07-01

    Optimizing strength training for the warfighter is challenged by past training philosophies that no longer serve the modern warfighter facing the "anaerobic battlefield." Training approaches for integration of strength with other needed physical capabilities have been shown to require a periodization model that has the flexibility for changes and is able to adapt to ever-changing circumstances affecting the quality of workouts. Additionally, sequencing of workouts to limit over-reaching and development of overtraining syndromes that end in loss of duty time and injury are paramount to long-term success. Allowing adequate time for rest and recovery and recognizing the negative influences of extreme exercise programs and excessive endurance training will be vital in moving physical training programs into a more modern perspective as used by elite strength-power anaerobic athletes in sports today. Because the warfighter is an elite athlete, it is time that training approaches that are scientifically based are updated within the military to match the functional demands of modern warfare and are given greater credence and value at the command levels. A needs analysis, development of periodized training modules, and individualization of programs are needed to optimize the strength of the modern warfighter. We now have the knowledge, professional coaches and nonprofit organization certifications with continuing education units, and modern training technology to allow this to happen. Ultimately, it only takes command decisions and implementation to make this possible.

  3. RANCANGAN PROGRAM PELATIHAN UNTUK MENINGKATKAN SELF EFFICACY NEGOSIASI PADA SISWA SMK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarvia Syarvia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop a training design to increase self-efficacy on negotiation for students of vocational school. Research subjects were 18 students of the SMK 1 Bandung class of 2011 marketing majoring. The design of the training program was conceived and developed with reference to the strength aspect of self-efficacy and negotiation, by applying the model of experiential learning. The training material organized into two main activities to improve selfefficacy in negotiation namely our business and making a profit. The effectiveness of the training is measured by the increase of self-efficacy category by using an instrument on negotiation selfefficacy, behavioral observation and evaluation of training. This study used a quasi-experimental method with the untreated control group pretest and posttest sample dependent design. T-Test results showed there’s no significant improvement in the category of self-efficacy negotiations after the training program. Quantitatively and observations during training showed an increase in self-efficacy negotiation in aspects of communication, strategy and relationships, as well as a decrease in the emotional aspects among training participants.

  4. Effect of job maintenance training program for employees with chronic disease - a randomized controlled trial on self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varekamp, Inge; Verbeek, Jos H; de Boer, Angela; van Dijk, Frank J H

    2011-07-01

    Employees with a chronic physical condition may be hampered in job performance due to physical or cognitive limitations, pain, fatigue, psychosocial barriers, or because medical treatment interferes with work. This study investigates the effect of a group-training program aimed at job maintenance. Essential elements of the program are exploration of work-related problems, communication at the workplace, and the development and implementation of solutions. Participants with chronic physical diseases were randomly assigned to the intervention (N=64) or the control group (N=58). Participants were eligible for the study if they had a chronic physical disease, paid employment, experienced work-related problems, and were not on long-term 100% sick leave. Primary outcome measures were self-efficacy in solving work- and disease-related problems (14-70), job dissatisfaction (0-100), fatigue (20-140) and job maintenance measured at 4-, 8-, 12- and 24-month follow-up. We used GLM repeated measures for the analysis. After 24 months, loss to follow-up was 5.7% (7/122). Self-efficacy increased and fatigue decreased significantly more in the experimental than the control group [10 versus 4 points (P=0.000) and 19 versus 8 points (P=0.032), respectively]. Job satisfaction increased more in the experimental group but not significantly [6 versus 0 points (P=0.698)]. Job maintenance was 87% in the experimental and 91% in the control group, which was not a significant difference. Many participants in the control group also undertook actions to solve work-related problems. Empowerment training increases self-efficacy and helps to reduce fatigue complaints, which in the long term could lead to more job maintenance. Better understanding of ways to deal with work-related problems is needed to develop more efficient support for employees with a chronic disease.

  5. Work-related self-efficacy as a moderator of the impact of a worksite stress management training intervention: Intrinsic work motivation as a higher order condition of effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Joda; Bond, Frank W; Flaxman, Paul E

    2017-01-01

    Employees with low levels of work-related self-efficacy may stand to benefit more from a worksite stress management training (SMT) intervention. However, this low work-related self-efficacy/enhanced SMT benefits effect may be conditional on employees also having high levels of intrinsic work motivation. In the present study, we examined this proposition by testing three-way, or higher order, interaction effects. One hundred and fifty-three U.K. government employees were randomly assigned to a SMT intervention group (n = 68), or to a waiting list control group (n = 85). The SMT group received three half-day training sessions spread over two and a half months. Findings indicated that there were significant overall reductions in psychological strain, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization in the SMT group, in comparison to the control group. Furthermore, there were significant higher order Group (SMT vs. control) × Time 1 Work-Related Self-Efficacy × Time 1 Intrinsic Work Motivation interactions, such that reductions in emotional exhaustion and depersonalization at certain time points were experienced only by those who had low baseline levels of work-related self-efficacy and high baseline levels of intrinsic work motivation. Implications for work-related self-efficacy theory and research and SMT research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Communication skills training for physicians performing work disability assessments increases knowledge and self-efficacy: results of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijssen, Jolanda; Schellart, Antonius J M; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-07-21

    It was assessed whether a post-graduate communication skills training course would increase physicians' competence and knowledge with regard to communication during work disability assessment interviews, and would change the determinants of their communication behaviour. A randomised controlled trial was performed. At baseline and at follow-up, 42 physicians completed questionnaires. The primary outcome measures were competence and knowledge about communication. The secondary outcome measures were 21 self-reported determinants of communication behaviour. One-way analyses of variance and covariance were performed. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in overall competence, but there was for the introduction phase (intervention: mean = 7.0, SD 2.7; control: mean = 4.8, SD 2.7; p = 0.014). Knowledge about communication was significantly higher (p = 0.001) in the intervention group (mean = 79.6, SD 9.2) than in the control group (mean = 70.9, SD 6.7), especially concerning the information-gathering phase of the interview (intervention: mean = 80.0, SD 10.2; control: mean = 69.4, SD 8.9; p = 0.001). The intervention group scored significantly better on 7 of the 21 self-reported determinants (secondary outcomes), including self-efficacy, intentions, skills and knowledge. The communication skills training course may improve some aspects of physician communication, but not all. Because physicians were unanimously positive about the course, further development is warranted. Implications for Rehabilitation Even though optimal communication is essential in face-to-face assessment interviews for determining entitlement to work disability benefits, and there is a lot at stake for the claimants, this issue has scarcely been addressed in scientific research. A tailor-made two-day communication skills training course, based on scientific research, increases physicians' knowledge about communication

  7. Influence of Self-Efficacy on Compliance to Workplace Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette K; Jørgensen, Henning Langberg

    2013-01-01

    the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster...... of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account....

  8. A Study of Factors Related to Dissertation Progress among Doctoral Candidates: Focus on Students' Research Self-Efficacy as a Result of Their Research Training and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Forooz; Rakow, Ernest A.; Ethington, Corinna

    This study examined relationships among doctoral candidates' background characteristics, research preparation, research environment, research involvement, student-advisor relationship, research self-efficacy, and dissertation progress. The study focused on differences in research self-efficacy and dissertation progress among students from the…

  9. The effect of communication skills training on quality of care, self-efficacy, job satisfaction and communication skills rate of nurses in hospitals of tabriz, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Esmail; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Moghaddasian, Sima; Babapour, Jalil

    2013-03-01

    Having an effective relationship with the patient in the process of treatment is essential. Nurses must have communication skills in order to establish effective relationships with the patients. This study evaluated the impact of communication skills training on quality of care, self-efficacy, job satisfaction and communication skills of nurses. This is an experimental study with a control group that has been done in 2012. The study sample consisted of 73 nurses who work in hospitals of Tabriz; they were selected by proportional randomizing method. The intervention was only conducted on the experimental group. In order to measure the quality of care 160 patients, who had received care by nurses, participated in this study. The Data were analyzed by SPSS (ver.13). Comparing the mean scores of communication skills showed a statistically significant difference between control and experimental groups after intervention. The paired t-test showed a statistically significant difference in the experimental group before and after the intervention. Independent t-test showed a statistically significant difference between the rate of quality of care in patients of control and experimental groups after the intervention. The results showed that the training of communication skills can increase the nurse's rate of communication skills and cause elevation in quality of nursing care. Therefore, in order to improve the quality of nursing care it is recommended that communication skills be established and taught as a separate course in nursing education.

  10. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise

  11. The Importance of Muscular Strength: Training Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Nimphius, Sophia; Bellon, Christopher R; Stone, Michael H

    2018-04-01

    This review covers underlying physiological characteristics and training considerations that may affect muscular strength including improving maximal force expression and time-limited force expression. Strength is underpinned by a combination of morphological and neural factors including muscle cross-sectional area and architecture, musculotendinous stiffness, motor unit recruitment, rate coding, motor unit synchronization, and neuromuscular inhibition. Although single- and multi-targeted block periodization models may produce the greatest strength-power benefits, concepts within each model must be considered within the limitations of the sport, athletes, and schedules. Bilateral training, eccentric training and accentuated eccentric loading, and variable resistance training may produce the greatest comprehensive strength adaptations. Bodyweight exercise, isolation exercises, plyometric exercise, unilateral exercise, and kettlebell training may be limited in their potential to improve maximal strength but are still relevant to strength development by challenging time-limited force expression and differentially challenging motor demands. Training to failure may not be necessary to improve maximum muscular strength and is likely not necessary for maximum gains in strength. Indeed, programming that combines heavy and light loads may improve strength and underpin other strength-power characteristics. Multiple sets appear to produce superior training benefits compared to single sets; however, an athlete's training status and the dose-response relationship must be considered. While 2- to 5-min interset rest intervals may produce the greatest strength-power benefits, rest interval length may vary based an athlete's training age, fiber type, and genetics. Weaker athletes should focus on developing strength before emphasizing power-type training. Stronger athletes may begin to emphasize power-type training while maintaining/improving their strength. Future research should

  12. Student Self-Efficacy and Gender-Personality Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallan, Lars; Opstad, Leiv

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the self-efficacy levels and self-efficacy strength for male and female students in a course in Principle of Economics. The groups of male and female students may be mutually heterogeneous when it comes to personality types in a business school (Fallan & Opstad, 2014). This study does not treat the gender groups as…

  13. The Effects of Mental Imagery with Video-Modeling on Self-Efficacy and Maximal Front Squat Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. M. Buck

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of mental imagery supplemented with video-modeling on self-efficacy and front squat strength (three repetition maximum; 3RM. Subjects (13 male, 7 female who had at least 6 months of front squat experience were assigned to either an experimental (n = 10 or a control (n = 10 group. Subjects′ 3RM and self-efficacy for the 3RM were measured at baseline. Following this, subjects in the experimental group followed a structured imagery protocol, incorporating video recordings of both their own 3RM performance and a model lifter with excellent technique, twice a day for three days. Subjects in the control group spent the same amount of time viewing a placebo video. Following three days with no physical training, measurements of front squat 3RM and self-efficacy for the 3RM were repeated. Subjects in the experimental group increased in self-efficacy following the intervention, and showed greater 3RM improvement than those in the control group. Self-efficacy was found to significantly mediate the relationship between imagery and front squat 3RM. These findings point to the importance of mental skills training for the enhancement of self-efficacy and front squat performance.

  14. The Effects of Mental Imagery with Video-Modeling on Self-Efficacy and Maximal Front Squat Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Daniel J M; Hutchinson, Jasmin C; Winter, Christa R; Thompson, Brian A

    2016-04-14

    This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of mental imagery supplemented with video-modeling on self-efficacy and front squat strength (three repetition maximum; 3RM). Subjects (13 male, 7 female) who had at least 6 months of front squat experience were assigned to either an experimental ( n = 10) or a control ( n = 10) group. Subjects' 3RM and self-efficacy for the 3RM were measured at baseline. Following this, subjects in the experimental group followed a structured imagery protocol, incorporating video recordings of both their own 3RM performance and a model lifter with excellent technique, twice a day for three days. Subjects in the control group spent the same amount of time viewing a placebo video. Following three days with no physical training, measurements of front squat 3RM and self-efficacy for the 3RM were repeated. Subjects in the experimental group increased in self-efficacy following the intervention, and showed greater 3RM improvement than those in the control group. Self-efficacy was found to significantly mediate the relationship between imagery and front squat 3RM. These findings point to the importance of mental skills training for the enhancement of self-efficacy and front squat performance.

  15. Collaborative curriculum design to increase science teaching self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    The focus in this study is on developing a teacher training program for improving teachers’ science teaching self-efficacy. Teachers with a high sense of self-efficacy will set higher goals for themselves, are less afraid of failure and will find new strategies when old ones fail. If their sense of

  16. Regulation of Cognitive Processes through Perceived Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1989-01-01

    Addresses issues concerning the extension of self-efficacy theory to memory functioning. Issues include perceived memory capabilities, memory self-appraisal, personal control over memory functioning, preservation of a favorable sense of memory self-efficacy, and strategies for generalizing the impact of training in memory skills. (RJC)

  17. MODALITIES OF TRAINING PARAMETER ALTERNATION IN NOWADAYS STRENGTH TRAINING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANISAVLJEV IGOR

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Large number of variables could be alternated during the process of planning and programming in sports training. Superior training results in majority of sports are achieved by optimally manipulating training parameters in appropriate sequences and combinations. Additionally, in some sports they might be the result of appropriate periodization pattern. Today's tendency in strength training practice is training movements instead of training muscles. Exercise classification according to the dominant movement types, allows creating new modalities in training alternation. Additional variations in volume, intensity, rest brakes, repetition velocity andinter-repetition rest can be the important part of functional strength training program. Alternation and combination of different training parameters makes appropriate training stimulus for strength increase in the most of nowadays sports. Optimal alternation of basic training parameters should be the first part in the processof planning and programming. As a result, majority of athletes might not need advanced periodization patterns for optimal improvement in muscle strength and power

  18. Balance training with multi-task exercises improves fall-related self-efficacy, gait, balance performance and physical function in older adults with osteoporosis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvarsson, Alexandra; Franzén, Erika; Ståhle, Agneta

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of a balance training program including dual- and multi-task exercises on fall-related self-efficacy, fear of falling, gait and balance performance, and physical function in older adults with osteoporosis with an increased risk of falling and to evaluate whether additional physical activity would further improve the effects. Randomized controlled trial, including three groups: two intervention groups (Training, or Training+Physical activity) and one Control group, with a 12-week follow-up. Stockholm County, Sweden. Ninety-six older adults, aged 66-87, with verified osteoporosis. A specific and progressive balance training program including dual- and multi-task three times/week for 12 weeks, and physical activity for 30 minutes, three times/week. Fall-related self-efficacy (Falls Efficacy Scale-International), fear of falling (single-item question - 'In general, are you afraid of falling?'), gait speed with and without a cognitive dual-task at preferred pace and fast walking (GAITRite®), balance performance tests (one-leg stance, and modified figure of eight), and physical function (Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument). Both intervention groups significantly improved their fall-related self-efficacy as compared to the controls (p ≤ 0.034, 4 points) and improved their balance performance. Significant differences over time and between groups in favour of the intervention groups were found for walking speed with a dual-task (p=0.003), at fast walking speed (p=0.008), and for advanced lower extremity physical function (p=0.034). This balance training program, including dual- and multi-task, improves fall-related self-efficacy, gait speed, balance performance, and physical function in older adults with osteoporosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. The Mediating Effect of Self-Efficacy in the Connections between Strength-Based Parenting, Happiness and Psychological Distress in Teens

    OpenAIRE

    Loton, Daniel J.; Waters, Lea E.

    2017-01-01

    Preliminary studies of strength-based parenting (SBP), a style of parenting that seeks to build strengths knowledge and strengths use in one’s child, have reported benefits such as higher life satisfaction, subjective wellbeing, and positive emotions together with lower stress in children and teens. Two proximal mediators conveying these effects have been identified: teen’s own use of strengths and strength-based coping, along with a small moderating effect of growth mindsets relating to stre...

  20. Self-Efficacy as Related to Career Aspirations Based on the Educational Quality Assessment Inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentler, Donna J.

    A study examined the relationship between the self-efficacy and career aspirations of 37,942 11th-grade students across the state of Pennsylvania. Using Albert Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, which states that the level and strength of self-efficacy of an individual will determine (1) whether or not the individual will initiate coping behavior,…

  1. Influence of Self-Efficacy on Compliance to Workplace Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Langberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about...... the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. PURPOSE: To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. METHODS: We performed a cluster......). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. RESULTS: Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio...

  2. Strength training for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faigenbaum, A D

    2000-10-01

    The potential benefits of youth strength training extend beyond an increase in muscular strength and may include favorable changes in selected health- and fitness-related measures. If appropriate training guidelines are followed, regular participation in a youth strength-training program has the potential to increase bone mineral density, improve motor performance skills, enhance sports performance, and better prepare our young athletes for the demands of practice and competition. Despite earlier concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of youth strength training, current public health objectives now aim to increase the number of boys and girls age 6 and older who regularly participate in physical activities that enhance and maintain muscular fitness. Parents, teachers, coaches, and healthcare providers should realize that youth strength training is a specialized method of conditioning that can offer enormous benefit but at the same time can result in serious injury if established guidelines are not followed. With qualified instruction, competent supervision, and an appropriate progression of the volume and intensity of training, children and adolescents cannot only learn advanced strength training exercises but can feel good about their performances, and have fun. Additional clinical trails involving children and adolescents are needed to further explore the acute and chronic effects of strength training on a variety of anatomical, physiological, and psychological parameters.

  3. Strength Training and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in organized sports or activities such as baseball, soccer, or gymnastics usually can safely to start strength ... as biking and running, adequate hydration, and healthy nutrition. Reviewed by: Mary L. Gavin, MD Date reviewed: ...

  4. Neural adaptations to electrical stimulation strength training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, Tibor; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.

    2011-01-01

    This review provides evidence for the hypothesis that electrostimulation strength training (EST) increases the force of a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) through neural adaptations in healthy skeletal muscle. Although electrical stimulation and voluntary effort activate muscle differently, there

  5. Upper extremity injuries associated with strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, H A

    2001-07-01

    Most injuries sustained during strength training are mild strains that resolve with appropriate rest. More severe injuries include traumatic shoulder dislocations, tendon ruptures of the pectoralis major, biceps, and triceps; stress fractures of the distal clavicle, humerus, radius, and ulna; traumatic fractures of the distal radius and ulna in adolescent weightlifters; and compressive and stretch neuropathies. These more severe injuries are usually the result of improperly performing a strength training exercise. Educating athletes regarding proper strength-training techniques serves to reverse established injury patterns and to prevent these injuries in the first place. Recognizing the association of anabolic steroid use to several of the injury patterns further reinforces the need for medical specialists to counsel athletes against their use. With the increasing use of supplements such as creatine, the incidence and nature of strength-training injuries may change further. Greater emphasis on the competitive performance of younger athletes undoubtedly will generate enthusiasm for strength training at earlier ages in both sexes. The importance of proper supervision of these young athletes by knowledgeable persons will increase. As the popularity of strength training grows, there will be ample opportunity to continue to catalog the injury patterns associated with this activity.

  6. Influence of self-efficacy on compliance to workplace exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette Merete; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Langberg, Henning; Poulsen, Otto Melchior; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Jensen, Jette Nygaard; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Bredahl, Thomas; Andersen, Lars Louis

    2013-09-01

    Continuous neck and shoulder pain is a common musculoskeletal complaint. Physical exercise can reduce pain symptoms, but compliance to exercise is a challenge. Exercise-specific self-efficacy has been found to be a predictor of participation in preplanned exercise. Little is known about the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to workplace physical exercise. To determine the influence of exercise-specific self-efficacy on compliance to specific strength exercises during working hours for laboratory technicians. We performed a cluster-randomized controlled trial, including laboratory technicians from two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. The participants were randomized to supervised specific strength exercises for the neck and shoulder muscles for 20 minutes three times a week (n = 282) or to a reference group (n = 255). The participants answered baseline and follow-up questions regarding self-efficacy and registered all exercises in a diary. Overall compliance to exercises was 45 %. Compliance in company A (private sector) differed significantly between the three self-efficacy groups after 20 weeks. The odds ratio of compliance was 2.37 for moderate versus low self-efficacy, and 2.93 for high versus low self-efficacy. No significant difference was found in company B (public sector) or in the intervention group as a whole. We did not find self-efficacy to be a general statistically significant predictor of compliance to exercises during 20 weeks, but found self-efficacy to be a predictor of compliance in a private sector setting. Workplace-specific differences might be present and should be taken into account.

  7. Weight Training for Strength and Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, Washington, DC.

    This paper begins by defining the terms "weight training,""weight lifting,""strength,""power," and "muscular endurance.""Weight training" is differentiated from "weight lifting" and defined as a systematic series of resistance exercises designed to promote physical development and conditioning or to rehabilitate persons who have suffered injury or…

  8. Engineering Professional Development: Elementary Teachers' Self-efficacy and Sources of Self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Donna Louise

    Currently, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) is a popular buzz word in P-12 education as it represents a means to advance American competitiveness in the global economy. Proponents of the engineering component of STEM advocate additional benefits in teaching engineering, such as its capacity to engage students in collaboration, and to apply critical thinking, systems thinking, negotiation, and communication skills to solve real-life contextual problems. Establishing a strong foundation of engineering knowledge at a young age will provide students with internal motivation as it taps into their curiosity toward how things work, and it also prepares them for secondary science courses. Successful STEM education is often constrained by elementary teachers' low perception of self-efficacy to teach science and engineering. Elementary teachers with low self-efficacy in science are more likely to spend less instructional time teaching science, which suggests that teachers with little to no training in engineering might avoid teaching this topic. Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to examine the effects of engineering professional development on elementary (K-6) teachers' content and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and perceptions of self-efficacy to teach engineering, and (b) to identify and explain sources influencing self-efficacy. Professional development was conducted in a metropolitan area in the Pacific Northwest. Results revealed that after the engineering professional development, teachers experienced statistically significant gains in content, PCK, and self-efficacy to teach engineering. Increases in self-efficacy were mainly attributed to mastery experiences and cultivation of a growth mindset by embracing the engineering design process.

  9. Academic Motivations and Academic Self-Efficacy of Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gamze Sarikoc

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Academic motivation and academic self-efficacy play important roles in the learning process. They increase academic achievement and the attainment of educational goals, thus providing opportunities in the training of qualified nurses. This study was conducted to determine nursing students%u2019 academic motivation and academic self-efficacy levels. Material and Method: This is a descriptive study. A total of 346 students who are attending a nursing school as either a first, second, third...

  10. Effects of sex composition by class and instructor's sex on physical self-efficacy of college men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, E S; Rust, D M; Blassingame, C L; Reed, J L

    2000-02-01

    The relationship of sex composition of class and instructor's sex to Physical Self-efficacy has yielded conflicting results in several studies. This study examined the relationship of sex composition of class and instructor's sex to scores on Physical Self-efficacy, Perceived Physical Ability, and Physical Self-presentation Confidence of 80 male students enrolled in one of four sections of a strength training class. Analysis indicated no significant difference on Physical Self-efficacy between male students who were enrolled in all male classes or in coeducational classes; improvements in scores on Physical Self-efficacy were not specific to the sex composition of the class or sex of the instructor and no significant difference on Perceived Physical Ability and Physical Self-presentation Confidence between male students who joined an all male class or a coeducational class. Perceived Physical Ability improved from the pretest to the posttest in all classes; and no improvement in scores for Physical Self-presentation Confidence was found in all classes. In conclusion, the analysis showed sex composition of the class and sex of the instructor were not significantly related to scores for self-efficacy.

  11. The Role of Health Volunteers in Training Women Regarding Coping Strategies Using Self-Efficacy Theory: Barriers and Challenges Faced by Health Volunteers in Empowerment of Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveh, Mohammad Hossein; Rokhbin, Moslem; Mani, Arash; Maghsoudi, Ahmad

    2017-09-27

    Introduction: Psychological distress is among physical and mental health threats, and health volunteers can play a critical role in empowerment of women. However, evidence has revealed a decline in health volunteers’ activities. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the challenges faced by health volunteers in empowerment of women. Methods: The participants’ knowledge level was assessed using a written test. Their perceived skills were also measured using Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations by Endler and Parker and Chesney’s Coping Self-efficacy Scale, respectively. The study data were entered into the SPSS statistical software, version 11.5 and were analyzed using chi-square, sample t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed a considerable increase in the intervention group health volunteers’ knowledge about stress, as well as their self-efficacy. Besides, a significant correlation was observed between self-efficacy and task-oriented strategy scores. However, no significant increase was found in this group’s coping strategies. The results also indicated a significant increase in the intervention group women’s knowledge about stress, but no significant change was observed in other constructs. Some challenging factors, such as managerial, personal, and interpersonal factors, were also detected that might have affected the results. Discussion: This study caused no considerable change in coping with stress, except for increasing the women’s knowledge in this regard. Considering the challenges identified in this study, programs should be developed for researchers and health center managers to improve this condition in future. Creative Commons Attribution License

  12. At-home resistance tubing strength training increases shoulder strength in the trained and untrained limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, C R A; Boychuk, K; Kim, S Y; Farthing, J P

    2014-06-01

    The purpose was to determine if an at-home resistance tubing strength training program on one shoulder (that is commonly used in rehabilitation settings) would produce increases in strength in the trained and untrained shoulders via cross-education. Twenty-three participants were randomized to TRAIN (strength-trained one shoulder; n = 13) or CONTROL (no intervention; n = 10). Strength training was completed at home using resistance tubing and consisted of maximal shoulder external rotation, internal rotation, scaption, retraction, and flexion 3 days/week for 4 weeks. Strength was measured via handheld dynamometry and muscle size measured via ultrasound. For external rotation strength, the trained (10.9 ± 10.9%) and untrained (12.7 ± 9.6%) arm of TRAIN was significantly different than CONTROL (1.6 ± 13.2%; -2.7 ± 12.3%; pooled across arm; P tubing training program on one limb can produce increases in strength in both limbs, and has implications for rehabilitation after unilateral shoulder injuries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The conviction of self-efficacy and midwives’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Krysa

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interest in scientific research of the self-efficacy phenomenon provides new data and reveals further relationships between this phenomenon and the functioning of the individual in the society. The Albert Bandura’s socio-cognitive theory presents its important and the most popular theoretical construct - self-efficacy, which is a part of the cognitive components of personality. It is an assessment of the individual's competences, its conviction about the possibility of managing planned activities in a given field. Studies on the relationship between coping with the learning process and self-efficacy seem to be particularly interesting. In the analysis of the problem, there are a number of personality variables that could be important for undertaking and continuing education and training in adulthood, which is particularly important among people performing medical professions, including midwives. Motivation, conscientiousness, conviction about self-efficacy or cognitive abilities are mentioned in literature of the subject.

  14. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  15. Self-efficacy in the context of organizational psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Fesel Martinčevič

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The article outlines the concept of self-efficacy and its applications in context of work and organizational behavior. Self-efficacy stems from the social cognitive theory of A. Bandura and is believed to be an important determinant of behavior. Numerous studies have confirmed its connection to actual effectiveness. First, the article focuses on definition of self-efficacy in general and on its theoretical background. It continues by reviewing the concept's cases of use within organizational psychology either in connection with consequences of self-efficacy on employees (work effectiveness, absenteeism, work satisfaction and burn-out, in relation to sources of employee's self-efficacy (application of the self-efficacy concept in leadership and training, or in connection with counseling of organizations or individuals (application in selection and work-team formation. It is concluded, that the application of the concept in connection with work and organizational behavior is useful and perspective. Finally, a critical review of the concept is given and guidelines for its further use and studies are outlined.

  16. Enhancing of Self-Efficacy in Teacher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Romualdas K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of training module on enhancing self-efficacy in teacher education students was investigated. Sixty-eight (68) teacher education students (M age = 22.74; SD = 0.57) participated in this study, 36 of whom were assigned to an experimental group and the other 32 were assigned to a control group. The training module on…

  17. The Relationship between Perceived Coaching Behaviours, Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Wrestlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, İhsan; Bayazıt, Betül

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The current study aimed to determine the relationship between perceived coaching behaviours, motivation, self-efficacy and general self-efficacy of wrestlers who competed in the Super National Wrestling League. The sample consisted of 289 wrestlers. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure self-efficacy perception, the Sports Motivation Scale to measure the motivation of the athletes, the Leadership Scale for Sport to determine perceived leadership behaviours, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale to determine the general self-efficacy perceptions of the athletes. For data analyses, SPSS 17.0 software was used. According to the results of the regression analyses performed with the enter method, it was found that perceived training and instruction behaviour along with perceived social support behaviour significantly explained self-efficacy (adjusted R2_ = .03), intrinsic motivation (adjusted R2 = .04) and amotivation (adjusted R2 = .05). Also, perceived training and instruction behaviour (β = .51), autocratic behaviour (β = -.17) and social support behaviour (β = -.27) significantly contributed to athletes’ general self-efficacy (adjusted R2 = .10). In light of these findings, it may be argued that perceived training and instruction behaviour may be beneficial for self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and amotivation. On the other hand, it could be stated that perceived autocratic behaviour may be detrimental for general self-efficacy of the athletes. As for social support behaviour, it may be suggested that it is negatively related to self-efficacy, general self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Lastly, a positive relationship was observed between perceived social support behaviour and amotivation in wrestlers. The results reveal the specific characteristics of wrestlers and suggest some implications for wrestling coaches. PMID:28713476

  18. The Relationship Between Perceived Coaching Behaviours, Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Wrestlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarı İhsan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to determine the relationship between perceived coaching behaviours, motivation, self-efficacy and general self-efficacy of wrestlers who competed in the Super National Wrestling League. The sample consisted of 289 wrestlers. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure self-efficacy perception, the Sports Motivation Scale to measure the motivation of the athletes, the Leadership Scale for Sport to determine perceived leadership behaviours, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale to determine the general self-efficacy perceptions of the athletes. For data analyses, SPSS 17.0 software was used. According to the results of the regression analyses performed with the enter method, it was found that perceived training and instruction behaviour along with perceived social support behaviour significantly explained self-efficacy (adjusted R2_ = .03, intrinsic motivation (adjusted R2 = .04 and amotivation (adjusted R2 = .05. Also, perceived training and instruction behaviour (β = .51, autocratic behaviour (β = -.17 and social support behaviour (β = -.27 significantly contributed to athletes’ general self-efficacy (adjusted R2 = .10. In light of these findings, it may be argued that perceived training and instruction behaviour may be beneficial for self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and amotivation. On the other hand, it could be stated that perceived autocratic behaviour may be detrimental for general self-efficacy of the athletes. As for social support behaviour, it may be suggested that it is negatively related to self-efficacy, general self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Lastly, a positive relationship was observed between perceived social support behaviour and amotivation in wrestlers. The results reveal the specific characteristics of wrestlers and suggest some implications for wrestling coaches.

  19. The Relationship between Perceived Coaching Behaviours, Motivation and Self-Efficacy in Wrestlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarı, İhsan; Bayazıt, Betül

    2017-06-01

    The current study aimed to determine the relationship between perceived coaching behaviours, motivation, self-efficacy and general self-efficacy of wrestlers who competed in the Super National Wrestling League. The sample consisted of 289 wrestlers. The Self-Efficacy Scale was used to measure self-efficacy perception, the Sports Motivation Scale to measure the motivation of the athletes, the Leadership Scale for Sport to determine perceived leadership behaviours, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale to determine the general self-efficacy perceptions of the athletes. For data analyses, SPSS 17.0 software was used. According to the results of the regression analyses performed with the enter method, it was found that perceived training and instruction behaviour along with perceived social support behaviour significantly explained self-efficacy (adjusted R 2_ = .03), intrinsic motivation (adjusted R 2 = .04) and amotivation (adjusted R 2 = .05). Also, perceived training and instruction behaviour (β = .51), autocratic behaviour (β = -.17) and social support behaviour (β = -.27) significantly contributed to athletes' general self-efficacy (adjusted R 2 = .10). In light of these findings, it may be argued that perceived training and instruction behaviour may be beneficial for self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and amotivation. On the other hand, it could be stated that perceived autocratic behaviour may be detrimental for general self-efficacy of the athletes. As for social support behaviour, it may be suggested that it is negatively related to self-efficacy, general self-efficacy and intrinsic motivation. Lastly, a positive relationship was observed between perceived social support behaviour and amotivation in wrestlers. The results reveal the specific characteristics of wrestlers and suggest some implications for wrestling coaches.

  20. Work Engagement, Organizational Commitment, Self Efficacy and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work engagement, organizational commitment and self-efficacy will create a positive attitude in records ... counseling, effective communication and leadership skills. This study therefore ...... self-efficacy and self-esteem: Toward theoretical and ...

  1. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and

  2. Increasing Lean Mass and Strength: A Comparison of High Frequency Strength Training to Lower Frequency Strength Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael H; Burns, Steve P

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect strength training frequency has on improvements in lean mass and strength. Participants were 7 women and 12 men, age ( χ̄ = 34.64 years ± 6.91 years), with strength training experience, training age ( χ̄ = 51.16 months ± 39.02 months). Participants were assigned to one of two groups to equal baseline group demographics. High frequency training group (HFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist, 3 times per week, exercising with 3 sets per muscle group per session (3 total body workouts). Low frequency training group (LFT) trained each muscle group as the agonist one time per week, completing all 9 sets during that one workout. LFT consisted of a routine split over three days: 1) pectoralis, deltoids, and triceps; 2) upper back and biceps; 3) quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and abdominals. Following eight weeks of training, HFT increased lean mass by 1.06 kg ± 1.78 kg, (1.9%), and LFT increased lean mass by .99 kg ± 1.31 kg, (2.0%). HFT strength improvements on the chest press was 9.07 kg ± 6.33 kg, (11%), and hack squat 20.16 kg ± 11.59 kg, (21%). LFT strength improvements on chest press was 5.80kg ± 4.26 kg, (7.0%), and hack squat 21.83 kg ± 11.17 kg, (24 %). No mean differences between groups were significant. These results suggest that HFT and LFT of equal set totals result in similar improvements in lean mass and strength, following 8 weeks of strength training.

  3. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educator's Self Efficacy and Collective Educators' Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff: An Ethical Issue. ... staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was discussed in line with ethical principles and code of conduct of psychologists.

  4. Self-Efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of Behavioral Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1977-01-01

    This research presents an integrative theoretical framework to explain and to predict psychological changes achieved by different modes of treatment. This theory states that psychological procedures, whatever their form, alter the level and strength of "self-efficacy". (Editor/RK)

  5. Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuya, Habila Elisha; Kwalat, Simon Kevin; Attah, Bala Galle

    2016-01-01

    Pre-service mathematics teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching self-efficacy were investigated in this study. The purpose was to determine the confidence levels of their self-efficacy in mathematics and mathematics teaching. Also, the study was aimed at finding whether their mathematics self-efficacy and teaching…

  6. Self-Efficacy: Conditioning the Entrepreneurial Mindset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle; Mauer, René; Kirketerp Linstad, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Research that has sought to identify the underlying determinants of self-efficacy is sparse. This chapter seeks to identify antecedents of entrepreneurial self-efficacy and the processes that produce and reinforce self-efficacy. It seeks to broaden our understanding of the self-efficacy concept t...... through an exploration of its origins and via a journey to its impact in the field of entrepreneurship. Finally, it suggests pedagogical initiatives needed to promote entrepreneurial self-efficacy in the different social arenas of life....

  7. Traditional versus functional strength training: Effects on muscle strength and power in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Seiler, Hilde Lohne; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Anderssen, Sigmund A.

    2013-01-01

    Published versiom of an article in the journal:Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. Also available from Human Kinetics: http://http://journals.humankinetics.com/japa-back-issues/japa-volume-21-issue-1-january/traditional-versus-functional-strength-training-effects-on-muscle-strength-and-power-in-the-elderly The aim was to determine whether strength training with machines vs. functional strength training at 80% of one-repetition maximum improves muscle strength and power among the elderl...

  8. Effects of strength training on mechanomyographic amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFreitas, Jason M; Beck, Travis W; Stock, Matt S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine if the patterns of mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude across force would change with strength training. Twenty-two healthy men completed an 8-week strength training program. During three separate testing visits (pre-test, week 4, and week 8), the MMG signal was detected from the vastus lateralis as the subjects performed isometric step muscle actions of the leg extensors from 10–100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). During pre-testing, the MMG amplitude increased linearly with force to 66% MVC and then plateaued. Conversely, weeks 4 and 8 demonstrated an increase in MMG amplitude up to ∼85% of the subject's original MVC before plateauing. Furthermore, seven of the ten force levels (30–60% and 80–100%) showed a significant decrease in mean MMG amplitude values after training, which consequently led to a decrease in the slope of the MMG amplitude/force relationship. The decreases in MMG amplitude at lower force levels are indicative of hypertrophy, since fewer motor units would be required to produce the same absolute force if the motor units increased in size. However, despite the clear changes in the mean values, analyses of individual subjects revealed that only 55% of the subjects demonstrated a significant decrease in the slope of the MMG amplitude/force relationship. (paper)

  9. Antecedents of job search self-efficacy of Syrian refugees in Greece and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic, Sofija; Ulceluse, Magdalena; Kismihók, Gábor; Mol, Stefan T; den Hartog, Deanne N

    2018-04-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate the relationships among psychological resources, career barriers, and job search self-efficacy in a sample of post-2014 Syrian refugees. Participants included 330 refugees in Greece and the Netherlands. Data were obtained using paper-based surveys, with all measures translated into Arabic. Drawing from career construction theory (Savickas, 2005), we hypothesized that adaptive readiness, operationalized in terms of psychological capital, would be positively related to job search self-efficacy through career adaptability. In addition, social and administrative career barriers were hypothesized to moderate the first stage of the indirect effect between psychological capital and job search self-efficacy, such that this relationship is weaker when refugees experience higher career barriers. Results indicated that individuals with higher psychological capital more confidently engaged in job search behavior in the destination country, mostly due to their enhanced career adaptability. However, this relationship weakened when participants experienced higher social barriers and strengthened when they experienced higher administrative barriers. The findings provide further support for the career construction model of adaptation (Savickas & Porfeli, 2012) and pinpoint career adapt-ability resources as critical self-regulatory strengths that help individuals in this particularly vulnerable group adapt to occupational transitions. Moreover, the results highlight the potentially detrimental role of social barriers in this process. Based on the results, we offer implications for formulating training and career construction theory-based career counseling focused on enhancing career adaptability and psychological capital.

  10. Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Through core strength training, patients with chronic low back pain can strengthen their deep trunk muscles. However, independent training remains challenging, despite the existence of numerous core strength training strategies. Currently, no standardized system has been established analyzing and comparing the results of core strength training and typical resistance training. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the results of previous studies to explore the effectiveness ...

  11. The Impact of a DBT Training on the Counselor Self-Efficacy of Preservice Counselors Working with Borderline Personality Disordered Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Wendy S.

    2013-01-01

    As the demand for community mental health services grows, more and more counselors-in-training are being asked to face the challenge of working with high needs clients, including clients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Counselors-in-training are entering therapeutic relationships with high-risk clients without training specifically…

  12. The Relationship of Gender and Self-Efficacy on Social Physique Anxiety among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothberger, Sara M; Harris, Brandonn S; Czech, Daniel R; Melton, Bridget

    The anxiety or fear associated with physique evaluation is defined as Social Physique Anxiety (SPA). Numerous studies have examined this construct, yet a gap exists exploring this phenomenon among current college students with SPA, self-efficacy, and gender concurrently. Therefore, the purposes of this study included quantitatively analyzing the association between SPA, gender, and self-efficacy. Participants included 237 students at a Southeastern university participating in jogging, body conditioning, or weight training courses. Analysis of Variance yielded a significant main effect for self-efficacy as well, as those with lower self-efficacy displayed higher levels of SPA ( p college student population.

  13. Changes in executive functions and self-efficacy are independently associated with improved usual gait speed in older women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improved usual gait speed predicts substantial reduction in mortality. A better understanding of the modifiable factors that are independently associated with improved gait speed would ensure that intervention strategies are developed based on a valid theoretical framework. Thus, we examined the independent association of change in executive functions and change in falls-related self-efficacy with improved gait speed among community-dwelling senior women. Methods A secondary analysis of the 135 senior women aged 65 to 75 years old who completed a 12-month randomized controlled trial of resistance training. Usual gait speed was assessed using a 4-meter walk. Three executive processes were assessed by standard neuropsychological tests: 1 set shifting; 2 working memory; and 3 selective attention and response inhibition. A linear regression model was constructed to determine the independent association of change in executive functions and falls-related self-efficacy with change in gait speed. Results Improved selective attention and conflict resolution, and falls-related self-efficacy, were independently associated with improved gait speed after accounting for age, global cognition, baseline gait speed, and change in quadriceps strength. The total variance explained was 24%. Conclusions Interventions that target executive functions and falls-related self-efficacy, in addition to physical functions, to improve gait speed may be more efficacious than those that do not. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00426881

  14. Multidimensional Self-Efficacy and Affect in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, variables grounded in social cognitive theory with athletes with disabilities were examined. Performance, training, resiliency, and thought control self-efficacy, and positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect were examined with wheelchair basketball athletes (N = 79). Consistent with social cognitive theory, weak to strong…

  15. Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Academic Achievement of Zahedan Medical Sciences Students in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizollah Arbabisarjou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Students with higher self-efficacy utilize higher tendency, endeavor, and strength in performing academic tasks and feel ensure of their ability, thus self-efficacy can influence their academic achievement. Current study was conducted aiming at investigating relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement of students of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences. It is a descriptive – analytical research on 190 students of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences during 2015 – 2016. Subjects were selected randomly and two-part questionnaire was used as data collection tool. First part was related to demographic characteristics and second part was related to self-efficacy questionnaire. Finally data were analyzed by SPSS 19 Software using deceptive statistics, Pearson correlation and independent t. Average age of individuals was 21.46 ± 312 and 82 students were female.Relationship between gender and self-efficacy of students was significant and self-efficacy was higher in females. But relationship between gender and academic achievementis not significant. Relationship between age and academic achievement was not significant. Relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement of students was measured through Pearson correlation test and significant relationship was observed. People with higher selfefficacy have more optimal academic status compared to people with low self-efficacy and there is direct positive relationship between GPA and self-efficacy.

  16. INFLUENCE OF STRENGTH TRAINING PROGRAM ON ISOMETRIC MUSCLE STRENGTH IN YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Radovanovic

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Strength training, or resistance training, is a form of physical conditioning used to increase the ability to resist force. Since muscular strength is required for success in many sports, it is logical to assume that stronger and more powerful young athletes will achieve better results. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of strength training on young athletes. An eight-week strength training program for developing muscle strength was performed in this study. Training protocol was designed specifically for young adolescent’s athletes. The program consisted of exercises for lower and upper body, abdominal and lower back muscles. The programs did not involve the maximal (1-3 repetitions maximum and other very hard intensity exercises that may had negative effect on young athletes. The results showed that strength training program had positive effects on maximal isometric muscle force (Fmax and motor skill. The increase presents the combined influence of strength training and growth.

  17. The Effects of Isokinetic Strength Training on Strength at Different Angular Velocities: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba Kocahan

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: It was shown that angular velocity is important in isokinetic training, and that training at high angular velocities provides strength increases at lower angular velocities, but would not increase strength at angular velocities above the training level. For this reason, it is thought that in the preparation of an isokinetic strength training protocol, angular velocities need to be taken into account. For any athlete, the force at the angular velocity required in her/his sports branch needs to be considered.

  18. An overview of strength training injuries: acute and chronic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, Mark E; Balam, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the history of strength training, explains the many different styles of strength training, and discusses common injuries specific to each style. Strength training is broken down into five disciplines: basic strength or resistance training, bodybuilding, power lifting, style-dependant strength sports (e.g., strongman competitions, Highland games, field events such as shot put, discus, hammer throw, and javelin), and Olympic-style weightlifting. Each style has its own principal injuries, both acute and chronic, related to the individual technique. Acute injuries should be further categorized as emergent or nonemergent. Specific age-related populations (i.e., the very young and the aging athlete) carry additional considerations.

