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Sample records for steel stress corrosion

  1. Stress corrosion of low alloy steel forgings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, D.V.; Mould, P.B.; Patrick, E.C.

    1976-01-01

    The catastrophic failure of a steam turbine rotor disc at Hinkley Point 'A' Power station was shown to have been caused by the growth of a stress corrosion crack to critical dimensions. This failure has promoted great interest in the stress corrosion susceptibility of medium strength low alloy steel forgings in steam environments. Consequently, initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks of typical disc steels have been investigated in steam and also in water at 95 0 C. Cracking has been shown to occur, predominantly in an intergranular manner, with growth rates of between 10 -9 and 10 -7 mm sec. -1 . It is observed that corrosion pitting and oxide penetration prior to the establishment of a stress corrosion crack in the plain samples. (author)

  2. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic chloride solution was studied by slow strain rate (SSR) ... Stress corrosion cracking; chloride; stainless steel; inhibitor. 1. Introduction. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) ..... Xi'an Jiaotong University Press) (in Chinese). Huang Y L, Cao C N, Lu M and Lin ...

  3. Resistance of Some Steels to Stress Corrosion Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Evaluations of stress-corrosion cracking resistance of five high-strength low-alloy steels described in report now available. Steels were heat-treated to various tensile strengths and found to be highly resistant to stress-corrosion cracking.

  4. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Type 304 Stainless Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Louthan, M

    1964-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel exposed in dilute chloride solutions is being investigated at the Savannah River Laboratory in attempts to develop a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon...

  5. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  6. Corrosion under stress of AISI 304 steel in thiocyanate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, P.M.; Duffo, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion susceptibility under stress of AISI 304 steel sensitized in a sodium thiocyanate solution has been studied and results were compared with those obtained with solutions of thiosulfate and tetrathionate. Sensitized steel type 304 is highly susceptible to corrosion when under intergranular stress (IGSCC) in thiocyanate solutions but the aggressiveness of this anion is less than that of the other sulphur anions studied (thiosulfate and tetrathionate). This work has been partly carried out in the Chemistry Department. (Author) [es

  7. Stress corrosion cracking properties of 15-5PH steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ferdinand

    1993-01-01

    Unexpected occurrence of failures, due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of structural components, indicate a need for improved characterization of materials and more advanced analytical procedures for reliably predicting structures performance. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to determine the stress corrosion susceptibility of 15-5PH steel over a wide range of applied strain rates in a highly corrosive environment. The selected environment for this investigation was a highly acidified sodium chloride (NaCl) aqueous solution. The selected alloy for the study was a 15-5PH steel in the H900 condition. The slow strain rate technique was selected to test the metals specimens.

  8. Stress Corrosion-Cracking and Corrosion Fatigue Impact of IZ-C17+ Zinc Nickel on 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    corrosion, cracking, corrosion fatigue impact, zinc-nickel, steel , metallic coating 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...REPORT NO: NAWCADPAX/TIM-2016/189 STRESS CORROSION-CRACKING AND CORROSION FATIGUE IMPACT OF IZ-C17+ ZINC-NICKEL ON 4340 STEEL by...CORROSION-CRACKING AND CORROSION FATIGUE IMPACT OF IZ-C17+ ZINC-NICKEL ON 4340 STEEL by Craig Matzdorf Charles Lei Matt Stanley

  9. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOOMER, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed

  10. Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Behaviors of Low and Medium Carbon Steels in Agro-Fluid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out to study critically the corrosion behaviour and Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC of low and medium carbon steels in cassava and cocoa extracts by weight loss measurement and constant extension to fracture method respectively. The results obtained showed that medium carbon steel is more susceptible to corrosion than low carbon steel in both media. SCC is also more in medium carbon steel than low carbon steel in the two media under study. These deductions are due to higher carbon content in medium carbon steel coupled with various aggressive corrosion constituents contained in these media. Hydrogen embrittlement, as well as carbon cracking, is responsible for SCC of these materials in the agro-fluid media.

  11. Ambient temperature stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieradzki, K.; Isaacs, H.S.; Newman, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking of sensitized Type 304 steel in low temperature borated water has been observed. The probable role of low levels of chloride ions or sulfur-containing ions is described, including the relationship of the phenomenon to polythionic acid cracking. The mechanism of the sulfur-induced cracking and its usefulness as a test for sensitization are outlined

  12. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  13. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saithala, Janardhan R.

    An investigation has been performed to determine the pitting resistance of stainless steels and stress corrosion cracking of super duplex stainless steels in water containing chloride ions from 25 - 170°C. The steels studied are 12% Cr, FV520B, FV566, 304L, Uranus65, 2205, Ferallium Alloy 255, and Zeron 100. All these commercial materials used in very significant industrial applications and suffer from pitting and stress corrosion failures. The design of a new experimental setup using an autoclave enabled potentiodynamic polarisation experiments and slow strain rate tests in dilute environments to be conducted at elevated temperatures. The corrosion potentials were controlled using a three electrode cell with computer controlled potentiostat.The experimental programme to determine pitting potentials was designed to simulate the service conditions experienced in most industrial plants and develop mathematical model equations to help a design engineer in material selection decision. Stress corrosion resistance of recently developed Zeron100 was evaluated in dilute environments to propose a mechanism in chloride solutions at high' temperatures useful for the nuclear and power generation industry. Results have shown the significance of the composition of alloying elements across a wide range of stainless steels and its influence on pitting. Nitrogen and molybdenum added to modern duplex stainless steels was found to be unstable at higher temperatures. The fractographic results obtained using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has given insight in the initiation of pitting in modem duplex and super duplex stainless steels. A mathematical model has been proposed to predict pitting in stainless steels based on the effect of environmental factors (temperature, chloride concentration, and chemical composition). An attempt has been made to identify the mechanism of SCC in Zeron100 super duplex stainless steel.The proposed empirical models have shown good correlation

  14. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of 18 Ni maraging steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of 18Ni maraging steel (grades 200, 250, 300, and 350) was determined in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) solution, synthetic sea water, high humidity, and outside MSFC atmosphere. All grades of the maraging steel were found to be susceptible to SCC in varying degrees according to their strengths, with the lowest strength steel (grade 200) being the least susceptible and the highest strength steel (grade 350), the most susceptible to SCC. The SCC resistance of 250 grade maraging steel was also evaluated in salt and salt-chromate solutions using fracture mechanics techniques. The threshold value, K sub SCC, was found to be approximately 44 MN/sq m square root m, (40 ksi square root in.) or 40 percent of the K sub Q value.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Ananya

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) with roughly equal amount of austenite and ferrite phases are being used in industries such as petrochemical, nuclear, pulp and paper mills, de-salination plants, marine environments, and others. However, many DSS grades have been reported to undergo corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in some aggressive environments such as chlorides and sulfide-containing caustic solutions. Although stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in chloride solution has been investigated and well documented in the literature but the SCC mechanisms for DSS in caustic solutions were not known. Microstructural changes during fabrication processes affect the overall SCC susceptibility of these steels in caustic solutions. Other environmental factors, like pH of the solution, temperature, and resulting electrochemical potential also influence the SCC susceptibility of duplex stainless steels. In this study, the role of material and environmental parameters on corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in caustic solutions were investigated. Changes in the DSS microstructure by different annealing and aging treatments were characterized in terms of changes in the ratio of austenite and ferrite phases, phase morphology and intermetallic precipitation using optical micrography, SEM, EDS, XRD, nano-indentation and microhardness methods. These samples were then tested for general and localized corrosion susceptibility and SCC to understand the underlying mechanisms of crack initiation and propagation in DSS in the above-mentioned environments. Results showed that the austenite phase in the DSS is more susceptible to crack initiation and propagation in caustic solutions, which is different from that in the low pH chloride environment where the ferrite phase is the more susceptible phase. This study also showed that microstructural changes in duplex stainless steels due to different heat treatments could affect their SCC

  16. Stress corrosion crack growth rates and general corrosion rates at crack tips of steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.

    1995-01-01

    The maximum stress corrosion crack growth rates for a number of structural materials (steels and nickel alloys) have been measured in 288 C water. Also, the general corrosion rates of these materials have been determined from weight loss experiments in simulated stress corrosion crack tip electrolytes at 288 C. It is shown that the stress corrosion crack growth rates are typically twenty times faster than the general corrosion rates. This correlation holds over five orders of magnitude. It is concluded that strategies to prevent stress corrosion cracking in high temperature aqueous environments might include alloys of higher general corrosion resistance

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of A515 grade 60 carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.L.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of welding method plate thickness, and subsequent stress relief treatment on the stress corrosion cracking propensity of ASTM A515 Grade 60 carbon steel plate exposed to a 5 M NaNO 3 solution at 190 0 F for eight weeks. It was found that all weld coupons receiving no thermal stress relief treatment cracked within eight weeks; all weld coupons given a vibratory stress relief cracked within eight weeks; two of the eight weld coupons stress relieved at 600 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; none of the weld coupons stress relieved at 1100 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; and that cracking was generally more severe in coupons fabricated from 7/8 inch plate by shielded metal arc welding than it was in coupons fabricated by other welding methods. (U.S.)

  18. Guidelines for controlling stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue of stainless steels: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjanne, Pekka; Haenninen, Hannu

    1992-11-01

    Guidelines for obtaining and using Environmentally Assisted Cracking (EAC) test data for stainless steels, which are used in a wide range of industrial applications, are presented. Both fracture mechanics and non fracture mechanics tests and test results for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion Fatigue (CF) are considered, but the emphasis is on using fracture mechanics as part of an overall strategy (a fracture control plan) to prevent or control EAC in service. Various threshold values for cracking to occur are reviewed based on loading, electrochemistry, solution chemistry, and temperature.

  19. Stress-corrosion susceptibility of highway bridge construction steels. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-04-01

    A catalog of steels used in highway bridge construction has been developed. A state-of-the-art survey on the stress-corrosion susceptibility of these steels has been conducted. The types and concentrations of corrosives that can be experienced in the...

  20. Enhanced stress corrosion resistance from steels having a dual-phase austenite-martensite microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, T.V.; Baker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel with an austenite-martensite duplex microstructure has been produced by extruding nickel coated steel powder. The austenite is present as a continuous network surrounding a high strength martensite. The steel exhibits superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 pct NaCl solution, the effectiveness of the austenite in improving stress corrosion cracking resistance increases as yield strength increases. The austenite reduces the effective stress intensity at the advancing crack tip and at the same time shields the crack tip from the corrosive environment

  1. Stress-corrosion crack initiation behavior of carbon steel in simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Koki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Kazuo; Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1994-01-01

    Carbon steels and low-alloy steels are said to possess, even though susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking themselves, conspicuously longer life than weld-sensitized Type 304 stainless steels in actual boiling water reactor (BWR) primary coolant environments of high-temperature, high-purity water containing some dissolved oxygen. This has been examined for a carbon steel pipe material and its weld by conducting uniaxial constant-load tests as a laboratory accelerated test. By statistically analyzing the distribution of stress-corrosion cracking lifetimes and metallographical examining the features of stress-corrosion crack initiation in an SEM, following results have been obtained: (1) the stress-corrosion cracking lifetime obeys the exponential distribution model; (2) stress-corrosion cracks are initiated at the bottom of corrosion pits, and it appears possible to analyze their initiation conditions in terms of stress-intensity calculated regarding the pit as a sharp crack; (3) the microcracks as initiated at the corrosion pit are non-propagative per se, so that it is only when they have grown into a main crack by coalescence with nearby microcracks that steady propagation becomes possible; and (4) both the process of pit initiation and that of microcrack coalescence can be described as a Poisson stochastic process just as for the stainless steels in the same environment, so that the whole process of stress-corrosion crack initiation can be conceived as consisting of these two independent Poisson stochastic processes connected in serial succession

  2. High temperature and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride corrosive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pornpibunsompop

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of 310S austenitic stainless steel in wet chloride environment at a high temperature was investigated. The result showed that high temperature corrosion products mostly consisted of ferrous oxides and chromium oxides. Chloride ions attacked a chromium passive film and strongly reacted with iron and chromium. As a result of metal chlorides being volatized, tunnel of pores inside corrosion layer existed. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking was observed. The oxide originated on surface could act as a crack initiator and a crack propagation would progress along grain boundaries and particularly along tunnel of pores.

  3. A contribution to the question of stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel cladding in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupka, I.; Mrkous, P.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review is presented of the basic types of corrosion damage (uniform corrosion, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion) and their influence on operational safety are estimated. Corrosion cracking is analyzed of austenitic stainless steel cladding taking into account the adverse impact of coolant and stress (both operational and residual) in a light water reactor primary circuit. Experimental data are given of residual stresses in the stainless steel clad material, as well as their magnitude and distribution after cladding and heat treatment. (author)

  4. In situ TEM study of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.X.; Chu, W.Y.; Wang, Y.B.; Qiao, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A constant deflection device designed for use within a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to investigate the change in dislocation configuration ahead of a crack tip during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of type 310 austenitic stainless steel in a boiling MgCl 2 solution, and the initiation of stress corrosion microcracking. Results showed that crack tip corrosion processes during SCC-enhanced dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. SCC microcracks initiated when the corrosion-enhanced dislocation emission and motion had fully develop. A passive film formed during corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in the boiling MgCl 2 solution generated a tensile stress. During SCC, the additive tensile stress generated at the metal/passive film interface assists the applied stress to enhance dislocation emission and motion

  5. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundaries of retained austenite on rate anddevelopment of stress corrosion processes. The lowest corrosion resistance was obtained for W3 steel characterized by high contents ofmolybdenum (2.94% Mo which should be connected with the intensity precipitate processes of Fe2Mo phase. For steels W1 and W2which contents molybdenum equals 1.02% and 1.88%, respectively were obtained similar courses of corrosive cracking.

  6. Stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, M.O.; Magdowski, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents an extensive investigation of stress corrosion cracking of nuclear reactor pressure vessel and piping steels exposed to hot water. Experimental fracture mechanics results are compared with data from the literature and other laboratories. Thus a comprehensive overview of the present knowledge concerning stress corrosion crack growth rates is provided. Several sets of data confirm that 'fast' stress corrosion cracks with growth rates between 10 -8 and 10 -7 m/s and threshold stress intensities around 20 MN m -3/2 can occur under certain conditions. However, it appears possible that specific environmental, mechanical and metallurgical conditions which may prevail in reactors can result in significantly lower stress corrosion crack growth rates. The presently known stress corrosion crack growth rate versus stress intensity curves are discussed with emphasis on their usefulness in establishing safety margins against stress corrosion cracking of components in service. Further substantial research efforts would be helpful to provide a data base which permits well founded predictions as to how stress corrosion cracking in pressure vessels and piping can be reliably excluded or tolerated. It is emphasized, however, that the nucleation of stress corrosion cracks (as opposed to their growth) is difficult and may contribute substantially to the stress corrosion free service behaviour of the overwhelming majority of pressure vessels and pipes. (author)

  7. Comparative Stress Corrosion Cracking and General Corrosion Resistance of Annealed and Hardened 440 C Stainless Steel - New Techniques in Stress Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendreck, M. J.; Hurless, B. E.; Torres, P. D.; Danford, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) characteristics of annealed and hardened 440C stainless steel were evaluated in high humidity and 3.5-percent NaCl solution. Corrosion testing consisted of an evaluation of flat plates, with and without grease, in high humidity, as well as electrochemical testing in 3.5-percent NaCl. Stress corrosion testing consisted of conventional, constant strain, smooth bar testing in high humidity in addition to two relatively new techniques under evaluation at MSFC. These techniques involve either incremental or constant rate increases in the load applied to a precracked SE(B) specimen, monitoring the crack-opening-displacement response for indications of crack growth. The electrochemical corrosion testing demonstrated an order of magnitude greater general corrosion rate in the annealed 440C. All techniques for stress corrosion testing showed substantially better SCC resistance in the annealed material. The efficacy of the new techniques for stress corrosion testing was demonstrated both by the savings in time and the ability to better quantify SCC data.

  8. Intergranular stress corrosion in soldered joints of stainless steel 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora R, L.

    1994-01-01

    The intergranular stress cracking of welded joints of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, is a serious problem in BWR type reactors. It is associated with the simultaneous presence of three factors; stress, a critical media and sensibilization (DOS). EPR technique was used in order to verify the sensibilization degree in the base metal, and the zone affected by heat and welding material. The characterization of material was done. The objective of this work is the study of microstructure and the evaluation of EPR technique used for the determination of DOS in a welded plate of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304. (Author)

  9. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Singh Raman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT in 30 wt. % MgCl2 solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking of an Austenitic Stainless Steel in Nitrite-Containing Chloride Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, R K Singh; Siew, Wai Hoong

    2014-12-05

    This article describes the susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a nitrite-containing chloride solution. Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) in 30 wt. % MgCl₂ solution established SCC susceptibility, as evidenced by post-SSRT fractography. Addition of nitrite to the chloride solution, which is reported to have inhibitive influence on corrosion of stainless steels, was found to increase SCC susceptibility. The susceptibility was also found to increase with nitrite concentration. This behaviour is explained on the basis of the passivation and pitting characteristics of 316L steel in chloride solution.

  11. Hydrogen-related stress corrosion cracking in line pipe steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    1997-01-01

    A correlation between hydrogen concentration (C0) and the critical stress intensity factor for propagation of hydrogen-related cracks has been established by fracture mechanical testing of CT-specimens for the heat affected zone of an X-70 pipeline steel. This has been compared with field...

  12. Surface preparation for residual stress measurement of an accelerated corrosion tested welded marine steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress measurement is often required for the assessment of structural integrity of components. Measurement of residual stress in corrosion tested specimens is challenging owing to the difficulty of accessing the surface because of the rust layer. This study explored the potential methods for the surface preparation of an ultrasonically-peened and accelerated corrosion tested DH36 marine steel fillet welded specimen to ease the way for subsequent residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction and the contour method. We find that hydroblasting introduces compressive residual stress at the surface that will alter the surface stress to be measured

  13. Crack growth and fracture behaviour of stress corrosion cracks of turbine generator steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger; Vahle.

    1989-01-01

    The object of this investigation was the quantifying of the behaviour of cracks which were induced during service under corrosive media. To investigate the influence of stress corrosion crack configurations on stress intensity factor, six different test materials from 2 and 3.5% NiCrMoV and 2% Cr/1% Ni steels were chosen. The stress corrosion cracks were induced at wedge loaded compact tension specimens in a corrosive media in the laboratory. Fracture mechanics tests as well as fatigue crack growth tests were performed at these specimens. All stress corrosion cracks have an intercrystalline path and a crack length longer than 1 mm; they are multiple and have branched cracks tips. The fracture mechanics tests at these stress corrosion cracks induced in the laboratory and during service of components show that their stress intensity factor is 30 to 70% smaller than the stress intensity factor calculated for single straight cracks too. Theoretical calculations arrived to the same results. Crack initiation and growth behaviour under cyclic loading starting from these stress corrosion cracks results in that the load or the stress intensity range ΔK has to be increased three times larger than the ΔK-threshold value to induce crack initiation. The crack growth velocity influenced by multiple crack tips and multiple growing cracks from these crack tips is much lower than the crack growth velocity of a normal fatigue crack (one crack tip). (orig./MM) With 32 figs

  14. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Acid Soil Environment with SRB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Fei; Wu, Ming; Liu, Guangxin; Zong, Yue; Li, Xue

    2017-06-01

    Self-designed experimental device was adopted to ensure the normal growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sterile simulated Yingtan soil solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X80 pipeline steel in simulated acid soil environment was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, slow strain rate test, and scanning electron microscope. Results show that the presence of SRB could promote stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. In a growth cycle, polarization resistance first presents a decrease and subsequently an increase, which is inversely proportional to the quantities of SRB. At 8 days of growth, SRB reach their largest quantity of 1.42 × 103 cells/g. The corrosion behavior is most serious at this time point, and the SCC mechanism is hydrogen embrittlement. In other SRB growth stages, the SCC mechanism of X80 steel is anodic dissolution. With the increasing SRB quantities, X80 steel is largely prone to SCC behavior, and the effect of hydrogen is considerably obvious.

