WorldWideScience

Sample records for storage emergency state

  1. SOLID-STATE STORAGE DEVICE WITH PROGRAMMABLE PHYSICAL STORAGE ACCESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    a storage device action request, and the storage device evaluating a first rule of the one or more rules by determining if the received request fulfills request conditions comprised in the first rule, and in the affirmative the storage device performing request actions comprised in the first rule......Embodiments of the present invention includes a method of operating a solid-state storage device, comprising a storage device controller in the storage device receiving a set of one or more rules, each rule comprising (i) one or more request conditions to be evaluated for a storage device action...... request received from a host computer, and (ii) one or more request actions to be performed on a physical address space of a non-volatile storage unit in the solid-state storage device in case the one or more request conditions are fulfilled; the method further comprises: the storage device receiving...

  2. Using Emergent and Internal Catchment Data to Elucidate the Influence of Landscape Structure and Storage State on Hydrologic Response in a Piedmont Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, S. M.; Harman, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Many studies have sought to unravel the influence of landscape structure and catchment state on the quantity and composition of water at the catchment outlet. These studies run into issues of equifinality where multiple conceptualizations of flow pathways or storage states cannot be discriminated against on the basis of the quantity and composition of water alone. Here we aim to parse out the influence of landscape structure, flow pathways, and storage on both the observed catchment hydrograph and chemograph, using hydrometric and water isotope data collected from multiple locations within Pond Branch, a 37-hectare Piedmont catchment of the eastern US. This data is used to infer the quantity and age distribution of water stored and released by individual hydrogeomorphic units, and the catchment as a whole, in order to test hypotheses relating landscape structure, flow pathways, and catchment storage to the hydrograph and chemograph. Initial hypotheses relating internal catchment properties or processes to the hydrograph or chemograph are formed at the catchment scale. Data from Pond Branch include spring and catchment discharge measurements, well water levels, and soil moisture, as well as three years of high frequency precipitation and surface water stable water isotope data. The catchment hydrograph is deconstructed using hydrograph separation and the quantity of water associated with each time-scale of response is compared to the quantity of discharge that could be produced from hillslope and riparian hydrogeomorphic units. Storage is estimated for each hydrogeomorphic unit as well as the vadose zone, in order to construct a continuous time series of total storage, broken down by landscape unit. Rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions are parameterized for each hydrogeomorphic unit as well as the catchment as a whole, and the relative importance of changing proportions of discharge from each unit as well as storage in controlling the variability in the catchment

  3. Emerging electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badwal, Sukhvinder P. S.; Giddey, Sarbjit S.; Munnings, Christopher; Bhatt, Anand I.; Hollenkamp, Anthony F.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical cells and systems play a key role in a wide range of industry sectors. These devices are critical enabling technologies for renewable energy; energy management, conservation, and storage; pollution control/monitoring; and greenhouse gas reduction. A large number of electrochemical energy technologies have been developed in the past. These systems continue to be optimized in terms of cost, life time, and performance, leading to their continued expansion into existing and emerging market sectors. The more established technologies such as deep-cycle batteries and sensors are being joined by emerging technologies such as fuel cells, large format lithium-ion batteries, electrochemical reactors; ion transport membranes and supercapacitors. This growing demand (multi billion dollars) for electrochemical energy systems along with the increasing maturity of a number of technologies is having a significant effect on the global research and development effort which is increasing in both in size and depth. A number of new technologies, which will have substantial impact on the environment and the way we produce and utilize energy, are under development. This paper presents an overview of several emerging electrochemical energy technologies along with a discussion some of the key technical challenges. PMID:25309898

  4. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a method for converting metals to metal hydrides at low pressures for hydrogen storage systems with high efficiency with respect to volume...

  5. State Certification of Underground Storage Tanks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1998-01-01

    .... The audit was performed in response to a Senate Armed Services Committee inquiry about whether state environmental regulatory agencies would be able to certify that DoD underground storage tanks...

  6. EMERGENCY STATES IN ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gurevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes in detail potential emergency states in patients with different stages of arterial hypertension with special attention to diagnosis and rational management of hypertensive crisis. Differentiated approach to management of different forms of hypertensive crisis is specified.

  7. Radionuclide diagnosis of emergency states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishmukhametov, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Solution of emergency state radionuclide diagnostics from the technical point of view is provided by the application of the mobile quick-operating equipment in combination with computers, by the use of radionuclides with acceptable for emergency medicine characteristics and by development of radionuclide investigation data propcessing express-method. Medical developments include the study of acute disease and injury radioisotope semiotics, different indication diagnostic value determining, comparison of the results, obtained during radionuclide investigation, with clinicolaboratory and instrumental data, separation of methodical complex series

  8. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  9. Every storage function is a state function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, H.L.; Willems, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that for linear dynamical systems with quadratic supply rates, a storage function can always be written as a quadratic function of the state of an associated linear dynamical system. This dynamical system is obtained by combining the dynamics of the original system with the dynamics of

  10. State of emergency medicine in Azerbaijan

    OpenAIRE

    Sule, Harsh; Kazimov, Shirin; Shahmaliyev, Oktay; Sirois, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Background There has been no previous study into the state of emergency medicine in Azerbaijan. As a legacy of the Soviet Semashko system, the ?specialty? model of emergency medicine and integrated emergency departments do not exist here. Instead, pre-hospital emergency care is delivered by ambulance physicians and in-hospital care by individual departments, often in specialty hospitals. Emergency care is therefore fragmented, highly specialized and inefficient. Aims The Emergency Medicine De...

  11. State of emergency and emergency: Comparative terminological and semantic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Avramović, Dragutin; Mlađan, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    The issue of theoretical definition and distinction between a state of emergency and an emergency is made current in recent national and international literature, as well as in different comparative law normative solutions. Considering the usage inconsistencies of the two terms, this paper attempts to highlight the differences between them, as they essentially carry distinctive legal meanings despite their implied lexical and logical similarity. The paper stresses the necessity of their clear...

  12. On-site interim storage of spent nuclear fuel: Emerging public issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, D.L.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1992-01-01

    Failure to consummate plans for a permanent repository or above- ground interim Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility for spent nuclear fuel has spurred innovative efforts to ensure at-reactor storage in an environmentally safe and secure manner. This article examines the institutional and socioeconomic impacts of Dry Cask Storage Technology (DCST)-an approach to spent fuel management that is emerging as the preferred method of on-site interim spent fuel storage by utilities that exhaust existing storage capacity

  13. State of emergency medicine in Azerbaijan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, Harsh; Kazimov, Shirin; Shahmaliyev, Oktay; Sirois, Adam

    2008-04-01

    There has been no previous study into the state of emergency medicine in Azerbaijan. As a legacy of the Soviet Semashko system, the "specialty" model of emergency medicine and integrated emergency departments do not exist here. Instead, pre-hospital emergency care is delivered by ambulance physicians and in-hospital care by individual departments, often in specialty hospitals. Emergency care is therefore fragmented, highly specialized and inefficient. The Emergency Medicine Development Initiative (EMDI) of the International Medical Corps (IMC) was designed to improve the quality of emergency care in four pilot regional centers in Azerbaijan. The objective of this study was to assess the baseline emergency medical capacity of these four centers. EMDI staff conducted a four-part baseline survey in April 2006 to assess emergency care in Ganja (the second largest city in Azerbaijan), Kurdamir, Shamkir and Yevlakh. Data collection involved interviews with relevant personnel and a retrospective records review in each city. Pre-hospital: The number of ambulance teams per 10,000 inhabitants is below the number required by local regulations. On average, 45% of 27 medications and 37% of 17 pieces of critical equipment were available. Of the emergency procedures, 21% could be performed in the pre-hospital setting. In-hospital: Admission rates were near 100% for the admissions department-an area that is supposed to function as an emergency department would. On average 57% of 40 medications and 42% of 22 pieces of critical equipment were available. Of the emergency procedures, 62% could be performed in the in-hospital setting. The emergency medical system surveyed in Azerbaijan is inefficiently organized, under-financed, poorly equipped and lacks adequately trained staff. Reforms need to be directed towards achieving international standards, while adapting new models for service delivery into the existing framework and improving system capacity as highlighted by this baseline

  14. SOLID-STATE STORAGE DEVICE FLASH TRANSLATION LAYER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention include a method for storing a data page d on a solid-state storage device, wherein the solid-state storage device is configured to maintain a mapping table in a Log-Structure Merge (LSM) tree having a C0 component which is a random access memory (RAM) device...

  15. Emerging risk issues in underground storage of bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipila, J.

    2013-11-01

    This thesis aims to address the root causes and means of prevention, mitigation and other improvements to the challenges from smouldering fires, coal freezing and occupational risk in an underground storage silo built into granite bedrock. In addition, appropriate performance indicators are suggested, and the benefits of the recommended or adopted actions are estimated. The issues and observed incidents demonstrate hazards that are largely classified to represent issues of emerging risk. To reduce the fire risk, successful measures included bottom maintenance door sealing and modified design of silo filling and discharge. The assessed benefits of these actions suggest a payback period of only about 10 days, assuming that, without these measures, a fire like the one in 2008 could occur once in four years. Additional recommendations are made to reduce air flow through the coal bed and near the silo ceiling, and to improve nitrogen purging at the hoppers. Filling with subzero coal can freeze silo drains, resulting in water inflow and further freezing to hamper discharge. As the heat flow is unlike any previously known cases of coal freezing, conventional mitigation e.g. by freeze conditioning agents, would not help. After implementing modified filling procedures for cold coal, no severe freezing cases have occurred. Safety advantages from the automated and remotely controlled operation do not necessarily apply under exceptional circumstances requiring human involvement. As preventive measures, protection has been sought from additional technical barriers and training effort. The rarity of serious incidents is a challenge in demonstrating success, but also emphasizes the importance of using leading (not only lagging) safety performance indicators for measurable safety promotion. In contrast, suitable leading performance indicators of the fire risk have been suggested for deliveries as an index of coal properties and for storage (gas emissions and temperature

  16. Emerging Energy Alternatives for the Southeastern States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanakos, E. K. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    The proceedings of the first symposium on emerging energy alternatives for the Southeastern States are presented. Some topics discussed are: (1) solar energy, (2) wood energy, (3) novel energy sources, (4) agricultural and industrial process heat, (5) waste utilization, (6) energy conservation and (7) ocean thermal energy conversion.

  17. State of emergency declared for Gran Sasso

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "On June 27th the Council of Ministers has declared the state of socioeconomic and environmental emergency in the territory of L'Aquila and Teramo, the provinces involved in the safety of the Gran Sasso system. The measure includes the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratories, the high-way tunnels, the environment in general and water in particular" (1 page).

  18. State Emergency Department Opioid Guidelines: Current Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, Robert I; Gronowski, Tanner; Kalnow, Andrew F; Little, Andrew G; Lloyd, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and categorize current state-sponsored opioid guidelines for the practice of emergency medicine (EM). We conducted a comprehensive search of EM-specific opioid prescribing guidelines and/or policies in each state to determine current state involvement in EM opioid prescribing, as well as to evaluate some of the specifics of each guideline or policy. The search was conducted using an online query and a follow-up email request to each state chapter of ACEP. We found that 17 states had emergency department-specific guidelines. We further organized the guidelines into four categories: limiting prescriptions for opioids with 67 total recommendations; preventing/diverting abuse with 56 total recommendations; addiction-related guidelines with 29 total recommendations; and a community resources section with 24 total recommendations. Our results showed that current state guidelines focus on providers limiting opioid pain prescriptions and vetting patients for possible abuse/diversion. This study highlights the 17 states that have addressed opioid prescribing guidelines and categorizes their efforts to date. It is hoped that this study will provide the basis for similar efforts in other states.

  19. Southern State Radiological Transportation Emergency Response Training Course Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    The Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is an interstate compact organization that serves 16 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico with information and analysis in energy and environmental matters. Nuclear waste management is a topic that has garnered considerable attention in the SSEB region in the last several years. Since 1985, SSEB has received support from the US Department of Energy for the regional analysis of high-level radioactive waste transportation issues. In the performance of its work in this area, SSEB formed the Advisory Committee on High-Level Radioactive Materials Transportation, which comprises representatives from impacted states and tribes. SSEB meets with the committee semi-annually to provide issue updates to members and to solicit their views on activities impacting their respective states. Among the waste transportation issues considered by SSEB and the committee are shipment routing, the impacts of monitored retrievable storage, state liability in the event of an accident and emergency preparedness and response. This document addresses the latter by describing the radiological emergency response training courses and programs of the southern states, as well as federal courses available outside the southern region

  20. Bulk energy storage increases United States electricity system emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittinger, Eric S; Azevedo, Inês M L

    2015-03-03

    Bulk energy storage is generally considered an important contributor for the transition toward a more flexible and sustainable electricity system. Although economically valuable, storage is not fundamentally a "green" technology, leading to reductions in emissions. We model the economic and emissions effects of bulk energy storage providing an energy arbitrage service. We calculate the profits under two scenarios (perfect and imperfect information about future electricity prices), and estimate the effect of bulk storage on net emissions of CO2, SO2, and NOx for 20 eGRID subregions in the United States. We find that net system CO2 emissions resulting from storage operation are nontrivial when compared to the emissions from electricity generation, ranging from 104 to 407 kg/MWh of delivered energy depending on location, storage operation mode, and assumptions regarding carbon intensity. Net NOx emissions range from -0.16 (i.e., producing net savings) to 0.49 kg/MWh, and are generally small when compared to average generation-related emissions. Net SO2 emissions from storage operation range from -0.01 to 1.7 kg/MWh, depending on location and storage operation mode.

  1. Present states and views on vault storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Storage capacity of spent nuclear fuel storage pools in nuclear power station is reaching to a condition near its limit, and under a condition inevitable on delay of the Pu-thermal utilization plan importance on interim storage of the spent nuclear fuels is further rising. In U.S.A., Germany, and so on, a condition incapable of presenting nuclear energy business itself without its intermediate storage is approaching, so in Japan it will also be a key to smoothly promote the nuclear energy business how the interim storage is used and operated. Under such condition, in Japan storage facilities using a system called by 'metal cask' are established at areas of nuclear power stations to begin their operations. As on the system expensive metal containers are used for storage in themselves, it has a demerit of its high cost. On the other hand, on foreign countries, a storing system called by concrete cask, horizontal silo, or vault is occupying its main stream. Here was introduced present states and future views on vault storage system. (G. K)

  2. Design Considerations of a Solid State Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Houssainy, Sammy; Thacker, Ariana; Ip, Peggy; Ismail, Walid; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    With the growing governmental restrictions on carbon emission, renewable energies are becoming more prevalent. A reliable use of a renewable source however requires a built-in storage to overcome the inherent intermittent nature of the available energy. Thermal design of a solid state energy storage has been investigated for optimal performance. The impact of flow regime, laminar vs. turbulent, on the design and sizing of the system is also studied. The implications of low thermal conductivity of the storage material are discussed and a design that maximizes the round trip efficiency is presented. This study was supported by Award No. EPC-14-027 Granted by California Energy Commission (CEC).

  3. State of development of CERN proton storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, H

    1973-01-01

    The storage rings are briefly described and the 'luminosity', meaning a standardised counting method, is stated for the energies available at the centre of gravity. The maximum of luminosity reached so far is compared with the maximum possible luminosity and the reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. An example shows graphs of luminosity and of the beams after completion of the storage process, as functions of time. (2 refs).

  4. Generation and storage of quantum states using cold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Josse, Vincent; Cviklinski, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Cold cesium or rubidium atomic samples have a good potential both for generation and storage of nonclassical states of light. Generation of nonclassical states of light is possible through the high non-linearity of cold atomic samples excited close to a resonance line. Quadrature squeezing, polar...

  5. HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) contain the universe of emergency department visits in participating States. Restricted access data files are...

  6. Effect of hybrid, storage conditions and seed protection on sunflower field emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrđa Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed emergence under field conditions decisively and directly determines the number of plants per hectare, which is one of three basic components of yield in the plant world. Influence of chemical treatment on field emergence of three commercial sunflower hybrids stored in different conditions was tested in 2007 and 2008 on experimental field of Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad. On average, hybrid H1 had the highest value of field emergence (88.79% and for chemical treatment fl udioxonil + metalaxyl + imidacloprid (87.71%. Seed kept in common storage had the highest emergence value in fi eld (87.92%. Seed treated with fl udioxonil + metalaxyl + imidacloprid and stored for one year in common storage had the highest field emergence (90.18%. Considering interaction between storage conditions and genotype, hybrid H1 seed sown after chemical treatment had the highest field emergence (91.82% and seed kept in common storage (90.48%. Hybrid H1 seed compared with other two had the highest field emergence treated with fludioxonil + metalaxyl + imidacloprid (91.84%.

  7. Knowledge-based emergency planning for storage tank farms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nevrlý, Václav; Bitala, P.; Nevrlá, P.; Střižík, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2008), s. 10-15 ISSN 1335-4205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : emergency * preparedness * modeling tank fire boilover Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine http://www.utc.sk/komunikacie

  8. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary. The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic, others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms. State-by-state breakdowns are given for specific states

  9. Universality of emergent states in diverse physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Mike

    2017-12-01

    Our physics textbooks are dominated by examples of simple weakly-interacting microscopic states, but most of the real world around us is most effectively described in terms of emergent states that have no clear connection to simple textbook states. Emergent states are strongly-correlated and dominated by properties that emerge as a consequence of interactions and are not part of the description of the corresponding weakly-interacting system. This paper proposes a connection of weakly-interacting textbook states and realistic emergent states through fermion dynamical symmetries having fully-microscopic generators of the emergent states. These imply unique truncation of the Hilbert space for the weakly-interacting system to a collective subspace where the emergent states live. Universality arises because the possible symmetries under commutation of generators, which transcend the microscopic structure of the generators, are highly restricted in character and determine the basic structure of the emergent state, with the microscopic structure of the generators influencing emergent state only parametrically. In support of this idea we show explicit evidence that high-temperature superconductors, collective states in heavy atomic nuclei, and graphene quantum Hall states in strong magnetic fields exhibit a near-universal emergent behavior in their microscopically-computed total energy surfaces, even though these systems share essentially nothing in common at the microscopic level and their emergent states are characterized by fundamentally different order parameters.

  10. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The radiological emergency response laws and regulations of the Southern States Energy Compact member states are in some cases disparate. Several states have very specific laws on radiological emergency response while in others, the statutory law mentions only emergency response to ''natural disasters.'' Some states have adopted extensive regulations on the topic; others have none. For this reason, any general overview must necessarily discuss laws and regulations in general terms

  11. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock

  12. United States National Waste Terminal Storage argillaceous rock studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunton, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    The past and present argillaceous rock studies for the US National Waste Terminal Storage Program consist of: (1) evaluation of the geological characteristics of several widespread argillaceous formations in the United States; (2) laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of selected argillaceous rock samples; and (3) two full-scale in-situ surface heater experiments that simulate the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste in argillaceous rock

  13. Development of a state radioactive materials storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper outlines the site selection and facility development processes of the state of Wisconsin for a radioactive materials facility. The facility was developed for the temporary storage of wastes from abandoned sites. Due to negative public reaction, the military site selected for the facility was removed from consideration. The primary lesson learned during the 3-year campaign was that any project involving radioactive materials is a potential political issue

  14. Emergency food storage for organisations and citizens in New Zealand: results of optimisation modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Nhung; Carter, Mary-Ann; Wilson, Nick

    2012-12-14

    New Zealand (NZ), is a country subject to a wide range of natural disasters, some of which (e.g., floods and storms) may increase in frequency and severity with the effects of climate change. To improve disaster preparations, we aimed to use scenario development and linear programming to identify the lowest-cost foods for emergency storage. We used NZ food price data (e.g., from the Food Price Index) and nutritional data from a NZ food composition database. Different scenarios were modelled in Excel and R along with uncertainty analysis. A collection of low-cost emergency storage foods that meet daily energy requirements for men were identified e.g., at a median purchase cost of NZ$2.21 per day (equivalent to US$1.45) (95% simulation interval = NZ$2.04 to 2.38). In comparison, the cost of such a collection of foods which did not require cooking, was NZ$3.67 per day. While meeting all nutritional recommendations (and not just energy) is far from essential in a disaster setting, if such nutritionally optimised foods are purchased for storage, then the cost would be higher (NZ$7.10 per day). Where a zero level of food spoilage was assumed (e.g., storage by a government agency), the cost of purchasing food for storage was as low as NZ$1.93 per day. It appears to cost very little to purchase basic emergency foods for storage in the current New Zealand setting. The lists of the foods identified could be considered by organisations who participate in disaster relief (civil defence) but also by citizens.

  15. New York State's low-level radioactive waste storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spath, John P.

    1992-01-01

    Like their counterparts in other states, low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) generators in New York State face the prospect of being unable to transfer their LLRW off site beginning January 1, 1993. How long will those generators be able to accumulate and store LLRW on site before activities producing the waste are seriously interrupted? Would a centralized storage facility be a more economically viable solution for medical and academic institutions? The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority is conducting a study that seeks to answer these and a variety of related questions over the coming year. This paper describes the origin and design of the study. It reviews the plans for generator-specific data collection, the method for assessing generator storage capability, and the approach to evaluating economic viability. In pursuing this study, the Energy Authority has attempted to incorporate the views of the broad spectrum of LLRW interests. The formation and role of the Study Review Panel, established specifically for that purpose, is discussed. Finally, the paper reviews some of the more interesting questions and issues raised in the development of the study and relates the study to the State's other LLRW management activities, particularly its Interim LLRW Management Plan. (author)

  16. From Agamben State of Emergency to Colombian State of Emergency: A Possibility of Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos López

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The following article seeks to open the possibility of thinking the reality of the Colombian conflict from new conceptual categories, specifically those put forth by Giorgio Agamben, not necessarily to force the facts into the theory, but to open new possibilities of understanding the human tragedy that Colombia has lived (and continues to live in terms of human loss (death policies, of lack of conditions to live a dignified life and of an existence that is zoé (barely existence, stripped from dignity rather than bios (life in political community. The text further proposes the question of whether the Colombian State has become an everlasting State of Emergency that employs it as a normal mode of establishing social and political hegemony

  17. Southern states radiological emergency response laws and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the emergency response laws and regulations in place in the various states within the southern region for use by legislators, emergency response planners, the general public and all persons concerned about the existing legal framework for emergency response. SSEB expects to periodically update the report as necessary. Radiation protection regulations without emergency response provisions are not included in the summary

  18. Storage options in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.; Richardson, J.

    1994-01-01

    The inventory of spent fuel from commercial reactors in the United States is nearly 25 000 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) and is increasing at a rate of about 2000 MTHM per year. By the time the last licence for the current generation of nuclear reactors expires, the inventory of spent fuel is expected to be about 85 000 MTHM. Almost all of the spent fuel is stored in water pools at reactor sites, but dry storage has begun to be used by several utilities that have used up their pool capacity. Eventually the spent fuel will be transferred to the Federal waste-management system now being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DOE is developing a waste-management system consisting of three components: a geologic repository, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system to support MRS and repository operations. This paper briefly describes how the commercial nuclear utilities are addressing spent fuel storage at their reactor sites and the DOE's strategy for interfacing with the utilities. (author)

  19. Emergency preparedness hazards assessment for the Concentrate, Storage and Transfer Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents this facility Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Concentrate, Storage and Transfer Facility (CSTF) located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The CSTF encompasses the F-Area and the H-Area Tank Farms including the Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator (RHLWE) (3H evaporator) as a segment of the H-Area Tank Farm. This EPHA is intended to identify and analyze those hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in the tank farm operational emergency management programs

  20. Hydrogen storage: state-of-the-art and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzimas, E.; Filiou, C.; Peteves, S.D.; Veyret, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    The EU aims at establishing a sustainable energy supply, able to provide affordable and clean energy without increasing green house gas emissions. Hydrogen and fuel cells are seen by many as key energy system solutions for the 21. century, enabling clean and efficient production of power and heat from a broad range of primary energy sources. To be effective, there is a crucial need for well-coordinated research, development and deployment at European Level. The particular segment of hydrogen storage is one key element of the full hydrogen chain and it must meet a number of challenges before it is introduced into the global energy system. Regarding its energy characteristics, the gravimetric energy density of hydrogen is about three times higher than gasoline, but its energy content per volume is about a quarter. Therefore, the most significant problem for hydrogen (in particular for on-board vehicles) is to store sufficient -amounts of hydrogen. The volumetric energy density of hydrogen can be increased by compression or liquefaction which are both the most mature technologies. Still the energy required for both compression and liquefaction is one element to be properly assessed in considering the different pathways in particular for distribution. As far as on-board vehicle storage is concerned all possible options (compressed, liquid, metal hydrides and porous structures) have their own advantages and disadvantages with respect to weight, volume, energy efficiency, refuelling times, cost and safety aspects. To address these problems, long-term commitments to scientific excellence in research, coupled with co-ordination between the many different stakeholders, is required. In the current state-of-the-art in hydrogen storage, no single technology satisfies all of the criteria required by manufacturers and end-users, and a large number of obstacles have to be overcome. The current hydrogen storage technologies and their associated limitations/needs for improvement

  1. Electric energy storage systems in a market-based economy. Comparison of emerging and traditional technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazempour, S. Jalal; Moghaddam, M. Parsa; Haghifam, M.R.; Yousefi, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike markets for storable commodities, electricity markets depend on the real-time balance of supply and demand. Although much of the present-day grid operate effectively without storage technologies, cost-effective ways of storing electrical energy can make the grid more efficient and reliable. This work addresses an economic comparison between emerging and traditional Electric Energy Storage (EES) technologies in a competitive electricity market. In order to achieve this goal, an appropriate Self-Scheduling (SS) approach must first be developed for each of them to determine their maximum potential of expected profit among multi-markets such as energy and ancillary service markets. Then, these technologies are economically analyzed using Internal Rate of Return (IRR) index. Finally, the amounts of needed financial supports are determined for choosing the emerging technologies when an investor would like to invest on EES technologies. Among available EES technologies, we consider NaS battery (Natrium Sulfur battery) and pumped-storage plants as emerging and traditional technologies, respectively. (author)

  2. Creation, Storage, and On-Demand Release of Optical Quantum States with a Negative Wigner Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Yoshikawa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Highly nonclassical quantum states of light, characterized by Wigner functions with negative values, have been all-optically created so far only in a heralded fashion. In this case, the desired output emerges rarely and randomly from a quantum-state generator. An important example is the heralded production of high-purity single-photon states, typically based on some nonlinear optical interaction. In contrast, on-demand single-photon sources are also reported, exploiting the quantized level structure of matter systems. These sources, however, lead to highly impure output states, composed mostly of vacuum. While such impure states may still exhibit certain single-photon-like features such as antibunching, they are not nonclassical enough for advanced quantum-information processing. On the other hand, the intrinsic randomness of pure, heralded states can be circumvented by first storing and then releasing them on demand. Here, we propose such a controlled release, and we experimentally demonstrate it for heralded single photons. We employ two optical cavities, where the photons are both created and stored inside one cavity and finally released through a dynamical tuning of the other cavity. We demonstrate storage times of up to 300 ns while keeping the single-photon purity around 50% after storage. Our experiment is the first demonstration of a negative Wigner function at the output of an on-demand photon source or a quantum memory. In principle, our storage system is compatible with all kinds of nonclassical states, including those known to be essential for many advanced quantum-information protocols.

  3. A State of Emergency in Alabama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Edward Spencer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the Alabama Department of Corrections August 2009 Monthly Statistical Report and Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report, recent articles to explain the serious public safety issue of prison overcrowding within the state of Alabama, lack of funding and correctional staff, and increasing violence among inmates. It is imperative that the stakeholders take a restorative justice approach to offenders who commit nonviolent crimes or otherwise be prepared to release substantial numbers of violent inmates due to federal court intervention, expanding parole, and other types of early release programs. Violent offenders will pose a greater threat to the community. Correctional workers continue to be exposed daily to the risk of injury or death caused by severe prison overcrowding. The state could experience additional financial hardship to rebuild a destroyed correctional facility in an event of a riot. The excessive use of incarceration for nonviolent offenders is one of the most important issues facing the state of Alabama this decade.

  4. Emergency distress call system for automobiles in Lagos state, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emergency distress call system for automobiles in Lagos state, Nigeria. ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... and communications technology capabilities to transportation and the medical care system in order to save lives, ...

  5. Key study on the potential of hydrazine bisborane for solid- and liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypko, Sergii; Petit, Eddy; Yot, Pascal G; Salles, Fabrice; Cretin, Marc; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2015-05-04

    Hydrazine bisborane N2H4(BH3)2 (HBB; 16.8 wt %) recently re-emerged as a potential hydrogen storage material. However, such potential is controversial: HBB was seen as a hazardous compound up to 2010, but now it would be suitable for hydrogen storage. In this context, we focused on fundamentals of HBB because they are missing in the literature and should help to shed light on its effective potential while taking into consideration any risk. Experimental/computational methods were used to get a complete characterization data sheet, including, e.g., XRD, NMR, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and DSC. From the reported results and discussion, it is concluded that HBB has potential in the field of chemical hydrogen storage given that both thermolytic and hydrolytic dehydrogenations were analyzed. In solid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it cannot be used in the pristine state (risk of explosion during dehydrogenation) but can be used for the synthesis of derivatives with improved dehydrogenation properties. In liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it can be studied for room-temperature dehydrogenation, but this requires the development of an active and selective metal-based catalyst. HBB is a thus a candidate for chemical hydrogen storage.

  6. State-level emergency preparedness and response capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Sharon M; Perrotta, Dennis M; Stanbury, Martha; Heumann, Michael; Anderson, Henry; Simms, Erin; Huang, Monica

    2011-03-01

    Prior assessments of public health readiness had identified gaps in radiation preparedness. In recent years, preparedness planning has involved an "all-hazards" approach. Current assessment of the national status related to radiation public health emergency preparedness capabilities at the state and local health department levels was needed. A survey of state health departments related to radiation readiness was undertaken in 2010 by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE). States with nuclear power plants were instructed to consider their responses exclusive of capabilities and resources related to the plants given that the emergency response plans for nuclear power plants are specific and unique. Thirty-eight (76%) state health departments responded to the survey, including 26 of the 31 states with nuclear power plants. Specific strengths noted at the state level included that the majority of states had a written radiation response plan and most plans include a detailed section for communications issues during a radiation emergency. In addition, more than half of the states indicated that their relationship with federal partners is sufficient to provide resources for radiation emergencies, indicating the importance states placed on federal resources and expertise. Specific weaknesses are discussed and include that most states had completed little to no planning for public health surveillance to assess potential human health impacts of a radiation event; less than half had written plans to address exposure assessment, environmental sampling, human specimen collection and analysis, and human health assessment. Few reported having sufficient resources to do public health surveillance, radiation exposure assessment, laboratory functions and other capabilities. Levels of planning, resources and partnerships varied among states, those with nuclear power plants were better prepared. Gaps were evident in all states; however and additional training and

  7. Combined Solid State and High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Jensen, Torben René

    Presented at The First European Early Stage Researcher's Conference on Hydrogen Storage in Belgrade, Serbia.......Presented at The First European Early Stage Researcher's Conference on Hydrogen Storage in Belgrade, Serbia....

  8. The Solar Energy Trifecta: Solar + Storage + Net Metering | State, Local,

    Science.gov (United States)

    and Tribal Governments | NREL The Solar Energy Trifecta: Solar + Storage + Net Metering The Solar Energy Trifecta: Solar + Storage + Net Metering February 12, 2018 by Benjamin Mow Massachusetts (DPU) seeking an advisory ruling on the eligibility of pairing solar-plus-storage systems with current

  9. Expecting the unexpected [The IAEA's Incident and Emergency Centre helps prepare States to face radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, W.; Buglova, E.

    2007-01-01

    The IAEA works with its partners worldwide to promote safe, secure and peaceful nuclear technologies. The IAEA's Statute assigns functions to the Secretariat in relation to radiation emergencies, including fostering international cooperation in the area of emergency preparedness and response. The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (often called the 'Emergency Conventions') place specific legal obligations on the IAEA with regard to emergency preparedness and response. In 2005, the IAEA established a fully integrated Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) which acts as the global focal point for international preparedness, communication and response to nuclear and radiological incidents or emergencies irrespective of their cause. In this role, the IEC stands at the centre of coordinating effective and efficient activities worldwide. While emergency response capabilities have existed within the IAEA since concluding the Emergency Conventions in the 1980s, the decision to create an integrated Centre within the IAEA became more pressing with the growing use of nuclear applications worldwide as well as increasing concern over malicious use of nuclear or radioactive materials. Today, the IEC provides around-the-clock assistance to States dealing with nuclear and radiological events. Under the Emergency Conventions, the IEC coordinates actions of global experts and efforts within the IAEA. It also helps coordinate the responses of States as well as other international organizations, such as the WHO (World Health Organization), FAO (Food and Agricultural Organization) or WMO (World Meteorological Organization) in case of a nuclear or radiological emergency. Response to incidents and emergencies can involve exchange of information, provision of advice and/or coordination of field response. The IEC ensures that the IAEA's incident and emergency arrangements are fully

  10. Technical issues and approach to license dry storage of LWR fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.; Beeman, G.H.; Creer, J.M.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Dry storage is emerging as an important alternative to wet storage for US utilities, even though wet storage will remain the principal storage method, at least until the federal government begins to accept fuel in 1998. Dry storage has been licensed in several countries. In the USA, dry storage issues are related to storage system performance and behavior of spent fuel during storage. There is a coordinated US effort among electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to license two dry storage concepts: metal casks, and horizontal storage modules. The following activities are underway to resolve the licensing issues associated with dry storage and to establish the licensing basis: a) summarize and assimilate domestic and foreigh dry storage experience; b) conduct tests which resolve specific licensing issues; c) conduct cooperative demonstrations of the leading dry storage concepts; d) establish criteria and justifications for generic licensing. The paper summarizes the licensing issues and the approach to their resolution

  11. Underground storage tanks: State regulations and compliance strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    In an effort to resolve underground storage tank (UST) management problems, several states and localities have moved ahead of EPA in the promulgation of UST regulations. Developed independently, these regulations represent different strategies for ensuring compliance: from an extensive set of permitting requirements that allow for the implementation of site-specific control measures to a uniform set of technical and operational requirements that vary according to installation date. For the tank owner, complying with these regulations can be a time-consuming and frustrating endeavor. However, during the course of several environmental audits of similar facilities in different states, useful strategies were observed or developed that enabled facilities to respond more effectively to requirements: these included computerization of files, designation of tank custodians, installation of low-maintenance equipment, and increased use of above-ground tanks. Of special additional interest was the wide variation in costs for similar tank services quoted by both private and government sources. These strategies are coupled with general observations on the efficacy of the various regulatory approaches to provide a field view that may be useful to tank owners and others involved in underground tank management and evaluation

  12. The crisis in United States hospital emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Ferguson, Emily D

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services are critical for high-quality healthcare service provision to support acute illness, trauma and disaster response. The greater availability of emergency services decreases waiting time, improves clinical outcomes and enhances local community well being. This study aims to assess United States (U.S.) acute care hospital staffs ability to provide emergency medical services by evaluating the number of emergency departments and trauma centers. Data were obtained from the 2003 and 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) annual surveys, which included over 5000 US hospitals and provided extensive information on their infrastructure and healthcare capabilities. U.S. acute care hospital numbers decreased by 59 or 1.1 percent from 2003 to 2007. Similarly, U.S. emergency rooms and trauma centers declined by 125, or 3 percent. The results indicate that US hospital staffs ability to respond to traumatic injury and disasters has declined. Therefore, US hospital managers need to increase their investment in emergency department beds as well as provide state-of-the-art clinical technology to improve emergency service quality. These investments, when linked to other clinical information systems and the electronic medical record, support further healthcare quality improvement. This research uses the AHA annual surveys,which represent self-reported data by individual hospital staff. However, the AHA expendssignificant resources to validate reported information and the annual survey data are widely used for hospital research. The declining US emergency rooms and trauma centers have negative implications for patients needing emergency services. More importantly, this research has significant policy implications because it documents a decline in the US emergency healthcare service infrastructure. This article has important information on US emergency service availability in the hospital industry.

  13. Thermodynamic and economic assessment of off-grid portable cooling systems with energy storage for emergency areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozcan, Hasan; Akyavuz, Umit Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar based refrigeration systems with energy storage are proposed. • Thermodynamic and economic assessments are applied. • Cost of the pumped-hydro storage quadruples the hydrogen storage option. • A case study is made for the city of Aleppo in Syria as an emergency region. - Abstract: This study aims to investigate performance and cost aspects of a solar powered portable cooling system to conserve first aid supplies for off-grid areas with energy storage. Due to the intermittent nature of solar energy availability, two energy storage options are considered for a stationary system. Additional to the standalone system without energy storage, hydrogen is selected to be the storage medium by considering electrolysis at day time, and use of a hydrogen fuel cell unit at night time. This system consists of solar photovoltaic cells, a Polymer Exchange Membrane (PEM) electrolysis unit (PEME), hydrogen tank, a PEM fuel cell unit (PEMFC), and a vapor compression refrigeration (VCR) system to condition a container rated with ∼11 kW cooling load. The second system utilizes pumped – hydro storage (PHS) technology using a simple pump – turbine couple by storing water at a higher reservoir during day time and utilizing it to produce hydro power at night. Existence of higher reservoir brings a significant additional cost for the PHS system, making this configuration almost four times more costly than that of the hydrogen storage option, even though the storage efficiency of the PHS system is significantly higher than the hydrogen storage.

  14. 41 CFR 302-9.10 - For what POV emergency storage expenses will my agency pay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES... expenses, including but not limited to readying the POV for storage, transportation to point of storage, storage, readying the POV for use after storage, and transportation from the point of storage. Insurance...

  15. State of emergency preparedness for US health insurance plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Raina M; Finne, Kristen; Lardy, Barbara; Veselovskiy, German; Korba, Caey; Margolis, Gregg S; Lurie, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Health insurance plans serve a critical role in public health emergencies, yet little has been published about their collective emergency preparedness practices and policies. We evaluated, on a national scale, the state of health insurance plans' emergency preparedness and policies. A survey of health insurance plans. We queried members of America's Health Insurance Plans, the national trade association representing the health insurance industry, about issues related to emergency preparedness issues: infrastructure, adaptability, connectedness, and best practices. Of 137 health insurance plans queried, 63% responded, representing 190.6 million members and 81% of US plan enrollment. All respondents had emergency plans for business continuity, and most (85%) had infrastructure for emergency teams. Some health plans also have established benchmarks for preparedness (eg, response time). Regarding adaptability, 85% had protocols to extend claim filing time and 71% could temporarily suspend prior medical authorization rules. Regarding connectedness, many plans shared their contingency plans with health officials, but often cited challenges in identifying regulatory agency contacts. Some health insurance plans had specific policies for assisting individuals dependent on durable medical equipment or home healthcare. Many plans (60%) expressed interest in sharing best practices. Health insurance plans are prioritizing emergency preparedness. We identified 6 policy modifications that health insurance plans could undertake to potentially improve healthcare system preparedness: establishing metrics and benchmarks for emergency preparedness; identifying disaster-specific policy modifications, enhancing stakeholder connectedness, considering digital strategies to enhance communication, improving support and access for special-needs individuals, and developing regular forums for knowledge exchange about emergency preparedness.

  16. Physical principles and current status of emerging non-volatile solid state memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Yang, C.-H.; Wen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Today the influence of non-volatile solid-state memories on persons' lives has become more prominent because of their non-volatility, low data latency, and high robustness. As a pioneering technology that is representative of non-volatile solidstate memories, flash memory has recently seen widespread application in many areas ranging from electronic appliances, such as cell phones and digital cameras, to external storage devices such as universal serial bus (USB) memory. Moreover, owing to its large storage capacity, it is expected that in the near future, flash memory will replace hard-disk drives as a dominant technology in the mass storage market, especially because of recently emerging solid-state drives. However, the rapid growth of the global digital data has led to the need for flash memories to have larger storage capacity, thus requiring a further downscaling of the cell size. Such a miniaturization is expected to be extremely difficult because of the well-known scaling limit of flash memories. It is therefore necessary to either explore innovative technologies that can extend the areal density of flash memories beyond the scaling limits, or to vigorously develop alternative non-volatile solid-state memories including ferroelectric random-access memory, magnetoresistive random-access memory, phase-change random-access memory, and resistive random-access memory. In this paper, we review the physical principles of flash memories and their technical challenges that affect our ability to enhance the storage capacity. We then present a detailed discussion of novel technologies that can extend the storage density of flash memories beyond the commonly accepted limits. In each case, we subsequently discuss the physical principles of these new types of non-volatile solid-state memories as well as their respective merits and weakness when utilized for data storage applications. Finally, we predict the future prospects for the aforementioned solid-state memories for

  17. On Emergent Physics, "Unparticles" and Exotic "Unmatter" States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smarandache F.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergent physics refers to the formation and evolution of collective patterns in systems that are nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium. This type of large-scale behavior often develops as a result of simple interactions at the component level and involves a dynamic interplay between order and randomness. On account of its universality, there are credible hints that emergence may play a leading role in the Tera-ElectronVolt (TeV sector of particle physics. Following this path, we examine the possibility of hypothetical high-energy states that have fractional number of quanta per state and consist of arbitrary mixtures of particles and antiparticles. These states are similar to "un-particles", massless fields of non-integral scaling dimensions that were recently conjectured to emerge in the TeV sector of particle physics. They are also linked to "unmatter", exotic clusters of matter and antimatter introduced few years ago in the context of Neutrosophy.

  18. Emerging Powers and Effective Governance in Fragile States | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    New and emerging development organizations are providing assistance to countries experiencing tensions and challenges after periods of conflict. This research will test whether their development assistance approaches are more effective at addressing the political and social realities of fragile states than those used by ...

  19. Current state and perspectives of spent fuel storage in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurnosov, V.A.; Tichonov, N.S.; Makarchuk, T.F.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty-nine power units at nine nuclear power plants, having a total installed capacity of 22 GW(e), are now in operation in the Russian Federation. They produce approximately 12% of the generated electricity in the country. The annual spent fuel arising is approximately 790 tU. The concept of the closed fuel cycle was adopted as the basis for nuclear power development in the Russian Federation, but until now this concept is only implemented for the fuel cycles of WWER-440 and BN-600 reactors. The WWER-1000 spent fuel is planned to be reprocessed at the reprocessing plant RT-2 which is under construction near Krasnoyarsk. The RBMK-1000 spent fuel is not reprocessed. It is meant to be stored in intermediate storage facilities at the NPP sites. The status of the spent fuel (SF) stored in the storage facilities is given in the paper. The principal characteristics of the fuel cycles of the Russian NPPs in the period up to 2015 is also given in the report. The key variant of the current spent fuel management at RBMK-1000 NPPs is storage in at-reactor and in away-from-reactor wet storage facilities at the power plant site with a capacity of 2,000 W. The storage capacity at the operating RBMKs (including the increase due to denser fuel assembly arrangement) will provide SF reception from the NPPs only up to 2005. For RBMK spent fuel, intermediate dry storage is foreseen at power plant sites in metallic concrete casks and thereafter transportation to the central storage facility at the RT-2 plant for long-term storage. The SF will be reprocessing after completion of the reprocessing plant at RT-2. In the Programme of Nuclear Power Development in the Russian Federation for the period 1998 to 2005 and for the period until 2010 year, provisions are made for the construction of a central dry storage facility before 2010. The facility will have a design capacity of 30,000 tU for WWER-1000 and RBMK-1000 spent fuel and is part of the reprocessing plant RT-2. The paper considers

  20. Incorporating solid state drives into distributed storage systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wacha, Rosie

    2012-01-01

    Big data stores are becoming increasingly important in a variety of domains including scientific computing, internet applications, and business applications. For price and performance reasons, such storage is comprised of magnetic hard drives. To achieve the necessary degree of performance and reliability, the drives are configured into storage subsystems based on RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks). Because of their mechanical nature, hard drives are relatively power-hungry and slow ...

  1. State environmental review of a proposed utility independent spent fuel storage installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabel, G.; Halstead, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the environmental review process which was applied by the State of Minnesota to a proposed dry cask storage facility. An environmental analysis of the proposed project is summarized, as are alternatives including other dry storage technologies, increased in-pool storage, transhipment, reprocessing, use of higher burnup fuel and conservation. Public comments and concerns included potential cask failures, health impacts, and the possibility of the site becoming a open-quotes permanentclose quotes storage facility. State intervention in the federal license process is also described

  2. The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, N S

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

  3. CALCULATING ENERGY STORAGE DUE TO TOPOLOGICAL CHANGES IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGION NOAA AR 11112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The minimum current corona model provides a way to estimate stored coronal energy using the number of field lines connecting regions of positive and negative photospheric flux. This information is quantified by the net flux connecting pairs of opposing regions in a connectivity matrix. Changes in the coronal magnetic field, due to processes such as magnetic reconnection, manifest themselves as changes in the connectivity matrix. However, the connectivity matrix will also change when flux sources emerge or submerge through the photosphere, as often happens in active regions. We have developed an algorithm to estimate the changes in flux due to emergence and submergence of magnetic flux sources. These estimated changes must be accounted for in order to quantify storage and release of magnetic energy in the corona. To perform this calculation over extended periods of time, we must additionally have a consistently labeled connectivity matrix over the entire observational time span. We have therefore developed an automated tracking algorithm to generate a consistent connectivity matrix as the photospheric source regions evolve over time. We have applied this method to NOAA Active Region 11112, which underwent a GOES M2.9 class flare around 19:00 on 2010 October 16th, and calculated a lower bound on the free magnetic energy buildup of ∼8.25 × 10 30 erg over 3 days.

  4. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments

  5. Storage functions for dissipative linear systems are quadratic state functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trentelman, Harry L.; Willems, Jan C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with dissipative dynamical systems. Dissipative dynamical systems can be used as models for physical phenomena in which energy exchange with their environment plays a role. In a dissipative dynamical system, the book-keeping of energy is done via the supply rate and a storage

  6. Emergence of a phase transition for the required amount of storage in highly renewable electricity systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tue Vissing; Greiner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    -up of the required amount of storage, with renewable penetration being the control parameter and average relative storage filling level being the order parameter. A singularity appears for the required storage energy capacity at a renewable penetration determined by the parameters of the storage. For an ideal...... storage with no roundtrip losses the transition occurs at 100% renewable penetration. Moreover, the required storage energy capacity is strongly enhanced by temporal correlations on the synoptic weather time scale. A Markov process is proposed, which reproduces these findings....

  7. Emergence of advance waves in a steady-state universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobart, R.H.

    1979-10-01

    In standard Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics advanced waves from any source are absolutely canceled by the advanced waves from the absorber responding to that source. The present work shows this cancellation fails over cosmic distances in a steady-state universe. A test of the view proposed earlier, in a paper which assumed failure of cancellation ad hoc, that zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are such emergent advanced waves, is posed. The view entails anomalous slowing of spontaneous transition rates at longer emission wavelengths; available data go against this, furnishing additional argument against the suspect assumption that the universe is steady-state.

  8. Emergence of advance waves in a steady-state universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    In standard Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics advanced waves from any source are absolutely canceled by the advanced waves from the absorber responding to that source. The present work shows this cancellation fails over cosmic distances in a steady-state universe. A test of the view proposed earlier, in a paper which assumed failure of cancellation ad hoc, that zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field are such emergent advanced waves, is posed. The view entails anomalous slowing of spontaneous transition rates at longer emission wavelengths; available data go against this, furnishing additional argument against the suspect assumption that the universe is steady-state

  9. On Emergent Physics, "Unparticles" and Exotic "Unmatter" States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldfain E.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergent physics refers to the formation and evolution of collective patterns in systems that are nonlinear and out-of-equilibrium. This type of large-scale behavior often de- velops as a result of simple interactions at the component level and involves a dynamic interplay between order and randomness. On account of its universality, there are credi- ble hints that emergence may play a leading role in the Tera-ElectronVolt (TeV sector of particle physics. Following this path, we examine the possibility of hypothetical high- energy states that have fractional number of quanta per state and consist of arbitrary mixtures of particles and antiparticles. These states are similar to “un-particles”, mass- less fields of non-integral scaling dimensions that were recently conjectured to emerge in the TeV sector of particle physics. They are also linked to “unmatter”, exotic clusters of matter and antimatter introduced few years ago in the context of Neutrosophy.

  10. Federal/State Jurisdictional Split: Implications for Emerging Electricity Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Jeffery S. [Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Kelly, Suedeen G. [Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Nordhaus, Robert R. [Van Ness Feldman, LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Smith, Douglas W. [Van Ness Feldman, LLP, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The first Administration-wide Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), released in April 2015, found that the “interacting and overlapping” division of authority between “federal, regional and state institutions and regulatory structures” for the electricity sector could “impede development of the grid of the future [and] . . . the development of markets that efficiently integrate” new and emerging technologies.1 While “technology is indifferent to state-Federal boundaries and jurisdictions,” the QER explained, “technology users cannot be.”2 The report concluded that “[b]oth Federal and state governments need to play constructive and collaborative roles in the future to ensure that consumers and industry are able to maximize the value of new technologies.”3 The QER recommended that the Department of Energy (“DOE”) facilitate such collaboration by playing a “convening role” to bring together state and federal regulators and other stakeholders to consider these issues.4 This paper provides background and analysis on these jurisdictional issues and the impact they may have on adoption of emerging energy technologies and coordination of markets for those technologies, in support of future dialogs on these subjects. In particular, this paper reviews the structure of the Federal Power Act (“FPA”),5 and compares the division of authority between the federal and state governments adopted there with other federal energy and energy-related statutes.

  11. The mechanism of the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, You-Liang; Sun, Zhao-Yan, E-mail: zysun@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lu, Zhong-Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2016-01-14

    Although multiple overstretched DNA states were identified in experiments, the mechanism of the emergence of distinct states is still unclear. Molecular dynamics simulation is an ideal tool to clarify the mechanism, but the force loading rates in stretching achieved by conventional all-atom DNA models are much faster, which essentially affect overstretching states. We employed a modified coarse-grained DNA model with an unprecedented low loading rate in simulations to study the overstretching transitions of end-opened double-stranded DNA. We observed two-strand peeling off for DNA with low stability and the S-DNA with high stability under tension. By introducing a melting-forbidden model which prevents base-pair breaking, we still observed the overstretching transition induced by the formation of S-DNA due to the change of dihedral angle. Hence, we confirmed that the competition between the two strain-softening manners, i.e., base-pair breaking and dihedral angle variation, results in the emergence of distinct overstretched DNA states.

  12. State planning for winter energy emergencies: workshop materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    Workshops were conducted in 5 cities to improve communications between the states and the Federal government so that both might be better prepared to avoid or mitigate the impacts of energy emergencies during the winter; to provide a forum for the exchange of technical information regarding selected energy demand restraint measures which could be implemented by individual states or regions in an energy emergency; and to promote the concept of pre-crisis contingency planning and strategy development, with particuliar emphasis on the need for interstate coordination of emergency plans. The major topics addressed by the discussion guide involved net energy use impact, implementation procedures and problems, and social and economic effects. The Task Force performed extensive research into the technical considerations and prior experience in implementing each of the demand restraint measures selected for discussion. Results and conclusions are summarized for reduction of thermostat setting for space conditioning and water heating; reduction in hours of operation and lighting in commercial establishments; reduction in hours of operation in school, and industrial fuel substitution. (MCW)

  13. Hydrogen storage on carbon materials: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Cazorla Amoros; D Lozano Castello; F Suarez Garcia; M Jorda Beneytoa; A Linares Solano

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: From an economic point of view, the use of hydrogen could revolutionize energy and transportation markets, what generates a great interest towards this fuel. This interest has led to the so-called 'hydrogen economy'. However, the main drawback for the use of hydrogen as transportation fuel or in power generation is the storage of this gas to reach a sufficiently high energy density, which could fit to the goals of the DOE hydrogen plan to automotive fuel cell systems i.e. 62 kg H 2 /m 3 ). [1] A review of both experimental and theoretical studies published on the field of hydrogen storage on carbon materials (nano-tubes, nano-fibers and porous carbons) shows a large dispersion in hydrogen storage values. Although some values have exceeded by far the goals of the DOE [2], other authors assure that it is not feasible the use of carbonaceous materials as hydrogen storage systems [3]. The first objective of this presentation is to analyze some possible reasons of the large values dispersion. The discrepancy among the different theoretical studies can be due to non-realist models or to unsuitable approaches. High results dispersion and low reproducibility of experimental measurements are mostly consequence of experimental errors (as for example, the use of small amount of sample) and/or to the use of non-purified materials. In fact, the main disadvantage of the use of novel carbon materials, such as nano-tubes and nano-fibers, is the unavailability of large amounts of those materials with sufficient purity in order to get both feasible measurements in the laboratory, an their subsequent use in large scale. In addition to these possible reasons of errors, for a better understanding of the large results dispersion, the different mechanism of hydrogen storage, such as hydride formation, hydrogen transfer and hydrogen adsorption will be also reviewed in this presentation. Differently to nano-tubes and nano-fibers, activated carbons are

  14. Hydrogen storage on carbon materials: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazorla-Amoros, D.; Lozano-Castello, D.; Suarez-Garcia, F.; Jorda-Beneyto, M.; Linares-Solano, A.

    2005-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: From an economic point of view, the use of hydrogen could revolutionize energy and transportation markets, what generates a great interest towards this fuel. This interest has led to the so-called 'hydrogen economy'. However, the main drawback for the use of hydrogen as transportation fuel or in power generation is the storage of this gas to reach a sufficiently high energy density, which could fit to the goals of the DOE hydrogen plan to automotive fuel cell systems i.e. 62 kg H 2 /m 3 ) [1]. A review of both experimental and theoretical studies published on the field of hydrogen storage on carbon materials (nano-tubes, nano-fibers and porous cartons) shows a large dispersion in hydrogen storage values. Although some values have exceeded by far the goals of the DOE [2], other authors assure that it is not feasible the use of carbonaceous materials as hydrogen storage systems [3]. The first objective of this presentation is to analyze some possible reasons of the large values dispersion. The discrepancy among the different theoretical studies can be due to non-realist models or to unsuitable approaches. High results dispersion and low reproducibility of experimental measurements are mostly consequence of experimental errors (as for example, the use of small amount of sample) and/or to the use of non-purified materials. In fact, the main disadvantage of the use of novel carbon materials, such as nano-tubes and nano-fibers, is the unavailability of large amounts of those materials with sufficient purity in order to get both feasible measurements in the laboratory, an their subsequent use in large scale. In addition to these possible reasons of errors, for a better understanding of the large results dispersion, the different mechanism of hydrogen storage, such as hydride formation, hydrogen transfer and hydrogen adsorption will be also reviewed in this presentation. Differently to nano-tubes and nano-fibers, activated carbons are

  15. Terrorism and emergency preparedness in state and territorial public health departments--United States, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-13

    After the events of September 11, 2001, federal funding for state public health preparedness programs increased from $67 million in fiscal year (FY) 2001 to approximately $1 billion in FY 2002. These funds were intended to support preparedness for and response to terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and other public health threats and emergencies. The Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) assessed the impact of funding on epidemiologic capacity, including terrorism preparedness and response, in state health departments in November 2001 and again in May 2004, after distribution of an additional $1 billion in FY 2003. This report describes the results of those assessments, which indicated that increased funding for terrorism preparedness and emergency response has rapidly increased the number of epidemiologists and increased capacity for preparedness at the state level. However, despite the increase in epidemiologists, state public health officials estimate that 192 additional epidemiologists, an increase of 45.3%, are needed nationwide to fully staff terrorism preparedness programs.