  19. Enhancing quality of life in older adults: A comparison of muscular strength and power training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsh Anthony P

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although progressive resistance strength training (ST has been found to improve various measures of physical functioning in older adults, the benefit to quality of life is unclear. Additionally, recent evidence suggests that high velocity power training (PT may be more beneficial for physical functioning than ST, but it is not known whether this type of training impacts quality of life. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in multiple measures of quality of life resulting from ST vs. PT in older adults. A no exercise group was also included as control comparison condition. Methods Forty-five older adults (M age = 74.8 years; SD = 5.7 were randomly assigned to either a PT, b ST, or c control group (no exercise. Measures of self-efficacy (SE, satisfaction with physical function (SPF, and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWL were assessed at baseline and following training. The resistance training conditions met 3 times per week for 12 weeks at an intensity of 70% 1 repetition maximum. Results A series of ANCOVA's comparing between group differences in change and controlling for baseline values revealed significant group differences in all three measures: SE (F(2,31 = 9.77; p (2,32 = 3.36; p = .047; SWL (F(2,31 = 4.76; p = .016. Follow up analyses indicated that the PT group reported significantly more change in SE, SPF, and SWL than the control group whereas the ST group reported greater change than the control group only in SE. Conclusion These pilot data indicate that high velocity power training may influence multiple levels of quality of life over and above the benefits gained through traditional strength training.

  20. Efficacy of strength training on tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjarne K; Søgaard, Karen; Andersen, Lars L

    2018-01-01

    Background Strength training has shown effects in reducing neck pain. As neck pain is highly prevalent in tension-type headache (TTH), it is relevant to examine the effect of strength training of the shoulder muscles on TTH patients. Aim To examine the effect of strength training of the shoulder....../neck muscles on TTH frequency and duration. Methods Sixty patients with TTH were randomised into strength training or a control group. The strength training group trained ten weeks with elastic resistance bands. The control group performed ergonomic and posture correction. Efficacy was evaluated at follow......-up after 19-22 weeks. Results Twenty-three patients completed strength training and 21 completed ergonomic and posture correction (per-protocol). No between-group effect was detected, but within groups numerical reductions were noted in both groups from baseline to follow-up. Frequency of TTH...

  1. Can a Three-Day Training Focusing on the Nature of Science and Science Practices as They Relate to Mind in the Making Make a Difference in Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy Engaging in Science Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Colleen

    As technology and our world understanding develop, we will need citizens who are able to ask and answer questions that have not been thought of yet. Currently, high school and college graduates entering the workforce demonstrate a gap in their ability to develop unique solutions and fill the current technology-driven jobs. To address this gap, science needs to be prioritized early in children's lives. The focus of this research was to analyze a science training program that would help pre-school teachers better understand Mind in the Making life skills, the nature of science, science practices, and improve their self-efficacy integrating science education into their classrooms and curriculum. Seventy-one teachers enrolled in two three-day, professional development trainings that were conducted over three, five-hour sessions approximately one month apart... During that training the teachers learned hands-on activities for young children that introduced life and physical science content. They were also given the task of developing and implementing a science-based lesson for their students and then analyzing it with other participants. The information from the lesson plans was collected for analysis. After the last training the teachers were given a pre/post retrospective survey to measure effective outcomes. The results from the lesson plans and surveys indicate that the trainings helped improve the teachers' understanding of Mind in the Making, the nature of science, and science practices. The results also show that the teachers felt more comfortable integrating science education into their classrooms and curriculum.

  2. Comparison of effects of training programs for final year nursing students in Turkey: differences in self-efficacy with regard to information literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbıçakçı, Şeyda; Gezer, Nurdan; Bilik, Özlem

    2015-02-01

    Information literate person are aware of where and how they can obtain the information they need. Little is known about student nurses information literacy skills in different education programs. To find out how final year nursing students rated their own abilities to acquire new information. This study used comparative and descriptive cross-sectional surveys. Participants were final year students in two different programs, in two different universities in Turkey. The study sample consisted of final year nursing students who received training in Classic Learning (N: 61) and Problem-Based Learning (N: 96). As an evaluation instrument for the perceptions of the students their own information literacy, a scale consisting of 28 questions with 7 Likert ratings for each was used (min: 28, max: 196). The return rates of the surveys were 96.7% in the school with classic training and 81.2% in the school with PBL. It was found that the average scores of the students were high, with a mean of 137±29 in the school where the classic training program was carried out, and 163±21 in the school where the training was PBL. A statistically significant difference was found by comparing the average scores of the two independent groups (t : -6.0; pinformation literacy. We conclude that training programs should be reviewed, and new methods should be developed based on these concepts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigating the Effect of Humor Communication Skills Training on Pro-Social and Anti-Social Humor Styles, Cognitive Learning, Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Humor Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    Humor is an important aspect of interpersonal interactions as it is linked to the development and maintenance of relationships (Merolla, 2006). The purpose of this dissertation was to test the effect of a humor communication skills training program on the ability to minimize anti-social humor (i.e., aggressive, self-defeating) and enhance…

  4. Effect of job maintenance training program for employees with chronic disease - a randomized controlled trial on self-efficacy, job satisfaction, and fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varekamp, Inge; Verbeek, Jos H.; de Boer, Angela; van Dijk, Frank J. H.

    2011-01-01

    Employees with a chronic physical condition may be hampered in job performance due to physical or cognitive limitations, pain, fatigue, psychosocial barriers, or because medical treatment interferes with work. This study investigates the effect of a group-training program aimed at job maintenance.

  5. Strength training and albuterol in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi, EL; Vogels, OJM; van Asseldonk, RJGP; Lindeman, E; Hendriks, JCM; Wohlgemuth, M; van der Maarel, SM; Padberg, GW

    2004-01-01

    Background: In animals and healthy volunteers beta2-adrenergic agonists increase muscle strength and mass, in particular when combined with strength training. In patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) albuterol may exert anabolic effects. The authors evaluated the effect of

  6. The Relative Importance of Specific Self-Efficacy Sources in Pretraining Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howardson, Garett N.; Behrend, Tara S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is clearly important for learning. Research identifying the most important sources of self-efficacy beliefs, however, has been somewhat limited to date in that different disciplines focus largely on different sources of self-efficacy. Whereas education researchers focus on Bandura's original sources of "enactive mastery,"…

  7. Principal Self-Efficacy and Work Engagement: Assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2011-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work…

  8. Factors Relating to Self-Efficacy Among Psychiatric Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Hironori; Kobayashi, Mako; Odachi, Ryo; Yamane, Toshie

    This study aimed to clarify the factors related to self-efficacy experienced by psychiatric nurses. Analysis of qualitative descriptive data from a free self-description questionnaire administered to 16 psychiatric nurses working in psychiatric hospitals revealed 24 codes across the following 8 categories as factors that increase self-efficacy: A1. possibility of practical use in nursing, A2. nursing judgment, A3. improvement of psychiatric symptoms, A4. the patients presenting a positive attitude, A5. building a relationship of trust with the patients, A6. building a relationship of trust with other nurses, A7. work progressing according to plan and A8. team medical practice. Twenty-five codes across the following 10 categories were identified as factors that decrease self-efficacy: B1. lack of communication, B2. uncertainty in caregiving, B3. recurrence of psychiatric symptoms, B4. feeling overpowered by a patient, B5. sense of being too busy to work adequately, B6. difficulty in bringing about self-improvement, B7. sense of loss regarding one's role as a nurse, B8. lack of physical strength, B9. mechanical performance of nursing and B10. fluctuating view of nursing due to mistakes. These factors require intervention for psychiatric nurses' self-efficacy.

  9. Core strength training for patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Dien; Lin, Hung-Yu; Lai, Ping-Tung

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] Through core strength training, patients with chronic low back pain can strengthen their deep trunk muscles. However, independent training remains challenging, despite the existence of numerous core strength training strategies. Currently, no standardized system has been established analyzing and comparing the results of core strength training and typical resistance training. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the results of previous studies to explore the effectiveness of various core strength training strategies for patients with chronic low back pain. [Methods] We searched for relevant studies using electronic databases. Subsequently, we evaluated their quality by analyzing the reported data. [Results] We compared four methods of evaluating core strength training: trunk balance, stabilization, segmental stabilization, and motor control exercises. According to the results of various scales and evaluation instruments, core strength training is more effective than typical resistance training for alleviating chronic low back pain. [Conclusion] All of the core strength training strategies examined in this study assist in the alleviation of chronic low back pain; however, we recommend focusing on training the deep trunk muscles to alleviate chronic low back pain.

  10. The Self-Efficacy Scale: A Construct Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Mark; Adams, Carol

    Self-efficacy is defined as the belief that one can successfully perform a behavior. Self-efficacy theory asserts that self-efficacy expectancies exert powerful influence on behavior and behavior change. The Self-efficacy Scale, which was developed to assess generalized self-efficacy expectations, consists of two subscales: general self-efficacy…

  11. Prematurity and parental self-efficacy: the Preterm Parenting & Self-Efficacy Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Claire; Whittingham, Koa; Boyd, Roslyn; Sanders, Matthew; Colditz, Paul

    2012-12-01

    There is a lack of research investigating parental self-efficacy in parents of infants born preterm as well as a paucity of parental self-efficacy measures that are domain-specific and theoretically grounded. This study aimed to compare parental self-efficacy in parents of infants born term, preterm and very preterm as well as to test whether parental self-efficacy mediates the relationship between psychological symptoms and parental competence. In order to achieve this, a new measure of parental self-efficacy and parental competence relevant for the preterm population and consistent with Bandura's (1977, 1986, 1989) conceptualisation of self-efficacy was developed. Participants included 155 parents, 83 of whom were parents of very preterm (GAparents of preterm (GAparents of term born infants. Parents completed the Preterm Parenting & Self-Efficacy Checklist (the new measure), Family Demographic Questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale and Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. This initial study indicates that the Preterm Parenting & Self-Efficacy Checklist has adequate content validity, construct validity, internal consistency and split half reliability. Contrary to expectations, parents of very preterm infants did not report significantly lower overall levels of parental self-efficacy or significantly higher levels of psychological symptoms compared to parents of preterm and term infants. Parental self-efficacy about parenting tasks mediated the relationship between psychological symptoms and self perceived parental competence as predicted. Clinical implications of the results and suggestions for future research are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of Nordic hamstring strength training on muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymore, Kayla D; Domire, Zachary J; DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick M; Kulas, Anthony S

    2017-05-01

    Hamstring strain injury is a frequent and serious injury in competitive and recreational sports. While Nordic hamstring (NH) eccentric strength training is an effective hamstring injury-prevention method, the protective mechanism of this exercise is not understood. Strength training increases muscle strength, but also alters muscle architecture and stiffness; all three factors may be associated with reducing muscle injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of NH eccentric strength training on hamstring muscle architecture, stiffness, and strength. Twenty healthy participants were randomly assigned to an eccentric training group or control group. Control participants performed static stretching, while experimental participants performed static stretching and NH training for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention measurements included: hamstring muscle architecture and stiffness using ultrasound imaging and elastography, and maximal hamstring strength measured on a dynamometer. The experimental group, but not the control group, increased volume (131.5 vs. 145.2 cm 3 , p hamstring strength. The NH intervention was an effective training method for muscle hypertrophy, but, contrary to common literature findings for other modes of eccentric training, did not increase fascicle length. The data suggest that the mechanism behind NH eccentric strength training mitigating hamstring injury risk could be increasing volume rather than increasing muscle length. Future research is, therefore, warranted to determine if muscle hypertrophy induced by NH training lowers future hamstring strain injury risk.

  13. Mindfulness predicts student nurses' communication self-efficacy: A cross-national comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundling, Vibeke; Sundler, Annelie J; Holmström, Inger K; Kristensen, Dorte Vesterager; Eide, Hilde

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare student nurses' communication self-efficacy, empathy, and mindfulness across two countries, and to analyse the relationship between these qualities. The study had a cross-sectional design. Data was collected from final year student nurses in Norway and Sweden. Communication self-efficacy, empathy, and mindfulness were reported by questionnaires; Clear-cut communication with patients, Jefferson Scale of Empathy, and Langer 14 items mindfulness scale. The study included 156 student nurses, 94 (60%) were Swedish. The mean communication self-efficacy score was 119 (95% CI 116-122), empathy score 115 (95% CI 113-117) and mindfulness score 79 (95% CI 78-81). A Mann-Whitney test showed that Swedish students scored significantly higher on communication self-efficacy, empathy, and mindfulness than Norwegian students did. When adjusted for age, gender, and country in a multiple linear regression, mindfulness was the only independent predictor of communication self-efficacy. The Swedish student nurses in this study scored higher on communication self-efficacy, empathy, and mindfulness than Norwegian students did. Student nurses scoring high on mindfulness rated their communication self-efficacy higher. A mindful learning approach may improve communication self-efficacy and possibly the effect of communication skills training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. HOW DO KNOWLEDGE AND SELF-EFFICACY OF INTERNSHIP NURSING STUDENTS IN PERFORMING CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selly Desiani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR is the emergency first aid in cardiac arrest. CPR delivery is influenced by knowledge and self-efficacy. Internship students can be the first responder of cardiac arrest in hospital and expected on having knowledge and high self-efficacy of CPR early. But there is no data on self-efficacy of internship students in performing CPR. Objective: The purpose of this research was to identify knowledge and self-efficacy of internship students in performing CPR. Methods: The method in this research was descriptive quantitative with cross-sectional approach on 76 internship students selected by simple random sampling. Knowledge questionnaire and Resuscitation Self-Efficacy Scale instrument were used in this research, with validity score 0.56-0.84 (α=0.91. Data were analysed by distribution frequency. Results: The results showed that 49 respondents (64.5% had moderate knowledge and 73 respondents (96.1% had high self-efficacy. The lowest domain in knowledge was conceptual knowledge, while in self-efficacy were reporting, debriefing and recording. Conclusions: Therefore, it becomes important to increase information on the conceptual knowledge and enhances training on the self-efficacy domain: reporting; debriefing and recording.

  15. Self-efficacy and performance of the roundhouse kick in taekwondo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Estevan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of self-efficacy scales allows the analysis of athletes’ perceptions and examination of the relationship between perception and performance. The aim of this paper was to: (1 develop a specific self-efficacy scale in a taekwondo task, the roundhouse kick, and (2 analyse the sport performance and its relationship with two self-efficacy scales (specific and general outcomes according to the athletes’ gender. Forty-three taekwondo athletes (33 male and 10 female participated in this study. The Physical (PSE and Specific (RKSES self-efficacy scales were administered. Performance data (impact force and total response time were acquired by athletes kicking twice to an instrumented target. Results showed that the specific self-efficacy scale has high reliability and is able to predict sport performance in males and females. Males had higher self-efficacy scores and also higher performance results than females. Females’ taekwondo psychological training should be focus on improving their self-efficacy perception in order to increase their performance in the roundhouse kick. This specific self-efficacy scale for the taekwondo roundhouse kick offers empirical information to coaches, sport psychologists and researchers that allow them to predict athletes’ sport performance in the roundhouse kick.

  16. Feasibility of progressive strength training shortly after hip fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jan; Kristensen, Morten T

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients.......To investigate the feasibility of a 6-wk progressive strength-training programme commenced shortly after hip fracture surgery in community-dwelling patients....

  17. At-Risk Boys' Social Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy in a Summer Sports Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E.; Liu, Jiling; Thornton, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined at-risk boys' social self-efficacy and physical activity self-efficacy within Bandura's self-efficacy framework. A total of 97 boys, aged between 10 and 13 years, attending a summer sports camp completed questionnaires assessing their social self-efficacy, physical activity self- efficacy, prosocial behaviors, and effort.…

  18. Learning to teach effectively: Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduate teaching assistants' teaching self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechenne, Sue Ellen

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) from science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are important in the teaching of undergraduate students (Golde & Dore, 2001). However, they are often poorly prepared for teaching (Luft, Kurdziel, Roehrig, & Turner, 2004). This dissertation addresses teaching effectiveness in three related manuscripts: (1) A position paper that summarizes the current research on and develops a model of GTA teaching effectiveness. (2) An adaptation and validation of two instruments; GTA perception of teaching training and STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. (3) A model test of factors that predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy. Together these three papers address key questions in the understanding of teaching effectiveness in STEM GTAs including: (a) What is our current knowledge of factors that affect the teaching effectiveness of GTAs? (b) Given that teaching self-efficacy is strongly linked to teaching performance, how can we measure STEM GTAs teaching self-efficacy? (c) Is there a better way to measure GTA teaching training than currently exists? (d) What factors predict STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy? An original model for GTA teaching effectiveness was developed from a thorough search of the GTA teaching literature. The two instruments---perception of training and teaching self-efficacy---were tested through self-report surveys using STEM GTAs from six different universities including Oregon State University (OSU). The data was analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Using GTAs from the OSU colleges of science and engineering, the model of sources of STEM GTA teaching self-efficacy was tested by administering self-report surveys and analyzed by using OLS regression analysis. Language and cultural proficiency, departmental teaching climate, teaching self-efficacy, GTA training, and teaching experience affect GTA teaching effectiveness. GTA teaching self-efficacy is a second-order factor combined from self-efficacy

  19. Strength testing and training of rowers: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Trent W; Cronin, John B; McGuigan, Michael R

    2011-05-01

    In the quest to maximize average propulsive stroke impulses over 2000-m racing, testing and training of various strength parameters have been incorporated into the physical conditioning plans of rowers. Thus, the purpose of this review was 2-fold: to identify strength tests that were reliable and valid correlates (predictors) of rowing performance; and, to establish the benefits gained when strength training was integrated into the physical preparation plans of rowers. The reliability of maximal strength and power tests involving leg extension (e.g. leg pressing) and arm pulling (e.g. prone bench pull) was high (intra-class correlations 0.82-0.99), revealing that elite rowers were significantly stronger than their less competitive peers. The greater strength of elite rowers was in part attributed to the correlation between strength and greater lean body mass (r = 0.57-0.63). Dynamic lower body strength tests that determined the maximal external load for a one-repetition maximum (1RM) leg press (kg), isokinetic leg extension peak force (N) or leg press peak power (W) proved to be moderately to strongly associated with 2000-m ergometer times (r = -0.54 to -0.68; p training experience and muscle morphology, in that those individuals with greater training experience and/or proportions of slow twitch fibres performed more repetitions. Muscle balance ratios derived from strength data (e.g. hamstring-quadriceps ratio training may be counterproductive to strength development over the shorter term (i.e. training within the sequence of training units should be considered, particularly over the non-competition phase (e.g. 2-6 sets × 4-12 repetitions, three sessions a week). Maximal strength was sustained when infrequent (e.g. one or two sessions a week) but intense (e.g. 73-79% of maximum) strength training units were scheduled; however, it was unclear whether training adaptations should emphasize maximal strength, endurance or power in order to enhance

  20. An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

  1. Relationship Between Self-Management Strategy and Self-Efficacy Among Staff of Ardabil Disaster and Emergency Medical Management Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Amini

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: In general, considering that job stress, safety behavior and self-management predictive self-efficacy of emergency staff. Individuals with high self-efficacy wait for the desired outcomes of their performance. So by giving stress management training and applying their safety principles and strategies, targeting can create a sense of self-efficacy such that a person can withstand persistent efforts to overcome obstacles. Improving working conditions also plays an effective role in increasing productivity.

  2. Adaptations in athletic performance after ballistic power versus strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2010-08-01

    To determine whether the magnitude of improvement in athletic performance and the mechanisms driving these adaptations differ in relatively weak individuals exposed to either ballistic power training or heavy strength training. Relatively weak men (n = 24) who could perform the back squat with proficient technique were randomized into three groups: strength training (n = 8; ST), power training (n = 8; PT), or control (n = 8). Training involved three sessions per week for 10 wk in which subjects performed back squats with 75%-90% of one-repetition maximum (1RM; ST) or maximal-effort jump squats with 0%-30% 1RM (PT). Jump and sprint performances were assessed as well as measures of the force-velocity relationship, jumping mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural drive. Both experimental groups showed significant (P training with no significant between-group differences evident in either jump (peak power: ST = 17.7% +/- 9.3%, PT = 17.6% +/- 4.5%) or sprint performance (40-m sprint: ST = 2.2% +/- 1.9%, PT = 3.6% +/- 2.3%). ST also displayed a significant increase in maximal strength that was significantly greater than the PT group (squat 1RM: ST = 31.2% +/- 11.3%, PT = 4.5% +/- 7.1%). The mechanisms driving these improvements included significant (P force-velocity relationship, jump mechanics, muscle architecture, and neural activation that showed a degree of specificity to the different training stimuli. Improvements in athletic performance were similar in relatively weak individuals exposed to either ballistic power training or heavy strength training for 10 wk. These performance improvements were mediated through neuromuscular adaptations specific to the training stimulus. The ability of strength training to render similar short-term improvements in athletic performance as ballistic power training, coupled with the potential long-term benefits of improved maximal strength, makes strength training a more effective training modality for relatively weak individuals.

  3. Strength training and physical activity in boys: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Udo; Witassek, Fabienne; Petrò, Renato; Fritz, Chris; Eiholzer, Urs

    2013-12-01

    In developed societies levels of daily physical activity (PA) among school-age children are decreasing. This implies risk factors for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Specific strategies to improve levels of PA are needed. In prepubertal boys there is evidence that strength training increases spontaneous PA outside of training. A total of 102 schoolchildren (age 10-14 years) in Switzerland were randomly assigned to physical education classes or to participate twice weekly at a guided strength training program for 19 weeks. Spontaneous PA energy expenditure (PAEE; 3axial accelerometry for 7 days), leg and arm strength, and body composition (dual energy radiograph absorptiometry) were measured at baseline, after 19 weeks of training intervention, and after 3 months of washout. There were no significant differences between the groups at baseline. In the intervention group, PAEE increased by 10% from baseline to end of training in boys (P = .02), but not in girls. Leg and arm strength were increased owing to training intervention in both boys and girls. All other variables were unchanged. Baseline PAEE was significantly negatively correlated with changes of PAEE. Targeted strength training significantly increases daily spontaneous PA behavior in boys. The less active children showed the greatest increase in spontaneous PAEE. Girls showed a similar increase in strength, but not in spontaneous PAEE. This may be explained by their earlier pubertal development. Strength training may be a promising strategy in schools to counteract decreasing levels of PA.

  4. Vocational training in Tunisia Strengths and weaknesses

    OpenAIRE

    bouoiyour, jamal

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of institutional aspects of professional training in Tunisia. We describe briefly the genesis of this system and pointed out that Tunisia in spite of remarkable progress, suffers from some problems related to the low and partial integration of the professional training system in the general system of training. In a more precise way, the implement of professional training turns out incapable to anticipate future professions. Furthermore, when certain professions a...

  5. Relationship of breastfeeding self-efficacy with quality of life in Iranian breastfeeding mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Kamalifard, Mahin; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Gordani, Nasrin

    2017-07-20

    Due to the importance of breastfeeding, we decided to conduct a study to examine the relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and quality of life. This study was a cross-sectional study, which was carried out on 547 breastfeeding mothers that had 2-6 months old infants. The participants were selected randomly, and the sociodemographic characteristics questionnaire, Dennis' breastfeeding self-efficacy scale, and WHO's Quality of Life (WHOQOL) questionnaire were completed through interview. The multivariate linear regression model was used for data analysis. The means (standard deviations) of breastfeeding self-efficacy score and quality of life score were 134.5 (13.3) and 67.7 (13.7), respectively. Quality of life and all of its dimensions were directly and significantly related to breastfeeding self-efficacy. According to the results of multivariate linear regression analysis, there was a relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and the following variables: environmental dimension of quality of life, education, spouse's age, spouse's job, average duration of previous breastfeeding period and receiving breastfeeding training. Findings showed that there is direct and significant relationship between breastfeeding self-efficacy and quality of life. Moreover, it seems that the development of appropriate training programs is necessary for improving the quality of life of pregnant women, as it consequently enhances breastfeeding self-efficacy.

  6. EFFECT OF MUSIC THERAPY ON INTRINSIC MOTIVATION, PHYSICAL SELF EFFICACY AND PERFORMANCE OF FEMALE FOOTBALL PLAYERS

    OpenAIRE

    Mamta Sharma; Gagandeep Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is increasingly used in sports for enhancing sport performance. It provides a mean of improving mental strength among sportspersons. The purpose of this study is to enhance intrinsic motivation, physical self-efficacy and performance of female football players through music therapy. For this purpose, twenty two female football players, in the age group of 21-26 were screened on the basis of their scores on Sport Motivation Scale and Physical Self-Efficacy Scale. Then, they were ...

  7. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, Henning; Hodges, P W

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function...... and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals....

  8. Strength training for a child with suspected developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Stacy M; Hatten, Kristin; Grant-Beuttler, Marybeth

    2013-01-01

    Children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) demonstrate difficulty with feedforward motor control and use varied compensatory strategies. To examine gross motor function changes following strength training in a child with motor control difficulties. A girl aged 6 years 11 months, with apraxia and hypotonia, and demonstrating motor delays consistent with DCD. Twenty-four strength training sessions were completed using a universal exercise unit. Postintervention scores significantly improved on the Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency, second edition, and the Canadian occupational performance measure scores and raised the developmental coordination disorder questionnaire, revised 2007, scores above the range where DCD is suspected. Nonsignificant changes in strength were observed. Improved function and significant gains in manual coordination were observed following blocked practice of isolated, simple joint movements during strength training. Improved motor skills may be because of effective use of feedforward control and improved stabilization. Strength training does not rehearse skills using momentum, explaining nonsignificant changes in locomotor or locomotion areas.

  9. Perceived Organisational Target Selling, Self- Efficacy, Sexual ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Data were gathered using a self report questionnaire consisting of scales measuring variables in the study. Self efficacy, job insecurity, sexual harassment and target selling significantly jointly ...

  10. How specific is specific self-efficacy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine; Makransky, Guido; Vang, Maria Louison

    2017-01-01

    academic learning self-efficacy (SAL-SE) and specific academic exam self-efficacy (SAE-SE), each scale being measurement invariant relative to age, Gender, admission method and specific course targeted. Furthermore, significant and relevant differences between the SAL-SE and SAE-SE scores dependent......Self-efficacy is an important and much used construct in psychology and social science studies. The validity of the measurements used is not always sufficiently evaluated. The aim was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish translation of the self-efficacy subscale of The Motivated...... Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ-SE) within a higher education context. Rasch measurement models were employed focusing on measurement invariance and dimensionality. Results with one students sample showed the MSLQ-SE to be not one, but two separate unidimensional subscales, measuring specific...

  11. Muscular coordination and strength training. Implications for injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, O M

    1988-03-01

    Strength training is commonly used in the rehabilitation of muscles atrophied as a result of injury and/or disuse. Studies on the effects of conventional leg extension training in healthy subjects have shown the changes to be very task-specific to the training manoeuvre itself. After conventional leg extension training for the quadriceps muscle the major improvement was in weightlifting ability with only small increases in isometric strength. The maximum dynamic force and power output during sprint cycling showed no improvement. These results suggest that the major benefit of this type of training is learning to coordinate the different muscle groups involved in the training movement rather than intrinsic increases in strength of the muscle group being trained. Other studies have shown changes in strength to be specific to the length and speed at which the muscle has been trained. The implication for rehabilitation is that strength training for isolated muscle groups may not be the most effective way of increasing functional ability. As the major changes are task-specific it may be better to incorporate the training into task-related practice. This would have the advantage of strengthening the muscle groups affected whilst increasing performance in those activities which are required in daily life.

  12. In hip osteoarthritis, Nordic Walking is superior to strength training and home based exercise for improving function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, T.; Siersma, Volkert; Magnusson, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    in 60+-year-old persons (n = 152) with hip osteoarthritis (OA) not awaiting hip replacement. Functional performance [i.e., 30-s chair stand test (primary outcome), timed stair climbing, and 6-min walk test] and self-reported outcomes (i.e., physical function, pain, physical activity level, self-efficacy......This observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial compared the short- and long-term effects of 4 months of supervised strength training (ST) in a local fitness center, supervised Nordic Walking (NW) in a local park, and unsupervised home-based exercise (HBE, control) on functional performance...... activity and to both ST and HBE for improving (P exercise modality compared with ST and HBE....

  13. Association of cardiopulmonary resuscitation psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Issenberg, S Barry

    2014-12-01

    Effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills are essential for better patient survival, but whether these skills are associated with knowledge of and self-efficacy in CPR is not well known. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of CPR skills and identify the association of the psychomotor skills with knowledge and self-efficacy at the time of CPR skills training. A convenience sample of 124 nursing students participated in a one-group posttest-only study. The quality of CPR psychomotor skills, as assessed by structured observation using a manikin, was suboptimal. Nursing students who performed correct chest compression skills reported higher self-efficacy, but there was no association between CPR psychomotor skills and total knowledge. Rigorous skills training sessions with more objective feedback on performance and individual coaching are warranted to enable mastery learning and self-efficacy. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Strength training and body composition in middle-age women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrup, Rachelle; Tucker, Larry A; LE Cheminant, James D; Bailey, Bruce W

    2018-01-01

    Strength training is a sound method to improve body composition. However, the effect of age, diet, menopause, and physical activity on the relationship between strength training and body composition in women remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the intricacies of the relationship between strength training and body composition in 257 middle-age women and to quantify the effect of these factors on the association. The study was cross-sectional. Five variables were used to index strength training participation. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Diet was assessed by 7-day weighed food records, and physical activity was measured objectively using accelerometers. There were 109 strength trainers in the sample. For each day per week of strength training, body fat was 1.3 percentage points lower (F=14.8, Pdevote to strength training, the lower their body fat and the higher their fat-free mass tend to be. A significant portion of the differences in body composition seems to result from lifters participating in more physical activity than non-lifters. Menopause status also contributes significantly to the relationship.

  15. Do medical students and young physicians assess reliably their self-efficacy regarding communication skills? A prospective study from end of medical school until end of internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gude, Tore; Finset, Arnstein; Anvik, Tor; Bærheim, Anders; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Grimstad, Hilde; Vaglum, Per

    2017-06-30

    This prospective study from end of medical school through internship investigates the course and possible change of self- reported self-efficacy in communication skills compared with observers' ratings of such skills in consultations with simulated patients. Sixty-two medical students (43 females) from four Norwegian universities performed a videotaped consultation with a simulated patient immediately before medical school graduation (T1) and after internship (internal medicine, surgery and family medicine, half a year each - T2). Before each consultation, the participants assessed their general self-efficacy in communication skills. Trained observers scored the videos and applied a well-validated instrument to rate the communication behaviour. Results from the two assessment methods were correlated at both time points and possible differences from T1 to T2 were explored. A close to zero correlation between self-efficacy and observed communication skills were found at T1. At T2, participants' self-efficacy scores were inversely correlated with levels of observed skills, demonstrating a lack of concordance between young physicians' own assessment of self-efficacy and observers' assessment. When dividing the sample in three groups based on the observers' scores (low 2/3), the group of male physicians showed higher levels of self-efficacy than females in all the three performance groups at T1. At T2, those having a high performance score yielded a low self-efficacy, regardless of gender. The lack of positive correlations between self-efficacy assessment and expert ratings points to limitations in the applicability of self-assessment measures of communication skills. Due to gender differences, groups of female and male physicians should be investigated separately. Those obtaining high-performance ratings from observers, through the period of internship, may become more conscious of how demanding clinical communication with patients may be. This insight may represent a

  16. A survey of parental self-efficacy experiences: maximising potential through health visiting and universal parenting support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Karen A; Cowley, Sarah

    2012-11-01

    To examine parental self-efficacy experiences for users of a parenting support programme and consider the pertinence of self-efficacy theory to health visiting (public health nursing) practice. Commonly, successful parenting training programmes are underpinned by social learning principles and aim to strengthen parental self-efficacy. However, research examining programme effectiveness rarely discusses how self-efficacy outcomes are achieved. A descriptive survey was completed as the first part of a realistic evaluation study examining how a UK parenting support programme worked. The first part of the realistic evaluation involved validating outcome measures (the Parenting Self-Agency Measure and Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Index subscales) and administering a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire was completed by adults accessing a parenting support programme during a 10-month period (n = 168). Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics.   Women were the main users of the programme, which included informal drop-in groups as well as more formalised health visiting services and parenting training courses. The Parenting Self-Agency Measure results indicated good general parental self-efficacy; however, the task-specific Self-Efficacy for Parenting Tasks Indexes scales suggested that parents were less self-efficacious in disciplining children. Lower self-efficacy scores correlated with high ratings for 'feeling tired', 'receiving negative comments' and 'giving-in to a child's demands'. Study results indicate that the domain general and task-specific measures provide different, but helpful, insights into parental self-efficacy experiences. By identifying factors associated with the levels of general and task-specific parental self-efficacy, health visitors can gain a fuller appreciation of support needs. To maximise potential through parenting support, attention should be given to addressing factors associated with poorer self-efficacy

  17. Mixed maximal and explosive strength training in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Ritva S; Mikkola, Jussi; Salo, Tiina; Hokka, Laura; Vesterinen, Ville; Kraemer, William J; Nummela, Ari; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2014-03-01

    Supervised periodized mixed maximal and explosive strength training added to endurance training in recreational endurance runners was examined during an 8-week intervention preceded by an 8-week preparatory strength training period. Thirty-four subjects (21-45 years) were divided into experimental groups: men (M, n = 9), women (W, n = 9), and control groups: men (MC, n = 7), women (WC, n = 9). The experimental groups performed mixed maximal and explosive exercises, whereas control subjects performed circuit training with body weight. Endurance training included running at an intensity below lactate threshold. Strength, power, endurance performance characteristics, and hormones were monitored throughout the study. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Increases were observed in both experimental groups that were more systematic than in the control groups in explosive strength (12 and 13% in men and women, respectively), muscle activation, maximal strength (6 and 13%), and peak running speed (14.9 ± 1.2 to 15.6 ± 1.2 and 12.9 ± 0.9 to 13.5 ± 0.8 km Ł h). The control groups showed significant improvements in maximal and explosive strength, but Speak increased only in MC. Submaximal running characteristics (blood lactate and heart rate) improved in all groups. Serum hormones fluctuated significantly in men (testosterone) and in women (thyroid stimulating hormone) but returned to baseline by the end of the study. Mixed strength training combined with endurance training may be more effective than circuit training in recreational endurance runners to benefit overall fitness that may be important for other adaptive processes and larger training loads associated with, e.g., marathon training.

  18. Enhancing Writing Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Students with Learning Disabilities Improves Their Writing Processes and Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caso, Ana Maria; Garcia, Jesus Nicasio; Diez, Carmen; Robledo, Patricia; Alvarez, Maria Lourdes

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The use of self efficacy has been suggested as an effective classroom intervention procedure. The present research examined the use of self-efficacy training on the writing of Spanish elementary student with learning disabilities. Objectives: We present a research study focused on the improvement of the writing product and the…

  19. Effect of Educational Intervention on Self-efficacy for Choosing Delivery Method among Pregnant Women in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Taheri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Our findings showed that training-based self-efficacy procedure has been effective in encouraging mothers to choose natural childbirth. Therefore, the design and implementation of curriculum-based strategies for increasing self-efficacy is suggested for pregnant women.

  20. Students Enrolled in Selected Upper-Division Agriculture Courses: An Examination of Computer Experiences, Self-Efficacy and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald M.; Ferguson, James A.; Lester, Melissa L.

    2000-01-01

    Of 169 agriculture students surveyed, 79% had computer training, 66% owned computers; they had slightly above average computer self-efficacy, especially in word processing, electronic mail, and Internet use. However, 72.7% scored 60% or less on a test of computer knowledge. There was little correlation between self-efficacy and computer knowledge.…

  1. Aerobic training alone or combined with strength training affects fitness in elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burich, Rasmus; Teljigović, Sanel; Boyle, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate if combined strength and aerobic training can enhance aerobic capacity in the elderly to a similar extent as aerobic training alone when training duration is matched. METHODS: Elderly men and women (age 63.2 ± 4.7) were randomized into two intervention groups: an aerobic...... on the general health dimension on the SF-36 health survey improved more than AG's score. CONCLUSION: Elderly can substitute a part of their aerobic training with strength training and still improve VO2max to a clinically significant degree when strength training is performed with large muscle groups...

  2. Strength Training: A Natural Prescription for Staying Healthy and Fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Raymond, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This newsletter highlights the importance of strength training in keeping older adults healthy and fit, explaining how it can forestall declines in strength and muscle mass, along with their attendant negative impact upon other metabolic functions and activities of daily living. Physical inactivity is common throughout the nation. Approximately 11…

  3. Influence of strength training intensity on subsequent recovery in elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Rosa Orssatto, Lucas Bet; de Moura, Bruno Monteiro; de Souza Bezerra, Ewertton

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the influence of strength training intensity on subsequent recovery in elderly is important to avoid reductions in physical function during the days following training. Twenty-two elderly were randomized in two groups: G70 (65.9 ± 4.8 years, n = 11) and G95 (66.9 ± 5.1, n = 11...... in elderly depending on the type of physical function and intensity of training. Higher intensity resulted in greater impairment. Exercise prescription in elderly should take this into account, e.g., by gradually increasing intensity during the first months of strength training. These results have relevance...... for elderly who have to be fit for work or other activities in the days following strength training....

  4. Kettlebell swing training improves maximal and explosive strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jason P; Lauder, Mike A

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect that kettlebell swing (KB) training had on measures of maximum (half squat-HS-1 repetition maximum [1RM]) and explosive (vertical jump height-VJH) strength. To put these effects into context, they were compared with the effects of jump squat power training (JS-known to improve 1RM and VJH). Twenty-one healthy men (age = 18-27 years, body mass = 72.58 ± 12.87 kg) who could perform a proficient HS were tested for their HS 1RM and VJH pre- and post-training. Subjects were randomly assigned to either a KB or JS training group after HS 1RM testing and trained twice a week. The KB group performed 12-minute bouts of KB exercise (12 rounds of 30-second exercise, 30-second rest with 12 kg if 70 kg). The JS group performed at least 4 sets of 3 JS with the load that maximized peak power-Training volume was altered to accommodate different training loads and ranged from 4 sets of 3 with the heaviest load (60% 1RM) to 8 sets of 6 with the lightest load (0% 1RM). Maximum strength improved by 9.8% (HS 1RM: 165-181% body mass, p < 0.001) after the training intervention, and post hoc analysis revealed that there was no significant difference between the effect of KB and JS training (p = 0.56). Explosive strength improved by 19.8% (VJH: 20.6-24.3 cm) after the training intervention, and post hoc analysis revealed that the type of training did not significantly affect this either (p = 0.38). The results of this study clearly demonstrate that 6 weeks of biweekly KB training provides a stimulus that is sufficient to increase both maximum and explosive strength offering a useful alternative to strength and conditioning professionals seeking variety for their athletes.

  5. HOW INNOVATION ENCOURAGES SELF EFFICACY TO SUPPORT BUSINESS START UP SUCCESS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinathasya Br Sitepu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A business start up is identical to a new business run by an entrepeneur to gain profit. The research is to analyze the function of the entrepreneurship training given by Universitas Ciputra Surabaya to the villagers in Desa Mojowarno.  The objectives of the research are: 1 to learn the proper innovation technique to increase the self efficacy of the entrepreneur/participant, 2 to understand the impact of the increased self-efficacy towards the business continuity managed by the entrepreneur/participant. The research method used is qualitative descriptive analysis with the subject of the research are entrepreneurs (ten training participants who managed banana trunk chips in Mojowarno. The validation technique used in this research is triangulation data method with participative observation, in depth interview and documentation (photo and video of the participants’ capability. The result of the research: 1 Innovation realization (5+1 concept succeeded in increasing the self efficacy of the participants (ten training participants; 2 The self-efficacy increase provides a positive impact (business increase so that the entrepreneur has an additional income. It is suggested that the entrepreneur must keep on innovating innovated to increase their self-efficacy so that the business can improve the continuity.Keywords: descriptive qualitative, innovation, self-efficacy, business entrepreneur start up, trainingABSTRAKStart-up bisnis identik dengan usaha baru yang dijalankan oleh seorang entrepreneur untuk mendapatkan keuntungan. Penelitian ini menganalisis peran pelatihan kewirausahaan yang diberikan Universitas Ciputra Surabaya kepada masyarakat Desa Mojowarno. Tujuan penelitian ini terdiri dari: 1 mengetahui teknik yang tepat untuk berinovasi guna meningkatkan self-efficacy dari entrepreneur/peseta yang mengikuti pelatihan, 2 Mengetahui dampak dari peningkatan self-efficacy terhadap keberlangsungan bisnis yang dijalankan oleh entrepreneur

  6. Surgeons' and trainees' perceived self-efficacy in operating theatre non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G; Altree, M; Field, J; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P; Babidge, W; Maddern, G J

    2015-05-01

    An important factor that may influence an individual's performance is self-efficacy, a personal judgement of capability to perform a particular task successfully. This prospective study explored newly qualified surgeons' and surgical trainees' self-efficacy in non-technical skills compared with their non-technical skills performance in simulated scenarios. Participants undertook surgical scenarios challenging non-technical skills in two simulation sessions 6 weeks apart. Some participants attended a non-technical skills workshop between sessions. Participants completed pretraining and post-training surveys about their perceived self-efficacy in non-technical skills, which were analysed and compared with their performance in surgical scenarios in two simulation sessions. Change in performance between sessions was compared with any change in participants' perceived self-efficacy. There were 40 participants in all, 17 of whom attended the non-technical skills workshop. There was no significant difference in participants' self-efficacy regarding non-technical skills from the pretraining to the post-training survey. However, there was a tendency for participants with the highest reported self-efficacy to adjust their score downwards after training and for participants with the lowest self-efficacy to adjust their score upwards. Although there was significant improvement in non-technical skills performance from the first to second simulation sessions, a correlation between participants' self-efficacy and performance in scenarios in any of the comparisons was not found. The results suggest that new surgeons and surgical trainees have poor insight into their non-technical skills. Although it was not possible to correlate participants' self-belief in their abilities directly with their performance in a simulation, in general they became more critical in appraisal of their abilities as a result of the intervention. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. COMBINED STRENGTH AND ENDURANCE TRAINING IN COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stian Aspenes

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A combined intervention of strength and endurance training is common practice in elite swimming training, but the scientific evidence is scarce. The influences between strength and endurance training have been investigated in other sports but the findings are scattered. Some state the interventions are negative to each other, some state there is no negative relationship and some find bisected and supplementary benefits from the combination when training is applied appropriately. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a combined intervention among competitive swimmers. 20 subjects assigned to a training intervention group (n = 11 or a control group (n = 9 from two different teams completed the study. Anthropometrical data, tethered swimming force, land strength, performance in 50m, 100m and 400m, work economy, peak oxygen uptake, stroke length and stroke rate were investigated in all subjects at pre- and post-test. A combined intervention of maximal strength and high aerobic intensity interval endurance training 2 sessions per week over 11 weeks in addition to regular training were used, while the control group continued regular practice with their respective teams. The intervention group improved land strength, tethered swimming force and 400m freestyle performance more than the control group. The improvement of the 400m was correlated with the improvement of tethered swimming force in the female part of the intervention group. No change occurred in stroke length, stroke rate, performance in 50m or 100m, swimming economy or peak oxygen uptake during swimming. Two weekly dry-land strength training sessions for 11 weeks increase tethered swimming force in competitive swimmers. This increment further improves middle distance swimming performance. 2 weekly sessions of high- intensity interval training does not improve peak oxygen uptake compared with other competitive swimmers

  8. Combined strength and endurance training in competitive swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenes, Stian; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Hoff, Jan; Helgerud, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A combined intervention of strength and endurance training is common practice in elite swimming training, but the scientific evidence is scarce. The influences between strength and endurance training have been investigated in other sports but the findings are scattered. Some state the interventions are negative to each other, some state there is no negative relationship and some find bisected and supplementary benefits from the combination when training is applied appropriately. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a combined intervention among competitive swimmers. 20 subjects assigned to a training intervention group (n = 11) or a control group (n = 9) from two different teams completed the study. Anthropometrical data, tethered swimming force, land strength, performance in 50m, 100m and 400m, work economy, peak oxygen uptake, stroke length and stroke rate were investigated in all subjects at pre- and post-test. A combined intervention of maximal strength and high aerobic intensity interval endurance training 2 sessions per week over 11 weeks in addition to regular training were used, while the control group continued regular practice with their respective teams. The intervention group improved land strength, tethered swimming force and 400m freestyle performance more than the control group. The improvement of the 400m was correlated with the improvement of tethered swimming force in the female part of the intervention group. No change occurred in stroke length, stroke rate, performance in 50m or 100m, swimming economy or peak oxygen uptake during swimming. Two weekly dry-land strength training sessions for 11 weeks increase tethered swimming force in competitive swimmers. This increment further improves middle distance swimming performance. 2 weekly sessions of high- intensity interval training does not improve peak oxygen uptake compared with other competitive swimmers. Key pointsTwo weekly sessions of dry land strength training improves the

  9. Association of self-efficacy of parents/caregivers with childhood asthma control parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ana Lúcia Araújo; Lima, Kamila Ferreira; Mendes, Elizamar Regina da Rocha; Joventino, Emanuella Silva; Martins, Mariana Cavalcante; Almeida, Paulo César de; Ximenes, Lorena Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Objective To verify the association between the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers and control parameters of childhood asthma. Method Cross-sectional study with parents/caregivers of asthmatic children. Data were collected through a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Self-efficacy and their child's level of asthma control scale: Brazilian version. Results Participation of 216 parents/caregivers in the study. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy scores and the following variables: unscheduled physician visit (p=0.001), visit to emergency department (pcrisis medication from control medication (p=0.024), use of spacer (p=0.001), performing oral hygiene after use of inhaled corticosteroids (p=0.003), and knowledge of medication gratuity (p=0.004). Conclusion A significant relationship of the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers of asthmatic children with control parameters and training on the necessary skills to reach this control was demonstrated in the study.