  16. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Steel and Aluminum in Sodium Hydroxide: Field Failure and Laboratory Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prawoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Through an investigation of the field failure analysis and laboratory experiment, a study on (stress corrosion cracking SCC behavior of steel and aluminum was performed. All samples were extracted from known operating conditions from the field failures. Similar but accelerated laboratory test was subsequently conducted in such a way as to mimic the field failures. The crack depth and behavior of the SCC were then analyzed after the laboratory test and the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking was studied. The results show that for the same given stress relative to ultimate tensile strength, the susceptibility to SCC is greatly influenced by heat treatment. Furthermore, it was also concluded that when expressed relative to the (ultimate tensile strength UTS, aluminum has similar level of SCC susceptibility to that of steel, although with respect to the same absolute value of applied stress, aluminum is more susceptible to SCC in sodium hydroxide environment than steel.

  17. Stress corrosion cracking of turbine disc steels: a study of mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.; Vaillant, F.; Dordonat, M.; Dury, J.P.

    1993-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking was found to affect shrunk-on discs of 900 MW-EDF turbines. Investigations revealed that intergranular cracking occurred in high-stress confined locations, where concentrations of pollutants resulting from some assembling operations could take place (MoS 2 sometimes used as a lubricant, carbonated compounds with chloride as in paint marks). Laboratory tests allowed to assess the chemical conditions (pH, electrochemical potential, pollutants) responsible for the stress corrosion cracking of NiCrMo V-steels. Three main E-pH fields were found to favour stress corrosion cracking, whose boundaries may be dependant on the anionic species. The crack growth rates in these conditions were measured at 95 and 130 deg C, and compared to the observed average measurements from service. The most likely mechanism seems to involve molybdic acid, as a result of thermal decomposition of MoS 2 or generated by general corrosion of Mo-containing steel. Cracks might also have been initiated by carbonated compounds. The relevance of classical models to stress corrosion cracking of disc steel was discussed with respect to electrochemical behaviour. (authors). 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  18. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  19. Influence of surface treatments on corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Residual stresses in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, J. Philippe

    1968-05-01

    In a first part, this research thesis proposes presentation of the definition of a surface condition: chemical characteristics such as passivity and contamination, physical characteristics (obtained through micrographic methods, X ray diffusion, magnetic methods), and micro-geometrical characteristics. The author notably discusses the measurement of characteristics either by appropriate conventional methods or by an original method in the case of passivity. In a second part, the author reports the study of the influence of surface condition on different types of corrosion of stainless steels in chemical environments (corrosion in sulphuric acid, intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking in magnesium chloride, pitting corrosion) and of high temperature oxidation (corrosion in pressurized water, oxidation in dry vapour or in carbon dioxide)

  20. Stress corrosion evaluation on stainless steel 304 pipes in Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C.R.

    1996-01-01

    Inside the frame of the project IAEA/MEX-41044 'Stress corrosion as a starting event of accidents in nuclear plants', and of the institutional project IA-252 under the same name, it was required from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Plant, material equivalent to the one employed in the piping of the primary recycling system. Laguna Verde Nuclear Plant granted two tracks of tubes, that could be used to substitute the ones that are in operation, as is the tube SA-358TP304 CL-QC with transversal welding, designated as ER-316-LQA. According to the report entitles 'Revision of the operational experience related to corrosion in the nuclear plants' it was found that the stress corrosion is the principal mechanism of corrosion present in the nuclear plants. Previous records indicate that sensitized stainless steels are resistant to stress corrosion in testings of constant loading in sea water (3.5% of chlorides approximately) to 80 Centigrade and to 80% of the limit of conveyance and that a solution of 22% of NaCl to 90 Centigrade, produces cracking due to stress corrosion in highly sensitized steels, in tests of speed of slow extension (SSRT), to a speed of 1x10 -6 s -1 . Daniels reports that there is a direct relation between the speed limit of detection of the SSRT test and the concentration of chlorides, for stainless steels tested to 100 Centigrade. The minimum detection speed of susceptibility to stress corrosion for solution to 20% of NaCl, is of 1x10 -7 s -1 . Taking into account these considerations, the employment of a solution with 22% of NaCl to 90 Centigrade to a speed of 1x10 -6 s -1 seems a good choice for the evaluation of stainless steel. (Author)

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Hardening-Treated 13Cr Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Bin; Ishitake, Hisamitsu; Izumi, Sakae; Shiokawa, Kunio; Yamashita, Mitsuo; Sakai, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of the hardening-treated materials of 13Cr stainless steel was examined with SSRT tests and constant load tests. In the simulated geothermal water and even in the test water without addition of impurities, the hardening-treated materials showed a brittle intergranular fracture due to the sensitization, which was caused by the present hardening-treatments.

  2. Stress corrosion in austenitic stainless steel tube of a heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, R.; Wolynec, S.

    1984-01-01

    A case history of premature failure in a heat exchanger used to warm up the black liquor with water vapor in a pulp and paper plant is presented. Stress corrosion cracking did occur just after 48 hours of operation at the broaching region of AISI 304 strainless steel tubes. The cracks were initiated at the inner surface in contact with the black liquor. The stress corrosion was ascribed to high residual stresses introduced during broaching operation and to a strong alcaline environment at temperatures around 135 0 C. (Author) [pt

  3. Contribution to surface physicochemical factors to stress corrosion resistance in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, Jean-Marie

    1974-01-01

    The author of this research thesis first presents and discusses the various aspects of stress corrosion cracking of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys of high purity: experimental conditions (alloy elaboration, sample preparation), corrosion results (Schaeffer diagram, crack morphology, intergranular corrosion), influence of addition elements in ferritic alloys. He reports an electrochemical study of stainless steels in magnesium chloride (experimental conditions, influence of metallurgic and environmental parameters on polarization resistance, current-voltage curves), and an analytical study of layers formed in the magnesium chloride

  4. Localized corrosion and stress-corrosion cracking behavior of stainless steel weldments. Annual progress report, June 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1980-02-01

    Pitting corrosion experiments were conducted on 308L stainless steel as a function of alloy microstructure (% delta ferrite) in acidified water-methanol solutions. Slow strain rate stress corrosion cracking studies were performed on single-phase and duplex 304 stainless steels as functions of solution chemistry, temperature, and sensitization

  5. Stress corrosion of very high purity stainless steels in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hechmat-Dehcordi, Ebrahim

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of stress corrosion resistance of stainless steels in caustic environments. It notably concerns the electronuclear industrial sector, the production of soda by electrolysis, and the preparation of hydrogen as energy vector. After a presentation of the experimental conditions, the author highlights the influence of purity on stress corrosion cracking of 20Cr-25Ni-type austenitic alloys. The specific action of a high number of addition metallic and non-metallic elements has been studied. Stress corrosion tests have been also performed in autoclave on austeno-ferritic (21 to 25 pc Cr - 6 to 10 pc Ni) as well as ferritic (26 pc Cr) grades. The author reports the study of electrochemical properties of stainless steel in soda by means of potentiostatic techniques with an application of Pourbaix thermodynamic equilibrium diagrams, and the study of the chemical composition of passivation thin layers by Auger spectroscopy. He more particularly studies the influence of electrode potential and of some addition elements on the chemical characteristics of oxides developed at the surface of austenite. Then, the author tries to establish correlations between strain hardening microstructure of the various steels and their sensitivity to stress corrosion [fr

  6. Demonstration through EPR tests of the sensitivity of austeno-ferritic steels to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels can be sensitised to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under some conditions (heat treatments, welding). The aim of this work is to contribute to the validation of the EPR (Electrochemical Potentiodynamic Reactivation) test in order to determine conditions for normalisation. This method, based on the dissolution of chromium depleted areas due to precipitation of σ-phase, provides a degree of sensitisation to intergranular corrosion. The test is broaden considering the mechanical stress by the way of slow strain rate tests, performed in chloride magnesium and in a solution similar to the EPR solution. A metallurgical study puts on the precipitates and the structural modifications due to welding and heat treatments, in order to make a critical analysis of the EPR test. (author) [fr

  7. Stress corrosion of low alloy steels used in external bolting on pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeldon, P.; Hurst, P.; Smart, N.R.

    1992-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of AISI 4140 and AISI 4340 steels has been evaluated in five environments, three simulating a leaking aqueous boric acid environment and two simulating ambient external conditions ie moist air and salt spray. Both steels were found to be highly susceptible to SCC in all environments at hardnesses of 400 VPN and above. The susceptibility was greatly reduced at hardnesses below 330 VPN but in one environment, viz refluxing PWR primary water, SCC was observed at hardnesses as low as 260VPN. Threshold stress intensities for SCC were frequently lower than those in the literature

  8. Evaluation of the stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength low alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance was studied for high strength alloy steels 4130, 4340, for H-11 at selected strength levels, and for D6AC and HY140 at a single strength. Round tensile and C-ring type specimens were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, salt spray, the atmosphere at Marshall Space Flight Center, and the seacoast at Kennedy Space Center. Under the test conditions, 4130 and 4340 steels heat treated to a tensile strength of 1240 MPa (180 ksi), H-11 and D6AC heat treated to a tensile strength of 1450 MPa (210 ksi), and HY140 (1020 MPa, 148 ksi) are resistant to stress corrosion cracking because failures were not encountered at stress levels up to 75 percent of their yield strengths. A maximum exposure period of one month for alternate immersion in salt water or salt spray and three months for seacoast is indicated for alloy steel to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking because of failure resulting from severe pitting.

  9. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of low carbon stainless steel in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami

    2008-01-01

    Some examples and characteristics of old intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the improvement methods are described. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low carbon stainless steel in the core shroud and major piping of BWR has been reported since 1990. Most parts of them start at the transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and progress to IGSCC. The shape of crack is originated by the residual tensile stress that depends on welding and mechanical processing. The chromium-deficient layer was not observed. The crack progressed from the parent materials to the deposited metal with low content of ferrite. SCC crack growth rates of type SUS316 were 1/10 of type SUS304 stainless steel. The countermeasures of SCC of low carbon stainless steel to control its generation and progressing are stated. Method for SCC of major piping can include the introduction heating stress improvement (IHSI) and narrow gap edge welding. Methods for SCC of shroud include the laser peening, water jet peening, and polish processing. (S.Y.)

  10. Simulation of Mechanical Stress on Stainless Steel for Pb-Bi Corrosion Test by Using ABAQUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwanto, D.; Mustari, A. P. A.; Budiman, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Pb-Bi eutectic with its advantageous is proposed to be utilized as a coolant in the GEN IV type of rSeactor. However, high temperature corrosion when contact with stainless steels is one of the issues of Pb-Bi eutectic utilization. It is known that in the environment of high temperature Pb-Bi, mechanical strength of stainless steel may decrease. Thus, simulation of mechanical stress working on stainless steel during in-situ bending test by using ABAQUS was conducted. Several bending degrees were simulated at high temperature to obtain the mechanical stress information. Temperature condition was strongly affect the stress vs. displacement profile. The reported mechanical strength reduction percentage was used to draw predicted mechanical stress under high temperature Pb-Bi environment.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the earthquake resistant NOM B457 Mexican steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganis J, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Mexican construction code was modified after the Mexico city 1985 earthquake, substituted the medium carbon reinforced steel NOM B6 by the new micro alloyed steel NOM B457 in 42 Kg/mm 2 grade. The present study reports the evaluation of the NOM B457 steel behavior in mortar with and without 2% wt. in chlorides and in Ca(OH) 2 saturated solutions. The results are compared with the NOM B6 steel behavior in the same conditions. The Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is not present in all the conditions used in this study and there are not susceptibility potential range to SCC when the material is evaluated by electrochemical Tests, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERT) and Constant Load Test at 80 % of yield stress. A susceptibility potential range to Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) is detected, below -900 mV. vs Standard Calomel Electrode (SCE) by CERT at constant potential

  12. Stress corrosion cracking of AISI 321 stainless steel in acidic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    seashore facilities showed that an acidic chloride solution film formed on the surface of steel and the stainless steel ... of the specimens was single phase auste- nite. After heat treatment, the specimens were pickled for .... metal at the crack tip reacted with the test solution to generate vacancies and the brittle fracture process ...

  13. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of ion irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    IASCC is irradiation – assisted enhancement of intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel. It is a complex degrading phenomenon which can have a significant influence on maintenance time and cost of PWRs’ core internals and hence, is an issue of concern. Recent studies have proposed using ion irradiation (to be specific, proton irradiation) as an alternative of neutron irradiation to improve the current understanding of the mechanism. The objective of...

  14. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  15. Prediction of stress corrosion of carbon steel by nuclear process liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1978-08-01

    Radioactive liquid wastes are produced as a consequence of processing fuel from Savannah River Plant (SRP) production reactors. These wastes are stored in mild steel waste tanks, some of which have developed cracks from stress corrosion. A laboratory test was developed to determine the relative agressiveness of the wastes for stress corrosion cracking of mild steel. Tensile samples were strained to fracture in synthetic waste solutions in an electrochemical cell with the sample as the anode. Crack initiation is expected if total elongation of the steel in the test is less than its uniform elongation in air. Cracking would be anticipated in a plant waste tank if solution conditions were equivalent to test conditions that cause a total elongation that is less than uniform elongation. The electrochemical tensile tests showed that the supernates in salt receiver tanks at SRP have the least aggressive compositions, and wastes newly generated during fuel repocessing have the most aggressive ones. Test data also verified that ASTM A 516-70 steel used in the fabrication of the later design waste tanks is less susceptible to cracking than the ASTM A 285-B steel used in earlier designs

  16. Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking of high-toughness D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history, and test technique, under sustained load in filtered natural seawater, 3.3 per cent sodium chloride solution, and distilled water, was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered in terms of the present study with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, and threshold. Both threshold and growth kinetics were found to be relatively insensitive to these test parameters. The apparent incubation period was dependent on technique, both detection sensitivity and precracking stress intensity level.

  17. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  18. Hydrogen Cracking and Stress Corrosion of Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A543

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShawaf, Ali Hamad

    with the previously used plain carbon steel and other currently used pressure vessel steels was successfully completed. The experimental and computational results of the Q&T HSLA steel agreed well with each other. The susceptibility of the Q&T A543 steel to stress corrosion cracking was investigated using the slow strain rate testing under different environments and conditions. Also, advanced corrosion study using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was done at different conditions. The corrosion study revealed that this A543 steel is prone to form pits in most of the conditions. The model results in the corrosion study were validated with the Gamry Echem Analyst software that A543 steel tends to form pits in the tested environment.

  19. Literature Survey on the Stress Corrosion Cracking of Low-Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.

    2002-02-01

    The present report is a summary of a literature survey on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour/ mechanisms in low-alloy steels (LAS) in high-temperature water with special emphasis to primary-pressure-boundary components of boiling water reactors (BWR). A brief overview on the current state of knowledge concerning SCC of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel and piping steels under BWR conditions is given. After a short introduction on general aspects of SCC, the main influence parameter and available quantitative literature data concerning SCC of LAS in high-temperature water are discussed on a phenomenological basis followed by a summary of the most popular SCC models for this corrosion system. The BWR operating experience and service cracking incidents are discussed with respect to the existing laboratory data and background knowledge. Finally, the most important open questions and topics for further experimental investigations are outlined. (author)

  20. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, A.; Owen, J.; Quirk, G.; G, Lewis; Rudge, A.; Woolsey, I.S.

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  1. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steel weldments containing retained ferrite. Annual progress report, June 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking experiments have been performed on single phase 304 stainless steel alloys and autogeneous weldments containing retained delta ferrite as a second phase. The results of the pitting experiments show that the pressure of delta ferrite decreases localized corrosion resistance with pits initiating preferentially at delta ferrite--gamma austenite interphase boundaries. This increased susceptibility is reversible with elevated temperature heat treatments which revert the metastable ferrite phase to the equilibrium austenite phase

  2. Effect of cold working and annealing on stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Y.M.; Kwun, S.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of cold working and annealing on the stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304 stainless steel in boiling 42% MgCl 2 solution. When the 60% or 76% of yield stress was applied, the resistance to SCC showed maximum at 30% of cold work. However, when the same load was applied to the annealed specimens after cold working, the resistance to SCC decreased abruptly at 675degC annealing. The fracture mode changed mode change mixed → intergranular → transgranular as the amount of cold work increased. (Author)

  3. Stress corrosion cracking behavior of weldments of ferritic stainless steels in high temperature pure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo; Shimogori, Kazutoshi

    1985-01-01

    Considering the application of a ferritic stainless steel as heat exchanger tubing for a moisture separator reheater of light water reactors, stress corrosion cracking behavior at the weldment of commercial ferritic stainless steels in high temperature pure water was studied. Double U-bend method was used for the study and the relationship with microstructure was discussed. Welded joint of Type 439SS containing 0.021% C, 0.025% N and 0.27% Ti with In-82 type filler metal was susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking if a tight crevice was provided by inserting a teflon sheet between the inner and outer specimens of double U-bend. This was attributable to the formation of chromium depleted zone due to the precipitation of chromium carbides/nitrides along ferrite grain boundaries. On the other hand welded joint of Type 444SS with 0.007% C, 0.010% N and 0.26% Nb was immune to stress corrosion cracking, and this might be attributed to the higher ratio of Nb/(C+N) content. (author)

  4. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-01-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  5. Effects of Ultrasonic Nanocrystal Surface Modification on the Residual Stress, Microstructure, and Corrosion Resistance of 304 Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chang; Telang, Abhishek; Gill, Amrinder; Wen, Xingshuo; Mannava, Seetha R.; Qian, Dong; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, ultrasonic nanocrystal surface modification (UNSM) of 304 stainless steel welds was carried out. UNSM effectively eliminates the tensile stress generated during welding and imparts beneficial compressive residual stresses. In addition, UNSM can effectively refine the grains and increase hardness in the near-surface region. Corrosion tests in boiling MgCl2 solution demonstrate that UNSM can significantly improve the corrosion resistance due to the compressive residual stresses and changes in the near-surface microstructure.

  6. Effect of applied stress on chloride induced external stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel in air atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashibara, Hitoshi; Mayuzumi, Masami; Mizutani, Yoshihiro; Tani, Jun-ichi

    2006-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SS) are widely used in various components of chemical plants, nuclear power plants, etc, because of the superior mechanical property and general corrosion resistance. However, it is also well known that austenitic stainless steels are susceptible to localized corrosion in the environments containing chloride ions, and several equipment in the plants built in coastal area has been suffering from chloride induced external stress corrosion cracking (ESCC). Hence, for the establishment of the countermeasures it is very important to clarify the factors governing ESCC process from the view points of stress, material and environmental conditions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of applied stress on ESCC of type 304 stainless steel. ESCC tests were conducted on type 304 SS specimens, which were fabricated from a cold rolled plate, by a uniaxial constant load method using springs. After loading, droplets of synthetic sea water were put on the gage section of specimen and dried, and then the specimens were placed in a chamber with a constant temperature of 353 K and a relative humidity of 35%. The test specimens after the test were observed by a scanning electron microscope to measure the crack length and depth. No clear difference was found in the maximum values of the average crack propagation rate (crack depth divided by test time) among the applied stress conditions. In addition, most of ESCC were initiated from the bottom or periphery of pits under the low applied stress condition (0.5σ 0.2 ). (author)

  7. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  8. Detection of stress corrosion cracking on the surface of stainless steel plate by DC-PDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroki; Tada, Naoya; Uchida, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the applicability of the direct-current potential difference method to detection of stress corrosion cracking, the potential difference was measured on the surface of stainless steel plates with simulated cracking. Potential difference was measured near the cracking and at the points distant from the crack to evaluate the degree of increase in the potential difference by the crack. The potential difference near the cracking area was higher than that in the other area. The normalized potential difference, which is the ratio of potential difference near the cracking to that far from the area, was 1.03 to 1.50. The result suggests that stress corrosion cracking was able to be detected by direct-current potential difference method. (author)

  9. Stress corrosion cracking studies of reactor pressure vessel steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform a critical review of the information available in open literature on stress corrosion cracking of reactor pressure vessel materials in simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) conditions, develop a test procedure for conducting stress corrosion crack growth experiments in simulated LWR environments, and conduct a test program in an effort to duplicate some of the data available from the literature. The authors concluded that stress corrosion crack growth has been observed in pressure vessel steels under laboratory test conditions. The composition of the water in most cases where growth was observed is outside of the composition specified for operating conditions. Crack growth was observed in the experiments performed in this program, and it was intermittent. The cracking would start and stop for no apparent reason. In most instances, it would not restart without the change of some external variable. In a few instances, it restarted on its own. Crack growth rates as high as 3.6 x 10 -9 m/sec were observed in pressure vessel steels in high-purity water with 8 ppm oxygen. These high crack growth rates were observed for extremely short bursts in crack extension. They could not be sustained for crack growth extensions greater than a few tenths of a millimeter. From the results of this project it appears highly unlikely that stress corrosion cracking will be observed in operating nuclear plants where the coolant composition is maintained within water chemistry guidelines. However, more work is needed to better define the contaminations that cause crack growth. The crack growth rates are so high and the threshold values for crack nucleation are so low that the conditions causing them need to be well defined and avoided

  10. Effect of Ultrasonic Peening and Accelerated Corrosion Exposure on the Residual Stress Distribution in Welded Marine Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Bilal; Fitzpatrick, Michael E.