  16. Economic analysis of a centralized LLRW storage facility in New York State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spath, J.P.; Voelk, H.; Brodie, H.

    1994-01-01

    In response to the possibility of no longer having access to out-of-State disposal facilities, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority) was directed by the New York State Legislature (1990-91 State Operation Budget Appropriations) to conduct a low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) storage study. One of the objectives of this study was to investigate the economic viability of establishing a separate Centralized Storage Facility for Class A LLRW from medical and academic institutions. This resulted in the conceptual design of a nominal Centralized Storage Facility capable of storing 100,000 cubic feet of dry-solid and liquid wastes and freezer storage capacity of 20,000 cubic feet for biological wastes. The facility itself includes office and laboratory space as well as receipt, inspection, and health physics monitoring stations. The Conceptual Design was initially developed to define the scope and detail of the cost parameters to be evaluated. It established a basis for conducting comparisons of the cost of four alternative project approaches and the sensitivity of unit storage costs to siting-related costs. In estimating costs of a Centralized Storage Facility, four cases were used varying assumptions with respect to parameters such as volume projections and freezer capacity; siting costs; and site acquisition costs

  17. The State of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Dixon, Julia M; Sefa, Nana; Yancey, Arthur; Hollong, Bonaventure G; Hagahmed, Mohamed; Ginde, Adit A; Wallis, Lee A

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Little is known about the existence, distribution, and characteristics of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa, or the corresponding epidemiology of prehospital illness and injury. A survey was conducted between 2013 and 2014 by distributing a detailed EMS system questionnaire to experts in paper and electronic versions. The questionnaire ascertained EMS systems' jurisdiction, operations, finance, clinical care, resources, and regulatory environment. The discovery of respondents with requisite expertise occurred in multiple phases, including snowball sampling, a review of published scientific literature, and a rigorous search of the Internet. The survey response rate was 46%, and data represented 49 of 54 (91%) African countries. Twenty-five EMS systems were identified and distributed among 16 countries (30% of African countries). There was no evidence of EMS systems in 33 (61%) countries. A total of 98,574,731 (8.7%) of the African population were serviced by at least one EMS system in 2012. The leading causes of EMS transport were (in order of decreasing frequency): injury, obstetric, respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal complaints. Nineteen percent of African countries had government-financed EMS systems and 26% had a toll-free public access telephone number. Basic emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and Basic Life Support (BLS)-equipped ambulances were the most common cadre of provider and ambulance level, respectively (84% each). Emergency Medical Services systems exist in one-third of African countries. Injury and obstetric complaints are the leading African prehospital conditions. Only a minority (<9.0%) of Africans have coverage by an EMS system. Most systems were predominantly BLS, government operated, and fee-for-service. Mould-Millman NK , Dixon JM , Sefa N , Yancey A , Hollong BG , Hagahmed M , Ginde AA , Wallis LA . The state of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(3):273-283.

  18. Ten major trends now emerging in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naisbitt, J.

    1978-01-01

    Using a special analytical procedure for tracking and assessing events reported in the nation's newspapers, the Center for Policy Process has identified ten emerging trends in the United States that are having a major impact on all our lives and on all businesses and industries--and especially on the electric utility industry. Although the trends may move in contradictory directions and have different degrees of significance, all have been carefully monitored for a considerable length of time. All are firmly established--and are not to be viewed as the momentary interests of certain radical elements of the population. The ten trends are: the fast-emerging clash between nuclear fuel and coal as an environmental health issue; displacement of racism and sexism by ''ageism'' as society's most prominent anti-discrimination preoccupation, and the complete elimination soon of mandatory retirement; in government and technology, the phenomenon of ''appropriate scale'' replacing economies of scale, emergence of single-issue political organizations; coming-of-age of the recycling ethic; emergence of ''access to capital'' as the new equity issue--the new rights issue; continuing shift from centralization to decentralization; movement of society in the dual directions of high technology/high touch; business' increasing involvement with the well-established accountability trend; and shift from a representative democracy to a participatory democracy--this profound change in American democracy actually began about a decade or so ago.

  19. Summary of State-of-the-Art Power Conversion Systems for Energy Storage Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atcitty, S.; Gray-Fenner, A.; Ranade, S.

    1998-09-01

    The power conversion system (PCS) is a vital part of many energy storage systems. It serves as the interface between the storage device, an energy source, and an AC load. This report summarizes the results of an extensive study of state-of-the-art power conversion systems used for energy storage applications. The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential for cost reduction and performance improvement in these power conversion systems and to provide recommendations for fiture research and development. This report provides an overview of PCS technology, a description of several state-of-the-art power conversion systems and how they are used in specific applications, a summary of four basic configurations for l:he power conversion systems used in energy storage applications, a discussion of PCS costs and potential cost reductions, a summary of the stancku-ds and codes relevant to the technology, and recommendations for future research and development.

  20. Review of Solid State Hydrogen Storage Methods Adopting Different Kinds of Novel Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renju Zacharia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overview of advances in the technology of solid state hydrogen storage methods applying different kinds of novel materials is provided. Metallic and intermetallic hydrides, complex chemical hydride, nanostructured carbon materials, metal-doped carbon nanotubes, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, metal-doped metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks (COFs, and clathrates solid state hydrogen storage techniques are discussed. The studies on their hydrogen storage properties are in progress towards positive direction. Nevertheless, it is believed that these novel materials will offer far-reaching solutions to the onboard hydrogen storage problems in near future. The review begins with the deficiencies of current energy economy and discusses the various aspects of implementation of hydrogen energy based economy.

  1. Search for an Emergency Contraception Provider in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... emergency contraception provider. Concerned about cost? Click here . ---------- Emergency contraceptive pills are stocked by all major pharmacy chains, ... daily birth control pills you can use as emergency contraceptive pills. You can search for a provider in ...

  2. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son-Jong Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of 11B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH4 is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of 11B{1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  3. Solid state storage of radioactive krypton in a silica matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Gray, W.J.; Wheeler, K.R.

    1980-12-01

    The feasibility of loading a low density SiO 2 glass with krypton for storage of radioactive 85 Kr has been demonstrated by studies using non-radioactive krypton. A 96% SiO 2 glass with 28% porosity was heated at an elevated pressure of Kr gas to a temperature of 850 to 900 0 C and held at that temperature to sinter the glass-krypton composite to a density of about 2 g/cm 3 . A krypton content of 30 cm 3 of Kr(STP)/cm 3 of glass has been demonstrated when loading pressures of 140 MPa are used. Krypton release rates from the glass are lower than reported for any other waste form considered currently. At 420 0 C a diffusion parameter, D/r 0 2 , of 8.66 x 10 -13 min -1 was determined which leads to a total release of 0.7% of the krypton in 10 years. Release rates increase moderately with increasing temperature up to 600 0 C and increase rapidly above 600 0 C. The lower loading pressures (about 40 MPa) may appear to yield a more favorable product from the point of view of krypton release than the high pressures. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique are given in the conclusions section

  4. Advanced materials for solid state hydrogen storage: “Thermal engineering issues”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa Murthy, S.; Anil Kumar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen has been widely recognized as the “Energy Carrier” of the future. Efficient, reliable, economical and safe storage and delivery of hydrogen form important aspects in achieving success of the “Hydrogen Economy”. Gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities become important when one considers portable and mobile applications of hydrogen. In the case of solid state hydrogen storage, the gas is reversibly embedded (by physisorption and/or chemisorption) in a solid matrix. A wide variety of materials such as intermetallics, physisorbents, complex hydrides/alanates, metal organic frameworks, etc. have been investigated as possible storage media. This paper discusses the feasibility of lithium– and sodium–aluminum hydrides with emphasis on their thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties. Drawbacks such as poor heat transfer characteristics and poor kinetics demand special attention to the thermal design of solid state storage devices. - Highlights: • Advanced materials suitable for solid state hydrogen storage are discussed. • Issues related to thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of hydriding materials are brought out. • Hydriding and dehydriding behavior including sorption kinetics of complex hydrides with emphasis on alanates are explained

  5. Monitoring of carbon monoxide in residences with bulk wood pellet storage in the Northeast United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, Alan; Jordan, Carolyn E; Wake, Cameron; Soto-Garcia, Lydia

    2017-10-01

    The interest in biomass fuel is continuing to expand globally and in the northeastern United States as wood pellets are becoming a primary source of fuel for residential and small commercial systems. Wood pellets for boilers are often stored in basement storage rooms or large bag-type containers. Due to the enclosed nature of these storage areas, the atmosphere may exhibit increased levels of carbon monoxide. Serious accidents in Europe have been reported over the last decade in which high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) have been found in or near bulk pellet storage containers. The aim of this study was to characterize the CO concentrations in areas with indoor storage of bulk wood pellets. Data was obtained over approximately 7 months (December 2013 to June 2014) at 25 sites in New Hampshire and Massachusetts: 16 homes using wood pellet boilers with indoor pellet storage containers greater than or equal to 3 ton capacity; 4 homes with wood pellet heating systems with outdoor pellet storage; 4 homes using other heating fuels; and a university laboratory site. CO monitors were set up in homes to collect concentrations of CO in the immediate vicinity of wood pellet storage containers, and data were then compared to those of homes using fossil fuel systems. The homes monitored in this study provided a diverse set of housing stock spanning two and a half centuries of construction, with homes built from 1774 to 2013, representing a range of air exchange rates. The CO concentration data from each home was averaged hourly and then compared to a threshold of 9 ppm. While concentrations of CO were generally low for the homes studied, the need to properly design storage locations for pellets is and will remain a necessary component of wood pellet heating systems to minimize the risk of CO exposure. This paper is an assessment of carbon monoxide (CO) exposure from bulk wood pellet storage in homes in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Understanding the CO concentrations

  6. Standards for Exchange and Storage of 3D Information : Challenges and Opportunities for Emergency Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlatanova, S.; Stoter, J.; Isikdag, U.

    2012-01-01

    3D standards have been developed throughout the years for many different purposes: visualisation (fast and realistic), data management (efficient storage), modelling (validity and topology) or data exchange (platform independence). The developers also vary from companies to international

  7. Solid-State Ultracapacitor for Improved Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a solid-state ultracapacitor using a novel nanocomposite, dielectric material. The material's design is based on the internal barrier layer capacitance (IBLC) concept, and it uses novel dielectric and metallic conductive ink formulations. Novel processing methods developed by NASA provide for unique dielectric properties at the grain level. Nanoscale raw material powders are tailored using a variety of techniques and then formulated into a special ink. This dielectric ink is used with novel metallic conductive ink to print a capacitor layer structure into any design necessary to meet a range of technical requirements. The innovation is intended to replace current range safety batteries that NASA uses to power the systems that destroy off-course space vehicles. A solid-state design provides the needed robustness and safety for this demanding application.

  8. Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, David J.; Greenfield, Eric J.; Hoehn, Robert E.; Lapoint, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees in the United States was quantified to assess the magnitude and role of urban forests in relation to climate change. Urban tree field data from 28 cities and 6 states were used to determine the average carbon density per unit of tree cover. These data were applied to statewide urban tree cover measurements to determine total urban forest carbon storage and annual sequestration by state and nationally. Urban whole tree carbon storage densities average 7.69 kg C m −2 of tree cover and sequestration densities average 0.28 kg C m −2 of tree cover per year. Total tree carbon storage in U.S. urban areas (c. 2005) is estimated at 643 million tonnes ($50.5 billion value; 95% CI = 597 million and 690 million tonnes) and annual sequestration is estimated at 25.6 million tonnes ($2.0 billion value; 95% CI = 23.7 million to 27.4 million tonnes). -- Highlights: •Total tree carbon storage in U.S. urban areas (c. 2005) is estimated at 643 million tonnes. •Total tree carbon storage in U.S. urban and community areas is estimated at 1.36 billion tonnes. •Net carbon sequestration in U.S. urban areas varies by state and is estimated at 18.9 million tonnes per year. •Overlap between U.S. forest and urban forest carbon estimates is between 247 million and 303 million tonnes. -- Field and tree cover measurements reveal carbon storage and sequestration by trees in U.S. urban and community areas

  9. Status and current spent fuel storage practices in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Brief discussions are presented on the history and state of spent fuel generation by utilities that comprise the United States commercial nuclear power industry, the current situation regarding the Federal government's nuclear waste policy, and evolving spent fuel storage practices. These evolving spent fuel storage practices are the result of private sector initiatives, but appear to be influenced by various external factors. The paper is not intended to provide a comprehensive appraisal of the storage initiatives being conducted by the private sector. The focus, instead, is on the Federal government's role and activities related to spent fuel management. Although the Federal government has adopted a policy calling for deep geological disposal of spent fuel, the US Congress has recently begun to consider expanding that policy to include a centralized interim storage facility. In the absence of such an expanded policy, the Department of Energy has performed some preliminary activities that would expedite development of a centralized interim storage facility, if Congress were to enact such a policy. The Department's current activities with regard to developing a centralized interim storage facility, which are consistent with the current policy, are described in the paper. The paper also describes two important technical development activities that have been conducted by the Department of Energy to support improved efficiency in spent fuel management. The Department's activities regarding development of a burnup credit methodology, and a dry transfer system are summarized. (author)

  10. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    SiO[symbol]) ceramics via solid state sintering of Zr)[symbol] and SiO[symbol] and the effect of dopants on the zircon yield / U. Dhanayake, B. S. B. Karunaratne. Preparation and properties of vanadium doped ZnTe cermet thin films / M. S. Hossain, R. Islam, K. A. Khan. Dynamical properties and electronic structure of lithium-ion conductor / M. Kobayashi ... [et al.]. Cuprous ion conducting Montmorillonite-Polypyrrole nanocomposites / D. M. M. Krishantha ... [et al.]. Frequency dependence of conductivity studies on a newly synthesized superionic solid solution/mixed system: [0.75AgI: 0.25AgCl] / R. K. Nagarch, R. Kumar. Diffuse X-ray and neutron scattering from Powder PbS / X. Lian ... [et al.]. Electron affinity and work function of Pyrolytic MnO[symbol] thin films prepared from Mn(C[symbol]H[symbol]O[symbol])[symbol].4H[symbol]) / A. K. M. Farid Ul Islam, R. Islam, K. A. Khan. Crystal structure and heat capacity of Ba[symbol]Ca[symbol]Nb[symbol]O[symbol] / T. Shimoyama ... [et al.]. XPS and impedance investigations on amorphous vanadium oxide thin films / M. Kamalanathan ... [et al.]. Sintering and mixed electronic-ionic conducting properties of La[symbol]Sr[symbol]NiO[symbol] derived from a polyaminocarboxylate complex precursor / D.-P. Huang ... [et al.]. Preparation and characteristics of ball milled MgH[symbol] + M (M= Fe, VF[symbol] and FeF[symbol]) nanocomposites for hydrogen storage / N. W. B. Balasooriya, Ch. Poinsignon. Structural studies of oxysulfide glasses by X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulation / R. Prasada Rao, M. Seshasayee, J. Dheepa. Synthesis, sintering and oxygen ionic conducting properties of Bi[symbol]V[symbol]Cu[symbol]O[symbol] / F. Zhang ... [et al.]. Synthesis and transport characteristics of PbI[symbol]-Ag[symbol]O-Cr[symbol]O[symbol] superioninc system / S. A. Suthanthiraraj, V. Mathew. Electronic conductivity of La[symbol]Sr[symbol]Ga[symbol]Mg[symbol]Co[symbol]O[symbol] electrolytes / K. Yamaji ... [et al.] -- pt. II. Electrode materials

  11. Issue Brief: A Survey of State Policies to Support Utility-Scale and Distributed-Energy Storage (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes proposed and enacted legislation and activities related to energy storage for nine states, which are presented alphabetically. These states were selected to provide a high-level view of various energy storage efforts taking place across the United States.

  12. Contraceptive availability during an emergency response in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Sascha R; Kourtis, Athena P; Curtis, Kathryn M; Tepper, Naomi; Gorman, Susan; Jamieson, Denise J; Zotti, Marianne; Barfield, Wanda

    2013-03-01

    This article provides the evidence for contraceptive need to prevent unintended pregnancy during an emergency response, discusses the most appropriate types of contraceptives for disaster situations, and details the current provisions in place to provide contraceptives during an emergency response.

  13. United States Department of Energy radiological emergency response programme - a national capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon-Hagerty, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    In order to respond to a radiological emergency, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) maintains seven emergency response assets and capabilities in support of a radiological emergency of any proportion within the continental United States and abroad. The seven emergency response assets and capabilities include: Accident Response Group; Aerial Measuring Systems; Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability; Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center; Nuclear Emergency Search Team; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiological Assistance Program. Presently, USDOE maintains the most comprehensive national radiological emergency response assets in the United States, capable of dealing with any type of emergency involving nuclear materials. In all, the Department's assets are available to support any type of accident/incident involving radioactive materials in coordination with other United States Federal agencies, as well as state and local governments, as required. (author)

  14. Hydrogen storage in clathrate hydrates: Current state of the art and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veluswamy, Hari Prakash; Kumar, Rajnish; Linga, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen is looked upon as the next generation clean energy carrier, search for an efficient material and method for storing hydrogen has been pursued relentlessly. Improving hydrogen storage capacity to meet DOE targets has been challenging and research efforts are continuously put forth to achieve the set targets and to make hydrogen storage a commercially realizable process. This review comprehensively summarizes the state of the art experimental work conducted on the storage of hydrogen as hydrogen clathrates both at the molecular level and macroscopic level. It identifies future directions and challenges for this exciting area of research. Hydrogen storage capacities of different clathrate structures – sI, sII, sH, sVI and semi clathrates have been compiled and presented. In addition, promising new approaches for increasing hydrogen storage capacity have been described. Future directions for achieving increased hydrogen storage and process scale up have been outlined. Despite few limitations in storing hydrogen in the form of clathrates, this domain receives prominent attention due to more environmental-friendly method of synthesis, easy recovery of molecular hydrogen with minimum energy requirement, and improved safety of the process

  15. Accidental Release of Chlorine from a Storage Facility and an On-Site Emergency Mock Drill: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambalathumpara Raman Soman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current industrial scenario there is a serious need for formulating strategies to handle hazardous substances in the safest way. Manufacture, storage, and use of hazardous substances pose a serious risk to industry, people, and the environment. Accidental release of toxic chemicals can lead to emergencies. An emergency response plan (ERP is inevitable to minimize the adverse effects of such releases. The on-site emergency plan is an integral component of any process safety and risk management system. This paper deals with an on-site emergency response plan for a chlorine manufacturing industry. It was developed on the basis of a previous study on chlorine release and a full scale mock drill has been conducted for testing the plan. Results indicated that properly trained personnel can effectively handle each level of incidents occurring in the process plant. As an extensive guideline to the district level government authorities for off-site emergency planning, risk zone has also been estimated with reference to a chlorine exposure threshold of 3 ppm.

  16. Radioactive solid waste inventories at United States Department of Energy burial and storage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.

    1987-06-01

    Radioactive solid waste inventories are given for United States Department of Energy (DOE) burial and storage sites. These data are obtained from the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) and reflect the inventories as of the end of the calendar year 1986. 4 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Opportunities and barriers to pumped-hydro energy storage in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chi-Jen; Jackson, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    As concerns about global warming grow, societies are increasingly turning to the use of intermittent renewable energy resources, where energy storage becomes more and more important. Pumped-hydro energy storage (PHES) is the most established technology for utility-scale electricity storage. Although PHES has continued to be deployed globally, its development in the United States has largely been dormant since the 1990s. In recent years, however, there has been a revival of commercial interests in developing PHES facilities. In this paper we examine the historical development of PHES facilities in the United States, analyze case studies on the controversies of disputed projects, examine the challenges to and conflicting views of future development in the United States, and discuss new development activities and approaches. The main limiting factors for PHES appear to be environmental concerns and financial uncertainties rather than the availability of technically feasible sites. PHES developers are proposing innovative ways of addressing the environmental impacts, including the potential use of waste water in PHES applications. In some cases, a properly designed PHES system can even be used to improve water quality through aeration and other processes. Such new opportunities and the increasing need for greater energy storage may lead policymakers to reassess the potential of PHES in the United States, particularly for coupling with intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. (author)

  18. Frequency of unsafe storage, use, and disposal practices of opioids among cancer patients presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Julio; Reddy, Akhila; de la Cruz, Maxine; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Diane; Bruera, Eduardo; Todd, Knox H

    2017-12-01

    Approximately 75% of prescription opioid abusers obtain the drug from an acquaintance, which may be a consequence of improper opioid storage, use, disposal, and lack of patient education. We aimed to determine the opioid storage, use, and disposal patterns in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) of a comprehensive cancer center. We surveyed 113 patients receiving opioids for at least 2 months upon presenting to the ED and collected information regarding opioid use, storage, and disposal. Unsafe storage was defined as storing opioids in plain sight, and unsafe use was defined as sharing or losing opioids. The median age was 53 years, 55% were female, 64% were white, and 86% had advanced cancer. Of those surveyed, 36% stored opioids in plain sight, 53% kept them hidden but unlocked, and only 15% locked their opioids. However, 73% agreed that they would use a lockbox if given one. Patients who reported that others had asked them for their pain medications (p = 0.004) and those who would use a lockbox if given one (p = 0.019) were more likely to keep them locked. Some 13 patients (12%) used opioids unsafely by either sharing (5%) or losing (8%) them. Patients who reported being prescribed more pain pills than required (p = 0.032) were more likely to practice unsafe use. Most (78%) were unaware of proper opioid disposal methods, 6% believed they were prescribed more medication than required, and 67% had unused opioids at home. Only 13% previously received education about safe disposal of opioids. Overall, 77% (87) of patients reported unsafe storage, unsafe use, or possessed unused opioids at home. Many cancer patients presenting to the ED improperly and unsafely store, use, or dispose of opioids, thus highlighting a need to investigate the impact of patient education on such practices.

  19. KEYNOTE ADDRESS: The role of standards in the emerging optical digital data disk storage systems market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainbridge, Ross C.

    1984-09-01

    The Institute for Computer Sciences and Technology at the National Bureau of Standards is pleased to cooperate with the International Society for Optical Engineering and to join with the other distinguished organizations in cosponsoring this conference on applications of optical digital data disk storage systems.

  20. Monthly variation of United States pediatric headache emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Sita; Ginde, Adit A; Grubenhoff, Joseph A; Kempe, Allison; Hershey, Andrew D; Powers, Scott W

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this article is to determine the monthly variation of emergency department (ED) visits for pediatric headache. We hypothesized youth have increased headache-related ED visits in the months associated with school attendance. Using a United States representative sample of ED visits in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1997 to 2009, we estimated number of visits associated with ICD-9 codes related to headache, migraine, status migrainosus, or tension-type headache in 5- to 18-year-olds. Age-stratified multivariate models are presented for month of visit (July as reference). There was a national estimate of 250,000 ED visits annually related to headache (2.1% of total visits) in 5- to 18-year-olds. In 5- to 11-year-olds, the adjusted rate of headache-related visits was lower in April (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.20, 0.88). In 12- to 18-year-olds, there were higher rates in January (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.16, 3.14) and September (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.06, 2.55). In adolescents we found higher ED utilization in January and September, the same months associated with school return from vacation for a majority of children nationally. No significant reduction in the summer suggests that school itself is not the issue, but rather changes in daily lifestyle and transitions.

  1. Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, David J; Greenfield, Eric J; Hoehn, Robert E; Lapoint, Elizabeth

    2013-07-01

    Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees in the United States was quantified to assess the magnitude and role of urban forests in relation to climate change. Urban tree field data from 28 cities and 6 states were used to determine the average carbon density per unit of tree cover. These data were applied to statewide urban tree cover measurements to determine total urban forest carbon storage and annual sequestration by state and nationally. Urban whole tree carbon storage densities average 7.69 kg C m(-2) of tree cover and sequestration densities average 0.28 kg C m(-2) of tree cover per year. Total tree carbon storage in U.S. urban areas (c. 2005) is estimated at 643 million tonnes ($50.5 billion value; 95% CI = 597 million and 690 million tonnes) and annual sequestration is estimated at 25.6 million tonnes ($2.0 billion value; 95% CI = 23.7 million to 27.4 million tonnes). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Recent Applications of 2D Inorganic Nanosheets for Emerging Energy Storage System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung Mi; Patil, Sharad B; Jin, Xiaoyan; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2018-04-03

    Among many types of nanostructured inorganic materials, highly anisotropic 2D nanosheets provide unique advantages in designing and synthesizing efficient electrode and electrocatalyst materials for novel energy storage technologies. 2D inorganic nanosheets boast lots of unique characteristics such as high surface area, short ion diffusion path, tailorable compositions, and tunable electronic structures. These merits of 2D inorganic nanosheets render them promising candidate materials as electrodes for diverse secondary batteries and supercapacitors, and electrocatalysts. A wide spectrum of examples is presented for inorganic nanosheet-based electrodes and electrocatalysts. Future perspectives in research about 2D nanosheet-based functional materials are discussed to provide insight for the development of next-generation energy storage systems using 2D nanostructured materials. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The emerging chemistry of sodium ion batteries for electrochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Dipan; Talaie, Elahe; Duffort, Victor; Nazar, Linda F

    2015-03-09

    Energy storage technology has received significant attention for portable electronic devices, electric vehicle propulsion, bulk electricity storage at power stations, and load leveling of renewable sources, such as solar energy and wind power. Lithium ion batteries have dominated most of the first two applications. For the last two cases, however, moving beyond lithium batteries to the element that lies below-sodium-is a sensible step that offers sustainability and cost-effectiveness. This requires an evaluation of the science underpinning these devices, including the discovery of new materials, their electrochemistry, and an increased understanding of ion mobility based on computational methods. The Review considers some of the current scientific issues underpinning sodium ion batteries. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Optical storage studies on the trapping states of BaFCl:Eu sup 2 sup +

    CERN Document Server

    Meng Xian Guo; Sun Li; Jin Hui; Zhang Li

    2003-01-01

    The optical absorption spectra of BaF sub 2 sub - sub x Cl sub x :Eu in different states of optical storage were measured to clarify the electron trapping mechanism for its optical storage and photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL). Based on the absorption spectra and difference absorption spectra, the electron transfer processes after ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation were investigated. This demonstrates that (1) Eu sup 3 sup + ions are formed upon UV light irradiation at room temperature; (2) the two absorption bands in the visible region (400-600 nm) should be assigned to two different F centres, both of which contribute to the optical storage and PSL, and (3) a third broad difference absorption band around approx 650 nm, which matches the common laser better, was observed.

  5. Tank designs for combined high pressure gas and solid state hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea

    Many challenges have still to be overcome in order to establish a solid ground for significant market penetration of fuel cell hydrogen vehicles. The development of an effective solution for on-board hydrogen storage is one of the main technical tasks that need to be tackled. The present thesis...... deals with the development of a simulation tool to design and compare different vehicular storage options with respect to targets based upon storage and fueling efficiencies. The set targets represent performance improvements with regard to the state-of-the-art technology and are separately defined...... volume. Heat transfer augmentation techniques (e.g. encapsulation) are found to be the reward strategy to achieve the same stored mass and fueling time of the standard technology, while enabling ambient temperature fueling and save the energy cooling demand (4.2 MJ per fueling) at the refueling station....

  6. Study on state equation for hydrogen storage measurement by volumetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Wei; Xu Jiajing; Wang Chaoyang; Tang Yongjian

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric measurement technique is one of the most popular methods for determining the amount of hydrogen storage. A new state equation was established which extended the limitations from the ideal gas state equation, the van der Waals equation and the Gou equation. The new state equation was then employed to describe the p-V-T character of hydrogen and investigate the adsorption quantity of hydrogen storage in resorcin-formaldehyde aerogel under different temperatures and pressures. The new equation was used to describe the density of hydrogen under different temperatures and pressures. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data. The differences arising from various underlying physics were carefully analyzed. (authors)

  7. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ares, Jos Ramon; Bals, Sara; Biliskov, Nikola; Chakraborty, Sudip; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Chaudhary, Anna Lisa; Cuevas, Fermin; Dam, Bernard; de Jongh, Petra; Dornheim, Martin; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Novakovic, Jasmina G.; Hirscher, Michael; Hirscher, M.; Jensen, Torben R.; Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Novakovic, Nikola; Lai, Qiwen; Leardini, Fabrice; Gattia, Daniele Mirabile; Pasquini, Luca; Steriotis, Theodore; Turner, Stuart; Vegge, Tejs; Zuttel, Andreas; Montone, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated

  8. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated...

  9. Militarised violence in the service of state-imposed emergencies over Palestine and Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Pfingst

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available States of Emergency are declared against the disorder-ing of state sovereign power by acts of resistance, rebellion and revolt and are characterised by the technologies of control, containment and punishment. Through spatial, archival and visual encounters with emergency landscapes and the geographies of resistance, the essay considers the historic and contemporary operations, provisions, regulations and practices authorised under state-imposed emergencies. It does so in order firstly, to bring attention to the practices authorised through state-imposed emergencies and the currency and saliency of their ongoing effects, and secondly to re-frame the militarised violence of settlement/occupation as an integral part of state-imposed emergencies in which all that is necessary will be done to protect the sovereign state from the resistance of the colonised/occupied and to effect a return to ‘order’.     Through encounters with the archival record, and the architectures, remnants and territorial arrangements found in post-colonial Kenya and across the multiple geographies of Palestine, the essay draws out seven clusters of state imposed emergency practices and effects. The work grapples with a number of questions: what is it that a declared state of emergency performs for the state? Does a state of emergency enable particular forms of militarised violence? Are there common practices to be found across different modes of state-imposed emergencies? What is the genealogy to the states of emergency across Palestine and Kenya? Does our excavation of the practices of state-imposed emergency shed light on the ways we apprehend state violence in colonial, post-colonial and neo-colonial geographies?

  10. Opportunities and challenges for emerging nuclear power states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nkong-Njock, V.; Facer, R.I.; Boussaha, A.

    2009-01-01

    ) resources including financial and human, (iv) site selection and transport of radioactive materials and (vi) fuel cycle and waste management including nuclear waste storage and disposal. The proliferation risks associated with the nuclear fuel cycle are issues of concern requiring that nuclear power facilities are operated in an open and transparent manner. But above all that, the main critical and challenging issues in introducing nuclear power in a State is to ensure and maintain the necessary trust and confidence on the nuclear power programme. In this connection and in line with its mandate, the IAEA is devoting increased attention to its special role in advancing nuclear energy and safety around the globe, thus ensuring that Member States use nuclear energy efficiently, safely, securely and with minimal proliferation risk. The IAEA supports the safe and peaceful use of nuclear power by providing standards, guidance, review and assessment, inspections and assistance related to (i) Technology, (ii) Safety and security and (iii) Safeguards. (Author)

  11. Emergency response capabilities developed in the United States to deal with nuclear materials transportation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandevender, S.G.; Reese, R.T.; Schilling, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    The non-existence of emergency response programs is frequently stated as a reason for restricting the movement of radioactive materials through states or local jurisdictions. Yet, studies discussed here indicate that emergency response capability, while not in the best condition, is getting more money, interest and attention, and in most states response networks exist which could be effective in responding to radiological emergencies. Awareness of such capabilities by the public is an important feature in increasing the public's confidence in the ability of federal, state and local officials in controlling hazards. One aspect of this awareness program could be in broader availability of radioactive emergency techniques for possible first responders to emergencies. This training, public awareness and more emphasis on workable emergency plans will help to assure reliable and workable emergency response plans

  12. Emerging Powers and Effective Governance in Fragile States | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Emerging economies argue that their approach to development and security is ... Their national experiences provide them with more relevant insights into the ... and Turkey's role in Somalia, particularly in the areas of security and justice.

  13. The state of emergency care in Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Malemo Kalisya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC is the second largest country on the African continent with a population of over 70 million. It is also a major crossroad through Africa as it borders nine countries. Unfortunately, the DRC has experienced recurrent political and social instability throughout its history and active fighting is still prevalent today. At least two decades of conflict have devastated the civilian population and collapsed healthcare infrastructure. Life expectancy is low and government expenditure on health per capita remains one of the lowest in the world. Emergency Medicine has not been established as a specialty in the DRC. While the vast majority of hospitals have emergency rooms or salle des urgences, this designation has no agreed upon format and is rarely staffed by doctors or nurses trained in emergency care. Presenting complaints include general and obstetric surgical emergencies as well as respiratory and diarrhoeal illnesses. Most patients present late, in advanced stages of disease or with extreme morbidity, so mortality is high. Epidemics include HIV, cholera, measles, meningitis and other diarrhoeal and respiratory illnesses. Lack of training, lack of equipment and fee-for-service are cited as barriers to care. Pre-hospital care is also not an established specialty. New initiatives to improve emergency care include training Congolese physicians in emergency medicine residencies and medic ranger training within national parks.

  14. Innovative States: Emerging Family Support and Education Programs. Arkansas, Iowa, Oregon, Vermont, Washington. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Family Research Project, Cambridge, MA.

    The five states featured in this second edition of "Innovative States" were chosen because they reflect crucial elements in an emerging understanding of state policy making in family support and education. Creative state partnerships involving program development and funding are a key ingredient to successful endeavors. States rely on…

  15. Radioactive solid waste inventories at United States Department of Energy burial and storage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.

    1986-06-01

    Radioactive solid waste inventories are given for United States Department of Energy (DOE) burial and storage sites. These data are obtained from the Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) and reflect the inventories as of the end of the calendar year 1985. This report differs from previous issues in that the data cutoff date is December 31, 1985, rather than the fiscal year end. Another difference from previous issues is that data for the TRU categories 1 and 6 have been omitted

  16. Logic operations and data storage using vortex magnetization states in mesoscopic permalloy rings, and optical readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, S R; Gibson, U J, E-mail: u.gibson@dartmouth.ed [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755-8000 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Optical coatings applied to one-half of thin film magnetic rings allow real-time readout of the chirality of the vortex state of micro- and nanomagnetic structures by breaking the symmetry of the optical signal. We use this technique to demonstrate data storage, operation of a NOT gate that uses exchange interactions between slightly overlapping rings, and to investigate the use of chains of rings as connecting wires for linking gates.

  17. Real-Time Transmission and Storage of Video, Audio, and Health Data in Emergency and Home Care Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Stagnaro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the availability of bandwidth for wireless links, network integration, and the computational power on fixed and mobile platforms at affordable costs allows nowadays for the handling of audio and video data, their quality making them suitable for medical application. These information streams can support both continuous monitoring and emergency situations. According to this scenario, the authors have developed and implemented the mobile communication system which is described in this paper. The system is based on ITU-T H.323 multimedia terminal recommendation, suitable for real-time data/video/audio and telemedical applications. The audio and video codecs, respectively, H.264 and G723.1, were implemented and optimized in order to obtain high performance on the system target processors. Offline media streaming storage and retrieval functionalities were supported by integrating a relational database in the hospital central system. The system is based on low-cost consumer technologies such as general packet radio service (GPRS and wireless local area network (WLAN or WiFi for lowband data/video transmission. Implementation and testing were carried out for medical emergency and telemedicine application. In this paper, the emergency case study is described.

  18. Disparities in access to emergency general surgery care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jasmine A; Shen, Connie; Ayturk, Didem; Kiefe, Catarina I; Santry, Heena P

    2018-02-01

    As fewer surgeons take emergency general surgery call and hospitals decrease emergency services, a crisis in access looms in the United States. We examined national emergency general surgery capacity and county-level determinants of access to emergency general surgery care with special attention to disparities. To identify potential emergency general surgery hospitals, we queried the database of the American Hospital Association for "acute care general hospital," with "surgical services," and "emergency department," and ≥1 "operating room." Internet search and direct contact confirmed emergency general surgery services that covered the emergency room 7 days a week, 24 hours a day. Geographic and population-level emergency general surgery access was derived from Geographic Information Systems and US Census. Of the 6,356 hospitals in the 2013 American Hospital Association database, only 2,811 were emergency general surgery hospitals. Counties with greater percentages of black, Hispanic, uninsured, and low-education individuals and rural counties disproportionately lacked access to emergency general surgery care. For example, counties above the 75th percentile of African American population (10.2%) had >80% odds of not having an emergency general surgery hospital compared with counties below the 25th percentile of African American population (0.6%). Gaps in access to emergency general surgery services exist across the United States, disproportionately affecting underserved, rural communities. Policy initiatives need to increase emergency general surgery capacity nationwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergency response planning in hospitals, United States: 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-08-20

    This study presents baseline data to determine which hospital characteristics are associated with preparedness for terrorism and natural disaster in the areas of emergency response planning and availability of equipment and specialized care units. Information from the Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Preparedness Supplements to the 2003 and 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys was used to provide national estimates of variations in hospital emergency response plans and resources by residency and medical school affiliation, hospital size, ownership, metropolitan statistical area status, and Joint Commission accreditation. Of 874 sampled hospitals with emergency or outpatient departments, 739 responded for an 84.6 percent response rate. Estimates are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals. About 92 percent of hospitals had revised their emergency response plans since September 11, 2001, but only about 63 percent had addressed natural disasters and biological, chemical, radiological, and explosive terrorism in those plans. Only about 9 percent of hospitals had provided for all 10 of the response plan components studied. Hospitals had a mean of about 14 personal protective suits, 21 critical care beds, 12 mechanical ventilators, 7 negative pressure isolation rooms, and 2 decontamination showers each. Hospital bed capacity was the factor most consistently associated with emergency response planning and availability of resources.

  20. State gun safe storage laws and child mortality due to firearms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, P; Grossman, D C; Rivara, F P; Koepsell, T D

    1997-10-01

    Since 1989, several states have passed laws that make gun owners criminally liable if someone is injured because a child gains unsupervised access to a gun. These laws are controversial, and their effect on firearm-related injuries is unknown. To determine if state laws that require safe storage of firearms are associated with a reduction in child mortality due to firearms. An ecological study of firearm mortality from 1979 through 1994. All 50 states and the District of Columbia. All children younger than 15 years. Unintentional deaths, suicides, and homicides due to firearms. Laws that make gun owners responsible for storing firearms in a manner that makes them inaccessible to children were in effect for at least 1 year in 12 states from 1990 through 1994. Among children younger than 15 years, unintentional shooting deaths were reduced by 23% (95% confidence interval, 6%-37%) during the years covered by these laws. This estimate was based on within-state comparisons adjusted for national trends in unintentional firearm-related mortality. Gun-related homicide and suicide showed modest declines, but these were not statistically significant. State safe storage laws intended to make firearms less accessible to children appear to prevent unintentional shooting deaths among children younger than 15 years.

  1. The quiet revolution in agri-food value chains in Asia: Understanding the fast emergence of cold storages in poor districts in India

    OpenAIRE

    Minten, Bart; Reardon, Thomas; Singh, K.M.; Sutradhar, Rajib

    2012-01-01

    In disadvantaged districts of Bihar, one of the poorest states in India and an area where smallholders dominate, we find that there have been dramatic increases and rapid up-scaling of modern cold storages, triggered by market reform, investment subsidies, and better overall public service provision and governance. Almost all potato farmers, small and large, participate in these cold storages. The availability of cold storages has seemingly led to improved efficiency in value chains because o...

  2. Non-uniform regulations of underground storage tanks in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadim, F.; Hoag, G.E.; Liu, S.; Carley, R.J.; Zack, P.

    2000-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks (USTs) are one of the major sources of ground water contamination. United States federal regulations for USTs were established in September of 1988. Since that time little or no amendments have been made to these regulations. In order to protect sensitive areas such as aquifer recharge zones for public water supply wells and wetlands, different states have been obligated to apply more stringent standards than the federal UST regulations. This practice however, has led to a non-uniform application of regulations for USTs throughout the country. In this article, United States regulations for USTs are reviewed and its deficits are highlighted. Based on these regulations and the experience of northeastern states of United States, a sequence of leak and spill preventive measures for USTs is proposed. Application of the proposed measures could substantially reduce the possibility of UST failure and would be more protective of the subsurface environment. (author)

  3. 77 FR 35061 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “Off” in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Triggering ``Off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 Program and the Federal-State Extended...: Announcement regarding states triggering ``off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08... average, seasonally adjusted total unemployment rate in Connecticut fell below the 8.0% rate required to...

  4. 77 FR 21811 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “Off” in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... Triggering ``Off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program and the Federal-State.... SUMMARY: Announcement regarding states triggering ``off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008... average, seasonally-adjusted total unemployment rate (TUR trigger) for Texas fell below the 8.5% threshold...

  5. 77 FR 35062 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “Off” in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... Triggering ``Off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 Program and the Federal-State Extended...: Announcement regarding states triggering ``off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08... unemployment rate be at least 110% of one of the rates from a comparable period in one of the three prior years...

  6. Assessing innovation in emerging energy technologies: Socio-technical dynamics of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Jennie C.; Jiusto, Scott

    2010-01-01

    This study applies a socio-technical systems perspective to explore innovation dynamics of two emerging energy technologies with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electrical power generation in the United States: carbon capture and storage (CCS) and enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The goal of the study is to inform sustainability science theory and energy policy deliberations by examining how social and political dynamics are shaping the struggle for resources by these two emerging, not-yet-widely commercializable socio-technical systems. This characterization of socio-technical dynamics of CCS and EGS innovation includes examining the perceived technical, environmental, and financial risks and benefits of each system, as well as the discourses and actor networks through which the competition for resources - particularly public resources - is being waged. CCS and EGS were selected for the study because they vary considerably with respect to their social, technical, and environmental implications and risks, are unproven at scale and uncertain with respect to cost, feasibility, and life-cycle environmental impacts. By assessing the two technologies in parallel, the study highlights important social and political dimensions of energy technology innovation in order to inform theory and suggest new approaches to policy analysis.

  7. Modeling of storage tank settlement based on the United States standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruchenkova Alesya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Up to 60% of storage tanks in operation have uneven settlement of the outer bottom contour, which often leads to accidents. Russian and foreign regulatory documents have different requirements for strain limits of metal structures. There is an increasing need for harmonizing regulatory documents. The aim of this study is to theoretically justify and to assess the possibility of applying the U.S. standards for specifying the allowable settlement of storage tanks used in Russia. The allowable uneven settlement was calculated for a vertical steel tank (VST-20000 according to API-653, a standard of the American Petroleum Institute. The calculated allowable settlement levels were compared with those established by Russian standards. Based on the finite element method, the uneven settlement development process of a storage tank was modeled. Stress-strain state parameters of tank structures were obtained at the critical levels established in API-653. Relationships of maximum equivalent stresses in VST metal structures to the vertical settlement component for settlement zones of 6 to 72 m in length were determined. When the uneven settlement zone is 6 m in length, the limit state is found to be caused by 30-mm vertical settlement, while stresses in the wall exceed 330 MPa. When the uneven settlement zone is 36 m in length, stresses reach the yield point only at 100-mm vertical settlement.

  8. State-of-Charge Balance Using Adaptive Droop Control for Distributed Energy Storage Systems in DC MicroGrid Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Xiaonan; Sun, Kai; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the coordinated control of distributed energy storage systems (DESSs) in DC micro-grids. In order to balance the state-of-charge (SoC) of each energy storage unit (ESU), an SoC-based adaptive droop control method is proposed. In this decentralized control method, the droop...

  9. Ferroelectric polymer dielectrics: Emerging materials for future electrostatic energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Maheswar

    2018-05-01

    In this manuscript, the dielectric behavior of a variety of ferroelectric polymer dielectrics (FPD), which may bethe materials for future electrostatic energy storage application shave been discussed. The variety of polymer dielectrics, comprising of ferroelectric polymer[polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)]/non-polarpolymer [low density polyethylene (LDPE)] and different sizes of metal particles (Ni, quasicrystal of Al-Cu-Fe) as filler, were prepared through different process conditions (cold press/hot press) and are investigated experimentally. Very high values of effective dielectric constants (ɛeff) with low loss tangent (Tan δ) were observed forall the prepared FPD at their respective percolation thresholds (fc). The enhancement of ɛeff and Tan δ at the insulator to metal transition (IMT) is explained through the boundary layer capacitor effect and the percolation theory respectively. The non-universal fc/critical exponents across the IMT have been explained through percolation theory andis attributed to the fillerparticle size& shape, interaction between the components, method of their preparation, adhesiveness, connectivity and homogeneity, etc. of the samples. Recent results on developed FPD with high ɛeff and low Tan δ prepared through cold press have proven themselves to be the better candidates for low frequency and static dielectric applications.

  10. Information technology and emergency management: preparedness and planning in US states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of information technology (IT) on emergency preparedness and planning by analysing a survey of US state government departments of emergency management. The research results show that there has been a significant impact of IT on emergency planning. IT has proven to be effective for all phases of emergency management, but especially for the response phase. There are numerous technologies used in emergency management, ranging from the internet, Geographic Information Systems and wireless technologies to more advanced hazard analysis models. All were generally viewed as being effective. Lack of financial resources and support from elected officials is a perennial problem in public administration, and was found to be prevalent in this study of IT and emergency management. There was evidence that state governments rating high on a performance index were more likely to use IT for emergency management. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2011.

  11. Effect of the Affordable Care Act Medicaid Expansion on Emergency Department Visits: Evidence From State-Level Emergency Department Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikpay, Sayeh; Freedman, Seth; Levy, Helen; Buchmueller, Tom

    2017-08-01

    We assess whether the expansion of Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) results in changes in emergency department (ED) visits or ED payer mix. We also test whether the size of the change in ED visits depends on the change in the size of the Medicaid population. Using all-capture, longitudinal, state data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Fast Stats program, we implemented a difference-in-difference analysis, which compared changes in ED visits per capita and the share of ED visits by payer (Medicaid, uninsured, and private insurance) in 14 states that did and 11 states that did not expand Medicaid in 2014. Analyses controlled for state-level demographic and economic characteristics. We found that total ED use per 1,000 population increased by 2.5 visits more in Medicaid expansion states than in nonexpansion states after 2014 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1 to 3.9). Among the visit types that could be measured, increases in ED visits were largest for injury-related visits and for states with the largest changes in Medicaid enrollment. Compared with nonexpansion states, in expansion states the share of ED visits covered by Medicaid increased 8.8 percentage points (95% CI 5.0 to 12.6), whereas the uninsured share decreased by 5.3 percentage points (95% CI -1.7 to -8.9). The ACA's Medicaid expansion has resulted in changes in payer mix. Contrary to other studies of the ACA's effect on ED visits, our study found that the expansion also increased use of the ED, consistent with polls of emergency physicians. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Surface chemical state of Ti powders and its alloys: Effect of storage conditions and alloy composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryha, Eduard, E-mail: hryha@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Shvab, Ruslan [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Bram, Martin; Bitzer, Martin [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Materials Synthesis and Processing (IEK-1), D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Nyborg, Lars [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Rännvägen 2A, SE - 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Powder particles of Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V are covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer. • Thickness of the Ti-oxide layer is in the range of 2.9 to 4.2 nm in as-atomized state. • Exposure to the air results in immediate oxide thickness increase of up to 30%. • Oxide thickness increase of only 15% during storage for 8 years. • High passivation of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powder surface by Ti-oxide layer. - Abstract: High affinity of titanium to oxygen in combination with the high surface area of the powder results in tremendous powder reactivity and almost inevitable presence of passivation oxide film on the powder surface. Oxide film is formed during the short exposure of the powder to the environment at even a trace amount of oxygen. Hence, surface state of the powder determines its usefulness for powder metallurgy processing. Present study is focused on the evaluation of the surface oxide state of the Ti, NiTi and Ti6Al4V powders in as-atomized state and after storage under air or Ar for up to eight years. Powder surface oxide state was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR SEM). Results indicate that powder in as-atomized state is covered by homogeneous Ti-oxide layer with the thickness of ∼2.9 nm for Ti, ∼3.2 nm and ∼4.2 nm in case of Ti6Al4V and NiTi powders, respectively. Exposure to the air results in oxide growth of about 30% in case of Ti and only about 10% in case of NiTi and Ti6Al4V. After the storage under the dry air for two years oxide growth of only about 3-4% was detected in case of both, Ti and NiTi powders. NiTi powder, stored under the dry air for eight years, indicates oxide thickness of about 5.3 nm, which is about 30% thicker in comparison with the as-atomized powder. Oxide thickness increase of only ∼15% during the storage for eight years in comparison with the powder, shortly exposed to the air after manufacturing, was detected. Results indicate a

  13. Firearm Ownership, Storage Practices, and Suicide Risk Factors in Washington State, 2013-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Erin Renee; Gomez, Anthony; Rowhani-Rahbar, Ali

    2018-05-17

    To characterize firearm ownership and storage practices in Washington State and assess their relationship with suicide risk factors. Using Washington State Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data for 2013 to 2016, we conducted survey-weighted multivariable Poisson regression models to obtain prevalence ratios (PRs) and confidence intervals (CIs). Of 34 884 adult respondents, 34.3% (95% CI = 33.7%, 35.0%) reported a firearm in their household, among whom 36.6% (95% CI = 35.4%, 37.7%) stored their firearm locked and unloaded. There were no differences in mental health indicators by firearm ownership or storage practice status. Binge and chronic alcohol use were somewhat more prevalent among adults from firearm-owning households (PR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.1, 1.3; PR = 1.2; 95% CI = 1.1, 1.4, respectively) and among those living in households not practicing safe storage (PR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.2, 1.7; PR = 1.9; 1.5, 2.3, respectively). Variability in mental health does not explain the substantial increased suicide risk among individuals in firearm-owning households. Greater prevalence of alcohol misuse among adults in firearm-owning households not practicing safe storage highlights the need for suicide prevention interventions. (Am J Public Health. Published online ahead of print May 17, 2018: e1-e7. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2018.304403).

  14. Marketized State Ownership and Foreign Expansion of Emerging Market Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ming Hua; Cui, Lin; Lu, Jiangyong

    2017-01-01

    direct investment. We argue that firms with marketized state ownership may derive institutional competitive advantages from their dual responsiveness to shifting global market conditions and home government expectations which has a positive impact on their foreign investment decisions. However...

  15. Archiving and Managing Remote Sensing Data using State of the Art Storage Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, B.; Chandrasekhara Reddy, C.; Kishore, S. V. S. R. K.

    2014-11-01

    Integrated Multi-mission Ground Segment for Earth Observation Satellites (IMGEOS) was established with an objective to eliminate human interaction to the maximum extent. All emergency data products will be delivered within an hour of acquisition through FTP delivery. All other standard data products will be delivered through FTP within a day. The IMGEOS activity was envisaged to reengineer the entire chain of operations at the ground segment facilities of NRSC at Shadnagar and Balanagar campuses to adopt an integrated multi-mission approach. To achieve this, the Information Technology Infrastructure was consolidated by implementing virtualized tiered storage and network computing infrastructure in a newly built Data Centre at Shadnagar Campus. One important activity that influences all other activities in the integrated multi-mission approach is the design of appropriate storage and network architecture for realizing all the envisaged operations in a highly streamlined, reliable and secure environment. Storage was consolidated based on the major factors like accessibility, long term data protection, availability, manageability and scalability. The broad operational activities are reception of satellite data, quick look, generation of browse, production of standard and valueadded data products, production chain management, data quality evaluation, quality control and product dissemination. For each of these activities, there are numerous other detailed sub-activities and pre-requisite tasks that need to be implemented to support the above operations. The IMGEOS architecture has taken care of choosing the right technology for the given data sizes, their movement and long-term lossless retention policies. Operational costs of the solution are kept to the minimum possible. Scalability of the solution is also ensured. The main function of the storage is to receive and store the acquired satellite data, facilitate high speed availability of the data for further

  16. Solid state phase change materials for thermal energy storage in passive solar heated buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Christensen, C.

    1983-11-01

    A set of solid state phase change materials was evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol, pentaglycerine and neopentyl glycol. Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature within the range from less than 25 deg to 188 deg. Thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, density and volumetric expansion were measured. Computer simulations were used to predict the performance of various Trombe wall designs incorporating solid state phase change materials. Optimum performance was found to be sensitive to the choice of phase change temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the phase change material. A molecular mechanism of the solid state phase transition is proposed and supported by infrared spectroscopic evidence.

  17. Dissociative Recombination of HD+ - State-to-State Experimental Investigation Using Fragment Imaging and Storage Ring Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amitay, Z.; Baer, A.; Dahan, M.; Levin, J.; Vager, Z.; Zajfman, D.

    1998-01-01

    When a molecular ion collides with a free electron it can capture the electron and dissociate. The resulting process of Dissociative Recombination (DR) is a process of great significance in a wide variety of plasma environments. In this process, the capture of a free electron leads to the formation of an highly excited state of the neutral molecule, which then dissociates into neutral fragments with kinetic energy and, possibly, internal excitation depending on the energy balance of the reaction. Despite its importance, the DR process is still not yet completely understood theoretically. This is mainly due to the complexity of the nature and dynamics of highly excited molecular states, especially when several channels are involved, as is usually the situation in DR. from experimental point of view, for direct comparison between experiment and theory, this complexity requires detailed experimental data, including the knowledge of both the initial state of the molecular ion, to which DR is very sensitive, and of the final quantum states of the DR products. Inherent un- certainties in the initial vibrational excitation of the laboratory molecular ions was the main drawback of the experiments conducted over the years to, study DR. A substantial progress in the understanding of the DR process was achieved with the introduction (about five years ago) of a new experimental approach, which uses heavy-ion storage ring technique. In a storage ring, one can store many molecular ions for a time which is long enough to allow complete radiative deexcitation of tile initial electronic and vibrational excitation coming from the ion source. Those vibrationally cold ions are then merged with an intense electron beam to measure their DR cross section. Further experimental progress was the inclusion of two and three-dimensional molecular imaging techniques [1] for the measurement of the branching ratio to different final quantum states of the neutral DR fragments. This talk will

  18. Viability of platelets following storage in the irradiated state. A pair-controlled study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, E.J.; Kodis, C.; Carter, C.S.; Leitman, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood products is a standard practice recommended for the prevention of posttransfusion graft-versus-host disease in susceptible hosts. We studied the effects of irradiation on stored platelet concentrates and evaluated whether platelets could be stored for 5 days in the irradiated state without adverse effects on their viability. Using a pair-controlled design in which each of six normal subjects acted as his or her own control, we compared in vitro storage characteristics and in vivo kinetics of platelet concentrates exposed to 30 Gy and stored for 5 days with those of platelet concentrates simply stored for 5 days without irradiation. Irradiation had no significant effects on in vitro storage characteristics (platelet count, mean platelet volume, pH, and white cell count) or on in vivo kinetics, including initial recovery and mean platelet survival. Using the multiple-hit model, initial recovery was 49.6 +/- 10.8 percent, and mean platelet survival was 5.6 +/- 1.05 days for irradiated concentrates, compared with 51.3 +/- 13.0 percent and 5.9 +/- 0.50 days, respectively, for the unirradiated control concentrates. We conclude that irradiation of platelet concentrates with up to 30 Gy has no effect on their in vivo recovery or survival, and that irradiation administered before storage of platelet concentrates does not interfere with their clinical efficacy

  19. Ionic liquids and their solid-state analogues as materials for energy generation and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Douglas R.; Forsyth, Maria; Howlett, Patrick C.; Kar, Mega; Passerini, Stefano; Pringle, Jennifer M.; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Yan, Feng; Zheng, Wenjun; Zhang, Shiguo; Zhang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Salts that are liquid at room temperature, now commonly called ionic liquids, have been known for more than 100 years; however, their unique properties have only come to light in the past two decades. In this Review, we examine recent work in which the properties of ionic liquids have enabled important advances to be made in sustainable energy generation and storage. We discuss the use of ionic liquids as media for synthesis of electromaterials, for example, in the preparation of doped carbons, conducting polymers and intercalation electrode materials. Focusing on their intrinsic ionic conductivity, we examine recent reports of ionic liquids used as electrolytes in emerging high-energy-density and low-cost batteries, including Li-ion, Li-O2, Li-S, Na-ion and Al-ion batteries. Similar developments in electrolyte applications in dye-sensitized solar cells, thermo-electrochemical cells, double-layer capacitors and CO2 reduction are also discussed.