  10. Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, K L; Suhaida, S; Leong, Y P

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R 2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

  11. Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, K. L.; Suhaida, S.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

  12. Neither Basic Life Support knowledge nor self-efficacy are predictive of skills among dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, C; Ho, J D; Guerin, S; Yeoh, Y L; Mohamed Medhat, M; Doody, K; Hwang, S; Hania, M; Boggs, S; Nolan, A; Nunn, J

    2017-08-01

    Basic life support (BLS) is considered a core competence for the graduating dentist. This study aimed to measure BLS knowledge, self-efficacy and skills of undergraduate dental students in Dublin. This study consisted of a cross-sectional survey measuring BLS knowledge and self-efficacy, accompanied by a directly observed BLS skills assessment in a subsample of respondents. Data were collected in January 2014. Bivariate correlations between descriptive and outcome variables (knowledge, self-efficacy and skills) were tested using Pearson's chi-square. We included knowledge and self-efficacy as predictor variables, along with other variables showing association, into a binary logistic regression model with BLS skills as the outcome measure. One hundred and thirty-five students participated. Almost all (n = 133, 98.5%) participants had BLS training within the last 2 years. One hundred and four (77%) felt that they were capable of providing effective BLS (self-efficacy), whilst only 46 (34.1%) scored >80% of knowledge items correct. Amongst the skills (n = 85) subsample, 38.8% (n = 33) were found to pass the BLS skills assessment. Controlling for gender, age and skills assessor, the regression model did not identify a predictive relationship between knowledge or self-efficacy and BLS skills. Neither knowledge nor self-efficacy was predictive of BLS skills. Dental students had low levels of knowledge and skills in BLS. Despite this, their confidence in their ability to perform BLS was high and did not predict actual competence. There is a need for additional hands-on training, focusing on self-efficacy and BLS skills, particularly the use of AED. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Coping self-efficacy of Chinese nursing undergraduates with their research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Li, Kun; Zhang, XiuMin; Chen, Li

    2016-10-01

    Undergraduate nursing education includes both professional knowledge and research skills. With regard to training nursing professionals for future healthcare settings, the ability to conduct research is fundamental for nurses after they graduate from universities. However, how nursing students develop coping self-efficacy and scientific skills as a specific ability during their professional study has received little attention. We studied nursing undergraduates' scientific research ability and its associated factors in the Chinese context and evaluated their self-efficacy for coping with research tasks. A total of 134 nursing undergraduates participated in the study. A purposely designed 22-item questionnaire was used to quantify students' research ability in implementing their research projects and the associated factors. Coping self-efficacy was measured with a modified Chinese version. The mean total self-efficacy score was 50.78±6.604 (M±SD). The majority (63.4%) of the students' coping self-efficacy was at a moderate level. Having "the ability to write a manuscript before conducting research projects" (P=0.006) and "topics determined by instructors after discussion with group members" (P=0.005) were the two predictive factors of good coping self-efficacy in students. Nursing undergraduates' self-efficacy was high enough to cope with their scientific research projects, but the information on procedures needed for project application was not abundant, and new training programs might be needed to meet the needs of nursing undergraduates. We should make full use of the predictors of good coping self-efficacy and promote nursing undergraduates' research ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Computer Self-Efficacy: A Practical Indicator of Student Computer Competency in Introductory IS Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Karsten

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Students often receive their first college-level computer training in introductory information systems courses. Students and faculty frequently expect this training to develop a level of student computer competence that will support computer use in future courses. In this study, we applied measures of computer self-efficacy to students in a typical introductory IS course. The measures provided useful evidence that student perceptions of their ability to use computers effectively in the future significantly improved as a result of their training experience. The computer self-efficacy measures also provided enhanced insight into course-related factors of practical concern to IS educators. Study results also suggest computer self-efficacy measures may be a practical and informative means of assessing computer-training outcomes in the introductory IS course context

  15. Retention of basic life support knowledge, self-efficacy and chest compression performance in Thai undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partiprajak, Suphamas; Thongpo, Pichaya

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the retention of basic life support knowledge, self-efficacy, and chest compression performance among Thai nursing students at a university in Thailand. A one-group, pre-test and post-test design time series was used. Participants were 30 nursing students undertaking basic life support training as a care provider. Repeated measure analysis of variance was used to test the retention of knowledge and self-efficacy between pre-test, immediate post-test, and re-test after 3 months. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare the difference in chest compression performance two times. Basic life support knowledge was measured using the Basic Life Support Standard Test for Cognitive Knowledge. Self-efficacy was measured using the Basic Life Support Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. Chest compression performance was evaluated using a data printout from Resusci Anne and Laerdal skillmeter within two cycles. The training had an immediate significant effect on the knowledge, self-efficacy, and skill of chest compression; however, the knowledge and self-efficacy significantly declined after post-training for 3 months. Chest compression performance after training for 3 months was positively retaining compared to the first post-test but was not significant. Therefore, a retraining program to maintain knowledge and self-efficacy for a longer period of time should be established after post-training for 3 months. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Using goal orientations to understand motivation in strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Todd A; Chow, Graig M; Ewing, Martha E

    2008-07-01

    Despite the importance that today's athletics place on strength training, research exploring the motivation of athletes in this arena is sparse. It is known that not all athletes will use the same motivational cognitions as inspiration, and these differences can be explored through achievement goal orientations. Through questionnaire data and semistructured interviews, the present study investigated how collegiate athletes maintain high levels of motivation over a period of time during strength training and explored relationships among five goal orientations: task-orientation, self-enhancing ego-orientation, self-defeating ego-orientation, social-approval orientation, and work-avoidance orientation. Subjects (N = 133), comprising 90 men and 43 women, were current varsity collegiate athletes from 15 different sports at a major Midwestern university. In addition, using a screener survey to assess achievement goal orientations, 15 subjects from the sample group who demonstrated a stronger inclination to only one achievement goal orientation were interviewed to gain a more in-depth understanding of their motivation cognitions in strength training. Results showed that the strongest achievement goal orientations reported from all athletes were task-orientation and social-approval. Additionally, five higher-order themes (significant others, improvement, competitive demands, being stronger than others, and miscellaneous) were consistent among the interviewed athletes when describing how they stay motivated during strength training. Whereas all athletes were able to describe at least one motivational strategy they employed during strength training, the dominant achievement goal orientation of some athletes influenced their motivational strategy. By employing the T.A.R.G.E.T. model (), strength coaches can foster adaptive achievement goal orientations and thereby enhance intrinsic motivation for athletes engaging in strength training.

  17. A study of self-efficacy in job-related context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Frlec

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The article stems from an attempt to transfer the Bandura's social cognitive theory into organisational praxis. Beliefs of self-efficacy, which is defined as people's judgments of their capabilities to organize and execute courses of action required to attain designated types of performances, are constructed from 4 principal sources of information: enactive mastery experiences; vicarious experiences that alter efficacy beliefs through transmission of competencies and comparison with the attainment of others; verbal persuasion and allied types of social influences that one possesses certain capabilities; and physiological and affective states from which people partly judge their capableness, strength, and vulnerability to dysfunction. The study of self-efficacy in job-related context involved 295 employees from 3companies belonging to the same business group. Self-efficacy was assed using Schwarzer's scale, while rating scales were used for assessing the 4 principal sources of influence upon it. First, differences between companies regarding demographic characteristics of the employees, job characteristics and self-efficacy were analyzed. Dependence of employee's self-efficacy on his/her age, gender, education, work experience, employment status, job type and the four principal influence sources was tested using a regression model. Finally, we identified typical employee profiles with respect to the studied factors. We hope that our study will help human-resources specialists design appropriate interventions for developing a resilient sense of self-efficacy in the employees.

  18. Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the "Leadership Behavior Description Question" (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969),…

  19. Career Self Efficacy, Achievement Motivation and Organizational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Career self efficacy, achievement motivation and organizational commitments are considered as predictors of lecturers‟ conflict preventive behaviours in tertiary institutions in Oyo town. 300 lecturers (149 male and 151 female) of the four tertiary institutions were randomly sampled. What is the relative contributions of each ...

  20. Self-Efficacy and Academic Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes as its starting point the difficulties inherent in listening in a second language. It argues that self-efficacy, broadly defined as the belief in one's ability to carry out specific tasks successfully, is crucial to the development of effective listening skills, and that listening strategy instruction has the potential to boost…

  1. Genetic Counseling Supervisors' Self-Efficacy for Select Clinical Supervision Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Sabra Ledare; Veach, Pat McCarthy; MacFarlane, Ian M; LeRoy, Bonnie S; Callanan, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Supervision is a primary instructional vehicle for genetic counseling student clinical training. Approximately two-thirds of genetic counselors report teaching and education roles, which include supervisory roles. Recently, Eubanks Higgins and colleagues published the first comprehensive list of empirically-derived genetic counseling supervisor competencies. Studies have yet to evaluate whether supervisors possess these competencies and whether their competencies differ as a function of experience. This study investigated three research questions: (1) What are genetic counselor supervisors' perceptions of their capabilities (self-efficacy) for a select group of supervisor competencies?, (2) Are there differences in self-efficacy as a function of their supervision experience or their genetic counseling experience, and 3) What training methods do they use and prefer to develop supervision skills? One-hundred thirty-one genetic counselor supervisors completed an anonymous online survey assessing demographics, self-efficacy (self-perceived capability) for 12 goal setting and 16 feedback competencies (Scale: 0-100), competencies that are personally challenging, and supervision training experiences and preferences (open-ended). A MANOVA revealed significant positive effects of supervision experience but not genetic counseling experience on participants' self-efficacy. Although mean self-efficacy ratings were high (>83.7), participant comments revealed several challenging competencies (e.g., incorporating student's report of feedback from previous supervisors into goal setting, and providing feedback about student behavior rather than personal traits). Commonly preferred supervision training methods included consultation with colleagues, peer discussion, and workshops/seminars.

  2. Training visual imagery: Improvements of metacognition, but not imagery strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanne Lynn Rademaker

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Visual imagery has been closely linked to brain mechanisms involved in perception. Can visual imagery, like visual perception, improve by means of training? Previous research has demonstrated that people can reliably evaluate the vividness of single episodes of sensory imagination – might the metacognition of imagery also improve over the course of training? We had participants imagine colored Gabor patterns for an hour a day, over the course of five consecutive days, and again two weeks after training. Participants rated the subjective vividness and effort of their mental imagery on each trial. The influence of imagery on subsequent binocular rivalry dominance was taken as our measure of imagery strength. We found no overall effect of training on imagery strength. Training did, however, improve participant’s metacognition of imagery. Trial-by-trial ratings of vividness gained predictive power on subsequent rivalry dominance as a function of training. These data suggest that, while imagery strength might be immune to training in the current context, people’s metacognitive understanding of mental imagery can improve with practice.

  3. Coping planning: a patient-centred and strengths-focused approach to suicide prevention training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallman, Helen M

    2018-04-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of premature death and, despite significant investment, the prevalence rate has remained relatively stable for more than a decade. Theoretically, the use of 'safety planning' as a response to suicidality likely maintains suicide as a potential solution for vulnerable people. This paper describes a theoretically-supported paradigm shift from safety planning to 'coping planning' to improve patient outcomes and improve the confidence and competence of clinicians working with people with suicidality. Coping planning is a strategy used to support people with acute distress. Its components of 'caring', 'collaborating' and 'connecting' reinforce existing strengths, promote self-efficacy and link people with more intensive supports, as needed. Coping planning overcomes the limitations of existing approaches. It reframes suicide prevention from managing patients disclosing suicidality to ensuring patients have minimally sufficient temporary support to help them cope. This approach has the potential to promote coping self-efficacy and prevent deterioration that leads to suicide.

  4. Preventive strength training improves working ergonomics during welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Karsten; Petermann, Carmen; Pilat, Christian; Schubert, Emil; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Mooren, Frank C

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of a preventive strength training program on cardiovascular, metabolic and muscular strains during welding. Welders are one of the occupation groups which typically have to work in extended forced postures which are known to be an important reason for musculoskeletal disorders. Subjects (exercise group) accomplished a 12-week strength training program, while another group served as controls (control group). Pre and post training examinations included the measurements of the one repetition maximum and an experimental welding test. Local muscle activities were analysed by surface electromyography. Furthermore, heart rate, blood pressure, lactate and rating of perceived exertion were examined. In the exercise group, strength training lead to a significant increase of one repetition maximum in all examined muscles (pwelding test muscle activities of trunk and shoulder muscles and arm muscles were significantly reduced in the exercise group after intervention (pwelding (p<.05). Effects of strength training can be translated in an improved working ergonomics and tolerance against the exposure to high physical demands at work.

  5. Transference of kettlebell training to strength, power, and endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manocchia, Pasquale; Spierer, David K; Lufkin, Adrienne K S; Minichiello, Jacqueline; Castro, Jessica

    2013-02-01

    Kettlebells are a popular implement in many strength and conditioning programs, and their benefits are touted in popular literature, books, and videos. However, clinical data on their efficacy are limited. The purpose of this study was to examine whether kettlebell training transfers strength and power to weightlifting and powerlifting exercises and improves muscular endurance. Thirty-seven subjects were assigned to an experimental (EXP, n = 23; mean age = 40.9 ± 12.9 years) or a control group (CON; n = 14; mean age = 39.6 ± 15.8 years), range 18-72 years. The participants were required to perform assessments including a barbell clean and jerk, barbell bench press, maximal vertical jump, and 45° back extensions to volitional fatigue before and after a 10-week kettlebell training program. Training was structured in a group setting for 2 d·wk(-1) for 10 weeks. A repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted to determine group × time interactions and main effects. Post hoc pairwise comparisons were conducted when appropriate. Bench press revealed a time × group interaction and a main effect (p power and strength in response to 10 weeks of training with kettlebells. Traditional training methods may not be convenient or accessible for strength and conditioning specialists, athletes, coaches, and recreational exercisers. The current data suggest that kettlebells may be an effective alternative tool to improve performance in weightlifting and powerlifting.

  6. The Influence of Trainee Gaming Experience and Computer Self-Efficacy on Learner Outcomes of Videogame-Based Learning Environments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orvis, Karin A; Orvis, Kara L; Belanich, James; Mullin, Laura N

    2005-01-01

    .... The purpose of the current research was to investigate the influence of two trainee characteristics, prior videogame experience and computer self-efficacy, on learner outcomes of a videogame-based training environment...

  7. Effects of Strength Training on Postpubertal Adolescent Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagrove, Richard C; Howe, Louis P; Cushion, Emily J; Spence, Adam; Howatson, Glyn; Pedlar, Charles R; Hayes, Philip R

    2018-06-01

    Strength training activities have consistently been shown to improve running economy (RE) and neuromuscular characteristics, such as force-producing ability and maximal speed, in adult distance runners. However, the effects on adolescent (training on several important physiological and neuromuscular qualities associated with distance running performance. Participants (n = 25, 13 female, 17.2 ± 1.2 yr) were paired according to their sex and RE and randomly assigned to a 10-wk strength training group (STG) or a control group who continued their regular training. The STG performed twice weekly sessions of plyometric, sprint, and resistance training in addition to their normal running. Outcome measures included body mass, maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max), speed at V˙O2max, RE (quantified as energy cost), speed at fixed blood lactate concentrations, 20-m sprint, and maximal voluntary contraction during an isometric quarter-squat. Eighteen participants (STG: n = 9, 16.1 ± 1.1 yr; control group: n = 9, 17.6 ± 1.2 yr) completed the study. The STG displayed small improvements (3.2%-3.7%; effect size (ES), 0.31-0.51) in RE that were inferred as "possibly beneficial" for an average of three submaximal speeds. Trivial or small changes were observed for body composition variables, V˙O2max and speed at V˙O2max; however, the training period provided likely benefits to speed at fixed blood lactate concentrations in both groups. Strength training elicited a very likely benefit and a possible benefit to sprint time (ES, 0.32) and maximal voluntary contraction (ES, 0.86), respectively. Ten weeks of strength training added to the program of a postpubertal distance runner was highly likely to improve maximal speed and enhances RE by a small extent, without deleterious effects on body composition or other aerobic parameters.

  8. Greater Strength Gains after Training with Accentuated Eccentric than Traditional Isoinertial Loads in Already Strength-Trained Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon; Blazevich, Anthony J.; Haff, G. Gregory; Tufano, James J.; Newton, Robert U.; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2016-01-01

    As training experience increases it becomes more challenging to induce further neuromuscular adaptation. Consequently, strength trainers seek alternative training methods in order to further increase strength and muscle mass. One method is to utilize accentuated eccentric loading, which applies a greater external load during the eccentric phase of the lift as compared to the concentric phase. Based upon this practice, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 10 weeks of accentuated eccentric loading vs. traditional isoinertial resistance training in strength-trained men. Young (22 ± 3 years, 177 ± 6 cm, 76 ± 10 kg, n = 28) strength-trained men (2.6 ± 2.2 years experience) were allocated to concentric-eccentric resistance training in the form of accentuated eccentric load (eccentric load = concentric load + 40%) or traditional resistance training, while the control group continued their normal unsupervised training program. Both intervention groups performed three sets of 6-RM (session 1) and three sets of 10-RM (session 2) bilateral leg press and unilateral knee extension exercises per week. Maximum force production was measured by unilateral isometric (110° knee angle) and isokinetic (concentric and eccentric 30°.s−1) knee extension tests, and work capacity was measured by a knee extension repetition-to-failure test. Muscle mass was assessed using panoramic ultrasonography and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Surface electromyogram amplitude normalized to maximum M-wave and the twitch interpolation technique were used to examine maximal muscle activation. After training, maximum isometric torque increased significantly more in the accentuated eccentric load group than control (18 ± 10 vs. 1 ± 5%, p < 0.01), which was accompanied by an increase in voluntary activation (3.5 ± 5%, p < 0.05). Isokinetic eccentric torque increased significantly after accentuated eccentric load training only (10 ± 9%, p < 0.05), whereas concentric torque

  9. The efficacy of incorporating partial squats in maximal strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyler, Caleb D; Sato, Kimitake; Wassinger, Craig A; Lamont, Hugh S; Stone, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine the effects of 2 different training methods on dynamic and isometric measures of maximal strength. Seventeen recreationally trained men (1 repetition maximum [1RM] squat: 146.9 ± 22.4 kg) were assigned to 2 groups: full range of motion (ROM) squat (F) and full ROM with partial ROM squat (FP) for the 7-week training intervention. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that there was a statistically significant group-by-time interaction for impulse scaled at 50, 90, and 250 milliseconds at 90° of knee flexion and rate of force development at 200 milliseconds with 120° of knee flexion (p ≤ 0.05). There was also a statistically significant time effect (p ≤ 0.05) for the 1RM squat, 1RM partial squat, isometric squat peak force allometrically scaled (IPFa) 90°, IPFa 120°, and impulse allometrically scaled at 50, 90, 200, and 250 milliseconds at 90° and 120° of knee flexion. Additionally, the FP group achieved statistically larger relative training intensities (%1RM) during the final 3 weeks of training (p ≤ 0.05). There was a trend for FP to improve over F in 1RM squat (+3.1%, d = 0.53 vs. 0.32), 1RM partial squat (+4.7%, d = 0.95 vs. 0.69), IPFa 120° (+5.7%, d = 0.52 vs. 0.12), and impulse scaled at 50, 90, 200, and 250 milliseconds at 90° (+6.3 to 13.2%, d = 0.50-1.01 vs. 0.30-0.57) and 120° (+3.4 to 16.8%, d = 0.45-1.11 vs. 0.08-0.37). These larger effect sizes in the FP group can likely be explained their ability to train at larger relative training intensities during the final 3 weeks of training resulting in superior training adaptations. Our findings suggest that partial ROM squats in conjunction with full ROM squats may be an effective training method for improving maximal strength and early force-time curve characteristics in men with previous strength training experience. Practically, partial squats may be beneficial for strength and power athletes during a strength-speed mesocycle while peaking

  10. Can resistance training change the strength, body composition and self-concept of overweight and obese adolescent males? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schranz, Natasha; Tomkinson, Grant; Parletta, Natalie; Petkov, John; Olds, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Resistance training is an exercise modality at which overweight and obese adolescents can excel and which can therefore positively affect their psychological well-being. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a 6-month resistance training intervention on the self-concept strength and body composition of overweight and obese adolescent males. 56 overweight and obese males aged 13-17 years were randomly allocated to an Intervention (n=30) or Control (n=26) group. Primary (psychological) and secondary (strength and body composition) outcomes were assessed at baseline as well as at 3 (halfway through the intervention), 6 (immediately postintervention) and 12 months follow-up. Random effects mixed modelling was used to determine the effects of the intervention. Statistically significant differences between the Intervention and Control groups were observed at 3-month and 6-month assessments for exercise self-efficacy, resistance training confidence and self-esteem. Large increases in strength for the Intervention group, relative to Controls, were also observed with no substantial changes in body composition shown for either group. Values for all variables returned to baseline following completion of the programme. A 6-month resistance training intervention can positively affect the self-concept and strength of overweight and obese adolescent boys. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. The effects of tapering on strength performance in trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibala, M J; MacDougall, J D; Sale, D G

    1994-11-01

    The optimum pre-competition taper procedure for "strength athletes" is not known. We examined voluntary strength and evoked contractile properties of the elbow flexors over a 10 day rest only (ROT) and a 10 day reduced volume taper (RVT) in 8 resistance trained males (23 +/- 2.1 years). Following 3 wks of standardized training of the elbow flexors, subjects were randomly assigned to one of the tapers. Upon completion, they resumed training for 3 wks and completed the other taper. No arm training was performed during the ROT, while high intensity, low volume training was done every second day during the RVT. Maximum isometric (MVC), low (0.52 rad.s-1; LV) and high velocity (3.14 rad.s-1; HV) concentric peak torque, and evoked isometric twitch contractile properties were measured before and after each training phase and every 48 h during each taper. ANOVA comparison of the tapers revealed that MVC increased (p pre-taper values throughout the RVT (measurement days 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10), as did LV at 2, 4, 6, and 8 d. MVC did not change over the ROT but LV was significantly higher on day 2 and lower on days 8 and 10. LV was also greater on days 4, 6, 8 and 10 during the RVT compared to the ROT. The evoked contractile properties remained largely unchanged. The data indicate that resistance-trained athletes can improve low velocity concentric strength for at least 8 days by greatly reducing training volume, but maintaining training intensity.

  12. Self-efficacy and parental motivation as correlates ofstudends ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self-efficacy and parental motivation as correlates ofstudends' academic ... and academic performance of secondary school students in attaining academic ... and improve their self-efficacy and to motivate parents to provide more support, care ...

  13. The effects of aerobic- versus strength-training on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Strong, Heather A; Arent, Shawn M; Bray, Steven R; Bassett-Gunter, Rebecca L

    2014-06-01

    This experiment compared the effects of aerobic-training (AT) versus strength-training (ST) on body image among young women with pre-existing body image concerns. Theory-based correlates of body image change were also examined. Participants were 46 women (M age=21.5 years), randomly assigned to an 8-week AT or ST intervention consisting of supervised exercise 3 days/week. Multidimensional measures of body image were administered pre- and post-intervention, along with measures of physical fitness, perceived fitness, and exercise self-efficacy. Women in the AT condition reported greater reductions in social physique anxiety (p=.001) and tended to report greater improvements in appearance evaluation (p=.06) than women in the ST condition. Changes in perceived fatness, perceived aerobic endurance and aerobic self-efficacy were significantly correlated with body image change (psexercise to improve body image and advancing theory to account for the effects of exercise. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of strength training on cardiac risk prevention in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has widely been shown that exercise, particularly aerobic exercise, has extensive cardioprotective benefits and is an important tool in the prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). The present investigation aimed to determine the multivariate impact of strength training, designed to prevent the development of CHD, on ...

  15. Implementation of specific strength training among industrial laboratory technicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mogens Theisen; Andersen, Christoffer Højnicke; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown positive effects of physical exercise at the workplace on musculoskeletal disorders. However, long-term adherence remains a challenge. The present study evaluates long-term adherence and effects of a workplace strength training intervention on back, neck and upper extr...

  16. Effect of strength training on orthostatic hypotension in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilla, L R; Stephens, A B; Knutzen, K M; Caine, D

    1998-01-01

    This preliminary study attempted to identify the frequency of orthostatic hypotension (OH) in community dwelling older adults who volunteered to participate in an 8-week, heavy-resistance, strength-training program. It also assessed the effect of the strength-training program on OH. From a larger study (n = 53) on high-resistance strength training in older adults (mean age 71.4 +/- 6.6 years), a subset of subjects (n = 24), mean age 71.0 +/- 5.8 years, was evaluated who met at least one criterion for OH. All subjects were tested for resting blood pressures (BP) and heart rates (HR) in the supine, sitting, and standing positions. Also noted was their response to orthostatism in rising from a cot after 10 minutes and rising from a chair after 5 minutes. The subset was not different from the overall group in gender ratio, age, or effect of medication on BP. The treatment was an 8-week strength-training program at 80% of their one repetition maximum. Significant changes (P response to the orthostatic challenge, significant (P positive adaptation to an orthostatic challenge.

  17. Endurance and strength training in pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Daabis

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: PR is an effective intervention for the post-exacerbation management of COPD patients. It leads to significant improvements of dyspnea, HRQL and functional exercise capacity. When added to a program of ET, strength training confers additional benefits in muscle force, but not in overall exercise capacity or health status.

  18. How Much Weight to Use During Strength Training Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many women want to start a strength training routine but aren’t sure how much weight to use. Start with resistance bands, soup cans, or light weights (1 to 3 pounds) and build up to tighter bands or heavier weights as you feel and become stronger.

  19. Relationship between isometric and dynamic strength in recreationally trained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Michael J; Winchester, Jason B; Nelson, Arnold G

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the relationships between measures of maximal isometric force (peak force [PF]), rate of force development (RFD), vertical jump performance (VJ) and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) strength in recreationally trained men. The subjects in this study were 26 men ([mean +/- SD]: age 22 +/- 1 years; height 175 +/- 7 cm; mass 90 +/- 10 kg). They were tested for PF using the isometric midthigh pull exercise. The 1RM for the squat and bench press exercise were determined as a measure of dynamic strength. Explosive strength was measured as RFD from the isometric force-time curve. Correlations between the variables were calculated using Pearson product moment correlation coefficient. There was a nearly perfect correlation between measures of PF and 1RM squat (r = 0.97, p isometric maximum strength determined during the isometric midthigh pull test correlated well with 1RM and VJ testing. However, RFD measured during the same test did not appear to correlate as well with other measures. The isometric midthigh pull provides an efficient method for assessing strength in recreationally trained individuals. Practitioners wishing to obtain performance data related to maximum strength may wish to consider isometric testing as a less time intensive method of testing.

  20. Transfer of strength and power training to sports performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Warren B

    2006-06-01

    The purposes of this review are to identify the factors that contribute to the transference of strength and power training to sports performance and to provide resistance-training guidelines. Using sprinting performance as an example, exercises involving bilateral contractions of the leg muscles resulting in vertical movement, such as squats and jump squats, have minimal transfer to performance. However, plyometric training, including unilateral exercises and horizontal movement of the whole body, elicits significant increases in sprint acceleration performance, thus highlighting the importance of movement pattern and contraction velocity specificity. Relatively large gains in power output in nonspecific movements (intramuscular coordination) can be accompanied by small changes in sprint performance. Research on neural adaptations to resistance training indicates that intermuscular coordination is an important component in achieving transfer to sports skills. Although the specificity of resistance training is important, general strength training is potentially useful for the purposes of increasing body mass, decreasing the risk of soft-tissue injuries, and developing core stability. Hypertrophy and general power exercises can enhance sports performance, but optimal transfer from training also requires a specific exercise program.

  1. Does plyometric training improve strength performance? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Sáez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Requena, Bernardo; Newton, Robert U

    2010-09-01

    Majority of the research suggests plyometric training (PT) improves maximal strength performance as measured by 1RM, isometric MVC or slow velocity isokinetic testing. However, the effectiveness of PT depends upon various factors. A meta-analysis of 15 studies with a total of 31 effect sizes (ES) was carried out to analyse the role of various factors on the effects of PT on strength performance. The inclusion criteria for the analysis were: (a) studies using PT programs for lower limb muscles; (b) studies employing true experimental design and valid and reliable measurements; (c) studies including sufficient data to calculate ES. When subjects can adequately follow plyometric exercises, the training gains are independent of fitness level. Subjects in either good or poor physical condition, benefit equally from plyometric work, also men obtain similar strength results to women following PT. In relation to the variables of program design, training volume of less than 10 weeks and with more than 15 sessions, as well as the implementation of high-intensity programs, with more than 40 jumps per session, were the strategies that seem to maximize the probability to obtain significantly greater improvements in performance (p<0.05). In order to optimise strength enhancement, the combination of different types of plyometrics with weight-training would be recommended, rather than utilizing only one form (p<0.05). The responses identified in this analysis are essential and should be considered by the strength and conditioning professional with regard to the most appropriate dose-response trends for PT to optimise strength gains.

  2. Strength Development: Using Functional Isometrics in an Isotonic Strength Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Allen; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to determine if a combination of functional isometrics and standard isotonic training would be superior to a standard isotonic program in an instructional setting. The results provide support for functional isometrics as an enhancement where achievement of maximum strength is the goal. (Author/MT)

  3. Core stability training on lower limb balance strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dello Iacono, Antonio; Padulo, Johnny; Ayalon, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of core stability training on lower limbs' muscular asymmetries and imbalances in team sport. Twenty footballers were divided into two groups, either core stability or control group. Before each daily practice, core stability group (n = 10) performed a core stability training programme, while control group (n = 10) did a standard warm-up. The effects of the core stability training programme were assessed by performing isokinetic tests and single-leg countermovement jumps. Significant improvement was found for knee extensors peak torque at 3.14 rad · s(-1) (14%; P core stability group. The jump tests showed a significant reduction in the strength asymmetries in core stability group (-71.4%; P = 0.02) while a concurrent increase was seen in the control group (33.3%; P core exercises for optimal lower limbs strength balance development in young soccer players.

  4. Burrowing as a novel voluntary strength training method for mice : A comparison of various voluntary strength or resistance exercise methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roemers, P; Mazzola, P N; De Deyn, P P; Bossers, W J; van Heuvelen, M J G; van der Zee, E A

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary strength training methods for rodents are necessary to investigate the effects of strength training on cognition and the brain. However, few voluntary methods are available. NEW METHOD: The current study tested functional and muscular effects of two novel voluntary strength

  5. Motivational Partnerships: Increasing ESL Student Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave, Paul N.; Evans, Norman W.; Dewey, Dan P.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2018-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between student use of self-efficacy-building strategies through motivational partnerships and student levels of self-efficacy and motivation in an adult intensive English programme in the United States. The extent to which self-efficacy influenced motivation was also examined. After being organized…

  6. Using Video Feedback to Measure Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, Linda; Andrews, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    When a student has a high sense of self-efficacy, foreseeing success and providing positive guides and supports for performing the skill will usually occur. A low self-efficacy tends to predict failure and anticipation of what could go wrong. Videotape feedback provided to students has reported favorable outcomes. Self-efficacy could alter…

  7. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

  8. Examining Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy Doubts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Chesnut, Steven Randall; Alejandro, Angela Ybarra; Young, Haeni Alecia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to add to the research on teachers' self-efficacy beliefs by examining preservice teachers' culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy doubts. We examined the tasks that preservice teachers felt least efficacious to successfully execute and explored the reasoning behind these self-efficacy doubts. Consequently, we were…

  9. Effects of strength training, detraining and retraining in muscle strength, hypertrophy and functional tasks in older female adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Cleiton S; Cunha, Giovani; Marques, Nise; Oliveira-Reischak, Ãlvaro; Pinto, Ronei

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies presented different results regarding the maintenance time of muscular adaptations after strength training and the ability to resume the gains on muscular performance after resumption of the training programme. This study aimed to verify the effect of strength training on knee extensors and elbow flexor muscle strength, rectus femoris muscle volume and functional performance in older female adults after 12 weeks of strength training, 1 year of detraining and followed by 12 weeks of retraining. Twelve sedentary older women performed 12 weeks of strength training, 1 year of detraining and 12 weeks of retraining. The strength training was performed twice a week, and the assessment was made four times: at the baseline, after the strength training, after the detraining and after the retraining. The knee extensor and elbow flexor strength, rectus femoris muscle volume and functional task were assessed. Strength of knee extensor and elbow flexor muscles, rectus femoris muscle volume and 30-s sit-to-stand increased from baseline to post-training (respectively, 40%, 70%, 38% and 46%), decreased after detraining (respectively, -36%, -64%, -35% and -43%) and increased again these parameters after retraining (35%, 68%, 36% and 42%). Strength training induces gains on strength and hypertrophy, also increased the performance on functional tasks after the strength training. The stoppage of the strength caused strength loss and reduction of functional performance. The resumption of the strength training promoted the same gains of muscular performance in older female adults. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Career Self-Efficacy and Personality: Linking Career Confidence and the Healthy Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgen, Fred H.; Betz, Nancy E.

    2008-01-01

    This article extends recent work on the relationship between personality and career self-efficacy by examining relationships across two new inventories with scales for identifying human strengths. The Healthy Personality Inventory (HPI) has 17 content scales tapping an array of positive personality measures. The CAPA Confidence Inventory (CCI) has…

  11. IS ENHANCED-ECCENTRIC RESISTANCE TRAINING SUPERIOR TO TRADITIONAL TRAINING FOR INCREASING ELBOW FLEXOR STRENGTH?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Kaminski

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for strengthening muscle are important for fitness, rehabilitation, and the prevention of myotendinous injuries. In trained individuals, the optimal method of increasing strength remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a traditional method of strengthening with a method that allowed for enhanced-eccentric training, on changes in elbow flexor strength in trained subjects. Thirty-nine (8 male, 31 female trained subjects with normal elbow function participated in this study. Subjects were rank-ordered according to isometric force production and randomly assigned to one of three training groups: control (CONT, traditional concentric/eccentric (TRAD, and concentric/enhanced-eccentric (NEG. The training groups completed 24 training sessions. An evaluator blinded to training group performed all testing. Mixed model ANOVA techniques were used to determine if differences existed in concentric one repetition maximum strength, and isometric force production among groups. Changes in peak and average isokinetic force production were also compared. Type 1 error was maintained at 5%. While both groups improved concentric one repetition maximum (NEG = 15.5%, TRAD = 13.8% neither training group statistically differed from changes demonstrated by the CONT group. Nor did either training group show significant improvements in isometric or isokinetic force production over the CONT group. These results do not support the superiority of enhanced-eccentric training for increasing force production in trained subjects.

  12. Development and validation of a managerial decision making self-efficacy questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Myburgh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Self-efficacy beliefs, given their task-specific nature, are likely to influence managers’ perceived decision-making competence depending on fluctuations in their nature and strength as non-ability contributors. Research purpose: The present research describes the conceptualisation, design and measurement of managerial decision-making self-efficacy. Motivation for the study: The absence of a domain-specific measure of the decision-making self-efficacy of managers was the motivation for the development of the Managerial Decisionmaking Self-efficacy Questionnaire (MDMSEQ. Research approach, design and method: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a nonprobability convenience sample of managers from various organisations in South Africa. Statistical analysis focused on the construct validity and reliability of items through exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to test the factorial validity of the measure. Main findings: The research offers confirmatory validation of the factorial structure of the MDMSEQ. The results of two studies involving 455 (Study 1, n = 193; Study 2, n = 292 experienced managers evidenced a multidimensional structure and demonstrated respectable subscale internal consistencies. Findings also demonstrated that the MDMSEQ shared little common variance with confidence and problem-solving self-efficacy beliefs. In addition, several model fit indices suggested a reasonable to good model fit for the measurement model. Practical/managerial implications: The findings have implications for practical applications in employment selection and development with regard to managerial decision-making. Absence of the assessment of self-efficacy beliefs may introduce systematic, non-performance related variance into managerial decision-making outcomes in spite of abilities that managers possess. Contribution/value-add: Research on the volition-undermining effect of self-efficacy beliefs has been remarkably prominent

  13. Comparing the Impact of Specific Strength Training vs General Fitness Training on Professional Symphony Orchestra Musicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard Andersen, Lotte; Mann, Stephanie; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal symptoms, especially in the upper body, are frequent among professional symphony orchestra musicians. Physical exercise may relieve pain but might also interfere with playing performance. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility and effect of "specific strength training" (SST) versus...... "general fitness training" (GFT). METHODS: A feasibility study using randomized controlled methods. Primarily, evaluations involved self-reported impact on instrument playing and satisfaction with the interventions. Secondary evaluations included pain intensity, hand-grip strength, aerobic capacity, body...

  14. Prior Self-Efficacy Interacts with Experiential Valence to Influence Self-Efficacy among Engineering Students: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yevvon Yi-Chi; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2017-01-01

    Self-efficacy toward science learning has been shown to play a crucial role in determining students' motivation and achievements. Social cognitive theory proposes that positive and negative task outcomes affect mastery experiences from which self-efficacy develops. The current research examined whether prior level of self-efficacy would serve as a…

  15. Up-regulation of reciprocal inhibition by explosive strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    of 26 ± 7 years strength trained the ankle dorsiflexor muscles 3 times a week for 4 weeks. Each training session consisted of 4 sets of 16 isometric dorsiflexions with the aim of increasing force as rapidly as possible, separated by 4min rest periods. Test sessions were conducted before, immediately...... in the ankle plantarflexors at the onset of dorsiflexion is larger the quicker the movement, we hypothesized that DRI may be up-regulated when subjects are trained to perform dorsiflexion movements as quickly as possible.   For this purpose, 15 healthy human subjects (7 male, 8 female) with an average age...... after and 2 weeks after the training period. The rate of dorsiflexion force development measured within 30, 50, 100 and 200ms after onset of voluntary explosive isometric dorsiflexion increased by 20-30% (p

  16. Factors influencing Australian agricultural workers' self-efficacy using chemicals in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Ian R

    2012-11-01

    A hypothetical model was formulated to explore which factors can simultaneously influence the self-reported ability of agricultural employees to embrace chemical safety practices. Eight variables were considered in the study, including the employees' gender, age, duration of current employment status, and whether they were employed full-time or part-time. The self-efficacy measures of 169 participants were then estimated by measuring their self-rated ability to understand and perform different chemical safety practices. Models identifying employee self-efficacy pathways leading to worker readiness to engage in chemical safety were then tested using Partial Least Squares Path Analysis. Study results suggest that employees' self-efficacy to successfully engage in safe chemical practices in their workplace can be directly predicted by four variables, with additional indirect effects offered by one other variable, which cumulatively account for 41% of the variance of employees' chemical safety self-efficacy scores. The most significant predictor variables that directly influenced employees' self-efficacy in adopting chemical safety practices in the workplace were worker age, gender, years of employment, and concurrent confidence (self-efficacy) arising from prior experience using chemicals in the workplace. The variables of employees' prior knowledge and understanding about the use of administrative controls and personal protective equipment to protect workers from chemical exposure had no direct influence on self-efficacy to handle chemical emergencies. Employees' unfamiliarity with risk control strategies and reliance on material safety data sheets for information suggest that ongoing and targeted training are necessary if chemical safety issues are to be addressed.

  17. Static muscle strength trained and untrained of female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopanski R.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Static muscle strength is one of the defining characteristics of human motor potential. Standard terms and exclude the impact of short-term measurement techniques for motion and strain measurements, hence the widespread use of Mm measurements in the assessment of fitness of both trained and untrained, healthy subjects and patients undergoing a variety of reasons the process of rehabilitation. The paper deals with static muscle strength (dynamometry back of the hand of female students trained (n = 38 and untrained (n = 213. Examined relationships between individual measurements and body weight in both groups, the degree of asymmetry of the palmar and the differences in the level of power (at the level of the absolute and relative terms between the groups. Disclosed according to form the basis of their conclusions.

  18. Practicing the Test Produces Strength Equivalent to Higher Volume Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kevin T; Buckner, Samuel L; Jessee, Matthew B; Dankel, Scott J; Mouser, J Grant; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-09-01

    To determine if muscle growth is important for increasing muscle strength or if changes in strength can be entirely explained from practicing the strength test. Thirty-eight untrained individuals performed knee extension and chest press exercise for 8 wk. Individuals were randomly assigned to either a high-volume training group (HYPER) or a group just performing the one repetition maximum (1RM) strength test (TEST). The HYPER group performed four sets to volitional failure (~8RM-12RM), whereas the TEST group performed up to five attempts to lift as much weight as possible one time each visit. Data are presented as mean (90% confidence interval). The change in muscle size was greater in the HYPER group for both the upper and lower bodies at most but not all sites. The change in 1RM strength for both the upper body (difference of -1.1 [-4.8, 2.4] kg) and lower body (difference of 1.0 [-0.7, 2.8] kg for dominant leg) was not different between groups (similar for nondominant). Changes in isometric and isokinetic torque were not different between groups. The HYPER group observed a greater change in muscular endurance (difference of 2 [1,4] repetitions) only in the dominant leg. There were no differences in the change between groups in upper body endurance. There were between-group differences for exercise volume (mean [95% confidence interval]) of the dominant (difference of 11,049.3 [9254.6-12,844.0] kg) leg (similar for nondominant) and chest press with the HYPER group completing significantly more total volume (difference of 13259.9 [9632.0-16,887.8] kg). These findings suggest that neither exercise volume nor the change in muscle size from training contributed to greater strength gains compared with just practicing the test.