    2015-03-01

    Specimens of DH36 marine steel were prepared with welded attachments. Residual stress measurements were made on the samples as-welded, following an ultrasonic peening treatment, and following accelerated corrosion exposure after ultrasonic peening. Neutron diffraction and the contour method were used for determining the residual stress profiles. The welding introduces tensile near-surface residual stress, approaching the material yield strength, and the ultrasonic peening overlays this with a compressive residual stress. Material removal by corrosion decreases the peak surface compressive stress slightly, by removal of a layer of stressed material, but does not cause significant redistribution of the residual stress profile.

  11. Effect of Stress Ratio and Loading Frequency on the Corrosion Fatigue Behavior of Smooth Steel Wire in Different Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songquan Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of loading condition and corrosion solution on the corrosion fatigue behavior of smooth steel wire were discussed. The results of polarization curves and weight loss curves showed that the corrosion of steel wire in acid solution was more severe than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. With the extension of immersion time in acid solution, the cathodic reaction of steel wire gradually changed from the reduction of hydrogen ion to the reduction of oxygen, but was always the reduction of hydrogen ion in neutral and alkaline solutions. The corrosion kinetic parameters and equivalent circuits of steel wires were also obtained by simulating the Nyquist diagrams. In corrosion fatigue test, the effect of stress ratio and loading frequency on the crack initiation mechanism was emphasized. The strong corrosivity of acid solution could accelerate the nucleation of crack tip. The initiation mechanism of crack under different conditions was summarized according to the side and fracture surface morphologies. For the crack initiation mechanism of anodic dissolution, the stronger the corrosivity of solution was, the more easily the fatigue crack source formed, while, for the crack initiation mechanism of deformation activation, the lower stress ratio and higher frequency would accelerate the generation of corrosion fatigue crack source.

  12. Manufacturing method for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced test specimen for stainless steel pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futagawa, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a manufacturing step for intragranular stress corrosion cracking-induced for stainless steel pipelines, pipe are abutted against with each other and welded, and a heat affected portion is applied with a sensitizing heat treatment. Further, a crevice jig is attached near the heat affected portion at the inner surface of the pipe and kept in a chlorine ion added water under high temperature and high pressure at a predetermined period of time. If tap water is used instead of purified water for C.P.T. test in a step of forming sample of IGSCC (intergranular stress corrosion cracking), since the chlorine ion concentration in the tap water is relatively high, TGSCC (intragranular stress corrosion crackings caused in all of the samples. A heat input and an interlayer temperature are determined for the material of stainless pipe having a carbon content of more than 0.05% so that the welding residual stress on the inner surface is applied as tension. The condition for the heat treatment is determined as, for example, 500degC x 24hr, and the samples are kept under water at high temperature and high pressure applied with chlorine ions for 500 to 200hours. As a result, since samples of TGSCC can be formed by utilizing the manufacturing step for IGSCC, there is no requirement for providing devices for applying environmental factors separately. (N.H.)

  13. Internal oxidation and probabilistic fracture model of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinović, M. J.

    2017-11-01

    A probabilistic fracture model is applied to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking effect, assuming that the oxidized part of stainless steel sample plays an essential role in the crack initiation, propagation and the sample failure. The Weibull statistical distribution of time-to-failures, estimated through the correlation with the statistical distribution of oxide strengths, including both the surface oxide layer and oxidized grain boundaries, fully describe the experimental scatter obtained in the constant load time-to-failure tests. Large failure uncertainties in these type of tests originate from an intrinsic stochastic behavior of the oxide cracking due to subcritical crack propagation process.

  14. Inhibition of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.F.

    1977-01-01

    The effectiveness of various inhibitors in mitigating stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel in hot aqueous environment was evaluated. The inhibitors studied were of three types: poly-oxy-anions, organic competitive absorbers, and simple cations; the corrosive medium was 4M NaCl acidified with H 2 SO 4 to ph of about 2.3. The following conclusions were reached: pH does not affect cracking kinetics in a sensitive way; cracking time is highly dependent on chloride concentrations; poly-oxy-anions do not perform well; organics offer some possibilities as inhibitors; cationic additives can have effects varying from trivial to total suppression of cracking--behavior is both cation and concentration dependent. 2 figures, 5 tables

  15. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low carbon stainless steels with work hardened layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Tsukada, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    To avoid introduction of Cr depletion at grain boundaries by welding process, low carbon stainless steels (SSs) were used in corrosive environment as one of countermeasures for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). Recently, it is reported that SCCs were introduced at portion with work hardened layer although low carbon SSs had been used at core shrouds and primary loop recirculation piping in Boiling Water Reactors. To simulate and examine the phenomenon, mechanical working, metallographic observation, hardness test and SCC tests in chloride solutions were conducted for low carbon SSs. From the results of metallographic observation and hardness test, it was confirmed that slip bands were observed around the surface and hardened layer was introduced by mechanical working. From the results of SCC tests, it was noticed that cracks which introduced from the surface, had grown into the matrix. It is thought that low carbon SSs with work hardened layer have susceptibility to SCC from the above. (author)

  16. Assessment of crevice corrosion and hydrogen-induced stress-corrosion cracks in titanium-carbon steel composite overpack for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, G.; Nakamura, N.; Fukaya, Y.; Akashi, M.; Ueda, H.

    2003-01-01

    Overpacks for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must be reliable for geological disposal for as long as 1000-10 000 years. From a study of parameters such as the critical potential for initiation of crevice corrosion, E R,CREV and the free corrosion potential E sp in neutral aqueous environments it is concluded that composite overpacks composed of a corrosion resistant Ti alloy (Ti-0.06 Pd, or Ti-Gr.17) outer layer and a carbon steel inner layer should never be subject to crevice corrosion and hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking when stored deep underground environments. Hydrogen-induced stress corrosion cracking has been shown not to occur in alloys exposed to conditions of disposal based according to results based on accelerated constant current tests and constant load tests. (authors)

  17. Kinetic studies of the stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of load interactions on the crack growth velocity of D6AC steel under stress corrosion cracking conditions was determined. The environment was a 3.5 percent salt solution. The modified-wedge opening load specimens were fatigue precracked and subjected to a deadweight loading in creep machines. The effects of load shedding on incubation times and crack growth rates were measured using high-sensitivity compliance measurement techniques. Load shedding results in an incubation time, the length of which depends on the amount of load shed and the baseline stress intensity. The sequence of unloading the specimen also controls the subsequent incubation period. The incubation period is shorter when load shedding passes through zero load than when it does not if the specimen initially had the same baseline stress intensity. The crack growth rates following the incubation period are also different from the steady-state crack growth rate at the operating stress intensity. These data show that the susceptibility of this alloy system to stress corrosion cracking depends on the plane-strain fracture toughness and on the yield strength of the material.

  18. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dresden 1 Radiation Level Reduction Program. Intergranular corrosion tests of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel in Dow NS-1, and stress corrosion cracking tests of Type-304 stainless steel and carbon and low alloy steels in Dow copper rinse solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, W.L.

    1978-09-01

    Corrosion tests were performed to evaluate the extent of intergranular attack on sensitized Type-304 stainless steel by a proprietary Dow Chemical solvent, NS-1, which is to be used in the chemical cleaning of the Dresden 1 primary system. In addition, tests were performed to evaluate stress corrosion cracking of sensitized Type-304 stainless steel and post-weld heat-treated ASTM A336-F1, A302-B, and A106-B carbon and low alloy steels in a solution to be used to remove residual metallic copper from the Dresden 1 primary system surfaces following the chemical cleaning. No evidence of deleterious corrosion was observed in either set of tests

  20. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  1. Stress Corrosion Cracking—Crevice Interaction in Austenitic Stainless Steels Characterized By Acoustic Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, H.; Schildt, T.; Hänninen, H.

    2011-02-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of austenitic EN1.4301 (AISI 304) and EN1.4404 (AISI 316L) stainless steels was studied using the constant load method and polymer (PTFE) crevice former in order to study the effects of crevice on SCC susceptibility. The uniaxial active loading tests were performed in 50 pct CaCl2 at 373 K (100 °C) and in 0.1 M NaCl at 353 K (80 °C) under open-circuit corrosion potential (OCP) and electrochemical polarization. Pitting, crevice, and SCC corrosion were characterized and identified by acoustic emission (AE) analysis using ∆ t filtering and the linear locationing technique. The correlation of AE parameters including amplitude, duration, rise time, counts, and energy were used to identify the different types of corrosion. The stages of crevice corrosion and SCC induced by constant active load/crevice former were monitored by AE. In the early phase of the tests, some low amplitude AE activity was detected. In the steady-state phase, the AE activity was low, and toward the end of the test, it increased with the increasing amplitude of the impulses. AE allowed a good correlation between AE signals and corrosion damage. Although crevice corrosion and SCC induced AE signals overlapped slightly, a good correlation between them and microscopical characterization and stress-strain data was found. Especially, the activity of AE signals increased in the early and final stages of the SCC experiment under constant active load conditions corresponding to the changes in the measured steady-state creep strain rate of the specimen. The results of the constant active load/crevice former test indicate that a crevice can initiate SCC even in the mild chloride solution at low temperatures. Based on the mechanistic model of SCC, the rate determining step in SCC is thought to be the generation of vacancies by selective dissolution, which is supported by the low activity phase of AE during the steady-state creep strain rate region.

  2. Cluster analysis of stress corrosion mechanisms for steel wires used in bridge cables through acoustic emission particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Wenyao

    2017-05-01

    Stress corrosion is the major failure type of bridge cable damage. The acoustic emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor the stress corrosion process of steel wires used in bridge cable structures. The damage evolution of stress corrosion in bridge cables was obtained according to the AE characteristic parameter figure. A particle swarm optimization cluster method was developed to determine the relationship between the AE signal and stress corrosion mechanisms. Results indicate that the main AE sources of stress corrosion in bridge cables included four types: passive film breakdown and detachment of the corrosion product, crack initiation, crack extension, and cable fracture. By analyzing different types of clustering data, the mean value of each damage pattern's AE characteristic parameters was determined. Different corrosion damage source AE waveforms and the peak frequency were extracted. AE particle swarm optimization cluster analysis based on principal component analysis was also proposed. This method can completely distinguish the four types of damage sources and simplifies the determination of the evolution process of corrosion damage and broken wire signals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Low temperature tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking resistance in the super duplex stainless steels weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeung Woo; Sung, Jang Hyun; Lee, Sung Keun

    1998-01-01

    Low temperature tensile properties and SCC resistances of super duplex stainless steels and their weldments are investigated. Tensile strengths increase remarkably with decreasing test temperature, while elongations decrease steeply at -196 .deg. C after showing peak or constant value down to -100 .deg. C. Owing to the low tensile deformation of weld region, elongations of welded specimen decrease in comparison to those of unwelded specimen. The welded tensile specimen is fractured through weld region at -196 .deg. C due to the fact that the finely dispersed ferrite phase in the austenite matrix increases an opportunity to supply the crack propagation path through the brittle ferrite phase at low temperature. The stress corrosion cracking initiates preferentially at the surface ferrite phase of base metal region and propagates through ferrite phase. When the corrosion crack meets with the fibrously aligned austenite phase to the tensile direction, the ferrite phase around austenite continues to corrode. Eventually, fracture of the austenite phase begins without enduring the tensile load. The addition of Cu+W to the super duplex stainless steel deteriorates the SCC resistance in boiling MgCl 2 solution, possibly due to the increment of pits in the ferrite phase and reduction of N content in the austenite phase

  4. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking behavior in welded austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, B.T.; Chen, Z.K.; Luo, J.L.; Patchett, B.M.; Xu, Z.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of microstructural changes in 304 austenitic stainless steel induced by the processes of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser-beam welding (LBW) on the pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors was investigated. According to the in situ observations with scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the breakdown potentials of the test material with various microstructures, the GTAW process made the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) more sensitive to pitting corrosion than base metal (BM), but the LBW process improved the pitting resistance of the WM. In the initiation stage of SCC, the cracks in the BM and HAZ propagated in a transgranular mode. Then, the crack growth mechanism changed gradually into a mixed transgranular + intergranular mode. The cracks in the WM were likely to propagate along the dendritic boundaries. The crack initiation rate, crack initiation lifetime and crack propagation rate indicated that the high-to-low order of SCC resistance is almost the same as that for pitting resistance. High heat-input (and low cooling rate) was likely to induce the segregation of alloying elements and formation of Cr-depleted zones, resulting in the degradation in the corrosion resistance

  5. Stress Corrosion Behavior of Low-temperature Liquid-Nitrided 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel in a Sour Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Yan, Jing; Duan, Lian; Gu, Tan; Xian, Guang; Sun, Lan; Wang, Danqi

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature nitridation is a widely used surface heat treatment. Low-temperature liquid nitridation was applied to 316 austenitic stainless steel and an S-phase (expanded austenite) layer was achieved on the alloy surface. The effect of the S-phase layer on corrosion resistance and stress corrosion cracking was investigated in a sour environment. When a bending stress of 164 MPa (80 pct yield stress, YS) was applied, no macroscopic corrosion cracking and pits were observed on the nitrided samples and the S-phase layer stayed intact. Although no macroscopic corrosion cracking was observed on the non-nitrided samples under 205 MPa (100 pct YS), some pits were formed on the alloy surface. This could be attributed to the high stresses and hardness, and the excellent corrosion resistance of the S-phase layer introduced by low-temperature nitridation. Supersaturated nitrogen atoms in the S-phase layer can effectively prevent the decrease in pH of the corrosive medium and accelerate the alloy repassivation kinetics. However, when the bending stress was increased to 205 and 246 MPa (100 pct YS, 120 pct YS), macroscopic cracks were observed in the presence of both tensile stress and a corrosive medium.

  6. Effects of hardness and test temperature on the stress-corrosion cracking susceptibility of carbon steel in simulated BWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1998-01-01

    Carbon steels which are used for such as water supply line, core spray line, and clean up heat exchanger in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Plant, are main structural materials as well as an austenitic stainless steels, and Ni based alloys. It has been well known that carbon steels can become susceptible to stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in BWR primary coolant water environments, i.e., the high-temperature, high-purity water containing dissolved oxygen. Nevertheless, their sensitivity of SCC appears to be markedly smaller compared to that of weld-sensitized Type 304 stainless steels, whole failure has often been observed. This paper examines the critical condition, especially effects of hardness, and temperature for the initiation of SCC by means of Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) test, and Creviced Bent Beam (CBB) test as laboratory accelerated tests. It has been shown that, (1) Intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiates over hardness of Hv 400 for single bead weld material, simulated corner weld; (2) in middle temperature domain around 160 to 190degC range, so many stress-corrosion cracks initiate, but each crack is not so deep, on the other hand, in high temperature domain, stress-corrosion cracks initiate few in number, but each cracks is developed so deep. (author)

  7. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of Dissimilar Welding of AISI 310S Austenitic Stainless Steel to 2304 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago AmaroVicente

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the weld metal chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC susceptibility of dissimilar weldments between 310S austenitic stainless steel and 2304 duplex steels was investigated by constant load tests and microstructural examination. Two filler metals (E309L and E2209 were used to produce fusion zones of different chemical compositions. The SCC results showed that the heat affected zone (HAZ on the 2304 base metal side of the weldments was the most susceptible region to SCC for both filler metals tested. The SCC results also showed that the weldments with 2209 duplex steel filler metal presented the best SCC resistance when compared to the weldments with E309L filler metal. The lower SCC resistance of the dissimilar joint with 309L austenitic steel filler metal may be attributed to (1 the presence of brittle chi/sigma phase in the HAZ on the 2304 base metal, which produced SC cracks in this region and (2 the presence of a semi-continuous delta-ferrite network in the fusion zone which favored the nucleation and propagation of SC cracks from the fusion zone to HAZ of the 2304 stainless steel. Thus, the SC cracks from the fusion zone associated with the SC cracks of 2304 HAZ decreased considerably the time-of-fracture on this region, where the fracture occurred. Although the dissimilar weldment with E2209 filler metal also presented SC cracks in the HAZ on the 2304 side, it did not present the delta ferrite network in the fusion zone due to its chemical composition. Fractography analyses showed that the mixed fracture mode was predominant for both filler metals used.

  8. The effect of heat treatment and test parameters on the aqueous stress corrosion cracking of D6AC steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, W. P.; Adamson, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The crack growth behavior of D6AC steel as a function of stress intensity, stress and corrosion history and test technique, under sustained load in natural seawater, 3.3 percent NaCl solution, distilled water, and high humidity air was investigated. Reported investigations of D6AC were considered with emphasis on thermal treatment, specimen configuration, fracture toughness, crack-growth rates, initiation period, threshold, and the extension of corrosion fatigue data to sustained load conditions. Stress history effects were found to be most important in that they controlled incubation period, initial crack growth rates, and apparent threshold.

  9. The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels in high temperature, high purity water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kenjyo, Takao; Matsukura, Shinji; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1984-01-01

    In order to discuss the probability distribution of intergranular stress corrsion carcking life for sensitized 304 stainless steels, a series of the creviced bent beem (CBB) and the uni-axial constant load tests were carried out in oxygenated high temperature, high purity water. The following concludions were resulted; (1) The initiation process of intergranular stress corrosion cracking has been assumed to be approximated by the Poisson stochastic process, based on the CBB test results. (2) The probability distribution of intergranular stress corrosion cracking life may consequently be approximated by the exponential probability distribution. (3) The experimental data could be fitted to the exponential probability distribution. (author)

  10. Development of stress corrosion cracking resistant welds of 321 stainless steel by simple surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankari, Kamal; Acharyya, Swati Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    We hereby report a simple surface engineering technique to make AISI grade 321 stainless steel (SS) welds resistant to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in chloride environment. Heat exchanger tubes of AISI 321 SS, welded either by (a) laser beam welding (LBW) or by (b) metal inert gas welding (MIG) were used for the study. The welds had high magnitude of tensile residual stresses and had undergone SCC in chloride environment while in service. The welds were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, the welded surfaces were subjected to buffing operation followed by determination of residual stress distribution and surface roughness by XRD and surface profilometer measurements respectively. The susceptibility of the welds to SCC was tested in buffed and un-buffed condition as per ASTM G-36 in boiling MgCl2 for 5 h and 10 h, followed by microstructural characterization by using optical microscope and FESEM. The results showed that the buffed surfaces (both welds and base material) were resistant to SCC even after 10 h of exposure to boiling MgCl2 whereas the un-buffed surfaces underwent severe SCC for the same exposure time. Buffing imparted high magnitude of compressive stresses on the surface of stainless steel together with reduction in its surface roughness and reduction in plastic strain on the surface which made the welded surface, resistant to chloride assisted SCC. Buffing being a very simple, portable and economic technique can be easily adapted by the designers as the last step of component fabrication to make 321 stainless steel welds resistant to chloride assisted SCC.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking of ferritic reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.