  20. Retention of intermediate polarization states in ferroelectric materials enabling memories for multi-bit data storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dong; Asadi, Kamal; Blom, Paul W. M.; Leeuw, Dago M. de, E-mail: deleeuw@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Katsouras, Ilias [Holst Centre, High Tech Campus 31, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Groen, Wilhelm A. [Holst Centre, High Tech Campus 31, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-06-06

    A homogeneous ferroelectric single crystal exhibits only two remanent polarization states that are stable over time, whereas intermediate, or unsaturated, polarization states are thermodynamically instable. Commonly used ferroelectric materials however, are inhomogeneous polycrystalline thin films or ceramics. To investigate the stability of intermediate polarization states, formed upon incomplete, or partial, switching, we have systematically studied their retention in capacitors comprising two classic ferroelectric materials, viz. random copolymer of vinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene, P(VDF-TrFE), and Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}. Each experiment started from a discharged and electrically depolarized ferroelectric capacitor. Voltage pulses were applied to set the given polarization states. The retention was measured as a function of time at various temperatures. The intermediate polarization states are stable over time, up to the Curie temperature. We argue that the remarkable stability originates from the coexistence of effectively independent domains, with different values of polarization and coercive field. A domain growth model is derived quantitatively describing deterministic switching between the intermediate polarization states. We show that by using well-defined voltage pulses, the polarization can be set to any arbitrary value, allowing arithmetic programming. The feasibility of arithmetic programming along with the inherent stability of intermediate polarization states makes ferroelectric materials ideal candidates for multibit data storage.

  1. Retention of intermediate polarization states in ferroelectric materials enabling memories for multi-bit data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Katsouras, Ilias; Asadi, Kamal; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2016-06-01

    A homogeneous ferroelectric single crystal exhibits only two remanent polarization states that are stable over time, whereas intermediate, or unsaturated, polarization states are thermodynamically instable. Commonly used ferroelectric materials however, are inhomogeneous polycrystalline thin films or ceramics. To investigate the stability of intermediate polarization states, formed upon incomplete, or partial, switching, we have systematically studied their retention in capacitors comprising two classic ferroelectric materials, viz. random copolymer of vinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene, P(VDF-TrFE), and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3. Each experiment started from a discharged and electrically depolarized ferroelectric capacitor. Voltage pulses were applied to set the given polarization states. The retention was measured as a function of time at various temperatures. The intermediate polarization states are stable over time, up to the Curie temperature. We argue that the remarkable stability originates from the coexistence of effectively independent domains, with different values of polarization and coercive field. A domain growth model is derived quantitatively describing deterministic switching between the intermediate polarization states. We show that by using well-defined voltage pulses, the polarization can be set to any arbitrary value, allowing arithmetic programming. The feasibility of arithmetic programming along with the inherent stability of intermediate polarization states makes ferroelectric materials ideal candidates for multibit data storage.

  2. Small State Strategies in emerging Regional Governance Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Michael Friederich; Lynggaard, Kennet

    2017-01-01

    This article departs from the puzzling observation that of the five littoral arctic states the Danish realm has been the most consistent backer in China’s quest to gain observer status in the Arctic Council. Small states are generally assumed to adapt to changes in the international system...... such as spatial reconfigurations and alterations in the distribution of capabilities. Yet Denmark’s enabling role in relation to China seems to contravene that assumption. Why would a small state invite one of the world’s leading powers to enter its regional domain while its principle allies and regional partners...... explanation suggesting that unease with growing Canadian securitisation of Arctic issues has prompted courting China as a balancing act. 3) a foreign policy identity explanation focussing on the normative desire to enmeshment China into a liberal Arctic order....

  3. Emergence of Leviathan : Monopolization of Violence in a Post-Colonial State

    OpenAIRE

    Jonson N., Porteux

    2018-01-01

    This article investigates the post-war state building experience of South Korea, with a focus on state-non-state cooperation as a process of the consolidation of power under a single coercive entity. While often presented as an outlier case in terms of state emergence, the evidence suggests that the case of South Korea fits within the broader empirical patterns and experiences of Western polities, which in turn adds robustness to existing theory. Namely, state seekers collaborated with non-st...

  4. Study of storage capacity in various carbon/graphene-based solid-state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, C. K.; Boopalan, G.

    2014-09-01

    Solid-state electrochemical double-layer capacitor (SEDLC) forms excellent energy storage device for high-power applications. They are highly reliable, with no electrolyte leaks, and can be packaged to suit various applications. The electrode material can be activated carbon to graphene. These can have a range of particle size, surface area, pore size and pore distribution for charge storage. The emphasis will be to optimize the graphene to carbon blend in the electrodes which would provide appreciable storage density of the SEDLC. We can use perfluorosulfonic acid polymer as the solid electrolyte in the SEDLC assembly. They have high ionic conductivity, good thermal stability, and mechanical strength. They also have excellent long-term chemical stability. Carbon is widely used for many practical applications, especially for the adsorption of ions and molecules, as it is possible to synthesize one-, two- or three-dimensional (1-, 2-, or 3-D) carbons. Some of the problems in activated carbon like varying micro or mesopores, poor ion mobility due to varying pore distribution, low electrical conductivity, can be overcome using graphene and blends of graphene with carbon of the right pore dimension and distribution. Graphene in various structural nomenclatures have been used by various groups for charge storage. Graphene nanoplates (GNP), with narrow mesopore distributions have been effectively used for SEDLCs. SEDLCs assembled with GNP and blends of GNP with Vulcan XC and solid polymer electrolyte like Nafion show exceptional performance. The cyclic voltammetric studies show that they support high scan rates with substantial smaller capacitance drop as we increase scan rates. Optimization of the electrode structure in terms of blend percentage, binder content and interface character in the frequency and time domain provides excellent insight into the double-layer interface.

  5. Golf-related injuries treated in United States emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brittany A; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Friedenberg, Laura; Smith, Gary A

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates unintentional non-fatal golf-related injuries in the US using a nationally representative database. This study analyzed golf-related injuries treated in US hospital emergency departments from 1990 through 2011 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database. Injury rates were calculated using golf participation data. During 1990 through 2011, an estimated 663,471 (95% CI: 496,370-830,573) individuals ≥7years old were treated in US emergency departments for golf-related injuries, averaging 30,158 annually or 12.3 individuals per 10,000 golf participants. Patients 18-54years old accounted for 42.2% of injuries, but injury rates per 10,000 golf participants were highest among individuals 7-17years old (22.1) and ≥55years old (21.8) compared with 18-54years old (7.6). Patients ≥55years old had a hospital admission rate that was 5.01 (95% CI: 4.12-6.09) times higher than that of younger patients. Injured by a golf club (23.4%) or struck by a golf ball (16.0%) were the most common specified mechanisms of injury. The head/neck was the most frequently injured body region (36.2%), and sprain/strain (30.6%) was the most common type of injury. Most patients were treated and released (93.7%) and 5.9% required hospitalization. Although golf is a source of injury among all age groups, the frequency and rate of injury were higher at the two ends of the age spectrum. Given the higher injury and hospital admission rates of patients ≥55years, this age group merits the special attention of additional research and injury prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Interethnic conflict in Jonglei State, South Sudan: Emerging ethnic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses the escalation of interethnic confl icts between the Lou Nuer and the Murle in Jonglei State of South Sudan. Historically, interethnic confl icts in Jonglei were best described as environmental confl icts, in which multiple ethnic groups competed over scarce resources for cattle grazing. Cattle raiding was ...

  7. Radiological transportation emergency response training course funding and timing in the southern states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The following is a review of the enabling statutes of 16 southern states regarding training for personnel preparing for or responding to a transportation-related emergency involving highway route-controlled quantities of spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This report outlines the funding sources and procedures for administering funds for programs attended by state and local officials. Additionally, the report outlines the views of emergency response officials in the southem states concerning the timing and administration of future federal assistance to be provided under section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act. Under section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to provide technical assistance and funds to states for training public safety officials of appropriate units of local government and Indian tribes when spent nuclear fuel or high-level radioactive waste is transported through their jurisdictions. The Comprehensive Cooperative Agreement (CCA) is the primary funding mechanism for federal assistance to states for the development of their overall emergency management capabilities. FEMA supports 12 separate emergency management programs including the Emergency Management Training program (EMT). This program provides funds for emergency management training and technical assistance to states for unique state training needs. Funds may be used for instructors, students and other related costs

  8. 45 CFR 205.45 - Federal financial participation in relation to State emergency welfare preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with other government and voluntary welfare agencies, and welfare-related business and professional organizations and associations, in developing emergency operating plans and attaining operational readiness; (5..., as prescribed in “Guidelines for the Preparation of State Emergency Welfare Services Plan” issued by...

  9. United States and Israeli Homeland Security: A Comparative Analysis of Emergency Preparedness Efforts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pockett, Consuella B

    2005-01-01

    This paper will provide a comparative analysis of the United States (U.S.) Department of Homeland Security's Emergency Preparedness and Response directorate and the Israel Defense Forces Home Front Command...

  10. Analysis and simulation of emergency departments: state of the art and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Vanbrabant, Lien; Braekers, Kris; Ramaekers, Katrien

    2017-01-01

    This abstract gives a brief overview of the state of the art on the analysis and simulation of emergency departments in hospitals. Based on this, research opportunities which will be addressed during my PhD are identified.

  11. 47 CFR 11.55 - EAS operation during a State or Local Area emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., earthquakes, heavy snows, icing conditions, widespread fires, etc. Man-made emergencies may include: toxic gas...) SDARS licensees and DBS providers may participate in EAS at the state and local level and make their...

  12. Rethinking State emerging as a Sinaloa mexican migration

    OpenAIRE

    Pintor Sandoval, Renato; Sánchez Sánchez, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Objective: this paper aims at analyzing the different studies that examined theinternational migration of people from Sinaloa to the United States. This research contextualizes the importance of Sinaloa within the current Mexican migration map to the American Union.Methodology: a documentary methodology based on national surveys was used. These surveys involved the region mentioned. Several case studieswere also carried out. Results: the results show that Sinaloa has been directly involved in...

  13. Statistical Analysis of Terrestrial Water Storage Change Over Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibedingil, I. G.; Mubako, S. T.; Hargrove, W. L.; Espino, A. C.

    2017-12-01

    A warming trend over recent decades has aggravated water resource challenges in the arid southwestern region of the United States (U.S.). An increase in temperature, coupled with decreasing snowpack and rainfall have impacted the region's cities, ecosystems, and agriculture. The region is the largest contributor of agricultural products to the U.S. market resulting from irrigation. Water use through irrigation is stressing already limited terrestrial water resources. Population growth in recent decades has also led to increased water demand. This study utilizes products of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) twin satellites experiment in MATLAB and ArcGIS to examine terrestrial water storage changes in the southwestern region of the U.S., comprised of the eight states of Texas, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Oklahoma. Linear trend analysis was applied to the equivalent water-height data of terrestrial water storage changes (TWSC), precipitation, and air temperature. Correlation analysis was performed on couplings of TWSC - precipitation and TWSC - air temperature to examine the impact of temperature and precipitation on the region's water resources. Our preliminary results show a decreasing trend of TWSC from April 2002 to July 2016 in almost all parts of the region. Precipitation shows a decreasing trend from March 2000 to March 2017 for most of the region, except for sparse areas of increased precipitation near the northwestern coast of California, and a belt running from Oklahoma through the middle of Texas to the El Paso/New Mexico border. From April 2002 to December 2014, air temperature exhibited a negative trend for most of the region, except a larger part of California and a small location in central Texas. Correlation between TWSC and precipitation was mostly positive, but a negative trend was observed when TWSC and air temperature were correlated. The study contributes to the understanding of terrestrial water

  14. Energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  15. Large N BPS states and emergent quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenstein, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a heuristic derivation of how classical gravitational physics in the AdS/CFT correspondence appears from the strong dynamics of the N = 4 SYM theory in a systematic way. We do this in a minisuperspace approximation by studying 1/8 BPS configurations. We can show that our description matches the semiclassical physics of 1/8 BPS states in supergravity. We also provide a heuristic description of how massive strings appear in the geometry, and how at strong 't Hooft coupling they become local on the S 5 suggesting that they can be realized as a sigma model on a weakly curved background. We show that the dynamics of 1/8 BPS dynamics of N = 4 SYM on a round S 3 can be reduced to that of a matrix model for commuting matrices. Including measure factors, we show that this effective dynamics is related to bosons living on a six dimensional phase space with repulsive interactions. Because of these interactions, we can argue that on the ground state the bosons assemble themselves on a spherical shell in the shape of a round five sphere. This sphere will be identified with the S 5 in the AdS dual geometry. To do this, we first define a precise way to coarse grain the dynamics. We use half BPS configurations as a toy model for this coarse graining, and we can reproduce the droplet picture of these half BPS states systematically. The droplet appears as the saddle point approximation of a statistical ensemble related to the square of the wave function of the eigenvalues of a complex matrix. This procedure is also applied to the set of 1/8 BPS configurations to extract the geometry, giving an analog of the droplet picture of half BPS states for the case of 1/8 BPS configurations. We also have a conjectured realization of some 1/8 BPS giant graviton wave functions in the dynamics, which captures all 1/8 BPS giant gravitons constructed by Mikhailov. This leads to a lot of different topology changes which can be treated heuristically

  16. A national perspective on paleoclimate streamflow and water storage infrastructure in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Michelle; Lall, Upmanu; Sun, Xun; Cook, Edward

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale water storage infrastructure in the Conterminous United States (CONUS) provides a means of regulating the temporal variability in water supply with storage capacities ranging from seasonal storage in the wetter east to multi-annual and decadal-scale storage in the drier west. Regional differences in water availability across the CONUS provides opportunities for optimizing water dependent economic activities, such as food and energy production, through storage and transportation. However, the ability to sufficiently regulate water supplies into the future is compromised by inadequate monitoring of non-federally-owned dams that make up around 97% of all dams. Furthermore, many of these dams are reaching or have exceeded their economic design life. Understanding the role of dams in the current and future landscape of water requirements in the CONUS is needed to prioritize dam safety remediation or identify where redundant dams may be removed. A national water assessment and planning process is needed for addressing water requirements, accounting for regional differences in water supply and demand, and the role of dams in such a landscape. Most dams in the CONUS were designed without knowledge of devastating floods and prolonged droughts detected in multi-centennial paleoclimate records, consideration of projected climate change, nor consideration of optimal operation across large-scale regions. As a step towards informing water supply across the CONUS we present a paleoclimate reconstruction of annual streamflow across the CONUS over the past 555 years using a spatially and temporally complete paleoclimate record of summer drought across the CONUS targeting a set of US Geological Survey streamflow sites. The spatial and temporal structures of national streamflow variability are analyzed using hierarchical clustering, principal component analysis, and wavelet analyses. The reconstructions show signals of contemporary droughts such as the Dust Bowl (1930s

  17. Important historical efforts at emergency department categorization in the United States and implications for regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Abhishek; Sklar, David P; Tayal, Vivek S; Kocher, Keith E; Handel, Daniel A; Myles Riner, R

    2010-12-01

    This article is drawn from a report created for the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) Emergency Department (ED) Categorization Task Force and also reflects the proceedings of a breakout session, "Beyond ED Categorization-Matching Networks to Patient Needs," at the 2010 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Beyond Regionalization: Integrated Networks of Emergency Care." The authors describe a brief history of the significant national and state efforts at categorization and suggest reasons why many of these efforts failed to persevere or gain wider implementation. The history of efforts to categorize hospital (and ED) emergency services demonstrates recognition of the potential benefits of categorization, but reflects repeated failures to implement full categorization systems or limited excursions into categorization through licensing of EDs or designation of receiving and referral facilities. An understanding of the history of hospital and ED categorization could better inform current efforts to develop categorization schemes and processes. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. 77 FR 8860 - Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ...; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... agencies. The emergency exemptions may take the following form: Crisis, public health, quarantine, or.... These are rarely requested. 3. A ``crisis exemption'' is initiated by a State or Federal agency (and is...

  19. State Higher Education Funding Models: An Assessment of Current and Emerging Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layzell, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an assessment of the current and emerging approaches used by state governments in allocating funding for higher education institutions and programs. It reviews a number of desired characteristics or outcomes for state higher education funding models, including equity, adequacy, stability, and flexibility. Although there is…

  20. Olympic Diplomacy and the Emerging States: Striving for Influence in the Multipolar World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luša Đana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The world of sports is a reflection of the world of politics. It is becoming increasingly multipolar with the emerging states hosting mega sporting events. Firstly, the article problematizes the concept of multipolarity and, secondly, globalisation by questioning whether the Olympic Games reinforce national identities and promote national interests by using Olympic diplomacy as a soft power tool. In doing so, the article explores the correlation between the changes in international affairs and the hosting of and participation at the Olympic Games by emerging states such as Brazil, China and Russia. The analysis distinguishes globalisation from the role of the nation-state, by highlighting the evident differences between emerging states in terms of hosting the Games, but also takes into consideration geopolitical and geo-economic parameters.

  1. A Comparison of Mortality Following Emergency Laparotomy Between Populations From New York State and England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Benjamin H L; Mytton, Jemma; Al-Khyatt, Waleed; Aquina, Christopher T; Evison, Felicity; Fleming, Fergal J; Griffiths, Ewen; Vohra, Ravinder S

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare mortality following emergency laparotomy between populations from New York State and England. Mortality following emergency surgery is a key quality improvement metric in both the United States and UK. Comparison of the all-cause 30-day mortality following emergency laparotomy between populations from New York State and England might identify factors that could improve care. Patient demographics, in-hospital, and 30-day outcomes data were extracted from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England and the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) administrative databases for all patients older than 18 years undergoing laparotomy for emergency open bowel surgery between April 2009 and March 2014. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality within 30 days of the index laparotomy. Mixed-effects logistic regression was performed to model independent demographic variables against mortality. A one-to-one propensity score matched dataset was created to compare the odd ratios of mortality between the 2 populations. Overall, 137,869 patient records, 85,286 (61.9%) from England and 52,583 (38.1%) from New York State, were extracted. Crude 30-day mortality for patients was significantly higher in the England compared with New York State [11,604 (13.6%) vs 3633 (6.9%) patients, P New York State (odds ratio 2.35, confidence interval 2.24-2.46, P New York State despite similar patient groups.

  2. An emerging network storage management standard: Media error monitoring and reporting information (MEMRI) - to determine optical tape data integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, Fernando; Vollrath, William; Williams, Joel; Kobler, Ben; Crouse, Don

    1998-01-01

    Sophisticated network storage management applications are rapidly evolving to satisfy a market demand for highly reliable data storage systems with large data storage capacities and performance requirements. To preserve a high degree of data integrity, these applications must rely on intelligent data storage devices that can provide reliable indicators of data degradation. Error correction activity generally occurs within storage devices without notification to the host. Early indicators of degradation and media error monitoring 333 and reporting (MEMR) techniques implemented in data storage devices allow network storage management applications to notify system administrators of these events and to take appropriate corrective actions before catastrophic errors occur. Although MEMR techniques have been implemented in data storage devices for many years, until 1996 no MEMR standards existed. In 1996 the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved the only known (world-wide) industry standard specifying MEMR techniques to verify stored data on optical disks. This industry standard was developed under the auspices of the Association for Information and Image Management (AIIM). A recently formed AIIM Optical Tape Subcommittee initiated the development of another data integrity standard specifying a set of media error monitoring tools and media error monitoring information (MEMRI) to verify stored data on optical tape media. This paper discusses the need for intelligent storage devices that can provide data integrity metadata, the content of the existing data integrity standard for optical disks, and the content of the MEMRI standard being developed by the AIIM Optical Tape Subcommittee.

  3. Supply and demand of board-certified emergency physicians by U.S. state, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Ashley F; Ginde, Adit A; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A

    2009-10-01

    The objective was to estimate the emergency medicine (EM) board-certified emergency physician (EP) workforce supply and demand by U.S. state. The 2005 National Emergency Department Inventories-USA provided annual visit volumes for U.S. emergency departments (EDs). We estimated full-time equivalent (FTE) EP demand at each ED by dividing the actual number of visits by the estimated average EP visit volume (3,548 visits/year) and then summing FTEs by state. Our model assumed that at least one EP should be present 24/7 in each ED. The number of EM board-certified EPs per state was provided by the American Board of Medical Specialties (American Board of Emergency Medicine, American Board of Pediatrics) and the American Osteopathic Board of Emergency Medicine. We used U.S. Census Bureau civilian population estimates to calculate EP population density by state. The supply of EM board-certified EPs was 58% of required FTEs to staff all EDs nationally and ranged from 10% in South Dakota to 104% in Hawai'i (i.e., there were more EPs than the estimated need). Texas and Florida had the largest absolute shortages of EM board-certified EPs (2,069 and 1,146, respectively). The number of EM board-certified EPs per 100,000 U.S. civilian population ranged from 3.6 in South Dakota to 13.8 in Washington, DC. States with a higher population density of EM board-certified EPs had higher percent high school graduates and a lower percent rural population and whites. The supply and demand of EM board-certified EPs varies by state. Only one state had an adequate supply of EM board-certified EPs to fully staff its EDs.

  4. Emergency contraception use and counseling after changes in United States prescription status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Megan L; Williams, Sanithia L; Schwarz, E Bimla

    2011-06-30

    Analysis of data from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth indicates that use of emergency contraception in the United States has increased after changes in its prescription status in 2006. However, clinicians continue to play a pivotal role in ensuring that women have accurate information about emergency contraception. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Strength analysis and optimization of welding robot mechanism in emergency stop state

    OpenAIRE

    Zdeněk Poruba; Jiří Podešva; Ondřej František; Martin Fusek; Robert Brázda; Marek Sadílek

    2016-01-01

    The contribution deals with the strength analysis and optimization of the welding robot mechanism in emergency stop state. The common operational positioning of the welding robot is characterized by smooth course of speeds in the time. The resulting load does not differ significantly from the static loading. However the safety requirements given by the norm require the ability of emergency stop function. Since the course of speed in time is rather steep the higher values of acceleration and t...

  6. Low temperature thermal energy storage: a state-of-the-art survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylin, F.

    1979-07-01

    The preliminary version of an analysis of activities in research, development, and demonstration of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technologies having applications in renewable energy systems is presented. Three major categories of thermal storage devices are considered: sensible heat; phase change materials (PCM); and reversible thermochemical reactions. Both short-term and annual thermal energy storage technologies based on prinicples of sensible heat are discussed. Storage media considered are water, earth, and rocks. Annual storage technologies include solar ponds, aquifers, and large tanks or beds of water, earth, or rocks. PCM storage devices considered employ salt hydrates and organic compounds. The sole application of reversible chemical reactions outlined is for the chemical heat pump. All program processes from basic research through commercialization efforts are investigated. Nongovernment-funded industrial programs and foreign efforts are outlined as well. Data describing low temperature TES activities are presented also as project descriptions. Projects for all these programs are grouped into seven categories: short-term sensible heat storage; annual sensible heat storage; PCM storage; heat transfer and exchange; industrial waste heat recovery and storage; reversible chemical reaction storage; and models, economic analyses, and support studies. Summary information about yearly funding and brief descriptions of project goals and accomplishments are included.

  7. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (USA). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  8. Thermal energy storage for solar power generation - State of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, K. N.

    1981-12-01

    High temperature storage for applications in solar-thermal electric systems is considered. Noting that thermal storage is in either the form of latent, sensible or chemically stored heat, sensible heat storage is stressed as the most developed of the thermal storage technologies, spanning direct heating of a storage medium from 120-1250 C. Current methods involve solids, packed beds, fluidized beds, liquids, hot water, organic liquids, and inorganic liquids and molten salts. Latent heat storage comprises phase-change materials that move from solid to liquid with addition of heat and liquid to solid with the removal of heat. Metals or inorganic salts are candidates, and the energy balances are outlined. Finally, chemical heat storage is examined, showing possible high energy densities through catalytic, thermal dissociation reactions.

  9. Storage on the vigor and viability of macauba seeds from two provenances of Minas Gerais State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Pereira de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Macauba palm stands out for having favorable features to biodiesel production such as the high oil content of its fruit. Considering the great potential of the species and their applicability in the renewable energy field, it becomes indispensable to establish the right conditions for storing the seeds for propagation purpose. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of seed moisture content, packaging, and storage conditions such as temperature and relative humidity on the quality of seeds from Minas Gerais State, during a 12-month storage period. The research had two independent assays: (I the seeds were stored with three moisture contents/ranges 4.0≤6.0%; 6.0≤8.0% and 8.0≤10.0% in impermeable packages, under room temperature and at 10ºC; (II seeds with approximately 5.9% of moisture content were stored in three different types of packages: a permeable, b semi-permeable and c impermeable. Three storing conditions were tested: a room temperature and RH under laboratory conditions; b 15ºC and 45% RH; c 20ºC and 55% RH. Water content, germination rate and germination speed index were evaluated at 0, 4, 8 and 12 months of storing. The best germination results were obtained with the moisture range of 6.0≤8.0%, with seeds kept at room temperature; while the seeds stored at 10ºC, regardless the moisture range, did not survive. The stored seeds with 5.9% moisture content and at both 15ºC/45%RH and 20ºC/55% RH conditions, independently of the package type used, showed the best results. Thus, macaw palm seeds can be classified as intermediates seeds.

  10. Web of Objects Based Ambient Assisted Living Framework for Emergency Psychiatric State Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Golam Rabiul; Abedin, Sarder Fakhrul; Al Ameen, Moshaddique; Hong, Choong Seon

    2016-01-01

    Ambient assisted living can facilitate optimum health and wellness by aiding physical, mental and social well-being. In this paper, patients’ psychiatric symptoms are collected through lightweight biosensors and web-based psychiatric screening scales in a smart home environment and then analyzed through machine learning algorithms to provide ambient intelligence in a psychiatric emergency. The psychiatric states are modeled through a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), and the model parameters are estimated using a Viterbi path counting and scalable Stochastic Variational Inference (SVI)-based training algorithm. The most likely psychiatric state sequence of the corresponding observation sequence is determined, and an emergency psychiatric state is predicted through the proposed algorithm. Moreover, to enable personalized psychiatric emergency care, a service a web of objects-based framework is proposed for a smart-home environment. In this framework, the biosensor observations and the psychiatric rating scales are objectified and virtualized in the web space. Then, the web of objects of sensor observations and psychiatric rating scores are used to assess the dweller’s mental health status and to predict an emergency psychiatric state. The proposed psychiatric state prediction algorithm reported 83.03 percent prediction accuracy in an empirical performance study. PMID:27608023

  11. Voltage Scheduling Droop Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed Energy Storage in DC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Aldana, Nelson Leonardo Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Due to higher power quality, lower conversion loss, and more DC loads, there has been an increasing awareness on DC microgrid. Previous emphasis has been on equal power sharing among different units in the DC microgrid, while overlooking the coordination of the energy storage units to maintain...... the State-of-Charge balance. In this paper, a new droop method based on voltage scheduling for State-of-Charge balance is proposed to keep the SoC balance for the energy storage units. The proposed method has the advantage of avoiding the stability problem existed in traditional methods based on droop gain...... scheduling. Simulation experiment is taken in Matlab on a DC microgrid with two distributed energy storage units. The simulation results show that the proposed method has successfully achieved SoC balance during the load changes while maintaining the DC bus voltage within the allowable range....

  12. Self-organized emergence of multilayer structure and chimera states in dynamical networks with adaptive couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, D. V.; Yanchuk, S.; Schöll, E.; Nekorkin, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    We report the phenomenon of self-organized emergence of hierarchical multilayered structures and chimera states in dynamical networks with adaptive couplings. This process is characterized by a sequential formation of subnetworks (layers) of densely coupled elements, the size of which is ordered in a hierarchical way, and which are weakly coupled between each other. We show that the hierarchical structure causes the decoupling of the subnetworks. Each layer can exhibit either a two-cluster state, a periodic traveling wave, or an incoherent state, and these states can coexist on different scales of subnetwork sizes.

  13. Who killed Rambhor?: The state of emergency medical services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh H Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the healthcare delivery system starts up from the sub-center at the village level and reaches up to super specialty medical centers providing state of the art emergency medical services (EMS. These highest centers, located in big cities, are considered the last referral points for the patients from nearby cities and states. As the incidents of rail and road accidents have increased in recent years, the role of EMS becomes critical in saving precious lives. But when the facilities and management of these emergency centers succumbs before the patient, then the question arises regarding the adequate availability and quality of EMS. The death of an unknown common man, Rambhor, for want of EMS in three big hospitals in the national capital of India put a big question on the "health" of the emergency health services in India. The emergency services infrastructure seems inadequate and quality and timely provision of EMS to critical patients appears unsatisfactory. There is lack of emergency medicine (EM specialists in India and also the postgraduation courses in EM have not gained foot in our medical education system. Creation of a Centralized Medical Emergency Body, implementation of management techniques, modification of medical curriculum, and fixing accountability are some of the few steps which are required to improve the EMS in India.

  14. Retrospective on the construction and practice of a state-level emergency medical rescue team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhang; Haitao, Guo; Xin, Wang; Yundou, Wang

    2014-10-01

    For the past few years, disasters like earthquakes, landslides, mudslides, tsunamis, and traffic accidents have occurred with an ever-growing frequency, coverage, and intensity greatly beyond the expectation of the public. In order to respond effectively to disasters and to reduce casualties and property damage, countries around the world have invested more efforts in the theoretical study of emergency medicine and the construction of emergency medical rescue forces. Consequently, emergency medical rescue teams of all scales and types have come into being and have played significant roles in disaster response work. As the only state-level emergency medical rescue force from the Chinese People's Armed Police Forces, the force described here has developed, through continuous learning and practice, a characteristic mode in terms of grouping methods, equipment system construction, and training.

  15. Multiagent-Based Distributed State of Charge Balancing Control for Distributed Energy Storage Units in AC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Coelho, Ernane Antônio Alves; Dragicevic, Tomislav

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a multiagent-based distributed control algorithm has been proposed to achieve state of charge (SoC) balance of distributed energy storage (DES) units in an ac microgrid. The proposal uses frequency scheduling instead of adaptive droop gain to regulate the active power. Each DES unit...

  16. A Review of State Public Health Emergency Declarations in Peru: 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambarén, Celso; Alatrista, Maria Del Socorro

    2018-04-01

    Peru has different legal mechanisms of emergency, one of which is the Public Health Emergency that is applicable when: there is high-risk for, or the existence of an outbreak, epidemic, or pandemic; the occurrence of cases of a disease classified as eliminated or eradicated; the occurrence of emerging or re-emerging infectious diseases with high epidemic potential; the occurrence of rapid disseminated epidemics that simultaneously affect more than one department; as well as the existence of an event that affects the continuity of health services. From July 2014 to December 2016, 23 Public Health Emergencies were declared, out of which 57% were in the high-risk or existence of epidemics, 30% were due to some natural or anthropic events that generate a sudden decrease in the operative capacity of health services, and 13% were due to the existence of a rapid spreading epidemic that could affect more than one department in the country. The risk or occurrence of epidemiological outbreaks, mainly of Dengue, was the main cause of emergency declaration. One-hundred and forty million US dollars were allocated to implement the action plans that were part of the declaration, of which 72% was used to keep the operational capacity of health services and 28% to vector and epidemiological control measures. Bambarén C , Alatrista MdS . A review of state public health emergency declarations in Peru: 2014-2016. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2018;33(2):197-200.

  17. Energy emergency information needs. Adequacy of data dissemination: state, industry, and government views

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    This briefing report discusses the extent to which the energy Information Agency (EIA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) are meeting the energy emergency statistical data and information needs of states and industry. Objectives were to obtain information on (1) what data and information are needed by states and industry to allow them to properly meet an oil shortage, whether EIA and DOE are meeting those needs, and what effective steps might be taken to better serve those needs.

  18. The World Health Organization Global Health Emergency Workforce: What Role Will the United States Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2016-08-01

    During the May 2016 World Health Assembly of 194 member states, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced the process of developing and launching emergency medical teams as a critical component of the global health workforce concept. Over 64 countries have either launched or are in the development stages of vetting accredited teams, both international and national, to provide surge support to national health systems through WHO Regional Organizations and the delivery of emergency clinical care to sudden-onset disasters and outbreak-affected populations. To date, the United States has not yet committed to adopting the emergency medical team concept in funding and registering an international field hospital level team. This article discusses future options available for health-related nongovernmental organizations and the required educational and training requirements for health care provider accreditation. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:531-535).

  19. The state of emergency care in the Republic of the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hassan A. A-Rahman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sudan is one of the largest African countries, covering an area of 1.9 million km2—approximately one fifth of the geographic area of the United States. The population is 30 million people, the majority of whom (68% live in rural areas, as compared with the sub-Saharan African average of approximately 62%. Sudan is considered a lower-middle income country—with 47% of the population living below the poverty line and a gross domestic product (GDP of US $62 billion in 2010. In addition to excessive burden of communicable diseases such as malaria, tuberculosis, and schistosomiasis, Sudan is particularly susceptible to both natural and manmade disasters. Drought and flood are quite common due to Sudan’s proximity to and dependency on the Nile, and throughout history Sudan has also been plagued with internal conflicts and outbreaks of violence, which bring about a burden of traumatic disease and demand high quality emergency care. The purpose of this paper is to describe the state of emergency care and Emergency Medicine education, and their context within the Sudanese health care system. As is the case in most African countries, emergency care is delivered by junior staff: new graduates from medical schools and unsupervised medical officers who handle all types of case presentations. In 2001, increased mortality and morbidity among unsorted patients prompted the Ministry of Health to introduce a new triage-based emergency care system. In late 2005, twenty-one Emergency physicians delivered these new Emergency Services. In 2011, following a curriculum workshop in November 2010, the Emergency Medicine residency program was started in Khartoum. Currently there are 27 rotating registrars, the first class of whom is expected to graduate in 2015.

  20. Medical research in emergency research in the European Union member states: tensions between theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanje, Erwin J O; Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2014-04-01

    In almost all of the European Union member states, prior consent by a legal representative is used as a substitute for informed patient consent for non-urgent medical research. Deferred (patient and/or proxy) consent is accepted as a substitute in acute emergency research in approximately half of the member states. In 12 European Union member states emergency research is not mentioned in national law. Medical research in the European Union is covered by the Clinical Trial Directive 2001/20/EC. A proposal for a regulation by the European Commission is currently being examined by the European Parliament and the Council and will replace Directive 2001/20/EC. Deferred patient and/or proxy consent is allowed in the proposed regulation, but does not fit completely in the practice of emergency research. For example, deferred consent is only possible when legal representatives are not available. This criterion will delay inclusion of patients in acute life-threatening conditions in short time frames. As the regulation shall be binding in its entirety in all member states, emergency research in acute situations is still not possible as it should be.

  1. 76 FR 69729 - Pesticide Emergency Exemptions; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...; Agency Decisions and State and Federal Agency Crisis Declarations AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... following form: Crisis, public health, quarantine, or specific. EPA has also listed denied emergency... or public health purposes. These are rarely requested. 3. A ``crisis exemption'' is initiated by a...

  2. When states regulate emergency contraceptives like abortion, what should guide disclosure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Cameron O'Brien; Wilson, Robin Fretwell

    2015-01-01

    State laws dictating "informed consent" about surgical and chemical abortions sometimes ensnare emergency contraceptives (EC), as the science surrounding EC shows. Courts evaluating mandated disclosures gravitate to professional norms rather than the information most women would value: basic factual information about EC so that they can decide for themselves whether to use these drugs. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  3. Solid-state supercapacitors with ionic liquid gel polymer electrolyte based on poly (3, 4-ethylenedioxythiophene), carbon nanotubes, and metal oxides nanocomposites for electrical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Amr M.

    Clean and renewable energy systems have emerged as an important area of research having diverse and significant new applications. These systems utilize different energy storage methods such as the batteries and supercapacitors. Supercapacitors are electrochemical energy storage devices that are designed to bridge the gap between batteries and conventional capacitors. Supercapacitors which store electrical energy by electrical double layer capacitance are based on large surface area structured carbons. The materials systems in which the Faradaic reversible redox reactions store electrical energy are the transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers. Among the different types of conducting polymers, poly (3, 4- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is extensively investigated owing to its chemical and mechanical stability. Due to instability of aqueous electrolytes at high voltages and toxicity of organic electrolytes, potential of supercapacitors has not been fully exploited. A novel aspect of this work is in utilizing the ionic liquid gel polymer electrolyte to design solid-state supercapacitors for energy storage. Various electrochemical systems were investigated including graphene, PEDOT, PEDOT-carbon nanotubes, PEDOT-manganese oxide, and PEDOT-iron oxide nanocomposites. The electrochemical performance of solid-state supercapacitor devices was evaluated based on cyclic voltammetry (CV), charge-discharge (CD), prolonged cyclic tests, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Raman spectroscopy technique was also utilized to analyze the bonding structure of the electrode materials. The graphene solid-state supercapacitor system displayed areal capacitance density of 141.83 mF cm-2 based on high potential window up to 4V. The PEDOT solid-state supercapacitor system was synthesized in acetonitrile and aqueous mediums achieving areal capacitance density of 219.17 mF cm-2. The hybrid structure of solid-state supercapacitors was also

  4. Shipping cask demand associated with United States Government storage of commercial spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daling, P.M.; Engel, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    There were primarily two objectives of this study. The first was to develop estimates of the shipping cask fleet size that will be needed in the United States in the near future. These estimates were compared with current US spent fuel cask fleet size to determine its adequacy to provide the transportation services. The second objective was to develop estimates of the transportation costs associated with future movements of spent fuel. The results of this study were based on assumptions that were made prior to passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 which authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide Federal Interim Storage of spent fuel from commercial reactors. The Act requires that the DOE is responsible for transportation of the fuel, although private industry is to provide these services. This paper examined the impacts of various spent fuel management strategies on spent fuel transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs. Conclusions related to optimization of the spent fuel transportation system can be drawn from the results of this study. The conclusions can be affected by changing the given set of assumptions used in this analysis. 3 tables

  5. A synthesis of current knowledge on forests and carbon storage in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, Duncan C; Ryan, Michael G; Birdsey, Richard A; Giardina, Christian P; Harmon, Mark E; Heath, Linda S; Houghton, Richard A; Jackson, Robert B; Morrison, James F; Murray, Brian C; Patakl, Diane E; Skog, Kenneth E

    2011-09-01

    Using forests to mitigate climate change has gained much interest in science and policy discussions. We examine the evidence for carbon benefits, environmental and monetary costs, risks and trade-offs for a variety of activities in three general strategies: (1) land use change to increase forest area (afforestation) and avoid deforestation; (2) carbon management in existing forests; and (3) the use of wood as biomass energy, in place of other building materials, or in wood products for carbon storage. We found that many strategies can increase forest sector carbon mitigation above the current 162-256 Tg C/yr, and that many strategies have co-benefits such as biodiversity, water, and economic opportunities. Each strategy also has trade-offs, risks, and uncertainties including possible leakage, permanence, disturbances, and climate change effects. Because approximately 60% of the carbon lost through deforestation and harvesting from 1700 to 1935 has not yet been recovered and because some strategies store carbon in forest products or use biomass energy, the biological potential for forest sector carbon mitigation is large. Several studies suggest that using these strategies could offset as much as 10-20% of current U.S. fossil fuel emissions. To obtain such large offsets in the United States would require a combination of afforesting up to one-third of cropland or pastureland, using the equivalent of about one-half of the gross annual forest growth for biomass energy, or implementing more intensive management to increase forest growth on one-third of forestland. Such large offsets would require substantial trade-offs, such as lower agricultural production and non-carbon ecosystem services from forests. The effectiveness of activities could be diluted by negative leakage effects and increasing disturbance regimes. Because forest carbon loss contributes to increasing climate risk and because climate change may impede regeneration following disturbance, avoiding

  6. The Impacts of State Ownership on Information Asymmetry: Evidence from an Emerging Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmoo Jay Choi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect of corporate ownership on information asymmetry as measured by bid-ask spread in the emerging markets of China. Government ownership has significant and positive impacts on bid-ask spread during the period 1995–2000, but disappears afterward during 2001–2003. The finding that state ownership raised bid-ask spread in the early period is consistent with recent studies on emerging markets including China, which indicate that firms with higher state ownership tend to have a greater deviation between cash flow rights and control rights (eg, Wei et al., 2005. This implies that lower state ownership is associated with lower information asymmetry in the market, an economic consequence of significant economic reform and privatization regarding the market microstructure. However, with more active control transfers and emergence of private controlling shareholders, regulatory changes in ownership structure and corporate governance mechanisms, and thus an improved legal and institutional environment, the link between the government ownership and information asymmetry turns to be insignificant in the later period. These results have important implications for transparency and information disclosure policies as well as privatization in emerging markets.

  7. Scattering-layer-induced energy storage function in polymer-based quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Hongrui

    2015-03-09

    Photo-self-charging cells (PSCs) are compact devices with dual functions of photoelectric conversion and energy storage. By introducing a scattering layer in polymer-based quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, two-electrode PSCs with highly compact structure were obtained. The charge storage function stems from the formed ion channel network in the scattering layer/polymer electrolyte system. Both the photoelectric conversion and the energy storage functions are integrated in only the photoelectrode of such PSCs. This design of PSC could continuously output power as a solar cell with considerable efficiency after being photo-charged. Such PSCs could be applied in highly-compact mini power devices.

  8. Emergency Contraception: Awareness, Perception and Practice among Female Undergraduates in Imo State University, Southeastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojiyi, Ec; Anolue, Fc; Ejekunle, Sd; Nzewuihe, Ac; Okeudo, C; Dike, Ei; Ejikem, Ce

    2014-11-01

    Limited knowledge and practice of contraception is a global public health problem. Unintended pregnancies are the primary cause of induced abortion. When safe abortions are not available, as in Nigeria with restricted abortion laws, abortion can contribute significantly to maternal mortality and morbidity. Adequate information on the awareness and the use of emergency contraception is necessary for planning interventions in groups vulnerable to unwanted pregnancy. The aim of the following study is to access the awareness, perception and practice of emergency contraception among female undergraduates in Imo State University, South Eastern Nigeria. A questionnaire based cross-sectional survey using female undergraduates selected randomly from Imo State University, Owerri. A total of 700 students participated in the study. Awareness of emergency contraception was very high (85.1%) (596/700). The awareness was significantly higher amongst students in health related faculties than in the non-health related faculties (P = 0.01). The main sources of information were through friends (43.1%) (317/700) and lectures (22.1%) (192/700). High dose progestogen (postinor-2) was the most commonly known type of emergency contraception (70.8%) (422/596). Only 58.1% (346/596) of those who were aware of emergency contraception approved of their use. The major reasons given by the 41.9% (250/596) who disapproved of their use were religious reasons (50.4%) (126/250) and that they were harmful to health (49.2%) (123/250). Two-third (67%) (46 9/700) of the students were sexually active and only 39.9% (187/469) of them used emergency contraception. High dose progestogen (postinor-2) was again the most commonly used method (70.8%) (422/596). The most common situation in which emergency contraception was used was following unprotected sexual intercourse (45.5%) (85/144). Only 34.6% (206/596) of those who were aware of emergency contraception identified correctly the appropriate time interval

  9. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  10. Transportation over long distance and thermal energy storage, coupling with energetic valuation processes from waste. State of art. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megret, O.; Bequet, L.; Manificat, A.; Weber, C.

    2011-12-01

    This study aims, on one hand, to realize a state of art about over long distance transport and heat energy storage and, on the other hand, to examine their coupling with waste valuation systems. After reminding the adequate context of development with those solutions and too showing the importance of the stake linked to the current work, we first expose the introductive elements in terms of storage and heat energy transport. The second chapter deals with the description of some materials, equipment and systems concerning heat storage energy. Afterward, the over long distance heat transport systems are detailed in the third chapter. In the fourth chapter, it is about waste valuation techniques and heat energy potentials users. The fifth chapter sums up the different techniques of storage and heat transport that are applicable to waste field according to the appropriate sector. Finally, the sixth chapter goes about 3 case-works in 3 fields: housing/commercial, industrial laundry and high temperature industry (steel industry). The purpose is to determine the implementation feasibility of the different techniques of storage and waste heat transport. (authors)

  11. State of emergency: behavior of gerbils is affected by the hunger state of their predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Tal, Oded; Kotler, Burt P

    2010-02-01

    Predator-prey interactions are usually composed of behaviorally sophisticated games in which the values of the strategies of foraging prey individuals may depend on those of their predators, and vice versa. Therefore, any change in the behavior of the predator should result in changes to the behavior of the prey. However, this key prediction has rarely been tested. To examine the effects of the predator state on prey behavior, we manipulated the state of captive Barn Owls, Tyto alba, and released them into an enclosure containing Allenby's gerbils, Gerbillus andersoni allenbyi, a common prey of the owls. The owls were significantly more active when hungry. In response, the gerbils altered their behavior according to the state of the owl. When the owl was hungry, the gerbils visited fewer food patches, foraged in fewer patches, and harvested less food from each patch. Moreover, the gerbils kept their foraging bouts closer to their burrow, which reduced the overlap among foraging ranges of individual gerbils. Thus, changes in the state of the predator affect the foraging behavior of its prey and can also mediate competition among prey individuals.

  12. Associations between active shooter incidents and gun ownership and storage among families with young children in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Taryn W

    2017-07-01

    The presence of firearms and their unsafe storage in the home can increase risk of firearm-related death and injury, but public opinion suggests that firearm ownership is a protective factor against gun violence. This study examined the effects of a recent nearby active shooter incident on gun ownership and storage practices among families with young children. A series of regression models, with data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort merged with the FBI's Active Shooter Incidents data collected in 2003-2006, were used to examine whether household gun ownership and storage practices differed in the months prior to and following an active shooter incident that occurred anywhere in the United States or within the same state. Approximately one-fifth of young children lived in households with one or more guns; of these children, only two-thirds lived in homes that stored all guns in locked cabinets. Results suggest that the experience of a recent active shooter incident was associated with an increased likelihood of storing all guns locked, with the magnitude dependent on the temporal and geographic proximity of the incident. The severity of the incident, defined as the number of fatalities, predicted an increase in storing guns locked. Findings suggest that public shootings change behaviors related to firearm storage among families with young children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Methane Emissions from the Natural Gas Transmission and Storage System in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerle, Daniel J; Williams, Laurie L; Vaughn, Timothy L; Quinn, Casey; Subramanian, R; Duggan, Gerald P; Willson, Bryan; Opsomer, Jean D; Marchese, Anthony J; Martinez, David M; Robinson, Allen L

    2015-08-04

    The recent growth in production and utilization of natural gas offers potential climate benefits, but those benefits depend on lifecycle emissions of methane, the primary component of natural gas and a potent greenhouse gas. This study estimates methane emissions from the transmission and storage (T&S) sector of the United States natural gas industry using new data collected during 2012, including 2,292 onsite measurements, additional emissions data from 677 facilities and activity data from 922 facilities. The largest emission sources were fugitive emissions from certain compressor-related equipment and "super-emitter" facilities. We estimate total methane emissions from the T&S sector at 1,503 [1,220 to 1,950] Gg/yr (95% confidence interval) compared to the 2012 Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Inventory (GHGI) estimate of 2,071 [1,680 to 2,690] Gg/yr. While the overlap in confidence intervals indicates that the difference is not statistically significant, this is the result of several significant, but offsetting, factors. Factors which reduce the study estimate include a lower estimated facility count, a shift away from engines toward lower-emitting turbine and electric compressor drivers, and reductions in the usage of gas-driven pneumatic devices. Factors that increase the study estimate relative to the GHGI include updated emission rates in certain emission categories and explicit treatment of skewed emissions at both component and facility levels. For T&S stations that are required to report to the EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP), this study estimates total emissions to be 260% [215% to 330%] of the reportable emissions for these stations, primarily due to the inclusion of emission sources that are not reported under the GHGRP rules, updated emission factors, and super-emitter emissions.

  14. A state-of-the-art review on hybrid heat pipe latent heat storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naghavi, M.S.; Ong, K.S.; Mehrali, M.; Badruddin, I.A.; Metselaar, H.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    The main advantage of latent heat thermal energy storage systems is the capability to store a large quantity of thermal energy in an isothermal process by changing phase from solid to liquid, while the most important weakness of these systems is low thermal conductivity that leads to unsuitable charging/discharging rates. Heat pipes are used in many applications – as one of the most efficient heat exchanger devices – to amplify the charging/discharging processes rate and are used to transfer heat from a source to the storage or from the storage to a sink. This review presents and critically discusses previous investigations and analysis on the incorporation of heat pipe devices into latent heat thermal energy storage with heat pipe devices. This paper categorizes different applications and configurations such as low/high temperature solar, heat exchanger and cooling systems, analytical approaches and effective parameters on the performance of hybrid HP–LHTES systems.

  15. Hydrogen Storage Materials for Mobile and Stationary Applications: Current State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qiwen; Paskevicius, Mark; Sheppard, Drew A; Buckley, Craig E; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Matthew R; Gu, Qinfen; Mao, Jianfeng; Huang, Zhenguo; Liu, Hua Kun; Guo, Zaiping; Banerjee, Amitava; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois

    2015-09-07

    One of the limitations to the widespread use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is its storage in a safe and compact form. Herein, recent developments in effective high-capacity hydrogen storage materials are reviewed, with a special emphasis on light compounds, including those based on organic porous structures, boron, nitrogen, and aluminum. These elements and their related compounds hold the promise of high, reversible, and practical hydrogen storage capacity for mobile applications, including vehicles and portable power equipment, but also for the large scale and distributed storage of energy for stationary applications. Current understanding of the fundamental principles that govern the interaction of hydrogen with these light compounds is summarized, as well as basic strategies to meet practical targets of hydrogen uptake and release. The limitation of these strategies and current understanding is also discussed and new directions proposed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. McPhy-Energy’s proposal for solid state hydrogen storage materials and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehan, Michel, E-mail: michel.jehan@mcphy.com [McPhy Energy SA, ZA Retière, 26190 La Motte-Fanjas (France); Fruchart, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.fruchart@grenoble.cnrs.fr [McPhy Energy SA, ZA Retière, 26190 La Motte-Fanjas (France); Institut Néel and CRETA, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Mechanical alloying with nano-structurizing highly reactive magnesium metal hydrides particles. •Solid reversible hydrogen storage at scale of kg to tons of hydrogen using MgH{sub 2} composite discs. •Natural Expanded Graphite draining heat of reaction during sorption. •Change Phase Material storing reversibly heat of reaction within tank storage as adiabatic system. •Technology fully adapted for renewable energy storage and network energy peak shavings through H{sub 2}. -- Abstract: The renewable resources related, for instance, to solar energies exhibit two main characteristics. They have no practical limits in regards to the efficiency and their various capture methods. However, their intermittence prevents any direct and immediate use of the resulting power. McPhy-Energy proposes solutions based on water electrolysis for hydrogen generation and storage on reversible metal hydrides to efficiently cover various energy generation ranges from MW h to GW h. Large stationary storage units, based on MgH{sub 2}, are presently developed, including both the advanced materials and systems for a total energy storage from ∼70 to more than 90% efficient. Various designs of MgH{sub 2}-based tanks are proposed, allowing the optional storage of the heat of the Mg–MgH{sub 2} reaction in an adjacent phase changing material. The combination of these operations leads to the storage of huge amounts of hydrogen and heat in our so-called adiabatic-tanks. Adapted to intermittent energy production and consumption from renewable sources (wind, sun, tide, etc.), nuclear over-production at night, or others, tanks distribute energy on demand for local applications (on-site domestic needs, refueling stations, etc.) via turbine or fuel cell electricity production.

  17. Superstorm Sandy: Emergency management staff perceptions of impact and recommendations for future preparedness, New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Adam; Hilts, Asante Shipp; Mack, Stephanie; Eidson, Millicent; Nguyen, Trang; Birkhead, Guthrie

    This study collected and summarized feedback from staff at the New York State (NYS) Office of Emergency Management (OEM) and three county OEMs within NYS to understand lessons learned from the 2012 Superstorm Sandy. Cross-sectional qualitative and quantitative analysis. One staff person from each identified critical role from the state and county OEMs who were still employed in the roles identified. In-person interviews in 2014 followed by an anonymous survey in 2015 examined the response strengths, challenges, and recommendations using federally and study-defined Public Health Preparedness Capabilities. Quantitative analysis of staff survey ratings was used to summarize perceptions of interagency collaboration, communication effectiveness, and differences by staff position. Response rates were 78 percent for interviews (n = 7) and 45 percent for surveys (n = 36). In interviews, "emergency operations coordination" was cited most frequently (48 percent), specifically for successful interagency coordination. "Emergency operations coordination" was also cited most among challenges (45 percent), with emphasis on problems with uniformity of software systems across agencies. Survey responses indicated that "volunteer management" (50 percent) and the "safety and health of responders" (40 percent) were frequently reported as challenges. Additionally, 38 percent of OEM staff reported that situation reports submitted by health departments need improvement. Recommendations from OEM staff included "emergency operations coordination" (36 percent) such as sharing of resources and "training" (16 percent) including hospital evacuation training. Analysis of OEM staff feedback identified specific challenges, and concrete recommendations were made to improve response going forward.

  18. Current state of WWER SNF storage in Russia and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, O.; Kozlov, Y.; Razmashkin, N.; Safutin, V.; Tikhonov, N.

    2006-01-01

    In the Russian Federation WWER-440 Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is reprocessed at RT-1 plant near Cheliabinsk. WWER-1000 SNF is supposed to be reprocessed at RT-2 plant, which will be built about 2020. The information on the capacity and fill up level of the at-reactor pools at NPP with WWER reactors considering its modification up to May 2005 is given. The regulatory requirements to all SNF 'wet' storage facilities; the principle design and engineering solutions as well as the complex of measures for radiation safety and the environmental protection of spent fuel storage are presented. WWER-440 SNF management, WWER-1000 SNF management and dry storage of WWER-1000 SNF are discussed. In the conclusion it is noted than neither Russia, nor any other country have the experience of construction of vault-type 'dry' storage facilities of such a capacity to store WWER-1000 SNF (9000 tU). The experience and design solutions approved earlier in creation of other dangerous facilities were used. The calculations were based on conservative assumptions allowing with a large assurance to guarantee the nuclear and radiation safety and the environmental protection. At present, a program is developed for scientific-technical support of the dry storage facility design and operation, aimed at the studies whose results will allow to optimize the taken technical decisions, simplify SNF management technology and, possibly, to reduce the cost of the storage facility itself

  19. Emerging solid-state laser technology by lidar/DIAL remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in the development of new, solid-state laser sources. This talk will present an overview of some of the new developments in solid-state lasers, and their application toward lidar/DIAL measurements of the atmosphere. Newly emerging lasers such as Ho:YAG, Tm:YAG, OPO, and Ti:Sapphire will be covered, along with the spectroscopic parameters required for differential operational modes of atmospheric remote sensing including Doppler-Windshear lidar, Tunable laser detection of water/CO2, and broad linewidth OPO's for open path detection of pollutant hydrocarbon gases. Additional considerations of emerging laser technology for lidar/DIAL will also be covered.