  19. Concentric resistance training increases muscle strength without affecting microcirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schroeder, Leif; Kinscherf, Ralf; Krix, Martin; Bachert, Peter; Delorme, Stefan; Essig, Marco; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: While the evidence is conclusive regarding the positive effects of endurance training, there is still some controversy regarding the effects of resistance training on muscular capillarity. Thus, the purpose was to assess whether resistance strength training influences resting skeletal muscle microcirculation in vivo. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine middle-aged subjects (15 female, 24 male; mean age, 54 ± 9 years) were trained twice a week on an isokinetic system (altogether 16 sessions lasting 50 min, intensity 75% of maximum isokinetic and isometric force of knee flexors and extensors). To evaluate success of training, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the quadriceps femoris muscle and its isokinetic and isometric force were quantified. Muscular capillarization was measured in biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle. In vivo, muscular energy and lipid metabolites were quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and parameters of muscular microcirculation, such as local blood volume, blood flow and velocity, by contrast-enhanced ultrasound analyzing replenishment kinetics. Results: The significant (P 2 after training) and in absolute muscle strength (isometric, 146 ± 44 vs. 174 ± 50 Nm; isokinetic, 151 ± 53 vs. 174 ± 62 Nm) demonstrated successful training. Neither capillary density ex vivo (351 ± 75 vs. 326 ± 62) nor ultrasonographic parameters of resting muscle perfusion were significantly different (blood flow, 1.2 ± 1.2 vs. 1.1 ± 1.1 ml/min/100 g; blood flow velocity, 0.49 ± 0.44 vs. 0.52 ± 0.74 mm s -1 ). Also, the intensities of high-energy phosphates phosphocreatine and β-adenosintriphosphate were not different after training within the skeletal muscle at rest (β-ATP/phosphocreatine, 0.29 ± 0.06 vs. 0.28 ± 0.04). Conclusion: The significant increase in muscle size and strength in response to concentric isokinetic and isometric resistance training occurs without an increase in the in vivo microcirculation of the skeletal muscles at

  20. Concentric resistance training increases muscle strength without affecting microcirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Marc-Andre [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)], E-mail: MarcAndre.Weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hildebrandt, Wulf [Immunochemistry, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Schroeder, Leif [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Kinscherf, Ralf [Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, Martin [Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Bachert, Peter [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, Stefan; Essig, Marco [Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Krakowski-Roosen, Holger [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: While the evidence is conclusive regarding the positive effects of endurance training, there is still some controversy regarding the effects of resistance training on muscular capillarity. Thus, the purpose was to assess whether resistance strength training influences resting skeletal muscle microcirculation in vivo. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine middle-aged subjects (15 female, 24 male; mean age, 54 {+-} 9 years) were trained twice a week on an isokinetic system (altogether 16 sessions lasting 50 min, intensity 75% of maximum isokinetic and isometric force of knee flexors and extensors). To evaluate success of training, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the quadriceps femoris muscle and its isokinetic and isometric force were quantified. Muscular capillarization was measured in biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscle. In vivo, muscular energy and lipid metabolites were quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and parameters of muscular microcirculation, such as local blood volume, blood flow and velocity, by contrast-enhanced ultrasound analyzing replenishment kinetics. Results: The significant (P < 0.001) increase in CSA (60 {+-} 16 before vs. 64 {+-} 15 cm{sup 2} after training) and in absolute muscle strength (isometric, 146 {+-} 44 vs. 174 {+-} 50 Nm; isokinetic, 151 {+-} 53 vs. 174 {+-} 62 Nm) demonstrated successful training. Neither capillary density ex vivo (351 {+-} 75 vs. 326 {+-} 62) nor ultrasonographic parameters of resting muscle perfusion were significantly different (blood flow, 1.2 {+-} 1.2 vs. 1.1 {+-} 1.1 ml/min/100 g; blood flow velocity, 0.49 {+-} 0.44 vs. 0.52 {+-} 0.74 mm s{sup -1}). Also, the intensities of high-energy phosphates phosphocreatine and {beta}-adenosintriphosphate were not different after training within the skeletal muscle at rest ({beta}-ATP/phosphocreatine, 0.29 {+-} 0.06 vs. 0.28 {+-} 0.04). Conclusion: The significant increase in muscle size and strength in response to concentric isokinetic and isometric

  1. Improved skeletal muscle mass and strength after heavy strength training in very old individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus Leidesdorff; Malmgaard-Clausen, Nikolaj Mølkjær; Gliese, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    , muscle fiber type distribution and size did not differ significantly between groups. We conclude that in protein supplemented very old individuals, heavy resistance training can increase muscle mass and strength, and that the relative improvement in mass is more pronounced when initial muscle mass is low.......Age-related loss of muscle mass and function represents personal and socioeconomic challenges. The purpose of this study was to determine the adaptation of skeletal musculature in very old individuals (83 + years) performing 12 weeks of heavy resistance training (3 ×/week) (HRT) compared to a non....... The increase in CSA is correlated inversely with the baseline level of CSA (R2 = 0.43, P muscle isometric strength, isokinetic peak torque and power increased significantly only in HRT by 10–15%, whereas knee extension one-repetition maximum (1 RM) improved by 91%. Physical functional tests...

  2. The Self-Efficacy of Preservice Elementary Teachers in Kuwaiti Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined educational factors that positively influenced the confidence of students training to be elementary science educators (self efficacy). Specifically, it compared the impacts of a science method course and a practicum teaching course on Kuwait University students. Using a pre/post design, The Science Teaching Efficacy Belief…

  3. Applying Bandura's Model to Identifying Sources of Self-Efficacy of Teaching Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Scott; Fisk, Timarie

    2016-01-01

    Teaching artists have significant roles within K-12 schools. Although some research has been conducted to describe the characteristics, training, and employment experiences of teaching artists, no study has been conducted concerning the self-efficacy that such individuals have regarding teaching. The purpose of the study was to investigate the…

  4. The job crafting intervention: effects on job resources, self-efficacy, and affective well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, M.; Demerouti, E.; Peeters, M.C.W.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental field study examines the effects of an intervention designed to boost job resources, affective well-being, and self-efficacy via job crafting behaviour. Employees (n = 39) in a Dutch police district received a 1-day training, after which they worked towards self-set crafting

  5. The job crafting intervention : Effects on job resources, self-efficacy, and affective well-being

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Machteld; Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07487893X

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental field study examines the effects of an intervention designed to boost job resources, affective well-being, and self-efficacy via job crafting behaviour. Employees (n = 39) in a Dutch police district received a 1-day training, after which they worked towards self-set crafting

  6. How Setting Goals Enhances Learners’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Listening Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Ballesteros Muñoz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines a study that explores the relationship between SMART goal setting (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-based and learning English in Colombia concerning a foreign language learners’ self-efficacy beliefs in listening. The participants were seventh and ninth grade students of two schools in Bogotá, Colombia. The results revealed that self-efficacy was highly positive when related to goal setting as students were able to set SMART goals to improve their listening comprehension and learners showed improvement in self-efficacy beliefs and felt more motivated while completing listening tasks related to songs. Furthermore this study shows that goal setting training can be incorporated successfully into the English as a foreign language classroom.

  7. Mediating Effect of School Nurses' Self Efficacy between Multicultural Attitude and Cultural Sensitivity in Korean Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hyun Suk, PhD, RN

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Given the meaningful influence of positive multicultural attitude on cultural sensitivity and significant mediator effect of self efficacy as a school nurse between the two variables, the strategies to cultivate a positive multicultural attitude and enhance school nurses' self efficacy in their unique role should be considered in a training program. School nurses' health care services will benefit from the improvement of cultural sensitivity toward young children from multicultural families.

  8. Combined isometric and vibration training does not enhance strength beyond that of isometric training alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J; Van-Dongen, M; Sutherland, R

    2015-09-01

    Research considering combined vibration and strength training is extensive yet results are equivocal. However, to date there appears no research which has considered the combination of both direct vibration and whole-body vibration when used in an isometric deadlift position. The aim of this study was to compare groups performing isometric training with and without direct and whole-body vibration. Twenty four participants (19-24 years) were randomly divided into: isometric training with vibration (ST+VT: N.=8), isometric training without vibration (ST: N.=8), and control (CON: N.=8). Within the training groups participants trained twice per week, for 6 weeks, performing 6-sets of maximal isometric deadlift contractions, increasing in duration from 30 seconds to 40 seconds (weeks 1-6). Hip and knee angle was maintained at 60° and 110°, respectively for both testing and training. Training sessions for ST+VT were identical to ST with the addition of a direct vibratory stimulus through hand-held straps and whole-body vibration via standing on vibration a platform. The amplitude remained constant (2 mm) throughout the intervention whilst the frequency increased from 35Hz to 50Hz. Pre- and post-test isometric strength was measured using an isometric deadlift dynamometer. Results revealed significant increases in isometric strength for both ST+VT (Pstrength training.

  9. Importance of Performing Experience in Strength Training Periodization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novosád Adrián

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Proper mastering of a training means seems to be an important determinant of the quality of strength training. Aim of the paper is to examine the differences in strength in relation to squat-performing experience and to offer a way of improving performance by means of increasing the quality of squat technique. Methods 1. Subjects were divided into two groups according to their previous experience with performing squat: a group of inexperienced (n = 9; age: 21.1 years ± 2.37; height: 179.2 cm ± 8.18; weight: 70.0 kg ± 7.38 and experienced (n = 9; age: 24.0 years ± 1.07; height: 182.1 cm ± 4.14; weight: 81.2 kg ± 4.29. We carried out a test of maximal isometric strength in deep squat (ISOmax50° and a modified diagnostic set (Fitro Force Plate which consisted of repetitions of heel raised deep squats with a gradually increasing external loading (FmaxBW+(0-100%. Posture and the body segments of the participants were not corrected during these tests. Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05 was used to evaluate the data obtained. Results 1. After comparing the differences in the maximal value of force curve in dynamic muscular mode (FmaxBW+(0-100% and the maximal isometric force in deep squat (ISOmax50° between the groups we found significantly bigger differences in the group of experienced when the resistance represented +75 % (Δ 279.0 N and +100 % of body weight (Δ 332.2 N. Methods 2. Eleven inexperienced subjects (age: 22.1 years ± 1.52; weight: 78.2 kg ± 2.84 completed a short term experiment (with 4 training sessions in weeklong microcycle. The purpose was to practise deep squat without any content of targeted strength development.

  10. Strength training and testosterone treatment have opposing effects on migration inhibitor factor levels in ageing men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, D.; Christensen, L. L.; Kvorning, T.

    2013-01-01

    Strength Training and Testosterone Treatment Have Opposing Effects on Migration Inhibitor Factor Levels in Ageing Men......Strength Training and Testosterone Treatment Have Opposing Effects on Migration Inhibitor Factor Levels in Ageing Men...

  11. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  12. Self-Efficacy as Predictor of Collective Self-Efficacy among Preschool Teachers in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Emel

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of preschool teachers' collective self-efficacy. A study group consists of 172 preschool teachers who are working in public preschools affiliated with the Ministry of National Education in different cities of Turkey. In this study, teacher self-efficiency scale is employed to assess professional efficiency…

  13. Effects of plyometric training volume and training surface on explosive strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo; Andrade, David C; Izquierdo, Mikel

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of different volume and training surfaces during a short-term plyometric training program on neuromuscular performance. Twenty-nine subjects were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control group (CG, n = 5), moderate volume group (MVG, n = 9, 780 jumps), moderate volume hard surface group (MVGHS, n = 8, 780 jumps), and high volume group (HVG, n = 7, 1,560 jumps). A series of tests were performed by the subjects before and after 7 weeks of plyometric training. These tests were measurement of maximum strength (5 maximum repetitions [5RMs]), drop jumps (DJs) of varying heights (20, 40, and 60 cm), squat and countermovement jumps (SJ and CMJ, respectively), timed 20-m sprint, agility, body weight, and height. The results of the present study suggest that high training volume leads to a significant increase in explosive performance that requires fast stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) actions (such as DJ and sprint) in comparison to what is observed after a moderate training volume regimen. Second, when plyometric training is performed on a hard training surface (high-impact reaction force), a moderate training volume induces optimal stimulus to increase explosive performance requiring fast SSC actions (e.g., DJ), maximal dynamic strength enhancement, and higher training efficiency. Thus, a finding of interest in the study was that after 7 weeks of plyometric training, performance enhancement in maximal strength and in actions requiring fast SSC (such as DJ and sprint) were dependent on the volume of training and the surface on which it was performed. This must be taken into account when using plyometric training on different surfaces.

  14. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance

    OpenAIRE

    Wirth Klaus; Keiner Michael; Hartmann Hagen; Sander Andre; Mickel Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ? 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ? 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ? 8.9 kg) joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were...

  15. A gender study investigating physics self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively the influence of self-efficacy in predicting success and then to qualitatively explore the development of self-efficacy. In the initial quantitative studies, I explore the utility of self-efficacy in predicting the success of introductory physics students, both women and men. Results indicate that self-efficacy is a significant predictor of success for all students. I then disaggregate the data to examine how self-efficacy develops differently for women and men in the introductory physics course. Results show women rely on different sources of self-efficacy than do men, and that a particular instructional environment, Modeling Instruction, has a positive impact on these sources of self-efficacy. In the qualitative phase of the project, this dissertation focuses on the development of self-efficacy. Using the qualitative tool of microanalysis, I introduce a methodology for understanding how self-efficacy develops moment-by-moment using the lens of self-efficacy opportunities. I then use the characterizations of self-efficacy opportunities to focus on a particular course environment and to identify and describe a mechanism by which Modeling Instruction impacts student self-efficacy. Results indicate that the emphasizing the development and deployment of models affords opportunities to impact self-efficacy. The findings of this dissertation indicate that introducing key elements into the classroom, such as cooperative group work, model development and deployment, and interaction with the instructor, create a mechanism by which instructors can impact the self-efficacy of their students. Results from this study indicate that

  16. Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Elena K.

    The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

  17. Exploring self-efficacy as a predictor of disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, N M; Dodge, J A

    1999-02-01

    Self-efficacy is posited in social cognitive theory as fundamental to behavior change. Few health behavior studies have examined self-efficacy prospectively, viewed it as part of a reciprocal behavioral process, or compared self-efficacy beliefs in the same population across different behaviors. This article first discusses self-efficacy in its theoretical context and reviews the available prospective studies. Second, it explores self-efficacy as a predictor of disease management behaviors in 570 older women with heart disease. Although the R2 statistics in each case were modest, the construct is shown to be a statistically significant (pmanagement behaviors: using medicine as prescribed, getting adequate exercise, managing stress, and following a recommended diet. Building self-efficacy is likely a reasonable starting point for interventions aiming to enhance heart disease management behaviors of mature female patients.

  18. Self-efficacy, pain, and quadriceps capacity at baseline predict changes in mobility performance over 2 years in women with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Nicholas M; Gatti, Anthony A; Stratford, Paul W; Maly, Monica R

    2018-02-01

    This study examined the extent to which baseline measures of quadriceps strength, quadriceps power, knee pain and self-efficacy for functional tasks, and their interactions, predicted 2-year changes in mobility performance (walking, stair ascent, stair descent) in women with knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that lesser strength, power and self-efficacy, and higher pain at baseline would each be independently associated with reduced mobility over 2 years, and each of pain and self-efficacy would interact with strength and power in predicting 2-year change in stair-climbing performance. This was a longitudinal, observational study of women with clinical knee osteoarthritis. At baseline and follow-up, mobility was assessed with the Six-Minute Walk Test, and stair ascent and descent tasks. Quadriceps strength and power, knee pain, and self-efficacy for functional tasks were also collected at baseline. Multiple linear regression examined the extent to which 2-year changes in mobility performances were predicted by baseline strength, power, pain, and self-efficacy, after adjusting for covariates. Data were analyzed for 37 women with knee osteoarthritis over 2 years. Lower baseline self-efficacy predicted decreased walking (β = 1.783; p = 0.030) and stair ascent (β = -0.054; p baseline pain intensity/frequency predicted decreased walking performance (β = 1.526; p = 0.002). Lower quadriceps strength (β = 0.051; p = 0.015) and power (β = 0.022; p = 0.022) interacted with lesser self-efficacy to predict worsening stair ascent performance. Strategies to sustain or improve mobility in women with knee osteoarthritis must focus on controlling pain and boosting self-efficacy. In those with worse self-efficacy, developing knee muscle capacity is an important target.

  19. Self-efficacy at work : Social, emotional, and cognitive dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Loeb, Carina

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that self-efficacy is one of the most important personal resources in the work context. However, research on working life has mainly focused on a cognitive and task-oriented dimension of self-efficacy representing employees’ perceptions of their capacity to successfully complete work tasks. Thus, little is known about the influence that believing in one’s social and emotional competence could have. This thesis aims to expand previous theory regarding self-efficacy in the wo...

  20. Hemoaction game: an educational step to improve hemophilia children and nurses self-efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOOASHIN BEHESHTIPOOR

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As hemophilia is a chronic bleeding disease and can interfere with daily performance of children, these children require continuous training to prevent bleeding and take timely action (1. Since children nurses play an important role in the education of involved children and their Selfefficacy and also due to today’s approach which is using educational computer games, the use of educational games in respect to teach hemophilia children how to have self-efficacy can be effective (2. Hemoaction game is a computerized educational game designed by the World Federation of Hemophilia to educate hemophilia disease and related procedures to the care of children with hemophilia. By the use of this game children with hemophilia (aged 8-12 and also nursing experts were educated how to increase self efficacy. Nursing School of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences has used this game for the first time after its publishing, in the world (3. The results of the mentioned study demonstrates that after the Hemophilia disease and its related procedures were instructed to children with hemophilia and nursing experts in order to know how to increase patients’ self efficacy by modern approaches, self efficacy of hemophilia children and nurses were both improved. This educational method is a novel way to enhance both Hemophilia children and nursing staff, as major participants in routine and lifelong education process, self-efficacy. Due to nurses’ important role in improving children with hemophilia self-efficacy by different instructions and world leading educational approaches towards use of modern technology in education, using Hemoaction educational game, published by World Federation of Hemophilia and used by Nursing and Midwifery College of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences for the first time, can fulfill hemophilia children needs of care.

  1. Alterations in Strength and Maximal Oxygen Uptake Consequent to Nautilus Circuit Weight Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P.; Dill, Mary Elizabeth

    1985-01-01

    The study compared the effects on muscular strength and maximal oxygen uptake of a Nautilus circuit weight training program, a free weight strength training program, and a running program. Nautilus circuit weight training appears to be equally effective for a training period of short duration. (MT)

  2. The Effect of Childbirth Self-Efficacy on Perinatal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilden, Ellen L.; Caughey, Aaron B.; Lee, Christopher S.; Emeis, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesize and critique the quantitative literature on measuring childbirth self-efficacy and the effect of childbirth self-efficacy on perinatal outcomes. Data Sources Eligible studies were identified through searching MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. Study Selection Published research using a tool explicitly intended to measure childbirth self-efficacy and also examining outcomes within the perinatal period were included. All manuscripts were in English and published in peer-reviewed journals. Data Extraction First author, country, year of publication, reference and definition of childbirth self-efficacy, measurement of childbirth self-efficacy, sample recruitment and retention, sample characteristics, study design, interventions (with experimental and quasi-experimental studies), and perinatal outcomes were extracted and summarized. Data Synthesis Of 619 publications, 23 studies published between 1983 and 2015 met inclusion criteria and were critiqued and synthesized in this review. Conclusions There is overall consistency in how childbirth self-efficacy is defined and measured among studies, facilitating comparison and synthesis. Our findings suggest that increased childbirth self-efficacy is associated with a wide variety of improved perinatal outcomes. Moreover, there is evidence that childbirth self-efficacy is a psychosocial factor that can be modified through various efficacy-enhancing interventions. Future researchers will be able to build knowledge in this area through: (a) utilization of experimental and quasi-experimental design; (b) recruitment and retention of more diverse samples; (c) explicit reporting of definitions of terms (e.g. ‘high risk’); (d) investigation of interventions that increase childbirth self-efficacy during pregnancy; and, (e) investigation regarding how childbirth self-efficacy enhancing interventions might lead to decreased active labor pain and suffering. Exploratory research should

  3. EFFECTS OF STRENGTH VS. BALLISTIC-POWER TRAINING ON THROWING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Zaras

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks strength vs. ballistic-power (Power training on shot put throwing performance in novice throwers. Seventeen novice male shot-put throwers were divided into Strength (N = 9 and Power (n = 8 groups. The following measurements were performed before and after the training period: shot put throws, jumping performance (CMJ, Wingate anaerobic performance, 1RM strength, ballistic throws and evaluation of architectural and morphological characteristics of vastus lateralis. Throwing performance increased significantly but similarly after Strength and Power training (7.0-13.5% vs. 6.0-11.5%, respectively. Muscular strength in leg press increased more after Strength than after Power training (43% vs. 21%, respectively, while Power training induced an 8.5% increase in CMJ performance and 9.0 - 25.8% in ballistic throws. Peak power during the Wingate test increased similarly after Strength and Power training. Muscle thickness increased only after Strength training (10%, p < 0.05. Muscle fibre Cross Sectional Area (fCSA increased in all fibre types after Strength training by 19-26% (p < 0.05, while only type IIx fibres hypertrophied significantly after Power training. Type IIx fibres (% decreased after Strength but not after Power training. These results suggest that shot put throwing performance can be increased similarly after six weeks of either strength or ballistic power training in novice throwers, but with dissimilar muscular adaptations

  4. Training strategy of explosive strength in young female volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana; Costa, Aldo M; Santos, Patricia; Figueiredo, Teresa; João, Paulo Vicente

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of an 8-week combined jump and ball throwing training program in the performance of upper and lower extremities among young female volleyball players of the high school. A total of 20 young female volleyball players playing at Scholar Sport in High School at the district level were divided in two groups: the experimental group (n=10; 14.0±0.0 years; 1.6±0.1 m; 52.0±7.0 kg and 20.7±2.4% body mass) and the control group (n=10; 13.8±0.4 years, 1.6±0.1 m; 53.5±4.7 kg and 20.3±1.7% body mass). The experimental group received additional plyometric and ball throwing exercises besides their normal volleyball practice. The control group underwent only their regular session of training. Strength performance in the experimental group significantly improved (medicine ball and volleyball ball throwing: P=0.00; and counter movement jump: P=0.05), with the improvement ranging from 5.3% to 20.1%. No significant changes in strength performance were observed in the control group (P>0.05). The 8-week combined jump and ball throwing training can significantly improve muscular performance in young female volleyball players. These findings may be useful for all physical education teachers and volleyball coaches. Copyright © 2015 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-Esteem, Self-Efficacy, and Resources in Adults With ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark, Patricia Elizabeth; Elsässer, Marina; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to shed light on therapy-relevant factors, such as self-esteem, self-efficacy, and resources in adults with ADHD in comparison with a healthy control group. A total of 43 adults who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; DSM-IV-TR) criteria for ADHD in adulthood were matched with a nonclinical sample in terms of age and gender. All participants (N = 86) were assessed with self-ratings: Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and Dick's Resources Checklist. Adults with ADHD showed lower levels of self-esteem and self-efficacy when compared with the control group. The authors found some, but not all, of the resources of adults with ADHD to be reduced. In other words, people with ADHD seem to possess specific resources. Our results have important implications for the treatment of adult ADHD and suggest that specific therapy programs should include resources-oriented modules for enhancing self-esteem, self-efficacy, and fostering strengths. © The Author(s) 2012.

  6. Effects of Strength vs. Ballistic-Power Training on Throwing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaras, Nikolaos; Spengos, Konstantinos; Methenitis, Spyridon; Papadopoulos, Constantinos; Karampatsos, Giorgos; Georgiadis, Giorgos; Stasinaki, Aggeliki; Manta, Panagiota; Terzis, Gerasimos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks strength vs. ballistic-power (Power) training on shot put throwing performance in novice throwers. Seventeen novice male shot-put throwers were divided into Strength (N = 9) and Power (n = 8) groups. The following measurements were performed before and after the training period: shot put throws, jumping performance (CMJ), Wingate anaerobic performance, 1RM strength, ballistic throws and evaluation of architectural and morphological characteristics of vastus lateralis. Throwing performance increased significantly but similarly after Strength and Power training (7.0-13.5% vs. 6.0-11.5%, respectively). Muscular strength in leg press increased more after Strength than after Power training (43% vs. 21%, respectively), while Power training induced an 8.5% increase in CMJ performance and 9.0 - 25.8% in ballistic throws. Peak power during the Wingate test increased similarly after Strength and Power training. Muscle thickness increased only after Strength training (10%, p ballistic power training in novice throwers, but with dissimilar muscular adaptations. Key pointsBallistic-power training with 30% of 1RM is equally effective in increasing shot put performance as strength training, in novice throwers, during a short training cycle of six weeks.In novice shot putters with relatively low initial muscle strength/mass, short-term strength training might be more important since it can increase both muscle strength and shot put performance.The ballistic type of power training resulted in a significant increase of the mass of type IIx muscle fibres and no change in their proportion. Thus, this type of training might be used effectively during the last weeks before competition, when the strength training load is usually reduced, in order to increase muscle power and shot put performance in novice shot putters.

  7. Determining the Predictors of Self-Efficacy and Cyber Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingöl, Tugba Yilmaz

    2018-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine the variables affecting self-efficacy and cyber bullying. The participants of the study were 223 high school students. The data was collected through the use of self-administered questionnaires which were the General Self-efficacy Scale, the Gratitude Scale, the Early Memories of Warmth and Safeness Scale…

  8. The Accuracy of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Outdoor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In the present era of outcome assessment and accountability, self-efficacy is a popular outcome measure in outdoor and adventure education. Self-efficacy beliefs are context specific perceptions an individual possesses about a likelihood of success in future tasks and are related to well-being confidence, and persistence. However, recent research…

  9. A Reanalysis of Engineering Majors' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concannon, James P.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in women's engineering self-efficacy beliefs across grade levels in comparison to men's engineering self-efficacy (ESE) beliefs across grade levels. Data for this study was collected from 746 (635 men, 111 women) engineering students enrolled in a large research extensive university. Four major conclusions resulted…

  10. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  11. Parental Self-Efficacy and Bullying in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Esther Kweiki; Henrich, Christopher; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated associations of general and specific parental self-efficacy factors with bullying and peer victimization behaviors among 142 fourth and fifth graders and their parents. Using structural equation modeling, exploratory factor analysis was used to examine one general parenting self-efficacy measure and a bullying-specific…

  12. Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy in Digital Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an important motivational construct for primary school teachers (teachers of children aged 5-12 years) within Australia. Teacher self-efficacy beliefs will determine the level of teacher confidence and competence to engage with a task. In this study, we explore engagement with digital technology and the associated learning and…

  13. Self-efficacy, personal goals, social comparison and scientific productivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrugt, A.J.; Koenis, M.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which perceived self-efficacy, personal goals, and upward comparison predict the scientific productivity of academic staff members. 123 academic staff employed at different Dutch universities answered written questions about their judgment of self-efficacy in the area of

  14. Identifying events that impact self-efficacy in physics learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vashti Sawtelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method of analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time using a framework of self-efficacy opportunities (SEOs. Considerable research has shown a connection between self-efficacy, or the confidence in one’s own ability to perform a task, and success in science fields. Traditional methods of investigating the development of self-efficacy have required participants to recollect past events. This reliance on participant memory makes it difficult to understand what impact particular events may have on developing self-efficacy in the moment. We use video recordings of three undergraduate Modeling Instruction students solving a physics problem to characterize SEOs in a moment-by-moment analysis. We then validate these characterizations of the development of self-efficacy by reviewing the problem-solving session with the participants and find evidence that the SEOs identified are taken up and impact self-efficacy. This characterization and validation of SEOs in the moment represents a first step towards establishing a methodology for analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time.

  15. Study Skills Course Impact on Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernersbach, Brenna M.; Crowley, Susan L.; Bates, Scott C.; Rosenthal, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Although study skills courses improve student retention, the impact of study skills courses on students' academic self-efficacy has not been investigated. The present study examined pre- and posttest levels of academic self-efficacy in college students enrolled in a study skills course (n = 126) compared to students enrolled in a general education…

  16. Does Digital Game Interactivity Always Promote Self-Efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hao

    2015-11-01

    Interactive digital games can promote self-efficacy by engaging players in enactive and observational learning. However, interactivity does not always lead to greater self-efficacy. Important constructs in social cognitive theory, such as performance outcome and perceived similarity, are often not accounted for in studies that have tested the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. This study assessed the effects of interactive digital games compared with passive digital games based on video comparison, a common experimental design used to test the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. In addition, this study also evaluated player performance and measured perceived similarity to the observed player. Findings suggested that in general, digital game interactivity predicted higher self-efficacy compared with noninteractive passive games. However, in the noninteractive conditions, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were moderated by perceived similarity between the observer and the observed player. When the observed player was perceived to be similar to the observer, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were comparable to the interactive game, but when the observed player was perceived as dissimilar to the observer, observing the dissimilar player failed to increase observer self-efficacy. Implications for interactivity manipulations and game developers are discussed.

  17. Self-Efficacy and Burnout in Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between burnout and self-efficacy among school counselors. Also, the level of their burnout and self-efficacy was examined in terms of the social support, task perception and the number of students. A sample of 194 school counselors filled out the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The School Counselors…

  18. The Four Sources of Influence on Computer Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheila M.

    2001-01-01

    Using Bandura's four sources of influence on self-efficacy, 210 students rated their computer self-efficacy. Mastery experiences were most influential for white males; vicarious learning had the most influence for females and nonwhite students. (Contains 29 references.) (SK)

  19. Self-Efficacy and Academic Performance in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meera, K. P.; Jumana, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    This study reviews the relevant self-efficacy related literature, a central point of social cognitive theory, in the area of language learning. Role of self-efficacy in academic performance of learners is also considered. In the global world, English language has become the fundamental means of international affairs and communication. As a…

  20. Self-Efficacy in Second/Foreign Language Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoofi, Saeid; Tan, Bee Hoon; Chan, Swee Heng

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the empirical literature of self-efficacy, a central component of social cognitive theory, in the area of second language learning by focusing on two research questions: first, to what extent, has self-efficacy, as a predicting variable, been explored in the field of second language learning? Second, what factors affect…

  1. Teacher Effectiveness through Self-Efficacy, Collaboration and Principal Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Prachee; Nambudiri, Ranjeet; Mishra, Sushanta Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Teacher effectiveness has been a matter of concern not only for the parents and students but also for the policy makers, researchers, and educationists. Drawing from the "self-efficacy" theory (Bandura, 1977), the purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between teacher self-efficacy and teacher effectiveness. In…

  2. Neighborhood Processes, Self-Efficacy, and Adolescent Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupere, Veronique; Leventhal, Tama; Vitaro, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs are central to mental health. Because adolescents' neighborhoods shape opportunities for experiences of control, predictability, and safety, we propose that neighborhood conditions are associated with adolescents' self-efficacy and, in turn, their internalizing problems (i.e., depression/anxiety symptoms). We tested these…

  3. Creative Self-Efficacy Development and Creative Performance over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Pamela; Farmer, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Building from an established framework of self-efficacy development, this study provides a longitudinal examination of the development of creative self-efficacy in an ongoing work context. Results show that increases in employee creative role identity and perceived creative expectation from supervisors over a 6-month time period were associated…

  4. Comparative Influence of Self-Efficacy, Social Support and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, different psychosocial constructs are found in separate settings to ... 509 participants aged 35-80 years from randomly selected health facilities in ... Physical activity level, self-efficacy, social support and perceived barriers of the ... using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, ...

  5. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R.; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication…

  6. Teacher self-efficacy in cross-cultural perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieluf, S.; Kuenther, M.; van de Vijver, F.J.R.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, teacher self-efficacy was examined in a cross-national setting. The cross-national generalizability of the scale and the meaning of cross-national variation in mean scores were investigated. Using data from TALIS involving 73,100 teachers in 23 countries, teacher self-efficacy

  7. Early breastfeeding experiences influence parental self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunseler, F.C.; Hankel, M.A.; Balm, K.E.; Oosterman, M.; Schuengel, C.

    2012-01-01

    Parental self-efficacy (PSE) is defined as "the expectation caregivers hold about their ability to parent successfully" (Jones & Prinz, 2005, p. 342). According to Bandura (1977), self-efficacy is based on four sources, including ‘performance accomplishments’: if successful experiences are repeated

  8. Examining the Computer Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Gifted Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Abdullah; Öztürk, Mesut; Doruk, Muhammet; Yilmaz, Alper

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to determine the computer self-efficacy perceptions of gifted students. The research group of this study is composed of gifted students (N = 36) who were studying at the Science and Arts Center in Gümüshane province in the spring semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The "Computer Self-Efficacy Perception…

  9. The investigation of STEM Self-Efficacy and Professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    self-efficacy and professional commitment to engineering. A total of 88 students from a national girls' high school participated in STEM project-based learning. A survey questionnaire named The STEM Self-efficacy and Professional Commitment to Engineering Questionnaire, developed by the researchers, was ...

  10. Academic Self-Efficacy of High Achieving Students in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo-Lavadores, Ana Karen; Sánchez-Escobedo, Pedro; Pinto-Sosa, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore for differences in the academic self-efficacy of Mexican high school students. A gird questionnaire was administered to 1,460 students form private and public schools. As expected, high achieving students showed significantly higher academic self-efficacy that their peers. However, interesting gender…

  11. Teacher Self-Efficacy According to Turkish Cypriot Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmez, Cemil; Ozbas, Serap

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the self-efficacy of Turkish Cypriot science teachers working at high schools in Northern Cyprus. The study sample was 200 science teachers who participated in the survey. The Teacher Self-Efficacy (TSE) Scale was used as a data source. It was observed that the science teachers' efficacy beliefs about student engagement in…

  12. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. The Relationship of Self-Efficacy, Sensation Seeking and Coping Sterategies with Aptitude of Substance Use in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Kiamarsi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of the research was to determine relationship of coping sterategies, self-efficacy and sensation seeking with aptitude of substance use in the students. Method: The population of the study included students of Islamic Azad University Ardabil Branch. The research sample consisted of 313 students who were studying in Islamic Azad University Ardabil Branch. To collect the data Coping Sterategies scale, Sensation Seeking scale, Self-Efficacy inventory and Substance Use Aptitude scale were used. Data was analyzed using of Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression analyses. Findings: The result of Pearson correlation coefficients showed that self-efficacy, sensation seeking, emotin coping sterategies and problem solving coping sterategies related to aptitude substance use in students. The results of multiple regression analysis showed that self-efficacy, sensation seeking and coping sterategies explained 43 percent of variance of aptitude of substance use in students. Conclusion: The results indicated that self-efficacy, sensation seeking and coping sterategies are significant predictors in predicting of aptitude of substance use in adolescents. Clinicians can be used these results for prevention of substance abuse by training of effective coping strategies and promotion of self efficacy.

  14. The relationship between employment-related self-efficacy and quality of life following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Warshowsky, Adam; Ashman, Teresa A; Cantor, Joshua B; Spielman, Lisa; Gordon, Wayne A

    2009-08-01

    This study examines the relative contribution of employment-related and general self-efficacy to perceptions of quality of life (QoL) for individuals with traumatic brain injury. Correlational. Community-based research and training center. 427 individuals with self-reported TBI under the age of 65 were included in analysis. Employment-related self-efficacy, general self-efficacy, perceived quality of life (PQoL), unmet important needs (UIN). Significant correlations were found between income, injury severity, age at injury, and employment and the QoL variables. In addition, employment-related and general self-efficacy correlated positively with both PQoL and UIN. Employment-related and general self-efficacy accounted for 16% of the variance in PQoL and 9.5% of the variance in UIN, over and above other variables traditionally associated with QoL. These findings highlight the importance of including subjective appraisals of employment, such as perceived self-efficacy at the workplace, in assessing QoL and successful return to work following TBI. (c) 2009 APA

  15. The relationship between work-family conflict and the level of self-efficacy in female nurses in Alzahra Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghban, Iran; Malekiha, Marziyeh; Fatehizadeh, Maryam

    2010-01-01

    Work-family conflict has many negative outcomes for organization and career and family life of each person. The aim of present study was to determine the relationship between work-family conflict and the level of self-efficacy in female nurses. In this cross-sectional descriptive research, the relationship between work-family conflict and the level of self-efficacy in female nurses of Alzahra Hospital was assessed. Questionnaire, demographic data form, work-family conflict scale and self-efficacy scale were the data collection tools. Content analysis and Cronbach's alpha were used for evaluating the validity and reliability of questionnaire. The study sample included 160 nurses (80 permanent nurses and 80 contract-based nurses) selected through simple random sampling from nurses working in different wards of Alzahra Hospital. Data analysis was done using SPSS software. There was significant difference in work-family conflict between the two groups of permanent and contract-based nurses (p = 0.02). Also, a significant difference in the level of self-efficacy was observed between the two groups of nurses (p = 0.03). The level of self-efficacy and work-family conflict in contract-based nurses was not acceptable. Therefore, it is suggested to arrange courses to train effective skills in the field of management of work-family conflicts in order to increase the level of self-efficacy for contract-based nurses.

  16. Investigating the Relationship between Self-efficacy and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemical Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Moradi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding to the importance of self-efficacy and its impact on health-related behaviors, chronic disease management and quality of life, and limited studies in this field, present study tried to investigated the relationship between self-efficacy and quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy in the Seyed-o-shohda hospital (Isfahan/ Iran. Methods: This descriptive- correlational study was done in Isfahan Seyed-o-shohada hospital in 2014. Statistical population included all women who had received chemical therapy because of their breast cancer (N=130. 100 participants were selected through Cochran formula and systematic sampling. Data gathering instruments included Sherer's standard questionnaire of self-efficacy and W.H.O questionnaire of quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF. The data were analyzed with use of the descriptive statistics and Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, one-way ANOVA and Pearson Correlation in SPSS 18. Results: The average and Standard Deviation of both self-efficacy (11.00 ± 55.78 and quality of life (15.28 ± 75.91 were estimated on the average level. There was a direct meaningful relation between self-efficacy and quality of life efficiency. The results also showed that there is meaningful relation between self-efficacy and quality of life’s dimensions including physical health, mental health, social relations and satisfaction with the environment. Conclusion: Based on the significant positive relation found between self-efficacy and quality of life it’s recommended to hold some training courses for these patients, have a physiologist in chemotherapy department, and prepare more palliative care to raise the breast cancer patients’ self-efficacy which finally leads to a better quality of life.

  17. Effectiveness of Traditional Strength vs. Power Training on Muscle Strength, Power and Speed with Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, David G.; Young, James D.; Whitten, Joseph H. D.; Reid, Jonathan C.; Quigley, Patrick J.; Low, Jonathan; Li, Yimeng; Lima, Camila D.; Hodgson, Daniel D.; Chaouachi, Anis; Prieske, Olaf; Granacher, Urs

    2017-01-01

    Numerous national associations and multiple reviews have documented the safety and efficacy of strength training for children and adolescents. The literature highlights the significant training-induced increases in strength associated with youth strength training. However, the effectiveness of youth strength training programs to improve power measures is not as clear. This discrepancy may be related to training and testing specificity. Most prior youth strength training programs emphasized lower intensity resistance with relatively slow movements. Since power activities typically involve higher intensity, explosive-like contractions with higher angular velocities (e.g., plyometrics), there is a conflict between the training medium and testing measures. This meta-analysis compared strength (e.g., training with resistance or body mass) and power training programs (e.g., plyometric training) on proxies of muscle strength, power, and speed. A systematic literature search using a Boolean Search Strategy was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, SPORT Discus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and revealed 652 hits. After perusal of title, abstract, and full text, 107 studies were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed small to moderate magnitude changes for training specificity with jump measures. In other words, power training was more effective than strength training for improving youth jump height. For sprint measures, strength training was more effective than power training with youth. Furthermore, strength training exhibited consistently large magnitude changes to lower body strength measures, which contrasted with the generally trivial, small and moderate magnitude training improvements of power training upon lower body strength, sprint and jump measures, respectively. Maturity related inadequacies in eccentric strength and balance might influence the lack of training specificity with the unilateral

  18. Effectiveness of Traditional Strength vs. Power Training on Muscle Strength, Power and Speed with Youth: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Behm

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous national associations and multiple reviews have documented the safety and efficacy of strength training for children and adolescents. The literature highlights the significant training-induced increases in strength associated with youth strength training. However, the effectiveness of youth strength training programs to improve power measures is not as clear. This discrepancy may be related to training and testing specificity. Most prior youth strength training programs emphasized lower intensity resistance with relatively slow movements. Since power activities typically involve higher intensity, explosive-like contractions with higher angular velocities (e.g., plyometrics, there is a conflict between the training medium and testing measures. This meta-analysis compared strength (e.g., training with resistance or body mass and power training programs (e.g., plyometric training on proxies of muscle strength, power, and speed. A systematic literature search using a Boolean Search Strategy was conducted in the electronic databases PubMed, SPORT Discus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and revealed 652 hits. After perusal of title, abstract, and full text, 107 studies were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed small to moderate magnitude changes for training specificity with jump measures. In other words, power training was more effective than strength training for improving youth jump height. For sprint measures, strength training was more effective than power training with youth. Furthermore, strength training exhibited consistently large magnitude changes to lower body strength measures, which contrasted with the generally trivial, small and moderate magnitude training improvements of power training upon lower body strength, sprint and jump measures, respectively. Maturity related inadequacies in eccentric strength and balance might influence the lack of training specificity with

  19. Self-efficacy reduces the impact of social isolation on medical student's rural career intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Vivian; Pit, Sabrina Winona; McLachlan, Craig S

    2018-03-20

    Social isolation in medical students is a subjective experience that may influence medical career decision making. Rural self-efficacy has been shown to influence rural career intentions following a rural clinical placement, however its impact on social isolation during a rural clinical placement has not been previously modeled. The objective of this study is to explore whether self-perception of social isolation is associated with rural career intent in rural medical students. Secondly, to determine whether self-efficacy influences the association between social isolation and rural career intent. 2015 data, from a cross-sectional survey of the National Federation of Rural Australian Medical Educators (FRAME) study. Among 619 medical students attending rural clinical schools (RCS), rural career intent was assessed. This included intended rural location for either postgraduate medical specialist or generalist training or completion of that training. Self-efficacy beliefs in rural medical practice were based on a validated scale consisting of six questions. Social isolation was measured asking students whether they felt socially isolated during their RCS placement. 31.3% of surveyed students self-reported feeling socially isolated during their rural placement. Social isolation was associated with reduced rural career intent after controlling for gender, rural background, RCS preference, RCS support and wellbeing. In step-wise logistic regression the association between social isolation and rural intent disappeared with the inclusion of rural self-efficacy. Social isolation during a rural clinical placement is commonly reported and is shown to reduce rural career intent. High levels of rural clinical self-efficacy reduce the effects of social isolation on future rural workforce intentions.

  20. Effect of Positive Training on Positive Psychological States (Character Strengths of Female High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Farnam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available psychological states of female students in second and third grades of high school. The research method was quasi-experimental with pre-test, post-test and follow-up. The sample consisted of forty students selected randomly in two groups (twenty students in each group. To collect data, Positive Psychological State Inventory (Rajaei, Khuy Nzhad and Nesaei was used. The experimental group received ninety minute positive training sessions (for two months and the control group did not receive treatment. The results of analysis  of covariance showed that positive training had positive effects on positive psychological states (trust in God, optimism, self-efficacy, duty, sense of control, targeted, hope, satisfaction with life, meaningful life, pleasant, sociability, self-esteem and self-worth, sense of peace, gratitude, and forgiveness among adolescents  both in the post  and follow-up tests

  1. Association of self-efficacy of parents/caregivers with childhood asthma control parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Araújo Gomes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To verify the association between the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers and control parameters of childhood asthma. Method Cross-sectional study with parents/caregivers of asthmatic children. Data were collected through a sociodemographic questionnaire and the Self-efficacy and their child’s level of asthma control scale: Brazilian version. Results Participation of 216 parents/caregivers in the study. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy scores and the following variables: unscheduled physician visit (p=0.001, visit to emergency department (p<0.001, hospital stays in the previous 12 months (p=0.005, physical activity limitation (p=0.003, school days missed (p<0.001, impaired sleep (p<0.001, ability to differentiate crisis medication from control medication (p=0.024, use of spacer (p=0.001, performing oral hygiene after use of inhaled corticosteroids (p=0.003, and knowledge of medication gratuity (p=0.004. Conclusion A significant relationship of the self-efficacy of parents/caregivers of asthmatic children with control parameters and training on the necessary skills to reach this control was demonstrated in the study.

  2. Heart Failure and Exercise: A Narrative Review of the Role of Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Francis J; Hare, David L; Cameron, James D; Toukhsati, Samia R

    2018-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a common, debilitating condition associated with significant health and economic burden. CHF management is multidisciplinary, however, achieving better health relies on a collaborative effort and patient engagement in self-care. Despite the importance of self-care in CHF, many patients have poor adherence to their medical and lifestyle regimens, in particular with regards to engaging in physical exercise. The patient's confidence in their ability, otherwise known as self-efficacy, is an important determinant of CHF health outcomes, most likely due to its effect on the uptake of CHF self-care activities especially exercise initiation and maintenance. Self-efficacy is responsive to experience such as exercise training, however the critical components of exercise interventions to improve self-efficacy have yet to be determined. This narrative review provides an overview of the role of self-efficacy in exercise adherence in CHF. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Student’s mathematical understanding ability based on self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdhani, M. R.; Usodo, B.; Subanti, S.