    2001-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels in oxygenated high-temperature water and its relevance to boiling water reactor (BWR) power operation, in particular its possible effect on both, RPV structural integrity and safety, has been a subject of controversial discussions for many years. The SCC crack growth behaviour of different RPV steels under simulated BWR/NWC conditions was therefore characterized by constant load and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens in oxygenated high-temperature water at temperatures of either 288, 250, 200 or 150 C. Modern high-temperature water loops, online crack growth monitoring (DCPD) and fractographical analysis by scanning electron microscopy were used to quantify the cracking response. It is concluded that there is no susceptibility to sustained SCC crack growth at temperatures around 288 C under purely static loading, as long as small-scale-yielding conditions prevail at the crack tip and the water chemistry is maintained within current BWR/NWC operational practice (EPRI water chemistry guidelines). However, sustained, fast SCC (with respect to operational time scales) cannot be excluded for faulted water chemistry conditions (EPRI Action Level 3) and/or for highly stressed specimens, either loaded near to K IJ or with a high degree of plasticity in the remaining ligament. The conservative character of the 'BWR VIP 60 Disposition Lines 1 and 2' for SCC crack growth in low-alloy steels has been confirmed by this study for 288 C and RPV base material. Preliminary results indicate, that these disposition lines may be significantly or slightly exceeded (even in steels with low sulphur content) in the case of small load fluctuations at high load ratios (ripple loading) or at intermediate temperatures (200 - 250 C) in RPV materials, which show a distinct susceptibility to Dynamic Strain Ageing (DSA). (orig.)

  12. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, R.N.

    1985-04-01

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm 2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm 2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm 2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  13. Prevention of corrosion in prestressing steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion of prestressing steel may lead to sudden, so called brittle failure, due to the special microstructure of the steel and the high tensile forces. Such brittle failure may seriously reduce the load capacity of a prestressed concrete structure. In principle all stressed high strength steel is

  14. Acoustic emission characteristics of stress corrosion cracks in a type 304 stainless steel tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woong Gi; Bae, Seung Gi; Lee, Bo Young [School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Seong [Center for Robot Technology and Manufacturing, Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Sik [Dept. of Nuclear Safety Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwag, Nog Won [Ultrasonic Division, RM910, Byucksan Digital Valley II, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Acoustic emission (AE) is one of the promising methods for detecting the formation of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs) in laboratory tests. This method has the advantage of online inspection. Some studies have been conducted to investigate the characteristics of AE parameters during SCC propagation. However, it is difficult to classify the distinct features of SCC behavior. Because the previous studies were performed on slow strain rate test or compact tension specimens, it is difficult to make certain correlations between AE signals and actual SCC behavior in real tube-type specimens. In this study, the specimen was a AISI 304 stainless steel tube widely applied in the nuclear industry, and an accelerated test was conducted at high temperature and pressure with a corrosive environmental condition. The study result indicated that intense AE signals were mainly detected in the elastic deformation region, and a good correlation was observed between AE activity and crack growth. By contrast, the behavior of accumulated counts was divided into four regions. According to the waveform analysis, a specific waveform pattern was observed during SCC development. It is suggested that AE can be used to detect and monitor SCC initiation and propagation in actual tubes.

  15. Acoustic emission characteristics of stress corrosion cracks in a type 304 stainless steel tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woonggi Hwang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE is one of the promising methods for detecting the formation of stress corrosion cracks (SCCs in laboratory tests. This method has the advantage of online inspection. Some studies have been conducted to investigate the characteristics of AE parameters during SCC propagation. However, it is difficult to classify the distinct features of SCC behavior. Because the previous studies were performed on slow strain rate test or compact tension specimens, it is difficult to make certain correlations between AE signals and actual SCC behavior in real tube-type specimens. In this study, the specimen was a AISI 304 stainless steel tube widely applied in the nuclear industry, and an accelerated test was conducted at high temperature and pressure with a corrosive environmental condition. The study result indicated that intense AE signals were mainly detected in the elastic deformation region, and a good correlation was observed between AE activity and crack growth. By contrast, the behavior of accumulated counts was divided into four regions. According to the waveform analysis, a specific waveform pattern was observed during SCC development. It is suggested that AE can be used to detect and monitor SCC initiation and propagation in actual tubes.

  16. Impact of surface condition on sulphide stress corrosion cracking of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, G.; Wickström, L.; Mingard, K.; Turnbull, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Heat tinting renders 316L stainless steel more susceptible to sulphide stress corrosion cracking. ► Pitting more likely at physical defects generated from specimen preparation than at inclusions. ► Cracks developed after 90 days that were not evident after the standard test duration of 30 days. ► Only shallow pitting observed due to constrained access of H 2 S to the pit recesses. ► Determination of near surface residual stress in austenitic stainless steels by XRD is unreliable. -- Abstract: The effect of surface condition on crack initiation in 316L stainless steel during laboratory testing in sour (H 2 S) environments for oil and gas applications has been investigated using the four-point bend test method. The main focus was on the effect of the degree of surface damage introduced during specimen machining and the influence of heat tinting to simulate the welding process. Detailed mapping of the surface of the four-point bend specimens before and after the tests revealed a greater tendency for pits to form at pre-existing mechanical defects than at inclusions. Perhaps surprisingly, pitting was initiated more readily on the finer ground surface. The effect of heat tinting was (i) to increase the pit density and (ii) to facilitate cracking, shifting the material from the pass to the failure domain. In all cases cracks initiated at pitting sites. A clear time dependence was observed in both the evolution of pitting and the transition from pit to crack during the four-point bend test, implying that the standard 30 day test duration may not always be sufficiently conservative. Characterisation of pitting and cracking in the specimens using electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling revealed evidence of de-alloying local to the crack. The origin of the cracks could not be identified precisely but initiation in the thinned region of the metal caused by undercutting or intense localised dissolution along slip

  17. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  18. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  19. Initiation of Stress Corrosion Cracking of 26Cr-1Mo Ferritic Stainless Steels in Hot Chloride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. S.; Hehemann, R. F.

    1987-01-01

    Elongation measurements of 26Cr-1Mo ferritic stainless steels undergoing stress corrosion in boiling LiCl solution allow the induction period to be distinguished from the propagation period of cracks by the deviation of elongation from the logarithmic creep law. Localised corrosion cells are activated exclusively at slip steps by loading and developed into corrosion trenches. No cracks have developed from the corrosion trenches until the induction period is exceeded. The induction period is regarded as a time for localised corrosion cells to achieve a critical degree of occlusion for crack initiation. The repassivation rate of exposed metal by creep or emergence of slip steps decreases as the load increases and is very sensitive to the microstructural changes that affect slip tep height. The greater susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of either prestrained or grain coarsened 26Cr-1Mo alloy compared with that of mill annealed material results from a significant reduction of repassivation rate associated with the increased slip step height. The angular titanium carbonitrides particles dispersed in Ti-stabilized 26Cr-1Mo alloy have a detrimental effect on the resistance to stress corrosion cracking

  20. Tensile stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to very high dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Ruther, W. E.; Strain, R. V.; Shack, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20--100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. The data bases and mechanistic understanding of, the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high dose, i.e., is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-commotion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-11 reactor after irradiation to {approximately}50 dpa at {approximately}370 C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microcopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at low ECP, and this susceptibility led to poor work-hardening capability and low ductility.

  1. Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in HAZ for super-martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Yukio; Kimura, Mitsuo [Tubular Products and Casting Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Nakamichi, Haruo; Sato, Kaoru [Analysis and Characterization Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Itakura, Noritsugu [Products Service and Development Dept., Chita Works, JFE Steel Corporation. 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Masamura, Katsumi [Tubular Products Business Planning Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 2-2-3, Uchisaiwai-sho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for heat affected zone (HAZ) of super-martensitic stainless steel was studied using two types of the steel. One was a lean grade, which was Mo free and low Ni, and the other was a high grade, which was Mo added and high Ni. Specimens received heat treatments simulating welding thermal cycles were applied to SCC tests. Cracks were observed in some specimens after U-bend SCC test under low pH environments. Thermal cycle conditions with sensitization were verified from the results. No crack was observed in the specimen with the thermal cycle simulating post welding heat treatment (PWHT) after sensitizing conditions. Therefore, PWHT was clarified to be effective to prevent the cracking. Cr carbides were observed along prior austenite grain boundary intermittently, and Cr depleted zone was confirmed on the grain boundary adjacent to carbides that precipitated on the grain boundary. It is, therefore, concluded that the cracking results from Cr depletion on prior austenite grain boundary accompanied by precipitation of Cr carbides under specific welding conditions. (authors)

  2. Influence of Thermal Aging on Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Totsuka, N.; Nakajima, N.; Arioka, K.; Negishi, K.

    2002-01-01

    In order to evaluate the SCC (stress corrosion cracking) susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels which are used for the main coolant piping material of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate test (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) were performed in simulated PWR primary water at 360 C. The main coolant piping materials contain ferrite phase with ranging from 8 to 23 % and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. The 23% ferrite material was prepared for test as the maximum ferrite content of main coolant pipes in Japanese PWRs. The brittle fracture in the non-aged materials after SSRT is mainly caused by quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. On the other hand, a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in austenite and ferrite phases was observed on long time aged material. Also on CLT, (2 times σ y ), after 3,000 hours exposure, microcracks were observed on the surface of non-aged and aged for 10,000 hours at 400 C materials. The crack initiation site of CLT is similar to that of SSRT. The SCC susceptibility of the materials increases with aging time. It is suggested that the ferrite hardening with aging affect SCC susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels. (authors)

  3. A mechanical property and stress corrosion evaluation of Custom 455 stainless steel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical and stress corrosion properties are presented of vacuum melted Custom 455 stainless steel alloy bar (1.0-inch diameter) and sheet (0.083-inch thick) material aged at 950 F, 1000 F, and 1050 F. Low temperature mechanical properties were determined at temperatures of 80 F, 0 F, -100 F, and -200 F. For all three aging treatments, the ultimate tensile and 0.2 percent offset yield strengths increased with decreasing test temperatures while the elongation held fairly constant down to -100 F and decreased at -200 F. Reduction in Area decreased moderately with decreasing temperature for the longitudinal round (0.250-inch diameter) specimens. Notched tensile strength and charpy V-notched impact strength decreased with decreasing test temperature. For all three aging treatments, no failures were observed in the unstressed specimens or the specimens stressed to 50, 75, and 100 percent of their yield strengths for 180 days of alternate immersion testing in a 3.5 percent NaCl solution. As indicated by the results of tensile tests performed after alternate immersion testing, the mechanical properties of Custom 455 alloy were not affected by stress or exposure under the conditions of the evaluation.

  4. Initiation of stress corrosion cracking in pre-stained austenitic stainless steels exposed to primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) plants. However, a limited number of cases of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) has been detected in cold-worked (CW) areas of non-sensitized austenitic stainless steel components in French PWRs. A previous program launched in the early 2000's identified the required conditions for SCC of cold-worked stainless steels. It was found that a high strain hardening coupled with a cyclic loading favoured SCC. The present study aims at better understanding the role of pre-straining on crack initiation and at developing an engineering model for IGSCC initiation of 304L and 316L stainless steels in primary water. Such model will be based on SCC initiation tests on notched (not pre-cracked) specimens under 'trapezoidal' cyclic loading. The effects of pre-straining (tensile versus cold rolling), cold-work level and strain path on the SCC mechanisms are investigated. Experimental results demonstrate the dominating effect of strain path on SCC susceptibility for all pre-straining levels. Initiation can be understood as crack density and crack depth. A global criterion has been proposed to integrate both aspects of initiation. Maps of SCC initiation susceptibility have been proposed. A critical crack depth between 10 and 20 μm has been demonstrated to define transition between slow propagation and fast propagation for rolled materials. For tensile pre-straining, the critical crack depth is in the range 20 - 50 μm. Experimental evidences support the notion of a KISCC threshold, whose value depends on materials, pre-straining ant load applied. The initiation time has been found to depend on the applied loading as a function of (σ max max/YV) 11,5 . The effect of both strain path and surface hardening is indirectly taken into account via the yield stress. In this study, material differences rely on strain path effect on mechanical properties. As a result, a stress

  5. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  6. Susceptibility of 17-4PH stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking in aqueous environments by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz S, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of a 17-4PH type steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in low pressure steam turbine environments was assessed using slow strain rate test at 90 Centigrade and at 1.35x10 -6 seg -1 . Environments tested included different concentrated solutions of NaCl, NaOH and Na 2 SO 4 . It was concluded that this steel is susceptible to SCC in 20 % NaCl and pH=3 and in 20 % NaCl pH=neutral but under cathodic polarisation. The electrochemical potential noise of the specimen was monitored during the test. The naturally fluctuations in potential were arise due to spontaneous brake protective film and were characteristics of the kind of corrosion like pit or stress corrosion cracking. After that using Fast Fourier Transformer (FFT) the noise data set were analyzed to obtain power spectral density plots which showed differences between general corrosion and localized corrosion. Polarization curves were carry out at two different rates and them showed the general behavior of the systems. (Author)

  7. Stress corrosion cracking behaviour of low alloy steels in high temperature water: Description and results from modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2001-01-01

    The initiation and growth of a crack by stress and corrosion in the low alloy steels used for the pressure vessels of Boiling Water Reactors may affect the availability and safety of the plant. This paper presents a new model for stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water. The model, based on observations, assumes the crack growth mechanism to be based on an anodic dissolution and cleavage. The main results deal with the position of the dissolution cell found at the crack tip, and with the identification of the parameters sensitive to crack growth, among which are the electrolyte composition and the cleavage length. The model is conservative, in qualitative agreement with measurements conducted at PSI, and may be extended to other metal-environment systems. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion of austenitic steels mono and polycrystals in Mg Cl2 medium: micro fractography and study of behaviour improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.

    1997-01-01

    The austenitic steels in a hot chlorinated medium present a rupture which is macroscopically fragile, discontinuous and formed with crystallographic facets. The interpretation of these facies crystallographic character is a key for the understanding of the stress corrosion damages. The first aim of this work is then to study into details the micro fractography of 316 L steels mono and polycrystals. Two types of rupture are observed: a very fragile rupture which stresses on the possibility of the interatomic bonds weakening by the corrosive medium Mg Cl 2 and a discontinuous rupture (at the micron scale) on the sliding planes which is in good agreement with the corrosion enhanced plasticity model. The second aim of this work is to search for controlling the stress corrosion by the mean of a pre-strain hardening. Two types of pre-strain hardening have been tested. A pre-strain hardening with a monotonic strain is negative. Indeed, the first cracks starts very early and the cracks propagation velocity is increased. This is explained by the corrosion enhanced plasticity model through the intensifying of the local corrosion-deformation interactions. On the other hand, a cyclic pre-strain hardening is particularly favourable. The first micro strains starts later and the strain on breaking point levels are increased. The delay of the starting of the first strains is explained by a surface distortion structure which is very homogeneous. At last, the dislocations structure created in fatigue at saturation is a planar structure of low energy which reduces the corrosion-deformation interactions, source of micro strains. (O.M.)

  9. POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

    2010-04-26

    The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The

  10. Oxide inclusions in laser additive manufactured stainless steel and their effects on impact toughness and stress corrosion cracking behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaoyuan; Andresen, Peter L.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2018-02-01

    Intergranular and intragranular Si and Mn rich oxide inclusions are present in laser additive manufactured austenitic stainless steel. The uniform oxide dispersions in additive manufactured material promoted early initiation of microvoids and reduced its impact toughness relative to powder metallurgy (hot isostatic pressing) and wrought materials. For stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water, the silica inclusions along the grain boundaries preferentially dissolved and appeared to accelerate oxidation and caused extensive crack branching.

  11. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, M.; de la Fuente, D.; Díaz, I.; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morphology of steel c...

  12. Influence of microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in synthetic caustic-nitrate nuclear waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarafian, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    The influence of alloy microstructure on stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in caustic-nitrate synthetic nuclear waste solutions was studied. An evaluation was made of the effect of heat treatment on a representative material (ASTM A 516 Grade 70) used in the construction of high activity radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River Plant. Several different microstructures were tested for susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking. Precracked fracture specimens loaded in either constant load or constant crack opening displacement were exposed to a variety of caustic-nitrate and nitrate solutions. Results were correlated with the mechanical and corrosion properties of the microstructures. Crack velocity and crack arrest stress intensity were found to be related to the yield strength of the steel microstructures. Fractographic evidence indicated pH depletion and corrosive crack tip chemistry conditions even in highly caustic solutions. Experimental results were compatible with crack growth by a strain-assisted anodic dissolution mechanism; however, hydrogen embrittlement also was considered possible

  13. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of ion irradiated 304L stainless steel in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    IASCC is irradiation - assisted enhancement of intergranular stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel. It is a complex degrading phenomenon which can have a significant influence on maintenance time and cost of PWRs' core internals and hence, is an issue of concern. Recent studies have proposed using ion irradiation (to be specific, proton irradiation) as an alternative of neutron irradiation to improve the current understanding of the mechanism. The objective of this study was to investigate the cracking susceptibility of irradiated SA 304L and factors contributing to cracking, using two different ion irradiations; iron and proton irradiations. Both resulted in generation of point defects in the microstructure and thereby causing hardening of the SA 304L. Material (unirradiated and iron irradiated) showed no susceptibility to intergranular cracking on subjection to SSRT with a strain rate of 5 * 10 -8 s -1 up to 4 % plastic strain in inert environment. But, irradiation (iron and proton) was found to increase intergranular cracking severity of material on subjection to SSRT in simulated PWR primary water environment at 340 C. Correlation between the cracking susceptibility and degree of localization was studied. Impact of iron irradiation on bulk oxidation of SA 304L was studied as well by conducting an oxidation test for 360 h in simulated PWR environment at 340 C. The findings of this study indicate that the intergranular cracking of 304L stainless steel in PWR environment can be studied using Fe irradiation despite its small penetration depth in material. Furthermore, it has been shown that the cracking was similar in both iron and proton irradiated samples despite different degrees of localization. Lastly, on establishing iron irradiation as a successful tool, it was used to study the impact of surface finish and strain paths on intergranular cracking susceptibility of the material. (author) [fr

  14. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steels under boiling water reactor conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.P.; Ritter, S.

    2008-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of different reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and weld filler/heat-affected zone materials was characterized under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) normal water (NWC) and hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) conditions by periodical partial unloading, constant and ripple load tests with pre-cracked fracture mechanics specimens. The experiments were performed in oxygenated or hydrogenated high-purity or sulphate/chloride containing water at temperatures from 150 to 288 deg. C. In good agreement with field experience, these investigations revealed a very low susceptibility to SCC crack growth and small crack growth rates (<0.6 mm/year) under most BWR/NWC and material conditions. Critical water chemistry, loading and material conditions, which can result in sustained and fast SCC well above the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines' were identified, but many of them generally appeared atypical for current optimized BWR power operation practice or modern RPVs. Application of HWC always resulted in a significant reduction of SCC crack growth rates by more than one order of magnitude under these critical system conditions and growth rates dropped well below the 'BWRVIP-60 SCC disposition lines'

  16. Modelling of the Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour for Low Alloy Steels in High Temperature Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirbonod, B.