  20. Radiological emergency response planning: Handbook for Federal Assistance to State and Local Governments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The handbook is directed toward those federal agencies involved in providing direct field assistance to state and local governments in radiological emergency response planning. Its principal purpose is to optimize the effectiveness of this effort by specifying the functions of the following federal agencies: Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of Transportation, Defense Civil Preparedness Agency, Federal Disaster Assistance Administration, and Federal Preparedness Agency

  1. 75 FR 69134 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “off” of Tiers Three and Four of Emergency Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... Triggering ``off'' of Tiers Three and Four of Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) AGENCY... triggering ``off'' of Tiers Three and Four of the Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08) program. Public... high unemployment states. The Department of Labor produces a trigger notice indicating which states...

  2. 76 FR 44611 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “Off” of Tiers Three and Four of Emergency Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Triggering ``Off'' of Tiers Three and Four of Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) AGENCY... triggering ``off'' of Tiers Three and Four of the Emergency Unemployment Compensation (EUC08) program. Public... high unemployment states. The Department of Labor produces a trigger notice indicating which states...

  3. Analysis of inland crude oil spill threats, vulnerabilities, and emergency response in the midwest United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Thomas M; Di Bianca, Paisly; Krysa, Jan

    2012-10-01

    Although coastal oil spills tend to be highly publicized, crude oil spills in the United States affect inland areas relatively often. Spills to inland areas often affect sensitive environments and can have greater impacts to health and welfare than spills to coastal areas. For these reasons, the authors investigated inland crude oil spill threats, vulnerabilities, and emergency response in the midwestern U.S. states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin. These states work with the Region 5 Offices of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Region 5's geospatial data in the Inland Sensitivity Atlas were turned into metrics indicating inland crude oil spill threats and vulnerabilities among the Region's sub-watersheds. These threats and vulnerabilities were weighted using data from the National Response Center and the Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration Priority System. The locations of the Region's emergency responders were geocoded in GIS. The GIS calculated the emergency response times to the Region's sub-watersheds. The resulting scatter plots are connected to the sub-watersheds in the map so stakeholders can (1) see the outlying sub-watersheds of concern and (2) better understand how reducing threats and better response time can reduce the risk of inland crude oil spills. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the U.S.A.

  4. Emergent low-energy bound states in the two-orbital Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Fernández, Y.; Kotliar, G.; Hallberg, K.

    2018-03-01

    A repulsive Coulomb interaction between electrons in different orbitals in correlated materials can give rise to bound quasiparticle states. We study the nonhybridized two-orbital Hubbard model with intra- (inter)orbital interaction U (U12) and different bandwidths using an improved dynamical mean-field theory numerical technique which leads to reliable spectra on the real energy axis directly at zero temperature. We find that a finite density of states at the Fermi energy in one band is correlated with the emergence of well-defined quasiparticle states at excited energies Δ =U -U12 in the other band. These excitations are interband holon-doublon bound states. At the symmetric point U =U12 , the quasiparticle peaks are located at the Fermi energy, leading to a simultaneous and continuous Mott transition settling a long-standing controversy.

  5. Security, Violent Events, and Anticipated Surge Capabilities of Emergency Departments in Washington State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyand, Jonathan S.; Junck, Emily; Kang, Christopher S.; Heiner, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Over the past 15 years, violent threats and acts against hospital patients, staff, and providers have increased and escalated. The leading area for violence is the emergency department (ED) given its 24/7 operations, role in patient care, admissions gateway, and center for influxes during acute surge events. This investigation had three objectives: to assess the current security of Washington State EDs; to estimate the prevalence of and response to threats and violence in Washington State EDs; and to appraise the Washington State ED security capability to respond to acute influxes of patients, bystanders, and media during acute surge events. Methods A voluntary, blinded, 28-question Web-based survey developed by emergency physicians was electronically delivered to all 87 Washington State ED directors in January 2013. We evaluated responses by descriptive statistical analyses. Results Analyses occurred after 90% (78/87) of ED directors responded. Annual censuses of the EDs ranged from violent threats or acts occurring in their ED. Of these, 93% were directed towards nursing staff, 90% towards physicians, 74% towards security personnel, and 51% towards administrative personnel. Nearly half (48%) noted incidents directed towards another patient, and 50% towards a patient’s family or friend. These events were variably reported to the hospital administration. After an acute surge event, 35% believed the initial additional security response would not be adequate, with 26% reporting no additional security would be available within 15 minutes. Conclusion Our study reveals the variability of ED security staffing and a heterogeneity of capabilities throughout Washington State. These deficiencies and vulnerabilities highlight the need for other EDs and regional emergency preparedness planners to conduct their own readiness assessments. PMID:28435498

  6. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...... = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Er) have been synthesized, which pave the way for studying the polymorphic transition in these compounds, obtaining new bimetallic borohydrides and designing new reactive hydride composites with improved hydrogen storage capacities. Two novel polymorphs of Pr(BH4)3 are identified...

  7. Review of Current State of the Art and Key Design Issues With Potential Solutions for Liquid Hydrogen Cryogenic Storage Tank Structures for Aircraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Arnold, Steven M.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Manderscheid, Jane M.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2006-01-01

    Due to its high specific energy content, liquid hydrogen (LH2) is emerging as an alternative fuel for future aircraft. As a result, there is a need for hydrogen tank storage systems, for these aircraft applications, that are expected to provide sufficient capacity for flight durations ranging from a few minutes to several days. It is understood that the development of a large, lightweight, reusable cryogenic liquid storage tank is crucial to meet the goals of and supply power to hydrogen-fueled aircraft, especially for long flight durations. This report provides an annotated review (including the results of an extensive literature review) of the current state of the art of cryogenic tank materials, structural designs, and insulation systems along with the identification of key challenges with the intent of developing a lightweight and long-term storage system for LH2. The broad classes of insulation systems reviewed include foams (including advanced aerogels) and multilayer insulation (MLI) systems with vacuum. The MLI systems show promise for long-term applications. Structural configurations evaluated include single- and double-wall constructions, including sandwich construction. Potential wall material candidates are monolithic metals as well as polymer matrix composites and discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites. For short-duration flight applications, simple tank designs may suffice. Alternatively, for longer duration flight applications, a double-wall construction with a vacuum-based insulation system appears to be the most optimum design. The current trends in liner material development are reviewed in the case that a liner is required to minimize or eliminate the loss of hydrogen fuel through permeation.

  8. Emergent Chiral Spin State in the Mott Phase of a Bosonic Kane-Mele-Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plekhanov, Kirill; Vasić, Ivana; Petrescu, Alexandru; Nirwan, Rajbir; Roux, Guillaume; Hofstetter, Walter; Le Hur, Karyn

    2018-04-01

    Recently, the frustrated X Y model for spins 1 /2 on the honeycomb lattice has attracted a lot of attention in relation with the possibility to realize a chiral spin liquid state. This model is relevant to the physics of some quantum magnets. Using the flexibility of ultracold atom setups, we propose an alternative way to realize this model through the Mott regime of the bosonic Kane-Mele-Hubbard model. The phase diagram of this model is derived using bosonic dynamical mean-field theory. Focusing on the Mott phase, we investigate its magnetic properties as a function of frustration. We do find an emergent chiral spin state in the intermediate frustration regime. Using exact diagonalization we study more closely the physics of the effective frustrated X Y model and the properties of the chiral spin state. This gapped phase displays a chiral order, breaking time-reversal and parity symmetry, but is not topologically ordered (the Chern number is zero).

  9. Defect States Emerging from a Non-Hermitian Flatband of Photonic Zero Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bingkun; Zhang, Lingxuan; Ge, Li

    2018-03-01

    We show the existence of a flatband consisting of photonic zero modes in a gain and loss modulated lattice system as a result of the underlying non-Hermitian particle-hole symmetry. This general finding explains the previous observation in parity-time symmetric systems where non-Hermitian particle-hole symmetry is hidden. We further discuss the defect states in these systems, whose emergence can be viewed as an unconventional alignment of a pseudospin under the influence of a complex-valued pseudomagnetic field. These defect states also behave as a chain with two types of links, one rigid in a unit cell and one soft between unit cells, as the defect states become increasingly localized with the gain and loss strength.

  10. Capitalizing on new opportunities in Canada's emerging midstream : processing, transportation, marketing, NGL, storage : proceedings of a Canadian Institute conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Text or speaking notes used at a conference to examine the challenges and opportunities facing Canada's midstream petroleum and natural gas industry are contained in this volume. A total of eight 8 papers were presented, focusing on the wide range of business opportunities that do not fit into the core functions of the upstream business (exploration and production), or into the core functions of the downstream business (distribution and retail marketing). One of the biggest opportunities lies in the development of storage facilities for the natural gas industry. Other aspects of the midstream business addressed included processing, transportation, marketing, and natural gas liquids. tabs., figs

  11. Emergency planning requirements and short-term countermeasures for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, F.; Hogan, R.; Mohseni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit, the United States Nuclear Regulatory's Commission (NRC's) emergency planning regulations are now considered and an important part of the regulatory framework for protecting the public health and safety. Many aspects of the countermeasures are presented: Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ), off-Site emergency planning and preparedness, responsibilities of nuclear power plants operators and states and local government. Finally, protective action recommendations are given as well as the federal response to an emergency. The authors noted that the use of potassium iodide is not considered as an effective countermeasure for the public protection in the US. (TEC). 1 fig

  12. Long-term management impacts on carbon storage in Lake States forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Powers; Randall Kolka; Brian Palik; Rachel McDonald; Martin. Jurgensen

    2011-01-01

    We examined carbon storage following 50+ years of forest management in two long-term silvicultural studies in red pine and northern hardwood ecosystems of North America’s Great Lakes region. The studies contrasted various thinning intensities (red pine) or selection cuttings, shelterwoods, and diameter-limit cuttings (northern hardwoods) to unmanaged controls of...

  13. Evaluating the development of carbon capture and storage technologies in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alphen, K. van; Noothout, P.M.; Hekkert, M.P.; Turkenburg, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as an important solution to solve the twin challenge of reducing GHG emissions, while utilizing fossil fuel reserves to meet future energy requirements. In this study an innovation systems perspective is applied to review the development of CCS technologies

  14. CA-storage : technology, application and research. State of the art in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaik, van A.C.R.; Verschoor, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    CA-technology in the Netherlands is used mostly for storage of apples and pears; main varieties for apples are Elstar and Jonagold. The main pear variety Conference is stored in CA after a specific delay time to prevent the pears from getting internal defects. For a wide range of produce (e.g.

  15. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme, Training Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of these training materials is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for a State embarking on a nuclear power programme, and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the Assistance Convention). Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. One of the concerns associated with nuclear power is the possibility that a State embarking on a nuclear power programme might not have sufficient capabilities and therefore would not be adequately prepared to respond to a radiation emergency caused by severe accident conditions. Protecting the public, the environment and property in the event of a failure of any level of defence in depth is the most important safety objective. A robust framework for emergency preparedness and response to a radiation emergency forms the last level of defence in depth and, as such, must be developed and implemented by any State embarking on a nuclear power programme, using best international practices. The establishment of capabilities and arrangements for emergency preparedness and response to severe accident conditions is one of the principal tasks in the development of a national infrastructure for nuclear power. State of the art emergency preparedness and response is a key element in achieving overall plant safety. This training course complements the IAEA publication 'Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme' (EPR-Embarking 2012). These materials are designed to help States apply the guidance in EPR-Embarking 2012, in order to develop the capability to adequately prepare for and respond to a radiation emergency after the commissioning and start of

  16. Investigating the Failure of State Owned Enterprises (SOEs of an Emerging Economy: A Comparative Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Salah Uddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the failure and aftermath of state owned enterprises (SOEs of an emerging economy, Bangladesh. Failure of SOEs of emerging economy has been investigated by many researchers during the last few decades. This study is an extension of previous research. Through the comparative case study, this study tries to explore the scenario of failure of SOEs, the causal factors of failure, remedial actions and aftermath in SOEs. The findings indicate that different authorities from the policy maker to the operating level employees cannot avoid the responsibilities for failure. Even proper restructuring within the ownership of government can drive the firm positively. It is expected that the comparative case study will help to make the decision for the concerned authorities of Bangladesh as well as the authorities of other countries of the world who are in the same position.

  17. Strength analysis and optimization of welding robot mechanism in emergency stop state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Poruba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the strength analysis and optimization of the welding robot mechanism in emergency stop state. The common operational positioning of the welding robot is characterized by smooth course of speeds in the time. The resulting load does not differ significantly from the static loading. However the safety requirements given by the norm require the ability of emergency stop function. Since the course of speed in time is rather steep the higher values of acceleration and thus higher excitation force is expected. The dynamical simulation performed describes the response of the robot mechanism in the form of stress course in time, quantifies the peak values of the stress caused by the dynamical component of loading and highlights the potential risks associated with this phenomenon.

  18. Vintage, the First 40 Years: The Emergence and Persistence of Vintage Style in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L. Fischer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper historicizes when wearing vintage clothing first became fashionable in the United States. I trace when the trend emerges in the U.S. and explore various ways the press framed secondhand/vintage clothes and anachronistic dressing. I contend that the emergence of vintage occurs as a form of alternative consumption alongside changes that occurred in the U.S. garment industry such as outsourcing and product licensing. These changes led many consumers to seek more authentic consumption experiences. Consumers with cultural capital found in vintage an alternative market for sourcing fashionable street style. Consumers attribute characteristics to vintage clothing that are typically part of authenticity discourse such as it being of exceptional quality, original, handcrafted, made from natural fibers, and providing continuity with the past. The authenticity of vintage is symbolically deployed in opposition to contemporary mass-produced clothing and standardized retail shopping experiences.

  19. National Characteristics of Emergency Medical Services Responses for Older Adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Hieu V; Herrera, Lauren Nicholas; Moore, Justin Xavier; Donnelly, John; Jacobson, Karen E; Carlson, Jestin N; Mann, N Clay; Wang, Henry E

    2018-01-01

    Older adults, those aged 65 and older, frequently require emergency care. However, only limited national data describe the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) care provided to older adults. We sought to determine the characteristics of EMS care provided to older adults in the United States. We used data from the 2014 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS), encompassing EMS response data from 46 States and territories. We excluded EMS responses for children older adults as age ≥65 years. We compared patient demographics (age, sex, race, primary payer), response characteristics (dispatch time, location type, time intervals), and clinical course (clinical impression, injury, procedures, medications) between older and younger adult EMS emergency 9-1-1 responses. During the study period there were 20,212,245 EMS emergency responses. Among the 16,116,219 adult EMS responses, there were 6,569,064 (40.76%) older and 9,547,155 (59.24%) younger adults. Older EMS patients were more likely to be white and the EMS incident to be located in healthcare facilities (clinic, hospital, nursing home). Compared with younger patients, older EMS patients were more likely to present with syncope (5.68% vs. 3.40%; OR 1.71; CI: 1.71-1.72), cardiac arrest/rhythm disturbance (3.27% vs. 1.69%; OR 1.97; CI: 1.96-1.98), stroke (2.18% vs. 0.74%; OR 2.99; CI: 2.96-3.02) and shock (0.77% vs. 0.38%; OR 2.02; CI: 2.00-2.04). Common EMS interventions performed on older persons included intravenous access (32.02%), 12-lead ECG (14.37%), CPR (0.87%), and intubation (2.00%). The most common EMS drugs administered to older persons included epinephrine, atropine, furosemide, amiodarone, and albuterol or ipratropium. One of every three U.S. EMS emergency responses involves older adults. EMS personnel must be prepared to care for the older patient.

  20. The Epidemiology of Emergency Department Trauma Discharges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaggio, Charles J; Avraham, Jacob B; Lee, David C; Frangos, Spiros G; Wall, Stephen P

    2017-10-01

    Injury-related morbidity and mortality is an important emergency medicine and public health challenge in the United States. Here we describe the epidemiology of traumatic injury presenting to U.S. emergency departments (EDs), define changes in types and causes of injury among the elderly and the young, characterize the role of trauma centers and teaching hospitals in providing emergency trauma care, and estimate the overall economic burden of treating such injuries. We conducted a secondary retrospective, repeated cross-sectional study of the Nationwide Emergency Department Data Sample (NEDS), the largest all-payer ED survey database in the United States. Main outcomes and measures were survey-adjusted counts, proportions, means, and rates with associated standard errors (SEs) and 95% confidence intervals. We plotted annual age-stratified ED discharge rates for traumatic injury and present tables of proportions of common injuries and external causes. We modeled the association of Level I or II trauma center care with injury fatality using a multivariable survey-adjusted logistic regression analysis that controlled for age, sex, injury severity, comorbid diagnoses, and teaching hospital status. There were 181,194,431 (SE = 4,234) traumatic injury discharges from U.S. EDs between 2006 and 2012. There was a mean year-to-year decrease of 143 (95% CI = -184.3 to -68.5) visits per 100,000 U.S. population during the study period. The all-age, all-cause case-fatality rate for traumatic injuries across U.S. EDs during the study period was 0.17% (SE = 0.001%). The case-fatality rate for the most severely injured averaged 4.8% (SE = 0.001%), and severely injured patients were nearly four times as likely to be seen in Level I or II trauma centers (relative risk = 3.9 [95% CI = 3.7 to 4.1]). The unadjusted risk ratio, based on group counts, for the association of Level I or II trauma centers with mortality was risk ratio = 4.9 (95% CI = 4.5 to 5.3); however, after sex, age

  1. High rates of carbon storage in old deciduous forests: Emerging mechanisms from the Forest Accelerated Succession ExperimenT (FASET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, C. M.; Nave, L. E.; Hardiman, B. S.; Bohrer, G.; Halperin, A.; Maurer, K.; Le Moine, J.; Nadelhoffer, K.; Vogel, C. S.; Curtis, P.; University Of Michigan Biological Station Forest Ecosystem Study (Umbs-Fest) Team

    2010-12-01

    Deciduous forests of the eastern US are broadly approaching an ecological threshold in which early successional dominant trees are senescing and giving way to later successional species, with unknown consequences for regional carbon (C) cycling. Though recent research demonstrates that forests may accumulate C for centuries, the mechanisms behind sustained rates of C storage in old, particularly deciduous, forests have not been identified. In a regionally representative forest at the University of Michigan Biological Station, we are combining observational and experimental C cycling studies to forecast how forest C storage responds to climate variation, disturbance, and succession. The Forest Accelerated Succession ExperimenT (FASET), in which >6,700 aspen and birch trees (~35 % LAI) were stem girdled within a 39 ha area, is testing the hypothesis that forest production will increase rather than decline with age, due to increases in nitrogen (N) availability, N allocation to the canopy, and the concurrent development of a more biologically and structurally complex canopy. Results thus far support our hypothesis that aging forests in the region may sustain high rates of C storage through shifts in N cycling and increased canopy complexity. Girdling-induced mortality of early successional species reduced soil respiration, accelerated fine root turnover, and prompted the redistribution of N from the foliage of early to later successional species. Nitrogen redistribution increased leaf area index (LAI) production by later successional species, offsetting declines in LAI from senescing early successional species. High rates of net primary production (NPP) were sustained in stands comprising a diverse assemblage of early and later successional species because later successional species, when already present in the canopy, rapidly compensated for declining growth of early successional species. Canopy structural complexity, which increased with forest age, was positively

  2. Independent Emergence of Yersinia ruckeri Biotype 2 in the United States and Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Timothy J.; Verner-Jeffreys, David W.; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2011-01-01

    with an increased frequency of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) outbreaks in previously vaccinated salmonid fish. In this study, four independent specific natural mutations that cause the loss of both motility and secreted lipase activity were identified in BT2 strains from the United States, United Kingdom...... emerged separately at least four times. In addition, BT2 strains from the United Kingdom were shown to have the same mutant allele found in U.S. BT2 strains, suggesting a common origin of this BT2 lineage. This differentiation of distinct BT2 lineages is of critical importance for the development...

  3. Team Resilience as a Second-Order Emergent State: A Theoretical Model and Research Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint Bowers

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Resilience has been recognized as an important phenomenon for understanding how individuals overcome difficult situations. However, it is not only individuals who face difficulties; it is not uncommon for teams to experience adversity. When they do, they must be able to overcome these challenges without performance decrements.This manuscript represents a theoretical model that might be helpful in conceptualizing this important construct. Specifically, it describes team resilience as a second-order emergent state. We also include research propositions that follow from the model.

  4. Common criteria among States for storage and use of dried blood spot specimens after newborn screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological samples collected in biobanks are a resource with significant research potential. The Italian Joint Group cNB - cNBBSV (National committee of Bioethics - National committee for Biosecurity, Biotechnologies and Life Sciences published a document reporting recommendations on storage and use of dried blood spot (DBS and on the development of a National Network of Regional Newborn Screening Repositories for collection of residual DBS. Several ethical questions (about consent, possible use of genetic information, unanticipated possible usages for research purposes rise from residual newborn screening specimens collections. Moreover, legal and ethical controversies are accentuated by the conflicts between the interests of sample donors, biobank holders, researchers and the public. To overcome these difficulties the identification of a few criteria for storage and research usage of DBS is crucial.

  5. Underground Gas Storage in the World 2013 (fifth edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2013-06-01

    Since its first publication in 1990, 'Underground Gas Storage in the World' has been the industry's reference on underground gas storage (UGS). The updated 2013 edition includes in-depth CEDIGAZ's analyses of the latest developments and trends in the storage industry all over the world as well as extensive country analyses with complete datasets including current, under construction and planned Underground Gas Storage facilities in 48 countries. It describes the 688 existing storage facilities in the world and the 236 projects under construction and planned. Future storage demand and its main drivers are presented at global and regional levels. The study builds on the CEDIGAZ Underground Gas Storage Database, the only worldwide Underground Gas Storage database to be updated every year. This document summarizes the key findings of the Survey which includes four main parts: The first part gives an overview of underground gas storage in the world at the beginning of 2013 and analyzes future storage needs by 2030, at regional and international levels. The second part focuses on new trends and issues emerging or developing in key storage markets. It analyzes the emerging storage market in China, reviews the storage business climate in Europe, examines Gazprom's storage strategy in Europe, and reviews recent trends in storage development in the United States. The third part gives some fundamental background on technical, economic and regulatory aspects of gas storage. The fourth part gives a countrywide analysis of the 48 countries in the world holding underground gas storage facilities or planning storage projects. 48 countries are surveyed with 688 existing UGS facilities, 256 projects under construction or planned

  6. A Population-Based Cohort Study of Emergency Appendectomy Performed in England and New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khyatt, Waleed; Mytton, Jemma; Tan, Benjamin H L; Aquina, Christopher T; Evison, Felicity; Fleming, Fergal J; Pasquali, Sandro; Griffiths, Ewen A; Vohra, Ravinder S

    2017-08-01

    To compare selected outcomes (30-day reoperation and total length of hospital stay) following emergency appendectomy between populations from New York State and England. This retrospective cohort study used demographic and in-hospital outcome data from Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) administrative databases for all patients aged 18+ years undergoing appendectomy between April 2009 and March 2014. Univariate and adjusted multivariable logistic regression were used to test significant factors. A one-to-one propensity score matched dataset was created to compare odd ratios (OR) of reoperations between the two populations. A total of 188,418 patient records, 121,428 (64.4%) from England and 66,990 (35.6%) from NYS, were extracted. Appendectomy was completed laparoscopically in 77.7% of patients in New York State compared to 53.6% in England (P New York State, respectively. All 30-day reoperation rates were higher in England compared to New York State (1.2 vs. 0.6%, P New York State. Increasing the numbers of appendectomy completed laparoscopically may decrease length of stay and reoperations.

  7. Devolution's policy impact on non-emergency medical transportation in State Children's Health Insurance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, Stephen; Blakely, Craig; Ponder, Linda; Raphael, David

    2011-01-01

    Proponents of devolution often maintain that the transfer of power and authority of programs enables local officials to craft policy solutions that better align with the needs of their constituents. This article provides one of the first empirical evaluations of this assumption as it relates to non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT) in the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). NEMT programs meet a critical need in the areas in which they serve, directly targeting this single key access barrier to care. Yet states have great latitude in making such services available. The authors utilize data from 32 states to provide a preliminary assessment of devolution's consequences and policy impact on transportation-related access to care. Their findings provide mixed evidence on devolution's impact on policy outcomes. Proponents of devolution can find solace in the fact that several states have gone beyond federally mandated minimum requirements to offer innovative programs to remove transportation barriers to care. Detractors of devolution will find continued pause on several key issues, as a number of states do not offer NEMT to their SCHIP populations while cutting services and leaving over $7 billion in federal matching funding unspent.

  8. Transportation and storage optimization of spent nuclear fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Boryczka, M.K.; Collyer, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    In 1987, the U.S. Congress amended the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, establishing an independent body known as the Monitored Retrievable Storage Review Commission. The mandate of the Commission was to review DOE's assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility and to evaluate the need for an MRS. The MRS Review Commission asked ICF Technology Incorporated to develop a systems integration and transportation analysis model that would aid their evaluation for Congress. The resulting model (Model for Analysis of System Risk And Cost - MARC) was adapted from an earlier model (TRICAM) written for the DOE. MARC was made available to the Commission to calculate the costs and risks (both radiological and non-radiological) of alternative spent fuel storage configurations within the Federal Waste Management System. Two of the over 30 MARC scenarios run by the MRS Commission are used to demonstrate the use of MARC in evaluating alternatives in terms of system costs and risks. These two cases are initially run in a cost minimizing mode and then in a risk minimizing mode in order to compare the difference in the value of risk for each system configuration. This example demonstrates the kind of insights MARC can yield and its utility in policy-making. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Variation in Emergency Department vs Internal Medicine Excess Charges in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tim; Park, Angela; Bai, Ge; Joo, Sarah; Hutfless, Susan M; Mehta, Ambar; Anderson, Gerard F; Makary, Martin A

    2017-08-01

    Uninsured and insured but out-of-network emergency department (ED) patients are often billed hospital chargemaster prices, which exceed amounts typically paid by insurers. To examine the variation in excess charges for services provided by emergency medicine and internal medicine physicians. Retrospective analysis was conducted of professional fee payment claims made by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for all services provided to Medicare Part B fee-for-service beneficiaries in calendar year 2013. Data analysis was conducted from January 1 to July 31, 2016. Markup ratios for ED and internal medicine professional services, defined as the charges submitted by the hospital divided by the Medicare allowable amount. Our analysis included 12 337 emergency medicine physicians from 2707 hospitals and 57 607 internal medicine physicians from 3669 hospitals in all 50 states. Services provided by emergency medicine physicians had an overall markup ratio of 4.4 (340% excess charges), which was greater than the markup ratio of 2.1 (110% excess charges) for all services performed by internal medicine physicians. Markup ratios for all ED services ranged by hospital from 1.0 to 12.6 (median, 4.2; interquartile range [IQR], 3.3-5.8); markup ratios for all internal medicine services ranged by hospital from 1.0 to 14.1 (median, 2.0; IQR, 1.7-2.5). The median markup ratio by hospital for ED evaluation and management procedure codes varied between 4.0 and 5.0. Among the most common ED services, laceration repair had the highest median markup ratio (7.0); emergency medicine physician review of a head computed tomographic scan had the greatest interhospital variation (range, 1.6-27.7). Across hospitals, markups in the ED were often substantially higher than those in the internal medicine department for the same services. Higher ED markup ratios were associated with hospital for-profit ownership (median, 5.7; IQR, 4.0-7.1), a greater percentage of uninsured patients seen

  10. Onshore/ Offshore Geologic Assessment for Carbon Storage in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, C. C.; Knapp, J. H.; Brantley, D.; Lakshmi, V.; Almutairi, K.; Almayahi, D.; Akintunde, O. M.; Ollmann, J.

    2017-12-01

    Eighty percent of the world's energy relies on fossil fuels and under increasingly stricter national and international regulations on greenhouse gas emissions storage of CO2 in geologic repositories seems to be not only a feasible, but also and vital solution for near/ mid-term reduction of carbon emissions. We have evaluated the feasibility of CO2 storage in saline formations of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) including (1) the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sandstones of the buried South Georgia Rift (SGR) basin, and (2) the Mesozoic and Cenozoic geologic formations along the Mid- and South Atlantic seaboard. These analyses have included integration of subsurface geophysical data (2- and 3-D seismic surveys) with core samples, well logs as well as uses of geological databases and geospatial analysis leading to CO2 injection simulation models. ENAM is a complex and regionally extensive mature Mesozoic passive margin rift system encompassing: (1) a large volume and regional extent of related magmatism known as the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), (2) a complete stratigraphic column that records the post-rift evolution in several basins, (3) preserved lithospheric-scale pre-rift structures including Paleozoic sutures, and (4) a wide range of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies both onshore and offshore. While the target reservoirs onshore show heterogeneity and a highly complex geologic evolution they also show promising conditions for significant safe CO2 storage away from the underground acquifers. Our offshore study (the Southeast Offshore Storage Resource Assessment - SOSRA) is focused on the outer continental shelf from North Carolina to the southern tip of Florida. Three old exploration wells are available to provide additional constraints on the seismic reflection profiles. Two of these wells (TRANSCO 1005-1 and COST GE-1) penetrate the pre-rift Paleozoic sedimentary formations while the EXXON 564-1 well penetrates the post

  11. 77 FR 33773 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “On” or “Off” in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... Triggering ``On'' or ``Off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program and the Federal...: Notice. SUMMARY: Announcement regarding states triggering ``on'' or ``off'' in the Emergency Unemployment... unemployment rate be at least 110% of one of the rates from a comparable prior period in one of the three prior...

  12. MANAGING THE LOAD SCHEDULE OF THE ADMINISTRATIVE BUILDING TAKING INTO ACCOUNT EMERGING RISKS WHEN CONNECTING THE KINETIC ENERGY STORAGE TO THE POWER SUPPLY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Shevchenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of the paper is to analyze load schedules of the administrative building and develop a structural scheme for connecting the kinetic energy storage in the power supply system of this building, which will allow using it as a consumer regulator, as well as a theoretical study of the risks that arise. Methodology. To conduct the research, the theory of designing internal electrical networks of buildings, the theory of plotting electric load graphs, methods of the theory of electromechanical systems and for analyzing the risk system, the T. Saati method of hierarchies were used. Results. The structure of kinetic energy storage (KES connection to the power supply system of the administrative building is developed and the structural diagram of the KES proposed for installation is given, the average daily winter and summer load schedules are presented, a set of groups and subgroups of risks and their influence on the work of the power supply system of the building are connected with the connection of the KES. Originality. For the first time, the application of the kinetic energy storage in the power supply system of the building with the analysis of emerging risks is considered, which makes it possible to improve the reliability of the developed system and the efficiency of load regulation. Practical value. The application of the proposed scheme will make it possible to use administrative buildings as load regulators of the external power supply system, and also effectively manage the load in the internal power supply system of the building.

  13. Self Inflicted Injuries among Children in United States - estimates from a nationwide emergency department sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseem Sulyman

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the current study are to provide nationally representative estimates of hospital based emergency department visits (ED attributed to self inflicted injuries and attempted suicides among children in United States; and to identify potential methods of such intentional self inflicted injuries and attempted suicides. METHODS: The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (year 2007 was used. All ED visits occurring among children (aged ≤18 years with an External Cause of Injury for any of self inflicted injuries were selected. Outcomes examined include hospital ED charges and hospitalization charges. All estimates were projected to national levels. RESULTS: 77,420 visits to hospital based emergency departments were attributed to self inflicted injuries among children (26,045 males and 51,370 females. The average age of the ED visits was 15.7 years. 134 patients died in ED's (106 males and 28 females and 93 died in hospitals following in-patient admission (75 males and 18 females. A greater proportion of male ED visits were discharged routinely as opposed to female ED visits (51.1% versus 44%. A greater proportion of male ED visits also died in the emergency departments compared to female visits (0.4% versus 0.05%. 17,965 ED visits necessitated admission into same hospital. The mean charge for each ED visit was $1,874. Self inflicted injuries by poisoning were the most frequently reported sources accounting for close to 70% of all ED visits. CONCLUSIONS: Females comprise a greater proportion of ED visits attributed to self inflicted injuries. 227 children died either in the ED's or in hospitals. The current study results highlight the burden associated with such injuries among children.

  14. Incidence and Cost of Ankle Sprains in United States Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shweta; Thomas, Abbey C.; Noone, Joshua M.; Blanchette, Christopher M.; Wikstrom, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ankle sprains represent a common injury in emergency departments, but little is known about common complications, procedures, and charges associated with ankle sprains in emergency departments. Hypothesis: There will be a higher incidence of ankle sprains among younger populations (≤25 years old) and in female patients. Complications and procedures will differ between ankle sprain types. Lateral ankle sprains will have lower health care charges relative to medial and high ankle sprains. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiological study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: A cross-sectional study of the 2010 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample was conducted. Outcomes such as charges, complications, and procedures were compared using propensity score matching between lateral and medial as well as lateral and high ankle sprains. Results: The sample contained 225,114 ankle sprains. Female patients sustained more lateral ankle sprains (57%). After propensity score adjustment, lateral sprains incurred greater charges than medial ankle sprains (median [interquartile range], $1008 [$702-$1408] vs $914 [$741-$1108]; P sprain of the foot (2.96% vs 0.70%, P ankle sprain events. Among procedures, medial ankle sprains were more likely to include diagnostic radiology (97.91% vs 83.62%, P ankle sprains (0.87% vs 2.79%, P ankle sprains than lateral ankle sprains (24 [6.06%] vs 1 [0.25%], P Ankle sprain emergency department visits account for significant health care charges in the United States. Age- and sex-related differences persist among the types of ankle sprains. Clinical Relevance: The health care charges associated with ankle sprains indicate the need for additional preventive measures. There are age- and sex-related differences in the prevalence of ankle sprains that suggest these demographics may be risk factors for ankle sprains. PMID:27474161

  15. An All-vanadium Continuous-flow Photoelectrochemical Cell for Extending State-of-charge in Solar Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zi; Shen, Yi; Liu, Dong; Liu, Fuqiang

    2017-04-04

    Greater levels of solar energy storage provide an effective solution to the inherent nature of intermittency, and can substantially improve reliability, availability, and quality of the renewable energy source. Here we demonstrated an all-vanadium (all-V) continuous-flow photoelectrochemical storage cell (PESC) to achieve efficient and high-capacity storage of solar energy, through improving both photocurrent and photocharging depth. It was discovered that forced convective flow of electrolytes greatly enhanced the photocurrent by 5 times comparing to that with stagnant electrolytes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) study revealed a great reduction of charge transfer resistance with forced convective flow of electrolytes as a result of better mass transport at U-turns of the tortuous serpentine flow channel of the cell. Taking advantage of the improved photocurrent and diminished charge transfer resistance, the all-V continuous-flow PESC was capable of producing ~20% gain in state of charge (SOC) under AM1.5 illumination for ca. 1.7 hours without any external bias. This gain of SOC was surprisingly three times more than that with stagnant electrolytes during a 25-hour period of photocharge.

  16. ENTREPRENEURIAL OPPORTUNITIES IN FOOD PROCESSING UNITS (WITH SPECIAL REFERENCES TO BYADGI RED CHILLI COLD STORAGE UNITS IN THE KARNATAKA STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. ISHWARA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available After the green revolution, we are now ushering in the evergreen revolution in the country; food processing is an evergreen activity. It is the key to the agricultural sector. In this paper an attempt has been made to study the workings of food processing units with special references to Red Chilli Cold Storage units in the Byadgi district of Karnataka State. Byadgi has been famous for Red Chilli since the days it’s of antiquity. The vast and extensive market yard in Byadagi taluk is famous as the second largest Red Chilli dealing market in the country. However, the most common and recurring problem faced by the farmer is inability to store enough red chilli from one harvest to another. Red chilli that was locally abundant for only a short period of time had to be stored against times of scarcity. In recent years, due to Oleoresin, demand for Red Chilli has grow from other countries like Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, America, Europe, Nepal, Indonesia, Mexico etc. The study reveals that all the cold storage units of the study area have been using vapour compression refrigeration system or method. All entrepreneurs have satisfied with their turnover and profit and they are in a good economic position. Even though the average turnover and profits are increased, few units have shown negligible amount of decrease in turnover and profit. This is due to the competition from increasing number of cold storages and early established units. The cold storages of the study area have been storing Red chilli, Chilli seeds, Chilli powder, Tamarind, Jeera, Dania, Turmeric, Sunflower, Zinger, Channa, Flower seeds etc,. But the 80 per cent of the each cold storage is filled by the red chilli this is due to the existence of vast and extensivered chilli market yard in the Byadgi. There is no business without problems. In the same way the entrepreneurs who are chosen for the study are facing a few problems in their business like skilled labour, technical and management

  17. China, the United States, and competition for resources that enable emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Andrew L.; Nassar, Nedal T.; Xun, Sean

    2018-01-01

    Historically, resource conflicts have often centered on fuel minerals (particularly oil). Future resource conflicts may, however, focus more on competition for nonfuel minerals that enable emerging technologies. Whether it is rhenium in jet engines, indium in flat panel displays, or gallium in smart phones, obscure elements empower smarter, smaller, and faster technologies, and nations seek stable supplies of these and other nonfuel minerals for their industries. No nation has all of the resources it needs domestically. International trade may lead to international competition for these resources if supplies are deemed at risk or insufficient to satisfy growing demand, especially for minerals used in technologies important to economic development and national security. Here, we compare the net import reliance of China and the United States to inform mineral resource competition and foreign supply risk. Our analysis indicates that China relies on imports for over half of its consumption for 19 of 42 nonfuel minerals, compared with 24 for the United States—11 of which are common to both. It is for these 11 nonfuel minerals that competition between the United States and China may become the most contentious, especially for those with highly concentrated production that prove irreplaceable in pivotal emerging technologies.

  18. Emergency radiological monitoring and analysis United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. Following a major radiological incident the FRERP authorizes the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The FRMAC is established to coordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted states and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for coordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis and quality assurance. This program includes: (1) Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed Wing and Helicopter, (2) Field Monitoring and Sampling, (3) Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories, (4) Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance, (5) Environmental Dosimetry, and (6) An integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures handbook is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets and operations of FRMAC monitoring and analysis and the content and preparation of this handbook

  19. Model describing the effect of employment of the United States military in a complex emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Donald S

    2005-01-01

    The end of the Cold War vastly altered the worldwide political landscape. With the loss of a main competitor, the United States (US) military has had to adapt its strategic, operational, and tactical doctrines to an ever-increasing variety of non-traditional missions, including humanitarian operations. Complex emergencies (CEs) are defined in this paper from a political and military perspective, various factors that contribute to their development are described, and issues resulting from the employment of US military forces are discussed. A model was developed to illustrate the course of a humanitarian emergency and the potential impact of a military response. The US intervention in Haiti, Northern Iraq, Kosovo, Somalia, Bosnia, and Rwanda serve as examples. A CE develops when there is civil conflict, loss of national governmental authority, a mass population movement, and massive economic failure, each leading to a general decline in food security. The military can alleviate a CE in four ways: (1) provide security for relief efforts; (2) enforce negotiated settlements; (3) provide security for non-combatants; and/or (4) employ logistical capabilities. The model incorporates Norton and Miskel's taxonomy of identifying failing states and helps illustrate the factors that lead to a CE. The model can be used to determine if and when military intervention will have the greatest impact. The model demonstrates that early military intervention and mission assignment within the core competencies of the forces can reverse the course of a CE. Further study will be needed to verify the model.

  20. Early emergence of anthropogenically forced heat waves in the western United States and Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Hosmay; West, Robert; Dong, Shenfu; Goni, Gustavo; Kirtman, Ben; Lee, Sang-Ki; Atlas, Robert

    2018-05-01

    Climate projections for the twenty-first century suggest an increase in the occurrence of heat waves. However, the time at which externally forced signals of anthropogenic climate change (ACC) emerge against background natural variability (time of emergence (ToE)) has been challenging to quantify, which makes future heat-wave projections uncertain. Here we combine observations and model simulations under present and future forcing to assess how internal variability and ACC modulate US heat waves. We show that ACC dominates heat-wave occurrence over the western United States and Great Lakes regions, with ToE that occurred as early as the 2020s and 2030s, respectively. In contrast, internal variability governs heat waves in the northern and southern Great Plains, where ToE occurs in the 2050s and 2070s; this later ToE is believed to be a result of a projected increase in circulation variability, namely the Great Plain low-level jet. Thus, greater mitigation and adaptation efforts are needed in the Great Lakes and western United States regions.

  1. One Health approach: A platform for intervention in emerging public health challenges of Kerala state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sukumaran

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors, key functionaries in the Kerala state public health system, review the communicable disease scenario of the state for the past 4 years, and in the background of the One Health concept, opines that the re-emerged discipline is perfectly in tune with the current challenges of the state. The unique model of Kerala state is witnessing newer challenges in its public health arena: The rapidly increasing migrant workforce from relatively poorer states of India, rapid urbanization and its consequent stress on public health, unsolved issues of urban waste disposal, reemergence of many communicable diseases like malaria, more so, the falciparum type, emergence of many zoonotic diseases like Lyme disease, scrub typhus, and Kyasanur forest disease etc. Conventional zoonotic infections such as anthrax and brucellosis remain potential threat for human health as well. Rabies continued to cause major concern from mortality point of view, as well as major drainer of state’s budget every year. Leptospirosis has remained major burden among the communicable disease for the past 10 years, and the annual incidence ranged from 2 to 7 per 100,000 population. Having a large section of its people working in various agriculture and animal rearing occupations, the state has all risk factors for propagation of Leptospirosis, but lacks interdisciplinary collaboration in its control and prevention area, the author highlights major avenues for collaboration. Japanese encephalitis appeared as an epidemic in 2011 in two of the southern districts in Kerala, one of the districts being famous tourist spot for both humans, as well as migrant birds. There is ample scope for collaborative research on the source of the virus, and in the subsequent years, the disease had been detected in more districts. Lyme disease was reported for the first time in India, from one of the districts in Kerala, promptly investigated by a joint team from Human Public Health and Veterinary

  2. Elder Abuse Identification in the Prehospital Setting: An Examination of State Emergency Medical Services Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namboodri, Brooke L; Rosen, Tony; Dayaa, Joseph A; Bischof, Jason J; Ramadan, Nadeem; Patel, Mehul D; Grover, Joseph; Brice, Jane H; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2018-03-22

    To describe statewide emergency medical service (EMS) protocols relating to identification, management, and reporting of elder abuse in the prehospital setting. Cross-sectional analysis. Statewide EMS protocols in the United States. Publicly available statewide EMS protocols identified from published literature, http://EMSprotocols.org, and each state's public health website. Protocols were reviewed to determine whether elder abuse was mentioned, elder abuse was defined, potential indicators of elder abuse were listed, management of older adults experiencing abuse was described, and instructions regarding reporting were provided. EMS protocols for child abuse were reviewed in the same manner for the purpose of comparison. Of the 35 publicly available statewide EMS protocols, only 14 (40.0%) mention elder abuse. Of protocols that mention elder abuse, 6 (42.9%) define elder abuse, 10 (71.4%) describe indicators of elder abuse, 8 (57.1%) provide instruction regarding management, and 12 (85.7%) provide instruction regarding reporting. Almost twice as many states met each of these metrics for child abuse. Statewide EMS protocols for elder abuse vary in regard to identification, management, and reporting, with the majority of states having no content on this subject. Expansion and standardization of protocols may increase the identification of elder abuse. © 2018, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2018, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Major alternatives for government policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to identify and assess major alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management in the United States. The National Academy of Public Administration agreed to identify and evaluate alternatives for governmental policies, organizational structures, and actions in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management. It agreed to review present policies and practices in civilian nuclear reactor emergency management, to review selected experiences and practices of governmental agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and industries other than the nuclear power industry, and to identify alternatives to the present nuclear emergency system

  4. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  5. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  6. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: August 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  7. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: August 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  8. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  9. Atmospheric release advisory capability pilot project at two nuclear power plants and associated state offices of emergency preparedness. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    A project to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) limited service with commercial nuclear power plants and their associated state offices of emergency preparedness is discussed. Preliminary planning, installation and testing of the ARAC site facilities at Indian Point Nucler Power Station, New York State; at New York State Office of Emergency Preparedness, Albany, New York; at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, California; and at the State of California Office of Emergency Services, Sacramento, California, are summarized. ARAC participation in the Robert E. Ginna nuclear generating plant accident in New York on January 25, 1982, is discussed. The ARAC system is evaluated with emphasis on communications, the suite of models contained within the ARAC system, and the staff. The implications of this project in designing the next-generation ARAC system to service federal and state needs are assessed

  10. Vertical Record of Ecological Change and Carbon Storage in a Young Emergent Mississippi River Coastal Deltaic Floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, A.; Twilley, R.; Bentley, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal deltaic floodplains are responsible for 40-50% of global coastal and marine carbon (C) burial and yet are often excluded from blue carbon literature. The Wax Lake Delta (WLD) is an unplanned Atchafalaya bayhead delta formation resulting from the dredging of the Wax Lake Outlet in 1942 to reduce downstream flooding of Morgan City. Twelve 4-5 m Vibracores were taken throughout the delta chronosequence to investigate ecological succession and C storage during the entirety of WLD's development. An oyster shell bed that can be found throughout the delta delineates the beginning of the WLD facies in 1952. As a young active delta its sediments are dominated by fine sand. However, the upper 0.4-0.7 m demonstrate a distinct transition to increased organic matter (OM) inputs, and in the upper half of this layer >90% of the C is organic. Spikes in organic matter and C content correspond to decreases in bulk density through the record. Notably, at 2.5 m depth there is a low bulk density layer corresponding to an increase in organic matter and C that is found throughout the older subaerial delta. This layer formed in 1970, a few years before WLD became subaerial in 1973 and therefore likely represents the point at which vegetation colonization began. Atomic N:P ratios, which are ecological indicators of biological influence, also demonstrate trends similar to OM and C further supporting this interpretation. With over 40 years of continuous subaerial land building, WLD provides a stark contrast to most of Louisiana's retrograding coastline and is considered a model for future sediment diversions.

  11. Overview of energy/hydrogen storage: state-of-the-art of the technologies and prospects for nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, M.; Prosini, P.P.; Passerini, S.

    2004-01-01

    A sustainable energy economy will be demanding primary energy sources, preferably renewable and mainly domestically available, using energy carriers, such as hydrogen and electricity, able to solve environmental problems and to assure adequate energy security. Instrumental to such goals will be the research and development of storage systems with performance characteristics compatible with major application requirements. Lithium or nickel are replacing lead in batteries, in order to better meet the extremely varying technical and economical requirements in fast growing conventional and new applications. Moreover, few technologies now permit to store hydrogen by modifying its physical state in gaseous or liquid form. The variety of hydrogen needs in the energy systems and in the vehicular sector is justifying the effort on solid state (metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures) or chemical systems (chemical hydrides). In this overview, emphasis is given to the major achievements in the field of electrical energy and hydrogen storage, in relation to the technological goals, which have been proposed in the major public research and collaborative programs throughout the world

  12. Financial assistance to States and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.A.; Jones, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Indian tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. The report has been prepared as an information resource for the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Office of Transportation, Emergency Management and Analytical Services. The report discusses funding programs administered by the following Federal agencies: Federal Emergency Management Agency; Department of Transportation; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Department of Energy. Also included is a summary of fees assessed by some States on carriers of hazardous materials and hazardous waste. The discussion of programs is supplemented by an Appendix that provides a series of tables summarizing funding sources and amounts. The report includes several conclusions concerning the level of funding provided to Indian tribes, the relative ranking of funding sources and the variation among States in overall revenues for emergency response and safe transportation

  13. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role that energy storage may have on the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include historical aspects of energy storage, thermal energy storage including sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, thermochemical heat storage, and seasonal heat storage, electricity storage including batteries, pumped hydroelectric storage, compressed air energy storage, and superconducting magnetic energy storage, and production and combustion of hydrogen as an energy storage option

  14. National Systematic Legal Review of State Policies on Emergency Medical Services Licensure Levels' Authority to Administer Opioid Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, Jeremiah M; Robinson, Kathy

    2018-02-27

    Previous research conducted in November 2013 found there were a limited number of states and territories in the United States (US) that authorize emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and emergency medical responders (EMRs) to administer opioid antagonists. Given the continued increase in the number of opioid-related overdoses and deaths, many states have changed their policies to authorize EMTs and EMRs to administer opioid antagonists. The goal of this study is to provide an updated description of policy on EMS licensure levels' authority to administer opioid antagonists for all 50 US states, the District of Columbia (DC), and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (PR). State law and scopes of practice were systematically reviewed using a multi-tiered approach to determine each state's legally-defined EMS licensure levels and their authority to administer an opioid antagonist. State law, state EMS websites, and state EMS scope of practice documents were identified and searched using Google Advanced Search with Boolean Search Strings. Initial results of the review were sent to each state office of EMS for review and comment. As of September 1, 2017, 49 states and DC authorize EMTs to administer an opioid antagonist. Among the 40 US jurisdictions (39 states and DC) that define the EMR or a comparable first responder licensure level in state law, 37 states and DC authorize their EMRs to administer an opioid antagonist. Paramedics are authorized to administer opioid antagonists in all 50 states, DC, and PR. All 49 of the US jurisdictions (48 states and DC) that define the advanced emergency medical technician (AEMT) or a comparable intermediate EMS licensure level in state law authorize their AEMTs to administer an opioid antagonist. 49 out of 52 US jurisdictions (50 states, DC, and PR) authorize all existing levels of EMS licensure levels to administer an opioid antagonist. Expanding access to this medication can save lives, especially in communities that have limited

  15. Communication of emergency public warnings: A social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileti, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Sorensen, J.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    More than 200 studies of warning systems and warning response were reviewed for this social science perspective and state-of-the-art assessment of communication of emergency public warnings. The major findings are as follows. First, variations in the nature and content of warnings have a large impact on whether or not the public heeds the warning. Relevant factors include the warning source; warning channel; the consistency, credibility, accuracy, and understandability of the message; and the warning frequency. Second, characteristics of the population receiving the warning affect warning response. These include social characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age, social setting characteristics such as stage of life or family context, psychological characteristics such as fatalism or risk perception, and knowledge characteristics such as experience or training. Third, many current myths about public response to emergency warning are at odds with knowledge derived from field investigations. Some of these myths include the keep it simple'' notion, the cry wolf'' syndrome, public panic and hysteria, and those concerning public willingness to respond to warnings. Finally, different methods of warning the public are not equally effective at providing an alert and notification in different physical and social settings. Most systems can provide a warning given three or more hours of available warning time. Special systems such as tone-alert radios are needed to provide rapid warning. 235 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Mountain biking-related injuries treated in emergency departments in the United States, 1994-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicolas G; McKenzie, Lara B

    2011-02-01

    Injury research on mountain biking has been mostly limited to examining professional riders and off-road biking. Mountain bikes represent the largest segment of bike sales in the United States. Recreational mountain bike use is popular and understudied. To describe the scope, distribution, and trends of mountain bike-related injuries treated in US emergency departments. Descriptive epidemiologic study. A retrospective analysis was conducted with data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission for patients aged ≥ 8 years from 1994 through 2007. Sample weights provided by the system were used to calculate national estimates of mountain bike-related injuries based on 4624 cases. Bivariate comparisons between categorical variables were assessed with injury proportion ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Nationwide, an estimated 217 433 patients were treated for mountain bike-related injuries in US emergency departments from 1994 to 2007, an average of 15 531 injuries per year. The annual number of injuries decreased 56%, from a high of 23 177 in 1995 to 10 267 in 2007 (P bike-related injuries decreased from 1994 to 2007. Upper extremity fractures were the most common injury. Girls and women may be more likely than boys and men to sustain more severe injuries requiring hospitalization. Despite the decline over the past decade, more can be done to improve safety and reduce injuries in this popular recreational activity.

  17. [Sexual behavior and emergency contraception among adolescents from public schools in Pernambuco State, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Maria Suely Peixoto de; Costa, Laura Olinda Bregieiro Fernandes

    2009-03-01

    This study focused on knowledge and use of emergency contraception among 4,210 adolescents (14-19 years) enrolled in public schools in Pernambuco State, Brazil. Information was collected using the Global School-Based Student Health Survey, previously validated. Knowledge, frequency, and form of use of emergency contraception were investigated. Independent variables were classified as socio-demographic and those related to sexual behavior. Most adolescents reported knowing and having received information about the method, but among those who had already used it, only 22.1% had done so correctly. Adjusted regression analysis showed greater likelihood of knowledge about the method among girls (OR = 5.03; 95%CI: 1.72-14.69) and the sexually initiated (OR = 1.52; 95%CI: 1.34-1.75), while rural residents were 68% less knowledgeable. Rural residents showed 1.68 times higher odds (CI95%: 1.09-2.25) of incorrect use, while girls showed 71% lower likelihood of incorrect use. Sexual and reproductive education is necessary, especially among male and rural adolescents.

  18. State-Of-The-Art in Microgrid-Integrated Distributed Energy Storage Sizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Alsaidan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Distributed energy storage (DES plays an important role in microgrid operation and control, as it can potentially improve local reliability and resilience, reduce operation cost, and mitigate challenges caused by high penetration renewable generation. However, to ensure an acceptable economic and technical performance, DES must be optimally sized and placed. This paper reviews the existing DES sizing methods for microgrid applications and presents a generic sizing method that enables microgrid planners to efficiently determine the optimal DES size, technology, and location. The proposed method takes into consideration the impact of DES operation on its lifetime to enhance the obtained results accuracy and practicality. The presented model can be used for both grid-tied (considering both grid-connected and islanded modes and isolated microgrids.

  19. Suppression of 19S proteasome subunits marks emergence of an altered cell state in diverse cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetkov, Peter; Sokol, Ethan; Jin, Dexter; Brune, Zarina; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Garraway, Levi A; Gupta, Piyush B; Santagata, Sandro; Whitesell, Luke; Lindquist, Susan

    2017-01-10

    The use of proteasome inhibitors to target cancer's dependence on altered protein homeostasis has been greatly limited by intrinsic and acquired resistance. Analyzing data from thousands of cancer lines and tumors, we find that those with suppressed expression of one or more 19S proteasome subunits show intrinsic proteasome inhibitor resistance. Moreover, such proteasome subunit suppression is associated with poor outcome in myeloma patients, where proteasome inhibitors are a mainstay of treatment. Beyond conferring resistance to proteasome inhibitors, proteasome subunit suppression also serves as a sentinel of a more global remodeling of the transcriptome. This remodeling produces a distinct gene signature and new vulnerabilities to the proapoptotic drug, ABT-263. This frequent, naturally arising imbalance in 19S regulatory complex composition is achieved through a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation, and marks the emergence of a heritably altered and therapeutically relevant state in diverse cancers.

  20. Tree seed handling, processing, testing, and storage at Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon Christians

    2008-01-01

    The Hayward State Nursery, Wisconsin grows more than 40 species from seeds. Up to 6000 bushels of raw unprocessed tree and shrub seeds are collected each year, and all seeds are collected in Wisconsin or adjacent states. All white spruce (Picea glauca) and some white pine seeds (Pinus strobus) are collected from orchards containing...

  1. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) survey of the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center, Boise, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutcher, R.I.; Buchanan, M.E.; Jones, R.W.