    2017-11-01

    Materials in mathematics are provided not only as an ability to memorize, but also to train the ability of mathematical understanding. Students’ mathematical understanding ability is influenced by the students’ belief in solving the given problems. This research aim to determine the mathematical understanding ability of junior high school students. This research is descriptive qualitative research. Data collection was done through a test, questionnaire, and interview. The result showed that students with high self-efficacy category could master the three indicators of students’ mathematical understanding ability well, namely translation, interpretation, and exploration. Students with moderate self-efficacy category can master translation indicator and able to achieve interpretation indicator but they unable to reach exploration indicator. Students with low self-efficacy category only master the translation, but they cannot achieve the interpretation and exploration indicators. So, the students who have high, moderate or low self-efficacy master the indicator of mathematical understanding based on the level of understanding capabilities on each student.

  4. Measuring and Supporting Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy towards Computers, Teaching, and Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killi, Carita; Kauppinen, Merja; Coiro, Julie; Utriainen, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on two studies designed to examine pre-service teachers' self-efficacy beliefs. Study I investigated the measurement properties of a self-efficacy beliefs questionnaire comprising scales for computer self-efficacy, teacher self-efficacy, and self-efficacy towards technology integration. In Study I, 200 pre-service teachers…

  5. Examining the Relationship between Referee Self-Efficacy and General Self-Efficacy Levels of Football, Basketball and Handball Referees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaçam, Aydin; Pulur, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between referee self-efficacy and general self-efficacy levels of football, basketball and handball referees in terms of gender, refereeing branch, age and refereeing experience. Study group was created within a convenience sampling method. 195 referees, 14% (n = 27) female and 86% (n = 168)…

  6. Resources of Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Perception of Science Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Deniz; Bozdag, Hüseyin Cihan

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the predictive power of mathematics self-efficacy resources and perception of science self-efficacy on academic achievement. The study, adopting a relational screening model, was conducted with a total of 698 students in sixth, seventh and eighth grade level of a state secondary school. Mathematics…

  7. Safety of strength training in premenopausal women: musculoskeletal injuries from a two-year randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Meghan; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2009-01-01

    The health benefits of strength training must be weighed against risks, including injuries. A prior study observed 4.2 injuries that limited usual activities for a day per 1000 strength training sessions among men and women. The analysis herein explores the incidence rates of musculoskeletal injuries from strength training in women. Randomized controlled trial. SETTING; Free-living community. A total of 163 injury-free, overweight, sedentary, premenopausal women aged 25 to 44 years. Two years of strength training (n = 81) or standard care (n = 82). The intervention followed published guidelines (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) with hypothesized injury prevention strategies. An injury survey was administered at years 1 and 2. Injury was defined as physical activity or strength training associated injuries that limited daily activities for 1 week or more. Denominators for rate calculation were accelerometer-measured physical activity and strength training attendance (strength training only). The between-group probability of injuries was assessed using generalized estimating equations. Injury incidence rates were higher in strength training compared with standard care. In strength training, the injury rates were 3.6 per 1000 strength training sessions (95% confidence interval: 2.5-4.8 per 1000) for physical activity-related injuries, and 2.6 per 1000 (95% confidence interval: 1.5-3.6 per 1000) for strength training-related injuries. Injury rates varied by definition and denominator. Strength training had lower injury rates than previously reported, providing preliminary support for the prevention strategies. The finding of strength training injuries underscores the need for balancing the benefits against the potential risks of this exercise modality.

  8. Does progressive resistance strength training as additional training have any measured effect on functional outcomes in older hospitalized patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, Sigrid; Andersen, Christina W.; Pedersen, Sigrid F

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of progressive resistance strength training as additional training measured on functional outcomes in older hospitalized patients. DESIGN: A single-blinded randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Department of Geriatric Rehabilitation in university hospital...

  9. DOES COMBINED DRY LAND STRENGTH AND AEROBIC TRAINING INHIBIT PERFORMANCE OF YOUNG COMPETITIVE SWIMMERS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Garrido

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study was twofold: (i to examine the effects of eight weeks of combined dry land strength and aerobic swimming training for increasing upper and lower body strength, power and swimming performance in young competitive swimmers and, (ii to assess the effects of a detraining period (strength training cessation on strength and swimming performance. The participants were divided into two groups: an experimental group (eight boys and four girls and a control group (six boys and five girls. Apart from normal practice sessions (six training units per week of 1 h and 30 min per day, the experimental group underwent eight weeks (two sessions per week of strength training. The principal strength exercises were the bench press, the leg extension, and two power exercises such as countermovement jump and medicine ball throwing. Immediately following this strength training program, all the swimmers undertook a 6 week detraining period, maintaining the normal swimming program, without any strength training. Swimming (25 m and 50 m performances, and hydrodynamic drag values, and strength (bench press and leg extension and power (throwing medicine ball and countermovement jump performances were tested in three moments: (i before the experimental period, (ii after eight weeks of combined strength and swimming training, and (iii after the six weeks of detraining period. Both experimental and control groups were evaluated. A combined strength and aerobic swimming training allow dry land strength developments in young swimmers. The main data can not clearly state that strength training allowed an enhancement in swimming performance, although a tendency to improve sprint performance due to strength training was noticed. The detraining period showed that, although strength parameters remained stable, swimming performance still improved

  10. Burrowing as a novel voluntary strength training method for mice: A comparison of various voluntary strength or resistance exercise methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemers, P; Mazzola, P N; De Deyn, P P; Bossers, W J; van Heuvelen, M J G; van der Zee, E A

    2018-04-15

    Voluntary strength training methods for rodents are necessary to investigate the effects of strength training on cognition and the brain. However, few voluntary methods are available. The current study tested functional and muscular effects of two novel voluntary strength training methods, burrowing (digging a substrate out of a tube) and unloaded tower climbing, in male C57Bl6 mice. To compare these two novel methods with existing exercise methods, resistance running and (non-resistance) running were included. Motor coordination, grip strength and muscle fatigue were measured at baseline, halfway through and near the end of a fourteen week exercise intervention. Endurance was measured by an incremental treadmill test after twelve weeks. Both burrowing and resistance running improved forelimb grip strength as compared to controls. Running and resistance running increased endurance in the treadmill test and improved motor skills as measured by the balance beam test. Post-mortem tissue analyses revealed that running and resistance running induced Soleus muscle hypertrophy and reduced epididymal fat mass. Tower climbing elicited no functional or muscular changes. As a voluntary strength exercise method, burrowing avoids the confounding effects of stress and positive reinforcers elicited in forced strength exercise methods. Compared to voluntary resistance running, burrowing likely reduces the contribution of aerobic exercise components. Burrowing qualifies as a suitable voluntary strength training method in mice. Furthermore, resistance running shares features of strength training and endurance (aerobic) exercise and should be considered a multi-modal aerobic-strength exercise method in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Situated Self-efficacy in Introductory Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rachel; DeVore, Seth; Michaluk, Lynnette; Stewart, John

    2017-01-01

    Within the general university environment, students' perceived self-efficacy has been widely studied and findings suggest it plays a role in student success. The current research adapted a self-efficacy survey, from the ``Self-Efficacy for Learning Performance'' subscale of the Motivated Learning Strategies Questionnaire and administered it to the introductory, calculus-based physics classes (N=1005) over the fall 2015 and spring 2016 semesters. This assessment measured students' self-efficacy in domains including the physics class, other science and mathematics classes, and their intended future career. The effect of gender was explored with the only significant gender difference (p gender difference was not explained by a student's performance which was measured by test average. However, a mediation analysis showed that students' overall academic self-efficacy, measured by their math and science self-efficacy, acts as a mediator for the effect of test average on self-efficacy towards the physics class domain. This mediation effect was significant for both female (p < . 01) and male students (p < . 001) however, it was more pronounced for male students.

  12. Effects of Self-Efficacy on Students’ Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alay Ahmad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Earlier studies show an effect of self-efficacy on students’ learning and achievement. Self efficacy has operationally defined as one’s belief that people can successfully perform a given task. The main purpose of the paper is to discuss how self-efficacy developed and the way it influences students’ academic performance in addition to social interaction with peers. A scenario was given to Pakistani high school students by solving mathematical problems. Present study was designed to study the impact of self-efficacy on 15 boys, students of the 5th grade of a local school. Hague’s (1990 Urdu Self-efficacy scale was administered. It was found that students with high self-efficacy obtained higher scores on 50 mathematical problems test. Further, content analysis of interviewees’ responses showed that students with high self-efficacy planned to study complex subjects in future. A cross-cultural study is strongly recommended in this issue that determines the students’ future.

  13. Breastfeeding Self-efficacy: A Critical Review of Available Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Emily L.; McGrath, Jacqueline M.; Graber, Melanie; Cusson, Regina M.; Young, Sera L.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing breastfeeding rates in the United States is a national priority. Yet, initiation and duration of breastfeeding remains below national targets. Breastfeeding self-efficacy has been shown to be a strong predictor of both breastfeeding initiation and duration and is therefore an important characteristic to be able to measure. However, there is currently a myriad of instruments for measuring breastfeeding self-efficacy, which makes selection of an appropriate instrument difficult. Thus, our aim was to identify, compare, and critically review available breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments. In a systematic review, 6 breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments were identified. The instruments’ purposes, theoretical framework, final scale development, and application in 5 most recent settings were analyzed. The 6 breastfeeding self-efficacy instruments apply a number of theoretical and conceptual frameworks in their development, with Bandura’s social cognitive theory being most common. Content, construct, and predictive validity were strong for most scales. Some, but not all, have been successfully adapted to novel settings. In sum, there are several measurements of breastfeeding self-efficacy that can and should be employed to better understand reasons for suboptimal breastfeeding rates and the effects of interventions on breastfeeding self-efficacy. Instrument selection should be based on domains of primary interest, time available, peripartum timing, and assessment of previous adaptations. Failure to apply appropriate measures in research may garner results that are inconclusive, inaccurate, or nonrepresentative of true study effects. PMID:26319113

  14. Individual responses to combined endurance and strength training in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavirta, Laura; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kauhanen, Antti; Arija-Blázquez, Alfredo; Sillanpää, Elina; Rinkinen, Niina; Häkkinen, Arja

    2011-03-01

    A combination of endurance and strength training is generally used to seek further health benefits or enhanced physical performance in older adults compared with either of the training modes alone. The mean change within a training group, however, may conceal a wide range of individual differences in the responses. The purpose, therefore, was to examine the individual trainability of aerobic capacity and maximal strength, when endurance and strength training are performed separately or concurrently. For this study, 175 previously untrained volunteers, 89 men and 86 women between the ages of 40 and 67 yr, completed a 21-wk period of either strength training (S) twice a week, endurance training (E) twice a week, combined training (ES) four times per week, or served as controls. Training adaptations were quantified as peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in a bicycle ergometer test to exhaustion and maximal isometric bilateral leg extension force (MVC) in a dynamometer. A large range in training responses, similar to endurance or strength training alone, was also observed with combined endurance and strength training in both ΔVO2peak (from -8% to 42%) and ΔMVC (from -12% to 87%). There were no significant correlations between the training responses in VO2peak and MVC in the E, S, or especially in the ES group, suggesting that the same subjects did not systematically increase both aerobic capacity and maximal strength. The goal of combined endurance and strength training--increasing both aerobic capacity and maximal strength simultaneously--was only achieved by some of the older subjects. New means are needed to personalize endurance, strength, and especially combined endurance and strength training programs for optimal individual adaptations.

  15. Effects of different strength training frequencies on maximum strength, body composition and functional capacity in healthy older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpela, Mari; Häkkinen, Keijo; Haff, Guy Gregory; Walker, Simon

    2017-11-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding the dose-response relationship of strength training in healthy older participants. The present study determined training frequency effects on maximum strength, muscle mass and functional capacity over 6months following an initial 3-month preparatory strength training period. One-hundred and six 64-75year old volunteers were randomly assigned to one of four groups; performing strength training one (EX1), two (EX2), or three (EX3) times per week and a non-training control (CON) group. Whole-body strength training was performed using 2-5 sets and 4-12 repetitions per exercise and 7-9 exercises per session. Before and after the intervention, maximum dynamic leg press (1-RM) and isometric knee extensor and plantarflexor strength, body composition and quadriceps cross-sectional area, as well as functional capacity (maximum 7.5m forward and backward walking speed, timed-up-and-go test, loaded 10-stair climb test) were measured. All experimental groups increased leg press 1-RM more than CON (EX1: 3±8%, EX2: 6±6%, EX3: 10±8%, CON: -3±6%, Ptraining frequency would induce greater benefit to maximum walking speed (i.e. functional capacity) despite a clear dose-response in dynamic 1-RM strength, at least when predominantly using machine weight-training. It appears that beneficial functional capacity improvements can be achieved through low frequency training (i.e. 1-2 times per week) in previously untrained healthy older participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Improving the collective self-efficacy of the teams of nurse trainers at IFSI through professional didactics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to show that the analysis of the activity is a factor of construction of the collective self-efficacy of the trainers of five training institutes in nursing care (IFSI). As a collective system of beliefs on the capacity of the group to attain its goals, self-efficacy finds its foundations in the sociocognitive theory which articulates, within a mutual triadic causality, the personal, behavioral and environmental factors of the human agentivity. The personal determiners (self-efficacy, cognitive organization of the activity) are put in connection with the behavioral (production of the performance) and environmental (attribution of skill, professional tasks and standards) factors. The intervention consisted in introducing one hundred and nine nurse trainers to work analysis in a context of hospital reforms. The collective self-efficacy of the trainers appears as a key variable of the success of these reforms. The collective self-efficacy was the object of a pre-test and a qualitative post-test on the basis of motivational indicators, of the effectiveness of the educational realizations to the students and the estimation of the performance of the group to conduct the reform. The level of collective self-efficacy increases and the first realizations maintain the belief of the trainers in their capacity to succeed collectively in the implementation of the training plan. This is the first research in France which shows that the analysis of the activity comes along with an increase of the collective self-efficacy in work. These results question the practices of the trainers beyond the paramedical sector alone.

  17. Instructional design considerations promoting engineering design self-efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew M.

    Engineering design activities are frequently included in technology and engineering classrooms. These activities provide an open-ended context for practicing critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and innovation---collectively part of the 21st Century Skills which are increasingly needed for success in the workplace. Self-efficacy is a perceptual belief that impacts learning and behavior. It has been shown to directly impact each of these 21st Century Skills but its relation to engineering design is only recently being studied. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructional considerations made when implementing engineering design activities might affect student self-efficacy outcomes in a middle school engineering classroom. Student responses to two self-efficacy inventories related to design, the Engineering Design Self-Efficacy Instrument and Creative Thinking Self-Efficacy Inventory, were collected before and after participation in an engineering design curriculum. Students were also answered questions on specific factors of their experience during the curriculum which teachers may exhibit control over: teamwork and feedback. Results were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients, paired and independent t-tests, and structural equation modeling to better understand patterns for self-efficacy beliefs in students. Results suggested that design self-efficacy and creative thinking self-efficacy are significantly correlated, r(1541) = .783, p classroom strategies for increasing self-efficacy and given specific recommendations related to teamwork and feedback to support students. Finally, although there were weaknesses in the study related to the survey administration, future research opportunities are presented which may build from this work.

  18. Relationship among practice change, motivation, and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Betsy W; Kessler, Harold A; Williams, Michael V

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between an individual's sense of self-efficacy, motivation to change, and the implementation of improvement programs has been reported. This research reports the relationship among self-efficacy, motivation to change, and intent to implement continuing medical education (CME) activity learnings. The measure of individual sense of self-efficacy was a 4-item scale. The measure of motivation was a 4-item scale following on the work of Johnson, et al. The self-efficacy scale has been confirmed for structure, and together the 2 scales provide indicators of 3 underlying variables-2 self-efficacy constructs and a motivation variable. In addition, a global intent to implement measure was collected. Preliminary analysis demonstrates a significant relationship between a self-efficacy construct, the motivation to change construct, and global intent to change. Specifically, the sense of efficacy in effecting change in the practice environment is predictive of a high level of motivation to change, which, in turn, is predictive of formation of an intent to change practice patterns. Further inspection of the motivation to change construct suggests that it mediates the self-efficacy constructs' effect on intent. This is consistent with an earlier report on the relationship among self-efficacy, barriers to change, and stated intent. This new finding suggests that the proximal construct motivation completely masks an important underlying causal relationship that appears to contribute to practice change following CME: self-efficacy. A focus on the participants' sense of self-agency may provide a path to practice change. © 2014 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  19. The corticospinal responses of metronome-paced, but not self-paced strength training are similar to motor skill training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Michael; Rantalainen, Timo; Teo, Wei-Peng; Kidgell, Dawson

    2017-12-01

    The corticospinal responses to skill training may be different to strength training, depending on how the strength training is performed. It was hypothesised that the corticospinal responses would not be different following skill training and metronome-paced strength training (MPST), but would differ when compared with self-paced strength training (SPST). Corticospinal excitability, short-interval intra-cortical inhibition (SICI) and strength and tracking error were measured at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks. Participants (n = 44) were randomly allocated to visuomotor tracking, MPST, SPST or a control group. MPST increased strength by 7 and 18%, whilst SPST increased strength by 12 and 26% following 2 and 4 weeks of strength training. There were no changes in strength following skill training. Skill training reduced tracking error by 47 and 58% at 2 and 4 weeks. There were no changes in tracking error following SPST; however, tracking error reduced by 24% following 4 weeks of MPST. Corticospinal excitability increased by 40% following MPST and by 29% following skill training. There was no change in corticospinal excitability following 4 weeks of SPST. Importantly, the magnitude of change between skill training and MPST was not different. SICI decreased by 41 and 61% following 2 and 4 weeks of MPST, whilst SICI decreased by 41 and 33% following 2 and 4 weeks of skill training. Again, SPST had no effect on SICI at 2 and 4 weeks. There was no difference in the magnitude of SICI reduction between skill training and MPST. This study adds new knowledge regarding the corticospinal responses to skill and MPST, showing they are similar but different when compared with SPST.

  20. Resistance training and aerobic training improve muscle strength and aerobic capacity in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvardsen, Lars H; Overgaard, Kristian; Heje, Karen; Sindrup, Søren H; Christiansen, Ingelise; Vissing, John; Andersen, Henning

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the effects of aerobic and resistance exercise in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Eighteen CIDP patients treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin performed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 12 weeks of resistance exercise after a run-in period of 12 weeks without exercise. Three times weekly the participants performed aerobic exercise on an ergometer bike or resistance exercise with unilateral training of knee and elbow flexion/extension. Primary outcomes were maximal oxygen consumption velocity (VO 2 -max) and maximal combined isokinetic muscle strength (cIKS) of knee and elbow flexion/extension. VO 2 -max and muscle strength were unchanged during run-in (-4.9% ± 10.3%, P = 0.80 and -3.7% ± 10.1%, P = 0.17, respectively). Aerobic exercise increased VO 2 -max by 11.0% ± 14.7% (P = 0.02). Resistance exercise resulted in an increase of 13.8% ± 16.0% (P = 0.0004) in cIKS. Aerobic exercise training and resistance exercise training improve fitness and strength in CIDP patients. Muscle Nerve 57: 70-76, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Exercise self-efficacy intervention in overweight and obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jude

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of a brief tailored intervention on self-efficacy beliefs and exercise energy expenditure in active and inactive overweight and obese women. Participants were randomly assigned to either control (N = 50) or intervention (N = 47) conditions, and their exercise self-efficacy was assessed three times over a 12-week period. Results showed that the intervention increased schedule, physical, exercise-worries efficacy, and energy expenditure in the previously inactive group. The results suggest that self-efficacy interventions are effective at increasing exercise energy expenditure in inactive overweight and obese women. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. KETERKAITAN SELF EFFICACY DAN SELF ESTEEM TERHADAP PRESTASI BELAJAR MAHASISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofwan Adiputra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to measure the relationship between self-efficacy and self-esteem on student achievement. The research was conducted using quantitative descriptive analysis by the method of field research, which is conducted by survey to respondents. To analyze the data using correlational analysis techniques and multiple regression analysis techniques. The conclusion from this study showed that the relationship of self-efficacy and self-esteem on learning achievement. Keywords: Self Efficacy, Self Esteem, Achievement

  3. University students’ self-efficacy and achievement in derivative concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kula Fulya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current study was to explore the relationship between self-efficacy and achievement in the derivative concept in university level. University students from education, engineering and science faculties attended the study. 1660 students’ data were gathered and the study has demonstrated that the there is a moderate and positive relationship between university students’ self-efficacy levels and their achievement in derivative concept. It is suggested that university level students’ self-efficacy levels be addressed when considering their achievement in the derivative concept.

  4. Improved Walking Capacity and Muscle Strength After Functional Power-Training in Young Children With Cerebral Palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vulpen, Liesbeth F; de Groot, Sonja; Rameckers, Eugene; Becher, Jules G; Dallmeijer, Annet J

    Background. Strength training programs for children with cerebral palsy (CP) showed inconclusive evidence for improving walking, despite improvements in strength. Recent studies have suggested that strength training with high movement velocity is more effective for improving walking than traditional

  5. Muscular strength after different types of training in physically active patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlberg, M.; Svantesson, U.; Magnusson, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Physical training is important in the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Optimal types of training and intensity are unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect on muscular strength after 6 months of endurance training (ET) and/or resistance training (RT). Twenty patients....... Vitamin E and cytokines were analyzed. Fifteen tests of muscular strength were used. Handgrip strength in females and quadriceps strength in males were significantly decreased compared with healthy age- and sex-matched controls and positively associated with lung function. Sixteen patients completed...

  6. The role of self-efficacy and assertiveness in aggression among high-school students in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi Mofrad, S H; Mehrabi, T

    2015-01-01

    Background. Nowadays, one sixth of the world's population is represented by adolescents, nearly 1.2 billion people being of age 10-19. According to the 2011 census in Iran, the estimation of adolescent population was 12 million, which represents 16% of the Iran population. Undoubtedly, adolescence is the most dominant stage of life. During this period, adolescents face biological, cognitive, and emotional changes that may be accompanied by inappropriate behavioral responses such as aggression. Considering pressures of peer groups during adolescence, assertiveness has an important role as a social skill. It seems that the success of adolescents in dealing with these problems depends on their self-efficacy. This study was designed to explore the role of self-efficacy and assertiveness in aggression among high-school students. Material and methods. This cross-sectional and correlational study was conducted among 321 first grade high-school students during 2014 and 2015. Samples were extracted from six education and training regions by a multi-stage random sampling. In this study, the questionnaire included demographic, Rathus Assertiveness, self-efficacy for children and aggression data. Results. The results showed that there was a notable negative association between aggression and assertiveness (p assertiveness and self-efficacy resulted in a decrease of aggression. So, training was recommended to reinforce self-efficacy beliefs and assertiveness behaviors for mental health promotion.

  7. Self-Efficacy in Social Work: Development and Initial Validation of the Self-Efficacy Scale for Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Pedrazza

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-efficacy beliefs do not reflect a generic sense of competence, but are instead context-specific. Therefore, self-efficacy should be assessed by using an ad hoc scale measuring individual behaviors that allows social workers to exercise influence over events that affect their work life. The present study describes the development and initial validation of the self-efficacy scale for social workers (SESSW. Items were generated through the Critical Incident Technique. Sixteen social workers with at least 10 years of service participated in two focus groups; they were asked to recall critical incidents in their work and to indicate the most effective behaviors to manage the incidents. Content analysis of the focus group transcripts provided 13 key self-efficacy beliefs. The 13-item scale was validated with a sample of 805 social workers. Data were analyzed using a split-sample technique. Exploratory factor analysis on the first split sample (n = 402 revealed three dimensions of self-efficacy, corresponding to emotion regulation, support request, and procedural self-efficacy. The three-factor structure of the scale was further confirmed with confirmatory factor analysis on the second split sample (n = 403. Our results show that SESSW is an adequate instrument for assessment of self-efficacy beliefs in social work.

  8. Motor skill training and strength training are associated with different plastic changes in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Marstrand, Peter C.D.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Changes in corticospinal excitability induced by 4 wk of heavy strength training or visuomotor skill learning were investigated in 24 healthy human subjects. Measurements of the input-output relation for biceps brachii motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation...... decreased significantly at rest but not during contraction in the strength-trained subjects (P = 0.01). No significant changes were observed in a control group. A significant correlation between changes in neurophysiological parameters and motor performance was observed for skill learning but not strength...... were obtained at rest and during voluntary contraction in the course of the training. The training paradigms induced specific changes in the motor performance capacity of the subjects. The strength training group increased maximal dynamic and isometric muscle strength by 31% (P

  9. Impact determination of strength and resistance training on Glycoside hemoglobin and blood sugar on patients with type II diabetes”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Hasanvand

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: This study shows that endurance training reduces Glycoside hemoglobin levels, the amount of strength training, although it did not significantly reduce, the strength training appears to cause more significant changes.

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Perceived Self-Efficacy in English Use on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    consisting of two Universities, two Polytechnics, two Colleges of Education and one. School of Nursing. ... 12 No 2, March, 2017 82. INTRODUCTION ..... Park, & Baek, 2011) found self-efficacy .... Oxford: Oxford University Press. Facione, P.

  11. Teachers' Self-efficacy Beliefs: The Relationship between Gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faculty of Education and Communication Sciences, College of Technology .... low self-esteem and harbour pessimistic thoughts concerning their ability to ... Thus, teachers' perceived self-efficacy is not an assessment of their skill set, but ...

  12. relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Many studies have been conducted on self-efficacy and academic achievement but ... efficacy beliefs affect how people approach new challenges and will contribute to ..... In addition, three psychology instructors critically assessed and ...

  13. Approaching Environmental Sustainability: Perceptions of Self-Efficacy and Changeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Nicola S; Bhullar, Navjot

    2017-04-03

    This paper describes a model focused on the role of self-efficacy and belief in changeability of behavior in motivating environmentally sustainable behavior. The model was tested in two studies. The first study found that participants who had greater self-efficacy for sustainability behavior and a greater belief in their changeability of sustainability behavior had a higher level of approach motivation toward sustainability behavior and reported more such actual behavior. The second study investigated the effect of brief interventions intended to increase perception of self-efficacy for sustainability-related purchasing and changeability of sustainability-related purchasing. The intervention that focused on enhancing self-efficacy for making sustainability-related purchases had the strongest impact on intention to purchase. These findings have implications for interventions intended to change behavior related to environmental sustainability.

  14. Systematic review on strength training in Parkinson’s disease: an unsolved question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazzina I

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ileana Ramazzina,1 Benedetta Bernazzoli,2 Cosimo Costantino1 1Department of Biomedical, Biotechnological and Translational Sciences, 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Graduate School of Rehabilitation and Physical Medicine, University of Parma, Parma, Italy Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of strength training, performed against a different resistance from body weight, in improving motor and nonmotor symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. The following electronic databases were searched: PubMed, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, and Web of Science. The review was conducted and reported in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Thirteen high-quality randomized controlled trials were included. Strength training performed against external resistance is well tolerated and appears to be a suitable physical activity to improve both physical parameters and quality of life parameters of PD subjects. However, although the study intervention included strength training, only a few selected studies assessed the improvement of muscle strength. Despite the encouraging results, it is difficult to establish a correlation between strength training and the improvements made. Our review highlights the lack of common intent in terms of study design and the presence of different primary and secondary outcomes. Accordingly, further studies are needed to support the beneficial effects of different types of strength training in PD subjects and to underline the superiority of strength training in PD patients with respect to other training. Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, strength training, muscle strength

  15. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Klaus; Keiner, Michael; Hartmann, Hagen; Sander, Andre; Mickel, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ± 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ± 8.9 kg) joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were the parallel barbell squat and the leg press. Before and after the training period, the 1-repetition-maximum in the barbell squat and the leg press, the squat jump, the countermovement jump and unilateral isometric force (maximal isometric force and the rate of force development) were evaluated. To compare each group pre vs. post-intervention, analysis of variance with repeated measures and Scheffé post-hoc tests were used. The leg press group increased their 1-repetition-maximum significantly (p squat group such variables as 1-repetition-maximum, the squat jump and the countermovement jump increased significantly (p squat group even showed a statistically significant decrease. Differences between the 2 experimental groups were detected for the squat jump and the countermovement jump. In comparison with the leg press, the squat might be a better strength training exercise for the development of jump performance.

  16. Impact of expiratory strength training in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowman, Emily K; Watts, Stephanie A; Tabor, Lauren; Robison, Raele; Gaziano, Joy; Domer, Amanda S; Richter, Joel; Vu, Tuan; Gooch, Clifton

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and impact of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) on respiratory and bulbar function in persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Twenty-five ALS patients participated in this delayed intervention open-label clinical trial. Following a lead-in period, patients completed a 5-week EMST protocol. Outcome measures included: maximum expiratory pressure (MEP); physiologic measures of swallow and cough; and penetration-aspiration scale (PAS) scores. Of participants who entered the active phase of the study (n = 15), EMST was well tolerated and led to significant increases in MEPs and maximum hyoid displacement during swallowing post-EMST (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed for PAS scores or cough spirometry measures. EMST was feasible and well tolerated in this small cohort of ALS patients and led to improvements in expiratory force-generating pressures and swallow kinematics. Further investigation is warranted to confirm these preliminary findings. Muscle Nerve 54: 48-53, 2016. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Keterkaitan Self Efficacy Dan Self Esteem Terhadap Prestasi Belajar Mahasiswa

    OpenAIRE

    Adiputra, Sofwan

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to measure the relationship between self-efficacy and self-esteem on student achievement. The research was conducted using quantitative descriptive analysis by the method of field research, which is conducted by survey to respondents. To analyze the data using correlational analysis techniques and multiple regression analysis techniques. The conclusion from this study showed that the relationship of self-efficacy and self-esteem on learning achievement.

  18. Electronic mail : attitudes, self-efficacy, and effective communication

    OpenAIRE

    Kandies, Jerry T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to investigate the functional use of e-mail in a university setting and the relationship of attitudes toward and self-efficacy with email technology, and (b) to evaluate writing effectiveness in an electronic medium. The study also sought to determine if certain personal characteristics could serve as predictor variables for explaining e-mail use, attitudes toward email, and self-efficacy with e-mail technology. The population of inter...

  19. Relationships among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction in Korean nurses working in the emergency medical center setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Sook; Jeoung, Yeonok; Lee, Hye Kyung; Sok, Sohyune R

    2015-06-01

    The communication competence of nurses working in emergency medical center settings is essential to establish a therapeutic nurse-patient relationship. Education and strategic development are required to improve the communication competence of emergency room (ER) nurses. This study was conducted to determine the relationships among individual communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction in Korean nurses in the emergency medical center setting. A cross-sectional descriptive design was adopted. The study sample included 214 nurses at 11 emergency medical centers in Seoul and Kyunggi-Do, Korea. Measures used included the Global Interpersonal Communication Competence, self-efficacy scale, and job satisfaction scale. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS version 18.0 statistical software program and included descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage, mean, standard deviation, independent t test, analysis of variance, and Pearson's correlation coefficient). The degrees of communication competence and self-efficacy of ER nurses were good, with higher scores than the median values. However, the degree of job satisfaction was poor, indicating a lower score than the median value. Religious affiliation and previous participation in communication education each had a significant impact on communication competence. Religious affiliation and time of worse duty each had a significant impact on self-efficacy. Length of career (year) in the emergency medical center and type of hospital each had a significant impact on job satisfaction. Positive correlations were identified among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction. This study supported the presence of significant correlations among communication competence, self-efficacy, and job satisfaction. Thus, it is necessary to develop training programs that are customized to individual characteristics such as self-efficacy and job satisfaction to improve the communicative competence

  20. Development of the rubric self-efficacy scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perihan Güneş

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a valid and reliable measurement tool determining teachers’ self-efficacy regarding rubrics. Especially in educational environments, rubrics are measurement tools used in the assessment phase of student products usually based on higher-order thinking skills. Determination of teachers’ self-efficacy regarding rubrics can give researchers an idea on how often and how accurately teachers use such tools.  For this reason, the existence of a tool accurately measuring self-efficacy variable is necessary. This study’s sample consists of 641 elementary, middle and high school teachers. To determine teachers’ self-efficacy levels regarding rubrics, 47-item draft was developed. As a result of validity and reliability analyzes, a 28-item measurement tool with a four-factor structure was obtained. The total scale’s and sub-factors’ internal consistency is quite high. Using this scale, researchers can examine the relationships between teachers’ self-efficacy and various variables that play an important role in education. In addition, comparative studies on the intended use of rubrics can be conducted by determining teachers’ self-efficacy levels regarding rubrics.

  1. A structural Model of Self-efficacy in Handball Referees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Falese, Lavinia; Mancone, Stefania; Purromuto, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to identify factors predicting self-efficacy in a sample of 248 Italian handball referees. The main hypothesis was that perception of teamwork efficacy would be a significant predictor of self-efficacy in handball referees. Participants completed an online questionnaire including Referee Self-Efficacy Scale (α = 0.85), Self-Determination Scale (α = 0.78), and an adaptation for Referees of the Sport Commitment Model (α = 0.80). Two hierarchical regression analyses have identified: (1) Enjoyment (β = 0.226), Couple Efficacy (β = 0.233), and Personal Awareness (β = 0.243), as predictors of Self-Efficacy; (2) Span of Co-Refereeing (β = 0.253), Perceived Quality of the Relationship (β = 0.239), and Mutual Agreement (β = 0.274), as predictors of Couple Self-Efficacy. A further SEM analysis confirmed the fit of a structural model of Self-efficacy considering the reciprocal influence of Couple Efficacy, Enjoyment and Awareness (χ2: 5.67; RMSEA: 0.000; SRMR: 0.019). The study underlines the importance of teamwork (or co-refereeing) as it relates to enjoyment and awareness in officiating and how it enhances the psychological well-being of handball referees. Future studies should investigate the relationship between factors influencing perceived teamwork efficacy and officiating performance outcome. PMID:28572783

  2. Self- Efficacy and Caregiver Strain in Alzheimer\\'s Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Mohamadi Shahbalaghi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This study with a co relational design has conducted to determine relationship between caregiving strain and self-efficacy in family caregiver of patient with Alzheimer. Accessible sample of the study consisted of 81 family caregivers that all of them were member of Iranian Alzheimer Association. Data was gathered by demographic, self-efficacy and care giving strain questioners. Findings showed the most of the subjects were female (%60, spouse of care giving recipient (56%, married (64%, reside in same household (55%, 49% under high school education, 45% of them haven't taken formal courses about the care of the patients, 53% of them were satisfied about providing of care, 36% reported bad health status. The most important caring needs consisted education for better care providing. the Mean of self-efficacy was 66/96 (29-106 and strain 39/43 (17-65. There were not any relations between strain and self-efficacy with demographic variables. There was positive significant Pearson correlation (r=0/539, p=O/ 01 between self-efficacy and strain. Findings indicated that self-efficacy and care giving strain are subjective and individualized concepts. Care giving to elderly patients is a stressful event but moderate co-relationship shows that caregivers apprise the stress of care giving as a constructive and controllable manner.

  3. Exercise self-efficacy correlates in people with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Gorczynski, Paul; De Hert, Marc; Probst, Michel; Naisiga, Annetie; Basangwa, David; Mugisha, James

    2018-04-01

    Despite the recognition of the importance of exercise self-efficacy in exercise adoption and maintenance, previous investigations on exercise self-efficacy in people with psychosis is scarce. The present study aimed to (1) explore if exercise self-efficacy differed between stages of behavior change in Ugandan outpatients with psychosis, and (2) assess sociodemographic, clinical and motivational correlates of exercise self-efficacy. In total, 48 patients (24 women) completed the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale (ESES), the Patient-centered Assessment and Counseling for Exercise questionnaire, the Brief Symptoms Inventory-18 (BSI-18), and questions pertaining to intrinsic motivation in the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2. Additionally, participants were asked about their exercise behavior in the past 7 days and screened for cardio-metabolic risk factors. Higher ESES-scores were observed in those in the maintenance (n = 17) versus those in the pre-action stage (n = 17) of behavior change. Higher ESES-scores were also significantly associated with lower BSI-18 somatization and higher intrinsic motivation scores. Our data indicated that health care professionals should assist patients with psychosis in interpreting physiological states during exercise. Future research should explore whether bolstering such sources of information might directly or indirectly effect exercise self-efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Smartphone Habits and Behaviors in Supporting Students Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Razzaq

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The widespread of smartphones usage have increased the convenience of accessing information and knowledge sharing for higher learning students. University’s students are exposed with the multi channels of knowledge from various sources primarily from online learning’s resources. The study examines smartphone habit, internet literacy, and mobile learning in relation to self-efficacy. Self-efficacy refers to the internal forces of a student’s belief in the abilities in utilizing smartphone as educational aid in the context of mobile learning. This study deploys a quantitative approach in assessing the relationship between self-efficacy, internet literacy and smartphone’s habits for of university students. Understanding student self-efficacy is important factor to deliver an effective ways in supporting mobile learning activities. In addition to documenting the findings of self-efficacy and mobile learning, the research also represents a model of internal and external factors that affects student self-efficacy to make mobile learning successful.

  5. Health visitors and breastfeeding support: influence of knowledge and self-efficacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Hanne; Væth, Michael; Olsen, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about what influences health visitors' breastfeeding support. The objective was to describe health visitors' breastfeeding experiences, beliefs, knowledge and self-efficacy in breastfeeding guidance and determine the impact of a training course on these factors, and how...... to learn the mechanisms of breastfeeding. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires before the intervention and after the follow-up period. One hundred and six (97%) health visitors and 1302 (82%) mothers responded. RESULTS: At baseline no substantial differences were seen between...... the two groups on years since education, own breastfeeding experiences, beliefs or self-efficacy in breastfeeding guidance except that health visitors in the intervention group, who had completed the course, demonstrated significantly higher scores on knowledge questions (P

  6. Effect of speed endurance and strength training on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup Petersen, Jacob; Tybirk, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Thomas Petursson

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of combined strength and speed endurance (SE) training along with a reduced training volume on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners. METHODS: Sixteen male endurance runners (VO2-max: ~60 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were rand...... and speed endurance training, along with a reduced training volume, can improve short-term exercise capacity and induce muscular adaptations related to anaerobic capacity in endurance-trained runners.......PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of combined strength and speed endurance (SE) training along with a reduced training volume on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners. METHODS: Sixteen male endurance runners (VO2-max: ~60 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were...... randomly assigned to either a combined strength and SE training (CSS; n = 9) or a control (CON; n = 7) group. For 8 weeks, CSS replaced their normal moderate-intensity training (~63 km week(-1)) with SE (2 × week(-1)) and strength training (2 × week(-1)) as well as aerobic high (1 × week(-1)) and moderate...

  7. Improvement of Ice Hockey Players' On-Ice Sprint With Combined Plyometric and Strength Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dæhlin, Torstein E; Haugen, Ole C; Haugerud, Simen; Hollan, Ivana; Raastad, Truls; Rønnestad, Bent R

    2017-08-01

    Combined plyometric and strength training has previously been suggested as a strategy to improve skating performance in ice hockey players. However, the effects of combined plyometric and strength training have not previously been compared with the effects of strength training only. To compare the effects of combined plyometric and strength training on ice hockey players' skating sprint performance with those of strength training only. Eighteen participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups that completed 5 strength-training sessions/wk for 8 wk. One group included plyometric exercises at the start of 3 sessions/wk (PLY+ST), and the other group included core exercises in the same sessions (ST). Tests of 10- and 35-m skating sprints, horizontal jumping, 1-repetition-maximum (1 RM) squat, skating multistage aerobic test (SMAT), maximal oxygen consumption, repeated cycle sprints, and body composition were performed before and after the intervention. The participants increased their 1RM squat, lean mass, and body mass (P plyometric and strength training for 8 wk was superior to strength training alone at improving 10-m on-ice sprint performance in high-level ice hockey players.

  8. Strongwomen® Program Evaluation: Effect of Strength Training Exercises on Physical Fitness of Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Van Horn, Beth; Corbin, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    The Strongwomen® Program (SWP) is a nationally disseminated group strength-training exercise and nutrition education program delivered by Extension. The study reported here examined the effect of strength training exercises in SWP on improvement in physical fitness of program participants. Senior Fitness Test was used to collect data. Upon…

  9. Relationships between Special Education Teachers' Leadership Styles, Self-Efficacy, and the Team Dynamics in Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uresti, Mario Alberto

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between leadership styles, self- efficacy, and team dynamics of special education teachers (SETs) working with the moderate/severe student population. Review of the literature suggests that it is common for special education teacher candidates to receive little to no training on how to supervise and…

  10. Mediating Effect of School Nurses' Self Efficacy between Multicultural Attitude and Cultural Sensitivity in Korean Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Min Hyun; Oh, Won Oak; Im, Yeo Jin; Cho, Hun Ha

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the mediating effect of school nurses' self efficacy, which is one of the significant cognitive factors influencing cultural sensitivity, on the mutual relationships between multicultural attitude and cultural sensitivity in Korean elementary schools. A cross-sectional descriptive survey design was used. Participants were 157 school nurses in elementary schools located in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea. The survey instruments included Teacher Multicultural Attitude Survey, Teacher Efficacy Scale, and Multicultural Sensitivity Scale. Data were analyzed using three regression equations to test the mediation model. The mean score of the school nurses' cultural sensitivity was relatively low. A positive correlation among multicultural attitude, self efficacy, and cultural sensitivity was noted. Self efficacy of school nurses showed a significant mediating effect on the relationships between multicultural attitude and cultural sensitivity. Given the meaningful influence of positive multicultural attitude on cultural sensitivity and significant mediator effect of self efficacy as a school nurse between the two variables, the strategies to cultivate a positive multicultural attitude and enhance school nurses' self efficacy in their unique role should be considered in a training program. School nurses' health care services will benefit from the improvement of cultural sensitivity toward young children from multicultural families. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. The Effectiveness of Abstinence-Based/Faith-Based Addiction Quitting Courses on General and Coping Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosin Nazari, Sh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: One of the influential elements in the life of an individual is his or her level of self efficacy. This research aimed to study the effectiveness of abstinence-based/faith-based addiction quitting courses on general and coping self efficacy of the people who want to quit opium addiction through these courses in Tehran city. Method: In semi experimental research design 80 people who referred to abstinence-based/faith-based addiction quitting courses were selected by census method. General self efficacy questionnaire of Jerusalem and Schwartzer (1981 and coping self-efficacy questionnaire of Chesney (2006 administered among selected sample before and after treatment. Results: The results of paired t-test indicated that abstinence-based/faith-based addiction quitting courses have a significant influence on the skills of impeding negative thoughts and excitements and gaining friends’ and colleagues’ support. Conclusion: The findings of this research concur with the findings of similar researches, and indicated with appropriate strategies of training self-efficacy beliefs can be improved and boosted.

  12. The Development of a Cultural-Based Educational Program to Enhance Breast Self-Examination (BSE Self-Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita Juanita

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop the educational program which is appropriate with Islamic culture in order to enhance BSE self-efficacy of nursing students and thus promote BSE practice. Method: This study is a development research study which is consisting of three phases including: 1 reviewing several existing BSE educational programs; 2 program design based on SCT and Islamic culture; and 3 program validation by three experts. Result: Based on previous studies, the most appropriate theory to enhance self-efficacy was Social Cognitive Theory (SCT because this theory provides several strategies to increase the self-efficacy. Further, the program that used Islamic culture was more appropriate to increase BSE practice among Muslim women. As a result, the newly developed program was developed used SCT and Islamic culture. This program was comprised of four sessions including: 1 exploring Islamic mandate on prevention and individual responsibility in health promotion, and culture-related beliefs toward BSE, 2 health education by conducting lecturing session and watching a video about BSE procedures, 3 BSE training activities including BSE demonstration and return demonstration, 4 follow-up by conducting a meeting. Conclusion: The cultural-based educational program for enhancing BSE self-efficacy and promoting BSE is a program using multifaceted methods. It designed based on a review of the literature from previous studies and were supported by research findings on experimental studies in other population. Keywords: Cultural, Educational program development, Breast self-examination, Self-efficacy.