    2000-11-01

    The goal of the model is to calculate the crack growth and to determine the parameters of relevance for the stress corrosion cracking of the low alloy steels in high temperature water for reactor safety purposes. The model assumes for the crack growth mechanism an anodic dissolution initiated by the rupture of the oxide film by creep at the crack tip, a repassivation, and, for representing other possible crack growth mechanisms, a cleavage. The model for the dissolution considers all the parameters of relevance for the dissolution and well accepted laws of physics. The creep is calculated by a constitutive law of Chaboche with the finite element method. The dissolution cell is found to be situated in the region of the crack tip with a length up to a few hundred micrometers. Sensitive parameters for the crack growth are the strain to film rupture, the composition of the electrolyte, the exchange current densities, and the cleavage length. The model is in qualitative agreement with measurements. It is discussed with particular attention to the geometry and dimensions of the dissolution cell and to the species transport in the dissolution cell and along the crack. Further work should be devoted to the comparison of the model to experiments. (author)

  17. Ferritic stainless steels: corrosion resistance + economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remus, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steels provide corrosion resistance at lower cost. They include Type 409, Type 439, 18SR, 20-Mo (1.6 Mo), 18-2 (2 Mo), 26-1S, E-Brite 26-1, 29 Cr-4 Mo, and 29 Cr-4 Mo-2 Ni. Their corrosion and mechanical properties are examined. Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking is an advantage compared to austenitic types

  18. Investigation with slow traction conditions of the stress corrosion of carbon steels in alkaline media. Role of passivating inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miroud, Lakhdar

    1991-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (S.C.C.) sensitivity of carbon steels in basic media, such as carbonates, is well known. A constant strain-rate test have allowed to observe two steels (A42 [E26] and XC38) behaviour in such conditions at pH 9. The S.C.C. potentials susceptibility range has been found. Inter and Trans-granular cracking have been revealed and measured with micrographic methods. A crack growth rate has been studied as a function of strain rate: an experimental rate has been compared to calculated values from methods which have proposed previously, and methods which have been elaborated in this work. These last permit a best approach of cracking in our case. The chromates use, as inhibitor ions, has permit to decrease the corrosive attack and to cancel the crack growth rate. (author) [fr

  19. Effects of fluoride and other halogen ions on the external stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whorlow, K.M.; Hutto, F.B. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    The drip procedure from the Standard Test Method for Evaluating the Influence of Thermal Insulation on External Stress Corrosion Cracking Tendency of Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASTM C 692-95a) was used to research the effect of halogens and inhibitors on the External Stress Corrosion Cracking (ESCC) of Type 304 stainless steel as it applies to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.36, Nonmetallic Thermal Insulation for Austenitic Stainless Steel. The solutions used in this research were prepared using pure chemical reagents to simulate the halogens and inhibitors found in insulation extraction solutions. The results indicated that sodium silicate compounds that were higher in sodium were more effective for preventing chloride-induced ESCC in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel. Potassium silicate (all-silicate inhibitor) was not as effective as sodium silicate. Limited testing with sodium hydroxide (all-sodium inhibitor) indicated that it may be effective as an inhibitor. Fluoride, bromide, and iodide caused minimal ESCC which could be effectively inhibited by sodium silicate. The addition of fluoride to the chloride/sodium silicate systems at the threshold of ESCC appeared to have no synergistic effect on ESCC. The mass ratio of sodium + silicate (mg/kg) to chloride (mg/kg) at the lower end of the NRC RG 1.36 Acceptability Curve was not sufficient to prevent ESCC using the methods of this research

  20. INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL FOR CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.

    2009-10-15

    The evaporator recycle streams contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that may be outside of the current waste tank corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history (1998-2008) of Tanks 30 and 32 showed that these tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved F-Area tanks. Therefore, for the Type III/IIIA waste tanks the efficacy of the stress relief of welding residual stress is the only corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (12 x 12 x 1 in.) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in Tanks 30 and 32. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test is currently in progress, but no cracking has been observed after 9 weeks of immersion. Based on the preliminary results, it appears that the environmental conditions of the tests are unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the duration of these tests.

  1. corrosion inhibitor for carbon steels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    potentiodynamic polarisation techniques. It was found that. CNSL reduces the extent of the electrochemical processes taking place on carbon steel undergoing corrosion. The corrosion rate of the carbon steel was reduced by over 92 % when only 300 ppm of CNSL was applied. This indicates that. CNSL is a potential ...

  2. Susceptibility to stress corrosion in stainless steels type AISI 321 and 12X18H10T used in PWR type reactors (WWER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matadamas C, N.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium stabilized stainless steels have been utilized in sovietic pressurized water reactors (VVER) for avoid the susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion (IGC) present in other austenitic stainless steels. However the Intergranular Corrosion resistance of this kind of materials has been questioned because of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking failures (IGSCC) have been reported. This paper study the electrochemical behavior of the AISI 321 stainless steel in a H 3 BO 3 Solution contaminated with chlorides and its susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion.Electrochemical prediction diagrams of the stainless steels AISI 321 and 12X18H10T (sovietic) sensitized (600 Centigrade, 3 h.) were compared. Cylindrical and conical samples were used in Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT), to determine the susceptibility to Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) in AISI 321 and 12X18H10T stainless steels. The results obtained showed that the temperature of the solution is a very important factor to detect this susceptibility. Fractography studies on the fracture surfaces of the samples obtained in the SSRT at high temperature were realized. Corrosion velocities of both AISI 321 and 12X18H10T stainless steels were determined using conical samples in the CERT system at high temperature. E.D.A.X. analysis was employed in both AISI 321 and 12X18H10T stainless steels in order to explain the degree of sensitization. (Author)

  3. Effects of potential and concentration of bicarbonate solution on stress corrosion cracking of annealed carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruna, Takumi; Zhu, Liehong; Murakami, Makoto; Shibata, Toshio

    2000-01-01

    Effects of potential and concentration of bicarbonate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of annealed SM 400 B carbon steel has been investigated in bicarbonate solutions at 343 K. The surface of annealed specimen had decarburized layer of about 0. 5 mm thickness. A potentiostatic slow strain rate testing apparatus equipped with a charge coupled device camera system was employed to evaluate SCC susceptibility from the viewpoint of the crack behavior. In a constant bicarbonate concentration of 1 M, cracks were observed in the potential range from -800 to 600 mV Ag/ A gCl . and especially, the initiation and the propagation of the cracks were accelerated at -600 mV. At a constant potential of -600 mV, cracks were observed in the concentration range from 0.001 to 1 M, and the initiation and the propagation of the cracks were suppressed as the concentration decreased. Polarization curves for the decarburized surface were measured with two different scan rates. High SCC susceptibility may be expected in the potential range where the difference between the two current densities is large. It was found in this system that the potential with the maximum difference in the current density was -600 mV for 1 M bicarbonate solution, and the potential increased with a decrease in the concentration of bicarbonate. This means that an applied potential of -600 mV provides the highest SCC susceptibility for 1 M bicarbonate solution, and that the SCC susceptibility decreases as the concentration decreases. These findings support the dependence of the actual SCC behavior on the potential and the concentration of bicarbonate. (author)

  4. Monte Carlo simulation taking account of surface crack effect for stress corrosion cracking in a stainless steel SUS 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohgo, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Shimamura, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Guen; Hirano, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in structural metal materials occurs by initiation and coalescence of micro cracks, subcritical crack propagation and multiple large crack formation or final failure under the combination of materials, stress and corrosive environment. In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation for the process of SCC has been proposed based on the stochastic properties of micro crack initiation and fracture mechanics concept for crack coalescence and propagation. The emphasis in the model is put on the influence of semi-elliptical surface cracks. Numerical simulations are carried out based on CBB (creviced bent beam) test results of a sensitized stainless steel SUS 304 and the influence of micro crack initiation rate and coalescence condition on the simulation results is discussed. The numerical examples indicate the applicability of the present model to a prediction of the SCC behavior in real structures. (author)

  5. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Fuente, Daniel de la; Díaz, Iván; Cano, H.

    2011-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a) the morpholog...

  6. On the Stress Corrosion Cracking and Hydrogen Embrittlement Behavior of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Boiling Saturated Magnesium Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama M. Alyousif

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC and hydrogen embrittlement (HE behaviors for types 304, 310, and 316 austenitic stainless steels were investigated in boiling saturated magnesium chloride solutions using a constant load method under different conditions including test temperature, applied stress, and sensitization. Both of type 304 and type 316 stainless steels showed quite similar behavior characteristics, whereas type 310 stainless steel showed a different behavior. The time to failure (tf parameter was used among other parameters to characterize the materials behavior in the test solution and to develop a mathematical model for predicting the time to failure in the chloride solution. The combination of corrosion curve parameters and fracture surface micrographs gave some explanation for the cracking modes as well as an indication for the cracking mechanisms. On the basis of the results obtained, it was estimated that intergranular cracking was resulted from hydrogen embrittlement due to strain-induced formation of martensite along the grain boundaries, while transgranular cracking took place by propagating cracks nucleated at slip steps by dissolution.

  7. A Simple Approach to the Determination of Threshold Stress Intensity for Stress Corrosion Cracking ( K ISCC) and Crack Growth of Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Raman, R. K.; Pal, Sarvesh

    2011-09-01

    This article discusses the intricacies associated with the determination of threshold stress intensity for stress corrosion cracking ( K ISCC) of narrow regions such as the sensitized microstructure of austenitic stainless steel and presents a simple approach to the accurate determination of K ISCC of a sensitized stainless steel. K ISCC and crack growth rates of solution-annealed and sensitized AISI 304 stainless steel in the 42 wt pct MgCl2 environment at 427 K (154 °C) were determined using the circumferential notch tensile (CNT) technique. The results presented here validate the ability of the CNT technique to overcome some of the fundamental difficulties in determination of the K ISCC of narrow regions, using the traditional techniques. This article also discusses the mechanistic aspects of the difference in fractographic features of the sensitized and solution-annealed stainless steels.

  8. Sulfide Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Modified ASTM A694 F60 Low Alloy Steel for Subsea Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Stridsklev, Camilla A

    2013-01-01

    The resistance to sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSC) of modified ASTM A694 F60 low alloy steel, produced by two different manufacturers, was studied by four-point bend-testing. The two materials are named material A and material B in this report. Both materials were tested in two different environments with different severity, one ?sweet-transition region? test and one ?sour service? test. The test conditions were controlled by the H2S partial pressure (pH2S) and pH. These parameters wer...

  9. Study of corrosion susceptibility of stainless steel-304 and stainless steel-316 under mechanical stress in diluted boiling nitric acid with chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desjardins, D.; Puiggali, M.; El Kheloui, A.; Petit, M.C.; Clement, C.; Berge, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of corrosion of stressed 304 and 316 stainless steels in boiling solutions of diluted nitric acid in presence of chloride is presented. After a chemical study of the electrolyte, the different kinds of corrosion observed are represented on HNO 3 concentration - Cl - concentration diagrams. A more fundamental study based on several electrochemical techniques (forward scan and return potentiodynamic curves, potentiokinetic curves with different scan rates, sample depassivation by rapid straining under potentiostatic control) is carried out. The results allow to confirm the observations and to explain them in terms of competition between anodic dissolution, depassivation, repassivation processes with a precise analyze of the role of the solution and of the mechanical stress [fr

  10. Stress corrosion of unalloyed steels in geological storage conditions; Corrosion sous contrainte des aciers non allies dans les conditions du stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Didot, A.; Herms, E.; Bataillon, C.; Chene, J. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/LECA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Crusset, D. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2007-07-01

    The concept retained for high level and years living radioactive waste disposal is the underground storage. It is then necessary to know the behaviour in time (about 10000 years) of the different constituent elements of the containment. The storage site chosen is the Bures' ones, presenting a clay formation at 600 m of depth. Each compartment is separated of a sufficient distance in order to profit of the thermal dispersion effect in the rock for optimizing the cooling of the package. In this work, has been used an unalloyed steel sur-container. The aim is to understand the resistance of the material under corrosion and loading, and particularly the stress corrosion which is a particular case of cracking assisted by environment. The material studied is a weld of two unalloyed steels obtained by electron beam. Slow traction tests have been carried out in an autoclave in the following experimental conditions: interstitial water in equilibrium with a helium-CO{sub 2} mixture 5.4 per thousand under 50 bar and at a temperature of 90 C. The results show an influence of the hydrogen corrosion on the mechanical behaviour of the material and particularly a decrease of the size of the reduction in area, which is practically unexisting in the case of the melted zone. These results are explained into details. (O.M.)

  11. Effect of Dynamic Change in Strain Rate on Mechanical and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of a Mild Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Govinda; Varshney, A.; Parameswaran, Venkitanarayanan; Mondal, K.

    2017-05-01

    The current work analyzes the effect of the dynamic change in strain rate during tensile loading of a mild steel on its mechanical and stress corrosion behavior in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. The sample experiences high strain rate (10-2 s-1) up to 10, 15 and 20% of total deformation and then very low strain rate of 10-6 s-1 till fracture without any unloading in between. The behavioral characteristics of the steel under these circumstances are found to be different from that exhibited during complete loading till fracture both at high and slow strain rates separately. Total strain increases with the increase in the strain at which change in strain rate happens, and this is attributed to the generation of large number of dislocations at higher strain rate and subsequently release of dislocation at low strain rate during change over due to more time available for dynamic recovery. This observation is common for both in air and corrosive environment. One unique observation in this study is the higher total strain and lower strength observed during dynamic change in strain rate in the corrosive environment compared to that in air, which is attributed to the hydrogen-induced plasticity mechanism.

  12. Influence of hydrogen embrittlement on caustic stress corrosion cracking of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels: comparative tests performed on specimens loaded in modes I and III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berge, P.; Vaillant, F.

    1982-01-01

    The comparison of stress corrosion susceptibilities in mode I (tensile stress) and mode III (shear stress) can reveal the possible involvement of an hydrogen embrittlement mechanism, particularly for 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels in caustic solution [fr

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under deaerated high-temperature water. Influence of cold work and processing orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terachi, Takumi; Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Arioka, Koji

    2006-01-01

    The influence of cold work and processing orientation on the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of stainless steel under hydrogenated high-temperature water was examined. It was shown that (1) the crack growth rates increased with heaviness of cold work, and (2) processing orientation affected crack growth rate with cracking direction. Crack growth rates showed anisotropy of T-L>>T-S>L-S, with T-S and L-S branches representing high shear stress direction. Geometric deformation of crystal grains due to cold work caused the anisotropy and shear stress also assisted the SCC propagation. (3) The step intervals of slip like patterns observed on intergranular facets increased cold work. (4) Nano-indentation hardness of the crack tip together with EBSD measurement indicated that the change of hardness due to crack propagation was less than 5% cold-work, even though the distance from the crack tip was 10μm. (author)

  14. Relative Humidity and the Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking in an impure Plutonium Oxide Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.; Duffey, J.; Lam, P.; Dunn, K.

    2010-05-05

    Laboratory tests to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons showed that corrosion occurred in selected samples. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The exposures were conducted in sealed containers in which the oxide-salt mixtures were loaded with about 0.6 wt % water from a humidified helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration, the composition of the salt and the moisture present in the test environment. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride and 0.6 wt% water. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas above the solid mixture, or in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either no CaCl{sub 2} or 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2}. SCC was present where the 0.6 wt % water content exceeded the value needed to fully hydrate the available CaCl{sub 2}, but was absent where the water content was insufficient. These results reveal the significance of the relative humidity in the austenitic stainless steels environment to their susceptibility to corrosion. The relative humidity in the test environment was controlled by the water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salts such as CaCl{sub 2}. For each salt or salt mixture there is a threshold

  15. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, The Waste Package Outer Barrier and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Stephen

    2000-04-17

    One of the potential failure modes of the drip shield (DS), the waste package (WP) outer barrier, and the stainless structural material is the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced by the WP environment and various types of stresses that can develop in the DSs or the WPs. For the current design of the DS and WP, however, the DS will be excluded from the SCC evaluation because stresses that are relevant to SCC are insignificant in the DS. The major sources of stresses in the DS are loadings due to backfill and earthquakes. These stresses will not induce SCC because the stress caused by backfill is generally compressive stress and the stress caused by earthquakes is temporary in nature. The 316NG stainless steel inner barrier of the WP will also be excluded from the SCC evaluation because the SCC performance assessment will not take credit from the inner barrier. Therefore, the purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of the material (i.e., Alloy 22) used for the WP outer barrier subjected to the effects of SCC. As already mentioned in the development plan for the WP PMR (CRWMS M and O 1999e), this Analyses and Models Report (AMR) is to serve as a feed to the Waste Package Degradation (WPD) Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) and Process Model Report (PMR).

  16. External stress-corrosion cracking of a 1.22-m-diameter type 316 stainless steel air valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Telesman, Jack; Moore, Allan S.; Johnson, Dereck F.; Kuivinen, David E.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the cause of the failure of a massive AISI Type 316 stainless steel valve which controlled combustion air to a jet engine test facility. Several through-the-wall cracks were present near welded joints in the valve skirt. The valve had been in outdoor service for 18 years. Samples were taken in the cracked regions for metallographic and chemical analyses. Insulating material and sources of water mist in the vicinity of the failed valve were analyzed for chlorides. A scanning electron microscope was used to determine whether foreign elements were present in a crack. On the basis of the information generated, the failure was characterized as external stress-corrosion cracking. The cracking resulted from a combination of residual tensile stress from welding and the presence of aqueous chlorides. Recommended countermeasures are included.

  17. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, L.; Savoie, M.; Delafosse, D.

    2007-06-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of precipitation-strengthened A-286 austenitic stainless steel was first investigated at room temperature under 0.2% plastic strain control. LCF led to hardening for the first 20 cycles and then to significant softening. LCF-induced dislocation microstructure was characterized using both bright and dark-field imaging techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Cycling softening was correlated with the formation of precipitate-free localized deformation bands. The effect of these precipitate-free localized deformation bands on A-286 stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in PWR primary water was then examined by means of constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 320 °C and 360 °C. Comparative CERT tests were performed on companion specimens with similar yield stress but pre-fatigued to a few cycles (4-8) or between 125 and 200 cycles. Specimens pre-fatigued to a few cycles with no precipitate-free localized deformation bands exhibited little susceptibility to intergranular SCC (IGSCC). In contrast, the presence of precipitate-free localized deformation bands formed by pre-fatigue to between 125 and 200 cycles strongly promoted IGSCC. The interest of the approach used in this study is to provide insight into the role of localized deformation in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  18. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, L.; Savoie, M.; Delafosse, D.

    2007-01-01

    The low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviour of precipitation-strengthened A-286 austenitic stainless steel was first investigated at room temperature under 0.2% plastic strain control. LCF led to hardening for the first 20 cycles and then to significant softening. LCF-induced dislocation microstructure was characterized using both bright and dark-field imaging techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Cycling softening was correlated with the formation of precipitate-free localized deformation bands. The effect of these precipitate-free localized deformation bands on A-286 stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour in PWR primary water was then examined by means of constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests at 320 o C and 360 o C. Comparative CERT tests were performed on companion specimens with similar yield stress but pre-fatigued to a few cycles (4-8) or between 125 and 200 cycles. Specimens pre-fatigued to a few cycles with no precipitate-free localized deformation bands exhibited little susceptibility to intergranular SCC (IGSCC). In contrast, the presence of precipitate-free localized deformation bands formed by pre-fatigue to between 125 and 200 cycles strongly promoted IGSCC. The interest of the approach used in this study is to provide insight into the role of localized deformation in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking

  19. Tensile and stress corrosion cracking properties of type 304 stainless steel irradiated to a very high dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Strain, R.V.; Shack, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Certain safety-related core internal structural components of light water reactors, usually fabricated from Type 304 or 316 austenitic stainless steels (SSs), accumulate very high levels of irradiation damage (20-100 displacement per atom or dpa) by the end of life. Our databases and mechanistic understanding of the degradation of such highly irradiated components, however, are not well established. A key question is the nature of irradiation-assisted intergranular cracking at very high doses, i.e. is it purely mechanical failure or is it stress-corrosion cracking? In this work, hot-cell tests and microstructural characterization were performed on Type 304 SS from the hexagonal fuel can of the decommissioned EBR-II reactor after irradiation to ∼50 dpa at ∼370 deg. C. Slow-strain-rate tensile tests were conducted at 289 degree sign C in air and in water at several levels of electrochemical potential (ECP), and microstructural characteristics were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The material deformed significantly by twinning and exhibited surprisingly high ductility in air, but was susceptible to severe intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at high ECP. Low levels of dissolved O and ECP were effective in suppressing the susceptibility of the heavily irradiated material to IGSCC, indicating that the stress corrosion process associated with irradiation-induced grain-boundary Cr depletion, rather than purely mechanical separation of grain boundaries, plays the dominant role. However, although IGSCC was suppressed, the material was susceptible to dislocation channeling at a low ECP, and this susceptibility led to a poor work-hardening capability and low ductility

  20. Stress corrosion cracking of X80 pipeline steel exposed to high pH solutions with different concentrations of bicarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lin; Du, Cui-wei; Liu, Zhi-yong; Li, Xiao-gang

    2013-07-01

    Susceptibilities to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in high pH solutions with various concentrations of HCO{3/-} at a passive potential of -0.2 V vs. SCE were investigated by slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The SCC mechanism and the effect of HCO{3/-} were discussed with the aid of electrochemical techniques. It is indicated that X80 steel shows enhanced susceptibility to SCC with the concentration of HCO{3/-} increasing from 0.15 to 1.00 mol/L, and the susceptibility can be evaluated in terms of current density at -0.2 V vs. SCE. The SCC behavior is controlled by the dissolution-based mechanism in these circumstances. Increasing the concentration of HCO{3/-} not only increases the risk of rupture of passive films but also promotes the anodic dissolution of crack tips. Besides, little susceptibility to SCC is found in dilute solution containing 0.05 mol/L HCO{3/-} for X80 steel. This can be attributed to the inhibited repassivation of passive films, manifesting as a more intensive dissolution in the non-crack tip areas than at the crack tips.