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop an engineering design package to protect the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) National Radio System (FNARS) facilities from the effects of high- altitude electromagnetic pulses (HEMPs). This report was developed specifically for the Idaho State Emergency Operating Center (EOC) in Boise, Idaho. It is highly probable that there will be a heavy dependence upon high-frequency (hf) radio communications for long- haul communications following a nuclear attack on the continental United States, should one occur. To maintain the viability of the FEMA hf radio network during such a situation, steps must be taken to protect the FNARS facilities against the effects of HEMP that are likely to be created in a nuclear confrontation. The solution must than be to reduce HEMP-induced stresses on the system by means of tailored retrofit hardening measures using commercial protection devices when available. It is the intent of this report to define the particular hardening measures that will minimize the susceptibility of system components to HEMP effects. To the extent economically viable, protective actions have been recommended for implementation, along with necessary changes or additions, during the period of the FNARS upgrade program. This report addresses electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects only and disregards any condition in which radiation effects may be a factor. It has been established that, except for the source region of a surface burst, EMP effects of high-altitude bursts are more severe than comparable detonations in either air or surface regions. Any system hardened to withstand the more extreme EMP environment will survive the less severe EMP conditions. The threatening environment will therefore be limited to HEMP situations.

  2. The state of emergency medicine in the United Republic of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Nicks

    2012-09-01

    Currently at most hospitals, emergency patients are cared for in Emergency Centres (ECs staffed with rotating personnel who are neither trained nor equipped to provide complete resuscitative care, but dedicated emergency care training projects are emerging. The first Emergency Medicine residency in the country was initiated in 2010 and will produce its first graduates in 2013. In 2011, a dedicated Emergency Nursing curriculum was introduced, and the Emergency Medical Association of Tanzania (EMAT, the first Emergency Medicine professional society in the country, was formed and ratified by the Ministry of Health. EMAT has been given a mandate to develop feasible initiatives for the dissemination of emergency care training to district and sub-district facilities. However, significant gaps exist in the capacity for emergency medical care including deficits in human resources, essential equipment and infrastructure – concurrent issues that EMAT must address within its development strategy.

  3. 77 FR 31026 - Use of Computer Simulation of the United States Blood Supply in Support of Planning for Emergency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ...] Use of Computer Simulation of the United States Blood Supply in Support of Planning for Emergency... entitled: ``Use of Computer Simulation of the United States Blood Supply in Support of Planning for... and panel discussions with experts from academia, regulated industry, government, and other...

  4. Investigation of storage-phosphor autoradiography for the rapid quantitative screening of air filters for emergency response purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Athena Marie

    Past nuclear accidents, such as Chernobyl, resulted in a large release of radionuclides into the atmosphere. Radiological assessment of the vicinity of the site of the incident is vital to assess the exposure levels and dose received by the population and workers. Therefore, it is critical to thoroughly understand the situation and risks associated with a particular event in a timely manner in order to properly manage the event. Current atmospheric radiological assessments of alpha emitting radioisotopes include acquiring large quantities of air samples, chemical separation of radionuclides, sample mounting, counting through alpha spectrometry, and analysis of the data. The existing methodology is effective, but time consuming and labor intensive. Autoradiography, and the properties of phosphor imaging films, may be used as an additional technique to facilitate and expedite the alpha analysis process in these types of situations. Although autoradiography is not as sensitive to alpha radiation as alpha spectrometry, autoradiography may benefit alpha analysis by providing information about the activity as well as the spatial distribution of radioactivity in the sample under investigation. The objective for this research was to develop an efficient method for quantification and visualization of air filter samples taken in the aftermath of a nuclear emergency through autoradiography using 241Am and 239Pu tracers. Samples containing varying activities of either 241Am or 239Pu tracers were produced through microprecipitation and assayed by alpha spectroscopy. The samples were subsequently imaged and an activity calibration curve was produced by comparing the digital light units recorded from the image to the known activity of the source. The usefulness of different phosphor screens was examined by exposing each type of film to the same standard nuclide for varying quantities of time. Unknown activity samples created through microprecipiation containing activities of

  5. All-MXene (2D titanium carbide) solid-state microsupercapacitors for on-chip energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, You-Yu

    2016-08-01

    On-chip energy storage is a rapidly evolving research topic, opening doors for integration of batteries and supercapacitors at microscales on rigid and flexible platforms. Recently, a new class of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and nitrides (so-called MXenes) has shown great promise in electrochemical energy storage applications. Here, we report the fabrication of all-MXene (Ti3C2Tx) solid-state interdigital microsupercapacitors by employing a solution spray-coating, followed by a photoresist-free direct laser cutting method. Our prototype devices consisted of two layers of Ti3C2Tx with two different flake sizes. The bottom layer was stacked large-size MXene flakes (typical lateral dimensions of 3-6 μm) serving mainly as current collectors. The top layer was made of small-size MXene flakes (~1 μm) with a large number of defects and edges as the electroactive layer responsible for energy storage. Compared to Ti3C2Tx micro-supercapacitors with platinum current collectors, the all-MXene devices exhibited much lower contact resistance, higher capacitances and better rate-capabilities. The areal and volumetric capacitances of ~27 mF cm-2 and ~337 F cm-3, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 were achieved. The devices also demonstrated their excellent cyclic stability, with 100% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1. This study opens up a plethora of possible designs for high-performance on-chip devices employing different chemistries, flake sizes and morphologies of MXenes and their heterostructures.

  6. All-MXene (2D titanium carbide) solid-state microsupercapacitors for on-chip energy storage

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, You-Yu; Akuzum, Bilen; Kurra, Narendra; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Alhabeb, Mohamed; Anasori, Babak; Kumbur, Emin Caglan; Alshareef, Husam N.; Ger, Ming-Der; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    On-chip energy storage is a rapidly evolving research topic, opening doors for integration of batteries and supercapacitors at microscales on rigid and flexible platforms. Recently, a new class of two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides and nitrides (so-called MXenes) has shown great promise in electrochemical energy storage applications. Here, we report the fabrication of all-MXene (Ti3C2Tx) solid-state interdigital microsupercapacitors by employing a solution spray-coating, followed by a photoresist-free direct laser cutting method. Our prototype devices consisted of two layers of Ti3C2Tx with two different flake sizes. The bottom layer was stacked large-size MXene flakes (typical lateral dimensions of 3-6 μm) serving mainly as current collectors. The top layer was made of small-size MXene flakes (~1 μm) with a large number of defects and edges as the electroactive layer responsible for energy storage. Compared to Ti3C2Tx micro-supercapacitors with platinum current collectors, the all-MXene devices exhibited much lower contact resistance, higher capacitances and better rate-capabilities. The areal and volumetric capacitances of ~27 mF cm-2 and ~337 F cm-3, respectively, at a scan rate of 20 mV s-1 were achieved. The devices also demonstrated their excellent cyclic stability, with 100% capacitance retention after 10,000 cycles at a scan rate of 50 mV s-1. This study opens up a plethora of possible designs for high-performance on-chip devices employing different chemistries, flake sizes and morphologies of MXenes and their heterostructures.

  7. Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern in landfill leachate of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, Dana W.; Masoner, Jason R.; Furlong, Edward T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Gray, James L.; Schwab, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Landfills are commonly the final respository for a heterogeneous mixture of waste from residential, commercial, and industrial sources. The use of landfills as a means of waste disposal will likely increase as the global population increases and nations develop. Thus, landfills receiving such waste have the potential to produce leachate containing numerous organic chemicals including contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and hormones. This leachate is often discharged to pathways that lead directly (e.g. groundwater, streams) or indirectly (e.g. wastewater treament plants) to the environment. Limited research, however, has been conducted regarding the characterisation of landfill leachate for CECs.To provide the first national-scale assessment of CECs in landfill leachate across the United States, fresh leachate samples (i.e. prior to onsite treatment) from 19 landfills in 16 states were collected in 2011 and analysed for 202 CECs [1]. The targeted CECs were selected for analysis because they were expected to be persistent in the environment; are used, excreted, or disposed of in substantial quantities; may have human or environmental health effects; or are potential indicators of environmentally relevant classes of chemicals or source materials.

  8. Evaluating the development of carbon capture and storage technologies in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Alphen, Klaas; Noothout, Paul M.; Hekkert, Marko P.; Turkenburg, Wim C.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as an important solution to solve the twin challenge of reducing GHG emissions, while utilizing fossil fuel reserves to meet future energy requirements. In this study an innovation systems perspective is applied to review the development of CCS technologies in the US between 2000 and 2009 and to come up with policy recommendations for technology managers that wish to accelerate the deployment of CCS. The analysis describes the successful built-up of an innovation system around CCS and pinpoints the key determinants for this achievement. However, the evaluation of the system's performance also indicates that America's leading role in the development of CCS should not be taken for granted. It shows that the large CCS R and D networks, as well as the extensive CCS knowledge base, which have been accumulated over the past decade, have not yet been valorized by entrepreneurs to explore the market for integrated CCS concepts linked to power generation. Therefore, it is argued that the build-up of the innovation system has entered a critical phase that is decisive for a further thriving development of CCS technologies in the US. This study provides a clear understanding of the current barriers to the technology's future deployment and outlines a policy strategy that (1) stimulates technological learning; (2) facilitates collaboration and coordination in CCS actor networks; (3) creates financial and market incentives for the technology; and (4) provides supportive regulation and sound communication on CCS. (author)

  9. Recent Progress and New Perspectives on Metal Amide and Imide Systems for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Garroni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage in the solid state represents one of the most attractive and challenging ways to supply hydrogen to a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell. Although in the last 15 years a large variety of material systems have been identified as possible candidates for storing hydrogen, further efforts have to be made in the development of systems which meet the strict targets of the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (FCH JU and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE. Recent projections indicate that a system possessing: (i an ideal enthalpy in the range of 20–50 kJ/mol H2, to use the heat produced by PEM fuel cell for providing the energy necessary for desorption; (ii a gravimetric hydrogen density of 5 wt. % H2 and (iii fast sorption kinetics below 110 °C is strongly recommended. Among the known hydrogen storage materials, amide and imide-based mixtures represent the most promising class of compounds for on-board applications; however, some barriers still have to be overcome before considering this class of material mature for real applications. In this review, the most relevant progresses made in the recent years as well as the kinetic and thermodynamic properties, experimentally measured for the most promising systems, are reported and properly discussed.

  10. State-of-Charge Balancing Control of a Modular Multilevel Converter with an Integrated Battery Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of the electric vehicle industry, the reuse of second-life batteries in vehicles are becoming more attractive, however, both the state-of-charge (SOC inconsistency and the capacity inconsistency of second-life batteries have limits in their utilization. This paper focuses on the second-life batteries applied battery energy storage system (BESS based on modular multilevel converter (MMC. By analyzing the power flow characteristics among all sources within the MMC-BESS, a three-level SOC equilibrium control strategy aiming to battery capacity inconsistency is proposed to balance the energy of batteries, which includes SOC balance among three-phase legs, SOC balance between the upper and lower arms of each phase, and SOC balance of submodules within each arm. In battery charging and discharging control, by introducing power regulations based on battery capacity proportion of three-phase legs, capacity deviation between the upper and lower’s arm, and the capacity coefficient of the submodule into the SOC feedback control loop, SOC balance of all battery modules is accomplished, thus effectively improving the energy utilization of second-life battery energy storage system. Finally, the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed methods are verified by results obtained from simulations and the experimental platform.

  11. Rapid mixing and short storage timescale in the magma dynamics of a steady-state volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Chiara Maria; Braschi, Eleonora; Francalanci, Lorella; Casalini, Martina; Tommasini, Simone

    2018-06-01

    Steady-state volcanic activity implies equilibrium between the rate of magma replenishment and eruption of compositionally homogeneous magmas, lasting for tens to thousands of years in an open conduit system. The Present-day activity of Stromboli volcano (Aeolian Islands, Southern Italy) has long been recognised as typical of a steady-state volcano, with a shallow magmatic reservoir (highly porphyritic or hp-magma) continuously refilled by more mafic magma (with low phenocryst content or lp-magma) at a constant rate and accompanied by mixing, crystallisation and eruption. Our aim is to clarify the timescale and dynamics of the plumbing system at the establishment of the Present-day steady-state activity (volcanoes.

  12. Youth Versus Adult “Weightlifting” Injuries Presenting to United States Emergency Rooms: Accidental Versus Nonaccidental Injury Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Myer, Gregory D.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Khoury, Jane; Wall, Eric J.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Myer, GD, Quatman, CE, Khoury, J, Wall, EJ, and Hewett, TE. Youth versus adult “weightlifting” injuries presenting to united states emergency rooms: accidental versus nonaccidental injury mechanisms. J Strength Cond Res 23(7): 2054–2060, 2009—Resistance training has previously been purported to be unsafe and ineffective in children. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate resistance training-related injuries presenting to U.S. emergency rooms by age, type, and mechanism of injury. W...

  13. Improving cancer patient emergency room utilization: A New Jersey state assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, Anthony J; Mahmoud, Omar M; Ghosh, Debopyria; Schwartzman, Jacob; Farooq, Mohammed; Cabrera, Javier; Wieder, Robert; Adam, Nabil R; Chokshi, Ravi J

    2017-12-01

    Due to its increasing incidence and its major contribution to healthcare costs, cancer is a major public health problem in the United States. The impact across different services is not well documented and utilization of emergency departments (ED) by cancer patients is not well characterized. The aim of our study was to identify factors that can be addressed to improve the appropriate delivery of quality cancer care thereby reducing ED utilization, decreasing hospitalizations and reducing the related healthcare costs. The New Jersey State Inpatient and Emergency Department Databases were used to identify the primary outcome variables; patient disposition and readmission rates. The independent variables were demographics, payer and clinical characteristics. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression models using clinical and demographic data were used to predict hospital admission or emergency department return. A total of 37,080 emergency department visits were cancer related with the most common diagnosis attributed to lung cancer (30.0%) and the most common presentation was pain. The disposition of patients who visit the ED due to cancer related issues is significantly affected by the factors of race (African American OR=0.6, p value=0.02 and Hispanic OR=0.5, p value=0.02, respectively), age aged 65 to 75years (SNF/ICF OR 2.35, p value=0.00 and Home Healthcare Service OR 5.15, p value=0.01, respectively), number of diagnoses (OR 1.26, p value=0.00), insurance payer (SNF/ICF OR 2.2, p value=0.02 and Home Healthcare Services OR 2.85, p value=0.07, respectively) and type of cancer (breast OR 0.54, p value=0.01, prostate OR 0.56, p value=0.01, uterine OR 0.37, p value=0.02, and other OR 0.62, p value=0.05, respectively). In addition, comorbidities increased the likelihood of death, being transferred to SNF/ICF, or utilization of home healthcare services (OR 1.6, p value=0.00, OR 1.18, p value=0.00, and OR 1.16, p value=0.04, respectively). Readmission is

  14. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Angela B; Pai, Rekha; Crook, Derrick W; Beall, Bernard

    2007-11-01

    The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the United States (US) in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990), but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s) at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny), recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  15. Emergency department burden of constipation in the United States from 2006 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Thomas; Corban, Caroline; Sengupta, Neil; Jones, Michael; Cheng, Vivian; Bollom, Andrea; Nurko, Samuel; Kelley, John; Lembo, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Although constipation is typically managed in an outpatient setting, there is an increasing trend in the frequency of constipation-related hospital visits. The aim of this study was to analyze trends related to chronic constipation (CC) in the United States with respect to emergency department (ED) visits, patient and hospital characteristics, and associated costs. Data from 2006 to 2011, in which constipation (The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes 564.00-564.09) was the primary discharge diagnosis, were obtained from the National Emergency Department Sample (NEDS). Between 2006 and 2011, the frequency of constipation-related ED visits increased by 41.5%, from 497,034 visits to 703,391 visits, whereas the mean cost per patient rose by 56.4%, from $1,474 in 2006 to $2,306 in 2011. The aggregate national cost of constipation-related ED visits increased by 121.4%, from $732,886,977 in 2006 to $1,622,624,341 in 2011. All cost data were adjusted for inflation and reported in 2014 dollars. Infants (constipation-related ED visits in both 2006 and 2011. The late elders (85+ years) had the second highest constipation-related ED visit rate in 2006; however, the 1- to 17-year-old age group experienced a 50.7% increase in constipation-related ED visit rate from 2006 to 2011 and had the second highest constipation-related ED visit rate in 2011. The frequency of and the associated costs of ED visits for constipation are significant and have increased notably from 2006 to 2011.

  16. State of the art and risk analysis for CO2 storage in a saline aquifer. Investigation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farret, R.; Gombert, P.; Hulot, C.; BOUR, Olivier; Thoraval, Alain

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with the impact of supercritical CO 2 injection in deep saline aquifer, but also addresses the case of depleted hydrocarbons fields. After a general presentation of the carbon capture and storage (CCS) technique, this report presents the main principles of risk analysis and defines an analysis method applicable to the whole CCS sector. It is based on practices coming from the field of industrial risk analysis, on the knowledge of underground processes, and on the state of the art of health risk analysis in the case of chemical species. The main considered risks are hydraulic risks (fluid pressurization), mechanical risks (cracking, soil rising and induced seismicity), CO 2 migration or leakages towards aquifers and surface, and migration of other species than CO 2 . The report addresses the characterisation of fluids and of possible geochemical evolutions, the characterisation of scenarios of fluid migration, and the hierarchy of health impacts related to fluid leakages

  17. Baseline and projected future carbon storage and greenhouse-gas fluxes in the Great Plains region of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Michelle; Butman, David; Hawbaker, Todd; Li, Zhengpeng; Liu, Jinxun; Liu, Shu-Guang; McDonald, Cory; Reker, Ryan R.; Sayler, Kristi; Sleeter, Benjamin; Sohl, Terry; Stackpoole, Sarah; Wein, Anne; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2011-01-01

    This assessment was conducted to fulfill the requirements of section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 and to improve understanding of carbon and greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes in the Great Plains region in the central part of the United States. The assessment examined carbon storage, carbon fluxes, and other GHG fluxes (methane and nitrous oxide) in all major terrestrial ecosystems (forests, grasslands/shrublands, agricultural lands, and wetlands) and freshwater aquatic systems (rivers, streams, lakes, and impoundments) in two time periods: baseline (generally in the first half of the 2010s) and future (projections from baseline to 2050). The assessment was based on measured and observed data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and many other agencies and organizations and used remote sensing, statistical methods, and simulation models.

  18. The system for diagnostics and monitoring of the IBR-2 reactor state. Data acquisition, accumulation and storage of information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermilov, V.G.; Ivanov, V.V.; Korolev, V.S.; Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Semashko, S.V.; Tulaev, A.B.

    2000-01-01

    The architectural decisions for a developed distributed system of the IBR-2 pulsed reactor conditions monitoring are described. The system is intended for measurement of the basic reactor parameters, acquisition, storage and processing of information, the current reactor state monitoring, analysis of reactor parameters for a long time operation period both in on-line, and in off-line modes. The system is constructed in the architecture client-server using DBMS MS SQL Server 7.0 The basic hardware components of the system are measuring workstations and devices, processing and user workstations and the central server. The software of the system consists of the measuring programs, data flows dispatching services, client applications for data processing and visualization, and means for preparing data for subsequent presentation in WWW. The basic results of the first system operation phase and prospect of its development are discussed. (author)

  19. Patient characteristics and trends in nontraumatic dental condition visits to emergency departments in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Q

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Okunseri1, Elaye Okunseri1, Joshua M Thorpe2, Qun Xiang3, Aniko Szabo31Department of Clinical Services, Marquette University School of Dentistry, Milwaukee, WI, 2Division of Social and Administrative Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison School of Pharmacy, Madison WI, 3Division of Biostatistics, Department of Population Health, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAObjective: We examined trends and patient characteristics for non-traumatic dental condition (NTDC visits to emergency departments (EDs, and compared them to other ED visit types, specifically non-dental ambulatory care sensitive conditions (non-dental ACSCs and non-ambulatory care sensitive conditions (non-ACSCs in the United States.Methods: We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care survey (NHAMCS for 1997 to 2007. We performed descriptive statistics and used a multivariate multinomial logistic regression to examine the odds of one of the three visit types occurring at an ED. All analyses were adjusted for the survey design.Results: NTDC visits accounted for 1.4% of all ED visits with a 4% annual rate of increase (from 1.0% in 1997 to 1.7% in 2007. Self-pay patients (32% and Medicaid enrollees (27% were over-represented among NTDC visits compared to non-dental ACSC and non-ACSC visits (P < 0.0001. Females consistently accounted for over 50% of all types of ED visits examined. Compared to whites, Hispanics had significantly lower odds of an NDTC visit versus other visit types (P < 0.0001. Blacks had significantly lower odds of making NDTC visits when compared to non-dental ACSC visits only (P < 0.0001. Compared to private insurance enrollees, Medicaid and self-pay patients had 2–3 times the odds of making NTDC visits compared to other visit types.Conclusion: Nationally, NTDC visits to emergency departments increased over time. Medicaid and self-pay patients had significantly higher odds of making NDTC visits.Keywords: emergency

  20. Moessbauer study of Mg-Ni(Fe) alloys processed as materials for solid state hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palade, P.; Principi, G., E-mail: giovanni.principi@unipd.it; Sartori, S.; Maddalena, A. [Universita di Padova, Settore Materiali, DIM (Italy); Lo Russo, S. [Universita di Padova, Dipartimento di Fisica (Italy); Schinteie, G.; Kuncser, V.; Filoti, G. [National Institute for Materials Physics, Solid State Magnetism Department (Romania)

    2006-02-15

    Mg-Ni-Fe magnesium-rich intermetallic compounds were prepared following two distinct routes. A Mg{sub 88}Ni{sub 11}Fe{sub 1} sample (A) was prepared by melt spinning Mg-Ni-Fe pellets and then by high-energy ball milling for 6 h the obtained ribbons. A (MgH{sub 2}){sub 88}Ni{sub 11}Fe{sub 1} sample (B) was obtained by high-energy ball milling for 20 h a mixture of Ni, Fe and MgH{sub 2} powders in the due proportions. A SPEX8000 shaker mill with a 10:1 ball to powder ratio was used for milling in argon atmosphere. The samples were submitted to repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles in a Sievert type gas-solid reaction controller at temperatures in the range 520 - 590 K and a maximum pressure of 2.5 MPa during absorption. The samples were analysed before and after the hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles by X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. The results concerning the hydrogen storage properties of the studied compounds are discussed in connection with the micro-structural characteristics found by means of the used analytical techniques. The improved kinetics of hydrogen desorption for sample A, in comparison to sample B, has been ascribed to the different behaviour of iron atoms in the two cases, as proved by Moessbauer spectroscopy. In fact, iron results homogeneously distributed in sample A, partly at the Mg{sub 2}Ni grain boundaries, with catalytic effect on the gas-solid reaction; in sample B, instead, iron is dispersed inside the hydride powder as metallic iron or superparamagnetic iron.

  1. Persistence and potential Viable but Non-culturable state of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates from agricultural biogas plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Maynaud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the development of on-farm anaerobic digestion as a process for making profitable use of animal by-products, factors leading to the inactivation of pathogenic bacteria during storage of digestates remain poorly described. Here, a microcosm approach was used to evaluate the persistence of three pathogenic bacteria (Salmonella enterica Derby, Campylobacter coli and Listeria monocytogenes in digestates from farms, stored for later land spreading. Nine samples, including raw digestates, liquid fractions of digestate and composted digestates, were inoculated with each pathogen and maintained for 40 days at 24°C. Concentrations of pathogens were monitored using culture and qPCR methods. The persistence of L. monocytogenes, detected up to 20 days after inoculation, was higher than that of Salmonella Derby, detected for 7-20 days, and of C. coli (not detected after 7 days. In some digestates, the concentration of the pathogens by qPCR assay was several orders of magnitude higher than the concentration of culturable cells, suggesting a potential loss of culturability and induction of Viable but Non-Culturable (VBNC state. The potential VBNC state which was generally not observed in the same digestate for the three pathogens, occurred more frequently for C. coli and L. monocytogenes than for Salmonella Derby. Composting a digestate reduced the persistence of seeded L. monocytogenes but promoted the maintenance of Salmonella Derby. The effect of NH4+/NH3 on the culturability of C. coli and Salmonella Derby was also shown.The loss of culturability may be the underlying mechanism for the regrowth of pathogens. We have also demonstrated the importance of using molecular tools to monitor pathogens in environmental samples since culture methods may underestimate cell concentration. Our results underline the importance of considering VBNC cells when evaluating the sanitary effect of an anaerobic digestion process and the persistence of pathogens during

  2. Factors associated with closures of emergency departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Renee Y; Kellermann, Arthur L; Shen, Yu-Chu

    2011-05-18

    Between 1998 and 2008, the number of hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) in the United States declined, while the number of ED visits increased, particularly visits by patients who were publicly insured and uninsured. Little is known about the hospital, community, and market factors associated with ED closures. Federal law requiring EDs to treat all in need regardless of a patient's ability to pay may make EDs more vulnerable to the market forces that govern US health care. To determine hospital, community, and market factors associated with ED closures. Emergency department and hospital organizational information from 1990 through 2009 was acquired from the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Surveys (annual response rates ranging from 84%-92%) and merged with hospital financial and payer mix information available through 2007 from Medicare hospital cost reports. We evaluated 3 sets of risk factors: hospital characteristics (safety net [as defined by hospitals caring for more than double their Medicaid share of discharges compared with other hospitals within a 15-mile radius], ownership, teaching status, system membership, ED size, case mix), county population demographics (race, poverty, uninsurance, elderly), and market factors (ownership mix, profit margin, location in a competitive market, presence of other EDs). All general, acute, nonrural, short-stay hospitals in the United States with an operating ED anytime from 1990-2009. Closure of an ED during the study period. From 1990 to 2009, the number of hospitals with EDs in nonrural areas declined from 2446 to 1779, with 1041 EDs closing and 374 hospitals opening EDs. Based on analysis of 2814 urban acute-care hospitals, constituting 36,335 hospital-year observations over an 18-year study interval (1990-2007), for-profit hospitals and those with low profit margins were more likely to close than their counterparts (cumulative hazard rate based on bivariate model, 26% vs 16%; hazard ratio [HR], 1

  3. Solid-state supercapacitors with rationally designed heterogeneous electrodes fabricated by large area spray processing for wearable energy storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun; Zhang, Jin; Young, Neil P.; Snaith, Henry J.; Grant, Patrick S.

    2016-01-01

    Supercapacitors are in demand for short-term electrical charge and discharge applications. Unlike conventional supercapacitors, solid-state versions have no liquid electrolyte and do not require robust, rigid packaging for containment. Consequently they can be thinner, lighter and more flexible. However, solid-state supercapacitors suffer from lower power density and where new materials have been developed to improve performance, there remains a gap between promising laboratory results that usually require nano-structured materials and fine-scale processing approaches, and current manufacturing technology that operates at large scale. We demonstrate a new, scalable capability to produce discrete, multi-layered electrodes with a different material and/or morphology in each layer, and where each layer plays a different, critical role in enhancing the dynamics of charge/discharge. This layered structure allows efficient utilisation of each material and enables conservative use of hard-to-obtain materials. The layered electrode shows amongst the highest combinations of energy and power densities for solid-state supercapacitors. Our functional design and spray manufacturing approach to heterogeneous electrodes provide a new way forward for improved energy storage devices. PMID:27161379

  4. Solid-state supercapacitors with rationally designed heterogeneous electrodes fabricated by large area spray processing for wearable energy storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun; Zhang, Jin; Young, Neil P; Snaith, Henry J; Grant, Patrick S

    2016-05-10

    Supercapacitors are in demand for short-term electrical charge and discharge applications. Unlike conventional supercapacitors, solid-state versions have no liquid electrolyte and do not require robust, rigid packaging for containment. Consequently they can be thinner, lighter and more flexible. However, solid-state supercapacitors suffer from lower power density and where new materials have been developed to improve performance, there remains a gap between promising laboratory results that usually require nano-structured materials and fine-scale processing approaches, and current manufacturing technology that operates at large scale. We demonstrate a new, scalable capability to produce discrete, multi-layered electrodes with a different material and/or morphology in each layer, and where each layer plays a different, critical role in enhancing the dynamics of charge/discharge. This layered structure allows efficient utilisation of each material and enables conservative use of hard-to-obtain materials. The layered electrode shows amongst the highest combinations of energy and power densities for solid-state supercapacitors. Our functional design and spray manufacturing approach to heterogeneous electrodes provide a new way forward for improved energy storage devices.

  5. Storage of multiple single-photon pulses emitted from a quantum dot in a solid-state quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-Shun; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Tao; Li, Yu-Long; Liu, Xiao; Hua, Yi-Lin; Zou, Yang; Wang, Shuang; He, De-Yong; Chen, Geng; Sun, Yong-Nan; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeaters are critical components for distributing entanglement over long distances in presence of unavoidable optical losses during transmission. Stimulated by the Duan–Lukin–Cirac–Zoller protocol, many improved quantum repeater protocols based on quantum memories have been proposed, which commonly focus on the entanglement-distribution rate. Among these protocols, the elimination of multiple photons (or multiple photon-pairs) and the use of multimode quantum memory are demonstrated to have the ability to greatly improve the entanglement-distribution rate. Here, we demonstrate the storage of deterministic single photons emitted from a quantum dot in a polarization-maintaining solid-state quantum memory; in addition, multi-temporal-mode memory with 1, 20 and 100 narrow single-photon pulses is also demonstrated. Multi-photons are eliminated, and only one photon at most is contained in each pulse. Moreover, the solid-state properties of both sub-systems make this configuration more stable and easier to be scalable. Our work will be helpful in the construction of efficient quantum repeaters based on all-solid-state devices. PMID:26468996

  6. HySDeP: a computational platform for on-board hydrogen storage systems – hybrid high-pressure solid-state and gaseous storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    A computational platform is developed in the Modelica® language within the DymolaTM environment to provide a tool for the design and performance comparison of on-board hydrogen storage systems. The platform has been coupled with an open source library for hydrogen fueling stations to investigate...

  7. INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL, A STATE-OF-THE-ART REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the study was to compile relevant background and interpretive material and prepare a state-of-the-art report which would put the...to-person communications. Section III presents basic IS and R concepts and techniques. It traces the history of traditional librarianship through...the process of communication between the originators and users of information. Section V categorizes the information system operations required to

  8. NRC analysis of the environmental impacts and licensing policies for expanded spent fuel storage in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.V. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviews the findings of the U.S. environmental impact studies on spent fuel storage to the year 2000, addresses design criteria for independent spent fuel storage installations and expresses the position of the NRC for licensing expanded spent fuel storage capabilities until such time as final solutions are established

  9. NRC Analysis of the environmental impacts and licensing policies for expanded spent fuel storage in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, V.S.

    1978-01-01

    The findings of the U.S. environmental impact studies on spent fuel storage to the year 2000 are reviewed, the design criteria for independent spent fuel storage installations are addressed and the position of the NRC for licensing expanded spent fuel storage capabilities, until such time as final solutions are established, is expressed. (author)

  10. Boiling liquid expanded vapor explosion (BLEVE) of petroleum storage and transportation facilities case study Khartoum State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elatabani, E. G. M.

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study includes the identification of possible causes of fires and explosions resulting from liquefied petroleum gases in Khartoum state, method of raising the awareness and knowledge of risks resulting from them, in addition to the proposal of safety precautions in the event of such incidents. The study was conducted in highly populated Khartoum state. It was in that context, the compilation and analysis of information on fire statistics was carried based on data collected through field studies and records of the civil defense - Administrative of Khartoum state, during period between (2007 - 2009). The procedure followed include statistical analysis of the collected data using program (e-views) method of estimation of least squares (LS). The obtained results of this method is negative sign and the percentage of house fires represent 98% from other type of fires (petroleum service stations - LPG tankers). These results, revealed that most of those fires were due to leakage of gas in residential houses attributed to lack of awareness of possible dangers and underestimation of safety precautions compared to those taken in to consideration in petroleum service stations and during transportation phases. The main recommendation of this study is to strengthen means of raising public awareness of dangers caused by liquefied petroleum gases fire through special media programs and training of workers in the field of civil defense and the empowerment of safety procedures. (Author)

  11. Soils in our big back yard: characterizing the state, vulnerabilities, and opportunities for detecting changes in soil carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Jennifer W.; Loiesel, Julie; Ryals, Rebecca; Lawrence, Corey; Blankinship, Joseph; Phillips, Claire; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Todd-Brown, Katherine; Vargas, Rodrigo; Hugelius, Gustaf; Nave, Luke; Malhotra, Avni; Silver, Whendee; Sanderman, Jon

    2017-04-01

    A number of diverse approaches and sciences can contribute to a robust understanding of the I. state, II. vulnerabilities, and III. opportunities for soil carbon in context of its potential contributions to the atmospheric C budget. Soil state refers to the current C stock of a given site, region, or ecosystem/landuse type. Soil vulnerabilities refers to the forms and bioreactivity of C stocks, which determine how soil C might respond to climate, disturbance, and landuse perturbations. Opportunities refer to the potential for soils in their current state to increase capacity for and rate of C storage under future conditions, thereby impacting atmospheric C budgets. In order to capture the state, vulnerability, and opportunities for soil C, a robust C accounting scheme must include at least three science needs: (1) a user-friendly and dynamic database with transparent, shared coding in which data layers of solid, liquid, and gaseous phases share relational metadata and allow for changes over time (2) a framework to characterize the capacity and reactivity of different soil types based on climate, historic, and landscape factors (3) a framework to characterize landuse practices and their impact on physical state, capacity/reactivity, and potential for C change. In order to transfer our science information to practicable implementations for land policies, societal and social needs must also include: (1) metrics for landowners and policy experts to recognize conditions of vulnerability or opportunity (2)communication schemes for accessing salient outcomes of the science. Importantly, there stands an opportunity for contributions of data, model code, and conceptual frameworks in which scientists, educators, and decision-makers can become citizens of a shared, scrutinized database that contributes to a dynamic, improved understanding of our soil system.

  12. [Life quality parameters in prenosologic evaluation of health state in residents of protective measures area near objects of storage and destruction of chemical weapons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, V L; Nechaeva, E N

    2014-01-01

    The article presents results of life quality assessment and subjective evaluation data on health state, used for prenosologic evaluation of health state in residents of protective measures area near objects of storage and destruction of chemical weapons. Considering specific features of residence near potentially dangerous objects, the authors conducted qualitative evaluation of satisfaction with various life facets, with taking into account the objects specificity, established correlation between life quality and self-evaluation of health with factors influencing public health state.

  13. Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jhaveri, Pavan M.; Sun Zhuyi; Ballas, Leslie; Followill, David S.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Jiang Jing; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest

  14. Enhanced electrocaloric analysis and energy-storage performance of lanthanum modified lead titanate ceramics for potential solid-state refrigeration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian-Fu; Huang, Xian-Xiong; Tang, Xin-Gui; Jiang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Qiu-Xiang; Lu, Biao; Lu, Sheng-Guo

    2018-01-10

    The unique properties and great variety of relaxer ferroelectrics make them highly attractive in energy-storage and solid-state refrigeration technologies. In this work, lanthanum modified lead titanate ceramics are prepared and studied. The giant electrocaloric effect in lanthanum modified lead titanate ceramics is revealed for the first time. Large refrigeration efficiency (27.4) and high adiabatic temperature change (1.67 K) are achieved by indirect analysis. Direct measurements of electrocaloric effect show that reversible adiabatic temperature change is also about 1.67 K, which exceeds many electrocaloric effect values in current direct measured electrocaloric studies. Both theoretical calculated and direct measured electrocaloric effects are in good agreements in high temperatures. Temperature and electric field related energy storage properties are also analyzed, maximum energy-storage density and energy-storage efficiency are about 0.31 J/cm 3 and 91.2%, respectively.

  15. Energy information needs for U. S. state-level policy making: Minimal data requirements during normal and emergency periods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Leff, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the oil embargo of 1973, state governments have increased their efforts to track and understand energy flows within their boundaries. There is a commonly perceived need to comprehend the status of present and expected future energy availability, demand, and price and to be prepared to exercise responsible and effective management during energy emergencies. This responsibility has brought with it new needs for accurate and timely state-level information on energy transactions and the external parameters that effect energy availability and disposition. What energy data are needed by a state, regardless of its idiosyncracies, during both normal and energy emergency periods, and to what extent are these data available now. The authors find that needed ongoing (core) data are only partially available at present, and that emergency data can be obtained only with a carefully planned monitoring program that can be fitted to specific emergency conditions. Overall, this paper provides a realistic assessment of the state-level energy data needed to provide state policy makers with sufficient information to make considered judgments.

  16. Energy-information needs for US state-level policy making: minimal data requirements during normal and emergency periods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkenbus, J.N.; Leff, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    Since the oil embargo of 1973, state governments have increased their efforts to track and understand energy flows within their boundaries. There is a commonly perceived need to comprehend the status of present and expected future energy availability, demand, and price and to be prepared to exercise responsible and effective management during energy emergencies. This responsibility has brought with it new needs for accurate and timely state-level information on energy transactions and the external parameters that effect energy availability and disposition. Hence, we ask: what energy data are needed by a state, regardless of its idiosyncracies, during both normal and energy emergency periods, and to what extent are these data available now. We find that needed ongoing (core) data are only partially available at present, and that emergency data can be obtained only with a carefully planned monitoring program that can be fitted to specific emergency conditions. Overall, this paper provides a realistic assessment of the state-level energy data needed to provide state policy makers with sufficient information to make considered judgments. 7 references, 6 tables.

  17. Techniques and Emerging Trends for State of the Art Equipment Maintenance Systems—A Bibliometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Hoppenstedt

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interconnection of machines in industrial production on one hand, and the improved capabilities to store, retrieve, and analyze large amounts of data on the other, offer promising perspectives for maintaining production machines. Recently, predictive maintenance has gained increasing attention in the context of equipment maintenance systems. As opposed to other approaches, predictive maintenance relies on machine behavior models, which offer several advantages. In this highly interdisciplinary field, there is a lack of a literature review of relevant research fields and realization techniques. To obtain a comprehensive overview on the state of the art, large data sets of relevant literature need to be considered and, best case, be automatically partitioned into relevant research fields. A proper methodology to obtain such an overview is the bibliometric analysis method. In the presented work, we apply a bibliometric analysis to the field of equipment maintenance systems. To be more precise, we analyzed clusters of identified literature with the goal to obtain deeper insight into the related research fields. Moreover, cluster metrics reveal the importance of a single paper and an investigation of the temporal cluster development indicates the evolution of research topics. In this context, we introduce a new measure to compare results from different time periods in an appropriate way. In turn, among others, this simplifies the analysis of topics, with a vast amount of subtopics. Altogether, the obtained results particularly provide a comprehensive overview of established techniques and emerging trends for equipment maintenance systems.

  18. Psychiatric boarding incidence, duration, and associated factors in United States emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Jason M; Fee, Christopher; Cooper, Bruce A; Rankin, Sally H; Blegen, Mary A

    2015-01-01

    Boarding, especially among psychiatric patients, has been characterized as a significant cause of ED crowding, but no quantitative analysis has described boarding nationally. This study determines the incidence, duration, and factors associated with ED boarding in the United States. 2008 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey ED data were stratified by visit type (psychiatric vs. non-psychiatric), boarding status, and patient and hospital characteristics. Boarding was defined as a visit with an ED length of stay >6 hours, and boarding time as ED length of stay minus 6 hours. Pearson's chi-square tests describe hospital and patient characteristics stratified by boarding status. Multilevel multivariable logistic and linear regressions determine associations with boarding and boarding time. While 11% of all ED patients boarded, 21.5% of all psychiatric ED patients boarded. Boarding was also more prolonged for psychiatric ED patients. Controlling for confounders, odds of boarding for psychiatric patients were 4.78 (2.63-8.66) times higher than non-psychiatric, and psychiatric patients boarded 2.78 (1.91-3.64) hours longer than non-psychiatric. US EDs experienced high proportions and durations of boarding with psychiatric patients disproportionately affected. Additional research concerning mental health care services and legislation may be required to address ED psychiatric patient boarding. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Resource Hazards Model for the Critical Infrastructure of the State Emergency Management Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrowska Teresa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation of the relevant factors related to the construction of a resource model which is designed to be useful in the management processes of the operation of critical infrastructure (CI for state emergencies. The genesis of the research lay in the perceived need for effective protection of multidimensional CI methodologies, and it was influenced by the nature of the physical characteristics of the available resources. It was necessary to establish a clear structure and well defined objectives and to assess the functional and structural resources required, as well as the potential relational susceptibilities deriving from a number of possible threats and the possible seriousness of a specific range of incidents and their possible consequences. The interdependence of CI stocks is shown by the use of tables of resource classes. The dynamics of the interaction of CI resources are modeled by examining how using clusters of potential risks can at any given time create a class of compounds related to susceptibilities and threats to the resources. As a result, the model can be used to conduct multi-dimensional risk calculations for crisis management CI resource configurations.

  20. Emerging Capripoxvirus disease outbreaks in Himachal Pradesh, a northern state of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S; Verma, L K; Gupta, V K; Katoch, V C; Dogra, V; Pal, B; Sharma, M

    2011-02-01

    Both sheep and goat pox are contagious viral diseases and affect small ruminants and are caused by sheep pox virus and goat pox virus respectively that belong to genus Capripoxvirus of Poxviridae family. Huge economic losses emanating from the disease outbreaks are the results of the wool and hide damage, subsequent production losses and also the morbidities and mortalities associated with the disease. This communication highlights clinico-epidemiological observations from the two sheep pox and one goat pox outbreaks. Grossly, multisystemic nodular lesions, mucopurulent nasal discharges and respiratory symptoms were observed in the affected animals. The morbidity, mortality and case fatality rates were 5.18%, 2.45% and 32.37%, respectively. Histopathological, haematological, molecular and serological techniques and also isolation of virus in embryonated chicken eggs were used for the diagnosis of the diseases. The spatial distribution of the disease signifies the role of common pasturelands used for grazing the animals while temporally all three outbreaks occurred in winters and were probably associated with cold stress and fodder scarcity. This is the first recorded report of Capripoxvirus infection in recent times and it highlights the disease as one of the emerging diseases in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh in India. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Telehealth in older adults with cancer in the United States: The emerging use of wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, John; Naeim, Arash

    2017-11-01

    As the aging and cancer populations in the world continue to increase, the need for complements to traditional geriatric assessments and the logical incorporation of fast and reliable telehealth tools have become interlinked. In the United States, studies examining the use of telehealth for chronic disease management have shown promising results in small groups. The implementation of health technology on a broader scale requires older adults to both accept and adapt such innovation into routine medical care. Though the commercial and recreational use of new technology has increased in older individuals, the transition into creating a smart and connected home that can interface with both patients and healthcare professionals is in its early phases. Current limitations include an inherent digital divide, as well as concerns regarding privacy, data volume, rapid change, cost and reimbursement. The emergence of low-cost, high-fidelity wearable sensors with a spectrum of clinical utility may be the key to increased use and adaptation by older adults. An opportunity to utilize wearable sensors for objective and real-time assessment of older patients with cancer for baseline functional status and treatment toxicity may be on the horizon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Progress in Public Health Emergency Preparedness-United States, 2001-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Bhavini Patel; Molinari, Noelle-Angelique M; LeBlanc, Tanya T; Vagi, Sara J; Avchen, Rachel N

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) program's progress toward meeting public health preparedness capability standards in state, local, and territorial health departments. All 62 PHEP awardees completed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's self-administered PHEP Impact Assessment as part of program review measuring public health preparedness capability before September 11, 2001 (9/11), and in 2014. We collected additional self-reported capability self-assessments from 2016. We analyzed trends in congressional funding for public health preparedness from 2001 to 2016. Before 9/11, most PHEP awardees reported limited preparedness capabilities, but considerable progress was reported by 2016. The number of jurisdictions reporting established capability functions within the countermeasures and mitigation domain had the largest increase, almost 200%, by 2014. However, more than 20% of jurisdictions still reported underdeveloped coordination between the health system and public health agencies in 2016. Challenges and barriers to building PHEP capabilities included lack of trained personnel, plans, and sustained resources. Considerable progress in public health preparedness capability was observed from before 9/11 to 2016. Support, sustainment, and advancement of public health preparedness capability is critical to ensure a strong public health infrastructure.

  3. State University’s Institusional Repository as a Storage for Civitas Academia Intelectul Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Puspita Srirahayu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many works - works the academic community that has not been published so that the intellectual property of an educational institution is not widely known by the general public. Institutional repository created and used to manage the results of these works that can be accessed by all people. This study aimed to describe the institutional repository of high perguruang country in Java Timursebagai container to the intellectual academic community views of content, the software used unit that houses, and ratings on Webometrik. This study uses a quantitative approach with descriptive methods. The population used in this study are all the institutional repository of public universities in East Java, which already are online. The sampling technique is the total sampling. The results of this study found that 50% of state universities in East Java has an IR that can be accessed via the internet, 100% of existing IR content is scientific output, the software used various existing GDL, DSpace, Eprints and others, and IR state universities in Java East 66.7% was ranked in webometrik

  4. Emergency Medical Services Public Health Implications and Interim Guidance for the Ebola Virus in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. McCoy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The 25th known outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD is now a global public health emergency and the World Health Organization (WHO has declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC. Since the first cases of the West African epidemic were reported in March 2014, there has been an increase in infection rates of over 13,000% over a 6-month period. The Ebola virus has now arrived in the United States and public health professionals, doctors, hospitals, Emergency Medial Services Administrators, Medical Directors, and policy makers have been working with haste to develop strategies to prevent the disease from reaching epidemic proportions. Prehospital care providers (emergency medical technicians and paramedics and medical first responders (including but not limited to firefighters and law enforcement are the healthcare systems front lines when it comes to first medical contact with patients outside of the hospital setting. Risk of contracting Ebola can be particularly high in this population of first responders if the appropriate precautions are not implemented. This article provides a brief clinical overview of the Ebola Virus Disease and provides a comprehensive summary of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Interim Guidance for Emergency Medical Services (EMS Systems and 9-1-1 Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPS for Management of Patients with Known of Suspected Ebola Virus Disease in the United States. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  5. Smoothing-based compressed state Kalman filter for joint state-parameter estimation: Applications in reservoir characterization and CO2 storage monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Kokkinaki, Amalia; Darve, Eric F.; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2017-08-01

    The operation of most engineered hydrogeological systems relies on simulating physical processes using numerical models with uncertain parameters and initial conditions. Predictions by such uncertain models can be greatly improved by Kalman-filter techniques that sequentially assimilate monitoring data. Each assimilation constitutes a nonlinear optimization, which is solved by linearizing an objective function about the model prediction and applying a linear correction to this prediction. However, if model parameters and initial conditions are uncertain, the optimization problem becomes strongly nonlinear and a linear correction may yield unphysical results. In this paper, we investigate the utility of one-step ahead smoothing, a variant of the traditional filtering process, to eliminate nonphysical results and reduce estimation artifacts caused by nonlinearities. We present the smoothing-based compressed state Kalman filter (sCSKF), an algorithm that combines one step ahead smoothing, in which current observations are used to correct the state and parameters one step back in time, with a nonensemble covariance compression scheme, that reduces the computational cost by efficiently exploring the high-dimensional state and parameter space. Numerical experiments show that when model parameters are uncertain and the states exhibit hyperbolic behavior with sharp fronts, as in CO2 storage applications, one-step ahead smoothing reduces overshooting errors and, by design, gives physically consistent state and parameter estimates. We compared sCSKF with commonly used data assimilation methods and showed that for the same computational cost, combining one step ahead smoothing and nonensemble compression is advantageous for real-time characterization and monitoring of large-scale hydrogeological systems with sharp moving fronts.

  6. Understanding the emergence of state goal orientation in organizational work groups: the role of leadership and multilevel climate perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Lisa

    2005-11-01

    This article attends to a broad range of practically significant employee motivations and provides insight into how to enhance individual-level performance by examining individual-level state goal orientation emergence in organizational work groups. Leadership and multilevel climate processes are theorized to parallel each dimension of state goal orientation to cue and ultimately induce the corresponding achievement focus among individual work group members. It is argued that the patterns of leader behavior, which elucidate the leader's achievement priority, shape group members' psychological and work group climate to embody this priority. Resulting multilevel climate perceptions signal and compel group members to adopt the ascribed form of state goal orientation. The quality of the leader-member exchange relationship is viewed as a means to clarify leader messages in the formation of group members' psychological climate and internalize these cues in the emergence of state goal orientation. Considerations for future research and practice are discussed. ((c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Production of Stone Spades and Emergence of the First State in the Yiluo region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available social changes during the Bronze Age (c. 2000-200 BC. This is a heartland of Chinese civilisation, as the earliest state emerged at the Erlitou site (c. 1900-1500 BC in the centre of the Yiluo basin. Our Yiluo archaeology project, initiated in 1997, is a long-term internationally collaborative and interdisciplinary programme, which holds a key position in the quest for the origins of early states in China. We have employed a number of methods and approaches to investigate many aspects relating to social change in the region. The full-coverage regional survey has helped us to reveal settlement patterns, and identify important regional centres, some of which were craft production sites. Spades were utilitarian in function and may have been primarily used by commoners for agricultural or other purposes. However, the sources of raw material were not widely available to every village, and some communities/social groups may have taken advantage of their settlement locations to control access to the raw material. Based on our research, production of stone tools most likely operated on a household basis, and the products were not only meant to fulfil the subsistence needs of makers and their neighbours, but also helped some individuals to gain higher social status and wealth through trade. The fact that dolomite spades found their way up to 100km away from their place of manufacture indicates the existence of region-wide trade networks in the Erlitou hinterland. Through these networks, not only utilitarian items but also elite goods (e.g., white pottery drinking vessels, were circulated, suggesting that lesser elite and commoners in the Erlitou hinterland created their own opportunities in the competition for power, prestige and wealth. From this perspective, the social formation of early states in China was not only hierarchical (Liu and Chen 2003, but heterarchical at a regional level. Stonemasons at Huizui were most likely independent craftsmen, whom

  8. Weak and Strong Gels and the Emergence of the Amorphous Solid State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack F. Douglas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Gels are amorphous solids whose macroscopic viscoelastic response derives from constraints in the material that serve to localize the constituent molecules or particles about their average positions in space. These constraints may either be local in nature, as in chemical cross-linking and direct physical associations, or non-local, as in case of topological “entanglement” interactions between highly extended fiber or sheet structures in the fluid. Either of these interactions, or both combined, can lead to “gelation” or “amorphous solidification”. While gels are often considered to be inherently non-equilibrium materials, and correspondingly termed “soft glassy matter”, this is not generally the case. For example, the formation of vulcanized rubbers by cross-linking macromolecules can be exactly described as a second order phase transition from an equilibrium fluid to an equilibrium solid state, and amorphous solidification also arises in diverse physical gels in which molecular and particle localization occurs predominantly through transient molecuar associations, or even topological interactions. As equilibrium, or near equilibrium systems, such gels can be expected to exhibit universal linear and non-linear viscoelastic properties, especially near the “critical” conditions at which the gel state first emerges. In particular, a power-law viscoelastic response is frequently observed in gel materials near their “gelation” or “amorphous solidification” transition. Another basic property of physical gels of both theoretical and practical interest is their response to large stresses at constant shear rate or under a fixed macrocopic strain. In particular, these materials are often quite sensitive to applied stresses that can cause the self-assembled structure to progressively break down under flow or deformation. This disintegration of gel structure can lead to “yield” of the gel material, i.e., a fluidization

  9. Compliance with federal and state regulations regarding the emergency response plan and physical security plan at the Oregon State TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.; Ringle, J.C.; Anderson, T.V.

    1976-01-01

    Recent legislative actions within the State of Oregon have had a significant impact upon the OSU TRIGA Emergency Response Plan, and to a lesser extent upon the Physical Security Plan. These state imposed changes will be reviewed in light of existing federal requirements. With the upcoming acquisition of FLIP fuel in August 1976, NRC required several major changes to the existing Physical Security Plan. Within the limitations of public disclosure, these changes will be contrasted to the present plan. (author)

  10. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data

  11. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data

  12. Assessing the adequacy of water storage infrastructure capacity under hydroclimatic variability and water demands in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M. W.; Devineni, N.; Cook, E. R.; Lall, U.

    2017-12-01

    As populations and associated economic activity in the US evolve, regional demands for water likewise change. For regions dependent on surface water, dams and reservoirs are critical to storing and managing releases of water and regulating the temporal and spatial availability of water in order to meet these demands. Storage capacities typically range from seasonal storage in the east to multi-annual and decadal-scale storage in the drier west. However, most dams in the US were designed with limited knowledge regarding the range, frequency, and persistence of hydroclimatic extremes. Demands for water supplied by these dams have likewise changed. Furthermore, many dams in the US are now reaching or have already exceeded their economic design life. The converging issues of aging dams, improved knowledge of hydroclimatic variability, and evolving demands for dam services result in a pressing need to evaluate existing reservoir capacities with respect to contemporary water demands, long term hydroclimatic variability, and service reliability into the future. Such an effort is possible given the recent development of two datasets that respectively address hydroclimatic variability in the conterminous United States over the past 555 years and human water demand related water stress over the same region. The first data set is a paleoclimate reconstruction of streamflow variability across the CONUS region based on a tree-ring informed reconstruction of the Palmer Drought Severity Index. This streamflow reconstruction suggested that wet spells with shorter drier spells were a key feature of 20th century streamflow compared with the preceding 450 years. The second data set in an annual cumulative drought index that is a measure of water balance based on water supplied through precipitation and water demands based on evaporative demands, agricultural, urban, and industrial demands. This index identified urban and regional hotspots that were particularly dependent on water

  13. SECARB Commercial Scale CO2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koperna, George J. [Advanced Resources International, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Pashin, Jack [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Walsh, Peter [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2017-10-30

    for the region and provide modern day analogues. Stability of the caprock over several test parameters was conducted by UAB to yield comprehensive measurements on long term stability of caprocks. The detailed geologic model of the full earth volume from surface thru the Donovan oil reservoir is incorporated into a state-of-the-art reservoir simulation conducted by the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) to explore optimization of CO2 injection and storage under different characterizations of reservoir flow properties. The application of a scaled up geologic modeling and reservoir simulation provides a proof of concept for the large scale volumetric modeling of CO2 injection and storage the subsurface.

  14. Emergency medicine and internal medicine trainees’ smartphone use in clinical settings in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja E. Raaum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Smartphone technology offers a multitude of applications (apps that provide a wide range of functions for healthcare professionals. Medical trainees are early adopters of this technology, but how they use smartphones in clinical care remains unclear. Our objective was to further characterize smartphone use by medical trainees at two United States academic institutions, as well as their prior training in the clinical use of smartphones. Methods: In 2014, we surveyed 347 internal medicine and emergency medicine resident physicians at the University of Utah and Brigham and Women’s Hospital about their smartphone use and prior training experiences. Scores (0%–100% were calculated to assess the frequency of their use of general features (email, text and patient-specific apps, and the results were compared according to resident level and program using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 184 residents responded (response rate, 53.0%. The average score for using general features, 14.4/20 (72.2% was significantly higher than the average score for using patient-specific features and apps, 14.1/44 (33.0%, P<0.001. The average scores for the use of general features, were significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 15.0/20 (75.1% than year 1–2 residents, 14.1/20 (70.5%, P=0.035, and for internal medicine residents, 14.9/20 (74.6% in comparison to emergency medicine residents, 12.9/20 (64.3%, P= 0.001. The average score reflecting the use of patient-specific apps was significantly higher for year 3–4 residents, 16.1/44 (36.5% than for year 1–2 residents, 13.7/44 (31.1%; P=0.044. Only 21.7% of respondents had received prior training in clinical smartphone use. Conclusion: Residents used smartphones for general features more frequently than for patient-specific features, but patient-specific use increased with training. Few residents have received prior training in the clinical use of smartphones.