  13. Effect of educational intervention on knowledge, perceived benefits, barriers and self-efficacy regarding AIDS preventive behaviors among drug addicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastami, Fatemeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Addicts account for approximately 68.15% of AIDS cases in Iran and injection drug users are considered as a major factor in the spread of AIDS in Iran. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an educational intervention on the perceived self-efficacy, benefits, and barriers concerning AIDS preventive behaviors among drug addicts in Khorramabad, Iran. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study carried out in 2013 on 88 addicts kept in rehabilitations center in Khorramabad. The data collection instruments included a questionnaire on self-efficacy, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, knowledge and preventive behaviors regarding HIV. Data were analyzed by paired t-test, independent t-test, Chi-square and analysis of covariance. Results: Paired t-test showed that the mean scores for perceived benefits and barriers, knowledge and preventive behaviors significantly increased in the intervention group after the intervention than before the intervention. But the increase in self-efficacy score was not statistically significant. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that training and education based on the health belief model led to an increase in knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived benefits, performance and reduction in perceived barriers in addicts. It is recommended that future studies should include strategies for enhancing self-efficacy and perceived benefits as well as strategies for reducing barriers to the adoption of preventive behaviors. PMID:27462632

  14. Gender, experience, and self-efficacy in introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayson M. Nissen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Gender in Physics.] There is growing evidence of persistent gender achievement gaps in university physics instruction, not only for learning physics content, but also for developing productive attitudes and beliefs about learning physics. These gaps occur in both traditional and interactive-engagement (IE styles of physics instruction. We investigated one gender gap in the area of attitudes and beliefs. This was men’s and women’s physics self-efficacy, which comprises students’ thoughts and feelings about their capabilities to succeed as learners in physics. According to extant research using pre- and post-course surveys, the self-efficacy of both men and women tends to be reduced after taking traditional and IE physics courses. Moreover, self-efficacy is reduced further for women than for men. However, it remains unclear from these studies whether this gender difference is caused by physics instruction. It may be, for instance, that the greater reduction of women’s self-efficacy in physics merely reflects a broader trend in university education that has little to do with physics per se. We investigated this and other alternative causes, using an in-the-moment measurement technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM. We used ESM to collect multiple samples of university students’ feelings of self-efficacy during four types of activity for two one-week periods: (i an introductory IE physics course, (ii students’ other introductory STEM courses, (iii their non-STEM courses, and (iv their activities outside of school. We found that women experienced the IE physics course with lower self-efficacy than men, but for the other three activity types, women’s self-efficacy was not reliably different from men’s. We therefore concluded that the experience of physics instruction in the IE physics course depressed women’s self-efficacy. Using complementary measures showing the IE

  15. Communication and mental health in general practice: physicians' self-perceived learning needs and self-efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Stensrud, Tonje L; Mjaaland, Trond A; Finset, Arnstein

    2012-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) often see patients presenting with mental health problems, but their training regarding mental health treatment varies. GPs' communication skills are of particular importance in these consultations, and communication skills training of GPs has been found to improve patients' mental health. To tailor a communication skills training by basing it on GPs' learning needs and self-efficacy, thereby maximising learning, we conducted a questionnaire study.

  16. The effects of electromyostimulation training and basketball practice on muscle strength and jumping ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffiuletti, N A; Cometti, G; Amiridis, I G; Martin, A; Pousson, M; Chatard, J C

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a 4-week electromyostimulation training program on the strength of the knee extensors and the vertical jump performance of 10 basketball players. Electromyostimulation sessions were carried out 3 times weekly; each session consisted of 48 contractions. Testing was carried out before and after the electromyostimulation training program (week 4) and once more after 4 weeks of normal basketball training (week 8). At week 4, isokinetic strength increased significantly (p training increased also isometric strength at the two angles adjacent to the training angle (p jump increased significantly by 14% at week 4 (p jump showed no change. At week 8, gains in isokinetic, isometric strength and squat-jump performance were maintained and the counter movement jump performance increased significantly by 17% (ptraining program enhanced knee extensor strength and squat jump performance of basketball players.

  17. Transportation Self-Efficacy and Social Problem-Solving of Persons Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crudden, Adele; O'Mally, Jamie; Antonelli, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Social problem-solving skills and transportation self-efficacy were assessed for 48 vocational rehabilitation consumers with visual disabilities who required assistance securing work transportation. Social problem solving was at the upper end of the normed average; transportation self-efficacy averaged 101.5 out of 140. Level of vision loss was not associated with score differences; urban residence related to slightly higher self-efficacy than suburban or rural residency. Participants appeared to have the skills necessary to secure employment transportation, but were less confident about transportation-seeking activities that required more initiative of social interaction. Training and information might help consumers gain confidence in these tasks and increase viable transportation options.

  18. Effects of strength training on endurance capacity in top-level endurance athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Jesper L

    2010-01-01

    The effect of concurrent strength (S) and endurance (E) training on adaptive changes in aerobic capacity, endurance performance, maximal muscle strength and muscle morphology is equivocal. Some data suggest an attenuated cardiovascular and musculoskeletal response to combined E and S training......, while other data show unimpaired or even superior adaptation compared with either training regime alone. However, the effect of concurrent S and E training only rarely has been examined in top-level endurance athletes. This review describes the effect of concurrent SE training on short-term and long......-term endurance performance in endurance-trained subjects, ranging from moderately trained individuals to elite top-level athletes. It is concluded that strength training can lead to enhanced long-term (>30 min) and short-term (...

  19. The Effect of Two Different Concurrent Training Programs on Strength and Power Gains in Highly-Trained Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petré, Henrik; Löfving, Pontus; Psilander, Niklas

    2018-01-01

    The effects of concurrent strength and endurance training have been well studied in untrained and moderately-trained individuals. However, studies examining these effects in individuals with a long history of resistance training (RT) are lacking. Additionally, few studies have examined how strength and power are affected when different types of endurance training are added to an RT protocol. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of concurrent training incorporating either low-volume, high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 8-24 Tabata intervals at ~150% of VO2max) or high-volume, medium-intensity continuous endurance training (CT, 40-80 min at 70% of VO2max), on the strength and power of highly-trained individuals. Sixteen highly-trained ice-hockey and rugby players were divided into two groups that underwent either CT (n = 8) or HIIT (n = 8) in parallel with RT (2-6 sets of heavy parallel squats, > 80% of 1RM) during a 6-week period (3 sessions/wk). Parallel squat performance improved after both RT + CT and RT + HIIT (12 ± 8% and 14 ± 10% respectively, p HIIT (4 ± 3%, p HIIT in athletes with a prior history of RT. This indicates that the volume and/or intensity of the endurance training does not influence the magnitude of strength improvements during short periods of concurrent training, at least for highly-trained individuals when the endurance training is performed after RT. However, since VO2max improved only after RT + HIIT and this is a time efficient protocol, we recommend this type of concurrent endurance training. Key points Lower body maximal strength is improved after concurrent strength and endurance training in highly trained individuals. The magnitude of this strength improvement is not influenced by the type of endurance training, i.e. HIIT or CT. HIIT improves VO2max and is more time efficient than CT. HIIT is recommended to athletes when concurrently training for strength and endurance. PMID:29769816

  20. Explosive strength training improves speed and agility in wheelchair basketball athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Ozmen; Bekir Yuktasir; Necmiye Un Yildirim; Birol Yalcin; Mark ET Willems

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Wheelchair basketball is a paralympic sport characterized by intermittent high-intensity activities that require explosive strength and speed. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of explosive strength training on speed and agility performance in wheelchair basketball players. METHODS: Ten male wheelchair basketball players (Mage=31±4 yrs) were divided into two groups [i.e. explosive strength training (ES); control (CN)] based on International Wheelchair Basketball Fede...

  1. Exploring the Relationship among International Students' English Self-Efficacy, Using English to Learn Self-Efficacy, and Academic Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-hsuan; Harrison, Jamie; Cardullo, Victoria; Lin, Xi

    2018-01-01

    One of the major challenges for international students to pursue academic goals in the United States is English language proficiency, which often negatively affects academic success. Even students with confidence in their English language proficiency encounter challenges using English in class. Previous research indicates self-efficacy positively…

  2. Healthcare professionals' attitudes, knowledge and self-efficacy levels regarding the use of self-hypnosis in childbirth: A prospective questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Sophie; Coxon, Kirstie; Murrells, T; Sandall, J

    2017-04-01

    to examine healthcare professionals' attitudes, knowledge and levels of self-efficacy regarding the use of self-hypnosis in childbirth. a prospective survey. two large maternity units in London, England. healthcare professionals (n=129) involved in the care of childbearing women (anaesthetists, midwives and obstetricians). online questionnaire assessing healthcare professionals' experience, knowledge, attitudes and self-efficacy relating to self-hypnosis in childbirth. attitude, self-efficacy and knowledge. over half of the participants surveyed (56%) reported they had minimal or no knowledge of hypnosis. Higher levels of knowledge were associated with higher levels of self-efficacy (phypnosis than doctors, and more exposure was significantly associated with higher levels of self-efficacy (midwives phypnosis in their own or partners' births had significantly higher self-efficacy scores (phypnosis in childbirth, they need to be confident in their ability to facilitate this method. Previous research has established that self-efficacy is a strong indicator of performance. Professionals with more knowledge of self-hypnosis are also more confident in supporting women using this technique in childbirth. Multi-disciplinary staff training which aims to increase knowledge, and which includes exposure to hypnosis in labour, may be beneficial in assisting staff to support women choosing to use self-hypnosis in labour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Weekly Time Course of Neuro-Muscular Adaptation to Intensive Strength Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Niklas; Bubeck, Dieter; Haeufle, Daniel F B; Weickenmeier, Johannes; Kuhl, Ellen; Alt, Wilfried; Schmitt, Syn

    2017-01-01

    Detailed description of the time course of muscular adaptation is rarely found in literature. Thus, models of muscular adaptation are difficult to validate since no detailed data of adaptation are available. In this article, as an initial step toward a detailed description and analysis of muscular adaptation, we provide a case report of 8 weeks of intense strength training with two active, male participants. Muscular adaptations were analyzed on a morphological level with MRI scans of the right quadriceps muscle and the calculation of muscle volume, on a voluntary strength level by isometric voluntary contractions with doublet stimulation (interpolated twitch technique) and on a non-voluntary level by resting twitch torques. Further, training volume and isokinetic power were closely monitored during the training phase. Data were analyzed weekly for 1 week prior to training, pre-training, 8 weeks of training and 2 weeks of detraining (no strength training). Results show a very individual adaptation to the intense strength training protocol. While training volume and isokinetic power increased linearly during the training phase, resting twitch parameters decreased for both participants after the first week of training and stayed below baseline until de-training. Voluntary activation level showed an increase in the first 4 weeks of training, while maximum voluntary contraction showed only little increase compared to baseline. Muscle volume increased for both subjects. Especially training status seemed to influence the acute reaction to intense strength training. Fatigue had a major influence on performance and could only be overcome by one participant. The results give a first detailed insight into muscular adaptation to intense strength training on various levels, providing a basis of data for a validation of muscle fatigue and adaptation models.

  4. Explosive strength training improves speed and agility in wheelchair basketball athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Ozmen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Wheelchair basketball is a paralympic sport characterized by intermittent high-intensity activities that require explosive strength and speed. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of explosive strength training on speed and agility performance in wheelchair basketball players. METHODS: Ten male wheelchair basketball players (Mage=31±4 yrs were divided into two groups [i.e. explosive strength training (ES; control (CN] based on International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF classification scores. The ES group underwent 6-weeks of training, twice weekly, at 50% 1RM, 10-12 repetitions and 3-4 sets in addition to routine training. Effects of training were measured by the 20 m sprint test and Illinois agility test. RESULTS: The ES group, showed significantly higher increases in speed and agility performance (p ≤ .05. CONCLUSION: A short-duration (i.e. 6-week explosive strength training programme in wheelchair basketball athletes results in significant improvements in sprint and agility performance.

  5. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...... functional training advises can be made. Thus, more than a review in the traditional context this review should be viewed upon as an attempt to bring sports-physiologists and coaches or others working directly with the athletes together for a mutual discussion on how recently acquired physiological knowledge...

  6. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties......Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... functional training advises can be made. Thus, more than a review in the traditional context this review should be viewed upon as an attempt to bring sports-physiologists and coaches or others working directly with the athletes together for a mutual discussion on how recently acquired physiological knowledge...

  7. Strength Training Prior to Endurance Exercise: Impact on the Neuromuscular System, Endurance Performance and Cardiorespiratory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conceição Matheus

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the acute effects of two strength-training protocols on the neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory responses during endurance exercise. Thirteen young males (23.2 ± 1.6 years old participated in this study. The hypertrophic strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 squats at 75% of maximal dynamic strength. The plyometric strength-training protocol was composed of 6 sets of 8 jumps performed with the body weight as the workload. Endurance exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer at a power corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold until exhaustion. Before and after each protocol, a maximal voluntary contraction was performed, and the rate of force development and electromyographic parameters were assessed. After the hypertrophic strengthtraining and plyometric strength-training protocol, significant decreases were observed in the maximal voluntary contraction and rate of force development, whereas no changes were observed in the electromyographic parameters. Oxygen uptake and a heart rate during endurance exercise were not significantly different among the protocols. However, the time-to-exhaustion was significantly higher during endurance exercise alone than when performed after hypertrophic strength-training or plyometric strength-training (p <0.05. These results suggest that endurance performance may be impaired when preceded by strength-training, with no oxygen uptake or heart rate changes during the exercise.

  8. Effects of core instability strength training on trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Lacroix, Andre; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Roettger, Katrin; Gollhofer, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Age-related postural misalignment, balance deficits and strength/power losses are associated with impaired functional mobility and an increased risk of falling in seniors. Core instability strength training (CIT) involves exercises that are challenging for both trunk muscles and postural control and may thus have the potential to induce benefits in trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility and balance performance. The objective was to investigate the effects of CIT on measures of trunk muscle strength, spinal mobility, dynamic balance and functional mobility in seniors. Thirty-two older adults were randomly assigned to an intervention group (INT; n = 16, aged 70.8 ± 4.1 years) that conducted a 9-week progressive CIT or to a control group (n = 16, aged 70.2 ± 4.5 years). Maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors/extensors/lateral flexors (right, left)/rotators (right, left) as well as of spinal mobility in the sagittal and the coronal plane was measured before and after the intervention program. Dynamic balance (i.e. walking 10 m on an optoelectric walkway, the Functional Reach test) and functional mobility (Timed Up and Go test) were additionally tested. Program compliance was excellent with participants of the INT group completing 92% of the training sessions. Significant group × test interactions were found for the maximal isometric strength of the trunk flexors (34%, p training-related improvements were found for spinal mobility in the sagittal (11%, p velocity (9%, p velocity (31%, p training regimen could be used as an adjunct or even alternative to traditional balance and/or resistance training. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The Effect of Two Different Concurrent Training Programs on Strength and Power Gains in Highly-Trained Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Petré, Pontus Löfving, Niklas Psilander

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of concurrent strength and endurance training have been well studied in untrained and moderately-trained individuals. However, studies examining these effects in individuals with a long history of resistance training (RT are lacking. Additionally, few studies have examined how strength and power are affected when different types of endurance training are added to an RT protocol. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of concurrent training incorporating either low-volume, high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 8-24 Tabata intervals at ~150% of VO2max or high-volume, medium-intensity continuous endurance training (CT, 40-80 min at 70% of VO2max, on the strength and power of highly-trained individuals. Sixteen highly-trained ice-hockey and rugby players were divided into two groups that underwent either CT (n = 8 or HIIT (n = 8 in parallel with RT (2-6 sets of heavy parallel squats, > 80% of 1RM during a 6-week period (3 sessions/wk. Parallel squat performance improved after both RT + CT and RT + HIIT (12 ± 8% and 14 ± 10% respectively, p < 0.01, with no difference between the groups. However, aerobic power (VO2max only improved after RT + HIIT (4 ± 3%, p < 0.01. We conclude that strength gains can be obtained after both RT + CT and RT + HIIT in athletes with a prior history of RT. This indicates that the volume and/or intensity of the endurance training does not influence the magnitude of strength improvements during short periods of concurrent training, at least for highly-trained individuals when the endurance training is performed after RT. However, since VO2max improved only after RT + HIIT and this is a time efficient protocol, we recommend this type of concurrent endurance training.

  10. Effects of Kettlebell Swing vs. Explosive Deadlift Training on Strength and Power

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew R. Maulit; David C. Archer; Whitney D. Leyva; Cameron N. Munger; Megan A. Wong; Lee E. Brown; Jared W. Coburn; Andrew J. Galpin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recent research has compared explosive deadlift to kettlebell training observing their effects on strength. The kettlebell swing is a popular practical exercise as it shares share a hip hinge movement with the explosive deadlift, but the two have not been compared. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of kettlebell swing vs. explosive deadlift training on strength and power. Methods: Thirty-one recreationally resistance-trained men (age = 23.1 ± 2.3 yea...

  11. Tinkering and Technical Self-Efficacy of Engineering Students at the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dale R.; Wood, Lorelei; Corkins, James; Krause, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy in engineering is important because individuals with low self-efficacy have lower levels of achievement and persistence in engineering majors. To examine self-efficacy among community college engineering students, an instrument to specifically measure two important aspects of engineering, tinkering and technical self-efficacy, was…

  12. Building Self-Efficacy for Exercise among Rural High School Students: It Takes Ongoing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortz, Brian; Petosa, R. Lingyak; Grim, Melissa L.; Stevens, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-efficacy has been associated with adolescent exercise. Previous studies have revealed that self-efficacy is relatively resistant to change. Effective strategies to build self-efficacy among adolescents are needed. Purpose: To describe the changes in self-efficacy and leisure time exercise produced by the "Planning to be…

  13. Change of Direction Speed: Toward a Strength Training Approach with Accentuated Eccentric Muscle Actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabene, Helmi; Prieske, Olaf; Negra, Yassine; Granacher, Urs

    2018-03-28

    There is growing evidence that eccentric strength training appears to have benefits over traditional strength training (i.e., strength training with combined concentric and eccentric muscle actions) from muscular, neuromuscular, tendinous, and metabolic perspectives. Eccentric muscle strength is particularly needed to decelerate and stabilize the body during the braking phase of a jump exercise or during rapid changes of direction (CoD) tasks. However, surprisingly little research has been conducted to elucidate the effects of eccentric strength training or strength training with accentuated eccentric muscle actions on CoD speed performance. In this current opinion article, we present findings from cross-sectional studies on the relationship between measures of eccentric muscle strength and CoD speed performance. In addition, we summarize the few available studies on the effects of strength training with accentuated eccentric muscle actions on CoD speed performance in athletic populations. Finally, we propose strength training with accentuated eccentric muscle actions as a promising element in strength and conditioning programs of sports with high CoD speed demands. Our findings from five cross-sectional studies revealed statistically significant moderate- to large-sized correlations (r = 0.45-0.89) between measures of eccentric muscle strength and CoD speed performance in athletic populations. The identified three intervention studies were of limited methodological quality and reported small- to large-sized effects (d = 0.46-1.31) of strength training with accentuated eccentric muscle actions on CoD speed performance in athletes. With reference to the available but preliminary literature and from a performance-related point of view, we recommend strength and conditioning coaches to include strength training with accentuated eccentric muscle actions in training routines of sports with high CoD speed demands (e.g., soccer, handball, basketball, hockey) to

  14. Fish-oil supplementation enhances the effects of strength training in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodacki, Cintia L N; Rodacki, André L F; Pereira, Gleber; Naliwaiko, Katya; Coelho, Isabela; Pequito, Daniele; Fernandes, Luiz Cléudio

    2012-02-01

    Muscle force and functional capacity generally decrease with aging in the older population, although this effect can be reversed, attenuated, or both through strength training. Fish oil (FO), which is rich in n-3 (omega-3) PUFAs, has been shown to play a role in the plasma membrane and cell function of muscles, which may enhance the benefits of training. The effect of strength training and FO supplementation on the neuromuscular system of the elderly has not been investigated. The objective was to investigate the chronic effect of FO supplementation and strength training on the neuromuscular system (muscle strength and functional capacity) of older women. Forty-five women (aged 64 ± 1.4 y) were randomly assigned to 3 groups. One group performed strength training only (ST group) for 90 d, whereas the others performed the same strength-training program and received FO supplementation (2 g/d) for 90 d (ST90 group) or for 150 d (ST150 group; supplemented 60 d before training). Muscle strength and functional capacity were assessed before and after the training period. No differences in the pretraining period were found between groups for any of the variables. The peak torque and rate of torque development for all muscles (knee flexor and extensor, plantar and dorsiflexor) increased from pre- to posttraining in all groups. However, the effect was greater in the ST90 and ST150 groups than in the ST group. The activation level and electromechanical delay of the muscles changed from pre- to posttraining only for the ST90 and ST150 groups. Chair-rising performance in the FO groups was higher than in the ST group. Strength training increased muscle strength in elderly women. The inclusion of FO supplementation caused greater improvements in muscle strength and functional capacity.

  15. A web-based intervention to support self-management of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: effect on self-efficacy, self-care and diabetes distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Catherine H; Parsons, Janet A; Mamdani, Muhammad; Lebovic, Gerald; Hall, Susan; Newton, David; Shah, Baiju R; Bhattacharyya, Onil; Laupacis, Andreas; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-12-14

    Management of diabetes mellitus is complex and involves controlling multiple risk factors that may lead to complications. Given that patients provide most of their own diabetes care, patient self-management training is an important strategy for improving quality of care. Web-based interventions have the potential to bridge gaps in diabetes self-care and self-management. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a web-based patient self-management intervention on psychological (self-efficacy, quality of life, self-care) and clinical (blood pressure, cholesterol, glycemic control, weight) outcomes. For this cohort study we used repeated-measures modelling and qualitative individual interviews. We invited patients with type 2 diabetes to use a self-management website and asked them to complete questionnaires assessing self-efficacy (primary outcome) every three weeks for nine months before and nine months after they received access to the website. We collected clinical outcomes at three-month intervals over the same period. We conducted in-depth interviews at study conclusion to explore acceptability, strengths and weaknesses, and mediators of use of the website. We analyzed the data using a qualitative descriptive approach and inductive thematic analysis. Eighty-one participants (mean age 57.2 years, standard deviation 12) were included in the analysis. The self-efficacy score did not improve significantly more than expected after nine months (absolute change 0.12; 95% confidence interval -0.028, 0.263; p = 0.11), nor did clinical outcomes. Website usage was limited (average 0.7 logins/month). Analysis of the interviews (n = 21) revealed four themes: 1) mediators of website use; 2) patterns of website use, including role of the blog in driving site traffic; 3) feedback on website; and 4) potential mechanisms for website effect. A self-management website for patients with type 2 diabetes did not improve self-efficacy. Website use was limited

  16. Exercise Video Games and Exercise Self-Efficacy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Hildemar; Bredehoft, Margaret Dinhluu; Gonzalez, Frecia M; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the use of exergaming in promoting exercise behavior among children and to examine the impact of the intervention on participants' exercise self-efficacy, in addition to assessing physiological changes. A sample of 55 children enrolled in the Family Fit program, where participants were categorized into 2 groups: healthy weight and overweight. Measures were taken at baseline, after the 7-week program, at the 12-week follow-up, and at the 24-month follow-up. Positive changes in exercise self-efficacy were significant for the overweight group, while the healthy weight group maintained their exercise self-efficacy. At the 24-month follow-up, 97% children reported being interested in participating in a future fitness program, and 96% children who did not play sports before the intervention started practicing sports. Exercise self-efficacy is a predictor of physical activity, and incorporating exergaming in a structured program may lead to increased self-efficacy in participants.

  17. Exercise Video Games and Exercise Self-Efficacy in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildemar Dos Santos MD, DrPH

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to investigate the use of exergaming in promoting exercise behavior among children and to examine the impact of the intervention on participants’ exercise self-efficacy, in addition to assessing physiological changes. A sample of 55 children enrolled in the Family Fit program, where participants were categorized into 2 groups: healthy weight and overweight. Measures were taken at baseline, after the 7-week program, at the 12-week follow-up, and at the 24-month follow-up. Positive changes in exercise self-efficacy were significant for the overweight group, while the healthy weight group maintained their exercise self-efficacy. At the 24-month follow-up, 97% children reported being interested in participating in a future fitness program, and 96% children who did not play sports before the intervention started practicing sports. Exercise self-efficacy is a predictor of physical activity, and incorporating exergaming in a structured program may lead to increased self-efficacy in participants.

  18. Self-Efficacy dan Konformitas dengan Prokrastinasi Akademik Mahasiswa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmayati Rosmayati

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan self-efficacy dan konformitas dengan prokrastinasi akademik mahasiswa Bimbingan dan Konseling Universitas Negeri Semarang baik secara parsial maupun secara bersama-sama. Penelitian ini menggunakan desain kuantitatif korelasional. Sampel yang digunakan berjumlah 125 dari populasi 284 mahasiswa dengan teknik pengambilan sampel simple random  sampling. Adapun teknik analisis data menggunakan regresi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa antara self-efficacy dengan prokrastinasi akademik memiliki hubungan yang signifikan (R= 0,565, F(3,121 = 18,903, p = 0,05. Sedangkan antara self-efficacy dan konformitas dengan prokrastinasi akademik memiliki hubungan yang signifikan (R = 0,595, F(18,903 = 7,957, p = 0,05. While between self-efficacy and conformity with academic procrastination have significant relationship (R = 0,595, F (18,903 = 7,957, p = <0,01. Based om the results of research Guidance and Counseling teachers are advised to provide Guidance and Counseling services to decrease academic procrastination through the development of self-efficacy and conformity.

  19. Self-efficacy scale for Brazilians with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Alves Gastal

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Diabetes is a public health problem and good glycemic control is able to prevent or contain its complications. Self-efficacy is a key factor in successfully achieving behavior goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the insulin management diabetes self-efficacy scale (IMDSES on type 1 diabetes patients from southern Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study in two cities in southern Brazil. METHODS: The psychometric properties of IMDSES were evaluated in a population of type 1 diabetes patients (n = 213, from September to December 2004, who were attended within the Brazilian public healthcare system. Principal component analysis was conducted to develop the subscales. Cronbach’s alpha was used as the reliability coefficient. RESULTS: The analysis of psychometric properties resulted in an IMDSES consisting of 20 items and three subscales: diet (alpha: 0.83, insulin (alpha: 0.92 and general management (alpha: 0.78 and accounted for 53% of the variance. Criteria validity was investigated through two parameters: glycohemoglobin, which showed significant association with self-efficacy on the insulin subscale (p = 0.04, and the variable "adherence", which was significantly associated with self-efficacy on two subscales (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the IMDSES is valid and reliable, and can be used to measure results from diabetes educational programs and to measure self-efficacy relating to diabetes management, for possible interventions.

  20. Emotional intelligence as a predictor of self-efficacy among students with different levels of academic achievement at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMENEH GHARETEPEH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: studies have indicated that emotional intelligence is positively related to self-efficacy and can predict the academic achievement. The present study aimed to investigate the role of emotional intelligence in identifying self-efficacy among the students of Public Health School with different levels of academic achievement. Methods: This correlational study was conducted on all the students of Public Health School. 129 students were included in the study through census method. Data were collected using Emotional Intelligence and self-efficacy questionnaires and analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analysis by SPSS 14. Results: The average score of students with high academic achievement was higher in self-efficacy (39.78±5.82 and emotional intelligence (117.07±10.33 variables and their components than that of students with low academic achievement (39.17±5.91, 112.07±13.23. The overall emotional intelligence score to predict self-efficacy explanation was different among students with different levels of academic achievement (p<0.001. Self-efficacy structure was explained through self-awareness and self-motivation components in students with low academic achievement (r=0.571. In students with high academic achievement, self-awareness, selfmotivation and social consciousness played an effective role in explaining self-efficacy (r=0.677, p<0.001. Conclusion: Emotional intelligence and self-efficacy play an important role in achieving academic success and emotional intelligence can explain self-efficacy. Therefore, it is recommended to teach emotional intelligence skills to students with low academic achievement through training workshops.

  1. The effect of site-based preservice experiences on elementary science teaching self-efficacy beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingfield, Mary E.

    Current reform in science education has focused on the need for improvement of preservice teacher training (National Science Education Standards, 1996). As a situation specific construct (Bandura, 1977), self-efficacy studies have been conducted to investigate factors that impact preservice teachers' sense of confidence as it relates to their ability to become successful science teachers. This descriptive study identified factors in the site based experiences that affected preservice elementary teachers' self-efficacy as measured by the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument (STEBL-B) (Enochs and Riggs, 1990). The sample consisted of the entire population of undergraduate elementary preservice teachers in the site based teacher education program during the fall semester of 1997 at a large south central urban university. The 131 paired, pretest posttests of the entire STEBL-B and the two constructs were analyzed for significance in mean score gains. Results of the paired t test yielded a t value of 11.52 which was significant at p Bandura identified as sources of information used to determine self-efficacy. These include performance accomplishments through authentic teaching experiences, vicarious experiences through observation of the site based teachers, and verbal persuasion and physiological states from feedback given by the university coordinators. The majority of these preservice teachers started the semester with a negative attitude toward teaching science, but ended the semester with a positive view of themselves as effective science teachers in the future.

  2. A comprehensive survey of government auditors' self-efficacy and professional development for improving audit quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shue-Ching; Su, Jau-Ming; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Lu, Tzu-Li; Dong, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Government audit authorities supervise the implementation of government budgets and evaluate the use of administrative resources to ensure that funding is used wisely, economically, and effectively. A quality audit involves reviewing policies according to international standards and perspectives, and provides insight, predictions, and warnings to related organizations. Such practice can reflect the effectiveness of a government. Professional development and self-efficacy have strong influence upon the performance of auditors. To further understand the factors that may enhance their performance and to ultimately provide practical recommendations for the audit authorities, we have surveyed about 50 % of all the governmental auditors in Taiwan using the stratified random sampling method. The result showed that any auditing experience and professionalization can positively influence the professional awareness. Also, acquired knowledge and skillset of an auditor can effectively improve ones professional judgment. We also found that professional development (including organizational culture and training opportunities) and self-efficacy (including profession and experience as well as trends and performance) may significantly impact audit quality. We concluded that to retain auditors, audit authorities must develop an attractive future outlook emphasizing feedback and learning within an organization. Our study provides a workable management guidelines for strengthening the professional development and self-efficacy of audit authorities in Taiwan.

  3. Strength training improves fatigue resistance and self-rated health in workers with chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus Due; Brandt, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    of a randomized controlled trial investigates the effect of strength training on muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health among workers with chronic pain. Sixty-six slaughterhouse workers with chronic upper limb pain and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of strength training or usual...... (Spearman's rho = -0.40; P = 0.01). In conclusion, specific strength training improves muscular fatigue resistance and self-rated health and reduces pain of the hand/wrist in manual workers with chronic upper limb pain. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01671267.......-rated health and pain. Time to fatigue, muscle strength, hand/wrist pain, and self-rated health improved significantly more following strength training than usual care (all P

  4. Intention to abstain from smoking among cardiac rehabilitation patients: the role of attitude, self-efficacy, and craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Esther C; Nijkamp, Marjan D; Sloot, Caroline; Berndt, Nadine C; Bolman, Catherine A W

    2015-01-01

    Smoking cessation after developing coronary heart disease improves disease prognosis more than any other treatment. However, many cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital discharge. The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with the intention to (permanently) abstain from smoking among cardiac rehabilitation patients 2 to 4 weeks after discharge from hospital. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 149 cardiac rehabilitation patients recruited from 2 cardiac rehabilitation centers in The Netherlands 2 to 4 weeks after hospital discharge, at the start of the cardiac rehabilitation period. Psychosocial cognitions including attitude toward nonsmoking, social influence, and self-efficacy were measured with a standardized and validated Dutch questionnaire based on the Attitude-Social Influence-Self-efficacy model. Anxiety was measured using the shortened version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Craving for cigarettes was assessed with 6 items measuring the urge to smoke. Intention toward nonsmoking was assessed with 2 visual analog scales indicating the strength and probability of the intention to permanently refrain from smoking. Of all patients, 31% still smoked after hospital discharge. The smokers had a lower self-efficacy and intention to abstain from smoking and reported higher craving. Logistic regression analyses revealed that attitudes that embraced the advantages of not smoking, self-efficacy, and craving were significantly related to the intention to (permanently) abstain from smoking, whereas social influence and anxiety were not. Actual smoking behavior moderated the relation between self-efficacy and intention: only the quitters showed a significant positive relation. Anxiety did not moderate the relationship between psychosocial cognitive factors and intention. The intention to (permanently) abstain from smoking, measured 2 to 4 weeks after hospitalization for a cardiac event, predominantly depends on attitude, self-efficacy

  5. Perceived self-efficacy and student-teacher relationships among diverse Title I students' achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larry, Triaka A.

    The need for more diversity in STEM-related careers and college majors is urgent. Self-efficacy and student-teacher relationships are factors that have been linked to influencing students’ pursuit of subject-specific careers and academic achievement. The impact of self-efficacy and student perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors on student achievement have been extensively researched in the areas of Mathematics and English, however, most studies using science achievement, as a criterion variable, were conducted using non-diverse, White upper middle class to affluent participants. In order to determine the strength of relationships between perceived science self-efficacy, and student perceptions of teacher interpersonal behaviors as factors that influence science achievement (science GPA), the Science Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (SSEQ) and Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI) were administered to twelfth grade students enrolled at a highly diverse urban Title I high school, while controlling for demographics, defined as gender, ethnicity, and minority status. Using a hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis, results demonstrated that the predictor variables (i.e., gender, ethnicity, minority status, science self-efficacy, and teacher interpersonal behaviors) accounted for 20.8% of the variance in science GPAs. Science self-efficacy made the strongest unique contribution to explaining science GPA, while minority status and gender were found to be statistically significant contributors to the full model as well. Ethnicity and teacher interpersonal behaviors did not make a statistically significant contribution to the variance in science GPA, and accounted for ≤ 1% of the variance. Implications and recommendations for future research are subsequently given.

  6. Self-Efficacy and Postpartum Depression Teaching Behaviors of Hospital-Based Perinatal Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Logsdon, M. Cynthia; Foltz, Melissa Pinto; Scheetz, James; Myers, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Based upon the Self-Efficacy Theory, this study examined the relationship between self-efficacy, self-efficacy-related variables, and postpartum depression teaching behaviors of hospital-based perinatal nurses. Findings revealed that teaching new mothers about postpartum depression is related to a perinatal nurse's self-efficacy in postpartum-depression teaching, self-esteem, and the following self-efficacy-related variables: social persuasion (supervisor's expectations for teaching); mastery...

  7. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Rio, Ebonie; Kidgell, Dawson; Moseley, G Lorimer; Gaida, Jamie; Docking, Sean; Purdam, Craig; Cook, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathy can be resistant to treatment and often recurs, implying that current treatment approaches are suboptimal. Rehabilitation programmes that have been successful in terms of pain reduction and return to sport outcomes usually include strength training. Muscle activation can induce analgesia, improving self-efficacy associated with reducing one's own pain. Furthermore, strength training is beneficial for tendon matrix structure, muscle properties and limb biomechanics. However, curre...

  8. Effect of 8 weeks of free-weight and machine-based strength training on strength and power performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirth Klaus

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of free-weight and machine-based exercises to increase different strength and speed-strength variables. One hundred twenty male participants (age: 23.8 ± 2.5 years; body height: 181.0 ± 6.8 cm; body mass: 80.2 ± 8.9 kg joined the study. The 2 experimental groups completed an 8 week periodized strength training program that included 2 training sessions per week. The exercises that were used in the strength training programs were the parallel barbell squat and the leg press. Before and after the training period, the 1-repetition-maximum in the barbell squat and the leg press, the squat jump, the countermovement jump and unilateral isometric force (maximal isometric force and the rate of force development were evaluated. To compare each group pre vs. post-intervention, analysis of variance with repeated measures and Scheffé post-hoc tests were used. The leg press group increased their 1-repetition-maximum significantly (p < 0.001, while in the squat group such variables as 1-repetition-maximum, the squat jump and the countermovement jump increased significantly (p < 0.001. The maximal isometric force showed no statistically significant result for the repeated measures factor, while the rate of force development of the squat group even showed a statistically significant decrease. Differences between the 2 experimental groups were detected for the squat jump and the countermovement jump. In comparison with the leg press, the squat might be a better strength training exercise for the development of jump performance.

  9. Effect of programmed strength training on explosive strength of lower extremities in children aged 11 to 14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasković Andrija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical jumps are an integral part of many sport activities. There are several factors that affect the athlete's jumping ability: strength, force and acceleration that occur when we jump. The jump is a complex and more articulated activity that requires not only strength, but great power as well. The main types of training to increase explosive strength are plyometric training and myogenic training with weight load on the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of myogenic training with weight load on explosive strength of the lower extremities. The first group is the control group (K, while the second group is an experimental group (E, each consisting of eighteen respondents. By Using the Myotest and performing the squat jump (SJ, the Height, Power, Force and Velocity were determined. The programme of power lasted for six weeks, twice a week for up to 60 minutes. We conclude that there is a statistically significant difference between the final and initial measurements in the experimental group, the multivariate level sig = 0.000. Increase in jump height ΔHeight = 3.28 in cm, force ΔForce = 4.68 in N/kg, the strength ΔPower = 6.18 in W/kg, the acceleration ΔVelocity = 21.8 in cm/s. The results of this study show that myogenic training with weight load has a positive impact on the explosive power of the lower extremities. This research was carried out against children aged 11 to 14 years, so we cannot say with certainty that this type of programme can have identical effects on athletes.

  10. Feasibility of Progressive Strength Training Implemented in the Acute Ward after Hip Fracture Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Lise; Bandholm, Thomas; Palm, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    . RESULTS: The strength training was commenced at a mean of 2.4 (0.7) days after surgery. The training loads (kilograms lifted) increased from 1.6 (0.8) to 4.3 (1.7) kg over 4.3 (2.2) training sessions (P....2) to 0.61 (0.3) Nm/kg (Psessions were not performed because of severe hip fracture-related pain. CONCLUSION AND RELEVANCE: Progressive knee-extension strength training......IMPORTANCE: Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility...

  11. Hip abduction strength training in the clinical setting: with or without external loading?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, T; Petersen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    only the weight of the leg as resistance, whereas training with external loading was performed with a relative load corresponding to 10 repetition maximum. Hip abduction strength was measured pre- and post-intervention. Isometric and eccentric hip abduction strength of the trained leg increased after......The side-lying hip abduction exercise is one of the most commonly used exercises in rehabilitation to increase hip abduction strength, and is often performed without external loading. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of 6 weeks of side-lying hip abduction training, with and without...... external loading, on hip abduction strength in healthy subjects. Thirty-one healthy, physically active men and women were included in a randomised controlled trial and allocated to side-lying hip abduction training, with or without external loading. Training without external loading was performed using...

  12. The effects of plyometric training followed by detraining and reduced training periods on explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eduardo J A M; Janeira, Manuel A A S

    2011-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effects of (a) plyometric training on explosive strength indicators in adolescent male basketball players and (b) detraining and reduced training on previously achieved explosive strength gains. Two groups were formed: an experimental and a control group. The former was submitted to a 10-week in-season plyometric training program, twice weekly, along with regular basketball practice. Simultaneously, the control group participated in regular basketball practice only. At the end of this period, the experimental group was subdivided into 2 groups: a reduced training group and a detraining group. All participants were assessed on squat jump, countermovement jump, Abalakov test, depth jump, mechanical power, and medicine ball throw at the beginning and at the end of the 10-week in-season plyometric training and on weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16 of the in-season detraining and reduced training periods. In the first phase of the study, the experimental group significantly increased all the assessed indicators (p training showed positive effects on upper- and lower-body explosive strength in adolescent male basketball players. Moreover, we can state that both detraining and a reduced training program indistinctly contribute to maintenance of strength levels. These results highlight the unique power that basketball-specific training seems to have on the sustainability and maintenance of sport performance.

  13. Changes of explosive strength in professional basketball players after a six week training cycle with plyometric training and resistance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lehnert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explosive strength of the lower extremities and agility are important parts of game performance in basketball. Although numerous studies have focused on the assessment of the training effect of plyometric training, studies focusing on elite players are missing. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to find out what changes in explosive strength of the lower extremities take place after a 6 week strength training with plyometric exercises and resistance exercises in elite basketball players. METHODS: Elite basketball players (n = 12; age 24.71 ± 1.5 years; height 197.0 ± 7.6 cm; weight 95.8 ± 8.1 kg performed during pre-season a 6 week training program with plyometric exercises and resistance exercises which were conducted biweekly during the pre-season. The changes in explosive strength were measured by the squat jump without arms, the counter movement jump without arms, the counter movement jump free arms and the 2 step run up jump. The players participated in two measurements. The 1st (pretesting was performed on the first day of pre-season and the 2nd (posttesting was completed two days after terminating the PT programme. The differences between the average values of the monitored parameters were determined by the Wilcoxon paired test. To calculate the effect size formula according to Fritz, Morris, and Richler (2012: R = Z/√N was used. RESULTS: Analysis of intra-group changes confirmed significant differences between the two measurements in tests of vertical jump squat (Z = 2.58, p = .01, r = .75, vertical jump from the point of the swing arm (Z = 2.49, p = .01, r = .72 and vertical jump from place without the swing arm (Z = 2.75, p = .01, r = .79. In case of the two step run up jump significant differences were not found (Z = 1.60, p = .11, r = .56. Analysis of intra-individual changes showed the significant interindividual differences in the changes of the explosive power of the lower limbs after a 6 week training. The

  14. Motor effort training with low exercise intensity improves muscle strength and descending command in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changhao; Ranganathan, Vinoth K; Zhang, Junmei; Siemionow, Vlodek; Yue, Guang H

    2016-06-01

    This study explored the effect of high mental effort training (MET) and conventional strength training (CST) on increasing voluntary muscle strength and brain signal associated with producing maximal muscle force in healthy aging. Twenty-seven older adults (age: 75 ± 7.9 yr, 8 women) were assigned into 1 of 3 groups: MET group-trained with low-intensity (30% maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) physical exercise combined with MET, CST group-trained with high-intensity muscle contractions, or control (CTRL) group-no training of any kind. MET and CST lasted for 12 weeks (5 sessions/week). The participants' elbow flexion strength of the right arm, electromyography (EMG), and motor activity-related cortical potential (MRCP) directly related to the strength production were measured before and after training. The CST group had the highest strength gain (17.6%, P boarder-line significance level (12.11%, P = 0.061) and that for CTRL group was only 4.9% (P = 0.539). These results suggest that high mental effort training combined with low-intensity physical exercise is an effective method for voluntary muscle strengthening and this approach is especially beneficial for those who are physically weak and have difficulty undergoing conventional strength training.

  15. The Effect of Two Different Concurrent Training Programs on Strength and Power Gains in Highly-Trained Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petré, Henrik; Löfving, Pontus; Psilander, Niklas

    2018-06-01

    The effects of concurrent strength and endurance training have been well studied in untrained and moderately-trained individuals. However, studies examining these effects in individuals with a long history of resistance training (RT) are lacking. Additionally, few studies have examined how strength and power are affected when different types of endurance training are added to an RT protocol. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of concurrent training incorporating either low-volume, high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 8-24 Tabata intervals at ~150% of VO 2max ) or high-volume, medium-intensity continuous endurance training (CT, 40-80 min at 70% of VO 2max ), on the strength and power of highly-trained individuals. Sixteen highly-trained ice-hockey and rugby players were divided into two groups that underwent either CT (n = 8) or HIIT (n = 8) in parallel with RT (2-6 sets of heavy parallel squats, > 80% of 1RM) during a 6-week period (3 sessions/wk). Parallel squat performance improved after both RT + CT and RT + HIIT (12 ± 8% and 14 ± 10% respectively, p HIIT (4 ± 3%, p HIIT in athletes with a prior history of RT. This indicates that the volume and/or intensity of the endurance training does not influence the magnitude of strength improvements during short periods of concurrent training, at least for highly-trained individuals when the endurance training is performed after RT. However, since VO 2max improved only after RT + HIIT and this is a time efficient protocol, we recommend this type of concurrent endurance training.