  1. Assessment of Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Activated Tungsten Inert Gas-Welded Duplex Stainless Steel Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, B.; Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2017-12-01

    The stress corrosion cracking behavior of duplex stainless steel (DSS) weld joint largely depends on the ferrite-austenite phase microstructure balance. This phase balance is decided by the welding process used, heat input, welding conditions and the weld metal chemistry. In this investigation, the influence of activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of DSS joints was evaluated and compared. Boiling magnesium chloride (45 wt.%) environment maintained at 155 °C was used. The microstructure and ferrite content of different weld zones are correlated with the outcome of sustained load, SCC test. Irrespective of the welding processes used, SCC resistance of weld joints was inferior to that of the base metal. However, ATIG weld joint exhibited superior resistance to SCC than the TIG weld joint. The crack initiation and final failure were in the weld metal for the ATIG weld joint; they were in the heat-affected zone for the TIG weld joint.

  2. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  3. Effect of strain-path on stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304L stainless steel in PWR primary environment at 360 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couvant, T.; Vaillant, F.; Boursier, JM.; Delafosse, D.

    2004-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASS) are widespread in primary and auxiliary circuits of PWR. Moreover, some components suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under neutron irradiation. This degradation could be the result of the increase of hardness or the modification of chemical composition at the grain boundary by irradiation. In order to avoid complex and costly corrosion facilities, the effects of irradiation on the material are commonly simulated by applying a cold work on non-irradiated material prior to stress corrosion cracking tests. Slow strain rate tests were conducted on an austenitic stainless steel (SS) AISI 304L in PWR environment (360 deg. C). Particular attention was directed towards pre-straining effects on crack growth rate (CGR) and crack growth path (CGP). Results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of 304L to SCC in high-temperature hydrogenated water was enhanced by pre-straining. It seemed that IGSCC was enhanced by complex strain paths. (authors)

  4. Effect of strain-path on stress corrosion cracking of AISI 304L stainless steel in PWR primary environment at 360 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couvant, T.; Vaillant, F.; Boursier, JM. [EDF R and D - MMC, Route de Sens, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Delafosse, D. [Ecole des Mines de St-Etienne, 157 Cours Fauriel, 42023 St-Etienne cedex 2 (France)

    2004-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (ASS) are widespread in primary and auxiliary circuits of PWR. Moreover, some components suffer stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under neutron irradiation. This degradation could be the result of the increase of hardness or the modification of chemical composition at the grain boundary by irradiation. In order to avoid complex and costly corrosion facilities, the effects of irradiation on the material are commonly simulated by applying a cold work on non-irradiated material prior to stress corrosion cracking tests. Slow strain rate tests were conducted on an austenitic stainless steel (SS) AISI 304L in PWR environment (360 deg. C). Particular attention was directed towards pre-straining effects on crack growth rate (CGR) and crack growth path (CGP). Results have demonstrated that the susceptibility of 304L to SCC in high-temperature hydrogenated water was enhanced by pre-straining. It seemed that IGSCC was enhanced by complex strain paths. (authors)

  5. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, M.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric corrosion of mild steel is an extensive topic that has been studied by many authors in different regions throughout the world. This compilation paper incorporates relevant publications on the subject, in particular about the nature of atmospheric corrosion products, mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and kinetics of the atmospheric corrosion process, paying special attention to two matters upon which relatively less information has been published: a the morphology of steel corrosion products and corrosion product layers; and b long-term atmospheric corrosion ( > 10 years.

    La corrosión atmosférica del acero suave es un tema de gran amplitud que ha sido tratado por muchos autores en numerosas regiones del mundo. Este artículo de compilación incorpora publicaciones relevantes sobre esta temática, en particular sobre la naturaleza de los productos de corrosión atmosférica, mecanismos y cinética de los procesos de corrosión atmosférica, prestando una atención especial a dos aspectos sobre los que la información publicada ha sido menos abundante: a morfología de los productos de corrosión del acero y capas de productos de corrosión, y b corrosión atmosférica a larga duración (> 10 años.

  6. Potential mechanisms for corrosion and stress corrosion cracking failure of 3013 storage containers composed of 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolman, D.G.; Butt, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    The degradation of 316 stainless steel (SS) storage container materials is a potential problem for radioactive waste disposition. Container materials will be exposed to significant ionizing radiation, elevated temperatures, embrittling and/or alloying agents (e.g., gallium), chloride-containing compounds (as much as 20 wt% Cl or Cl - ), oxidizing compounds, and a limited quantity of moisture. Additionally, containers will contain welds that have heterogeneous composition due to solute segregation and that may retain significant residual stress. All of the above-listed environmental and material conditions have been shown to be deleterious to material integrity under certain conditions. Unfortunately, the precise conditions within each container and environment is unknown and may vary widely from container to container. Thus, no single test or set of tests will be able mimic the broad range of storage container conditions. Additionally, material behavior cannot be predicted because the synergistic effects of temperature, time, chloride, moisture, sensitization, weldments, salt formation, etc., have not been fully studied. The complexity and uncertainty of storage conditions precludes any detailed recommendations. This document attempts to detail selected previous studies and to suggest some general guidelines for storage of radioactive waste. Because of the voluminous research in this area, this review cannot be considered to be comprehensive. Readers are directed to references that contain detailed reviews of particular processes for more information. Note that the effect of gallium on the degradation of SS storage containers has been discussed elsewhere and will not be discussed here

  7. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking mechanisms in Fe-Mn-C austenitic steels; Role de l'hydrogene dans les mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte des aciers austenitiques FE-MN-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieudonne, Th.; Chene, J. [CEA Saclay, CNRS/CEA UMR 8587, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marchetti, L.; Wery, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECA, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Wery, M. [IUTMesures Physiques d' Orsay, Universite Paris-11, 91 - Orsay (France); Allely, Ch.; Cugy, Ph.; Scott, C. [ArcelorMittal Research, 57 - Maizieres-les-Metz (France)

    2010-03-15

    The main objective of this study is to implement original experimental techniques (notably the hydrogen isotopic tracing with the use of deuterium and tritium) to characterize and then predict the influence of chemical composition and of the microstructural status of Fe-Mn-C austenitic steels on their susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking phenomena related to hydrogen absorption/segregation. They report an electrochemical investigation and the study of hydrogen diffusion in these steels. Results are obtained by secondary ion mass spectroscopy

  8. Stress corrosion cracking of steel 316L in concentrated solutions boric acid + chlorides at 100 and 200 deg C: boric acid influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasri, R.; Olive, J.M.; Puiggali, M.; Cid, M.; Desjardins, D.

    1993-01-01

    The stainless steel 316L was tested by slow traction in autoclave at 200 deg C. The different stress corrosion sensitive curves (deformation speed for different boric acid contents) may determine the role of boric acid. Stainless steel 316L is submitted to an hyperhardening under inert atmosphere at 1150 deg C during 30 minutes with fast cooling. The solutions contain 2g/l of sodium chloride and variable contents in boric acid. The electrochemical behaviour shows that the obtained currents during the depassivation of the steel and the localized dissolution increase with the boric acid content. 3 refs., 2 figs

  9. BWR steel containment corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, C.P.; Bagchi, G.

    1996-04-01

    The report describes regulatory actions taken after corrosion was discovered in the drywell at the Oyster Creek Plant and in the torus at the Nine Mile Point 1 Plant. The report describes the causes of corrosion, requirements for monitoring corrosion, and measures to mitigate the corrosive environment for the two plants. The report describes the issuances of generic letters and information notices either to collect information to determine whether the problem is generic or to alert the licensees of similar plants about the existence of such a problem. Implementation of measures to enhance the containment performance under severe accident conditions is discussed. A study by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) of the performance of a degraded containment under severe accident conditions is summarized. The details of the BNL study are in the appendix to the report.

  10. Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of Stainless Steel 304 in the Sulfuric Acid Environment Due to Prestrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badaruddin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of  research is to investigate the effect of prestrain  on the stress corossion cracking behavior of AISI 304 stainless steel in the sulfuric acid of 10% concentration  under the static cantilever loading according to ASTM E-1681 standart. The specimen of 304 Stainless steel was strain up over the yield strength until reaching the uniform strain of 5% and 10% using servopulser UTM 9506 under the  displacement control of 0,3 mm/sec. The results of test  show that the prestrain of 5%  specimen is faster  failure than both  of  the prestrain of 10% and unprestrain specimen. It was caused by both of the decrease of ductility and  the short   incubation period. The change of deflection could be only recorded under  the loading 20% of yield strength. Intergranular crack was the prestrain of 10% specimen under the static loading of  616 MPa. Whereas,  for the prestrain of 10% specimen transgranular crack  was found under the static loading of 554,4 MPa. The prestrain of 5% specimen was mixed crack  under the static loading of 369.6 MPa. Higher dislocation density on the layer surface due to plastic deformation with increasing the percentage of pre-strain, so more difficult hydrogen diffused into the crack tip. Consequently, The incubation period can be prolonged.

  11. Corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    A comparative study has been made of those properties of Massiv and Standard cements which are considered to determine their ability to protect steel reinforcement from corroding. Saturated Massiv cement has a higher evaporabel water content, but a significantly finer pore structure than has saturated Standard cement. This fine structure resulted in an electrical resistivity ten times higher and chloride diffusivity ten times lower than those of Standard cement. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the passive current density of steel in Massiv mortar is higher than that of steel in Standard mortar, but the higher current should lead to a more rapid decrease in potential to a level at which neither chloride attack of hydrogen evolution will occur. Whereas steel in Standard mortar was found to be highly susceptible to crevice corrosion, no such attack has been observed in Massiv mortar. Moreover, the initiation of chloride induced corrosion and the subsequent rates of corrosion were both lower in Massiv mortar than in Standard mortar. Thus, it may be predicted that Massiv cement would provide greater protection for steel reinforcement in underground structures exposed to chloride containing ground water than would Standard cement. (author)

  12. Effect of W substitution for Mo on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 25Cr-7Ni duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Tae Hong; Kim, Kyoo Young

    1998-01-01

    The effect of W substitution for Mo in duplex stainless steel (DSS) was investigated with respect to microstructure and stress corrosion cracking behavior. Homogenizing treatment was performed at 1100.deg.C for 10 minutes, while aging treatment was performed at 900.deg.C with different holding times. In homogenized condition, regardless of W substitution, all the specimens had the nearly equal volume-ratio of ferrite and austenite, and had no secondary phase precipitation. On aging, the W modification on suppression of secondary phase precipitation was very effective. Total amount of secondary phase precipitates was greatly reduced in the W-modified DSS in the early stage of the ageing treatment comparing to the commercial grade DSS without W modification. However, this effect was reduced rapidly as the aging time increased. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) was examined in boil-ing 42% MgCl 2 solution by slow strain rate test(SSRT) and constant load test (CLT). Under the homogenized condition, the beneficial effect of W was clearly observed at the low applied stress levels where the electrochemical action plays a dominant role. In the commercial grade DSS without W modification, the crack propagated in a trans-phase mode,whereas in the W-modified DSS, the crack propagated in a mixed mode of trans-phase and inter-phase due to barrier effect of austenite phase against crack growth. Under the aged condition, the signification improvement in SCC resistance of the aged DSS specimens with W modification resulted from increase in toughness due to a relatively small amount of the brittle secondary phase precipitates. However, the cracks propagated in a trans-phase mode in the DSS specimens regardless of W modification

  13. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in high temperature pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, T.K. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y.; Tsai, C.H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarizations, electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted to investigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics of Type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. A number of thermally sensitized specimens were prepared and were pre-oxidized in a 288 C environment with the presence of 300 ppb dissolved oxygen for 360 hours. Most of the specimens were then treated with various chemicals including powdered zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}), powdered titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), and zirconyl nitrate [ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] via static immersion at 90 C, 150 C, and 200 C. Test environments were specifically designed in a circulation loop to create a dissolved oxygen concentration of 300 ppb. Test results showed that the corrosion current densities of all treated specimens were lower than that of the untreated, pre-oxidized specimen at ambient temperature in a solution mixed with 1 mM K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and 1 mM K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The ECPs of the treated specimens could be lower or higher than that of the pre-oxidized one at 288 C, depending upon the type of treating chemical and the treating temperature. In addition, IGSCC was observed on all specimens (treated or untreated) in the same environment. However, the untreated specimen exhibited lower elongation, shorter failure time, and more secondary cracks on the side surfaces. It was therefore suggested that inhibitive chemicals such as ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} did provide a certain degree of enhancement in improving the mechanical behavior of the treated specimens and in prolonging the IGSCC initiation time. (authors)

  14. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  15. Influence of precracked specimen configuration and starting stress intensity on the stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisagor, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from a study of the effects of precracked specimen configuration and initial starting stress intensity on crack growth rate and threshold stress intensity, for both onset of cracking and crack arrest. Attention is given to AISI 4340 steel in a 3.5-percent NaCl solution, for configurations of a single edge-cracked specimen tested in cantilever bending under constant load, and a modified compact specimen bolt loaded to a constant deflection. The threshold stress intensity value determined was independent of specimen configuration, if the stress intensity value associated with the compact specimen is taken where the discontinuous break occurs in the velocity-stress intensity curve.

  16. Inhibition of nitrate stress corrosion cracking of mild steel in nuclear process wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The concentration of hydroxide and nitrite ions necessary to prevent crack growth in A-285-B steel exposed to waste solutions was determined by the systematic testing of solutions within the ranges of hydroxide, nitrate, and nitrite concentrations found in waste tanks. The relative susceptibility to SCC was assumed to be dependent on the concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and hydroxyl ions; the other components were assumed to have little effect on cracking. All of the tests were done at 97 0 C, with specimens loaded initially to an effective stress intensity of 45 ksi √in. Both the temperature of exposure and the initial stress intensity create conditions more severe than would normally be found in the waste tanks. All specimens were exposed for a minimum of 1000 hours. Results showed that the aggressiveness of the solutions increased with increasing nitrate ion concentration. For example, cracks grew in 5M NO 3 - + 0.3M NO 2 - , but not in 1.5M NO 3 - + 0.3M NO 2 - . Also, the solutions causing crack growth within the range of compositions found in the waste tank were concentrated in the high nitrate--low nitrite, hydroxyl ion region. Most of the results were obtained with solutions containing 5M NO 3 - and various amounts of nitrite and hydroxyl ion concentrations. (U.S.)

  17. Dynamic study of passive layers formed on stainless steels in chloride environment. Correlation with stress corrosion behaviour - influence of some alloying elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhanim, Hassan

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the nature and stability of passive films formed on stainless steels in chloride solutions in order to predict the conditions under which some forms of localized corrosion may occur. It aims at understanding the influence of surface preparation, of temperature, of strain rate, and, above all, of alloying elements on the reconstruction kinetics of the passive film after a disturbance induced by a mechanical action. After a discussion of the various techniques used to study passive films, and of their results, the author presents the experimental method (potentiostatic test and mechanical de-passivation test) and the obtained results which are then interpreted, more particularly in terms of influence of alloying elements (nickel, molybdenum, copper, titanium, austeno-ferritic steel). Correlations are established between the dynamic behaviour of passive films formed on the studied steels, and their sensitivity to stress corrosion cracking [fr

  18. A study on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steels in hot alkaline-sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasse, Kevin Robert

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) generally have superior strength and corrosion resistance as compared to most standard austenitic and ferritic stainless grades owing to a balanced microstructure of austenite and ferrite. As a result of having favorable properties, DSS have been selected for the construction of equipment in pulp and paper, chemical processing, nuclear, oil and gas as well as other industries. The use of DSS has been restricted in some cases because of stress corrosion cracking (SCC), which can initiate and grow in either the ferrite or austenite phase depending on the environment. Thorough understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in chloride- and hydrogen sulfide-containing solutions has been useful for material selection in many environments. However, understanding of SCC mechanisms of DSS in sulfide-containing caustic solutions is limited, which has restricted the capacity to optimize process and equipment design in pulp and paper environments. Process environments may contain different concentrations of hydroxide, sulfide, and chloride, altering corrosion and SCC susceptibility of each phase. Crack initiation and growth behavior will also change depending on the relative phase distribution and properties of austenite and ferrite. The role of microstructure and environment on the SCC of standard grade UNS S32205 and lean grade UNS S32101 in hot alkaline-sulfide solution were evaluated in this work using electrochemical, film characterization, mechanical testing, X-ray diffraction, and microscopy techniques. Microstructural aspects, which included residual stress state, phase distribution, phase ratio, and microhardness, were related to the propensity for SCC crack initiation in different simulated alkaline pulping liquors at 170 °C. Other grades of DSS and reference austenitic and superferritic grades of stainless steel were studied using exposure coupons for comparison to understand compositional effects and individual phase susceptibility

  19. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of various stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate new plant materials for their future applications to boiling water reactors (BWRs), the creviced bent beam SCC tests (CBB tests) were conducted on various sensitized stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water. The results obtained are as follows. 1. Field SCC can be easily reproduced by the CBB test using the specimens taken from the 304 stainless steel pipe weld joints. 2. The SCC susceptibility of 18Cr-11Ni stainless steel in oxygenated high temperature water decreases markedly with the reduction of the carbon content. 3. The SCC susceptibility of low carbon stainless steels (304L, 316L) and stabilized stainless steels (321, 347) is significantly lower than that of the 304 and 316 stainless steels. 4. The addition of molybdenum causes the sensitization of stainless steels to delay at lower temperatures, improving the SCC resistance of the weld joints of BWR pipe materials. (auth.)

  20. Evaluation of steel corrosion by numerical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahigashi, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    Recently, various non-destructive and numerical methods have been used and many cases of steel corrosion are examined. For example, methods of evaluating corrosion through various numerical methods and evaluating macrocell corrosion and micro-cell corrosion using measurements have been proposed. However, there are few reports on estimating of corrosion loss with distinguishing the macro-cell and micro-cell corrosion and with resembling an actuality phenomenon. In this study, for distinguishin...

  1. Corrosion characteristics of DMR-1700 steel and comparison with different steels in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurrappa, I.; Malakondaiah, G.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, a systematic corrosion study has been carried out on DMR-1700 steel to understand the protective nature of oxide scale that forms on its surface under marine environmental conditions. Further, the studies related to oxide scales as well as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of both stainless steels and widely used low alloy steel EN24 in marine environment have been studied for comparison purpose. The surface morphologies of corroded steels have been observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to understand the nature of corrosion. A high performance protective coating that has been developed for protection of low alloy steels DMR-1700 and EN24 against corrosion is presented after stressing the importance of surface engineering in enhancing the life of steels. Based on the studies with different techniques, DMR-1700 steel has been recommended for manufacture of components used in aerospace systems in association with appropriate protective coating for improving their efficiency

  2. Mechanism of corrosion fatigue cracking of automotive coil spring steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Tae-Heum; Kwon, Min-Seok; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2015-11-01

    The AISI 300M ultra-high strength steel was applied for the automotive suspension coil spring. Recently, some premature failures were reported, which caused by synergistic effect of cyclic mechanical stress and corrosion, namely corrosion fatigue cracking. In this study, the accurate mechanism of corrosion fatigue cracking for coil spring steel was studied for the proper prevention method against the catastrophic failure. Fatigue life was evaluated in 5 wt% NaCl solution under the anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement conditions, which is simulated by applying constant potentials. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis indicated that the corrosion fatigue cracking was initiated at the MnS inclusion of the pit initiation site. The calculation of hydrogen production corresponding to each corrosion fatigue test condition revealed the two operating mechanisms of the cracking process. The corrosion fatigue cracking failure of coil spring steel was mainly caused by the anodic dissolution combined with hydrogen embrittlement.