  15. Cooperative work program between ERDA/OWI and the Swedish State Power Board on waste storage in mined caverns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Recent conferences between members of OWI and LBL, and members of the Swedish State Power Board have revealed that an abandoned iron ore mine in Stripa, Sweden, can be used in a very profitable manner for a cooperative work program on the problem of radioactive waste storage in mined caverns. The main thrust of this cooperative work program will be to determine the feasibility of using a mined cavern in hard rock as a permanent repository for high level radioactive materials. The ERDA/OWI program is directed along different lines that complement the Swedish program. Seven tasks are involved as follows: Task 1 will investigate over a two-year period the temperature effects in the granite rock mass at Stripa using a full scale electric heater that simulates the energy output of radioactive waste canisters. Task 2 will determine the long term effect of waste heat in a fractured rock mass. Task 3 will assess the fracture hydrology in the Stripa mine. Task 4 will involve geophysical measurements to determine the locations of the fracture system in the granite rock mass. Task 5 is a laboratory investigation on the measurement of rock properties that are urgently needed in the overall problem of evaluating repository sites in the U.S. Task 6 will involve a method of measuring the gross seepage rate in the low permeability granitic rocks at Stripa. Task 7 will determine the virgin state of stress in the fractured granite rock mass at Stripa

  16. Identifying Critical Factors in the Cost-Effectiveness of Solar and Battery Storage in Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaren, Joyce A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Anderson, Katherine H. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Laws, Nicholas D. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gagnon, Pieter J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); DiOrio, Nicholas A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Li, Xiangkun [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-02-21

    This analysis elucidates the emerging market for distributed solar paired with battery energy storage in commercial buildings across the United States. It provides insight into the near-term and future solar and solar-plus-storage market opportunities as well as the variables that impact the expected savings from installing behind-the-meter systems.

  17. Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  18. 77 FR 45380 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “On” and “Off” in the Emergency Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... Triggering ``On'' and ``Off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program and the Federal... Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program and the Federal-State Extended Benefits (EB) Program. The U.S... Statistics on June 15, 2012, the three month average, seasonally adjusted total unemployment rate for Nevada...

  19. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies for Education: An Analysis of Planning, Implementation, and Diffusion in Florida's Eleven State University System Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Deborah J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand and appreciate the methodologies and procedures used in determining the extent to which an information technology (IT) organization within the eleven member State University Systems (SUS) of Florida planned, implemented, and diffused emerging educational technologies. Key findings found how critical it…

  20. State University’s Institusional Repository as a Storage for Civitas Academia Intelectul Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Puspitasari Srirahayu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many works - works the academic community that has not been published so that the intellectual property  of  an  educational  institution  is  not  widely  known  by  the  general  public.  Institutional repository  created  and  used  to  manage  the  results  of  these  works  that  can  be  accessed  by  all people.  This  study  aimed  to  describe  the  institutional  repository  of  high  perguruang  country  in Java  Timursebagai  container  to  the  intellectual  academic  community  views  of  content,  the software  used  unit  that  houses,  and  ratings  on  Webometrik.  This  study  uses  a  quantitative approach  with  descriptive  methods.  The  population  used  in  this  study  are  all  the  institutional repository of public universities in East Java, which already are online. The sampling technique is the total sampling. The results of this study found that 50% of state universities in East Java has an  IR that can be accessed via the internet, 100% of existing  IR content is scientific output, the software used various existing GDL, DSpace, Eprints and others, and IR state universities in Java East 66.7% was ranked in webometrik.

  1. 78 FR 64889 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Emergency Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... Catch (ABC) and Annual Catch Limit (ACL) for GB yellowtail flounder and white hake, and the 1.85-percent....noaa.gov/sfd/sfdmulti.html . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melissa Hooper, Fishery Policy Analyst... these emergency measures. 1. FY 2013 GB Yellowtail Flounder ABC The emergency specifications extended...

  2. External causes of pediatric injury-related emergency department visits in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tamara D; Bublitz, Caroline; Hambidge, Simon J

    2004-10-01

    To characterize the types and external causes of pediatric injury-related visits (IRVs) to emergency departments (EDs), in particular, sports-related injuries. To compare the characteristics of children with IRVs with those with non-IRVs, specifically, differences in IRV rates by race and ethnicity and by health insurance. This was a stratified random-sample survey of EDs in the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), including all IRVs for patients less than 19 years of age in 1998 (n = 2,656). National estimates of pediatric IRVs were obtained using the assigned patient visit weights in the NHAMCS databases and SUDAAN analyses. Measures of association between predictor variables (patient and health insurance characteristics) and whether a child had an IRV were calculated using multivariate logistic regression analyses to determine adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Pediatric IRVs accounted for more than 11 million ED visits annually. The most common diagnoses for IRVs were open wounds, contusions, sprains and strains, and fractures and dislocations. The leading external causes of IRVs were sports-related injuries, accidental falls, being struck by objects, and motor vehicle collisions. Children with IRVs differed from those who presented for non-IRVs in many characteristics: they were more likely to be male, to be older, to be of white race, and to have private insurance, and less likely to be of Asian or Hispanic ethnicity. Sports and recreation are the leading external causes of pediatric IRVs to EDs in the United States. There are different patterns of IRVs according to gender, age, race, ethnicity, and insurance. Identification of specific patterns of injury is necessary for the design of effective prevention strategies.

  3. Contaminants of Emerging Concern in Bats from the Northeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secord, Anne L; Patnode, Kathleen A; Carter, Charles; Redman, Eric; Gefell, Daniel J; Major, Andrew R; Sparks, Daniel W

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed bat carcasses (Myotis lucifugus, M. sodalis, M. septentrionalis, and Eptesicus fuscus) from the northeastern United States for contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and pharmaceuticals and personal care products. The CECs detected most frequently in samples were PBDEs (100 %), salicylic acid (81 %), thiabendazole (50 %), and caffeine (23 %). Other compounds detected in at least 15 % of bat samples were digoxigenin, ibuprofen, warfarin, penicillin V, testosterone, and N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET). The CECs present at the highest geometric mean wet weight concentrations in bat carcasses were bisphenol A (397 ng/g), ΣPDBE congeners 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, and 154 (83.5 ng/g), triclosan (71.3 n/g), caffeine (68.3 ng/g), salicylic acid (66.4 ng/g), warfarin (57.6 ng/g), sulfathiazole (55.8 ng/g), tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (53.8 ng/g), and DEET (37.2 ng/g). Bats frequently forage in aquatic and terrestrial habitats that may be subjected to discharges from wastewater-treatment plants, agricultural operations, and other point and nonpoint sources of contaminants. This study shows that some CECs are accumulating in the tissue of bats. We propose that CECs detected in bats have the potential to affect a number of physiological systems in bats including hibernation, immune function, and response to white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease causing population-level impacts to bats.

  4. Pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to Emergency Departments, United States 1990-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yard, Ellen E; Knox, Christy L; Smith, Gary A; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-08-01

    Although an estimated 6.5 million United States (US) children aged 6-17 practiced a martial art in 2004, there have been no nationally representative studies comparing pediatric injuries among the three most popular disciplines, karate, taekwondo, and judo. Describe pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to a representative sample of US Emergency Departments (EDs) from 1990 to 2003. We reviewed all martial arts injuries captured by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC), National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). An estimated 128,400 children injuries from 1990 to 2003. Injured tended to be male (73.0%) and had a mean age of 12.1 years. Most injuries were attributed to karate (79.5%). The most common mechanism of injury was being kicked (25.6%), followed by falling (20.6%) and kicking (18.0%). The majority of injuries occurred to the lower leg/foot/ankle (30.1%) and hand/wrist (24.5%). The most common injury diagnoses were sprains/strains (29.3%), contusions/abrasions (27.8%), and fractures (24.6%). Participants in judo sustained significantly higher proportions of shoulder/upper arm injuries than karate (IPR=4.31, 95% CI: 2.84-6.55) or taekwondo (IPR=9.75, 95% CI: 3.53-26.91) participants. There were also higher proportions of neck injuries sustained by judo participants compared to karate (IPR=4.73, 95% CI: 1.91-11.70) or taekwondo (IPR=4.17, 95% CI: 1.02-17.06) participants. Pediatric martial arts injuries differ by discipline. Understanding these injury patterns can assist with the development of discipline-specific preventive interventions.

  5. Utilization of head CT during injury visits to United States emergency departments: 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Brian J; Borczuk, Pierre; Zachrison, Kori S; Goldstein, Joshua N; Berlyand, Yosef; Raja, Ali S

    2018-05-18

    Studies have shown increasing utilization of head computed tomography (CT) imaging of emergency department (ED) patients presenting with an injury-related visit. Multiple initiatives, including the Choosing Wisely™ campaign and evidence-based clinical decision support based on validated decision rules, have targeted head CT use in patients with injuries. Therefore, we investigated national trends in the use of head CT during injury-related ED visits from 2012 to 2015. This was a secondary analysis of data from the annual United States (U.S.) National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 2012 to 2015. The study population was defined as injury-related ED visits, and we sought to determine the percentage in which a head CT was ordered and, secondarily, to determine both the diagnostic yield of clinically significant intracranial findings and hospital characteristics associated with increased head CT utilization. Between 2012 and 2015, 12.25% (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.48-13.02%) of injury-related visits received at least one head CT. Overall head CT utilization showed an increased trend during the study period (2012: 11.7%, 2015: 13.23%, p = 0.09), but the results were not statistically significant. The diagnostic yield of head CT for a significant intracranial injury over the period of four years was 7.4% (9.68% in 2012 vs. 7.67% in 2015, p = 0.23). Head CT use along with diagnostic yield has remained stable from 2012 to 2015 among patients presenting to the ED for an injury-related visit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. State of Charge Balancing Control of a Multi-Functional Battery Energy Storage System Based on a 11-Level Cascaded Multilevel PWM Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Songcen; Teodorescu, Remus; Máthé, Lászlo

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on modeling and SOC (State of Charge) balancing control of lithium-ion battery energy storage system based on cascaded multilevel converter for both grid integration and electric vehicle propulsion applications. The equivalent electrical circuit model of lithium-ion battery...

  7. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in United States emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Asher, Shellie L; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged U.S. emergency departments (EDs) to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to U.S. acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how U.S. EDs, emergency physicians (EPs), emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to U.S. EPs, emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to U.S. EDs in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. The influence of the ocean circulation state on ocean carbon storage and CO2 drawdown potential in an Earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ödalen, Malin; Nycander, Jonas; Oliver, Kevin I. C.; Brodeau, Laurent; Ridgwell, Andy

    2018-03-01

    During the four most recent glacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 during glacial maxima has been lowered by about 90-100 ppm with respect to interglacials. There is widespread consensus that most of this carbon was partitioned in the ocean. It is, however, still debated which processes were dominant in achieving this increased carbon storage. In this paper, we use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to explore the sensitivity of ocean carbon storage to ocean circulation state. We carry out a set of simulations in which we run the model to pre-industrial equilibrium, but in which we achieve different states of ocean circulation by changing forcing parameters such as wind stress, ocean diffusivity and atmospheric heat diffusivity. As a consequence, the ensemble members also have different ocean carbon reservoirs, global ocean average temperatures, biological pump efficiencies and conditions for air-sea CO2 disequilibrium. We analyse changes in total ocean carbon storage and separate it into contributions by the solubility pump, the biological pump and the CO2 disequilibrium component. We also relate these contributions to differences in the strength of the ocean overturning circulation. Depending on which ocean forcing parameter is tuned, the origin of the change in carbon storage is different. When wind stress or ocean diapycnal diffusivity is changed, the response of the biological pump gives the most important effect on ocean carbon storage, whereas when atmospheric heat diffusivity or ocean isopycnal diffusivity is changed, the solubility pump and the disequilibrium component are also important and sometimes dominant. Despite this complexity, we obtain a negative linear relationship between total ocean carbon and the combined strength of the northern and southern overturning cells. This relationship is robust to different reservoirs dominating the response to different forcing mechanisms. Finally, we conduct a drawdown experiment in which we investigate

  9. The influence of the ocean circulation state on ocean carbon storage and CO2 drawdown potential in an Earth system model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ödalen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During the four most recent glacial cycles, atmospheric CO2 during glacial maxima has been lowered by about 90–100 ppm with respect to interglacials. There is widespread consensus that most of this carbon was partitioned in the ocean. It is, however, still debated which processes were dominant in achieving this increased carbon storage. In this paper, we use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity to explore the sensitivity of ocean carbon storage to ocean circulation state. We carry out a set of simulations in which we run the model to pre-industrial equilibrium, but in which we achieve different states of ocean circulation by changing forcing parameters such as wind stress, ocean diffusivity and atmospheric heat diffusivity. As a consequence, the ensemble members also have different ocean carbon reservoirs, global ocean average temperatures, biological pump efficiencies and conditions for air–sea CO2 disequilibrium. We analyse changes in total ocean carbon storage and separate it into contributions by the solubility pump, the biological pump and the CO2 disequilibrium component. We also relate these contributions to differences in the strength of the ocean overturning circulation. Depending on which ocean forcing parameter is tuned, the origin of the change in carbon storage is different. When wind stress or ocean diapycnal diffusivity is changed, the response of the biological pump gives the most important effect on ocean carbon storage, whereas when atmospheric heat diffusivity or ocean isopycnal diffusivity is changed, the solubility pump and the disequilibrium component are also important and sometimes dominant. Despite this complexity, we obtain a negative linear relationship between total ocean carbon and the combined strength of the northern and southern overturning cells. This relationship is robust to different reservoirs dominating the response to different forcing mechanisms. Finally, we conduct a drawdown experiment

  10. State of emergency medicine in Rwanda 2015: an innovative trainee and trainer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbanjumucyo, Gabin; DeVos, Elizabeth; Pulfrey, Simon; Epino, Henry M

    2015-01-01

    The 1994 Rwandan war and genocide left more than 1 million people dead; millions displaced; and the country's economic, social, and health infrastructure destroyed. Despite remaining one of the poorest countries in the world, Rwanda has made remarkable gains in health, social, and economic development over the last 20 years, but modern emergency care has been slow to progress. Rwanda has recently established the Human Resources for Health program to rapidly build capacity in multiple sectors of its healthcare delivery system, including emergency medicine. This project involves multiple medical and surgical residencies, nursing programs, allied health professional trainings, and hospital administrative support. A real strength of the program is that trainers work with international faculty at Rwanda's referral hospital, but also as emergency medicine specialty trainers when returning to their respective district hospitals. Rwanda's first emergency medicine trainees are playing a unique and important role in the implementation of emergency care systems and education in the country's district hospitals. While there has been early vital progress in building emergency medicine's foundations in Rwanda, there remains much work to be done. This will be accomplished with careful planning and strong commitment from the country's healthcare and emergency medicine leaders.

  11. An emergency call system for patients in locked-in state using an SSVEP-based brain switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Wook; Lee, Jun-Hak; An, Kwang-Ok; Hwang, Han-Jeong; Cha, Ho-Seung; Han, Chang-Hee; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2017-11-01

    Patients in a locked-in state (LIS) due to severe neurological disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) require seamless emergency care by their caregivers or guardians. However, it is a difficult job for the guardians to continuously monitor the patients' state, especially when direct communication is not possible. In the present study, we developed an emergency call system for such patients using a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based brain switch. Although there have been previous studies to implement SSVEP-based brain switch system, they have not been applied to patients in LIS, and thus their clinical value has not been validated. In this study, we verified whether the SSVEP-based brain switch system can be practically used as an emergency call system for patients in LIS. The brain switch used for our system adopted a chromatic visual stimulus, which proved to be visually less stimulating than conventional checkerboard-type stimuli but could generate SSVEP responses strong enough to be used for brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. To verify the feasibility of our emergency call system, 14 healthy participants and 3 patients with severe ALS took part in online experiments. All three ALS patients successfully called their guardians to their bedsides in about 6.56 seconds. Furthermore, additional experiments with one of these patients demonstrated that our emergency call system maintains fairly good performance even up to 4 weeks after the first experiment without renewing initial calibration data. Our results suggest that our SSVEP-based emergency call system might be successfully used in practical scenarios. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  12. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed

  13. Efeito do armazenamento da calda na eficácia de herbicidas aplicados em pré-emergência (parte II Effect of storage time of diluted herbicides mix on their effectiveness: pre-emergency herbicides (part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton H. Ramos

    1999-04-01

    sprayers are used in farm practice. In small farms it is getting more economical to couple spraying booms and manual spraying lances to large volume tanks. In large farms the trend is to replace the traditional system by the ready diluted mix system. In both cases a prolonged storing time of the mix in tanks or refilling vehicle, especially in rainy periods of the year is required. So, it is important to determine how long the storage time may be without causing the effectiveness of the diluted mix to decrease. That is what this paper is related to. A random block design trial was carried out during the 1991/92 crop season, at the Experimental Station of the Agronomy College of UNESP, in Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil. Commercial diluted mixes of formulations of ametryne and diuron stored during 00, 05, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 days were field evaluated. A testimony plot was not treated. Countings of emerging weeds in a 1,2 m2 plots were perfomed at 30, 45 and 59 days after spraying. After a 95 day period a general visual control was also perfomed. Results showed that none of the storage times tested significantly influenced herbicides effectiveness, no matter what the product was. One concluded that the herbicides diluted mixes tested could be normally utilised, provided the storage time didn't exceed 30 days.

  14. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network: a history of multicenter collaboration in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimenatos, Leah; Kim, Emily; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we review the history and progress of a large multicenter research network pertaining to emergency medical services for children. We describe the history, organization, infrastructure, and research agenda of the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network and highlight some of the important accomplishments since its inception. We also describe the network's strategy to grow its research portfolio, train new investigators, and study how to translate new evidence into practice. This strategy ensures not only the sustainability of the network in the future but the growth of research in emergency medical services for children in general.

  15. Nevada test site underground storage tank number 12-13-1: Nevada division of emergency management case number H931130E corrective action unit 450. Closure report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The project site was identified as an abandoned Underground Storage Tank (UST) to be closed under the Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Program during Fiscal Year 1993. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that before permanent closure is completed an assessment of the site must take place. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) requires assessment and corrective actions for a petroleum substance in the soil which exceeds 100 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). Subsequent to the tank removal, a hydrocarbon release was identified at the site. The release was reported to the NDEP by DOE/NV on November 30, 1993. Nevada Division of Environmental Management (NDEM) Case Number H931130E was assigned. This final closure report documents the assessment and corrective actions taken for the hydrocarbon release identified at the site. The Notification of Closure, EPA Form 7530-1 dated March 22, 1994, is provided in Appendix A. A 45-day report documenting the notification for a hydrocarbon release was submitted to NDEP on April 6, 1994.

  16. Microwave-induced solid-state synthesis of TiO2(B) nanobelts with enhanced lithium-storage properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Yun; Hu Xianluo; Huang Yunhui

    2012-01-01

    A fast and economical route based on an efficient microwave-induced solid-state process has been developed to synthesize metastable TiO 2 (B) nanobelts with widths of 30–100 nm and lengths up to a few micrometers on a large scale. This new method reduces the synthesis time for the preparation of TiO 2 (B) nanobelts to less than half an hour, allowing the screening of a wide range of reaction conditions for optimizing and scaling up the production and facilitating the formation of metastable phase TiO 2 (B). The as-formed TiO 2 (B) nanobelts exhibit enhanced lithium-storage performances, compared with the TiO 2 (B) product obtained by the conventional heating. This study provides a new way for large-scale industrial production of high-quality metastable TiO 2 (B) nanostructures. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  18. Maintenance Practices for Emergency Diesel Generator Engines Onboard United States Navy Los Angeles Class Nuclear Submarines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawks, Matthew A

    2006-01-01

    .... All underway Navy nuclear reactors are operated with diesel generators as a backup power system, able to provide emergency electric power for reactor decay heat removal as well as enough electric...

  19. Pocket Size Solid State FLASH and iPOD Drives for gigabyte storage, display and transfer of digital medical images: an introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, A.

    2008-01-01

    The transition of radiological imaging from analog to digital was closely followed by the development of the Picture Archiving and Communication (PACS) system. Concomitantly, multidimensional imaging ( 4D and 5D, for motion and functional studies on 3D images) have presented new challenges, particularly in handling gigabyte size images from CT, MRI and PET scanners, which generate thousands of images. The storage and analysis of these images necessitate expensive image workstations. This paper highlights the recent innovations in mass storage, display and transfer of images, using miniature/pocket size solid state FLASH and iPOD drives

  20. Landfill leachate as a mirror of today's disposable society: Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern in final leachate from landfills in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoner, Jason R.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Furlong, Edward T.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.; Gray, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Final leachates (leachate after storage or treatment processes) from 22 landfills in 12 states were analyzed for 190 pharmaceuticals and other contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), which were detected in every sample, with the number of CECs ranging from 1 to 58 (median = 22). In total, 101 different CECs were detected in leachate samples, including 43 prescription pharmaceuticals, 22 industrial chemicals, 15 household chemicals, 12 nonprescription pharmaceuticals, 5 steroid hormones, and 4 animal/plant sterols. The most frequently detected CECs were lidocaine (91%, local anesthetic), cotinine (86%, nicotine degradate), carisoprodol (82%, muscle relaxant), bisphenol A (77%, component of plastics and thermal paper), carbamazepine (77%, anticonvulsant), and N,N-diethyltoluamide (68%, insect repellent). Concentrations of CECs spanned 7 orders of magnitude, ranging from 2.0 ng/L (estrone) to 17 200 000 ng/L (bisphenol A). Concentrations of household and industrial chemicals were the greatest (∼1000-1 000 000 ng/L), followed by plant/animal sterols (∼1000-100 000 ng/L), nonprescription pharmaceuticals (∼100-10 000 ng/L), prescription pharmaceuticals (∼10-10 000 ng/L), and steroid hormones (∼10-100 ng/L). The CEC concentrations in leachate from active landfills were significantly greater than those in leachate from closed, unlined landfills (p = 0.05). The CEC concentrations were significantly greater (p landfills than in leachate released to groundwater from closed, unlined landfills (p = 0.04). The CEC concentrations were significantly greater (p = 0.06) in the fresh leachate (leachate before storage or treatment) reported in a previous study compared with the final leachate sampled for the present study.

  1. Ambulatory cell phone injuries in the United States: an emerging national concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel C; Schreiber, Kristin M; Saltos, Andreas; Lichenstein, Sarah B; Lichenstein, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Over the past 15 years, the use of cell phones has increased 8-fold in the United States. Cell phone use has been shown to increase crash risks for drivers, but no systematic analyses have described injuries related to ambulatory cell phone use. The purpose of this study is to describe and quantitate injuries and deaths among persons using cell phones while walking. We searched the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for emergency department (ED) reports of injuries related to phone use. The cases that returned were screened initially using words that would eliminate cases unlikely to be related to cell phone use and walking, possibly linked to distraction. The resulting cases were randomized and evaluated for consistency with predetermined case definitions by two authors blinded to the dates of the incidents. Cases that were disagreed upon were evaluated in a second screening by both authors for final case determination. National ED visit rates were estimated based on NEISS sampling methods. Annual variations were analyzed using linear regression with a restricted maximum likelihood approach. Our screening process identified 5,754 possible cases that occurred between 2000 and 2011, and 310 were agreed on as cases of cell-phone-induced distraction. The majority of the patients were female (68%) and 40 years of age or younger (54%). The primary mechanism of injury was a fall (72%), and most patients were treated and released from the ED (85%). No patients died from their injuries while they were in the ED. Linear modeling by year revealed a statistically significant increase in distraction injury rates over the years of study (pcell phone use has been increasing. More research is needed to determine the risks associated with walking and talking on a cell phone and to develop strategies for intervention. Cell phone use continues to increase both at home and outdoor environments. The use of smart phones, with their more enticing features, increases

  2. The emergence of the State. A holistic approach to understand the origin, the role and challenges of public power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I. Gordillo Pérez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "State" is often used to identify a political phenomenon that emerged in Europe since the collapse of feudalism with the fundamental characteristics of territoriality, centralization, sovereignty, differentiation and institutionalization. This concept leads to limitations that result from the application of a methodology that is incomplete for a comprehensive understanding of the State, as it does not differentiate within the so-called States, the various existing types and political and social consequences derived from each of these types. This paper advocates the use of the methodology used by Pierre Birnbaum to analyze the State as a historical fact and social which is a creation from own social practices of a time and a specific space, in relation to a particular culture and with a particular historical trajectory. To this end, this article deals, first, with the sociological-historical theory on the origin of the State along with the presentation of their methodology and analysis of the relationship of capitalism, social structure and culture with the State (paragraphs 2 and 3 ; secondly, this work focuses on the advantages of the methodology proposed by Birnbaum to analyze the State while original creation, highlighting the division Strong State / Weak State proposed by the author (4 and 5; and, finally, it raises the challenges facing the State today (paragraphs 6 and 7.

  3. Emerging applications of spark plasma sintering in all solid-state lithium-ion batteries and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongzheng; Liu, Jian

    2018-07-01

    Solid-state batteries have received increasing attention due to their high safety aspect and high energy and power densities. However, the development of solid-state batteries is hindered by inferior solid-solid interfaces between the solid-state electrolyte and electrode, which cause high interfacial resistance, reduced Li-ion and electron transfer rate, and limited battery performance. Recently, spark plasma sintering (SPS) is emerging as a promising technique for fabricating solid-state electrolyte and electrode pellets with clean and intimate solid-solid interfaces. During the SPS process, the unique reaction mechanism through the combination of current, pressure and high heating rate allow the formation of desirable solid-solid interfaces between active material particles. Herein, this work focuses on the overview of the application of SPS for fabricating solid-state electrolyte and electrode in all solid-state Li-ion batteries, and beyond, such as solid-state Li-S and Na-ion batteries. The correlations among SPS parameters, interfacial resistance, and electrochemical properties of solid-state electrolytes and electrodes are discussed for different material systems. In the end, we point out future opportunities and challenges associated with SPS application in the hot area of solid-state batteries. It is expected that this timely review will stimulate more fundamental and applied research in the development of solid-state batteries by SPS.

  4. Exploring the relationship between the magnetic frustration and the emergence of FFLO state on a triangular lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jia; Jiang Hongmin; Li Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the FFLO state on the anisotropic triangular lattices is investigated. Focus on the required lower critical magnetic field to enter the FFLO state. Magnetic frustration facilitates the formation of the FFLO state. Layered organic superconductors are good candidates for exploring the FFLO state. The Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) unconventional superconductors attract renewed interest in recent years. However, an unambiguous experimental demonstration of the FFLO state is hindered by the stringent requirements for its realization. In this paper, we explore the relationship between the magnetic frustration and the emergence of the FFLO state on an anisotropic triangular lattice, based on the self-consistent calculation of the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. We find that the required lower critical magnetic field to enter the FFLO state decreases with the increase of both the anisotropic ratio and the on-site Coulomb repulsive interaction. This demonstrates that it is easier to enter the FFLO state on the structurally frustrated triangular lattice in comparison with the square lattice, and suggests that the layered organic superconductors with a triangular lattice may be good candidates for exploring the FFLO state.

  5. Information Communication Technology, State building, and Globalization in the 21st Century: Regional Frameworks for Emerging State Assistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reese, Justin Y

    2008-01-01

    .... Globalization has modified the essential role of the nation-state towards managing global flows of resource, capital, and populations rather than, as in the past, presiding over distinct national economies...

  6. Use of Bidding Supply to Attend State Emergency Caused by Poor Planning and its Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Gomes de Medeiros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of the law inherent in bidding in the country has been the subject of legal discussion, especially as the bidding exemption from the institute, particularly when justified in finding emergency situation, which requires the public administrator prompt and effective steps to eradicate or, least minimize the consequences harmful to the community. However, the biggest dilemma is to characterize the application possibilities of the legal provision, since with the passage of time has glimpsed the jurisprudential understanding change towards the dispensability of the bidding event when the emergency is the result of negligence of Public Administration.

  7. Underground gas storage in the World - 2013 (fifth Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornot-Gandolphe, Sylvie

    2013-07-01

    Since its first publication in 1990, 'Underground Gas Storage in the World' has been the industry's reference on underground gas storage (UGS). The updated 2013 edition includes in-depth CEDIGAZ's analyses of the latest developments and trends in the storage industry all over the world as well as extensive country analyses with complete datasets including current, under construction and planned Underground Gas Storage facilities in 48 countries. It describes the 688 existing storage facilities in the world and the 236 projects under construction and planned. Future storage demand and its main drivers are presented at global and regional levels. 'Underground Gas Storage in the World 2013' builds on the CEDIGAZ Underground Gas Storage Database, the only worldwide Underground Gas Storage database to be updated every year. The Survey includes four main parts: The first part gives an overview of underground gas storage in the world at the beginning of 2013 and analyzes future storage needs by 2030, at regional and international levels. The second part focuses on new trends and issues emerging or developing in key storage markets. It analyzes the emerging storage market in China, reviews the storage business climate in Europe, examines Gazprom's storage strategy in Europe, and reviews recent trends in storage development in the United States. The third part gives some fundamental background on technical, economic and regulatory aspects of gas storage. The fourth part gives a countrywide analysis of the 48 countries in the world holding underground gas storage facilities or planning storage projects. 48 countries surveyed, 688 existing UGS facilities, 256 projects under construction or planned. The document includes 70 tables, 72 charts and figures, 44 country maps. The countries surveyed are: Europe : Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland

  8. State-Funded "Eminent Scholars" Programs: University Faculty Recruitment as an Emerging Policy Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, James C.; McLendon, Michael K.; Lacy, T. Austin

    2013-01-01

    Over the past two decades, state governments have increasingly invested in programs to recruit accomplished scientists from elsewhere to university positions. This event history analysis suggests that an intriguing mix of comparative state disadvantage and leveragable existing research resources is associated with the likelihood of states adopting…

  9. The role of cross-listing, foreign ownership and state ownership in dividend policy in an emerging market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin C.K. Lam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate if dividend policy is influenced by ownership type. Within the dividend literature, dividends have a signaling role regarding agency costs, such that dividends may diminish insider conflicts (reduce free cash flow or may be used to extract cash from firms (tunneling effect – which could be predominant in emerging markets. We expect firms with foreign ownership and those that are listed in overseas markets to have different dividend policies and practices than those that are not, and firms with more state ownership and less individual ownership to be more likely to pay cash dividends and less likely to pay stock dividends. Using firms from an emerging economy (China, we examine whether these effects exist in corporate dividend policy and practice. We find that both foreign ownership and cross-listing have significant negative effects on cash dividends, consistent with the signaling effect and the notion of reduced tunneling activities for firms with the ability to raise capital from outside of China. Consistent with the tunneling effect, we find that firms with higher state ownership tend to pay higher cash dividends and lower stock dividends, while the opposite is true for public (individual ownership. Further analysis shows that foreign ownership mediates the effect of state ownership on dividend policy. Our results have significant implications for researchers, investors, policy makers and regulators in emerging markets.

  10. 75 FR 17618 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Black Sea Bass Recreational Fishery; Emergency Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Analyst, (978) 281-9104. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Correction Rule NMFS published an emergency rule to... reconsider their previous recommendations regarding the Acceptable Biological Catch (ABC) for black sea bass for the 2010 fishing year. The SSC concluded that the ABC for black sea bass could be increased from 2...

  11. A Novel Emergent State Control Law for an Integrated Helicopter/Turboshaft Engine System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, H.; Li, Y.; Deng, S.

    2014-01-01

    A two-layer robust control scheme is proposed to get a better response ability for emergency maneuvers of helicopter. Note that the power used in ascending flight is the main coupling between helicopter and its turboshaft engines; therefore vertical flight control is separated from conventional

  12. Teacher Retention in Refugee and Emergency Settings: The State of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Hannah Reeves; West, Amy R.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher quality is recognised as a primary driver of variation in student learning outcomes, particularly in refugee and emergency settings, but few studies have examined the factors that motivate or demotivate teachers in these contexts. In this article we use secondary source materials from academic experts and grey literature from United…

  13. Non steady-state model for dry oxidation of nuclear wastes metallic containers in long term interim storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, Nathalie; Desgranges, Clara; Poquillon, Dominique; Monceau, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    For high-level nuclear waste containers in long-term interim storage, dry oxidation will be the first and the main degradation mode. The reason is that, for this kind of waste, the temperature on the surface of the containers will be high enough to avoid any condensation phenomena for several years. Even if the scale growth kinetics is expected to be very slow since the temperature will be moderate at the beginning of the storage (around 300 deg. C) and will keep on decreasing, the metal thickness lost by dry oxidation over such a long period must be evaluated with a good reliability. To achieve this goal, modelling of the oxide scale growth is necessary and this is the aim of the dry oxidation studies, performed in the frame of the COCON programme. All existing oxidation models are based on the two main oxidation theories developed by Wagner between the 1930's and 1970's on the one hand, and by Cabrera and Mott in the 1960 and next by Fromhold on the other hand. These used to be associated with high temperature behaviour for Wagner's theory and with low temperature for the second one. Indeed it is certainly more relevant to consider their range of application in terms of the oxide scale thickness rather than in terms of temperature. The question is posed about which theory should an appropriate model rely on. It can be expected that the oxide scale could have a thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers up to several tens of micrometers depending on temperature and class of alloys chosen. At the present time, low-alloyed steels or carbon steels are considered candidate materials for high-level nuclear waste containers in long term interim storage. For this type of alloys, the scale formed during the dry oxidation stage will be 'rapidly' thick enough to neglect the Mott field. Hence, in a first step, some basic models based on a parabolic rate assumption, that is to say Wagner's model, have been derived from experimental data on iron and on low-alloy steel

  14. Influencing Tomorrow: A Study of Emerging Influence Techniques and Their Relevance to United States Information Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    offers insights into an international network that has preserved a holistic identity, while simultaneously franchising globally . The Islamic State...preserved a holistic identity, while simultaneously franchising globally . The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant is the second study and an...identity, while simultaneously franchising globally . The ISIL is an outstanding example of a regional non-state actor who rapidly claimed market share

  15. Non-state global environmental governance : the emergence and effectiveness of forest and fisheries certification schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbrandsen, Lars H.

    2009-01-01

    There is growing scholarly interest in the role and function of non-state actors in global governance. A number of non-state governance schemes have been created in recent years to set environmental and social standards for the certification of private companies and producers. This thesis focuses on certification schemes in the forestry and fisheries sectors, as initiatives in these two sectors arguably represent the most advanced cases of non-state rulemaking and governance in the environmen...

  16. Convention of August the 3-rd 2010 between the French State and the ANDRA about the future investment program (action 'research in waste processing and storage')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Published in the 'Journal Officiel' as a contract between the French State and the ANDRA (the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes), this text first defines the financed action, describes the selection of beneficiaries, describes the various financial and accounting arrangements, defines the foreseen organisation and means within the operator, defines the assessment process, the implementation follow-up. The concerned action deals with the setting up of valorization or recycling activities for low radioactive metallic wastes produced by the dismantling of nuclear installations, and with the development of innovating processes and technologies for the processing of chemically reactive radioactive wastes in order to make their storage easier. Others objectives are to decrease the waste volume, to store wastes from small producers, to obtain the most inert as possible physical-chemical state, and to facilitate the storage of some particular wastes

  17. Where Do Freestanding Emergency Departments Choose to Locate? A National Inventory and Geographic Analysis in Three States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, Jeremiah D; Baker, Olesya; Freshman, Jaclyn; Wilson, Michael; Cutler, David M

    2017-04-01

    We determine the number and location of freestanding emergency departments (EDs) across the United States and determine the population characteristics of areas where freestanding EDs are located. We conducted a systematic inventory of US freestanding EDs. For the 3 states with the highest number of freestanding EDs, we linked demographic, insurance, and health services data, using the 5-digit ZIP code corresponding to the freestanding ED's location. To create a comparison nonfreestanding ED group, we matched 187 freestanding EDs to 1,048 nonfreestanding ED ZIP codes on land and population within state. We compared differences in demographic, insurance, and health services factors between matched ZIP codes with and without freestanding EDs, using univariate regressions with weights. We identified 360 freestanding EDs located in 30 states; 54.2% of freestanding EDs were hospital satellites, 36.6% were independent, and 9.2% were not classifiable. The 3 states with the highest number of freestanding EDs accounted for 66% of all freestanding EDs: Texas (181), Ohio (34), and Colorado (24). Across all 3 states, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes that had higher incomes and a lower proportion of the population with Medicaid. In Texas and Ohio, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes with a higher proportion of the population with private insurance. In Texas, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes that had fewer Hispanics, had a greater number of hospital-based EDs and physician offices, and had more physician visits and medical spending per year than ZIP codes without a freestanding ED. In Ohio, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes with fewer hospital-based EDs. In Texas, Ohio, and Colorado, freestanding EDs were located in areas with a better payer mix. The location of freestanding EDs in relation to other health care facilities and use and spending on health care varied between states. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians

  18. X-ray inspection in the aerospace industry - state of the art, challenges, and emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, G.A.; Fock, T.

    2004-01-01

    The desire to non-destructively determine the quality and integrity of materials and structures has a long history in the aerospace industry. Through the entire life cycle of aircraft products and components, X-ray inspection technologies play a major role with continuously increasing demand. The requirements for X-ray inspections are continuing to be driven by the need of lower cost methods and solutions with greater reliability, sensitivity, user friendliness and high operation speed as well as applicability of new materials and structures. The presentation will summarize the status of radiographic and radioscopic X-ray inspection technologies in the aerospace industry while showing how X-ray inspection solutions respond to these requirements. Furthermore emerging inspection challenges will be identified and emerging X-ray inspection technologies will be reviewed. (author)

  19. Responding to the deaf in disasters: establishing the need for systematic training for state-level emergency management agencies and community organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Deaf and hard-of-hearing (Deaf/HH) individuals have been underserved before and during emergencies. This paper will assess Deaf/HH related emergency preparedness training needs for state emergency management agencies and deaf-serving community-based organizations (CBOs). Methods Four approaches were used: 1) a literature review; 2) results from 50 key informant (KI) interviews from state and territorial-level emergency management and public health agencies; 3) results from 14 KI interviews with deaf-serving CBOs in the San Francisco Bay Area; and 4) a pilot program evaluation of an emergency responder training serving the Deaf/HH in one urban community. Results Results from literature review and state and territorial level KIs indicate that there is a substantive gap in emergency preparedness training on serving Deaf/HH provided by state agencies. In addition, local KI interviews with 14 deaf-serving CBOs found gaps in training within deaf-serving CBOs. These gaps have implications for preparing for and responding to all-hazards emergencies including weather-related or earthquake-related natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and nuclear-chemical disasters. Conclusion Emergency preparedness trainings specific to responding to or promoting preparedness of the Deaf/HH is rare, even for state agency personnel, and frequently lack standardization, evaluation, or institutionalization in emergency management infrastructure. This has significant policy and research implications. Similarly, CBOs are not adequately trained to serve the needs of their constituents. PMID:23497178

  20. State of Acute Agitation at Psychiatric Emergencies in Europe: The STAGE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Luis; Marksteiner, Josef; Zwanzger, Peter; Figuero, María Aragüés; Romero, Francisco Toledo; Kyropoulos, Grigorios; Peixoto, Alberto Bessa; Chirita, Roxana; Boldeanu, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Agitation is an array of syndromes and types of behaviors that are common in patients with psychiatric disorders. In Europe, the estimation of prevalence of agitation has been difficult due to the lack of standard studies or systematic data collection done on this syndrome. An observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study aimed to assess the prevalence of agitation episodes in psychiatric emergencies in different European countries. For 1 week, all episodes of acute agitation that were attended to at the psychiatric emergency room (ER) or Acute Inpatient Unit (AIU) in the 27 participating centers were registered. The clinical characteristics and management of the agitation episode were also described. A descriptive analysis was performed. A total of 334 agitation episodes out of 7295 psychiatric emergencies were recorded, giving a prevalence rate of 4.6% (95% CI: 4.12-5.08). Of them, 172 [9.4% (95% CI: 8.2-10.9)] were attended at the ER and 162 [2.8% (95% CI: 2.4-3.3)] at AIU. Only data from 165 episodes of agitation (those with a signed informed consent form) was registered and described in this report. The most common psychiatric conditions associated with agitation were schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and personality disorder. The management of agitation included from non-invasive to more coercive measures (mechanical, physical restraint or seclusion) that were unavoidable in more than half of the agitation episodes (59.5%). The results show that agitation is a common symptom in the clinical practice, both in emergency and inpatient psychiatric departments. Further studies are warranted to better recognize (using a standardized definition) and characterize agitation episodes.

  1. A national survey of emergency pharmacy practice in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael C; Acquisto, Nicole M; Shirk, Mary Beth; Patanwala, Asad E

    2016-03-15

    The results of a survey to characterize pharmacy practice in emergency department (ED) settings are reported. An electronic survey was sent to all members of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Emergency Medicine Connect group and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy's Emergency Medicine Practice and Research Network. Approximately 400 nontrainee pharmacy practitioners were invited to participate in the survey, which was open for 30 days. Descriptive statistics were used for all analyses. Two hundred thirty-three responses to the survey that were at least partially completed were received. After the removal of duplicate responses and null records, 187 survey responses were retained. The majority of respondents were from community hospitals (59.6%) or academic medical centers (36.1%). A pharmacist's presence in the ED of more than eight hours per day on weekdays and weekends was commonly reported (68.7% of respondents); 49.4% of institutions provided more than eight hours of coverage daily. Nearly one in three institutions (34.8%) provided no weekend ED staffing. The most frequently reported hours of coverage were during the 1 p.m.-midnight time frame. The distribution of ED pharmacist activities, by category, was as follows (data are median reported time commitments): clinical, 25% (interquartile range [IQR], 15-40%); emergency response, 15% (IQR, 10-20%); order processing, 15% (IQR, 5-25%); medication reconciliation/history-taking, 10% (IQR, 5-25%); teaching, 10% (IQR, 5-15%); administrative, 5% (IQR, 3-10%); and scholarly endeavors, 0% (IQR, 0-5%). Pharmacists from academic and community EDs perform a variety of clinical, educational, and administrative activities. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. State Emergency Response and Field Observation Activities in California (USA) during the March 11, 2011, Tohoku Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. M.; Wilson, R. I.; Goltz, J.; Fenton, J.; Long, K.; Dengler, L.; Rosinski, A.; California Tsunami Program

    2011-12-01

    This poster will present an overview of successes and challenges observed by the authors during this major tsunami response event. The Tohoku, Japan tsunami was the most costly to affect California since the 1964 Alaskan earthquake and ensuing tsunami. The Tohoku tsunami caused at least $50 million in damage to public facilities in harbors and marinas along the coast of California, and resulted in one fatality. It was generated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake which occurred at 9:46PM PST on Thursday, March 10, 2011 in the sea off northern Japan. The tsunami was recorded at tide gages monitored by the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC), which projected tsunami surges would reach California in approximately 10 hours. At 12:51AM on March 11, 2011, based on forecasted tsunami amplitudes, the WCATWC placed the California coast north of Point Conception (Santa Barbara County) in a Tsunami Warning, and the coast south of Point Conception to the Mexican border in a Tsunami Advisory. The California Emergency Management Agency (CalEMA) activated two Regional Emergency Operation Centers (REOCs) and the State Operation Center (SOC). The California Geological Survey (CGS) deployed a field team which collected data before, during and after the event through an information clearinghouse. Conference calls were conducted hourly between the WCATWC and State Warning Center, as well as with emergency managers in the 20 coastal counties. Coordination focused on local response measures, public information messaging, assistance needs, evacuations, emergency shelters, damage, and recovery issues. In the early morning hours, some communities in low lying areas recommended evacuation for their citizens, and the fishing fleet at Crescent City evacuated to sea. The greatest damage occurred in the harbors of Crescent City and Santa Cruz. As with any emergency, there were lessons learned and important successes in managing this event. Forecasts by the WCATWC were highly accurate

  3. The State of Leadership Education in Emergency Medical Services: A Multi-national Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggio, William Joseph

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated how leadership is learned in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) from a multi-national perspective by interviewing EMS providers from multiple nations working in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A phenomenological, qualitative methodology was developed and 19 EMS providers from multiple nations were interviewed in June 2013. Interview questions focused on how participants learned EMS leadership as an EMS student and throughout their careers as providers. Data were analyzed to identify themes, patterns, and codes to be used for final analysis to describe findings. Emergency Medical Services leadership is primarily learned from informal mentoring and on-the-job training in less than supportive environments. Participants described learning EMS leadership during their EMS education. A triangulation of EMS educational resources yielded limited results beyond being a leader of patient care. The only course that yielded results from triangulation was EMS Management. The need to develop EMS leadership courses was supported by the findings. Findings also supported the need to include leadership education as part of continuing medical education and training. Emergency Medical Services leadership education that prepares students for the complexities of the profession is needed. Likewise, the need for EMS leadership education and training to be part of continuing education is supported. Both are viewed as a way to advance the EMS profession. A need for further research on the topic of EMS leadership is recognized, and supported, with a call for action on suggested topics identified within the study.

  4. The state-of-the-art of emergency contraception with the cutting edge drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar, Narendra Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate and elucidated the potential of selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs to be an effective emergency contraception (EC. The data are extracted from the literature through the MEDLINE database service from 2000–2010. The SPRMs are in fact progesterone receptor ligands that could bind to progesterone receptor (PR and exert antagonistic, agonistic or mixed agonist-antagonistic effects. These SPRMs are mifepristone, onapristone, asoprisnil, ulipristal, proellex among other compounds. Currently developed SPRMs may exert contraceptive effects by inhibiting ovulation and retarding endometrial synchronization. Low-doses of progesterone antagonists retard endometrial maturation without affecting ovulation. Mifepristone being a SPRM is effective for prevention of pregnancy but with prostaglandin acts as an excellent abortifacient; yet could not compete with levonorgestrel as EC. However, a single dose of 30 mg ulipristal acetate, another SPRM with similar effectiveness and side effect profiles as 1.5 mg levonorgestrel EC, has shown wider ‘window of effect’ by inhibition of the LH peak even if administered at the advanced pre-ovulatory phase, a time when use of levonorgestrel EC is no longer effective. Thus, ulipristal acetate goes one-step ahead of levonorgestrel in the field of emergency contraception treatment. Further studies are needed to explore the potential of other SPRMs to be cutting edge emergency contraceptive drugs.

  5. From to the Liberal State into the Social and Democratic State of Law: Analysis of the Emergence of Judicial Activism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Luna da Cunha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will examine the relationship between the judiciary and the effectiveness of social rights and, consequently, the vaunted judicial activism. More specifically, the article will answer the following question: the role of the judiciary has changed with the development of state models? Article develop their problem by analyzing the function of the judiciary in each of these rule of law models: the Liberal, Social (in spite of that State have not been fully implemented in Brazil and the Democratic. To do so, take into account the relationship between the established powers republish, social movement for the conquest of rights and assertiveness of a new generation of rights. The "Judicial activism" is analyzed as the practical consequence of a new constitutionalism, more guided in the realization of social rights outlined in the constitutions of democratic character.

  6. Healthy Families America state systems development: an emerging practice to ensure program growth and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Lori; Schreiber, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    In an era of fiscal constraints and increased accountability for social service programs, having a centralized and efficient infrastructure is critical. A well-functioning infrastructure helps a state reduce duplication of services, creates economies of scale, coordinates resources, supports high-quality site development and promotes the self-sufficiency and growth of community-based programs. Throughout the Healthy Families America home visitation network, both program growth and contraction have been managed by in-state collaborations, referred to as "state systems." This article explores the research base that supports the rationale for implementing state systems, describes the evolution of state systems for Healthy Families America, and discusses the benefits, challenges and lessons learned of utilizing a systems approach.

  7. The sensitivity of terrestrial carbon storage to historical climate variability and atmospheric CO2 in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.; Melillo, J. M.; Kicklighter, D. W.; McGuire, A. D.; Helfrich, J.

    1999-04-01

    We use the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, Version 4.1) and the land cover data set of the international geosphere biosphere program to investigate how increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate variability during 1900 1994 affect the carbon storage of terrestrial ecosystems in the conterminous USA, and how carbon storage has been affected by land-use change. The estimates of TEM indicate that over the past 95years a combination of increasing atmospheric CO2 with historical temperature and precipitation variability causes a 4.2% (4.3Pg C) decrease in total carbon storage of potential vegetation in the conterminous US, with vegetation carbon decreasing by 7.2% (3.2Pg C) and soil organic carbon decreasing by 1.9% (1.1Pg C). Several dry periods including the 1930s and 1950s are responsible for the loss of carbon storage. Our factorial experiments indicate that precipitation variability alone decreases total carbon storage by 9.5%. Temperature variability alone does not significantly affect carbon storage. The effect of CO2 fertilization alone increases total carbon storage by 4.4%. The effects of increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate variability are not additive. Interactions among CO2, temperature and precipitation increase total carbon storage by 1.1%. Our study also shows substantial year-to-year variations in net carbon exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems due to climate variability. Since the 1960s, we estimate these terrestrial ecosystems have acted primarily as a sink of atmospheric CO2 as a result of wetter weather and higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. For the 1980s, we estimate the natural terrestrial ecosystems, excluding cropland and urban areas, of the conterminous US have accumulated 78.2 Tg C yr1 because of the combined effect of increasing atmospheric CO2 and climate variability. For the conterminous US, we estimate that the conversion of natural ecosystems to cropland and urban areas has caused a 18.2% (17.7Pg C

  8. Cold storage of peaches cv. Aurora grown in the Zona da Mata Mineira, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Fabíola Pereira Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the postharvest behavior of peach cv. Aurora 1 harvested in the Zona da Mata region of Minas Gerais in two ripening stages and kept under different storage temperatures. Fruits on mid-ripe and fully ripe stages were stored at three temperatures: 5.6 ± 1.57 °C and 72.8 ± 3.8% RH; 10.4 ± 0.5 °C and 95.8 ± 5.5% RH; 21.04 ± 1.63 °C and 96.9 ± 2.6% RH up to 28 storage days (SD . During storage, fruits stored at 21.04 ± 1.63 °C were evaluated every two days until 8 SD, and every four days for fruits stored at other temperatures. The harvest day was assigned as day zero. The variables evaluated were CO2 production, color of the pericarp and pulp, fresh mass loss, flesh firmness, total soluble solids, titratable acidity, contents of ascorbic acid and carotenoids. The fresh mass loss increased during storage, peaking at 5.6 °C. The reduction in ascorbic acid content was higher in fully ripe fruits at all temperatures. Mid-ripe fruits reached the end of the storage period with better quality. The temperature of 10.4 °C was the most efficient in keeping postharvest quality of peach cv. Aurora 1 harvested in the Zona da Mata region.

  9. Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, W.

    2010-01-01

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10 -6 eV to 3.5 x 10 12 eV (LHC, 7 x 10 12 eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams

  10. Pumped storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    The privately financed 1,000 MW Rocky Point Pumped Storage Project located in central Colorado, USA, will be one of the world's highest head, 2,350 feet reversible pump/turbine projects. The project will offer an economical supply of peaking power and spinning reserve power to Colorado and other southwestern states. This paper describes how the project will be made compatible with the environmental conditions in the project area and the type of terrestrial mitigation measures that are being proposed for those situations where the project impacts the environment, either temporarily or permanently

  11. Emergence of localized states in narrow GaAs/AlGaAs nanowire quantum well tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Teng; Jackson, Howard E; Smith, Leigh M; Jiang, Nian; Gao, Qiang; Tan, H Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Zheng, Changlin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2015-03-11

    We use low-temperature photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation, and photoluminescence imaging spectroscopy to explore the optical and electronic properties of GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tube (QWT) heterostructured nanowires (NWs). We find that GaAs QWTs with widths >5 nm have electronic states which are delocalized and continuous along the length of the NW. As the NW QWT width decreases from 5 to 1.5 nm, only a single electron state is bound to the well, and no optical excitations to a confined excited state are present. Simultaneously, narrow emission lines (fwhm points along the length of the NW. We find that these quantum-dot-like states broaden at higher temperatures and quench at temperatures above 80 K. The lifetimes of these localized states are observed to vary from dot to dot from 160 to 400 ps. The presence of delocalized states and then localized states as the QWTs become more confined suggests both opportunities and challenges for possible incorporation into quantum-confined device structures.

  12. Acute care surgery: defining mortality in emergency general surgery in the state of Maryland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Mayur; Tesoriero, Ronald; Bruns, Brandon R; Klyushnenkova, Elena N; Chen, Hegang; Diaz, Jose J

    2015-04-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) is a major component of acute care surgery, however, limited data exist on mortality with respect to trauma center (TC) designation. We hypothesized that mortality would be lower for EGS patients treated at a TC vs non-TC (NTC). A retrospective review of the Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission database from 2009 to 2013 was performed. The American Association for the Surgery of Trauma EGS ICD-9 codes were used to identify EGS patients. Data collected included demographics, TC designation, emergency department admissions, and All Patients Refined Severity of Illness (APR_SOI). Trauma center designation was used as a marker of a formal acute care surgery program. Primary outcomes included in-hospital mortality. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed controlling for age. There were 817,942 EGS encounters. Mean ± SD age of patients was 60.1 ± 18.7 years, 46.5% were males; 71.1% of encounters were at NTCs; and 75.8% were emergency department admissions. Overall mortality was 4.05%. Mortality was calculated based on TC designation controlling for age across APR_SOI strata. Multivariable logistic regression analysis did not show statistically significant differences in mortality between hospital levels for minor APR_SOI. For moderate APR_SOI, mortality was significantly lower for TCs compared with NTCs (p surgery patients treated at TCs had lower mortality for moderate APR_SOI, but increased mortality for extreme APR_SOI when compared with NTCs. Additional investigation is required to better evaluate this unexpected finding. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical Weapons: FEMA and Army Must Be Proactive in Preparing States for Emergencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    .... Such an accident could affect people in 10 different states. The Army plans to destroy its entire chemical weapons stockpile by 2007 and is taking measures to protect the public before and during the demilitarization process...

  14. 21ST Century United States Military Strategy for East Asia: Countering an Emerging China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LeBlanc, Lee

    2004-01-01

    .... The United States National Security Strategy (NSS) suggests that the U.S. has relied on a U.S. forward military presence in the East Asian region for over 50 years enabling it to achieve its NSS objectives...

  15. The state of the Primary Degradation Factors and Models of Concrete Cask in Spent Fuel Dry Storage System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Lee, K. S.; Choi, J. W.; Kwon, S.