  16. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J; Wingood, Gina M

    2016-04-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale consisted of five underlying factors: contraception communication, positive sexual messages, negative sexual messages, sexual history, and condom negotiation. These factors demonstrated high internal consistency and presents evidence to support construct validity. This scale may have utility in assessing the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance sexual communication and sexual health behaviors among young people. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  17. Is a strong sense of self-efficacy always beneficial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas VERHAEREN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of self-efficacy, introduced by Albert Bandura, has received a lot of attention in psychological research. This comes as no surprise, as it encompasses a person's beliefs about his or her capabilities to successfully do what is necessary for desired goals, which is a central mechanism in human agency. The concept has been linked to many outcomes (e.g. motivation and performance, almost exclusively yielding positive results. Recently, however, arguments have risen that a strong sense of selfefficacy may not always be as beneficial as presumed until now. In this article, I review the core of the positive literature on self-efficacy and highlight studies that question and oppose the dominance of these positive self-efficacy associations. Implications for future research, emphasizing the need of a different research approach, are mentioned.

  18. Teacher self-efficacy in instruction and in parent involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Gavora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated self-efficacy of a sample of Slovak primary schoolteachers in two areas: area of instruction and area of parent involvement. Twoinstruments were used: the 16-item Slovak version of Teacher Efficacy Scale ofGibson and Dembo, and ZdUR, a 24-item scale to measure self-efficacy of teacherin parents’ involvement, developed by authors of the present study. The correlation between scores of personal teaching efficacy dimension of TES and ZdUR was 0.58 and between general teaching efficacy of TES and ZdUR was only 0.01. Teachers inthis sample had better scores in all dimensions of ZdUR than those of TES, with theexception of engaging parents in school activities. Scores of four teachers in TES andZdUR were analysed to document the possibility of making the individual profiles ofteacher self-efficacy.

  19. Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emme, Christina; Mortensen, Erik L; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; 26; 615-623 Danish version of 'The COPD self-efficacy scale': translation and psychometric properties The aim of the study was to translate 'The COPD self-efficacy scale' (CSES) into Danish and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Danish version (CSES-DK). CSES...... enables assessment of self-efficacy in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The scale consists of 34 items, describing situations which may cause dyspnoea in patients with COPD. The CSES was translated into Danish using a standard forward-backward translation procedure...... analysis was conducted to compare the internal structure of the Danish version and the American source version. The study included 151 patients with COPD, recruited from three outpatient clinics. Estimates of reliability were in accordance with the original version of CSES (Cronbach's a = 0.97, test...

  20. Improvements in self-efficacy for engaging in patient-centered communication following a course in peer-supervision and communication for medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassesen, Berit; O Connor, Maja; Kjær, Louise Binow

    and Department of Psychology and Behavioral Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Center for Medical Education, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.; belas@clu.au.dk Aim: The aim was to evaluate the outcome of a training course in peer-supervision and communication with the aim of improving medical...... student self-efficacy for engaging in patient-centered communication and examine the influence of course-related motivation to learn, course-related self-efficacy, and medical student well-being at baseline. Methods: A total of 127 graduate school medical students in clinical clerkship who participated...... in a course in peer-supervision and communication completed a pre-course questionnaire package including: 1) The Patient-Centeredness Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PCSEQ), 2) Course-Related Motivation to Learn (CRML), 3) Course-Related Self-Efficacy (CRSE), and 4) the Medical Student Well-Being Index (MSWBI...

  1. Science Self-Efficacy in the Primary Classroom: Using Mixed Methods to Investigate Sources of Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb-Williams, Jane

    2017-04-01

    Self-efficacy has been shown to influence student engagement, effort and performance as well as course selection and future career choice. Extending our knowledge regarding the development of self-efficacy has important implications for educators and for those concerned about the international uptake of science careers. Previous research has identified four sources that may contribute towards self-efficacy: mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion and physiological/affective states. Very little research has been conducted within the school environment that looks at the formation of these sources and yet early school experiences have been posited to be a key factor in girls' lack of engagement in post compulsory science education. This paper investigates children's self-efficacy beliefs in science and reports on findings from mixed method research conducted with 182 children aged between 10 and 12 years. Classroom data were collected through focus groups, individual interviews and surveys. Findings revealed that although girls and boys held similar levels of academic performance in science, many girls underestimated their capability. The four sources of self-efficacy identified by Bandura (1997) plus self-regulation as an additional source, were evident in the children's descriptions, with boys being more influenced by mastery experience and girls by a combination of vicarious experience and physiological/affective states. Girl's appraisal of information appeared to operate through a heuristic process whereby girls disregarded salient information such as teacher feedback in favour of reliance on social comparison. Contextual factors were identified. Implications for science teachers are discussed.

  2. Developing and Validating the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Gretchen L; Stylianou, Amanda M; Hetling, Andrea; Postmus, Judy L

    2017-05-01

    Experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and financial hardship are often intertwined. The dynamics of an abusive relationship may include economic abuse tactics that compromise a survivor's ability to work, pursue education, have access to financial resources, and establish financial skills, knowledge, and security. An increasingly common goal among programs serving IPV survivors is increasing financial empowerment through financial literacy. However, providing financial education alone may not be enough to improve financial behaviors. Psychological factors also play a role when individuals make financial choices. Economic self-efficacy focuses on the individual's perceived ability to perform economic or financial tasks, and may be considered a primary influence on one's ability to improve financial decisions and behaviors. The current study tests the reliability and validity of a Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy with a sample of female survivors of IPV. This study uses a calibration and validation analysis model including full and split-sample exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, assesses for internal consistency, and examines correlation coefficients between economic self-efficacy, economic self-sufficiency, financial strain, and difficulty living with income. Findings indicate that the 10-item, unidimensional Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy demonstrates strong reliability and validity among this sample of IPV survivors. An ability to understand economic self-efficacy could facilitate individualized service approaches and allow practitioners to better support IPV survivors on their journey toward financial empowerment. Given the increase in programs focused on assets, financial empowerment, and economic well-being, the Scale of Economic Self-Efficacy has potential as a very timely and relevant tool in the design, implementation, and evaluation of such programs, and specifically for programs created for IPV survivors.

  3. Nurses' leadership self-efficacy, motivation, and career aspirations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cziraki, Karen; Read, Emily; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Wong, Carol

    2018-02-05

    Purpose This paper aims to test a model examining precursors and outcomes of nurses' leadership self-efficacy, and their aspirations to management positions. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional survey of 727 registered nurses across Canada was conducted. Structural equation modelling using Mplus was used to analyse the data. Findings Results supported the hypothesized model: χ 2 (312) = 949.393; CFI = 0.927; TLI = 0.919; RMSEA = 0.053 (0.049-0.057); SRMR 0.044. Skill development opportunities ( ß = 0.20), temporary management roles ( ß = 0.12) and informal mentoring ( ß = 0.11) were significantly related to nurses' leadership self-efficacy, which significantly influenced motivation to lead ( ß = 0.77) and leadership career aspirations ( ß = 0.23). Motivation to lead was significantly related to leadership career aspirations ( ß = 0.50). Practical implications Nurses' leadership self-efficacy is an important determinant of their motivation and intention to pursue a leadership career. Results suggest that nurses' leadership self-efficacy can be influenced by providing opportunities for leadership mastery experiences and mentorship support. Leadership succession planning should include strategies to enhance nurses' leadership self-efficacy and increase front-line nurses' interest in leadership roles. Originality value With an aging nurse leader workforce, it is important to understand factors influencing nurses' leadership aspirations to develop and sustain nursing leadership capacity. This research study makes an important contribution to the nursing literature by showing that nurses' leadership self-efficacy appears to be an important determinant of their motivation to lead and desire to pursue a career as a nurse leader.

  4. The Predictors for Maternal Self-efficacy in Early Parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Azmoude

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Many parents do not believe in their ability to fulfill their parental responsibilities. Parental self-efficacy is crucial to parents’ sense of well-being and is considered a predictor for quality of life. However, evidence is scarce on the factors that influence parents’ perception of efficacy. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the predictors for parental self-efficacy in the early postpartum period. Methods:This descriptive analytical study was conducted on 150 primiparous women referring to the health care centers of Mashhad during their early postpartum months. For data collection, we used demographic questionnaires, Bates’ Infant Characteristics Questionnaire (ICQ, Scale of Perceived Social Support, Reece’s parent expectations survey (PES, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS. For data analysis, independent T-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and stepwise regression were performed, using SPSS version 16. Results: In this study, a significant association was observed between self-efficacy scores and the parents’ income, educational status, depression, and infant’s gender. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between self-efficacy scores and infant’s characteristics, mother’s satisfaction with childbirth experience, perceived support from friends, infant’s perceived temperament, infant’s gender, mother’s educational level, and depression, which could predict 26.1% of parental self-efficacy. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, the most significant predictors of maternal self-efficacy during the early postpartum months were maternal depression and educational status, infant’s gender, and infant’s characteristics.

  5. Strengthening Self-efficacy through Supportive Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geosciences have had a chronic problem of underrepresentation of students from diverse ethnic, cultural, gender and socio-economic backgrounds. As a community we need to strengthen our support of young scientists from all backgrounds to sustain their enthusiasm and ensure their success in our field. Investing in mentoring programs that empower students and young professionals is one of the best ways to do so. The Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) program, now entering its 20th year, has successfully developed and tested several mentoring models. The personalized, caring and consistent support is one of the key elements of the program's success; since its inception, 90% of SOARS participants have entered graduate school, research or science related careers after graduation. Many of our alumni who are now faculty apply the same mentoring strategies to build self-esteem and perseverance in their students. This presentation will cover the design and implementation of our four mentoring strategies, and provide insights on potential challenges, training aspects and impact assessment. The mentoring strategies include: 1) Multi-faceted, long-term mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students from diverse backgrounds. 2) Empowering advanced students to serve as peer mentors and role models. 3) Training faculty and professional scientists from all backgrounds to become mentors who are aware of diversity issues. 4) Providing mentor training for partner programs and laboratories. All four strategies have contributed to the creation of a mentoring culture in the geosciences.

  6. THE VALUE OF REMOVING DAILY OBSTACLES VIA EVERYDAY PROBLEM SOLVING THEORY: DEVELOPING AN APPLIED NOVEL PROCEDURE TO INCREASE SELF-EFFICACY FOR EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele eArtistico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to develop a novel procedure to increase self-efficacy for exercise. Gains in one’s ability to resolve day-to-day obstacles for entering an exercise routine were expected to cause an increase in self-efficacy for exercise. Fifty-five sedentary participants (did not exercise regularly for at least 4 months prior to the study who expressed an intention to exercise in the near future were selected for the study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: 1 an Experimental Group in which they received a problem-solving training session to learn new strategies for solving day-to-day obstacles that interfere with exercise, 2 a Control Group with Problem Solving Training which received a problem solving training session focused on a typical day-to-day problem unrelated to exercise, or 3 a Control Group which did not receive any problem-solving training. Assessment of obstacles to exercise and perceived self-efficacy for exercise were conducted at baseline; perceived self-efficacy for exercise was reassessed post-intervention (one week later. No differences in perceived challenges posed by obstacles to exercise or self-efficacy for exercise were observed across groups at baseline. The Experimental Group reported greater improvement in self-efficacy for exercise compared to the Control Group with Training (p < 0.01 and the Control Group (p < 0.01. Results of this study suggest that a novel procedure that focuses on removing obstacles to intended planned fitness activities is effective in increasing self-efficacy to engage in exercise among sedentary adults. Implications of these findings for use in applied settings and treatment studies are discussed.

  7. The Value of Removing Daily Obstacles via Everyday Problem-Solving Theory: Developing an Applied Novel Procedure to Increase Self-Efficacy for Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artistico, Daniele; Pinto, Angela Marinilli; Douek, Jill; Black, Justin; Pezzuti, Lina

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a novel procedure to increase self-efficacy for exercise. Gains in one's ability to resolve day-to-day obstacles for entering an exercise routine were expected to cause an increase in self-efficacy for exercise. Fifty-five sedentary participants (did not exercise regularly for at least 4 months prior to the study) who expressed an intention to exercise in the near future were selected for the study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: (1) an Experimental Group in which they received a problem-solving training session to learn new strategies for solving day-to-day obstacles that interfere with exercise, (2) a Control Group with Problem-Solving Training which received a problem-solving training session focused on a typical day-to-day problem unrelated to exercise, or (3) a Control Group which did not receive any problem-solving training. Assessment of obstacles to exercise and perceived self-efficacy for exercise were conducted at baseline; perceived self-efficacy for exercise was reassessed post-intervention (1 week later). No differences in perceived challenges posed by obstacles to exercise or self-efficacy for exercise were observed across groups at baseline. The Experimental Group reported greater improvement in self-efficacy for exercise compared to the Control Group with Training and the Control Group. Results of this study suggest that a novel procedure that focuses on removing obstacles to intended planned fitness activities is effective in increasing self-efficacy to engage in exercise among sedentary adults. Implications of these findings for use in applied settings and treatment studies are discussed.

  8. Teacher self-efficacy in instruction and in parent involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Gavora; Jana Majerčíková

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated self-efficacy of a sample of Slovak primary schoolteachers in two areas: area of instruction and area of parent involvement. Twoinstruments were used: the 16-item Slovak version of Teacher Efficacy Scale ofGibson and Dembo, and ZdUR, a 24-item scale to measure self-efficacy of teacherin parents’ involvement, developed by authors of the present study. The correlation between scores of personal teaching efficacy dimension of TES and ZdUR was 0.58 and between general teach...

  9. Improving body composition and strength in athletes through a 4-month combined martial arts and strength training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Stachoń

    2016-06-01

    2Zakład Sportów Indywidualnych, Akademia Wychowania Fizycznego, ul. Paderewskiego 35, Wrocław       Corresponding author: Dr Aleksandra Jadwiga Stachoń, e-mail: aleksandra.stachon@awf.wroc.pl Departament of Physical Anthropology, University School of Physical Education in Wrocław, al. I.J. Paderewskiego 35, bud. P2, 51-612 Wrocław; Poland Phone: 71 347 33 44         Key words: resistance training, body build, body composition, combat sport.   Abstract Background and aim. Body composition is one of key components of health in both general and athletic populations. In martial arts great significance is attached to the development of mesomorphy and strength, which are crucial for performing offensive and defensive actions during fights. The study proposes to introduce progressive strength training programme - arranged primarily for beginners – in order to improve body composition of non-elite male martial arts competitors. The present study aims to evaluate the changes in body massiveness, body composition and strength in 31 martial arts practitioners from academic sports clubs after a combined martial arts and strength training programme. Material and methods. The 16-week intervention was based on a targeted progressive resistance training protocol developed by Stefaniak [1995]. The anthropometric, physical and motoric measurements were performed twice at four months interval. This programme includes training three times weekly with increased number of repetitions (19-24, number of sets (1-3 and increased loads (5%. Results. After the completion of the training program, significant increase for about 1.8 kgin body mass was observed. Body massiveness (BMI increased from 23.2 ± 1.8 kg/m2 to 23.9 ± 1.8 kg/m2. The analysis using Sheldon’s somatotypes revealed an increase of mesomorphy (from 5.5 to 5.7 and decrease of ectomorphy (from 2.5 to 2.4. The level of endomorphy became stable (2.1. The maximal circumferences of flexed arm, forearm, calf and

  10. Self-efficacy enhancing intervention increases light physical activity in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Janet L; Covey, Margaret K; Kapella, Mary C; Alex, Charles G; McAuley, Edward

    2014-01-01

    People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease lead sedentary lives and could benefit from increasing their physical activity. The purpose of this study was to determine if an exercise-specific self-efficacy enhancing intervention could increase physical activity and functional performance when delivered in the context of 4 months of upper body resistance training with a 12-month follow-up. IN THIS RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL, SUBJECTS WERE ASSIGNED TO: exercise-specific self-efficacy enhancing intervention with upper body resistance training (SE-UBR), health education with upper body resistance training (ED-UBR), or health education with gentle chair exercises (ED-Chair). Physical activity was measured with an accelerometer and functional performance was measured with the Functional Performance Inventory. Forty-nine people with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease completed 4 months of training and provided valid accelerometry data, and 34 also provided accelerometry data at 12 months of follow-up. The self-efficacy enhancing intervention emphasized meeting physical activity guidelines and increasing moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Differences were observed in light physical activity (LPA) after 4 months of training, time by group interaction effect (P=0.045). The SE-UBR group increased time spent in LPA by +20.68±29.30 minutes/day and the other groups decreased time spent in LPA by -22.43±47.88 minutes/day and -25.73±51.76 minutes/day. Changes in LPA were not sustained at 12-month follow-up. There were no significant changes in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time, or functional performance. Subjects spent most of their waking hours sedentary: 72%±9% for SE-UBR, 68%±10% for ED-UBR, and 74%±9% for ED-Chair. The self-efficacy enhancing intervention produced a modest short-term increase in LPA. Further work is needed to increase the magnitude and duration of effect, possibly by targeting LPA.

  11. Effect of football or strength training on functional ability and physical performance in untrained old men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Nielsen, Jens Jung

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 16 weeks of football or strength training on performance and functional ability were investigated in 26 (68.2 ± 3.2 years) untrained men randomized into a football (FG; n = 9), a strength training (ST; n = 9), or a control group (CO; n = 8). FG and ST trained 1.6 ± 0.1 and 1.5 ± 0......% lower (P training for old men improves functional ability and physiological response to submaximal exercise, while football...... additionally elevates maximal aerobic fitness and exhaustive exercise performance....

  12. Computer related self-efficacy and anxiety in older adults with and without mild cognitive impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Katherine V.; Mattek, Nora; Maxwell, Shoshana A.; Dodge, Hiroko H.; Jimison, Holly B.; Kaye, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Background This study examines differences in computer related self-efficacy and anxiety in subgroups of older adults, and changes in those measures following exposure to a systematic training program and subsequent computer use. Methods Participants were volunteers in the Intelligent Systems for Assessment of Aging Changes Study (ISAAC) carried out by the Oregon Center for Aging and Technology. Participants were administered two questionnaires prior to training and again one year later, related to computer self-efficacy and anxiety. Continuous recording of computer use was also assessed for a subset of participants. Results Baseline comparisons by gender, age, education, living arrangement, and computer proficiency, but not cognitive status, yielded significant differences in confidence and anxiety related to specific aspects of computer use. At one-year follow-up, participants reported less anxiety and greater confidence. However, the benefits of training and exposure varied by group and task. Comparisons based on cognitive status showed that the cognitively intact participants benefited more from training and/or experience with computers than did participants with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), who after one year continued to report less confidence and more anxiety regarding certain aspects of computer use. Conclusion After one year of consistent computer use, cognitively intact participants in this study reported reduced levels of anxiety and increased self-confidence in their ability to perform specific computer tasks. Participants with MCI at baseline were less likely to demonstrate increased efficacy or confidence than their cognitively intact counterparts. PMID:23102124

  13. Parental self-efficacy and its measurement - an evaluation of a parental self-efficacy measurement scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purssell, Edward; While, Alison

    2013-05-01

    To field test a parental self-efficacy scale regarding its acceptability and feasibility and to describe parental self-efficacy in a convenience sample of parents with children aged 6 years old or less. Self-care within families is increasingly emphasised in health policy as a means of maximising healthcare resources. This study reports the field testing of a scale designed to measure parental self-efficacy. Cross-sectional survey of parents of children aged 6 years old or less. Subjects were recruited through a parenting internet website (n = 84) and local parenting and community organisations (n = 68) and asked to complete a questionnaire containing the scale. Data collection took place between January and August 2011. The scale, previously validated with an expert panel of professionals, gathered information about parental self-efficacy when administered either directly or through an on-line data collection portal, although there were more missing data when administered via the Internet. Although convenience and self-selecting samples precluded parameter estimation, areas of concern highlighted were difficulties differentiating children with serious illnesses and the use of the Personal Child Health Record. Use of the Internet was widespread, as was use of community pharmacists and nursery staff. Although the primary purpose was not to collect specific data, the data indicated the continuing concern of parents regarding serious illness and where additional investment may be required to meet parental needs and expectations. The previously validated scale can be used to collect information about parental self-efficacy either through a paper questionnaire or the Internet. Although there was slightly more missing data from the Internet version, the ease of its administration makes this an attractive option. Parents generally reported high levels of self-efficacy and satisfaction with services; however, the scale was able to identify areas where further investment

  14. Effects of walking and strength training on walking capacity in individuals with claudication: meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Souza Miranda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Over the past few years, several clinical trials have been performed to analyze the effects of exercise training on walking ability in patients with intermittent claudication (IC. However, it remains unclear which type of physical exercise provides the maximum benefits in terms of walking ability. OBJECTIVE: To analyze, by means of a meta-analysis, the effects of walking and strength training on the walking capacity in patients with IC. METHODS: Papers analyzing the effects of walking and strength training programs in patients with IC were browsed on the Medline, Lilacs, and Cochrane databases. Randomized clinical trials scoring >4 on the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro scale and assessing claudication distance (CD and total walking distance (TWD were included in the review. RESULTS: Walking and strength training yielded increases in CD and TWD (P < 0.05. However, walking training yielded greater increases than strength training (P = 0.02. CONCLUSION: Walking and strength training improve walking capacity in patients with IC. However, greater improvements in TWD are obtained with walking training.

  15. Variable Resistance Training Promotes Greater Strength and Power Adaptations Than Traditional Resistance Training in Elite Youth Rugby League Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Maxence; Louit, Loic; Strokosch, Alasdair; Seitz, Laurent B

    2017-04-01

    Rivière, M, Louit, L, Strokosch, A, and Seitz, LB. Variable resistance training promotes greater strength and power adaptations than traditional resistance training in elite youth rugby league players. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 947-955, 2017-The purpose of this study was to examine the strength, velocity, and power adaptations in youth rugby league players in response to a variable resistance training (VRT) or traditional free-weight resistance training (TRAD) intervention. Sixteen elite youth players were assigned to a VRT or TRAD group and completed 2 weekly upper- and lower-body strength and power sessions for 6 weeks. Training programs were identical except that the VRT group trained the bench press exercise with 20% of the prescribed load coming from elastic bands. Bench press 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and bench press mean velocity and power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM were measured before and after the training intervention, and the magnitude of the changes was determined using effect sizes (ESs). The VRT group experienced larger increases in both absolute (ES = 0.46 vs. 0.20) and relative (ES = 0.41 vs. 0.19) bench press 1RM. Similar results were observed for mean velocity as well as both absolute and relative mean power at 35, 45, 65, 75, and 85% of 1RM. Furthermore, both groups experienced large gains in both velocity and power in the heavier loads but small improvements in the lighter loads. The improvements in both velocity and power against the heavier loads were larger for the VRT group, whereas smaller differences existed between the 2 groups in the lighter loads. Variable resistance training using elastic bands may offer a greater training stimulus than traditional free-weight resistance training to improve upper-body strength, velocity, and power in elite youth rugby league players.

  16. Suppression of endogenous testosterone production attenuates the response to strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, Thue; Andersen, Marianne; Brixen, Kim

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that suppression of endogenous testosterone would inhibit the adaptations to strength training in otherwise healthy men. Twenty-two young men with minor experience with strength training participated in this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded intervention study....... The subjects were randomized to treatment with the GnRH analog goserelin (3.6 mg) or placebo (saline) subcutaneously every 4 wk for 12 wk. The strength training period of 8 wk, starting at week 4, included exercises for all major muscles [3-4 sets per exercise x 6-10 repetitions with corresponding 6- to 10......), whereas it remained constant in the placebo group. The goserelin group showed no changes in isometric knee extension strength after training, whereas the placebo group increased from 240.2 +/- 41.3 to 264.1 +/- 35.3 Nm (P

  17. Effects of Heavy Squat Training on a Vibration Platform on Maximal Strength and Jump Performance in Resistance-Trained Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Roger L; Linton, Joshua T; Hammer, Adam M

    2018-03-06

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine maximal strength and jump performance outcomes of heavy squat training on a low-amplitude (<1.0 mm peak-to-peak) vibration platform (VP). Nineteen recreationally resistance-trained college-aged men (22.3 ± 1.66 years) completed the 6-week study. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two training groups: SQT (n = 10) performed conventional back squats on the floor; SQTV (n = 9) performed back squats on the VP. Supervised training took place over 12 sessions (2 days/week) which utilized an aggressive strength development protocol (85-95 % 1-RM), which was identically followed by both groups. After the intervention, both groups showed (via t-test) a marked increase (p < 0.001) in 1-RM squat strength (SQT = 34.5 kg vs SQTV = 36.2 kg), but there was no significant difference (via mixed ANOVA) between groups (p = 0.875). Standing broad jump performance increased by an average of 5-6 cm, but was not significantly changed in either group (SQT; p = 0.199, SQTV; p = 0.087). In conclusion, squats performed with whole body vibration (WBV) were not superior to conventional squats with respect to maximal strength and jump performance outcomes. It appears that there was no additive effect of superimposed WBV training in strength beyond that caused by strength training alone. This study can help strength conditioning professionals and athletes make an informed decision on whether to invest in a VP and use WBV as an alternative or a complementary mode of training.

  18. Outcome expectancy and self-efficacy: theoretical implications of an unresolved contradiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David M

    2010-11-01

    According to self-efficacy theory, self-efficacy--defined as perceived capability to perform a behavior--causally influences expected outcomes of behavior, but not vice versa. However, research has shown that expected outcomes causally influence self-efficacy judgments, and some authors have argued that this relationship invalidates self-efficacy theory. Bandura has rebutted those arguments saying that self-efficacy judgments are not invalidated when influenced by expected outcomes. This article focuses on a contradiction in Bandura's rebuttal. Specifically, Bandura has argued (a) expected outcomes cannot causally influence self-efficacy, but (b) self-efficacy judgments remain valid when causally influenced by expected outcomes. While the debate regarding outcome expectancies and self-efficacy has subsided in recent years, the inattention to this contradiction has led to a disproportionate focus on self-efficacy as a causal determinant of behavior at the expense of expected outcomes.

  19. Training strategy of explosive strength in young female volleyball players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The 8-week combined jump and ball throwing training can significantly improve muscular performance in young female volleyball players. These findings may be useful for all physical education teachers and volleyball coaches.

  20. Injuries in women associated with a periodized strength training and running program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, K L; Harman, E A; Worsham, R E; Sykes, M B; Frykman, P N; Backus, V L

    2001-02-01

    Forty-five women participated in a 24-week physical training program designed to improve lifting, load carriage, and running performance. Activities included weightlifting, running, backpacking, lift and carry drills, and sprint running. Physicians documented by passive surveillance all training-related injuries. Thirty-two women successfully completed training program. Twenty-two women (48.9%) suffered least 1 injury during training, but only 2 women had to drop out of the study because of injuries. The rate of injury associated with lost training time was 2.8 injuries per 1,000 training hours of exposure. Total clinic visits and days lost from training were 89 and 69, respectively. Most injuries were the overuse type involving the lower back, knees, and feet. Weightlifting accounted for a majority of the lost training days. A combined strength training and running program resulted in significant performance gains in women. Only 2 out of 45 participants left the training program cause of injuries.

  1. Masculinity in the Making: Men’s Increased Consumption of Strength Training

    OpenAIRE

    Sherlock, Roger; Freeman, Olivia; Dunne, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the body, masculinity and the consumption of body-focussed activities. It examines the meaning and importance of strength training for men. Strength training is of interest because its increase in popularity is occurring at a particular point in time when a growing number of men are experiencing insecurities over their masculine identities as a result of recent socioeconomic changes. This paper proposes that men today are facing a dilemma in terms ...

  2. Effects of neck strength training on isometric neck strength in rugby union players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Kevin; Green, Brian S; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a neck strengthening program on the isometric neck strength profile of male rugby union players. Controlled laboratory study. Professional rugby union club. Fifteen professional and 10 semiprofessional rugby union players. The 15 professional players undertook a 5-week neck strengthening intervention, which was performed twice per week, whereas the 10 semiprofessional players acted as the control group. Isometric strength of the neck musculature was tested using a hand-held dynamometer, for flexion (F), extension (E), left-side flexion (LSF), and right-side flexion (RSF). Preintervention and postintervention evaluations were undertaken. No significant between-group differences in isometric neck strength were noted preintervention. A significant main effect for time was observed (P isometric neck strength in all planes after the 5-week intervention (F preintervention = 334.45 ± 39.31 N vs F postintervention 396.05 ± 75.55 N; E preintervention = 606.19 ± 97.34 vs E postintervention = 733.88 ± 127.16 N; LSF preintervention = 555.56 ± 88.34 N vs LSF postintervention = 657.14 ± 122.99 N; RSF preintervention = 570.00 ± 106.53 N vs RSF postintervention = 668.00 ± 142.18 N). No significant improvement in neck strength was observed for control group participants. The results of the present study indicate that a 5-week neck strengthening program improves isometric neck strength in rugby union players, which may have implications for injury prevention, screening, and rehabilitation. The strengthening program described in the present study may facilitate rehabilitation specialists in the development of neck injury prevention, screening, and rehabilitation protocols.

  3. Effects of weightlifting vs. kettlebell training on vertical jump, strength, and body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, William H; Coburn, Jared W; Brown, Lee E; Spiering, Barry A

    2012-05-01

    Effects of weightlifting vs. kettlebell training on vertical jump, strength, and body composition. J Strength Cond Res 26(5): 1199-1202, 2012-The present study compared the effects of 6 weeks of weightlifting plus traditional heavy resistance training exercises vs. kettlebell training on strength, power, and anthropometric measures. Thirty healthy men were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (a) weightlifting (n = 13; mean ± SD: age, 22.92 ± 1.98 years; body mass, 80.57 ± 12.99 kg; height, 174.56 ± 5.80 cm) or (b) kettlebell (n = 17; mean ± SD: age, 22.76 ± 1.86 years; body mass, 78.99 ± 10.68 kg; height, 176.79 ± 5.08 cm) and trained 2 times a week for 6 weeks. A linear periodization model was used for training; at weeks 1-3 volume was 3 × 6 (kettlebell swings or high pull), 4 × 4 (accelerated swings or power clean), and 4 × 6 (goblet squats or back squats), respectively, and the volume increased during weeks 4-6 to 4 × 6, 6 × 4, and 4 × 6, respectively. Participants were assessed for height (in centimeters), body mass (in kilograms), and body composition (skinfolds). Strength was assessed by the back squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM), whereas power was assessed by the vertical jump and power clean 1RM. The results of this study indicated that short-term weightlifting and kettlebell training were effective in increasing strength and power. However, the gain in strength using weightlifting movements was greater than that during kettlebell training. Neither method of training led to significant changes in any of the anthropometric measures. In conclusion, 6 weeks of weightlifting induced significantly greater improvements in strength compared with kettlebell training. No between-group differences existed for the vertical jump or body composition.

  4. Functional and muscular adaptations in an experimental model for isometric strength training in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Krüger

    Full Text Available Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionally, either a sedentary control group (CT or a regular endurance training group (ET groups were used as controls. Performance capacity was determined by maximum holding time (MHT and treadmill spirometry, respectively. Furthermore, muscle fiber types and diameter, muscular concentration of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK, succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa, and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 were determined. In a further approach, the effect of ST on glucose intolerance was tested in diabetic mice. In mice of the ST group we observed an increase of MHT in isometric strength tests, a type II fiber hypertrophy, and an increased GLUT4 protein content in the membrane fraction. In contrast, in mice of the ET group an increase of VO(2max, a shift to oxidative muscle fiber type and an increase of oxidative enzyme content was measured. Furthermore strength training was effective in reducing glucose intolerance in mice fed a high fat diet. An effective murine strength training model was developed and evaluated, which revealed marked differences in adaptations known from endurance training. This approach seems also suitable to test for therapeutical effects of strength training.

  5. Influence of career self-efficacy beliefs on career exploration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The career self-efficacy has positive and strong statistically significant association with past performances accomplishment of the students (r= .752, P< .01). However, it was statistically significant and has weak relationship with career exploration behaviour (r= .214, P<.05).Verbal persuasion is more significant association (r ...

  6. Teachers' Emotional Intelligence and Sense of Self-efficacy Beliefs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-three randomly selected EFL teachers were taken as a sample of the study. ... of the questionnaires were analyzed by using one sample t-test and Pearson ... teachers‟ EI and self-efficacy beliefs were found low as the observed means ...

  7. Older workers: stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiesa, R.; Toderi, S.; Dordoni, P.; Henkens, K.; Fiabane, E.M.; Setti, I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The present study aims to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, we intend to test the measurement invariance of Henkens (2005)’s age stereotypes scale across two age group, respectively under 50 years and 50 years and older.

  8. A self-efficacy approach to holistic student development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    This experience of success raises feelings of self efficacy, thus the student will be more likely to continue to apply him/herself to the specific activity, increasing chances of subsequent success. Vicarious experiences refer to the observation of the behaviour/ attitudes of other people and cognitive appraisal of what led to their.

  9. Humility and Forgiveness as Predictors of Teacher Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Ferudun; Erdogan, Onur

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the predictive influence of teachers' humility and forgiveness on their self-efficacy perceptions. The population of this research consists of teachers who work at public primary and secondary schools located in the central districts of Ankara, Turkey. The sample of the study is composed of 303 primary and secondary school…

  10. Students' Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy: Does the Teaching Method Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaho, Ernest; Olomi, Donath R.; Urassa, Goodluck Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the various entrepreneurship teaching methods in Uganda and how these methods relate to entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE). Design/methodology/approach: A sample of 522 final year students from selected universities and study programs was surveyed using self-reported questionnaires. Findings: There…

  11. The effects of Self- efficacy and Motivational Orientations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Self- efficacy and Motivational Orientations on Academic Achievement of Freshman Science Students. ... Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal ... Data through questionnaire, students' grades in four introductory science courses and College English collected at the end of the semester. Regression ...

  12. The Relationship Between Self-Efficacy and Help Evasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the relationship between self-efficacy and not wanting help to change health behaviors. Method. All employees in the Danish police department were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire. All respondents expressing a desire to change health behaviors in relation to...

  13. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Help Evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard; Villadsen, Ebbe; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between self-efficacy and not wanting help to change health behaviors. Method: All employees in the Danish police department were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire. All respondents expressing a desire to change health behaviors in relation to smoking ("n" = 845), alcohol…

  14. Self Efficacy, Self Esteem, and Gender as Factors Predicting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For most new students, adjusting to an unfamiliar academic setting can induce homesickness. While most studies have investigated homesickness as a negative outcome of relocation, the present study extended the literature by examining the influence of self esteem, self efficacy, and gender on homesickness among ...

  15. Background Characteristics as Predictors of Greek Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkolia, Aikaterini; Dimitrios, Belias A.; Koustelios, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between elementary and secondary teachers' background characteristics and constructs of self-efficacy, using the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale--TSES, during a difficult economic period for Greece and other European countries. Design/methodology/approach Equation modeling…

  16. Enhancing Students' Self-Efficacy in Making Positive Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddan, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Field Project A is an elective course in the Bachelor of Exercise Science program at Griffith University and includes elements of both career development learning and work-integrated learning. This paper aims to determine the effects of the learning activities and assessment items developed for the course on students' self-efficacy in making…

  17. Evidence for a Multidimensional Self-Efficacy for Exercise Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, W. M.; Wilson, P. M.; Hall, C. R.; Fraser, S. N.; Murray, T. C.

    2008-01-01

    This series of three studies considers the multidimensionality of exercise self-efficacy by examining the psychometric characteristics of an instrument designed to assess three behavioral subdomains: task, scheduling, and coping. In Study 1, exploratory factor analysis revealed the expected factor structure in a sample of 395 students.…

  18. Opportunities to Learn for Teachers’ Self-Efficacy and Enthusiasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mahler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify opportunities to learn for teachers’ motivational orientations. Motivational orientations are relevant characteristics of psychological functioning, which are important for the behavior of a teacher and mandatory for effective teaching. We focus on three domains: self-efficacy, subject-specific enthusiasm, and enthusiasm for teaching the subject. Self-efficacy covers the belief of an individual that he or she is capable of performing required behaviors to produce a desired outcome. Teacher enthusiasm is an affective teacher orientation that is related to a specific subject and to teaching this specific subject. Different opportunities to learn are considered for teachers’ motivational orientations. Since teacher education particularly focuses on the acquisition of professional knowledge, we added a further exploratory focus to the study and investigated the relationships between motivational orientations and professional knowledge (content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. 134 biology teachers participated in the study. The results reveal that teacher education at university, the attendance in professional development courses, and self-study provide opportunities to learn for self-efficacy and enthusiasm for teaching the subject. Moreover, we found self-efficacy and subject-specific enthusiasm to be positively related to pedagogical content knowledge.

  19. Knowledge, self-efficacy and behavioural intent towards AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate knowledge, self-efficacy, and behavioural intent towards AIDS prevention behaviours among culturally diverse secondary school pupils in South Africa. Design: Randomised study. Setting: Three urban secondary schools in Pietersburg, South Africa. Participants: Three hundred and sixty six Grade ...

  20. Teachers' Self-efficacy Beliefs: The Relationship between Gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the relationship between gender and self-efficacy beliefs in instructional strategies, classroom management and student engagement among senior high school teachers in Kumasi metropolis, as most previous studies tend to focused on the developed countries other than developing countries like ...

  1. Relationship between self-efficacy, academic achievement and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    50.08), and there is no significant difference in their self-efficacy between sexes (t (98) = 0.161, p> 0.1), but there is a statistically significant difference in achievement between sexes (t (98) = 0.68, p< 0.1) and also a significant relationship exists ...

  2. Self-efficacy beliefs of youth entering the labour market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kot Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the psychological meaning of school-to-work transition. Transition to taking up new social roles entails numerous difficulties, and that is why young people see it as a crisis point. According to researchers one of the predictors of effective transition to the labour market is self-efficacy.

  3. Ability Self-Estimates and Self-Efficacy: Meaningfully Distinct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubany, Shawn T.; Hansen, Jo-Ida C.

    2010-01-01

    Conceptual differences between self-efficacy and ability self-estimate scores, used in vocational psychology and career counseling, were examined with confirmatory factor analysis, discriminate relations, and reliability analysis. Results suggest that empirical differences may be due to measurement error or scale content, rather than due to the…

  4. Sport Management Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela; Franco, Dan; Multon, Karen; Achen, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    Grounded in a social cognitive theoretical perspective, this study explores the career decision-making self-efficacy (CDSE) and vocational identity development process for college students interested or majoring in sport management. While a popular undergraduate major, little research has investigated the specific factors that influence different…

  5. Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, and College Exam Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Jennifer; Dunn, Samantha; Lloyd, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    A student's level of self-efficacy and test anxiety directly impacts their academic success (Abdi, Bageri, Shoghi, Goodarzi, & Hosseinzadeh, 2012; Hassanzadeh, Ebrahimi, & Mahdinejad, 2012). When a student doubts themself and their own ability to test well, the students' sole focus becomes worrying about poor grades and cannot focus on…

  6. Frontline nurse managers' confidence and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyk, Jennifer; Siedlecki, Sandra L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-05-01

    This study was focused on determining relationships between confidence levels and self-efficacy among nurse managers. Frontline nurse managers have a pivotal role in delivering high-quality patient care while managing the associated costs and resources. The competency and skill of nurse managers affect every aspect of patient care and staff well-being as nurse managers are largely responsible for creating work environments in which clinical nurses are able to provide high-quality, patient-centred, holistic care. A descriptive, correlational survey design was used; 85 nurse managers participated. Years in a formal leadership role and confidence scores were found to be significant predictors of self-efficacy scores. Experience as a nurse manager is an important component of confidence and self-efficacy. There is a need to develop educational programmes for nurse managers to enhance their self-confidence and self-efficacy, and to maintain experienced nurse managers in the role. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Computer Self-Efficacy of University Faculty in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Hanadi Kassem

    2008-01-01

    Faculty use of technology is a critical issue in higher education; administrators and students are expecting faculty instruction to incorporate technology in classroom and distance education. Competition is demanding technologically proficient graduates for schools and colleges. Research indicates that computer self-efficacy (CSE) may be one…

  8. Relationships among motivation (self-efficacy and task value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Writing performance was determined by a robust testing procedure which is usually employed in high-stakes writing tests. The results showed that four motivational constructs (self-efficacy, intrinsic value, attainment value and cost), and four writing strategy categories (metacognitive, cognitive, affective and effort regulation) ...

  9. Factors Affecting Students' Self-Efficacy in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien

    2011-01-01

    Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature…

  10. Computer self-efficacy and computer attitude as correlates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Internet as a useful tool that supports teaching and learning is not in full use in most secondary schools in Nigeria hence limiting the students from maximizing the potentials of Internet in advancing their academic pursuits. This study, therefore, examined the extent to which computer self-efficacy and computer attitude ...

  11. Examining Relationship between Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkoglu, Muhammet Emin; Cansoy, Ramazan; Parlar, Hanifi

    2017-01-01

    Teaching in the 21st century poses many challenges for teachers, and thus, they need to take on more roles in their schools to meet the expectations of students, parents and the school community. In this regard, this study examined the relationship between teachers' self-efficacy beliefs and their job satisfaction. Participants of the study were…

  12. Dating Violence and Self-Efficacy for Delayed Sex among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In South Africa, dating violence is known to be widespread among adolescents, and is therefore a major public health issue because of its association with sexual risk behaviours. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between dating violence and self-efficacy for delayed sex among school-going ...

  13. Social activities, self-efficacy, game attitudes, and game addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eui Jun; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2011-04-01

    This study examines whether social activities with parents, online and offline social self-efficacy, and attitudes toward gaming are associated with the degree of game addiction among adolescents. Using data from a survey of 600 middle- and high-school students in South Korea, we tested the relationships of personal characteristics (grade point average and time spent on gaming each day), social self-efficacy (both on- and offline), general social activities (with parents, friends, and teachers), gaming activities with parents, and attitudes toward gaming (those of self, parents, friends, and teachers) with the degree of game addiction. In addition, we conducted ANOVA tests to determine the differences among three groups: non-addicts (NA), possible (mild or moderate) addicts (PA), and Internet addicts (IA). The results show that social self-efficacy in the real world (offline) was negatively related with the degree of game addiction, whereas social self-efficacy in the virtual world (online) indicated a positive association. Social activities with parents are negatively associated with game addiction, although no relationship is found between gaming activities with parents and game addiction. Parental attitude toward gaming has a negative relationship with the addiction. Results and implications are discussed.

  14. Self-Efficacy and social support of Academy cricketers | Cowan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... This article aims to provide an initial insight into the role that South African provincial cricket academies play in talent development of cricketers by reflecting on possible changes in academy cricketers' self-efficacy and perceived social ...

  15. Self Efficacy And Religiosity As Determinants Of Cognitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effectiveness of self efficacy component of the health action process approach (HAPA), and religiosity in the treatment of substance use disorders. Results indicated that belief leading to the adoption, initiation and maintenance of health behaviours must be explicitly conceived by patients as a ...

  16. INTEGRATING ENTREPRENEURIAL SELF-EFFICACY INTO EDUCATION AT UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljerka Sedlan-König

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Educational institutions are urged to provide more enterprising individuals who will either act as entrepreneurs, or will be able to manage their careers and lives in an entrepreneurial way. The purpose of this study is to address the role of teaching at universities in maximizing entrepreneurial self-efficacy, and to examine the possibility to maximize the likelihood of entrepreneurial behavior by enhancing entrepreneurial self-efficacy with university students. The study investigates the impact that entrepreneurial self-efficacy has on the development of entrepreneurial motivation and behavior using a sample of 324 students of Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek in Croatia. The results of the research indicate that students demonstrate a higher propensity for entrepreneurial behavior and a higher probability of starting their own business if they feel more self-efficient. The research has also highlighted that teaching at universities does not significantly improve the perception of entrepreneurial self-efficacy in students and that firsthand experience has a more important role in that. An important conclusion to emerge from this research is that in order to influence entrepreneurial behavior, it is necessary to make better use of experience-based learning and supplement university courses with components of informal and/or non-formal education.

  17. Gender Differences In Academic Self-Efficacy Beliefs And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether or not there were differences between male and female students in the way they perceived the conditions under which they studied collaboratively. It was also designed to find out if the collaborative learning context had a differential association with the self-efficacy of males ...

  18. Teachers' Self-Efficacy vs. Parental Involvement: Prediction and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Yael; Kostelitz, Yifat

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the influence of teachers' views regarding parental involvement on their perception of self-efficacy. Data were collected from a sample of 319 Israeli elementary schools teachers. A path analysis procedure was employed to test the mediating effect of personal background and organizational variables and perceived parental…

  19. Physical Self-Efficacy and Academic Level as Predictors Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self–efficacy is the belief in one's capabilities to organize and execute courses of action required to manage prospective situations. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of self-efficacy, academic level and gender in predicting university maladjustment. A total of 200 undergraduate students (100 male and 100 ...