  3. Corrosion scenario development for corrosion lifetime prediction of carbon steel used for geological disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Takanori; Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion scenario has been developed in an attempt to ensure the long-term integrity of carbon steel geological disposal packages for high-level nuclear waste. As the service life of the packages must span 1,000-10,000 years, the temperature, pH, and amount of oxygen, in the disposal facilities can hardly be expected to remain constant. Therefore, we clarified a system for predicting the corrosion lifetime of packages, taking into account long-term changes in the types of corrosion of carbon steel in disposal facilities relative to changes in the conditions of such facilities. This corrosion scenario charts the possible types of corrosion (i.e., general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and crevice corrosion) to which packages are subjected

  4. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement has been postulated as a cause of stress corrosion cracking in numerous alloy systems. Such an interrelationship is useful in design considerations because it permits the designer and working engineer to relate the literature from both fields to a potential environmental compatibility problem. The role of hydrogen in stress corrosion of high strength steels is described along with techniques for minimizing the susceptibility to hydrogen stress cracking. (U.S.)

  5. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Alcántara, Jenifer; Díaz, Iván; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; de la Fuente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products...

  6. Effects of H2S/HS- on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X100 Pipeline Steel Under Simulated Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Metabolite Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Q.; Li, Z.; Liu, Z. Y.; Li, X. G.; Wang, S. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of H2S/HS-, which simulates the main metabolites of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), on the electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors of X100 steel was investigated in a near-neutral solution. The results showed that different H2S/HS- contents mainly affected the cathodic process of X100 electrochemical corrosion. As the concentration of H2S/HS- increased, the corrosion potential was shifted negatively, the corrosion current density was considerably increased, and the corrosion rate was linearly increased. Different rust layers with shifting structures were formed under different conditions and had different effects on electrochemical behaviors. However, sulfide mainly promoted local corrosion processes. With the synergistic effects of stress and H2S/HS-, SCC susceptibility was considerably enhanced. The accelerated process of hydrogen evolution by sulfide was crucial in enhancing SCC processes. In brief, the trace H2S/HS- generated by SRB metabolites played a positive role in promoting SCC.

  7. Assessing resistance of stabilized corrosion resistant steels to intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, A.; Cihal, V. Jr.; Vanek, V.; Herzan, J.; Protiva, K.; Cihal, V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance to intergranular corrosion was determined for four types of titanium-stabilized steels from the coefficients of stabilization efficiency according to the degree the chemical composition was known. The ATA SUPER steel showed the highest resistance parameter value. The resistance of this type of steel of a specific composition, showing a relatively low value of mean nitrogen content was compared with steel of an optimized chemical composition and with low-carbon niobium stabilized, molybdenum modified steels. The comparison showed guarantees of a sufficient resistance of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The method of assessing the resistance to intergranular corrosion using the calculation of the minimum content of Cr', i.e., the effective chromium content, and the maximum effective carbon content C' giving the resistance parameter k seems to be prospective for practical use in the production of corrosion resistant steels. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 15 refs

  8. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  9. Apparent Fracture Toughness of Low-carbon Steel CSN 411353 as Related to Stress Corrosion Cracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Siegl, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, 8/9 (2011), s. 4348-4353 ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052; GA ČR(CZ) GPP105/10/P555 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA5/076 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : corrosion * fracture * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2011

  10. The Effect of Cathodic Protection on Stress Corrosion Cracking of High-Strength Pipeline Steels, #350

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-02

    The objective of this study was to establish the effect of cathodic protection (CP) to produce hydrogen that can cause cracking and in-service failures of high-strength pipeline steels, from X-70 to X-120, and to establish the effectiveness of cathod...

  11. Effects of Nitrogen and Tensile Direction on Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Ni-Free FeCrMnC-Based Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon-Young Ha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of Ni-free duplex stainless steels containing N and C (Febalance-19Cr-8Mn-0.25C-(0.03, 0.21N, in wt % was investigated by using a slow strain rate test (SSRT in air and aqueous NaCl solution with different tensile directions, including parallel (longitudinal and perpendicular (transverse to the rolling direction. It was found that alloying N was effective in increasing the resistance to SCC, while it was higher along the longitudinal direction than the transverse direction. The SCC susceptibility of the two alloys was assessed based on the electrochemical resistance to pitting corrosion, the corrosion morphology, and the fractographic analysis.

  12. Laser shock peening without coating induced residual stress distribution, wettability characteristics and enhanced pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, S.; Kulkarni, Aniket; Vasanth, G.; Kalainathan, S.; Shukla, Pratik; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2018-01-01

    Low energy laser shock peening without coating (LSPwC) was conducted on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel specimens with varying pulse densities or overlapping. Highest magnitude of compressive residual stress (CRS) was achieved for an optimized pulse density of 2500 pulses/cm2 (75% overlapping). The 2-D and 3-D topographical analysis were indicative of the fact that controlled roughening of the surface was achieved after the LSPwC process. After the LSPwC process, the hydrophilic unpeened surface was converted into the hydrophobic surface, thus decreasing the wettability characteristics of the surface. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that there is a beginning of the martensite transformation and the rise in the intensity value of the peaks after LSPwC indicates the presence of compressive residual stresses induced in the specimen. The optical microscope and high-resolution transmission electron microscope results provided evidence of grain refinement and deformation induced refinement features such as multidirectional mechanical twinning, dislocations lines, micro shear cells and stacking faults in the near and sub-surface areas. The average hardness value of the LSPwC specimens was found to be increased by 28% more than the untreated specimen. The potentiodynamic polarization revealed that there was a considerable amount of increase in the pitting corrosion resistance after the LSPwC process, thus, supporting to extend the fatigue life of the specimen. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) analysis depicts that the LSPwC process supports the formation of the strong passivation layer in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  13. Theoretical and experimental study of stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steel in near neutral pH environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B.; Fan, J.; Chudnovsky, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Gogotsi, Y. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Teitsma, A. [Gas Technology Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Field observations indicate that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in a near neutral pH environment starts with microcracks growing from corrosion pits on the external surface of the buried pipe. A complex phenomenon, SCC combines stochasticity and determinism resulting in the evolution of a SCC colony. The authors proposed a statistical model which generates a random field of corrosion pits and crack initiation at randomly selected pits. Using the framework of the Crack Layer theory, a thermodynamic model of individual stress corrosion growth was also developed recently. Relations between the crack growth, hydrogen diffusion and corrosion rates on one hand and corresponding thermodynamic forces on the other were used to develop the mathematical realization of the stress corrosion crack growth model. Additionally, there is a quick overview of the experimental program for determination of the kinetic coefficients employed in the crack growth equations. A simulation of SCC colony evolution, including a stage of the large-scale crack interaction is provided by applying the individual crack growth law to random configuration of multiple cracks. Finally, the FRANC2D Finite Element Methods resulted in a computer simulation of multi-crack cluster formation within the colony. 14 refs., 15 figs.

  14. The stress corrosion cracking of heavily sensitized type 316 stainless steel in water in the temperature range 50-100oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congleton, J.; Sui, G.

    1992-01-01

    The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of a Type 316 stainless steel tubing material which had been sensitized in a steam generating rig operated at temperatures from 502 to 533 o C was assessed using the slow strain rate technique. The experiments were performed in de-aerated and in oxygenated water with and without chloride additions and in the temperature range 50-100 o C. The material was susceptible to stress corrosion cracking and to mechanically induced cracking during dynamic straining. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking increased with increasing temperature and with increasing oxygen and chloride contents. Cracking occurred with greater than 200 ppb oxygen present even when the chloride content was less than 5 ppb. The maximum allowable oxygen content decreased further when the chloride content was increased. The maximum chloride content for immunity to stress corrosion cracking was 5 ppm even when less than 5 ppb oxygen was present in the water. The severe susceptibility of the material was caused by the complicated metallurgical state of the inner tube surface, but cracking could be prevented by appropriate potentiostatic control. (author)

  15. Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Metallic Materials. Part III. Hydrogen Entry and Embrittlement in Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    steels were by A. R. Troianc, as sm marized in the 1959 Campbell Memorial Le ,’turef2 "Similar delayed failure studies were conducted by Bastein et al...OMLr󈧘- eaZoR ý 5%HTCl 75 TACL T C Y 3’~~0K20% MTC ma 40%0&ILD 3W0 M MIEL 00% t4TC (OUENCNED AND 20% WALD rLh VPfRZCDJ /[Rj GjY EErrfOAr Pr 200o 400...moisture content up to a 73 cii . | - " - I- , I ’ ’ 1 I 00 0 H2 0o0 00 00 o Oe 2 • 𔃽 0 00 0 ASI 4340 STEEL o 0 ENS/ LE STRENGTH- 302,000psi 0 SPECIMEN I

  16. Investigation of the main chemical properties of water-magnesium chloride solutions. Application to the understanding of stress corrosion phenomena in 17.12 Mo stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasni, Abdellatif

    1988-01-01

    This research thesis reports the investigation of the main chemical properties of concentrated aqueous solutions of MgCl 2 and of their influence of stress corrosion of 17Cr-12Ni-2Mo stainless steel. It shows that the most important chemical properties are the equilibrium pH and the acidity range of MgCl 2 aqueous solutions, and that they strongly depend on solution temperature and concentration. The medium pH is governed by the increased acidity of water in presence of Mg ++ ions, while the acidity range is determined by a hydrolysis reaction of these ions which results in a precipitation of magnesium hydroxyl-chlorides. The investigation of stress corrosion behaviour of the steel in MgCl 2 solutions with varying temperature and concentration shows that this behaviour comes down to a prevailing pH effect which results from the variation of these both parameters, with a not negligible but less important effect of temperature. A study of cracking surfaces indicates that it is possible to pass from a transgranular to an intergranular mode by a variation of either media aggressiveness (pH, temperature, voltage) or strain rate. These results are explained by a concept of kinetic factor which limits stress corrosion [fr

  17. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  18. Influence of thermal aging on primary water stress corrosion cracking of cast duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Negishi, Kazuo; Totsuka, Nobuo; Nakajima, Nobuo

    2001-01-01

    In order to evaluate the SCC susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steels which are often used for the main coolant piping of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate test (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) of the materials were performed in simulated primary water at 360degC. The stainless steel contains ferritic phase with ranging from 8 to 23% and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. Therefore, we paid attention to the influence of its ferrite content and thermal aging on the SCC susceptibility of this stainless steel and prepared three kinds of specimen with different ferrite contents (23%, 15% and 8%). The reduction in area observed by the SSRT in simulated primary water at 360degC was smaller than that obtained by the tensile test in air at the same temperature. Microcracks were observed on the unaged specimen surfaces and aged ones at 400degC for 10,000 hours after 3,000 hours of the CLT with the load condition of two times of yield strength. The SCC susceptibility was evaluated by reduction ratio defined by the ratio of the reduction in area by the SSRT to that by the tensile test. The reduction ratio was not clear for low ferrite specimens, but apparently decreased with increasing aging time for the specimen with 23% ferrite. This change by aging time can be explained as follows: (1) the brittle fracture in the unaged specimens is mainly caused by quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. (2) After aging, it becomes a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in both austenitic and ferritic phases and phase boundary fracture of both phases. (author)

  19. Environmental and Material Influences on the Stress-Corrosion Cracking of Steel in H2O–CO–CO2 Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. van der Merwe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress-corrosion cracking of A516 pressure vessel steel was investigated by the use of slow strain-rate tests. The orientation of samples to the rolling direction was investigated, and it was found that samples machined longitudinal to the rolling direction showed a slightly increased sensitivity to stress corrosion. The temperature variation showed that for different gas mixtures, the maximum sensitivity to stress corrosion was in the region of 45° to 55°C for the 25% CO gas mixture, whereas with higher CO concentrations, this temperature region of maximum sensitivity moved to higher temperatures. Surface finish showed a slight increase in sensitivity to cracking with increased surface roughness. The most significant increase was found with increased total gas pressures and when samples have been exposed to the environment for an extended period. This was as a result of the inhibition of the corrosion reaction by the passivation of the carbon monoxide, which is a time-dependent process.

  20. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations

  1. Effect of High Cl- Environment on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of M152 and 17-4PH High-strength Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Wei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior and mechanism of M152 and 17-4PH high-strength steels in high Cl- environment were studied through neutral salt spray test and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT test. The result shows that M152 and 17-4PH steels exhibit a certain sensitivity to SCC in Cl- environment, elongations of them both decrease with the increasing time of early neutral salt spray test, and the SCC sensitivity gradually increases. Comparing the fracture morphology with lateral crack through SEM, it can be found that the fracture mechanism of M152 and 17-4PH high-strength steels converts ductile fracture to brittle fracture as the extension of neutral salt spray test time. The synergistic effect of anodic dissolution (AD and hydrogen embrittlement (HE result in the occurrence of SCC in high Cl- environment, and Cl- can promote the AD process. Due to the obvious effect of HE, 17-4PH steel has higher SCC sensitivity than M152 steel with the same time of early neutral salt spray test. 17-4PH high-strength steel is more prone to SCC than M152 in high Cl- environment.

  2. Studies on the influence of metallurgical variables on the stress corrosion behavior of aisi 304 stainless steel in sodium chloride solution using the fracture mechanics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatak, H. S.; Gnanamoorthy, J. B.; Rodriguez, P.

    1996-05-01

    Stress corrosion data on a nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel in a boiling solution of 5M NaCl+ 0.15M Na2SO4+ 3 mL/L HC1 (bp 381 K) for various metallurgical conditions of the steel are presented in this article. The metallurgical conditions used are solution annealing, sensitization, 10 pct cold work, 20 pct cold work, solution annealing + sensitization, 10 pct cold work + sensi-tization, and 20 pct cold work + sensitization. The fracture mechanics approach has been used to obtain quantitative data on the stress corrosion crack growth rates. The stress intensity factor, K 1, and J integral, J 1, have been used as evaluation parameters. The crack growth rates have been measured using compact tension type samples under both increasing and decreasing stress intensity factors. A crack growth rate of 5 X 10-11 m/s was chosen for the determination of threshold para-meters. Results of the optical microscopic and fractographic examinations are presented. Acoustic signals were recorded during crack growth. Data generated from acoustic emissions, activation energy measurements, and fractographic features indicate hydrogen embrittlement as the possible mechanism of cracking.

  3. Stress corrosion cracking in 3,5 NiCrMoV steel in a 403 K potential-PH diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center, (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works, (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    3,5 NiCrMoV steel is used in low-pressure turbine rotors and discs. It has been pointed out that intergranular stress corrosion cracking may occur in this material in the wet region at temperatures of about 400 K. Accordingly, the authors focused on the environmental conditions under which stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurs. A potential-pH diagram was used to investigate the region in which SCC occurs in the high strength materials that are particularly susceptible to SCC. The investigation found that SCC is initiated in this material not only in the high caustic region but in the neutral region as well. The investigation also found that initiation and propagation were accelerated in dissolved oxygen environments with increased chemical potential in the neutral region. Since careful observation of the starting point of cracks has shown that corrosion pits trigger SCC, subsequent immersion tests under constant potential were conducted. The results showed that corrosion pits are generated at the high potential range. These results led to the development of an acceleration test environment for laboratory to determine the susceptibility of SCC in field turbine disc and rotor materials. (author)

  4. A study on stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaga, Seiichi; Fujii, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Sakuma, Koosuke; Hibi, Seiji; Morimoto, Hiroyoshi.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on the stress corrosion cracking of explosive plugged part are conducted. SUS 304 stainless steel is used as testing material. The distribution of residual stress in plug and tube plate after plugging is obtained. The effect of residual stress on the stress corrosion cracking is studied. Residual stress in tube plate near the plug is compressive and stress corrosion cracking dose not occur in the tube plate there, and it occurs on the inner surface of plug because of residual tensile stress in axial direction of the plug. Stress corrosion test in MgCl 2 solution under constant load is conducted. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking of the explosive bonded boundary is lower than that of base metal because of greater resistance to plastic deformation. Stress corrosion test in high temperature and high pressure pure water is also conducted by means of static type of autoclave but stress corrosion cracking does not occur under the testing condition used. (author)

  5. STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF ALLOY 152 WELD BUTTER NEAR THE LOW ALLOY STEEL INTERFACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, Bogdan; Chen, Yiren; Natesan, Ken; Shack, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to obtain SCC growth data in Alloy 152 weld butter near the interface with Low Alloy Steel (LAS), which is a region where some dilution of Cr was expected to have occurred, thus presumably exhibiting an increased SCC-susceptibility vs. the bulk of the weld. The LAS piece used in this application was Alloy 533-Gr B from the Midland reactor lower head, and the Alloy 152 weld butter received a prototypical Post Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT) prior to joining by Alloy 152 to an Alloy 690 piece according to a procedure qualified to ASME IX. The compact tension specimens for SCC testing were aligned in the first layer of the Alloy 152 butter. The experimental approach based on tracking environmental enhancement vs. location was successful in identifying SCC-susceptible locations, and SCC rates ranging from 10-12 m/s to as high as 10-10 m/s were measured. The post-test examination of the specimens found that the fracture had the intergranular/interdendritic appearance typical of welds, and that the propagation was arrested wherever an intersection with the LAS occurred. The large range of SCC rates measured does not appear to correlate well with the local concentration of Cr (approx. 25% at the SCC locations), and, in fact, low Cr (20%) – high Fe “streaks” seemed to slow/arrest crack propagation. In short, simple “Cr dilution” does not seem to fully account for the “SCC-susceptible” microstructure that yielded the 10-10 m/s growth rate in this weld.

  6. Combined Effect of Alternating Current Interference and Cathodic Protection on Pitting Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of alternating current (AC on pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the near-neutral pH environment under cathodic protection (CP was investigated. Both corrosion and SCC are inhibited by −0.775 VSCE CP without AC interference. With the superimposition of AC current (1–10 mA/cm2, the direct current (DC potential shifts negatively under the CP of −0.775 VSCE and the cathodic DC current decreases and shifts to the anodic direction. Under the CP potential of −0.95 VSCE and −1.2 VSCE, the applied AC current promotes the cathodic reaction and leads to the positive shift of DC potential and increase of cathodic current. Local anodic dissolution occurs attributing to the generated anodic current transients in the positive half-cycle of the AC current, resulting in the initiation of corrosion pits (0.6–2 μm in diameter. AC enhances the SCC susceptibility of X70 steel under −0.775 VSCE CP, attributing to the promotion of anodic dissolution and hydrogen evolution. Even an AC current as low as 1 mA/cm2 can enhance the SCC susceptibility.

  7. Combined Effect of Alternating Current Interference and Cathodic Protection on Pitting Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liwei; Cheng, Lianjun; Li, Junru; Zhu, Zhifu; Bai, Shuowei; Cui, Zhongyu

    2018-03-22

    Influence of alternating current (AC) on pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the near-neutral pH environment under cathodic protection (CP) was investigated. Both corrosion and SCC are inhibited by -0.775 V SCE CP without AC interference. With the superimposition of AC current (1-10 mA/cm²), the direct current (DC) potential shifts negatively under the CP of -0.775 V SCE and the cathodic DC current decreases and shifts to the anodic direction. Under the CP potential of -0.95 V SCE and -1.2 V SCE , the applied AC current promotes the cathodic reaction and leads to the positive shift of DC potential and increase of cathodic current. Local anodic dissolution occurs attributing to the generated anodic current transients in the positive half-cycle of the AC current, resulting in the initiation of corrosion pits (0.6-2 μm in diameter). AC enhances the SCC susceptibility of X70 steel under -0.775 V SCE CP, attributing to the promotion of anodic dissolution and hydrogen evolution. Even an AC current as low as 1 mA/cm² can enhance the SCC susceptibility.

  8. Controlling stress corrosion cracking in mechanism components of ground support equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, W. A.