    2010-01-01

    In South Korea, a total of twenty nuclear reactors are in operation; the cumulative amount of spent fuel is estimated to be 10,490 MTU in 2009. The full capacity of the waste storage is expected to be saturated in around 2016. However, a national strategy for spent fuel management has not yet been set down and high level waste (HLW) such as spent fuel will have to be stored at-reactor (AR) by re-racking. Recently an worldwide interest on the dry storage has increased especially around U.S. With a perspective of the material of the spent fuel dry storage cask, the system can be divided into two types of metal and concrete casks. The concrete type cask is a very attractive option because of the cost competitiveness of concrete material and its relatively long-term durability. Although the type of metal cask is chosen, the use of cementitious material is inevitable at least for the cask foundation and the facilities for the protection of dry storage structures. Upon being placed, the performance of concrete begins to deteriorate from the intrinsic change of cement and the physical/ chemical environmental conditions. Thus it is necessary to evaluate the durability of a concrete for the increase of reliability and safety of the whole system during the designed life time. Considering the dry storage system of spent fuel is the item which can create a lot of added value, the development of a dry storage cask is usually initiated by private enterprises among developed countries. The detail research results and specific design criteria for the safety assessment of a concrete cask have not been revealed to the public well. In this paper, the major expected degradation factors and related degradation models of concrete casks were investigated as part of the safety assessment by taking account of the site where Korea industrial nuclear power plants are located

  16. Narco-Crime in Mexico: Indication of State Failure or Symptoms of an Emerging Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    16, 2010). 91 The Fund for Peace, “Country Profiles: Mexico,” http://www.fundforpeace.org/ web /index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=442&Itemid... sistemas /cgpv2000/religion/rel01.asp?s=est&c=11938, (accessed May 3, 2010). 36 underworld of illicit activities support the emerging concepts of Santa...Porcentaje de la Poblacíon Católica, 1895 a 2000.” http://www.inegi.org.mx/est/contiendos/espanol/ sistemas /cgpv2000/religion/rel01.asp?s= est&c

  17. New and emerging contraceptives: a state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahamondes L

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Luis Bahamondes, M Valeria Bahamondes Human Reproduction Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas and National Institute of Hormones and Women's Health, Campinas, SP, Brazil Background: The first hormonal contraceptive was introduced onto the market in several countries 50 years ago; however, the portfolio of contraceptive methods remains restricted with regards to their steroid composition, their cost, and their ability to satisfy the requirements of millions of women/couples in accordance with their different reproductive intentions, behaviors, cultures, and settings. Methods: A literature review was conducted using Medline, Embase, and Current Contents databases, up to September 1, 2013 to identify publications reporting new contraceptives in development using combinations of the search terms: contraception, contraceptives, oral contraceptives, patch, vaginal ring, implants, intrauterine contraceptives, and emergency contraception (EC. Also, several experts in the field were also consulted to document ongoing projects on contraception development. Additionally, the Clinicaltrial.gov website was searched for ongoing studies on existing contraceptive methods and new and emerging female contraceptives developed over the past 5 years. Information was also obtained from the pharmaceutical industry. Results: Early sexual debut and late menopause means that women may require contraception for up to 30 years. Although oral, injectable, vaginal, transdermal, subdermal, and intrauterine contraceptives are already available, new contraceptives have been developed in an attempt to reduce side effects and avoid early discontinuation, and to fulfill women's different requirements. Research efforts are focused on replacing ethinyl-estradiol with natural estradiol to reduce thrombotic events. In addition, new, less androgenic progestins are being introduced and selective progesterone receptor

  18. Private Sector Investments from Small States in Emerging Markets: Can International Financial Institutions Help Handle the Risks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Þór Hilmarsson

    2008-12-01

    Icelandic companies but also put Iceland’s economy in jeopardy. This is especially the case with large energy investments with long repayment periods. In addition to the specific case of Iceland, the discussion in this article could also be relevant to other small states which do not have the same leverage as do large states in the event of a dispute with the host governments, making partnership with IFIs more feasible in emerging markets.

  19. Underground Storage Tanks in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Underground storage tank (UST) sites which store petroleum in Iowa. Includes sites which have been reported to DNR, and have active or removed underground storage...

  20. Emergence of quasiparticle Bloch states in artificial crystals crafted atom-by-atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Girovsky, Jose L. Lado, Floris E. Kalff, Eleonora Fahrenfort, Lucas J. J. M. Peters, Joaquín Fernández-Rossier, Alexander F. Otte

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of electrons with a periodic potential of atoms in crystalline solids gives rise to band structure. The band structure of existing materials can be measured by photoemission spectroscopy and accurately understood in terms of the tight-binding model, however not many experimental approaches exist that allow to tailor artificial crystal lattices using a bottom-up approach. The ability to engineer and study atomically crafted designer materials by scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS helps to understand the emergence of material properties. Here, we use atom manipulation of individual vacancies in a chlorine monolayer on Cu(100 to construct one- and two-dimensional structures of various densities and sizes. Local STS measurements reveal the emergence of quasiparticle bands, evidenced by standing Bloch waves, with tuneable dispersion. The experimental data are understood in terms of a tight-binding model combined with an additional broadening term that allows an estimation of the coupling to the underlying substrate.

  1. Emergency group of the Commisariat a l'energie atomique for supplying help demanded by state authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penneroux, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of its obligations required by the state authority, the CEA has set up an organisation and intervention means for any needed assistance to responsible authority in case of radiological emergency. In order to be able to answer to any assistance demand of a custom-house officer an agreement has also been found and signed between the French customs and the CEA for the control of radioactive materials and contaminated substances. This paper presents the organisation set up by CEA to face critical conditions out of his own nuclear centers and specially in case of detection by the customs of unauthorized illicit domestic movement of radioactive materials. (author)

  2. The regulatory framework for storage and disposal of radioactive waste in the member states of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burholt, G.D.; Martin, A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to collate information and to summarise the present situation with regard to the regulatory framework for the storage and disposal of radioactive waste in each of the member countries of the European Community together with several important countries outside the Community. (author)

  3. Off-Site Storage and Special Collections: A Study in Use and Impact in ARL Libraries in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddle, Charlotte; McCann, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Special collections libraries collect and preserve materials of intellectual and cultural heritage, providing access to unique research resources. As their holdings continue to expand, special collections in research libraries confront increased space pressures. Off-site storage facilities, used frequently by research libraries for general…

  4. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded

  5. Proposed rulemaking on the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. Cross-statement of the United States Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-05

    The US DOE cross-statement in the matter of proposed rulemaking in the storage and disposal of nuclear wastes is presented. It is concluded from evidence contained in the document that: (1) spent fuel can be disposed of in a manner that is safe and environmentally acceptable; (2) present plans for establishing geological repositories are an effective and reasonable means of disposal; (3) spent nuclear fuel from licensed facilities can be stored in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner on-site or off-site until disposal facilities are ready; (4) sufficient additional storage capacity for spent fuel will be established; and (5) the disposal and interim storage systems for spent nuclear fuel will be integrated into an acceptable operating system. It was recommended that the commission should promulgate a rule providing that the safety and environmental implications of spent nuclear fuel remaining on site after the anticipated expiration of the facility licenses involved need not be considered in individual facility licensing proceedings. A prompt finding of confidence in the nuclear waste disposal and storage area by the commission is also recommeded. (DMC)

  6. (Dis Integration and the Emergence of the State System in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Imad El-Anis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The fall of the Ottoman Empire during World War One and theemergence of the modern state system in the Middle East have receivedsignificant attention in academic literature. However, the impacts thatthe proliferation of state borders in the 19th and 20th centuries havehad on political and economic integration within the Middle East isoften ignored. This study argues that between the mid-19th and mid-20th centuries the region underwent significant structural changes.Furthermore, these changes were driven by external intervention andinternal decline. A number of theoretical assumptions are positedconcerning the importance on integration and cooperation of thefollowing: the increase in borders and claims to sovereignty and theseparation of peoples/markets. The conclusions drawn are that thechange from a system characterised by large political actors andintegrated markets to one which is characterised by smaller states andseparated markets led to the disintegration of the region’s internalrelations.

  7. United States Local Government Reform: The Emergence of the City Manager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert McEVOY

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available City Managers came into being in the early 1900.s because of the corruption, waste, and lack of responsiveness of local governments in the United States. Business leaders in large cities had begun to recognise that major changes in their local governments were desperately needed for their businesses to grow and prosper. Andrew Carnegie, a founder of United States Steel, had indicated that business needed a stable society to prosper. Local government had to become responsive to the changing needs of the poor, abused and neglected children, the mentally ill and the elderly, to cite a few examples.

  8. Developing new transportable storage casks for interim dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Iwasa, K.; Araki, K.; Asano, R.

    2004-01-01

    Transportable storage metal casks are to be consistently used during transport and storage for AFR interim dry storage facilities planning in Japan. The casks are required to comply with the technical standards of regulations for both transport (hereinafter called ''transport regulation'') and storage (hereafter called ''storage regulation'') to maintain safety functions (heat transfer, containment, shielding and sub-critical control). In addition to these requirements, it is not planned in normal state to change the seal materials during storage at the storage facility, therefore it is requested to use same seal materials when the casks are transported after storage period. The dry transportable storage metal casks that satisfy the requirements have been developed to meet the needs of the dry storage facilities. The basic policy of this development is to utilize proven technology achieved from our design and fabrication experience, to carry out necessary verification for new designs and to realize a safe and rational design with higher capacity and efficient fabrication

  9. Drugs of abuse: the highs and lows of altered mental states in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Timothy J; Bryant, Sean M; Aks, Steven E

    2010-08-01

    The diagnosis and management of poisoned patients presenting with alterations in mental status can be challenging, as patients are often unable (or unwilling) to provide an adequate history. Several toxidromes exist. Recognition hinges upon vital signs and the physical examination. Understanding these "toxic syndromes" may guide early therapy and management, providing insight into the patient's underlying medical problem. Despite toxidrome recognition guiding antidotal therapy, the fundamental aspect of managing these patients involves meticulous supportive care. The authors begin with a discussion of various toxidromes and then delve into the drugs responsible for each syndrome. They conclude with a discussion on drug-facilitated sexual assault ("date rape"), which is both an underrecognized problem in the emergency department (ED) and representative of the drug-related problems faced in a modern ED. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. The emergence of sociology from political economy in the United States: 1890 to 1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cristobal

    2009-01-01

    Professional sociology in the U.S. began as a field area within economics, but gradually emerged as a separate discipline. Using new data on joint meetings and the separation of departments, I track interdisciplinary relations through three phases: sponsorship (1890-1905), collaboration (1905-1940), and disengagement (post-1940). In the early years, sociology was mostly a branch of economics departments. With the formation of the American Sociological Society, relations with economics began to be more characterized by professionally autonomous collaboration. The 1920s saw a large wave of sociology departments separating from economics. Still, joint annual meetings (including joint presidential addresses) remained the norm until 1940. Paradigmatic conflict between institutional and neoclassical economists was the major force that sustained the economics-sociology collaboration. As institutionalism faded from the scene in the late 1930s, so went interdisciplinary contact.

  11. Epidemiology of humerus fractures in the United States: nationwide emergency department sample, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunny H; Szabo, Robert M; Marder, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of emergency department (ED) visits due to humerus fractures in the US. We analyzed the 2008 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, which contained approximately 28 million ED records. We identified the cases of interest using diagnostic codes for proximal, shaft, and distal humerus fractures. In 2008, approximately 370,000 ED visits in the US resulted from humerus fractures. Proximal humerus fractures were the most common, accounting for 50% of humerus fractures. The incidence rate of proximal humerus fractures followed the shape of an exponential function in the age groups 40-84 years for women (R(2) = 97.9%) and 60-89 years for men (R(2) = 98.2%). After the exponential increase in these age intervals, the growth rate of proximal humerus fracture slowed and eventually decreased. The peak occurrence of distal humerus fractures was in children ages 5-9 years; however, elderly women had an increased risk. As the baby boomer generation ages, unless fracture prevention programs improve, more than 490,000 ED visits due to humerus fractures are expected in 2030 when the youngest of the baby boomers turn age 65 years. Compared to epidemiologic studies in Japan and European countries, the incidence rates of humerus fractures are substantially higher in the US. The high incidence rate of humerus fractures in the expanding elderly population may contribute to the recent trend of rapid increase in shoulder arthroplasty in the US. Rigorous safety measures to reduce falls and improved preventive treatments of osteoporosis are needed. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  12. An emerging paradigm for managing protected areas with examples from Europe and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Absher; Carsten Mann

    2010-01-01

    Parks and Protected Areas (PPA) have become increasingly important for societal well-being in Europe and the United States. Urbanization, detachment from nature, and demographic changes are fostering discussions about strengthening the social and cultural dimensions of management. The complexities and subtleties of incorporating PPAs into existing government and...

  13. Private Catholic Elementary Schools Established by Religious Congregations in the United States: Emerging Governance Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mary Grace

    2010-01-01

    Private Catholic elementary schools in the United States often trace their origins to religious congregations of women and men. The rapid decline of religious vocations and the choice of many religious to serve in diverse ministries since the Second Vatican Council, has had an effect on all Catholic schools. Schools founded by religious…

  14. Emergence of entanglement with temperature and time in factorization-surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Titas; Das, Tamoghna; Sadhukhan, Debasis; Pal, Amit Kumar; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2018-01-01

    There exist zero-temperature states in quantum many-body systems that are fully factorized, thereby possessing vanishing entanglement, and hence being of no use as resource in quantum information processing tasks. Such states can become useful for quantum protocols when the temperature of the system is increased, and when the system is allowed to evolve under either the influence of an external environment, or a closed unitary evolution driven by its own Hamiltonian due to a sudden change in the system parameters. Using the one-dimensional anisotropic XY model in a uniform and an alternating transverse magnetic field, we show that entanglement of the thermal states, corresponding to the factorization points in the space of the system parameters, revives once or twice with increasing temperature. We also study the closed unitary evolution of the quantum spin chain driven out of equilibrium when the external magnetic fields are turned off, and show that considerable entanglement is generated during the dynamics, when the initial state has vanishing entanglement. Interestingly, we find that creation of entanglement for a pair of spins is possible when the system is made open to an external heat bath, interacting with the system through that spin-pair via a repetitive quantum interaction.

  15. Emergence of a super-synchronized mobbing state in a large population of coupled chemical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Gourab; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory phenomena are ubiquitous in Nature. The ability of a large population of coupled oscillators to synchronize constitutes an important mechanism to express information and establish communication among members. To understand such phenomena, models and experimental realizations of globally coupled oscillators have proven to be invaluable in settings as varied as chemical, biological and physical systems. A variety of rich dynamical behavior has been uncovered, although usually in the context of a single state of synchronization or lack thereof. Through the experimental and numerical study of a large population of discrete chemical oscillators, here we report on the unexpected discovery of a new phenomenon revealing the existence of dynamically distinct synchronized states reflecting different degrees of communication. Specifically, we discover a novel large-amplitude super-synchronized state separated from the conventionally reported synchronized and quiescent states through an unusual sharp jump transition when sampling the strong coupling limit. Our results assume significance for further elucidating globally coherent phenomena, such as in neuropathologies, bacterial cell colonies, social systems and semiconductor lasers.

  16. Tritium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.

    1990-01-01

    This document represents a synthesis relative to tritium storage. After indicating the main storage particularities as regards tritium, storages under gaseous and solid form are after examined before establishing choices as a function of the main criteria. Finally, tritium storage is discussed regarding tritium devices associated to Fusion Reactors and regarding smaller devices [fr

  17. Immigrants in the United States: “Illegal Aliens” On Their Way To Becoming Emergent “Possible Subjects”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lejeune

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the likely event that immigration reform will be discussed again in the U.S. Congress in the year 2010, the circumstances and events that have led to the current state of affairs will here be analysed: firstly, the immigration policies implemented from 9/11 until the failed attempt at reforming immigration legislation; secondly, the complex array of recent local and state initiatives which have increasingly served as a substitute for federal immigration control and management. As I examine this evolution and the conflict it has generated, I will devote special attention to undocumented immigrants: from the harsh treatment to which they were subjected during the Bush presidency to the conditions in which they have come to mobilize and have emerged as political actors, even to the point of transforming ideas of citizenship and related rights.   

  18. Charge-state distributions of 100, 175, 275, and 352 MeV gold ions emerging from thin carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.A.; Auble, R.L.; Erb, K.A.; Jones, C.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    These measurements were undertaken as a consequence of our failure early this year to accelerate Au +46 ions in the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron using an injected beam of 352 MeV 197 Au +17 from the 25 MV tandem accelerator. Following that unsuccessful test, we made a preliminary measurement of the charge-state distribution of 352 MeV 197 Au ions emerging from a carbon foil using the bending magnet that is a part of the cyclotron beam injection system. The measured mean charge was approx.38.5, about 4.5 charge-states lower than predicted by the Sayer semi-empirical formula. The measurements reported here were done more precisely and systematically confirm that preliminary result. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Charge-state distributions of 100, 175, 275, and 352 MeV gold ions emerging from thin carbon foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J.A.; Auble, R.L.; Erb, K.A.; Jones, C.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    These measurements were undertaken as a consequence of our failure early this year to accelerate Au/sup +46/ ions in the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron using an injected beam of 352 MeV /sup 197/Au/sup +17/ from the 25 MV tandem accelerator. Following that unsuccessful test, we made a preliminary measurement of the charge-state distribution of 352 MeV /sup 197/Au ions emerging from a carbon foil using the bending magnet that is a part of the cyclotron beam injection system. The measured mean charge was approx.38.5, about 4.5 charge-states lower than predicted by the Sayer semi-empirical formula. The measurements reported here were done more precisely and systematically confirm that preliminary result. 12 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Public Health System Research in Public Health Emergency Preparedness in the United States (2009-2015): Actionable Knowledge Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoia, Elena; Lin, Leesa; Bernard, Dottie; Klein, Noah; James, Lyndon P; Guicciardi, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    In 2008, the Institute of Medicine released a letter report identifying 4 research priority areas for public health emergency preparedness in public health system research: (1) enhancing the usefulness of training, (2) improving timely emergency communications, (3) creating and maintaining sustainable response systems, and (4) generating effectiveness criteria and metrics. To (1) identify and characterize public health system research in public health emergency preparedness produced in the United States from 2009 to 2015, (2) synthesize research findings and assess the level of confidence in these findings, and (3) describe the evolution of knowledge production in public health emergency preparedness system research. Search Methods and Selection Criteria. We reviewed and included the titles and abstracts of 1584 articles derived from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and gray literature databases that focused on the organizational or financial aspects of public health emergency preparedness activities and were grounded on empirical studies. We included 156 articles. We appraised the quality of the studies according to the study design. We identified themes during article analysis and summarized overall findings by theme. We determined level of confidence in the findings with the GRADE-CERQual tool. Thirty-one studies provided evidence on how to enhance the usefulness of training. Results demonstrated the utility of drills and exercises to enhance decision-making capabilities and coordination across organizations, the benefit of cross-sector partnerships for successfully implementing training activities, and the value of integrating evaluation methods to support training improvement efforts. Thirty-six studies provided evidence on how to improve timely communications. Results supported the use of communication strategies that address differences in access to information, knowledge, attitudes, and practices across segments of the population as well as evidence on specific

  1. ULTimateCO2 - State of the art report. Dealing with uncertainty associated with long-term CO2 geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    ULTimateCO2, a four-year collaborative project financed by the 7. Framework Programme and coordinated by BRGM, aims to shed more light on the long-term processes associated with the geological storage of CO 2 . ULTimateCO2 unites 12 partners (research institutes, universities, industrialists) and a varied panel of experts (NGOs, national authority representatives, IEAGHG,...). Based on a multidisciplinary approach, and bringing together laboratory experiments, numerical modelling and natural analogue field studies, ULTimateCO2 will increase our understanding of the long-term effects of CO 2 Capture and Storage (CCS) in terms of hydrodynamics, geochemistry, mechanics of the storage formations and their vicinity. The report contains the partners' pooled knowledge and provides a view of the current state-of-the-art for the issues addressed by this project: - The long-term reservoir trapping efficiency (WP3); - The long-term sealing integrity of faulted and fractured cap-rock (WP4); - The near-well leakage characterisation and chemical processes (WP5); - The long-term behavior of stored CO 2 looking at the basin scale (WP2); - Uncertainty assessment (WP6). Each chapter is divided into two sections: (i) a summary which explains in 'simple words' the main issues and objectives of the WP, and (ii) a current state of the art section which provides a more sound review on the specific studied processes. The aim is to provide answers to pertinent questions from a variety of users, particularly project owners, site operators and national authorities, about their exposure to uncertainty downstream of closure of a CO 2 geological storage site

  2. The distribution of the h-index among academic emergency physicians in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Lawrence A; St John, Alex; Stolz, Uwe; Matheson, Lincoln; Simpson, Allan; Denninghoff, Kurt R

    2013-10-01

    Hirsch's h-index (h) attempts to measure the combined academic impact and productivity of a scientist by counting the number of publications by an author, ranked in descending order by number of citations, until the paper number equals the number of citations. This approach provides a natural number or index of the number of publications and the number of citations per publication. H was first described in physics and was demonstrated to be highly predictive of continued academic activity, including recognized measures of scientific excellence such as membership in the National Academy of Sciences and being a Nobel laureate. Citation rates, research environments, and years of experience all affect h, making any comparisons appropriate only for scientists working in the same field for a similar time period. The authors are unaware of any report describing the distribution of h among academic emergency physicians (AEPs). The objective was to describe the distribution of h for AEPs and to determine whether Hirsch's demonstration of the h-index as a predictor of continued scholarly activity among physicists would also apply to AEPs. Academic EPs were identified from lists provided on allopathic U.S. emergency medicine (EM) residency program websites. "Harzing's Publish or Perish," a free program available on the Web that queries Google Scholar, was used to calculate h for each AEP. Agreement between raters was analyzed on a subset of 100 EPs. An analysis of the 20 EPs with the top h-indices was performed to characterize the entire body of their scholarly work, and their h-indices were calculated at 12 and 24 years into their careers. A total of 4,744 AEPs from 136 programs were evaluated. Nine programs did not publicly list the faculty at their institutions and were excluded. A linear weighted kappa was used to measure rater concordance, with agreement of 98.3% and κ = 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.861 to 0.957). The majority of AEPs had h-indices of zero or

  3. Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, J; Al-Kashmiri, A

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999.

  4. Actuated rheology of magnetic micro-swimmers suspensions: Emergence of motor and brake states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenti, Benoit; Douarche, Carine; Clement, Eric

    2018-03-01

    We study the effect of magnetic field on the rheology of magnetic micro-swimmers suspensions. We use a model of a dilute suspension under simple shear and subjected to a constant magnetic field. Particle shear stress is obtained for both pusher and puller types of micro-swimmers. In the limit of low shear rate, the rheology exhibits a constant shear stress, called actuated stress, which only depends on the swimming activity of the particles. This stress is induced by the magnetic field and can be positive (brake state) or negative (motor state). In the limit of low magnetic fields, a scaling relation of the motor-brake effect is derived as a function of the dimensionless parameters of the model. In this case, the shear stress is an affine function of the shear rate. The possibilities offered by such an active system to control the rheological response of a fluid are finally discussed.

  5. Job satisfaction among mental healthcare professionals: The respective contributions of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the respective contribution of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states on the job satisfaction of 315 mental health professionals from Quebec (Canada). Methods: Job satisfaction was measured with the Job Satisfaction Survey. Independent variables were organized into four categories according to a conceptual framework inspired from the Input-Mediator-Outcomes-Input Model. The contribution of each category of variables was assessed using hierarchical regression analysis. Results: Variations in job satisfaction were mostly explained by team processes, with minimal contribution from the other three categories. Among the six variables significantly associated with job satisfaction in the final model, four were team processes: stronger team support, less team conflict, deeper involvement in the decision-making process, and more team collaboration. Job satisfaction was also associated with nursing and, marginally, male gender (professional characteristics) as well as with a stronger affective commitment toward the team (team emergent states). Discussion and Conclusion: Results confirm the importance for health managers of offering adequate support to mental health professionals, and creating an environment favorable to collaboration and decision-sharing, and likely to reduce conflicts between team members. PMID:29276591

  6. Job satisfaction among mental healthcare professionals: The respective contributions of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Marie-Josée; Grenier, Guy; Bamvita, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the respective contribution of professional characteristics, team attributes, team processes, and team emergent states on the job satisfaction of 315 mental health professionals from Quebec (Canada). Job satisfaction was measured with the Job Satisfaction Survey. Independent variables were organized into four categories according to a conceptual framework inspired from the Input-Mediator-Outcomes-Input Model. The contribution of each category of variables was assessed using hierarchical regression analysis. Variations in job satisfaction were mostly explained by team processes, with minimal contribution from the other three categories. Among the six variables significantly associated with job satisfaction in the final model, four were team processes: stronger team support, less team conflict, deeper involvement in the decision-making process, and more team collaboration. Job satisfaction was also associated with nursing and, marginally, male gender (professional characteristics) as well as with a stronger affective commitment toward the team (team emergent states). Results confirm the importance for health managers of offering adequate support to mental health professionals, and creating an environment favorable to collaboration and decision-sharing, and likely to reduce conflicts between team members.

  7. A cross-sectional study of emergency department boarding practices in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Stephen R; Vaughns, Frances L; Gautreau, Marc A; Cogdell, Matthew W; Meisel, Zachary

    2014-05-01

    The median emergency department (ED) boarding time for admitted patients has been a nationally reportable core measure that now also affects ED accreditation and reimbursement. However, no direct national probability samples of ED boarding data have been available to guide this policy until now. The authors studied new National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) survey items to establish baseline values, to generate hypotheses for future research, and to help improve survey quality in the future. This was a cross-sectional, multistage, stratified annual analysis of EDs and ED visits from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey public use files from 2007 to 2010, a total of 139,502 visit records. These data represent the only national measure of ED boarding. The main outcome of interest was boarding duration for individual patient visits. Data analyses accounted for complex sampling design. The national median boarding time was 79 minutes, with an interquartile range of 36 to 145 minutes. The prevalence of boarding for more than 2 hours among admitted patients was 32% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 30% to 35%). Average ED volume, occupancy, acuity, and hospital admission rates increased abruptly from the second to the third quartile of median boarding duration. The half of hospitals with the longest median boarding times accounted for 73% of ED visits and 79% of ED hospitalizations nationally. Thirty-nine percent of EDs (95% CI = 32% to 46%) reported never holding patients for more than 2 hours, but visit-level analysis at these EDs found that 21% of admissions did in fact stay in the ED over 2 hours. Only 19% of EDs (95% CI = 16% to 22%) used a strategy of moving admitted patients to alternative sites in the hospital during crowded times. In this national survey, ED boarding of admitted patients disproportionately affects hospitals with higher ED volumes, which also see sicker patients who wait longer to be seen, but not hospitals with

  8. A state of emergency in crisis communication: An intercultural crisis communication research agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Diers-Lawson, AR

    2016-01-01

    This article seeks to provide an evidence-based set of recommendations for the development of an intercultural crisis communication research agenda with three goals. First, to provide an advancement in our understanding of the state of crisis communication research in general. Second, to offer a grounded introduction to crisis communication for intercultural scholars who may not be as familiar with the field. Finally to identify three broad evidence-based areas for developing intercultural cr...

  9. Microbial Threats to Health. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    and HIV in- fection. Although in the United States, HIV infection occurs predominately in male homosexuals and intravenous substance abusers, the rate...Davis. W. A., J. G. Kane, and V. G. Garagusi. 1978. Human Aerononas infections : a review of the literature and a case report of endocarditis ...AD-A257 841 AD____ GRANT NO: DAMD17-90-Z-0047 TITLE: MICROBIAL THREATS TO HEALTH SUBTITLE: REmerging Infections - Microbial Threats to Health in the

  10. Bound states emerging from below the continuum in a solvable PT-symmetric discrete Schrodinger equation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Znojil, Miloslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 012127. ISSN 2469-9926 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-22945S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : non-Hermitian * PT symmetric * bound states Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics OBOR OECD: Atomic, molecular and chemical physics (physics of atoms and molecules including collision, interaction with radiation, magnetic resonances, Mössbauer effect) Impact factor: 2.925, year: 2016

  11. Hidden magnetic states emergent under electric field, in a room temperature composite magnetoelectric multiferroic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Clarkson, J.D.; Fina, I.; Liu, Z.Q.; Lee, Y.; Kim, J.; Frontera, C.; Cordero, K.; Wisotzki, S.; Sánchez, F.; Sort, J.; Hsu, S.L.; Ko, C.; Aballe, L.; Foerster, M.; Wu, J.; Christen, H.M.; Heron, J.T.; Schlom, D. G.; Salahuddin, S.; Kioussis, N.; Fontcuberta, J.; Martí, Xavier; Ramesh, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-7, č. článku 15460. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37427G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : antiferromagnetic phase-transition * total-energy calculations * wave basis-set Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  12. Emergent Ising degrees of freedom above a double-stripe magnetic ground state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanghua; Flint, Rebecca

    2017-12-01

    Double-stripe magnetism [Q =(π /2 ,π /2 )] has been proposed as the magnetic ground state for both the iron-telluride and BaTi2Sb2O families of superconductors. Double-stripe order is captured within a J1-J2-J3 Heisenberg model in the regime J3≫J2≫J1 . Intriguingly, besides breaking spin-rotational symmetry, the ground-state manifold has three additional Ising degrees of freedom associated with bond ordering. Via their coupling to the lattice, they give rise to an orthorhombic distortion and to two nonuniform lattice distortions with wave vector (π ,π ) . Because the ground state is fourfold degenerate, modulo rotations in spin space, only two of these Ising bond order parameters are independent. Here, we introduce an effective field theory to treat all Ising order parameters, as well as magnetic order, and solve it within a large-N limit. All three transitions, corresponding to the condensations of two Ising bond order parameters and one magnetic order parameter are simultaneous and first order in three dimensions, but lower dimensionality, or equivalently weaker interlayer coupling, and weaker magnetoelastic coupling can split the three transitions, and in some cases allows for two separate Ising phase transitions above the magnetic one.

  13. Poly(2-oxazoline) Hydrogels: State-of-the-Art and Emerging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargaville, Tim R; Park, Jong-Ryul; Hoogenboom, Richard

    2018-05-07

    The synthesis of poly(2-oxazoline)s has been known since the 1960s. In the last two decades, they have risen in popularity thanks to improvements in their synthesis and the realization of their potential in the biomedical field due to their "stealth" properties, stimuli responsiveness, and tailorable properties. Even though the bulk of the research to date has been on linear forms of the polymer, they are also of interest for creating network structures due to the relatively easy introduction of reactive functional groups during synthesis that can be cross-linked under a variety of conditions. This opinion article briefly reviews the history of poly(2-oxazoline)s and examines the in vivo data on soluble poly(2-oxazoline)s to date in an effort to predict how hydrogels may perform as implantable materials. This is followed by an overview of the most recent hydrogel synthesis methods and emerging applications, and is concluded with a section on the future directions predicted for these fascinating yet underutilized polymers. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Discharge against medical advice in a pediatric emergency center in the State of Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Abdulateef

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze cases that had left the Pediatric Emergency Center Al Sadd, Doha (PEC against medical advice, with the aim of developing policies to help reduce this occurrence. Methodology: All patients that were admitted to the main PEC observation room for treatment and/or investigation and subsequently left against medical advice from February 18, 2007 to June 18, 2007, were followed by a phone call, and a questionnaire, which was completed by the departmental patient representative. Results: 99,133 patients attended the facility during the study period. Of those, 106 left the facility against medical advice. Ninety-four guardians were successfully contacted. 90% of the cases were in children below 2 years of age. In 87% of the cases the mother was the main decision maker for leaving against medical advice. Domestic obligations were the leading cause of DAMA (discharge against medical advice, reported in 45% of the cases. Respondents reported that the consequences of DAMA were well explained by medical staff before they left the facility however, they had not met with the departmental patient representative during their stay. Conclusion:As the majority of DAMA cases occurred in infants, medical staff should address the concerns of this group early on in the course of treatment. Maintaining communication and providing support, in particular for mothers of higher risk groups may help to reduce the rate of DAMA cases.

  15. Characteristics of Emergency Department Visits by Older Versus Younger Homeless Adults in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the characteristics of emergency department (ED) visits of older versus younger homeless adults. Methods. We analyzed 2005–2009 data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative survey of visits to hospitals and EDs, and used sampling weights, strata, and clustering variables to obtain nationally representative estimates. Results. The ED visits of homeless adults aged 50 years and older accounted for 36% of annual visits by homeless patients. Although demographic characteristics of ED visits were similar in older and younger homeless adults, clinical and health services characteristics differed. Older homeless adults had fewer discharge diagnoses related to psychiatric conditions (10% vs 20%; P = .002) and drug abuse (7% vs 15%; P = .003) but more diagnoses related to alcohol abuse (31% vs 23%; P = .03) and were more likely to arrive by ambulance (48% vs 36%; P = .02) and to be admitted to the hospital (20% vs 11%; P = .003). Conclusions. Older homeless adults’ patterns of ED care differ from those of younger homeless adults. Health care systems need to account for these differences to meet the needs of the aging homeless population. PMID:23597348

  16. Nursery Product-Related Injuries Treated in United States Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaw, Christopher E; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Smith, Gary A

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the epidemiology of injuries associated with nursery products among young children treated in US emergency departments. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were retrospectively analyzed for patients aged nursery product from 1991 through 2011. An estimated 1 391 844 (95% confidence interval, 1 169 489-1 614 199) nursery product-related injuries among children aged Nursery product-related injuries were most commonly associated with baby carriers (19.5%), cribs/mattresses (18.6%), strollers/carriages (16.5%), or baby walkers/jumpers/exercisers (16.2%). The most common mechanism of injury was a self-precipitated fall (80.0%), and the most frequently injured body region was the head or neck (47.1%). Although successful injury prevention efforts with baby walkers led to a decline in nursery product-related injuries from 1991 to 2003, the number and rate of these injuries have been increasing since 2003. Greater efforts are warranted to prevent injuries associated with other nursery products, especially baby carriers, cribs, and strollers. Prevention of falls and concussions/closed head injuries associated with nursery products also deserves special attention. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Overview of Development and Deployment of Codes, Standards and Regulations Affecting Energy Storage System Safety in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, David R.

    2014-08-22

    This report acquaints stakeholders and interested parties involved in the development and/or deployment of energy storage systems (ESS) with the subject of safety-related codes, standards and regulations (CSRs). It is hoped that users of this document gain a more in depth and uniform understanding of safety-related CSR development and deployment that can foster improved communications among all ESS stakeholders and the collaboration needed to realize more timely acceptance and approval of safe ESS technology through appropriate CSR.

  18. Continuous solid-state phase transitions in energy storage materials with orientational disorder – Computational and experimental approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Harpreet; Talekar, Anjali; Chien, Wen-Ming; Shi, Renhai; Chandra, Dhanesh; Mishra, Amrita; Tirumala, Muralidhar; Nelson, Daryl J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on TES (thermal energy storage) in new CT (continuous phase transitions) in multicomponent tetrahederally configured (orientationally disordered) crystals of NPG-neopentylglycol-C 5 H 12 O 2 , PG-pentaglycerine-C 5 H 12 O 3 , and PE-pentaerythritol-C 5 H 12 O 4 . This discovery is applicable in thermal energy storage in many systems which do not require conventional isothermal first-order phase transition energy storage. The above compounds exhibit polymorphs of orientationally disordered phases in which O–H…O bond rotation around the C–C bond stores significant amount of energy; for example, in PE 41.26 kJ/mol are absorbed isothermally during solid–solid transitions. In this paper we show, anisothermal continuous phase transitions (CT), due to compositional changes with changes in temperature, associated with a measurable amount of energy, not reported earlier. The correlation of phase stability regions in pseudo-binaries, calculated from ternary NPG–PG–PE phase diagrams, is validated by experimental ternary DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) and in-situ x-ray diffraction data. We established equations for determining the CT in a temperature range, and their respective enthalpies of transitions for any composition of the ternaries. Thermodynamic calculations of the Gibbs energies of the solution phases are modeled as substitutional solid solutions, in which the excess Gibbs energies are expressed by the Redlich–Kister–Muggianu polynomial. There is excellent agreement between the experimental and CALPHAD calculated data. - Highlights: • Continuous phase transition (CT) thermal energy storage in organic ternary system. • Anisothermal temperature ramping leads to CT transitions as per lever rule. • Orientationally disordered phases store energy in O–H…O bond rotation/oscillation. • Validated calculated data with measured thermodynamic properties in ternary system. • Used CALPHAD methodology to calculate Gibbs energies of

  19. National and Regional Representativeness of Hospital Emergency Department Visit Data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program, United States, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Ralph J.; Pérez, Alejandro; Baer, Atar; Zhou, Hong; English, Roseanne; Coletta, Michael; Dey, Achintya

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the representativeness of the nonfederal hospital emergency department (ED) visit data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP). Methods We used the 2012 American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database, other databases, and information from state and local health departments participating in the NSSP about which hospitals submitted data to the NSSP in October 2014. We compared ED visits for hospitals submitting 15 data with all ED visits in all 50 states and Washington, DC. Results Approximately 60.4 million of 134.6 million ED visits nationwide (~45%) were reported to have been submitted to the NSSP. ED visits in 5 of 10 regions and the majority of the states were substantially underrepresented in the NSSP. The NSSP ED visits were similar to national ED visits in terms of many of the characteristics of hospitals and their service areas. However, visits in hospitals with the fewest annual ED visits, in rural trauma centers, and in hospitals serving populations with high percentages of Hispanics and Asians were underrepresented. Conclusions NSSP nonfederal hospital ED visit data were representative for many hospital characteristics and in some geographic areas but were not very representative nationally and in many locations. Representativeness could be improved by increasing participation in more states and among specific types of hospitals. PMID:26883318

  20. Mathematical modeling of bone marrow--peripheral blood dynamics in the disease state based on current emerging paradigms, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afenya, Evans K; Ouifki, Rachid; Camara, Baba I; Mundle, Suneel D

    2016-04-01

    Stemming from current emerging paradigms related to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, an existing mathematical model is expanded and used to study cell interaction dynamics in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The proposed mathematical model is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations with delay, to quantify the dynamics in abnormal hematopoiesis. The steady states of the model are analytically and numerically obtained. Some conditions for the local asymptotic stability of such states are investigated. Model analyses suggest that malignancy may be irreversible once it evolves from a nonmalignant state into a malignant one and no intervention takes place. This leads to the proposition that a great deal of emphasis be placed on cancer prevention. Nevertheless, should malignancy arise, treatment programs for its containment or curtailment may have to include a maximum and extensive level of effort to protect normal cells from eventual destruction. Further model analyses and simulations predict that in the untreated disease state, there is an evolution towards a situation in which malignant cells dominate the entire bone marrow - peripheral blood system. Arguments are then advanced regarding requirements for quantitatively understanding cancer stem cell behavior. Among the suggested requirements are, mathematical frameworks for describing the dynamics of cancer initiation and progression, the response to treatment, the evolution of resistance, and malignancy prevention dynamics within the bone marrow - peripheral blood architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance Improvement of V-Fe-Cr-Ti Solid State Hydrogen Storage Materials in Impure Hydrogen Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Ulrich; Oertel, Daria; Diemant, Thomas; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Dittmeyer, Roland; Behm, R Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2018-01-17

    Two approaches of engineering surface structures of V-Ti-based solid solution hydrogen storage alloys are presented, which enable improved tolerance toward gaseous oxygen (O 2 ) impurities in hydrogen (H 2 ) gas. Surface modification is achieved through engineering lanthanum (La)- or nickel (Ni)-rich surface layers with enhanced cyclic stability in an H 2 /O 2 mixture. The formation of a Ni-rich surface layer does not improve the cycling stability in H 2 /O 2 mixtures. Mischmetal (Mm, a mixture of La and Ce) agglomerates are observed within the bulk and surface of the alloy when small amounts of this material are added during arc melting synthesis. These agglomerates provide hydrogen-transparent diffusion pathways into the bulk of the V-Ti-Cr-Fe hydrogen storage alloy when the remaining oxidized surface is already nontransparent for hydrogen. Thus, the cycling stability of the alloy is improved in an O 2 -containing hydrogen environment as compared to the same alloy without addition of Mm. The obtained surface-engineered storage material still absorbs hydrogen after 20 cycles in a hydrogen-oxygen mixture, while the original material is already deactivated after 4 cycles.

  2. Estimating Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR Regional and Local Suitability: A Case Study in Washington State, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria T. Gibson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing aquifers as underground water supply reservoirs is an advantageous approach applicable to meeting water management objectives. Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR is a direct injection and subsequent withdrawal technology that is used to increase water supply storage through injection wells. Due to site-specific hydrogeological quantification and evaluation to assess ASR suitability, limited methods have been developed to identify suitability on regional scales that are also applicable at local scales. This paper presents an ASR site scoring system developed to qualitatively assess regional and local suitability of ASR using 9 scored metrics to determine total percent of ASR suitability, partitioned into hydrogeologic properties, operational considerations, and regulatory influences. The development and application of a qualitative water well suitability method was used to assess the potential groundwater response to injection, estimate suitability based on predesignated injection rates, and provide cumulative approximation of statewide and local storage prospects. The two methods allowed for rapid assessment of ASR suitability and its applicability to regional and local water management objectives at over 280 locations within 62 watersheds in Washington, USA. It was determined that over 50% of locations evaluated are suitable for ASR and statewide injection potential equaled 6400 million liters per day. The results also indicate current limitations and/or potential benefits of developing ASR systems at the local level with the intent of assisting local water managers in strategic water supply planning.

  3. Report on technical feasibility of underground pumped hydroelectric storage in a marble quarry site in the Northeast United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chas. T. Main, Inc.

    1982-03-01

    The technical and economic aspects of constructing a very high head underground hydroelectric pumped storage were examined at a prefeasibility level. Excavation of existing caverns in the West Rutland Vermont marble quarry would be used to construct the underground space. A plant capacity of 1200 MW and 12 h of continuous capacity were chosen as plant operating conditions. The site geology, plant design, and electrical and mechanical equipment required were considered. The study concluded that the cost of the 1200 MW underground pumped storage hydro electric project at this site even with the proposed savings from marketable material amounts to between $581 and $595 per kilowatt of installed capacity on a January 1982 pricing level. System studies performed by the planning group of the New England Power System indicate that the system could economically justify up to about $442 per kilowatt on an energy basis with no credit for capacity. To accommodate the plant with the least expensive pumping energy, a coal and nuclear generation mix of approximately 65% would have to be available before the project becomes feasible. It is not expected that this condition can be met before the year 2000 or beyond. It is therefore concluded that the West Rutland underground pumped storage facility is uneconomic at this time. Several variables however could have marked influence on future planning and should be examined on periodic basis.

  4. Theory of the disordered ν =5/2 quantum thermal Hall state: Emergent symmetry and phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Biao; Wang, Juven

    2018-04-01

    Fractional quantum Hall (FQH) system at Landau level filling fraction ν =5 /2 has long been suggested to be non-Abelian, either Pfaffian (Pf) or antiPfaffian (APf) states by numerical studies, both with quantized Hall conductance σx y=5 e2/2 h . Thermal Hall conductances of the Pf and APf states are quantized at κx y=7 /2 and κx y=3 /2 , respectively, in a proper unit. However, a recent experiment shows the thermal Hall conductance of ν =5 /2 FQH state is κx y=5 /2 . It has been speculated that the system contains random Pf and APf domains driven by disorders, and the neutral chiral Majorana modes on the domain walls may undergo a percolation transition to a κx y=5 /2 phase. In this paper, we do perturbative and nonperturbative analyses on the domain walls between Pf and APf. We show the domain wall theory possesses an emergent SO(4) symmetry at energy scales below a threshold Λ1, which is lowered to an emergent U (1 )×U (1) symmetry at energy scales between Λ1 and a higher value Λ2, and is finally lowered to the composite fermion parity symmetry Z2F above Λ2. Based on the emergent symmetries, we propose a phase diagram of the disordered ν =5 /2 FQH system and show that a κx y=5 /2 phase arises at disorder energy scales Λ >Λ1 . Furthermore, we show the gapped double-semion sector of ND compact domain walls contributes nonlocal topological degeneracy 2ND-1, causing a low-temperature peak in the heat capacity. We implement a nonperturbative method to bootstrap generic topological 1 +1 D domain walls (two-surface defects) applicable to any 2 +1 D non-Abelian topological order. We also identify potentially relevant spin topological quantum field theories (TQFTs) for various ν =5 /2 FQH states in terms of fermionic version of U (1) ±8 Chern-Simons theory ×Z8 -class TQFTs.

  5. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  6. Environmental risk of mesothelioma in the United States: An emerging concern-epidemiological issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Francine; Carbone, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Despite predictions of decline in mesothelioma following the ban of asbestos in most industrial countries, the incidence is still increasing globally, particularly in women. Because occupational exposure to asbestos is the main cause of mesothelioma, it occurs four- to eightfold more frequently in men than women, at a median age of 74 years. When mesothelioma is due to an environmental exposure, the M:F sex ratio is 1:1 and the median age at diagnosis is ~60 years. Studying environmental risk of mesothelioma is challenging because of the long latency period and small numbers, and because this type of exposure is involuntary and unknown. Individual-based methods cannot be used, and new approaches need to be found. To better understand the most recent trends of mesothelioma in the United States, all mesothelioma deaths reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during 1999-2010 were analyzed. Among all mesothelioma deaths in the United States, the 1920s birth cohort significantly predominated, and the proportion of younger cohorts constantly decreased with time, suggesting a decline in occupational exposure in these cohorts. The M:F mesothelioma sex ratio fell with time, suggesting an increased proportion of environmental cases. Environmental exposures occur in specific geographic areas. At the large scale of a state, mesotheliomas related to environmental exposure are diluted among occupational cases. The spatial analysis at a smaller scale, such as county, enables detection of areas with higher proportions of female and young mesothelioma cases, thus indicating possible environmental exposure, where geological and environmental investigations need to be carried out.

  7. Fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, C.; Alvarez-Miranda, A.

    2009-01-01

    ENSA is a well known manufacturer of multi-system primary components for the nuclear industry and is totally prepared to satisfy future market requirements in this industry. At the same time that ENSA has been gaining a reputation world wider for the supply of primary components, has been strengthening its commitment and experience in supplying spent fuel components, either pool racks or storage and transportation casks, and offers not only fabrication but also design capabilities for its products. ENSA has supplied Spent Fuel Pool Racks, in spain, Finland, Taiwan, Korea, China, and currently it is in the process of licensing its own rack design in the United States of America for the ESBWR along with Ge-Hitachi. ENSA has supplied racks for 20 pools and 22 different reactors and it has also manufactured racks under all available technologies and developed a design known as Interlock Cell Matrix whose main features are outlined in this article. Another ENSA achievement in rack technology is the use of remote control for re-racking activities instead of using divers, which improves the ALARA requirements. Regarding casks for storage and transportation, ENSA also has al leading worldwide position, with exports prevailing over the Spanish market where ENSA has supplied 16 storage and transportation casks to the Spanish nuclear power Trillo. In some cases, ENSA acts as subcontractor for other clients. Foreign markets are still a major challenge for ENSA. ENSA-is well known for its manufacturing capabilities in the nuclear industry, but has been always involved in design activities through its engineering division, which carries out different tasks: components Design; Tooling Design; Engineering and Documentation; Project Engineering; Calculations, Design and Development Engineering. (Author)

  8. Youth versus adult "weightlifting" injuries presenting to United States emergency rooms: accidental versus nonaccidental injury mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Quatman, Carmen E; Khoury, Jane; Wall, Eric J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2009-10-01

    Resistance training has previously been purported to be unsafe and ineffective in children. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate resistance training-related injuries presenting to U.S. emergency rooms by age, type, and mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that older athletes would sustain greater percentages of joint sprains and muscle strains, whereas younger athletes would sustain a greater percentage of accidental injuries that would result in an increased percentage of fractures in youths. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried from 2002 to 2005 using the CPSC code for "Weightlifting." Subjects between the ages of 8 and 30 were grouped by age categories 8 to 13 (elementary/middle school age), 14 to 18 (high school), 19 to 22 (college), and 23 to 30 (adult). Injuries were classified as "accidental" if caused by dropped weight or improper equipment use. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare accidental injuries between age groups. The sample consisted of 4,111 patients. Accidental injuries decreased (p 14 to 18 > 19 to 22 years = 23 to 30 years. Conversely, sprain/strain injuries increased in each successive age group (p injuries (n = 2,565) showed that the oldest categories (19-22 and 23-30 yr) demonstrated a greater percentage of sprains and strains relative to younger age categories (p injuries sustained in the 8 to 13 group were to the hand and foot and were most often related to "dropping" and "pinching" in the injury descriptions, and there was an increased percentage of fractures in the 8 to 13 group relative to all other groups (p injuries are the result of accidents that are potentially preventable with increased supervision and stricter safety guidelines.

  9. Sports-related genitourinary injuries presenting to United States emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, Herman S; Fisher, Patrick B; Tasian, Gregory E; Blaschko, Sarah D; McCulloch, Charles E; McAninch, Jack W; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2015-01-01

    To describe epidemiologic features of sports-related genitourinary (GU) injuries and determine patient cohorts and particular sporting activities associated with increased GU injury risk. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a data set validated to provide a probability sample of injury-related US emergency department (ED) presentations, was analyzed to characterize GU injuries between 2002 and 2010. A total of 13,851 observations were analyzed to derive national estimates. Between 2002 and 2010, an estimated 137,525 individuals (95% confidence interval, 104,490-170,620) presented to US EDs with GU injuries sustained during sporting activities. Nearly three-quarters of injuries occurred in the pediatric population. The most common product involved was a bicycle, representing approximately one-third of injuries in both adult and pediatric populations. Injuries related to team sports such as football, baseball or softball, basketball, and soccer were also common, particularly among boys where they represented a combined third of all injuries. Eighty-nine percent of all patients were evaluated and treated in the ED without inpatient admission. The large majority of injuries involved the external genitalia (60%), and significant injuries of paired GU organs (kidneys and testicles) requiring inpatient admission were rare (8.5%). Sports-related GU injuries are most commonly sustained during the use of a bicycle. However, there are other associated activities with identifiable high-risk cohorts, products, and situations. Consumers, practitioners, and injury-prevention experts can use our epidemiologic data to prioritize and develop strategies aimed at the prevention and limitation of such injuries, particularly when counseling at-risk cohorts, such as those with solitary kidneys or testicles. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Considerations in Emergency Preparedness and Response for a State Embarking on a Nuclear Power Programme. Publication Date: June 2013 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical tool for emergency planning for States embarking on a nuclear power programme and to fulfil, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency ('Assistance Convention'). Under Article 5.a (ii) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to State Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to such emergencies. As established in the publication Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2), the practical goal of emergency response is 'to ensure that arrangements are in place for a timely, managed, controlled, coordinated and effective response at the scene, and at the local, regional, national and international level, to any nuclear or radiological emergency'. In 2011 the IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(55)/RES/9, encouraged States 'embarking on new nuclear power programmes to take timely and proactive steps, based upon gradual and systematic application of IAEA safety standards, to establish and sustain a strong safety culture'. It also 'emphasizes the importance for all Member States to implement emergency preparedness and response mechanisms and develop mitigation measures at a national level, consistent with the IAEA's Safety Standards, for improving emergency preparedness and response, facilitating communication in an emergency and contributing to harmonization of national criteria for protective and other actions'. This publication, issued in the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, is intended to assist on steps to be taken by States embarking on a nuclear power programme to establish effective national capabilities and arrangements of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency (hereinafter referred to as

  11. Disaster Education: A Survey Study to Analyze Disaster Medicine Training in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu R; Cattamanchi, Srihari; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman; Aljohani, Majed; Keim, Mark; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-08-01

    The increase in natural and man-made disasters occurring worldwide places Emergency Medicine (EM) physicians at the forefront of responding to these crises. Despite the growing interest in Disaster Medicine, it is unclear if resident training has been able to include these educational goals. Hypothesis This study surveys EM residencies in the United States to assess the level of education in Disaster Medicine, to identify competencies least and most addressed, and to highlight effective educational models already in place. The authors distributed an online survey of multiple-choice and free-response questions to EM residency Program Directors in the United States between February 7 and September 24, 2014. Questions assessed residency background and details on specific Disaster Medicine competencies addressed during training. Out of 183 programs, 75 (41%) responded to the survey and completed all required questions. Almost all programs reported having some level of Disaster Medicine training in their residency. The most common Disaster Medicine educational competencies taught were patient triage and decontamination. The least commonly taught competencies were volunteer management, working with response teams, and special needs populations. The most commonly identified methods to teach Disaster Medicine were drills and lectures/seminars. There are a variety of educational tools used to teach Disaster Medicine in EM residencies today, with a larger focus on the use of lectures and hospital drills. There is no indication of a uniform educational approach across all residencies. The results of this survey demonstrate an opportunity for the creation of a standardized model for resident education in Disaster Medicine. Sarin RR , Cattamanchi S , Alqahtani A , Aljohani M , Keim M , Ciottone GR . Disaster education: a survey study to analyze disaster medicine training in emergency medicine residency programs in the United States. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(4):368-373.

  12. Two-Stage Battery Energy Storage System (BESS in AC Microgrids with Balanced State-of-Charge and Guaranteed Small-Signal Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xie

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a two-stage battery energy storage system (BESS is implemented to enhance the operation condition of conventional battery storage systems in a microgrid. Particularly, the designed BESS is composed of two stages, i.e., Stage I: integration of dispersed energy storage units (ESUs using parallel DC/DC converters, and Stage II: aggregated ESUs in grid-connected operation. Different from a conventional BESS consisting of a battery management system (BMS and power conditioning system (PCS, the developed two-stage architecture enables additional operation and control flexibility in balancing the state-of-charge (SoC of each ESU and ensures the guaranteed small-signal stability, especially in extremely weak grid conditions. The above benefits are achieved by separating the control functions between the two stages. In Stage I, a localized power sharing scheme based on the SoC of each particular ESU is developed to manage the SoC and avoid over-charge or over-discharge issues; on the other hand, in Stage II, an additional virtual impedance loop is implemented in the grid-interactive DC/AC inverters to enhance the stability margin with multiple parallel-connected inverters integrating at the point of common coupling (PCC simultaneously. A simulation model based on MATLAB/Simulink is established, and simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed BESS architecture and the corresponding control diagram.

  13. Emergence of Dirac and quantum spin Hall states in fluorinated monolayer As and AsSb

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qingyun

    2016-01-21

    Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the electronic and vibrational properties of monolayer As and AsSb. While the pristine monolayers are semiconductors (direct band gap at the Γ point), fluorination results in Dirac cones at the K points. Fluorinated monolayer As shows a band gap of 0.16 eV due to spin-orbit coupling, and fluorinated monolayer AsSb a larger band gap of 0.37 eV due to inversion symmetry breaking. Spin-orbit coupling induces spin splitting similar to monolayer MoS2. Phonon calculations confirm that both materials are dynamically stable. Calculations of the edge states of nanoribbons by the tight-binding method demonstrate that fluorinated monolayer As is topologically nontrivial in contrast to fluorinated monolayer AsSb.