  20. The relationship between perceived self-efficacy and adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between perceived self-efficacy and adherence to self-care activities in type 2 diabetic clients. Low adherence to diabetic self-care activities result in increased risks of developing chronic serious and life-threatening complications with increased morbidity ...

  1. Factors affecting students' self-efficacy in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Mart van Dinther; Prof. dr. Mien Segers; Prof. dr. Filip Dochy

    2011-01-01

    Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning.

  2. Older workers : stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiesa, Rita; Toderi, Stefano; Dordoni, Paola; Henkens, Kene; Fiabane, Elena Maria; Setti, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, the authors intend to test the measurement invariance of Henkens's (2005) age stereotypes scale across two age group, respectively, under 50 and 50 years

  3. Older workers : Stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiesa, R.; Toderi, S.; Dordoni, P.; Henkens, K.; Fiabane, E.M.; Setti, I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between organizational age stereotypes and occupational self-efficacy. First, the authors intend to test the measurement invariance of Henkens’s (2005) age stereotypes scale across two age group, respectively, under 50 and 50 years and

  4. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  5. Effect of strength training on regional hypertrophy of the elbow flexor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Marcos D M; Szmuchrowski, Leszek A; Goulart, Karine N O; Couto, Bruno P

    2016-10-01

    Muscle hypertrophy is the main structural adaptation to strength training. We investigated the chronic effects of strength training on muscle hypertrophy in different regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Eleven untrained men (21.8 ± 1.62 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to determine the proximal, medial, distal, and mean cross-sectional areas (CSA) of the elbow flexors. The volunteers completed 12 weeks of strength training. The training protocol consisted of 4 sets of 8-10 maximum repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion. The interval between sets was 120 s. The training frequency was 3 sessions per week. The magnetic resonance images verified the presence of significant and similar hypertrophy in the distal, medial, and proximal portions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle hypertrophy may be assessed using only the medial CSA. We should not expect different degrees of hypertrophy among the regions of the elbow flexor muscles. Muscle Nerve 54: 750-755, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effects of Role-Playing Scenarios on the Self-efficacy of Students in Resisting Against Substance Addiction: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatay, Gülnaz; Gürarslan Baş, Nazan

    2017-01-01

    During the first phases of adolescent development, young people have little self-efficacy and resistance against substance use. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of role-playing scenarios on the self-efficacy of students in resisting substance use. A pre test and post test study design was used with a single group. The study was carried out with 245 secondary school students. The scenario-based training, developed by the researchers, was presented by the school counselors once a week for 4 weeks. For this purpose, a booklet of scenarios was prepared for the teachers. The role-playing scenarios were intended to improve adolescents' abilities to say "no" to substance offers, to prevent them from becoming addicted to certain substances, and to call for help if needed. The data of the study were collected using the Personal Information Form and the Self-Efficacy for Adolescences Protecting Substance Abuse Scale . The obtained data were assessed using percentages, chi-square, t test, and F test in the SPSS software. Results showed that, after the training, the mean score in the Self-Efficacy for Adolescences Protecting Substance Abuse Scale increased significantly (103.20 ± 20.00) compared with before the training (92.11 ± 17.08) ( P < .05). Short-term outcomes of the class-based scenario training were observed to be effective in the development of students' self-efficacy to resist the temptations of substance use.

  7. Response switching and self-efficacy in Peer Instruction classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Schell, Julie; Ho, Andrew; Lukoff, Brian; Mazur, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Peer Instruction, a well-known student-centered teaching method, engages students during class through structured, frequent questioning and is often facilitated by classroom response systems. The central feature of any Peer Instruction class is a conceptual question designed to help resolve student misconceptions about subject matter. We provide students two opportunities to answer each question—once after a round of individual reflection and then again after a discussion round with a peer. The second round provides students the choice to "switch" their original response to a different answer. The percentage of right answers typically increases after peer discussion: most students who answer incorrectly in the individual round switch to the correct answer after the peer discussion. However, for any given question there are also students who switch their initially right answer to a wrong answer and students who switch their initially wrong answer to a different wrong answer. In this study, we analyze response switching over one semester of an introductory electricity and magnetism course taught using Peer Instruction at Harvard University. Two key features emerge from our analysis: First, response switching correlates with academic self-efficacy. Students with low self-efficacy switch their responses more than students with high self-efficacy. Second, switching also correlates with the difficulty of the question; students switch to incorrect responses more often when the question is difficult. These findings indicate that instructors may need to provide greater support for difficult questions, such as supplying cues during lectures, increasing times for discussions, or ensuring effective pairing (such as having a student with one right answer in the pair). Additionally, the connection between response switching and self-efficacy motivates interventions to increase student self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester by helping students develop early mastery or

  8. Condom promotion in Belize: self-efficacy of Belizean nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, W A

    2011-12-01

    Outside of abstinence, correct and consistent condom use is the single most effective tool to prevent the transmission human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This is particularly true in countries such as Belize where incidence rates remain high. Women are physiologically at higher risk for HIV, and many feel powerless to insist on condom use. Although nurses are in a position to promote condom use, variables that influence this decision are not clearly understood. In this study, we examined variables that influence a nurses' self-efficacy to promote and teach condom use to women specifically to reduce their HIV risk. Data related to self-efficacy, vicarious experience related to condom use promotion and a nurse's sexual relationship power were collected from nurses practising in Belize (n = 60). These data were cross-sectional and collected at the annual nurses' conference. Both years of nursing education and positive vicarious experience promoting and teaching condom use to women were positively correlated to their self-efficacy to do so. Vicarious experience was significantly correlated to self-efficacy in a subgroup of nurses with lower sexual relationship power but not in those with higher sexual relationship power. When designing HIV continuing education programmes for nurses in Belize, it is important to consider level of nursing education and access to vicarious experience such as mentoring and role modelling. An additional factor to consider is the influence that a nurse's power in her own primary sexual relationship may play in the formation of her self-efficacy. © 2011 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Effect of strength training with blood flow restriction on muscle power and submaximal strength in eumenorrheic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana L S; Neto, Gabriel R; Sousa, Maria S C; Dias, Ingrid; Vianna, Jeferson; Nunes, Rodolfo A M; Novaes, Jefferson S

    2017-03-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training stimulates muscle size and strength by increasing muscle activation, accumulation of metabolites and muscle swelling. This method has been used in different populations, but no studies have evaluated the effects of training on muscle power and submaximal strength (SS) in accounted for the menstrual cycle. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of strength training (ST) with BFR on the muscle power and SS of upper and lower limbs in eumenorrheic women. Forty untrained women (18-40 years) were divided randomly and proportionally into four groups: (i) high-intensity ST at 80% of 1RM (HI), (ii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM combined with partial blood flow restriction (LI + BFR), (iii) low-intensity ST at 20% of 1RM (LI) and d) control group (CG). Each training group performed eight training sessions. Tests with a medicine ball (MB), horizontal jump (HJ), vertical jump (VJ), biceps curls (BC) and knee extension (KE) were performed during the 1st day follicular phase (FP), 14th day (ovulatory phase) and 26-28th days (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle. There was no significant difference among groups in terms of the MB, HJ, VJ or BC results at any time point (P>0·05). SS in the KE exercise was significantly greater in the LI + BFR group compared to the CG group (P = 0·014) during the LP. Therefore, ST with BFR does not appear to improve the power of upper and lower limbs and may be an alternative to improve the SS of lower limbs of eumenorrheic women. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Link Between Positive Clinician-Conveyed Expectations of Treatment Effect and Pain Reduction in Knee Osteoarthritis, Mediated by Patient Self-Efficacy.

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    Hsiao-Wei Lo, Grace; Balasubramanyam, Ajay S; Barbo, Andrea; Street, Richard L; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2016-07-01

    A prior knee osteoarthritis (OA) trial found that provider-conveyed expectations for treatment success were associated with pain improvement. We hypothesized this relationship was mediated by patient self-efficacy, since expectations of improvement may enhance one's ability to control health behaviors, and therefore health. Our aim was to examine whether self-efficacy was a mediator of the relationship observed in this trial. A secondary analysis of a 3-arm (traditional acupuncture, sham acupuncture, and wait list) trial for knee OA was conducted. Those in the acupuncture groups were equally randomized to acupuncturists trained to communicate a high or neutral expectation of treatment success (e.g., using language conveying high or unclear likelihood that acupuncture would reduce knee pain). A modified Arthritis Self-Efficacy Questionnaire and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain subscale were administered. Linear regression analyses were used to examine whether patient self-efficacy mediated the relationship between provider communication style and knee pain at 3 months. High-expectation provider communication was associated with patient self-efficacy, β coefficient of 0.14 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.01, 0.28). Self-efficacy was associated with WOMAC pain, β coefficient of -9.29 (95% CI -11.11, -7.47), while controlling for the provider communication style. The indirect effect a × b of -1.36 for high versus neutral expectation (bootstrap 95% CI -2.80, -0.15; does not include 0), supports the conclusion that patient self-efficacy mediates the relationship between provider-communicated expectations of treatment effects and knee pain. Our findings suggest that clinician-conveyed expectations can enhance the benefit of treatments targeting knee OA symptoms, mediated by improved patient self-efficacy. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  11. Feasibility of progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward after hip fracture surgery.

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    Lise Kronborg

    Full Text Available Patients with a hip fracture lose more than 50% knee-extension strength in the fractured limb within one week of surgery. Hence, immediate progressive strength training following hip fracture surgery may be rational, but the feasibility unknown.To examine the feasibility of in-hospital progressive strength training implemented in the acute ward following hip fracture surgery, based on pre-specified criteria for feasibility.A prospective cohort study conducted in an acute orthopedic hip fracture unit at a university hospital. A consecutive sample of 36 patients, 18 with a cervical and 18 with a trochanteric hip fracture (27 women and 9 men, mean (SD age of 79.4 (8.3 years were included between June and December 2012.A daily (on weekdays program of progressive knee-extension strength training for the fractured limb, using ankle weight cuffs in 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum loadings.The primary outcome was the change in training load (kg during the knee-extension strength training. The secondary outcomes were changes in hip fracture-related pain and maximal isometric knee-extension strength.The strength training was commenced at a mean of 2.4 (0.7 days after surgery. The training loads (kilograms lifted increased from 1.6 (0.8 to 4.3 (1.7 kg over 4.3 (2.2 training sessions (P<.001. The maximal isometric knee-extension strength of the fractured limb increased from 0.37 (0.2 to 0.61 (0.3 Nm/kg (P<.001, while the average strength deficit in the fractured limb decreased from 50% to 32% (% non-fractured, P<.001. Only 3 of 212 sessions were not performed because of severe hip fracture-related pain.Progressive knee-extension strength training of the fractured limb commenced in the acute ward seems feasible, and may reduce strength asymmetry between limbs without hip pain interfering. The clinical efficacy needs confirmation in a randomized controlled design.ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01616030.

  12. Exploring the Relationship between Endurance and Strength Training in Power Sports

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    Rohleva, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research work is to track down the level of relation between strength and endurance in training exercises of handball athletes. The most successful ratio has been established during work with two groups of 10 players each, all of whom are university students. They were trained, respectively, according to the general training…

  13. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy and strength gain: strategies and mechanisms.

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    Ozaki, Hayao; Loenneke, J P; Thiebaud, R S; Abe, T

    2015-03-01

    Cycle training is widely performed as a major part of any exercise program seeking to improve aerobic capacity and cardiovascular health. However, the effect of cycle training on muscle size and strength gain still requires further insight, even though it is known that professional cyclists display larger muscle size compared to controls. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the effects of cycle training on muscle size and strength of the lower extremity and the possible mechanisms for increasing muscle size with cycle training. It is plausible that cycle training requires a longer period to significantly increase muscle size compared to typical resistance training due to a much slower hypertrophy rate. Cycle training induces muscle hypertrophy similarly between young and older age groups, while strength gain seems to favor older adults, which suggests that the probability for improving in muscle quality appears to be higher in older adults compared to young adults. For young adults, higher-intensity intermittent cycling may be required to achieve strength gains. It also appears that muscle hypertrophy induced by cycle training results from the positive changes in muscle protein net balance.

  14. Effect of Strength Training on Rate of Force Development in Older Women

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    Gurjao, Andre Luiz Demantova; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken; Carneiro, Nelson Hilario; Goncalves, Raquel; Ferreira de Moura, Rodrigo; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Altimari, Leandro Ricardo; Gobbi, Sebastiao

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of an 8-week strength training (ST) program on the rate of force development (RFD) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in older women. Seventeen women (M age = 63.4 years, SD = 4.9) without previous ST experience were randomly assigned to either a control (n = 7) or training (n = 10) group. A leg-press isometric test was…

  15. Effects of Nintendo Wii Fit Plus training on ankle strength with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Jun, Hyun-Ju; Heo, Myoung

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to examine the effects of a training program using the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus on the ankle muscle strengths of subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted using subjects in their 20s who had functional ankle instability. They were randomized to a strengthening training group and a balance training group with 10 subjects in each, and they performed an exercise using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus for 20 minutes. In addition, every participant completed preparation and finishing exercises for 5 minutes, respectively. [Results] The muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion and dorsiflexion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the strengthening training group. Furthermore, the muscle strengths after conducting plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, eversion, and inversion significantly increased at the angular velocities of 60° and 120° in the balance training group. [Conclusion] The balance training group using Nintendo Wii Fit Plus showed better results than the strengthening training group. Consequently, it is recommended to add the balance training program of the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus to conventional exercise programs to improve ankle muscle strength in functional ankle instability at a low cost.

  16. Endurance Training Intensity Does Not Mediate Interference to Maximal Lower-Body Strength Gain during Short-Term Concurrent Training.

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    Fyfe, Jackson J; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Hanson, Erik D; Stepto, Nigel K; Bishop, David J

    2016-01-01

    We determined the effect of concurrent training incorporating either high-intensity interval training (HIT) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) on maximal strength, counter-movement jump (CMJ) performance, and body composition adaptations, compared with single-mode resistance training (RT). Twenty-three recreationally-active males (mean ± SD: age, 29.6 ± 5.5 y; [Formula: see text], 44 ± 11 mL kg -1 ·min -1 ) underwent 8 weeks (3 sessions·wk -1 ) of either: (1) HIT combined with RT (HIT+RT group, n = 8), (2) work-matched MICT combined with RT (MICT+RT group, n = 7), or (3) RT performed alone (RT group, n = 8). Measures of aerobic capacity, maximal (1-RM) strength, CMJ performance and body composition (DXA) were obtained before (PRE), mid-way (MID), and after (POST) training. Maximal (one-repetition maximum [1-RM]) leg press strength was improved from PRE to POST for RT (mean change ± 90% confidence interval; 38.5 ± 8.5%; effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence interval; 1.26 ± 0.24; P body lean mass was similarly increased for RT (4.1 ± 2.0%; ES; 0.33 ± 0.16; P = 0.023) and MICT+RT (3.6 ± 2.4%; ES; 0.45 ± 0.30; P = 0.052); however, this change was attenuated for HIT+RT (1.8 ± 1.6%; ES; 0.13 ± 0.12; P = 0.069). We conclude that concurrent training incorporating either HIT or work-matched MICT similarly attenuates improvements in maximal lower-body strength and indices of CMJ performance compared with RT performed alone. This suggests endurance training intensity is not a critical mediator of interference to maximal strength gain during short-term concurrent training.

  17. Review of educational interventions to increase traditional birth attendants' neonatal resuscitation self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendhi, Marvesh M; Cartmell, Kathleen B; Newman, Susan D; Premji, Shahirose; Pope, Charlene

    2018-05-21

    Annually, up to 2.7 million neonatal deaths occur worldwide, and 25% of these deaths are caused by birth asphyxia. Infants born in rural areas of low-and-middle-income countries are often delivered by traditional birth attendants and have a greater risk of birth asphyxia-related mortality. This review will evaluate the effectiveness of neonatal resuscitation educational interventions in improving traditional birth attendants' knowledge, perceived self-efficacy, and infant mortality outcomes in low-and-middle-income countries. An integrative review was conducted to identify studies pertaining to neonatal resuscitation training of traditional birth attendants and midwives for home-based births in low-and-middle-income countries. Ten studies met inclusion criteria. Most interventions were based on the American Association of Pediatrics Neonatal Resuscitation Program, World Health Organization Safe Motherhood Guidelines and American College of Nurse-Midwives Life Saving Skills protocols. Three studies exclusively for traditional birth attendants reported decreases in neonatal mortality rates ranging from 22% to 65%. These studies utilized pictorial and oral forms of teaching, consistent in addressing the social cognitive theory. Studies employing skill demonstration, role-play, and pictorial charts showed increased pre- to post-knowledge scores and high self-efficacy scores. In two studies, a team approach, where traditional birth attendants were assisted, was reported to decrease neonatal mortality rate from 49-43/1000 births to 10.5-3.7/1000 births. Culturally appropriate methods, such as role-play, demonstration, and pictorial charts, can contribute to increased knowledge and self-efficacy related to neonatal resuscitation. A team approach to training traditional birth attendants, assisted by village health workers during home-based childbirths may reduce neonatal mortality rates. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  18. Does self-efficacy mediate the relationship between transformational leadership behaviours and healthcare workers' sleep quality? A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Fehmidah; Nielsen, Karina

    2009-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to investigate the longitudinal relationship between transformational leadership behaviours and employees' sleep quality, and the mediating effects of self-efficacy. Although there is evidence for the influential role of transformational leadership on health outcomes, researchers have used either attitude outcomes (e.g. job satisfaction) or softer health measures, such as general well-being. Specific measures of well-being such as sleep quality have not been used, despite its association with working conditions. A longitudinal design was used to collect data from Danish healthcare workers at time 1 in 2005 (n = 447) and 18 months later at time 2 in 2007 (n = 274). Structural equation modelling was used to investigate the relationships between transformational leadership, self-efficacy and sleep quality at both time points independently (cross-sectionally) and longitudinally. For all constructs, time 2 measures were influenced by the baseline level. Direct relationships between transformational leadership and sleep quality were found. This relationship was negative cross-sectionally at both time points, but positive between baseline and follow-up. The relationship between leadership and employees' sleep quality was not mediated by employees' self-efficacy. Our results indicate that training managers in transformational leadership behaviours may have a positive impact on healthcare workers' health over time. However, more research is needed to examine the mechanisms by which transformational leadership brings about improved sleep quality; self-efficacy was not found to be the explanation.

  19. Perceived exercise self-efficacy as a predictor of exercise behavior in individuals aging with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thilo; Kratz, Anna; Kehn, Matthew; Jensen, Mark P; Groah, Suzanne; Ljungberg, Inger H; Molton, Ivan R; Bombardier, Charles

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesized association between exercise self-efficacy and exercise behavior, controlling for demographic variables and clinical characteristics, in a sample of individuals with spinal cord injuries. A cross-sectional national survey of 612 community-dwelling adults with spinal cord injury in the United States ranging from 18 to 89 yrs of age was conducted. Sample consisted of 63.1% men with a mean (SD) duration of 15.8 (12.79) yrs postinjury; 86.3% reported using a wheelchair. Self-efficacy was the only independent variable that consistently predicted all four exercise outcomes. Self-efficacy beliefs were significantly related to frequency and intensity of resistance training (R(2) change = 0.08 and 0.03, respectively; P exercise frequency and intensity (R(2) change = 0.01 and 0.03, respectively; P exercise. Self-efficacy beliefs play an important role as predictors of exercise. Variations in exercise intensity along the age continuum have implications for exercise prescription and composition. Future research should replicate findings with objective activity measures.

  20. The impact of leadership programme on self-esteem and self-efficacy in school: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C S Wong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leadership training programs by experiential learning among adolescents are very popular worldwide and in particular developed countries, but there exists few studies which formally assessed their impact on the psychological well-being of program participants. This study evaluated the effectiveness of leadership training programs on self-esteem and self-efficacy among adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: a total of 180 students of the same grade of one secondary school were randomized into an intervention (n = 50 and a control group (n = 130. The students in the intervention group participated in a 6-month program of leadership training and service learning, while the control group did not participate in any training. Their self-esteem and self-efficacy were assessed by Rosenberg Self-Esteem questionnaire and Chinese Adaptation of the General Self-Efficacy Scale, respectively, before and after the program. Both scales have been recognized internationally as valid and reliable survey instruments to measure these psychological attributes. The scores were compared by Student's tests according to gender. A total of 180 students were enrolled during the study period October, 2009 to May, 2010. Their mean age was 15.18 years (0.62 and 56.7% were male. Students allocated to the intervention and control group had statistically similar demographic characteristics except gender (male 36.0% vs. 64.6%, p = 0.001. Overall, the self-esteem scores increased by 1.28 and decreased by 0.30 (p = 0.161 while the self-efficacy scores increased by 0.26 and decreased by 0.76 (p = 0.429 in the intervention and control group, respectively. Among female students, the intervention group showed significant improvements in both self-esteem (2.38 vs. -0.24, p<0.001 and self-efficacy (1.32 vs. -0.04, p = 0.043. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Leadership training program were not found to be effective to enhance self-esteem and self-efficacy

  1. Relationship Between Depression and Strength Training in Survivors of the Ischemic Stroke

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    Aidar Felipe José

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cerebral Vascular Accident is responsible for a significant increase in the mortality rate in individuals who have suffered this condition, regardless of the level of subsequent disability. This study aimed to analyze the influence of a strength training program on indicators of depression in survivors of the ischemic stroke. The study sample included subjects from both genders who were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG consisting of 11 subjects aged 51.7 8.0 years, and a control group (CG consisting of 13 subjects aged 52.5 7.7 years. The EG underwent 12 weeks of strength training. Assessment was made in the pre-test before training and at the re-test after 12 weeks of training. We used the Beck Depression Inventory and evaluated 1RM. Significant differences in depression were found between post-test and pretest measurements (Δ% = -21.47%, p = 0,021 in the EG; furthermore, there were significant differences in all indicators of depression between the EG and CG after completing 12 weeks of training. There were significant gains in strength of the EG in relation to the CG. There was a negative correlation between the strength gains as determined with the 1RM test and the levels of depression, especially in lower-limb exercises. The results of this study suggest that improvements in strength are negatively correlated with levels of depression. Improvements in strength are therefore associated with a reduction in levels of depression.

  2. Isometric parameters in the monitoring of maximal strength, power, and hypertrophic resistance-training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Heikki; Walker, Simon; Lähitie, Anuliisa; Häkkinen, Keijo; Avela, Janne

    2018-02-01

    This study monitored strength-training adaptations via isometric parameters throughout 2 × 10 weeks of hypertrophic (HYP I-II) or 10 weeks maximum strength (MS) followed by 10 weeks power (P) training with untrained controls. Trainees performed bilateral isometric leg press tests analyzed for peak force (maximal voluntary contraction (MVC)) and rate of force development (RFD) every 3.5 weeks. These parameters were compared with dynamic performance, voluntary and electrically induced isometric contractions, muscle activity, and cross-sectional area (CSA) in the laboratory before and after 10 and 20 weeks. RFD increased similarly during the first 7 weeks (HYP I, 44% ± 53%; MS, 48% ± 55%, P strength/power training, while MVC cannot distinguish between strength or muscle mass changes. Monitoring RFD provided important information regarding plateaus in RFD improvement, which were observed in dynamic explosive performances after HYP II compared with P.

  3. Preservation of eccentric strength in older adults: Evidence, mechanisms and implications for training and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Marc; Macintyre, Donna L; Eng, Janice J; Narici, Marco V; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Reid, W Darlene

    2010-06-01

    Overall reductions in muscle strength typically accompany the aging process. However, older adults show a relatively preserved capacity of producing eccentric strength. The preservation of eccentric strength in older adults is a well-established phenomenon, occurring indiscriminately across different muscle groups, independent of age-related architectural changes in muscle structure and velocity of movement. The mechanisms for the preservation of eccentric strength appear to be mechanical and cellular in origin and include both passive and active elements regulating muscle stiffness. The age-related accumulation of non-contractile material in the muscle-tendon unit increases passive stiffness, which might offer mechanical advantage during eccentric contractions. In addition, the preserved muscle tension and increased instantaneous stiffness of old muscle fibers during stretch increase active stiffness, which might enhance eccentric strength. The fact that the preservation of eccentric strength is present in people with chronic conditions when compared to age-matched healthy controls indicates that the aging process per se does not exclusively mediate the preservation of eccentric strength. Physical inactivity, which is common in elderly and people with chronic conditions, is a potential factor regulating the preservation of eccentric strength. When compared to concentric strength, the magnitude of preservation of eccentric strength in older adults ranges from 2% to 48% with a mean value of 21.6% from all studies. This functional reserve of eccentric strength might be clinically relevant, especially to initiate resistance training and rehabilitation programs in individuals with low levels of strength. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Concurrent Strength and HIIT Training in Octogenarians with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Aznar-Laín, Susana; Mañas, Asier; Castellanos, Juan; Alcázar, Julián; Ara, Ignacio; Mata, Esmeralda; Daimiel, Rosa; García-García, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the short- and long-term effects of concurrent strength and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on octogenarian COPD patients, nine males (age = 84.2 ± 2.8 years, BMI = 29.3 ± 2.3) with low to severe COPD levels (2.1 ± 1.5 BODE index) underwent a supervised 9-week strength and HIIT exercise program. Training had a significant (p HIIT training increases physical fitness in the oldest-old COPD patients, and has potential long-term benefits.

  5. Strength Training for Middle- and Long-Distance Performance: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Nicolas; Mujika, Inigo; Arvisais, Denis; Roubeix, Marie; Binet, Carl; Bosquet, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    To assess the net effects of strength training on middle- and long-distance performance through a meta-analysis of the available literature. Three databases were searched, from which 28 of 554 potential studies met all inclusion criteria. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated and weighted by the inverse of variance to calculate an overall effect and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Subgroup analyses were conducted to determine whether the strength-training intensity, duration, and frequency and population performance level, age, sex, and sport were outcomes that might influence the magnitude of the effect. The implementation of a strength-training mesocycle in running, cycling, cross-country skiing, and swimming was associated with moderate improvements in middle- and long-distance performance (net SMD [95%CI] = 0.52 [0.33-0.70]). These results were associated with improvements in the energy cost of locomotion (0.65 [0.32-0.98]), maximal force (0.99 [0.80-1.18]), and maximal power (0.50 [0.34-0.67]). Maximal-force training led to greater improvements than other intensities. Subgroup analyses also revealed that beneficial effects on performance were consistent irrespective of the athletes' level. Taken together, these results provide a framework that supports the implementation of strength training in addition to traditional sport-specific training to improve middle- and long-distance performance, mainly through improvements in the energy cost of locomotion, maximal power, and maximal strength.

  6. Public awareness and self-efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in communities and outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A multi-level analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Young Sun; Shin, Sang Do; Song, Kyoung Jun; Hong, Sung Ok; Kim, Young Taek; Lee, Dong-Woo; Cho, Sung-Il

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to test the association between capacity of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) at community level and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Emergency medical service (EMS)-treated OHCAs with cardiac etiology in Korea between 2012 and 2013 were analyzed, excluding cases witnessed by EMS providers. Exposure variables were five indexes of community CPR capacity: awareness of CPR (CPR-Awareness), any training experience of CPR (CPR-Any-Training), recent CPR training within the last 2 years (CPR-Recent-Training), CPR training with a manikin (CPR-Manikin-Training), and CPR self-efficacy (CPR-Self-Efficacy). All measures of capacity were calculated as aggregated values for each county level using the national Korean Community Health Survey database of 228,921 responders sampled representatively from 253 counties in 2012. Endpoints were bystander CPR (BCPR) and survival to discharge. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (AORs) per 10% increment in community CPR capacity using multi-level logistic regression models, adjusting for potential confounders at individual levels. Of 29,052 eligible OHCAs, 11,079 (38.1%) received BCPR. Patients were more likely to receive BCPR in communities with higher proportions of residents with CPR-Awareness, CPR-Any-Training, CPR-Recent-Training, CPR-Manikin-Training, and CPR-Self-Efficacy (all pCPR-Awareness, 1.10 (1.04-1.15) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.08 (1.03-1.13) for CPR-Self-Efficacy. For survival to discharge, AORs (95% CIs) were 1.34 (1.23-1.47) per 10% increment in CPR-Awareness, 1.36 (1.20-1.54) for CPR-Any-Training, and 1.29 (1.15-1.45) for CPR-Self-Efficacy. Higher CPR capacity at community level was associated with higher bystander CPR and survival to discharge rates after OHCA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Strength Training Program for Primary Care Patients, Central Pennsylvania, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vijay A.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Messina, Dino A.; Stuckey, Heather L.; Curry, William J.; Chuang, Cynthia H.; Sherwood, Lisa L.; Hess, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Primary care providers can recommend strength training programs to use “Exercise as Medicine,” yet few studies have examined the interest of primary care patients in these programs. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of primary care patients in central Pennsylvania. Interest in participating in free group-based strength training and weight control programs was assessed, in addition to patient demographics, medical history, and quality of life. Results Among 414 patients, most (61.0%) were aged 54 or older, and 64.0% were female. More patients were interested in a strength training program (55.3%) than in a weight control program (45.4%). Nearly three-quarters (72.8%) of those reporting 10 or more days of poor physical health were interested in a strength training program compared with 49.5% of those reporting no days of poor physical health. After adjusting for potential confounders, those reporting poorer physical health had 2.7 greater odds (95% confidence interval, 1.4–5.1) of being interested in a strength training program compared with those reporting better physical health. Patients with hypertension, diabetes, or high cholesterol were not more interested in a strength training program than those without these conditions. Conclusion Primary care practices may consider offering or referring patients to community-based strength training programs. This study observed high levels of interest in these widely available programs. Practices may also consider screening and referring those with poorer physical health, as they may be the most interested and have the most to gain from participating. PMID:24967829

  8. Effects of yoga, strength training and advice on back pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Bergström, Gunnar; Jensen, Irene; Hagberg, Jan; Kwak, Lydia

    2017-03-29

    Among the working population, non-specific low-back pain and neck pain are one of the most common reasons for sickness absenteeism. The aim was to evaluate the effects of an early intervention of yoga - compared with strength training or evidence-based advice - on sickness absenteeism, sickness presenteeism, back and neck pain and disability among a working population. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 159 participants with predominantly (90%) chronic back and neck pain. After screening, the participants were randomized to kundalini yoga, strength training or evidence-based advice. Primary outcome was sickness absenteeism. Secondary outcomes were sickness presenteeism, back and neck pain and disability. Self-reported questionnaires and SMS text messages were completed at baseline, 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months. The results did not indicate that kundalini yoga and strength training had any statistically significant effects on the primary outcome compared with evidence-based advice. An interaction effect was found between adherence to recommendations and sickness absenteeism, indicating larger significant effects among the adherers to kundalini yoga versus evidence-based advice: RR = 0.47 (CI 0.30; 0.74, p = 0.001), strength training versus evidence-based advice: RR = 0.60 (CI 0.38; 0.96, p = 0.032). Some significant differences were also found for the secondary outcomes to the advantage of kundalini yoga and strength training. Guided exercise in the forms of kundalini yoga or strength training does not reduce sickness absenteeism more than evidence-based advice alone. However, secondary analyses reveal that among those who pursue kundalini yoga or strength training at least two times a week, a significantly reduction in sickness absenteeism was found. Methods to increase adherence to treatment recommendations should be further developed and applied in exercise interventions. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01653782, date of registration: June, 28

  9. Effects of resistance training, detraining, and retraining on strength and functional capacity in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakugawa, Raphael Luiz; Moura, Bruno Monteiro; Orssatto, Lucas Bet da Rosa; Bezerra, Ewertton de Souza; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2018-05-17

    The interruption of training (detraining) results in loss of the gains acquired. Partial retention could occur after detraining, and variation in training stimuli may optimize retraining adaptations. To evaluate the effect of a resistance-retraining program on strength and functional capacity performance after a detraining period. Ten elderly men and women (63-68 years) completed 12 weeks of training, 16 weeks of detraining, and 8 weeks of retraining. One-repetition maximum (1-RM) at 45° leg press, maximum isometric knee extension torque, rate of torque development (RTD), 30-s sit-to-stand, timed up and go, and stair ascent and descent tests were assessed. The 1-RM increased after training (p training (p training period (p > 0.05). For RTD and 30-s sit-to-stand, there was an increase after retraining when compared to pre-training values (p training and post-training periods (p functional capacity at the same level obtained after a detraining period. The inclusion of an explosive strength session in retraining period improves RTD and 30-s sit-to-stand performance and can accelerate the recovery of strength after a detraining period.

  10. Effects of instability versus traditional resistance training on strength, power and velocity in untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Muñoz, José Luis; Monroy, Antonio J Antón; Jodra Jiménez, Pablo; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel V

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was compare the effects of a traditional and an instability resistance circuit training program on upper and lower limb strength, power, movement velocity and jumping ability. Thirty-six healthy untrained men were assigned to two experimental groups and a control group. Subjects in the experimental groups performed a resistance circuit training program consisting of traditional exercises (TRT, n = 10) or exercises executed in conditions of instability (using BOSU® and TRX®) (IRT, n = 12). Both programs involved three days per week of training for a total of seven weeks. The following variables were determined before and after training: maximal strength (1RM), average (AV) and peak velocity (PV), average (AP) and peak power (PP), all during bench press (BP) and back squat (BS) exercises, along with squat jump (SJ) height and counter movement jump (CMJ) height. All variables were found to significantly improve (p velocity and jumping ability. Key PointsSimilar adaptations in terms of gains in strength, power, movement velocity and jumping ability were produced in response to both training programs.Both the stability and instability approaches seem suitable for healthy, physically-active individuals with or with limited experience in resistance training.RPE emerged as a useful tool to monitor exercise intensity during instability strength training.

  11. A comparison of the effects of 6 weeks of traditional resistance training, plyometric training, and complex training on measures of strength and anthropometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Christopher J; Lamont, Hugh S; Garner, John C

    2012-02-01

    Complex training (CT; alternating between heavy and lighter load resistance exercises with similar movement patterns within an exercise session) is a form of training that may potentially bring about a state of postactivation potentiation, resulting in increased dynamic power (Pmax) and rate of force development during the lighter load exercise. Such a method may be more effective than either modality, independently for developing strength. The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of resistance training (RT), plyometric training (PT), and CT on lower body strength and anthropometrics. Thirty recreationally trained college-aged men were trained using 1 of 3 methods: resistance, plyometric, or complex twice weekly for 6 weeks. The participants were tested pre, mid, and post to assess back squat strength, Romanian dead lift (RDL) strength, standing calf raise (SCR) strength, quadriceps girth, triceps surae girth, body mass, and body fat percentage. Diet was not controlled during this study. Statistical measures revealed a significant increase for squat strength (p = 0.000), RDL strength (p = 0.000), and SCR strength (p = 0.000) for all groups pre to post, with no differences between groups. There was also a main effect for time for girth measures of the quadriceps muscle group (p = 0.001), the triceps surae muscle group (p = 0.001), and body mass (p = 0.001; post hoc revealed no significant difference). There were main effects for time and group × time interactions for fat-free mass % (RT: p = 0.031; PT: p = 0.000). The results suggest that CT mirrors benefits seen with traditional RT or PT. Moreover, CT revealed no decrement in strength and anthropometric values and appears to be a viable training modality.

  12. Effects of a low-intensity strength-training program on knee-extensor strength and functional ability of frail older people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, M.H.; Stemmerik, L.; Boshuizen, H.C.

    2000-01-01

    This study's purpose was to investigate whether a 10-week low-intensity strength-training program could improve strength of the knee extensors and functional ability. Participants 65 years and older with low knee-extensor muscle strength were randomized into an exercise (n = 11) and a control group

  13. The Relationship Between Goal Orientation, Social Comparison Responses, Self-Efficacy, and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, Carmen; Buunk, Abraham P.; Dijkstra, Arie; Peiro, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined whether social comparison responses (identification and contrast in social comparison) mediated the relationship between goal orientation (promotion and prevention) and self-efficacy, and whether self-efficacy was subsequently related with a better performance. As

  14. Comparison of Periodized and Non-Periodized Resistance Training on Maximal Strength: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tyler D; Tolusso, Danilo V; Fedewa, Michael V; Esco, Michael R

    2017-10-01

    Periodization is a logical method of organizing training into sequential phases and cyclical time periods in order to increase the potential for achieving specific performance goals while minimizing the potential for overtraining. Periodized resistance training plans are proposed to be superior to non-periodized training plans for enhancing maximal strength. The primary aim of this study was to examine the previous literature comparing periodized resistance training plans to non-periodized resistance training plans and determine a quantitative estimate of effect on maximal strength. All studies included in the meta-analysis met the following inclusion criteria: (1) peer-reviewed publication; (2) published in English; (3) comparison of a periodized resistance training group to a non-periodized resistance training group; (4) maximal strength measured by 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squat, bench press, or leg press. Data were extracted and independently coded by two authors. Random-effects models were used to aggregate a mean effect size (ES), 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and potential moderators. The cumulative results of 81 effects gathered from 18 studies published between 1988 and 2015 indicated that the magnitude of improvement in 1RM following periodized resistance training was greater than non-periodized resistance training (ES = 0.43, 95% CI 0.27-0.58; P training status (β = -0.59; P = 0.0305), study length (β = 0.03; P = 0.0067), and training frequency (β = 0.46; P = 0.0123) were associated with a change in 1RM. These results indicate that undulating programs were more favorable for strength gains. Improvements in 1RM were greater among untrained participants. Additionally, higher training frequency and longer study length were associated with larger improvements in 1RM. These results suggest that periodized resistance training plans have a moderate effect on 1RM compared to non-periodized training plans. Variation in training stimuli

  15. POWER-TYPE STRENGTH TRAINING IN MIDDLE-AGED MEN AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Surakka

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Muscle strength declines with increasing age, and the power-type strength characteristics decline even more drastically than the maximal muscle strength. Therefore, it is important to design training programmes specifically for sedentary middle-aged people to effectively improve the power-type strength in leg and trunk muscles. To be suitable for the target group, the exercise programmes should be feasible, motivating and easy to practice. The aim of this study was to design and investigate the effects and feasibility of a power-type strength training programme in 226 middle-aged men and women, with 26 persons as non-training controls. The subjects trained three times a week during 22 weeks, in 12 groups with exercise classes of 10-20 subjects, and using no or very little external equipment. All training sessions were controlled and supervised by an professional instructor. Vertical squat jump, standing long jump, 20 metre running time, maximal anaerobic cycling power, maximal oxygen uptake, and angular trunk muscle flexion and extension velocities were measured before and after the training period to evaluate the training effects. Questionnaires concerning employment, physical activity, smoking, musculoskeletal symptoms and exercise motives were also filled in before and after the training period. The greatest improvements were achieved in vertical squat jump (18% and in angular trunk flexion (14% and extension (16% velocities. An external loading totalling 2.2 kg (attached in ankles increased the height in vertical squat jump by 23% and maximal anaerobic cycling power by 12%, these improvements were significant compared with subjects in no load training group (p = 0.03 in vertical squat jump and p = 0.05 in maximal anaerobic cycling power. Exercise induced injuries occurred in 19% of men and 6% of women. Low back symptoms decreased in exercisers by 12% and knee symptoms (increased by 4% during the intervention. Of all subjects, 24% dropped out

  16. Predictors of Weight Loss Success: Exercise vs. Dietary Self-Efficacy and Treatment Attendance

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Shannon; Barry, Danielle; Petry, Nancy M.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-treatment diet and exercise self-efficacies can predict weight loss success. Changes in diet self-efficacy across treatment appear to be even stronger predictors than baseline levels, but research on changes in exercise self-efficacy is lacking. Using data from a pilot study evaluating tangible reinforcement for weight loss (N = 30), we examined the impact of changes in diet and exercise self-efficacy on outcomes. Multiple regression analyses indicated that treatment attendance and change...

  17. HUBUNGAN SELF EFFICACY AKADEMIK DENGAN PROKRASTINASI AKADEMIK PADA MAHASISWA YANG SEDANG MENYELESAIKAN SKRIPSI

    OpenAIRE

    Annisa Rosni Zusya; Sari Zakiah Akmal

    2016-01-01

    Having graduated not at the right time is a common phenomena among college students and  procrastinantion which is delaying the final assignment become the reason. One of factors that affect  procrastination is self-efficacy. Self-efficacy that is predicting academic achievement is academic self-efficacy. This research uses quantitative methods to examine the relationship between academic self-efficacy and academic procrastination among 210 students who are completing the last assignment. Ins...

  18. A Systematic Review of Isometric Lingual Strength-Training Programs in Adults With and Without Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Victoria S; Zhang, Bin; Haines, Morgan B; Kelchner, Lisa N

    2017-05-17

    This systematic review summarizes the effects of isometric lingual strength training on lingual strength and swallow function in adult populations. Furthermore, it evaluates the designs of the reviewed studies and identifies areas of future research in isometric lingual strength training for dysphagia remediation. A comprehensive literature search of 3 databases and additional backward citation search identified 10 studies for inclusion in the review. The review reports and discusses the isometric-exercise intervention protocols, pre- and postintervention lingual-pressure data (maximum peak pressures and lingual-palatal pressures during swallowing), and oropharyngeal swallowing measures such as penetration-aspiration scales, oropharyngeal residue and duration, lingual volumes, and quality-of-life assessments. Studies reported gains in maximum peak lingual pressures following isometric lingual strength training for both healthy adults and select groups of individuals with dysphagia. However, due to the variability in study designs, it remains unclear whether strength gains generalize to swallow function. Although isometric lingual strength training is a promising intervention for oropharyngeal dysphagia, the current literature is too variable to confidently report specific therapeutic benefits. Future investigations should target homogenous patient populations and use randomized controlled trials to determine the efficacy of this treatment for individuals with dysphagia.

  19. Upper Extremity Muscle Volumes and Functional Strength After Resistance Training in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Melissa; Vidt, Meghan E.; Eggebeen, Joel D.; Simpson, W. Greg; Miller, Michael E.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Saul, Katherine R.

    2014-01-01

    Aging leads to a decline in strength and an associated loss of independence. The authors examined changes in muscle volume, maximum isometric joint moment, functional strength, and 1-repetition maximum (1RM) after resistance training (RT) in the upper extremity of older adults. They evaluated isometric joint moment and muscle volume as predictors of functional strength. Sixteen healthy older adults (average age 75 ± 4.3 yr) were randomized to a 6-wk upper extremity RT program or control group. The RT group increased 1RM significantly (p strength (p = .003), isometric shoulder-adduction moment (p = .041), elbow-flexor volume (p = .017), and shoulder-adductor volume (p = .009). Shoulder-muscle volumes and isometric moments were good predictors of functional strength. The authors conclude that shoulder strength is an important factor for performing functional reaching and pulling tasks and a key target for upper extremity RT interventions. PMID:22952203

  20. Strength Training and Kinematics Parameters of Gait in Healthy Female Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydar Sadeghi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was under taken to consider the effect of strength training on some kinematics parameters of gait (step length, cadence and speed walking. Methods & Materials: Twenty-four healthy elderly women (with average and standard deviation age of 61.53±2.84 years, height of 157.1±5.5 cm, weight of 69.13±7.6 kg and BMI 28.1±3.6 kg/m participated in this study. The strength of lower limb assessed using leg press test. The subjects were randomly divided in to control and experimental group. Video camera, 3DMax, Premier and Photoshop soft ware’s were used to measure speed walking, cadence and step length before and after training program. The control group continued their daily activity, while experimental group were in eight weeks for strength training for lower limb and body stabilizer muscles. Within group differences using T-test for independent groups and between group differences were analyzed using by T-test for dependent group before and after training at significant level of 0.05. Results: The changes of speed walking and lower limb strength weren't significant in control group. While significant differences observed in step length and speed walking and lower limb strength in experimental group. In comparison between groups, except of cadence, step length, speed walking and lower limb strength showed significant increase in experimental group. Conclusion: The results confirmed the effectiveness of strength training and increasing lower limb and stabilizer muscles strength on step length and speed walking in healthy elder women.