  14. Code Help: Can This Unique State Regulatory Intervention Improve Emergency Department Crowding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Sean S; Broach, John P; Kotkowski, Kevin A; Brush, D Eric; Volturo, Gregory A; Reznek, Martin A

    2018-05-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding adversely affects multiple facets of high-quality care. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts mandates specific, hospital action plans to reduce ED boarding via a mechanism termed "Code Help." Because implementation appears inconsistent even when hospital conditions should have triggered its activation, we hypothesized that compliance with the Code Help policy would be associated with reduction in ED boarding time and total ED length of stay (LOS) for admitted patients, compared to patients seen when the Code Help policy was not followed. This was a retrospective analysis of data collected from electronic, patient-care, timestamp events and from a prospective Code Help registry for consecutive adult patients admitted from the ED at a single academic center during a 15-month period. For each patient, we determined whether the concurrent hospital status complied with the Code Help policy or violated it at the time of admission decision. We then compared ED boarding time and overall ED LOS for patients cared for during periods of Code Help policy compliance and during periods of Code Help policy violation, both with reference to patients cared for during normal operations. Of 89,587 adult patients who presented to the ED during the study period, 24,017 (26.8%) were admitted to an acute care or critical care bed. Boarding time ranged from zero to 67 hours 30 minutes (median 4 hours 31 minutes). Total ED LOS for admitted patients ranged from 11 minutes to 85 hours 25 minutes (median nine hours). Patients admitted during periods of Code Help policy violation experienced significantly longer boarding times (median 20 minutes longer) and total ED LOS (median 46 minutes longer), compared to patients admitted under normal operations. However, patients admitted during Code Help policy compliance did not experience a significant increase in either metric, compared to normal operations. In this single-center experience, implementation of the

  15. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  16. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  17. Amphibian responses to wildfire in the western united states: Emerging patterns from short-term studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossack, B.R.; Pilliod, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The increased frequency and severity of large wildfires in the western United States is an important ecological and management issue with direct relevance to amphibian conservation. Although the knowledge of fire effects on amphibians in the region is still limited relative to most other vertebrate species, we reviewed the current literature to determine if there are evident patterns that might be informative for conservation or management strategies. Of the seven studies that compared pre- and post-wildfire data on a variety of metrics, ranging from amphibian occupancy to body condition, two reported positive responses and five detected negative responses by at least one species. Another seven studies used a retrospective approach to compare effects of wildfire on populations: two studies reported positive effects, three reported negative effects from wildfire, and two reported no effects. All four studies that included plethodontid salamanders reported negative effects on populations or individuals; these effects were greater in forests where fire had been suppressed and in areas that burned with high severity. Species that breed in streams are also vulnerable to post-wildfire changes in habitat, especially in the Southwest. Wildfire is also important for maintaining suitable habitat for diverse amphibian communities, although those results may not be evident immediately after an area burns. We expect that wildfire will extirpate few healthy amphibian populations, but it is still unclear how populations will respond to wildfire in the context of land management (including pre- and post-fire timber harvest) and fragmentation. Wildfire may also increase the risk of decline or extirpation for small, isolated, or stressed (e.g., from drought or disease) populations. Improved understanding of how these effects vary according to changes in fire frequency and severity are critical to form more effective conservation strategies for amphibians in the western United States.

  18. Using GRACE Amplitude Data in Conjunction with the Spatial Distribution of Groundwater Recharge to Estimate the Components of the Terrestrial Water Storage Anomaly across the Contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, W. E.; Reitz, M.; Zell, W.

    2017-12-01

    The GRACE satellite project by NASA has been mapping the terrestrial water storage anomaly (TWSA) across the globe since 2002. To date most of the studies using this data have focused on estimating long-term storage declines in groundwater aquifers or the cryosphere. In this study we are focusing on using the amplitude of the seasonal storage signal to estimate the sources and values of the different water components that are contributing to the TWSA signal across the contiguous United States (CONUS). Across the CONUS the TWSA seasonal amplitude observed by GRACE varies by a factor of ten or more (from 1 to 10+ cm of liquid water equivalent). For a seasonal sinusoidal recharge rate, the change in storage in either the soil (unsaturated zone beneath the root zone) or groundwater (by water-table fluctuation) is limited to the amplitude of the recharge rate divided by π or 2π, respectively. We compiled the GRACE signal for the 18 major HUC watersheds across the CONUS and compared them to estimates of seasonal recharge-rate amplitudes based on a recent map of recharge rates generated by the USGS. The ratios of the recharge to GRACE amplitudes suggest that all but two of the HUCs must have other substantial sources of storage change in addition to soil or groundwater. The most likely additional sources are (1) winter snowpack, (2) seasonal irrigation withdrawals, and/or (3) surface water (rivers or reservoirs). Estimates of the seasonal amplitudes of these three signals across the CONUS suggest they can explain the remaining GRACE seasonal signal that cannot be explained by soil or groundwater fluctuations. Each of these signals has its own unique spatial distribution, with snowpack limited to the northern states, surface water limited to large rivers or reservoirs, and irrigation as a dominant signal limited to arid to semi-arid agricultural regions. Use of the GRACE seasonal signal shows promise in constraining the hydraulic diffusivities of surficial aquifer

  19. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  20. Assessment of emerging contaminants including organophosphate esters and pyrethroids during DISCOVER-AQ in Houston, Texas, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usenko, Sascha; Clark, Addie; Sheesley, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) is a NASA-funded air quality research program that focused on Houston, Texas, United States in September 2013. In conjunction with DISCOVER-AQ, particulate matter was collected for the month of September from four ground-based sampling sites across the Houston metropolitan area. The Houston metropolitan area is one of the most populous cities in the United States. Sampling sites included an upwind and downwind site as well as an urban (i.e. downtown) and industrial/port areas (i.e. Houston Ship Channel). Particulate matter samples were collected to examine both spatial and temporal trends (including day versus night). Particulate matter was collected on quartz fiber filters, which were analyzed for emerging classes of concern including organophosphate esters (OPEs; including flame retardants) and pyrethroids. OPEs have in recent years increased in both use and production as they replaced polybrominated diphenyl ethers flame retardants. Permethrin is one of the most commonly used mosquito adulticides in the United States.

  1. Product related adult genitourinary injuries treated at emergency departments in the United States from 2002 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, Herman S; Tasian, Gregory E; Fisher, Patrick B; McCulloch, Charles E; McAninch, Jack W; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2013-04-01

    We describe the epidemiological features of adult genitourinary injuries related to consumer products and determined the patient cohorts, products and situations associated with increased genitourinary injury risk. The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a data set validated to provide a probability sample of injury related emergency department presentations in the United States, was analyzed to characterize genitourinary injuries from 2002 to 2010. We analyzed 3,545 observations to derive national estimates. An estimated 142,144 adults (95% CI 115,324-168,964) presented to American emergency departments with genitourinary injuries from 2002 to 2010. Of the injuries 69% occurred in men. A large majority of injuries involved the external genitalia. The most common categories of products involved were sporting items in 30.2% of cases, clothing articles in 9.4% and furniture in 9.2%. The highest prevalence of injury was at ages 18 to 28 years (37.5%), which was most often related to sports equipment, such as bicycles. Older cohorts (age greater than 65 years) more commonly sustained injuries during falls and often in the bathroom during use of a shower or tub. Of all patients 88% were evaluated and treated in the emergency department without inpatient admission, although the admission rate increased with increasing patient age. Acute genitourinary injury is often associated with common consumer items and with identifiable high risk cohorts, products and situations. Consumers, practitioners and safety champions can use our epidemiological data to prioritize and develop strategies aimed at the prevention, limitation and informed treatment of such injuries. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pediatric Firework-Related Injuries Presenting to United States Emergency Departments, 1990-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billock, Rachael M; Chounthirath, Thiphalak; Smith, Gary A

    2017-06-01

    This study characterizes the epidemiology of nonfatal pediatric firework-related injuries in the United States among children and adolescents by analyzing data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 1990 through 2014. During this 25-year period, an estimated 136 991 (95% CI = 113 574-160 408) children firework-related injuries. The annual injury rate decreased significantly by 30.4% during this period. Most of those injured were male (75.7%), mean patient age was 10.6 years, and 7.6% required hospital admission. The hands (30.0%) were the most commonly injured body region, followed by head and neck (22.2%), and eyes (21.5%). Sixty percent of injuries were burns. Injuries were most commonly associated with firecrackers (26.2%), aerial devices (16.3%), and sparklers (14.3%). Consumer fireworks pose a serious injury risk to pediatric users and bystanders, and families should be encouraged to attend public firework displays rather than use consumer fireworks.

  3. The Emergency Radiological Monitoring and Analysis Division of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) provides the framework for integrating the various Federal agencies responding to a major radiological emergency. The FRERP authorises the creation of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), which is established to co-ordinate all Federal agencies involved in the monitoring and assessment of the off-site radiological conditions in support of the impacted States and the Lead Federal Agency (LFA). Within the FRMAC, the Monitoring and Analysis Division is responsible for co-ordinating all FRMAC assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, and quality assurance. This program includes: 1. Aerial Radiological Monitoring - Fixed-Wing and Helicopter; 2. Field Monitoring and Sampling; 3. Radioanalysis - Mobile and Fixed Laboratories; 4. Radiation Detection Instrumentation - Calibration and Maintenance; 5. Environmental Dosimetry; 6. Integrated program of Quality Assurance. To assure consistency, completeness, and the quality of the data produced, a methodology and procedures manual is being developed. This paper discusses the structure, assets, and operations of the FRMAC Monitoring and Analysis Division and the content and preparation of the manual. (author)

  4. [Accidents by external causes in adolescents: care in sentinel urgency and emergency services in the Brazilian State Capitals--2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Andrade, Silvania Suely Caribé de Araújo; das Neves, Alice Cristina Medeiros; de Melo, Elza Machado; da Silva Junior, Jarbas Barbosa

    2012-09-01

    Adolescents are seeking new references and experiences, which may involve attitudes of risk and exposure to accidents and violence from external causes. These events constitute a serious Public Health problem. The scope of this study was to analyze the occurrence of accidents by external causes in adolescents from 10 to 19 years of age attended at sentinel urgency and emergency services in Brazil. Data from the 2009 Surveillance System for Violence and Accidents (VIVA 2009) was analyzed in 74 emergency units in 23 state capitals and the Federal District. The findings revealed that 6,434 adolescents (89.8%) were victims of accidents and 730 (10.2 %) were victims of violence. The main causes of the accidents were falls and traffic accidents, and assaults were predominant in violence. For both accidents and violence, non-white male adolescents were predominant and the events occurred most frequently on the public highways. A marked increase was detected, with hospitalization of victims of violence between 15 and 19 years of age. Understanding the epidemiological reality of external causes among adolescents represents an important tool for health prevention and promotion policies and the culture of peace seeking to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  5. Results of the radiologic emergencies response in the state of Sao Paulo during the last five years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Suzuki, Fabio F.; Nicolau, Jose R.A.; Rodrigues, Demerval L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation is often associated with bombs, diseases, and destruction rather than with the many benefits of nuclear technology that are present in the daily life. The radiation risk symbol still frightens the population. In addition, small risks related to nuclear area are overestimated. So, when there is a radiological accident, a prompt response is necessary because some of its major deleterious impacts are not quantified just in terms of radiation dose, but they are related to the risk perceived, and in many cases, wrong information or just lack of information induces fear or anxiety. In case of unusual situations involving radiation sources in Sao Paulo State, the people can contact IPEN-CNEN/SP Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response Team by telephone. The objective of this paper is to show the results obtained in the last five years. In this period, there were 89 calls. About half of those calls were performed by intervening organizations, as Fire Department or Civil Defense. Most of the situations presented low potential risks and some did not involve radiation sources. The results indicate that arrangements should be made for training the intervening organization personnel, which usually are the first ones that arrive at the emergency scene, in fundamentals of radiological protection, including both theoretical and practical aspects. Moreover, major efforts should be intended to divulge and clarify the public about the peaceful uses of nuclear technology, focusing the safety requirements and the regulatory control over the radiation sources. (author)

  6. Text messaging versus email for emergency medicine residents’ knowledge retention: a pilot comparison in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirachin Hoonpongsimanont

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effectiveness of text messaging versus email, as a delivery method to enhance knowledge retention of emergency medicine (EM content in EM residents. We performed a multi-centered, prospective, randomized study consisting of postgraduate year (PGY 1 to PGY 3 & 4 residents in three United States EM residency programs in 2014. Fifty eight residents were randomized into one delivery group: text message or email. Participants completed a 40 question pre- and post-intervention exam. Primary outcomes were the means of pre- and post-intervention exam score differences. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and multiple linear regressions. No significant difference was found between the primary outcomes of the two groups (P=0.51. PGY 2 status had a significant negative effect (P=0.01 on predicted exam score difference. Neither delivery method enhanced resident knowledge retention. Further research on implementation of mobile technology in residency education is required.

  7. Text messaging versus email for emergency medicine residents' knowledge retention: a pilot comparison in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Kulkarni, Miriam; Tomas-Domingo, Pedro; Anderson, Craig; McCormack, Denise; Tu, Khoa; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Lotfipour, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of text messaging versus email, as a delivery method to enhance knowledge retention of emergency medicine (EM) content in EM residents. We performed a multi-centered, prospective, randomized study consisting of postgraduate year (PGY) 1 to PGY 3 & 4 residents in three United States EM residency programs in 2014. Fifty eight residents were randomized into one delivery group: text message or email. Participants completed a 40 question pre- and post-intervention exam. Primary outcomes were the means of pre- and post-intervention exam score differences. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, paired t-test, and multiple linear regressions. No significant difference was found between the primary outcomes of the two groups (P=0.51). PGY 2 status had a significant negative effect (P=0.01) on predicted exam score difference. Neither delivery method enhanced resident knowledge retention. Further research on implementation of mobile technology in residency education is required.

  8. The planning, construction, and operation of a radioactive waste storage facility for an Australian state radiation regulatory authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.D.; Kleinschmidt, R.; Veevers, P. [Radiation Health, Queensland (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    Radiation regulatory authorities have a responsibility for the management of radioactive waste. This, more often than not, includes the collection and safe storage of radioactive sources in disused radiation devices and devices seized by the regulatory authority following an accident, abandonment or unauthorised use. The public aversion to all things radioactive, regardless of the safety controls, together with the Not In My Back Yard (NIMBY) syndrome combine to make the establishment of a radioactive materials store a near impossible task, despite the fact that such a facility is a fundamental tool for regulatory authorities to provide for the radiation safety of the public. In Queensland the successful completion and operational use of such a storage facility has taken a total of 8 years of concerted effort by the staff of the regulatory authority, the expenditure of over $2 million (AUS) not including regulatory staff costs and the cost of construction of an earlier separate facility. This paper is a summary of the major developments in the planning, construction and eventual operation of the facility including technical and administrative details, together with the lessons learned from the perspective of the overall project.

  9. What do we know about state-owned emerging-economy firms, and how? Evaluating literature about inward and outward multinational activities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier; Li, Cha; Tihanyi, Laszlo; Banalieva, Elitsa R.; Devinney, Timothy M.; Pedersen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we conduct a conceptual and bibliographic analysis of the literature that deals with the international strategy of state-owned enterprises (SOEs), with particular attention to SOEs from emerging economies (EEs). We first review the state of the art in defining the concepts of EEs and

  10. Geologic occurrences of erionite in the United States: an emerging national public health concern for respiratory disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Blitz, Thomas A.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Pierson, M. Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Erionite, a mineral series within the zeolite group, is classified as a Group 1 known respiratory carcinogen. This designation resulted from extremely high incidences of mesothelioma discovered in three small villages from the Cappadocia region of Turkey, where the disease was linked to environmental exposures to fibrous forms of erionite. Natural deposits of erionite, including fibrous forms, have been identified in the past in the western United States. Until recently, these occurrences have generally been overlooked as a potential hazard. In the last several years, concerns have emerged regarding the potential for environmental and occupational exposures to erionite in the United States, such as erionite-bearing gravels in western North Dakota mined and used to surface unpaved roads. As a result, there has been much interest in identifying locations and geologic environments across the United States where erionite occurs naturally. A 1996 U.S. Geological Survey report describing erionite occurrences in the United States has been widely cited as a compilation of all US erionite deposits; however, this compilation only focused on one of several geologic environments in which erionite can form. Also, new occurrences of erionite have been identified in recent years. Using a detailed literature survey, this paper updates and expands the erionite occurrences database, provided in a supplemental file (US_erionite.xls). Epidemiology, public health, and natural hazard studies can incorporate this information on known erionite occurrences and their characteristics. By recognizing that only specific geologic settings and formations are hosts to erionite, this knowledge can be used in developing management plans designed to protect the public.

  11. Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugurlan, Maria; Tuffner, Francis K; Chassin, David P.

    2016-09-13

    Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage device includes a reservoir configured to hold a thermal energy storage medium, a temperature control system configured to adjust a temperature of the thermal energy storage medium, and a state observation system configured to provide information regarding an energy state of the thermal energy storage device at a plurality of different moments in time.

  12. Microencapsulation of salts for enhanced thermochemical storage materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, R.; Jong, A.J. de; Eversdijk, J.; Spijker, J.C. van 't; Oversloot, H.P.; Ingenhut, B.L.J.; Cremers, R.K.H.; Papen-Botterhuis, N.E.

    2013-01-01

    Thermochemical storage is a new and emerging long-term thermal storage for residential use (cooling, heating & domestic hot water generation), offering high thermal storage density without the need for thermal insulation during storage (Fig. 1). However, existing materials for thermochemical storage

  13. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    After having outlined the importance of energy storage in the present context, this document outlines that it is an answer to economic, environmental and technological issues. It proposes a brief overview of the various techniques of energy storage: under the form of chemical energy (hydrocarbons, biomass, hydrogen production), thermal energy (sensitive or latent heat storage), mechanical energy (potential energy by hydraulic or compressed air storage, kinetic energy with flywheels), electrochemical energy (in batteries), electric energy (super-capacitors, superconductor magnetic energy storage). Perspectives are briefly evoked

  14. Evaluation of the feasibility and viability of modular pumped storage hydro (m-PSH) in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hadjerioua, Boualem [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martinez, Rocio [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bishop, Norm [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The viability of modular pumped storage hydro (m-PSH) is examined in detail through the conceptual design, cost scoping, and economic analysis of three case studies. Modular PSH refers to both the compactness of the project design and the proposed nature of product fabrication and performance. A modular project is assumed to consist of pre-fabricated standardized components and equipment, tested and assembled into modules before arrival on site. This technology strategy could enable m-PSH projects to deploy with less substantial civil construction and equipment component costs. The concept of m-PSH is technically feasible using currently available conventional pumping and turbine equipment, and may offer a path to reducing the project development cycle from inception to commissioning.

  15. Ultrafast terahertz spectroscopy study of a Kondo insulating thin-film Sm B6 : Evidence for an emergent surface state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingdi; Yong, Jie; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Greene, Richard L.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2018-04-01

    We utilize terahertz time domain spectroscopy to investigate thin films of the heavy fermion compound Sm B6 , a prototype Kondo insulator. Temperature-dependent terahertz (THz) conductivity measurements reveal a rapid decrease in the Drude weight and carrier scattering rate at ˜T*=20 K , well below the hybridization gap onset temperature (100 K). Moreover, a low-temperature conductivity plateau (below 20 K) suggests the emergence of a surface state with an effective electron mass of 0.1 me . The conductivity dynamics following optical excitation is also measured and interpreted using Rothwarf-Taylor (R-T) phenomenology, yielding a hybridization gap energy of 17 meV. However, R-T modeling of the conductivity dynamics reveals a deviation from the expected thermally excited quasiparticle density at temperatures below 20 K, indicative of another channel opening up in the low-energy electrodynamics. Taken together, these results are consistent with the onset of a surface state well below the crossover temperature (100 K) after long-range coherence of the f -electron Kondo lattice is established.

  16. Role of the community pharmacist in emergency contraception counseling and delivery in the United States: current trends and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafie S

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sally Rafie,1 Rebecca H Stone,2 Tracey A Wilkinson,3 Laura M Borgelt,4,5 Shareen Y El-Ibiary,6 Denise Ragland7 1Department of Pharmacy, UC San Diego Health, San Diego, CA, 2Department of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy, University of Georgia, College of Pharmacy, Athens, GA, 3Children’s Health Services Research, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 5Department of Family Medicine, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, 6Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Midwestern University, Glendale, AZ, 7Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA Abstract: Women and couples continue to experience unintended pregnancies at high rates. In the US, 45% of all pregnancies are either mistimed or unwanted. Mishaps with contraceptives, such as condom breakage, missed pills, incorrect timing of patch or vaginal ring application, contraceptive nonuse, forced intercourse, and other circumstances, place women at risk of unintended pregnancy. There is a critical role for emergency contraception (EC in preventing those pregnancies. There are currently three methods of EC available in the US. Levonorgestrel EC pills have been available with a prescription for over 15 years and over-the-counter since 2013. In 2010, ulipristal acetate EC pills became available with a prescription. Finally, the copper intrauterine device remains the most effective form of EC. Use of EC is increasing over time, due to wider availability and accessibility of EC methods. One strategy to expand access for both prescription and nonprescription EC products is to include pharmacies as a point of access and allow pharmacist prescribing. In eight states, pharmacists are able to prescribe and provide EC directly to women: levonorgestrel EC in eight states and ulipristal

  17. Procedure for the determination of gap and base ground surface configurations beneath the bottom plate of storage tanks using neutron gauging inspection techniques : including radiation safety procedure and emergency procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaafar Abdullah

    1993-01-01

    The procedure is intended for the neutron gauging inspection of gap between the bottom plate and the foundation of bulk storage tanks, which potentially exhibit uneven sinking of the bottom plate and the foundation. Its describes the requirements for the performance of neutron back scattered inspection techniques (or radiometric non-destructive evaluation techniques), using an isotopic neutron source associated with neutron detecting systems, to detect and size the gap between the bottom plate and the foundations as well as to quantify the presence of hydrogenous materials (e.g. oil or water) underneath the bottom plate. This procedure is not only outline the requirements for the neutron gauging inspection, but also describes the requirements which shall be taken into account in formulating the radiation safety and emergency procedures for the neutron gauging inspection works

  18. Grid scale energy storage in salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crotogino, F.; Donadei, S.

    2011-05-15

    Fossil energy sources require some 20% of the annual consumption to be stored to secure emergency cover, cold winter supply, peak shaving, seasonal swing, load management and energy trading. Today the electric power industry benefits from the extreme high energy density of fossil and nuclear fuels. This is one important reason why e.g. the German utilities are able to provide highly reliable grid operation at a electric power storage capacity at their pumped hydro power stations of less then 1 hour (40 GWh) related to the total load in the grid - i.e. only 0,06% compared to 20% for natural gas. Along with the changeover to renewable wind-and to a lesser extent PV-based electricity production this 'outsourcing' of storage services to fossil and nuclear fuels will decline. One important way out will be grid scale energy storage in geological formations. The present discussion, research projects and plans for balancing short term wind and solar power fluctuations focus primarily on the installation of Compressed Air Energy Storages (CAES) if the capacity of existing pumped hydro plants cannot be expanded, e.g. because of environmental issues or lack of suitable topography. Because of their small energy density, these storage options are, however, generally less suitable for balancing for longer term fluctuations in case of larger amounts of excess wind power, wind flaws or even seasonal fluctuations. One important way out are large underground hydrogen storages which provide a much higher energy density because of chemical energy bond. Underground hydrogen storage is state of the art since many years in Great Britain and in the USA for the (petro-) chemical industry. (Author)

  19. Host and Potential Vector Susceptibility to an Emerging Orbivirus in the United States: Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruder, M G; Stallknecht, D E; Allison, A B; Mead, D G; Carter, D L; Howerth, E W

    2016-05-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDVs) are orbiviruses transmitted by Culicoides biting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. EHDV-1 and EHDV-2 are endemic in the United States, where epizootic hemorrhagic disease is the most significant viral disease of white-tailed deer (WTD;Odocoileus virginianus) and reports of epizootic hemorrhagic disease in cattle are increasing. In 2006, a reassortant EHDV-6 was isolated from dead WTD in Indiana and has been detected each subsequent year over a wide geographic region. Since EHDV-6 is not a historically endemic serotype in the United States, it is important to understand infection outcome in potential hosts. Specifically, we aimed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the virus in 2 primary US ruminant hosts (WTD and cattle) and the susceptibility of a confirmed US vector (Culicoides sonorensis). Five WTD and 4 cattle were inoculated with >10(6)TCID50EHDV-6 by intradermal and subcutaneous injection. All 5 WTD exhibited moderate to severe disease, and 3 died. Viremia was first detected 3 to 5 days postinfection (dpi) with surviving animals seroconverting by 10 dpi. Two of 4 inoculated cattle had detectable viremia, 5 to 10 dpi and 7 to 24 dpi, respectively. No clinical, hematologic, or pathologic abnormalities were observed. Antibodies were detected by 10 dpi in 3 of 4 cows.C. sonorensis were fed on WTD blood spiked with EHDV-6 and held for 4 to 14 days postfeeding at 25°C. From 4 to 14 days postfeeding, 19 of 171 midges were virus isolation positive and 6 of 171 had ≥10(2.7)TCID50EHDV-6. Although outcomes varied, these studies demonstrate the susceptibility of ruminant and vector hosts in the United States for this recently emerged EHDV serotype. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. CAEP 2015 Academic Symposium: Current State and Recommendations to Achieve Adequate and Sustainable Funding for Emergency Medicine Academic Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Eddy S; Artz, Jennifer D; Wilkie, Ryan D; Stiell, Ian G; Topping, Claude; Belanger, François P; Afilalo, Marc; Renouf, Tia; Crocco, Anthony; Wyatt, Kelly; Christenson, Jim

    2016-05-01

    To describe the current state of academic emergency medicine (EM) funding in Canada and develop recommendations to grow and establish sustainable funding. A panel of eight leaders from different EM academic units was assembled. Using mixed methods (including a literature review, sharing of professional experiences, a survey of current EM academic heads, and data previously collected from an environmental scan), 10 recommendations were drafted and presented at an academic symposium. Attendee feedback was incorporated, and the second set of draft recommendations was further distributed to the Canadian Association Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section for additional comments before being finalized. Recommendations were developed around the funding challenges identified and solutions developed by academic EM university-based units across Canada. A strategic plan was seen as integral to achieving strong funding of an EM unit, especially when it aligned with departmental and institutional priorities. A business plan, although occasionally overlooked, was deemed an important component for planning and sustaining the academic mission. A number of recommendations surrounding philanthropy consisted of creating partnerships with existing foundations and engaging multiple stakeholders and communities. Synergy between academic and clinical EM departments was also viewed as an opportunity to ensure integration of common missions. Education and networking for current and future leaders were also viewed as invaluable to ensure that opportunities are optimized through strong leadership development and shared experiences to further the EM academic missions across the country. These recommendations were designed to improve the financial circumstances for many Canadian EM units. There is a considerable wealth of resources that can contribute to financial stability for an academic unit, and an annual networking meeting and continuing education on these issues will facilitate

  1. Mutual emergency assistance in the event of accident during transport of radioactive materials within the member states of the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selling, H.A.

    1984-01-01

    The study consist of a compilation of information on the relevant emergency response plans that are at present in existence in the ten countries of the European Community. Consideration is given to the development of proposals for facilitating co-operation between the emergency services in different countries, particularly with regard to accidents that might occur near national boundaries or in countries in which all the necessary resources might not be available. The particular items of interest covered in this study are: compilation of information on existing organizational emergency response arrangements within each Member State relating to accidents in the transport of radioactive materials by all modes, including road, rail, inland waterways, air and compilation of information on existing arrangements for receiving or providing assistance from or to other Member States. Identification of any avoidable incompatibilities on an international scale. Recommendations for improving the existing arrangements and for encouraging the development of adequate systems of mutual emergency notification, liaison and assistance as required by the circumstances, recommendations should be compatible with the broader framework of emergency response for all types of accidents developed within Member States and envisaged in the IAEA system for mutual emergency assistance

  2. Energy Management Strategy Based on Multiple Operating States for a Photovoltaic/Fuel Cell/Energy Storage DC Microgrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a great challenge for DC microgrids with stochastic renewable sources and volatility loads to achieve better operation performance. This study proposes an energy management strategy based on multiple operating states for a DC microgrid, which is comprised of a photovoltaic (PV array, a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC system, and a battery bank. This proposed strategy can share the power properly and keep the bus voltage steady under different operating states (the state of charge (SOC of the battery bank, loading conditions, and PV array output power. In addition, a microgrids test platform is established. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy, the strategy is implemented in a hardware system and experimentally tested under different operating states. The experimental results illustrate the good performance of the proposed control strategy for the DC microgrid under different scenarios of power generation and load demand.

  3. Risk management of emergency service vehicle crashes in the United States fire service: process, outputs, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, David P; Pollack Porter, Keshia; Griffin, Stephanie; French, Dustin D; Jung, Alesia M; Crothers, Stephen; Burgess, Jefferey L

    2017-11-17

    Emergency service vehicle crashes (ESVCs) are a leading cause of death in the United States fire service. Risk management (RM) is a proactive process for identifying occupational risks and reducing hazards and unwanted events through an iterative process of scoping hazards, risk assessment, and implementing controls. We describe the process, outputs, and lessons learned from the application of a proactive RM process to reduce ESVCs in US fire departments. Three fire departments representative of urban, suburban, and rural geographies, participated in a facilitated RM process delivered through focus groups and stakeholder discussion. Crash reports from department databases were reviewed to characterize the context, circumstances, hazards and risks of ESVCs. Identified risks were ranked using a risk matrix that considered risk likelihood and severity. Department-specific control measures were selected based on group consensus. Interviews, and focus groups were used to assess acceptability and utility of the RM process and perceived facilitators and barriers of implementation. Three to six RM meetings were conducted at each fire department. There were 7.4 crashes per 100 personnel in the urban department and 10.5 per 100 personnel in the suburban department; the rural department experienced zero crashes. All departments identified emergency response, backing, on scene struck by, driver distraction, vehicle/road visibility, and driver training as high or medium concerns. Additional high priority risks varied by department; the urban department prioritized turning and rear ending crashes; the suburban firefighters prioritized inclement weather/road environment and low visibility related crashes; and the rural volunteer fire department prioritized exiting station, vehicle failure, and inclement weather/road environment related incidents. Selected controls included new policies and standard operating procedures to reduce emergency response, cameras to enhance driver

  4. Solid-state supercapacitors with rationally designed heterogeneous electrodes fabricated by large area spray processing for wearable energy storage applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chun Huang; Jin Zhang; Neil P. Young; Henry J. Snaith; Patrick S. Grant

    2016-01-01

    Supercapacitors are in demand for short-term electrical charge and discharge applications. Unlike conventional supercapacitors, solid-state versions have no liquid electrolyte and do not require robust, rigid packaging for containment. Consequently they can be thinner, lighter and more flexible. However, solid-state supercapacitors suffer from lower power density and where new materials have been developed to improve performance, there remains a gap between promising laboratory results that u...

  5. Geomechanical Framework for Secure CO2 Storage in Fractured Reservoirs and Caprocks for Sedimentary Basins in theMidwest United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sminchak, Joel [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-09-29

    This report presents final technical results for the project Geomechanical Framework for Secure CO2 Storage in Fractured Reservoirs and Caprocks for Sedimentary Basins in the Midwest United States (DE-FE0023330). The project was a three-year effort consisting of seven technical tasks focused on defining geomechanical factors for CO2 storage applications in deep saline rock formations in Ohio and the Midwest United States, because geomechancial issues have been identified as a significant risk factor for large-scale CO2 storage applications. A basin-scale stress-strain analysis was completed to describe the geomechanical setting for rock formations of Ordovician-Cambrian age in Ohio and adjacent areas of the Midwest United States in relation to geologic CO2 storage applications. The tectonic setting, stress orientation-magnitude, and geomechanical and petrophysical parameters for CO2 storage zones and caprocks in the region were cataloged. Ten geophysical image logs were analyzed for natural fractures, borehole breakouts, and drilling-induced fractures. The logs indicated mostly less than 10 fractures per 100 vertical feet in the borehole, with mostly N65E principal stress orientation through the section. Geophysical image logs and other logs were obtained for three wells located near the sites where specific models were developed for geomechanical simulations: Arches site in Boone County, Kentucky; Northern Appalachian Basin site in Chautauqua County, New York; and E-Central Appalachian Basin site in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. For these three wells, 9,700 feet of image logs were processed and interpreted to provide a systematic review of the distribution within each well of natural fractures, wellbore breakouts, faults, and drilling induced fractures. There were many borehole breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures but few natural fractures. Concentrated fractures were present at the Rome-basal sandstone

  6. Regulation of the State Office of Nuclear Safety No. 318/2002 of 13 June 2002 specifying details to ensure emergency preparedness of nuclear facilities and workplaces handling ionizing radiation sources, and requirements for the contents of internal emergency plans and emergency rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Regulation addresses the following issues: definition of a radiological event and interventions to be accomplished if a radiological event takes place; emergency preparedness; establishing a radiological event; assessment of a radiological event; warnings, notifications and alarms during a radiological event; intervention - management, procedures, instructions; radiological situation monitoring programme; provisions to restrict human exposure; health care provisions; documentation; informing the State Office of Nuclear Safety; personnel instructions and training; emergency preparedness inspection; internal emergency plan; emergency rules; and related issues. This Regulation supersedes Regulation No. 219/1997. (P.A.)

  7. Solar district heating and seasonal heat storage - state of the art; Solare Nahwaerme und Saisonale Waermespeicherung - Stand der Technik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeil, M.; Hahne, E. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich Solarthermische Energietechnik; Lottner, V. [BEO Biologie, Energie Oekologie, Juelich (Germany); Schulz, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Thermodynamik und Waermetechnik

    1998-02-01

    Solar energy technology becomes more and more important for space and water heating of residential buildings. Compared to small systems for single-family houses, the specific investment cost of big solar plants is lower and a higher contribution of solar energy can be achieved. In central solar heating plants with seasonal storage (CSHPSS), more than 50% of the total heat demand of residential areas can be covered by solar energy. The first pilot plants for CSHPSS are operating in Germany since 1996. The first results of the accompanying monitoring program show good agreement between calculated and actual solar contribution. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Nutzung solarer Niedertemperaturwaerme zur Brauchwassererwaermung und zur Beheizung von Wohngebaeuden erfaehrt in Deutschland ein immer groesseres Interesse. Solare Grossanlagen haben gegenueber solaren Kleinanlagen den Vorteil, dass mit geringeren Investitions- und Waermekosten groessere Anlagenertraege erzielt werden koennen. In Verbindung mit saisonaler Waermespeicherung erreichen solare Grossanlagen Deckungsanteile von 50% und darueber am Gesamtwaermebedarf von Wohnsiedlungen. Die ersten Pilotanlagen zur solaren Nahwaerme mit saisonalem Waermespeicher gingen 1996 in Betrieb und werden derzeit detailliert vermessen. Erste Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die vorausberechneten Werte fuer den Jahresenergieertrag erreicht werden koennen. (orig.)

  8. Neutron storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The report is devoted to neutron storage (NS) and describes the history of experiments on the NS development. Great attention is paid to ultracold neutron (UCN) storage. The experiments on the UCN generation, transport, spectroscopy, storage and detection are described. Experiments on searching the UCN electric-dipole moment and electric charge are continued. Possible using of UCN for studying the nanoparticles is discussed [ru

  9. Energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odru, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book proposes a broad overview of the technologies developed in the domains of on-board electricity storage (batteries, super-capacitors, flywheels), stationary storage (hydraulic dams, compressed air, batteries and hydrogen), and heat storage (sensible, latent and sorption) together with their relative efficiency, their expected developments and what advantages they can offer. Eminent specialists of this domain have participated to the redaction of this book, all being members of the Tuck's Foundation 'IDees' think tank. (J.S.)

  10. Energy storage

    CERN Document Server

    Brunet, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Energy storage examines different applications such as electric power generation, transmission and distribution systems, pulsed systems, transportation, buildings and mobile applications. For each of these applications, proper energy storage technologies are foreseen, with their advantages, disadvantages and limits. As electricity cannot be stored cheaply in large quantities, energy has to be stored in another form (chemical, thermal, electromagnetic, mechanical) and then converted back into electric power and/or energy using conversion systems. Most of the storage technologies are examined: b

  11. Tritium storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hircq, B.

    1989-01-01

    A general synthesis about tritium storage is achieved in this paper and a particular attention is given to practical application in the Fusion Technology Program. Tritium, storage under gaseous form and solid form are discussed (characteristics, advantages, disadvantages and equipments). The way of tritium storage is then discussed and a choice established as a function of a logic which takes into account the main working parameters

  12. A new storage-ring light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A recently proposed technique in storage ring accelerators is applied to provide potential high-power sources of photon radiation. The technique is based on the steady-state microbunching (SSMB) mechanism. As examples of this application, one may consider a high-power DUV photon source for research in atomic and molecular physics or a high-power EUV radiation source for industrial lithography. A less challenging proof-of-principle test to produce IR radiation using an existing storage ring is also considered.

  13. Head injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J Scott

    2004-03-01

    To examine the number and rates of head injuries occurring in the community as a whole for the team sports of ice hockey, soccer, and football by analyzing data from patients presenting to US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 to 1999. Retrospective analysis. Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System were used to generate estimates for the total number of head injuries, concussions, internal head injuries, and skull fractures occurring on a national level from the years 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injuries presenting to the ED for each sport. There were an estimated 17,008 head injuries from ice hockey, 86,697 from soccer, and 204,802 from football that presented to US EDs from 1990 to 1999. The total number of concussions presenting to EDs in the United States over the same period was estimated to be 4820 from ice hockey, 21,715 from soccer, and 68,861 from football. While the rates of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/internal head injuries/skull fractures presenting to EDs per 10,000 players were not always statistically similar for all 3 sports in each year data were available, they were usually comparable. While the total numbers of head injuries, concussions, and combined concussions/skull fractures/internal head injuries presenting to EDs in the United States are different for ice hockey, soccer, and football for the years studied, the yearly rates for these injuries are comparable among all 3 sports.

  14. Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, David

    2017-07-01

    As renewable energy use expands there will be a need to develop ways to balance its variability. Storage is one of the options. Presently the main emphasis is for systems storing electrical power in advanced batteries (many of them derivatives of parallel developments in the electric vehicle field), as well as via liquid air storage, compressed air storage, super-capacitors and flywheels, and, the leader so far, pumped hydro reservoirs. In addition, new systems are emerging for hydrogen generation and storage, feeding fuel cell power production. Heat (and cold) is also a storage medium and some systems exploit thermal effects as part of wider energy management activity. Some of the more exotic ones even try to use gravity on a large scale. This short book looks at all the options, their potentials and their limits. There are no clear winners, with some being suited to short-term balancing and others to longer-term storage. The eventual mix adopted will be shaped by the pattern of development of other balancing measures, including smart-grid demand management and super-grid imports and exports.

  15. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along

  16. S. 2258: Independent Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Act of 1990. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, March 8, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the United States Senate March 8, 1990. The purpose of the bill is to amend the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 to allow commercial nuclear utilities that have contracts with the Secretary of Energy under section 302 of that Act to receive credits to offset the cost of storing spent fuel that the Secretary is unable to accept for storage on and after January 31, 1998. The credits will be deducted from each remittance of a person's fee payments to the Nuclear Waste Fund and will be in the amount of 0.56 mil per kilowatt-hour for electricity generated by the person's civilian nuclear power reactor and sold during the period the person is eligible for the credit

  17. Multi-dimensional modeling of a thermal energy storage canister. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., Dec. 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Power Module being developed for Space Station Freedom uses a eutectic mixture of LiF-CaF2 phase change material (PCM) contained in toroidal canisters for thermal energy storage. Presented are the results from heat transfer analyses of a PCM containment canister. One and two dimensional finite difference computer models are developed to analyze heat transfer in the canister walls, PCM, void, and heat engine working fluid coolant. The modes of heat transfer considered include conduction in canister walls and solid PCM, conduction and pseudo-free convection in liquid PCM, conduction and radiation across PCM vapor filled void regions, and forced convection in the heat engine working fluid. Void shape, location, growth or shrinkage (due to density difference between the solid and liquid PCM phases) are prescribed based on engineering judgment. The PCM phase change process is analyzed using the enthalpy method. The discussion of the results focuses on how canister thermal performance is affected by free convection in the liquid PCM and void heat transfer. Characterizing these effects is important for interpreting the relationship between ground-based canister performance (in 1-g) and expected on-orbit performance (in micro-g). Void regions accentuate canister hot spots and temperature gradients due to their large thermal resistance. Free convection reduces the extent of PCM superheating and lowers canister temperatures during a portion of the PCM thermal charge period. Surprisingly small differences in canister thermal performance result from operation on the ground and operation on-orbit. This lack of a strong gravity dependency is attributed to the large contribution of container walls in overall canister energy redistribution by conduction.

  18. Fundamentally Addressing Bromine Storage through Reversible Solid-State Confinement in Porous Carbon Electrodes: Design of a High-Performance Dual-Redox Electrochemical Capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seung Joon; Evanko, Brian; Wang, Xingfeng; Romelczyk, Monica; Taylor, Aidan; Ji, Xiulei; Boettcher, Shannon W; Stucky, Galen D

    2017-07-26

    Research in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) and rechargeable batteries is converging to target systems that have battery-level energy density and capacitor-level cycling stability and power density. This research direction has been facilitated by the use of redox-active electrolytes that add faradaic charge storage to increase energy density of the EDLCs. Aqueous redox-enhanced electrochemical capacitors (redox ECs) have, however, performed poorly due to cross-diffusion of soluble redox couples, reduced cycle life, and low operating voltages. In this manuscript, we propose that these challenges can be simultaneously met by mechanistically designing a liquid-to-solid phase transition of oxidized catholyte (or reduced anolyte) with confinement in the pores of electrodes. Here we demonstrate the realization of this approach with the use of bromide catholyte and tetrabutylammonium cation that induces reversible solid-state complexation of Br 2 /Br 3 - . This mechanism solves the inherent cross-diffusion issue of redox ECs and has the added benefit of greatly stabilizing the reactive bromine generated during charging. Based on this new mechanistic insight on the utilization of solid-state bromine storage in redox ECs, we developed a dual-redox EC consisting of a bromide catholyte and an ethyl viologen anolyte with the addition of tetrabutylammonium bromide. In comparison to aqueous and organic electric double-layer capacitors, this system enhances energy by factors of ca. 11 and 3.5, respectively, with a specific energy of ∼64 W·h/kg at 1 A/g, a maximum power density >3 kW/kg, and cycling stability over 7000 cycles.

  19. Leadership emergence over time in short-lived groups: Integrating expectations states theory with temporal person-perception and self-serving bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalish, Yuval; Luria, Gil

    2016-10-01

    Research into leadership emergence typically focuses on the attributes of the emergent leader. By considering also the attributes of perceivers and the passage of time, we develop a more complete theory of leadership emergence in short-lived groups. Using expectation states theory as an overarching theoretical framework, and integrating it with the surface- and deep-level diversity literature and with theories of self-serving biases, we examine the predictors of leadership emergence in short timeframes. We conduct a field study in a military assessment boot camp (a pilot study, n = 60; and a main study, n = 89). We use cross-sectional and longitudinal exponential random graph models to analyze data on participants' abilities and on their perceptions of who, in their respective groups, were "leaders." We find that the criteria by which people perceive leadership in others change over time, from easily noticeable attributes to covert leadership-relevant attributes, and that people also rely on leadership-relevant attributes that they possess at high levels to inform their perceptions of leadership in others. The integration of expectation states theory, attribute salience over time and theories of self-serving bias is needed for a full understanding of leadership emergence in groups, because perceivers' own abilities are instrumental in shaping their perceptions of emergent leadership over time. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Determination of presence and quantification of cadmium, lead and copper in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus fillets obtained from three cold storage plants in the state of Parana, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Nobuhiro Tajiri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pisciculture is an economic activity that is steadily growing in the state of Parana, Brazil, and Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus is one of the widely cultivated species in this state. Tilapia is not only a very nutritious food, but also an important indicator of environmental contamination. This study aimed to verify contamination by cadmium, copper and lead in tilapia fillets, and to compare the found values to international legislations. Were collected 135 samples of tilapia fillets, between July 2006 and May 2007, in three fish stores located in regions west and north of Paraná State. Samples of tilapia fillet were analyzed in relation to the presence of cadmiun, lead and copper, using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Lead has not been detected in the analyses. Cadmium has been detected in three samples, on concentrations of 0.012 µg.g-1, 0.011 µg.g-1 and 0.014 µg.g-1. Copper has been detected in all fillets, and the average concentration of each cold storage plant was of 0.122 µg.g-1, 0.106 µg.g-1 and 0.153 µg.g-1. The concentrations found in this study are within the limits allowed by both the European and the Australian legislations.

  1. Radioactive waste storage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state's boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected

  2. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johannes Bernardus Charles; Khatib, M.G.; Koelmans, W.W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data

  3. Youth Versus Adult “Weightlifting” Injuries Presenting to United States Emergency Rooms: Accidental Versus Nonaccidental Injury Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Khoury, Jane; Wall, Eric J.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Myer, GD, Quatman, CE, Khoury, J, Wall, EJ, and Hewett, TE. Youth versus adult “weightlifting” injuries presenting to united states emergency rooms: accidental versus nonaccidental injury mechanisms. J Strength Cond Res 23(7): 2054–2060, 2009—Resistance training has previously been purported to be unsafe and ineffective in children. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate resistance training-related injuries presenting to U.S. emergency rooms by age, type, and mechanism of injury. We hypothesized that older athletes would sustain greater percentages of joint sprains and muscle strains, whereas younger athletes would sustain a greater percentage of accidental injuries that would result in an increased percentage of fractures in youths. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was queried from 2002 to 2005 using the CPSC code for “Weightlifting.” Subjects between the ages of 8 and 30 were grouped by age categories 8 to 13 (elementary/middle school age), 14 to 18 (high school), 19 to 22 (college), and 23 to 30 (adult). Injuries were classified as “accidental” if caused by dropped weight or improper equipment use. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare accidental injuries between age groups. The sample consisted of 4, 111 patients. Accidental injuries decreased (p 14 to 18 > 19 to 22 years = 23 to 30 years. Conversely, sprain/strain injuries increased in each successive age group (p injuries (n = 2, 565) showed that the oldest categories (19–22 and 23–30 yr) demonstrated a greater percentage of sprains and strains relative to younger age categories (p injuries sustained in the 8 to 13 group were to the hand and foot and were most often related to “dropping” and “pinching” in the injury descriptions, and there was an increased percentage of fractures in the 8 to 13 group relative to all other groups (p injuries are the result of accidents that are potentially

  4. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76).

  5. Financial assistance to states and tribes to support emergency preparedness and response and the safe transportation of hazardous shipments: 1996 Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, J.A.; Leyson, J.; Lester, M.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report revises and updates the 1995 report Financial Assistance to States and Tribes to Support Emergency Preparedness and Response and the Safe Transportation of Hazardous Shipments, PNL-10260 (UC-620). The presentation of data and some of the data reported have been changed; these data supersede those presented in the earlier publication. All data have been updated to fiscal year 1995, with the exception of FEMA data that are updated to fiscal year 1994 only. The report identifies and summarizes existing sources of financial assistance to States and Tribes in preparing and responding to transportation emergencies and ensuring the safe transportation of hazardous shipments through their jurisdictions. It is intended for use as an information resource for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Transportation, Emergency Management, and Analytical Services (EM-76)

  6. Storage of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Even if the best waste minimization measures are undertaken throughout radioisotope production or usage, significant radioactive wastes arise to make management measures essential. For developing countries with low isotope usage and little or no generation of nuclear materials, it may be possible to handle the generated waste by simply practicing decay storage for several half-lives of the radionuclides involved, followed by discharge or disposal without further processing. For those countries with much larger facilities, longer lived isotopes are produced and used. In this situation, storage is used not only for decay storage but also for in-process retention steps and for the key stage of interim storage of conditioned wastes pending final disposal. The report will serve as a technical manual providing reference material and direct step-by-step know-how to staff in radioisotope user establishments and research centres in the developing Member States without nuclear power generation. Considerations are limited to the simpler storage facilities. The restricted quantities and low activity associated with the relevant wastes will generally permit contact-handling and avoid the need for shielding requirements in the storage facilities or equipment used for handling. A small quantity of wastes from some radioisotope production cells and from reactor cooling water treatment may contain sufficient short lived activity from activated corrosion products to require some separate decay storage before contact-handling is suitable. 16 refs, 12 figs, 8 tabs

  7. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report is part of a dangerous waste permit application for the storage of wastes from the Purex process at Hanford. Appendices are presented on the following: construction drawings; HSW-5638, specifications for disposal facility for failed equipment, Project CA-1513-A; HWS-8262, specification for Purex equipment disposal, Project CGC 964; storage tunnel checklist; classification of residual tank heels in Purex storage tunnels; emergency plan for Purex facility; training course descriptions; and the Purex storage tunnels engineering study

  8. The Ability of the United States Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center to Collect and Disseminate Environmental Measurements during Radiological Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marianno, Craig; Essex, James

    2007-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is the United States response organization for radiological emergencies. The FRMAC is structured as an operations center and employs the combined resources of several federal agencies to respond to any disaster resulting in the release of radioactivity. The mission of the FRMAC is to support state and local authorities in the gathering of environmental data using an array of survey equipment ranging from alpha probes, beta/gamma probes, and high-purity germanium (HPGe) spectroscopy to the gathering of physical samples. Once collected, the data are projected on maps to assist public officials make protective action decisions. In addition to the accumulation of data, it is the legal obligation of the FRMAC to keep archival records of all data points and their actions. During an event, it is conceivable that hundreds to thousands of sample points will be recorded over a relatively short time. It is in the interest of the federal government and public that the information collected be put to the best use as fast as possible. Toward this end, the Remote Sensing Laboratory, working under the direction of the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, is investigating the use of several technologies that will accelerate data flow from field teams to the FRMAC and, finally, distribution of data to decision makers and the public. Not only can finished data products be viewed through the internet, but the actual collection of data via 'real-time' telemetry can be viewed using this same method. Data from the field will be transferred directly to the FRMAC using the MCPD (multi-path communication device). This base station receives the survey information from the field teams via Bluetooth and instantly investigates the best communication pathway to transfer data to the FRMAC. Possible paths include standalone radio, commercial cellular networks (GPRS and CDMA) and satellite

  9. Emergency procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Nasir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohammad Pauzi Ismail

    2004-01-01

    The following subjects are discussed - Emergency Procedures: emergency equipment, emergency procedures; emergency procedure involving X-Ray equipment; emergency procedure involving radioactive sources

  10. Coping with the emergence of new sovereignties over sustainability: Dilemmas and decision-making of the Indonesian state in a plural legal order

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospes, O.; Schouten, A.M.; Deike, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes how the Indonesian state copes with the emergence of global networks of business and civil society as new sovereigns over sustainability of an economically very important activity on its territory: the production of palm oil. Indonesia is the largest producer and exporter of

  11. Post-Coma Persons Emerged from a Minimally Conscious State and Showing Multiple Disabilities Learn to Manage a Radio-Listening Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Colonna, Fabio; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed microswitch-based technology to enable three post-coma adults, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state but presented motor and communication disabilities, to operate a radio device. The material involved a modified radio device, a microprocessor-based electronic control unit, a personal microswitch, and an amplified…

  12. Technology-Aided Leisure and Communication Opportunities for Two Post-Coma Persons Emerged from a Minimally Conscious State and Affected by Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed technology-aided programs for helping two post-coma persons, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state and were affected by multiple disabilities, to (a) engage with leisure stimuli and request caregiver's procedures, (b) send out and listen to text messages for communication with distant partners, and (c) combine…

  13. Post-coma persons emerging from a minimally conscious state with multiple disabilities make technology-aided phone contacts with relevant partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Oliva, D.; Campodonico, F.; D'Amico, F.; Buonocunto, F.; Sacco, V.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Post-coma individuals emerging from a minimally conscious state with multiple disabilities may enjoy contact with relevant partners (e.g., family members and friends), but may not have easy access to them. These two single-case studies assessed whether those individuals could make contact with

  14. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  15. A rechargeable solid-state proton battery with an intercalating cathode and an anode containing a hydrogen-storage material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, K.; Lakshmi, N.; Chandra, S. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1998-11-01

    Rechargeable proton batteries have been fabricated with the configuration Zn+ZnSO{sub 4} x 7H{sub 2}O//solid-state proton conductor//C+electrolyte+intercalating PbO{sub 2}+V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The solid-state proton conductor is phosphotungstic acid (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} x nH{sub 2}O) or a H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} x nH{sub 2}O+Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 16H{sub 2}O composite. The maximum cell voltage is {proportional_to}1.8 V at full charge. The cell can run for more than 300 h at low current drain (2.5 {mu}A cm{sup -2}). Further, the cell can withstand 20 to 30 cycles. The addition of a metal hydride in the anode side enhances the rechargeability and the addition of a small amount of Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} x 16H{sub 2}O in the H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} x nH{sub 2}O electrolyte improves the performance of the battery. (orig.)

  16. A rechargeable solid-state proton battery with an intercalating cathode and an anode containing a hydrogen-storage material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kamlesh; Lakshmi, N.; Chandra, S.

    Rechargeable proton batteries have been fabricated with the configuration Zn+ZnSO 4·7H 2O//solid-state proton conductor//C+electrolyte+intercalating PbO 2+V 2O 5. The solid-state proton conductor is phosphotungstic acid (H 3PW 12O 40· nH 2O) or a H 3PW 12O 40· nH 2O+Al 2(SO 4) 3·16H 2O composite. The maximum cell voltage is ˜1.8 V at full charge. The cell can run for more than 300 h at low current drain (2.5 μA cm -2). Further, the cell can withstand 20 to 30 cycles. The addition of a metal hydride in the anode side enhances the rechargeability and the addition of a small amount of Al 2(SO 4) 3·16H 2O in the H 3PW 12O 40· nH 2O electrolyte improves the performance of the battery.

  17. 77 FR 65718 - Announcement Regarding States Triggering “On” and “Off” in the Emergency Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... Triggering ``On'' and ``Off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program AGENCY... Triggering ``on'' and ``off'' in the Emergency Unemployment Compensation 2008 (EUC08) Program. The U.S... of the maximum regular Unemployment Compensation (UC) entitlement or 14 times the regular UC weekly...

  18. 78 FR 60283 - Guidance for Temporary Reassignment of State and Local Personnel During a Public Health Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Personnel During a Public Health Emergency AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the... and Local Personnel during a Public Health Emergency.'' Section 201 of the Pandemic and All-Hazards Preparedness Reauthorization Act of 2013 (PAHPRA), Public Law 113-5, amends section 319 of the Public Health...

  19. Point sources of emerging contaminants along the Colorado River Basin: Source water for the arid Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Lepp, Tammy L.; Sanchez, Charles; Alvarez, David A.; Wilson, Doyle C.; Taniguchi-Fu, Randi-Laurant

    2012-01-01

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) (e.g., pharmaceuticals, illicit drugs, personal care products) have been detected in waters across the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate point sources of ECs along the Colorado River, from the headwaters in Colorado to the Gulf of California. At selected locations in the Colorado River Basin (sites in Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and California), waste stream tributaries and receiving surface waters were sampled using either grab sampling or polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS). The grab samples were extracted using solid-phase cartridge extraction (SPE), and the POCIS sorbents were transferred into empty SPEs and eluted with methanol. All extracts were prepared for, and analyzed by, liquid chromatography–electrospray-ion trap mass spectrometry (LC–ESI-ITMS). Log DOW values were calculated for all ECs in the study and compared to the empirical data collected. POCIS extracts were screened for the presence of estrogenic chemicals using the yeast estrogen screen (YES) assay. Extracts from the 2008 POCIS deployment in the Las Vegas Wash showed the second highest estrogenicity response. In the grab samples, azithromycin (an antibiotic) was detected in all but one urban waste stream, with concentrations ranging from 30 ng/L to 2800 ng/L. Concentration levels of azithromycin, methamphetamine and pseudoephedrine showed temporal variation from the Tucson WWTP. Those ECs that were detected in the main surface water channels (those that are diverted for urban use and irrigation along the Colorado River) were in the region of the limit-of-detection (e.g., 10 ng/L), but most were below detection limits.

  20. Summary report of already published guidance on L2 PSA for external hazards, shutdown states, spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirksen, Gerben; Sauvage, Estelle

    2014-01-01

    This report (deliverable D40.2 of the project ASAMPSA-E) proposes a review of the existing guidance with relevance to ASAMPSA-E PSA Level 2 topics (external hazards, shutdown states, spent fuel pool). As a complement of this task, the deliverable D40.2 tries to identify any potential missing guidance for the development of an extended PSA level 2, and any sources of knowledge beyond existing guidance which might help generating extended PSA level 2. Based on this approach the last section provides a summary compilation which identifies possibilities for completing existing guidelines (especially the guidance developed in the previous ASAMPSA2 project) and/or creating new guidelines for extended PSA Level 2. (authors)