    1988-01-01

    The selection of materials for mechanism components used in ground support equipment so that failures resulting from stress corrosion cracking will be prevented is described. A general criteria to be used in designing for resistance to stress corrosion cracking is also provided. Stress corrosion can be defined as combined action of sustained tensile stress and corrosion to cause premature failure of materials. Various aluminum, steels, nickel, titanium and copper alloys, and tempers and corrosive environment are evaluated for stress corrosion cracking.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in PWR primary water: an update of metallurgical investigations performed on French withdrawn components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boursier, J.M. [R and D Division - Materials Branch Studies - Les Renardieres - 78 - Moret sur Loing (France); Gallet, S.; Rouillon, Y. [Nuclear Power Division - Corporate Laboratories - 37 - Avoine (France); Bordes, P. [Electricite de France, Nuclear Power Division - 93 - Saint Denis (France)

    2002-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304, 304L, 316 and 316L) are largely used in Nuclear Power Plants because of their good resistance to corrosion and their satisfactory mechanical properties. Nevertheless, on various French PWR Nuclear Power Plants, several cases of corrosion have been encountered in auxiliary circuit portions where deleterious species and oxygen can be present. This paper focuses on the metallurgical investigations performed on pulled out components such as Canopy welds or 'dead legs' (auxiliary circuit portions connected to the main primary loops) in terms of cracking locations and degradation parameters. In addition, some comparisons between Nuclear Power Plant feedback and fundamental research and development studies are discussed, particularly in the scope of temperature, microstructure, stresses (applied and residual) and medium responsible for the degradation. (authors)

  10. Corrosion of carbon steel under waste disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of carbon steel has been studied in the United Kingdom under granitic groundwater conditions, with pH between 5 and 10 and possibly substantial amounts of Cl - , SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- . Corrosion modes considered include uniform corrosion under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions; passive corrosion; localized attack in the form of pitting or crevice corrosion; and environmentally assisted cracking - hydrogen embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking. Studies of these processes are being carried out in order to predict the metal thicknesses required to give container lifetimes of 500 to 1000 years. A simple uniform corrosion model predicts a corrosion rate of around 13.4 μm/a at 20C, rising to 69 μm/a at 50C and 208 μm/a at 90C. A radiation dose of 10 5 rad/h and a G-value of 2.8 for the production of oxidizing species would account for an increase in corrosion rate of 7 μm/a. This model overestimates slightly the results actually achieved for experimental samples exposed for two years, the difference being due to a protective film formed on the samples. These corrosion rates predict that the container must be 227 mm thick to withstand uniform corrosion; however, they predict very high levels of hydrogen production. Conditions will be favourable for localized or pitting corrosion for about 125 years, leading to a maximum penetration of 160 mm. Since the exposure environment cannot be predicted precisely, one cannot state that stress corrosion cracking is impossible. Thus the container must be stress relieved. Other corrosion mechanisms such as microbial corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement are not considered significant

  11. General corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gras, J.M.

    1994-04-01

    This short paper seeks to provide a summary of the main knowledge about the general corrosion of carbon steels in high temperature water. In pure water or slightly alkaline deaerated water, steels develop a protective coating of magnetite in a double layer (Potter and Mann oxide) or a single layer (Bloom oxide). The morphology of the oxide layer and the kinetics of corrosion depend on the test parameters controlling the solubility of iron. The parameters exercising the greatest influence are partial hydrogen pressure and mass transfer: hydrogen favours the solubilization of the magnetite; the entrainment of the dissolved iron prevents a redeposition of magnetite on the surface of the steel. Cubic or parabolic in static conditions, the kinetics of corrosion tends to be linear in dynamic conditions. In dynamic operation, corrosion is at least one order of magnitude lower in water with a pH of 10 than in pure water with a pH of 7. The activation energy of corrosion is 130 kJ/mol (31 kcal/mol). This results in the doubling of corrosion at around 300 deg C for a temperature increase of 15 deg C. Present in small quantities (100-200 ppb), oxygen decreases general corrosion but increases the risk of pitting corrosion - even for a low chloride content - and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion-fatigue. The steel composition has probably an influence on the kinetics of corrosion in dynamic conditions; further work would be required to clarify the effect of some residual elements. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Effect of pH Value on the Electrochemical and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in the Dilute Bicarbonate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Z. Y.; Liu, Z. Y.; Wang, L. W.; Ma, H. C.; Du, C. W.; Li, X. G.; Wang, X.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, effects of pH value on the electrochemical and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the dilute bicarbonate solutions were investigated using electrochemical measurements, slow strain rate tensile tests and surface analysis techniques. Decrease of the solution pH from 6.8 to 6.0 promotes the anodic dissolution and cathodic reduction simultaneously. Further decrease of the pH value mainly accelerates the cathodic reduction of X70 pipeline steel. As a result, when the solution pH decreases form 6.8 to 5.5, SCC susceptibility decreases because of the enhancement of the anodic dissolution. When the solution pH decreases from 5.5 to 4.0, SCC susceptibility increases gradually because of the acceleration of cathodic reactions.

  13. A technique for predicting steel corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. F.; Sokolov, R. A.; Neradovskiy, D. F.; Muratov, K. R.

    2018-01-01

    Research works were carried out to develop a technique with the aim to increase the lifetime of steel items used in corrosive media. The possibility to monitor corrosion parameters of steel samples is analyzed on the basis of magnetic properties obtained by means of a magnetic structuroscope DIUS-1.15M designed by the Institute of Metal Physics of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMP UB RAS).

  14. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  15. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  16. Effect of temperature and dissolved oxygen on stress corrosion cracking behavior of P92 ferritic-martensitic steel in supercritical water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Hu, Z. F.; Zhang, L. F.; Chen, K.; Singh, P. M.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of P92 martensitic steel in supercritical water (SCW) was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) and fractography analysis. The SSRT was carried out at temperatures of 400, 500, 600 °C in deaerated supercritical water and at DO contents of 0, 200, 500 ppb at the temperature of 600 °C, respectively. The results of SSRT show that the decrease of ductility at the temperature of 400 °C may be related to the dynamic strain aging (DSA) of P92 steel. The degradation of the mechanical properties in SCW is the joint effect of temperature and SCC. Compared with the effect of temperature, DO in SCW has no significant effect on the SCC susceptibility of P92 steel. The observation of oxide layer shows that large numbers of pores are nucleated in the oxide layer, which is related to vacancy accumulation and hydrogen generated in the oxide layer. Under the combined action of the growth stress and tensile stress, micro cracks, nucleated from the pores in the oxide layer, are easily propagated intergranularly outward to the surface of specimen, and fewer cracks can extend inward along the intrinsic pores to the inner oxide/metal interface, which is the reason for the exfoliation of oxide films.

  17. Corrosion Properties of Laser Welded Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weldingh, Jakob; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the corrosion properties of laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel are examined. A number of different welds has been performed to test the influence of the weld parameters of the resulting corrosion properties. It has been chosen to use the potential independent critical pitting...... temperature (CPT) test as corrosion test. The following welding parameters are varied: Welding speed, lsser power, focus point position and laser operation mode (CW or pulsed)....

  18. Stress corrosion inhibitors for type 18-10 stainless steels with low carbon content in hot and concentrated solutions of MgCl2. Study of some inorganic iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard, J.-L.

    1974-01-01

    Stress corrosion inhibitors for type Z2CN18-10 austenitic stainless steels with low carbon content in a solution of Cl 2 Mg at 105 deg C were investigated. It was established that iodides are the most adequate corrosion inhibitors because they react simultaneously upon the three main components of the alloy (Fe, Ni, Cr). A difference of behavior between I 2 Mg and the other iodides was observed (in electrochemistry and in simple stress corrosion experiments) and the influence of the metallic cation associated to I - was studied. The formation of the superficial film and the phenomena liable to occur at the interface film-corrosive solution were examined: film growth in MgCl 2 ; influence of certain substances added to the solution. A mechanism of inhibition by I - is suggested. It is similar to the mechanism proposed by BERGEN for the stress corrosion cracking by Cl - [fr

  19. Effect of Strength and Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior and Mechanism of X80 Pipeline Steel in High pH Carbonate/Bicarbonate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Du, Cuiwei; Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Shengrong; Zhao, Tianliang; Jia, Jinghuan

    2014-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors and mechanisms of X80 pipeline steels with different strength and microstructure in high pH carbonate/bicarbonate solution were investigated by slow strain rate testing and electrochemical test. The results showed that the cracking mode of low strength X80 steel composed of bulky polygonal ferrite and granular bainite in high pH solution was intergranular (IGSCC), and the SCC mechanism was anodic dissolution (AD). While the mixed cracking mode of high strength X80 steel consisted of fine acicular ferrite and granular bainite was intergranular (IGSCC) in the early stage, and transgranular (TGSCC) in the later stage. The decrease of pH value of crack tip was probably the key reason for the occurrence of TGSCC. The SCC mechanism may be a mixed mode of AD and hydrogen embrittlement (HE), and the HE mechanism may play a significant role in the deep crack propagation at the later stage. The cracking modes and SCC mechanisms of the two X80 steels were associated with its microstructure and strength.

  20. Corrosion damage examples and brittleness affecting containing carbon steel materials of the PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, L.; Dordonat, M.; Guttmann, D.; Calle, P.

    1993-01-01

    Intercrystalline corrosion has been observed in carbon steel heat exchanger tubes. Waterproof turbine boxes composed of graphite rings and carbon steel, some coated with a KANIGEN chemical nickel, may develop a galvanic coupling corrosion between the graphite rings and the carbon steel body. In a steam impulsion pipe circuit, fatigue corrosion and stress corrosion cracking may appear. Brittleness of carbon steel is linked to an anomalous composition with an excess content of phosphorus and nitrogen. Lamellar wrenchings are observed on steam pipes connection. 5 refs., 3 figs

  1. Corrosion of carbon steel in neutral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Noboru; Iwahori, Toru; Kurosawa, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of materials used in the construction of heat exchanger and piping system of BWR nuclear power plants and thermal power plants have been examined in neutral water at 30, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C with two concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water. In air-saturated water, the corrosion rate of carbon steel was so higher than those in deaerated conditions and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 200 deg C. The corrosion rate in deaerated water gradually increased with increasing the water temperature. Low alloy steel (2.25 Cr, 1Mo) exhibited good corrosion resistance compared with the corrosion of carbon steel under similar testing conditions. Oxide films grown on carbon steel in deaerated water at 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C for 48 and 240 hrs were attacked by dissolved oxygen in room temperature water respectively. However the oxide films formed higher than about 160 deg C showed more protective. The electrochemical behavior of carbon steel with oxide films was also similar to the effect of temperature on the stability of oxide films. (author)

  2. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morcillo, M.; Alcantara, J.; Diaz, I.; Chico, B.; Simancas, J.; Fuente, D. de la

    2015-07-01

    Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a) environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b) characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c) corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d) exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e) long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f) behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camarinas, Galicia) in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mossbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy. (Author)

  3. Effect of Concentration and Temperature of Ethanol in Fuel Blends on Microbial and Stress Corrosion Cracking of High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Localized environments in fuel grade ethanol (FGE) transportation systems, where conditions are suitable for growth, may allow for microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of steel components. Interstate pipeline transportation of ethanol fuels i...

  4. Nuclear Repository steel canister: experimental corrosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporuscio, F.; Norskog, K.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Spent Fuel & Waste Science & Technology campaign evaluates various generic geological repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This experimental work analyzed and characterized the canister corrosion and steel interface mineralogy of bentonite-based EBS 304 stainless steel (SS), 316 SS, and low-carbon steel coupons in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. Experiments contrasted EBS with and without an argillite wall rock. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming simulated the clay buffer and Opalinus Clay represented the wall rock. Redox conditions were buffered at the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based brine was chosen to replicate generic granitic groundwater compositions, while Opalinous Clay groundwater was used in the wall rock series of experiments. Most experiments were run at 150 bar and 300°C for 4 to 6 weeks and one was held at elevated conditions for 6 months. The two major experimental mixtures were 1) brine-bentonite clay- steel, and 2) brine-bentonite clay-Opalinus Clay-steel. Both systems were equilibrated at a high liquid/clay ratio. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment were evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. In total 4291 measurements were obtained: 2500 measured steel corrosion depths and 1791 were of phyllosilicate mineral reactions/growths at the interface. The low carbon steel corrosion mechanism was via pit corrosion, while 304 SS and 316 SS were by general corrosion. The low carbon steel corrosion rate (1.95 μm/day) was most rapid. The 304 SS corrosion rate (0.37 μm/day) was slightly accelerated versus the 316 SS corrosion rate (0.26 μm/day). Note that the six month 316 SS experiment shows inhibited corrosion rates (0.07 μm/day). This may be in part due to mantling by the Fe-saponite/chlorite authigenic minerals. All phyllosilicate growth rates at the interface exhibit similar growth rate patterns to the steels (i.e. LCS>304>316> 316 six month).

  5. Structure, properties, and resistance to stress-corrosion cracking of a nitrogen-containing austenitic steel strengthened by thermomechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushnikova, S. Yu.; Kostin, S. K.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Kataeva, N. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results of comparative studies of the structure, mechanical properties, and resistance to stresscorrosion cracking (SCC) in the chloride solutions of a Cr-Mn-Ni austenitic nitrogen-containing steel (20Cr-6Ni-11Mn-1.5Mo-N-V-Nb) produced with the use of different regimes of the high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTTMT) have been presented. An unfavorable effect of the grain-boundary precipitates of the nitride phase on the impact toughness and resistance to SCC has been found. It has been shown that the strengthening of nitrogen-containing steel upon HTTMT, which ensures an increase in the yield stress by 1.8 times compared to the austenitized state, does not decrease the resistance to SCC.

  6. A study on the corrosion characteristics of gear steel by shot peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Jin Shik; Kim, Tae Hyung; Cheong, Seong Kyun; Yoon, Jong Ku; Lee, Seung Ho

    2001-01-01

    The surface treatment technique to increase corrosion resistance is very important in mechanical components of structures. Therefore, this paper investigates the effects of shot peening on the corrosion resistance of SCM 420steel. The results show that the surface compressive residual stress largely increases, which cause the increase of corrosion resistance

  7. Low-energy EDX--a novel approach to study stress corrosion cracking in SUS304 stainless steel via scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisnar, Martina; Lozano-Perez, Sergio; Moody, Michael; Holland, James

    2014-11-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in type SUS304 stainless steels, tested under pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water conditions, has been characterized with unprecedented spatial resolution using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and novel low-energy (∼3 kV) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). An advancement of the large area silicon drift detector (SDD) has enhanced its sensitivity for X-rays in the low-energy part of the atomic spectrum. Therefore, it was possible to operate the SEM at lower accelerating voltages in order to reduce the interaction volume of the beam with the material and achieve higher spatial resolution and better signal-to-noise ratio. In addition to studying the oxide chemistry at the surface of intergranular stress corrosion cracks, the technique has proven capable of resolving Ni enrichment ahead of some crack tips. Active cracks could be distinguished from inactive ones due to the presence of oxides in the open crack and Ni-rich regions ahead of the crack tip. Furthermore, it has been established that SCC features can be better resolved with low-energy (3 kV) than high-energy (12 kV) EDX. The low effort in sample preparation, execution and data analysis makes SEM the ideal tool for initial characterization and selection of the most important SCC features such as dominant cracks and interesting crack tips, later to be studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of sulphide and moisture content on steel corrosion during transport of fine wet coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Vorster, S. W.

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation the influence of compaction pressure (stress) on the corrosivity of wet coal was investigated. Two coal samples, one high in sulphur content (3 %) and the other low in sulphur content (0.6 %) were used to determine the influence of compaction stress on the corrosion rates of steel samples in contact with compacted coal. It was found that the pressure exerted on finely divided wet coal is an important factor in determining its water content and corrosivity towards mild steel. Corrosion of the steel was typically in the form of pitting and the sulphur content of the coal was an important factor in determining the corrosivity of the coal. The corrosion rate of the high sulphur content coal was higher than that of the low sulphur coal. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that a FeS species developed on the steel surface.

  9. Effect of Hydrogen Charging on the Stress Corrosion Behavior of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Under 3.5 wt.% NaCl Thin Electrolyte Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianliang; Liu, Zhiyong; Hu, Shanshan; Du, Cuiwei; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-05-01

    The effect of hydrogen charging on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) under 3.5 wt.% NaCl thin electrolyte layer was investigated on precharged samples through hydrogen determination, electrochemical measurement, and slow strain rate tensile test. Results show that hydrogen charging weakens the passive film without inducing any obvious trace of localized anodic dissolution. Therefore, hydrogen charging increases the SCC susceptibility of 2205 DSS mainly through mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement rather than mechanism of localized anodic dissolution. 2205 DSS shows a more susceptibility to hydrogen under the TEL when hydrogen charging current density (HCCD) is between 20 and 50 mA cm-2. The increasing trend is remarkable when hydrogen charging current density increases from 20 to 50 mA cm-2 and fades after 50 mA cm-2.

  10. Effects of long-term thermal aging on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels in simulated PWR primary water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shilei; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Hui; Xin, Changsheng; Wang, Xitao

    2016-02-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of cast austenitic stainless steels of unaged and thermally aged at 400 °C for as long as 20,000 h were studied by using a slow strain rate testing (SSRT) system. Spinodal decomposition in ferrite during thermal aging leads to hardening in ferrite and embrittlement of the SSRT specimen. Plastic deformation and thermal aging degree have a great influence on the oxidation rate of the studied material in simulated PWR primary water environments. In the SCC regions of the aged SSRT specimen, the surface cracks, formed by the brittle fracture of ferrite phases, are the possible locations for SCC. In the non-SCC regions, brittle fracture of ferrite phases also occurs because of the effect of thermal aging embrittlement.

  11. Stress corrosion cracking in repair-welded 3.5 NiCrMoV steel in an actual turbine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Itoh; Takashi, Shige [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Research and Development Center (Japan); Takashi, Momoo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago Machinery Works (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    Temporary welding repairs are sometimes needed when damage occurs at the teeth of blade grooves in a low-pressure turbine rotor operated at the dry/wet boundary region. When repair welding has been performed for the 3,5 NiCrMoV steel used in low-pressure turbines, the soundness of the weld must be confirmed. For this reason, a laboratory investigation of susceptibility for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was conducted for test specimens taken from simulated welds, and then an exposure test was conducted in an actual turbine environment for approximately 7,000 hours. As no SCC initiation was detected and also the propagation was extremely small, repair welding is deemed to be applicable. (author)

  12. corrosion of a carbon steel covered by treated bentonites in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F. Arbaoui

    2017-09-01

    Sep 1, 2017 ... Keywords: Corrosion inhibitor, Carbon steel, Electrochemical Impedances Spectroscopy;. Algerian bentonites; Tungstate. ... layer of corrosion products formed on the steel surface remains thinner than in aqueous solutions [11]. ..... chloride-induced crevice corrosion of Alloy 22. Corrosion Science, 2013, 68, ...

  13. An overview of materials degradation by stress corrosion in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    The aging of water cooled and moderated nuclear steam supply systems has given rise to many material corrosion problems of which stress corrosion cracking has proved to be one of the most serious. The aim of this paper is to review some examples of corrosion and particularly stress corrosion problems from the author's experience of interpreting and modelling these phenomena in PWR systems. Examples of stress corrosion cracking in PWR systems described include the major issue of Alloy 600 intergranular cracking in primary PWR coolants, for which it is generally perceived that both adequate life prediction models and remedial measures now exist. Intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 steam generator tubes that occur in occluded superheated crevices on the secondary side of steam generators due to hide-out and concentration of water borne impurities are also addressed. Rather less extensive or well known examples are discussed such as the stress corrosion cracking of carbon and low alloy steels and of stainless steels in occluded dead-leg situations where it is sometimes difficult to guarantee adequate control of water chemistry, particularly at plant start-up. Reference is also be made to the use of high strength fastener materials in PWR systems as well as to the emerging issue of the effect of high neutron doses on the stress corrosion resistance of core structural components fabricated from austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  14. Stress corrosion cracking of several high strength ferrous and nickel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, E. E.

    1971-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of several high strength ferrous and nickel base alloys has been determined in a sodium chloride solution. Results indicate that under these test conditions Multiphase MP35N, Unitemp L605, Inconel 718, Carpenter 20Cb and 20Cb-3 are highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking. AISI 410 and 431 stainless steels, 18 Ni maraging steel (250 grade) and AISI 4130 steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking under some conditions.

  15. Corrosion of a carbon steel in simulated liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    significant for A537 carbon steel in the concentration range of the solutions studied (pH 10-13) at 40 C degrees. The highest calculated corrosion rate for immersed samples, using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques, was 25 μm/yr, while the highest calculated corrosion rate for vapor phase coupons, using weight-loss measurements, was 51 μm/yr. On the contrary, it was found that A537 carbon steel was highly susceptible to localized attack, due to pitting and crevice corrosion, in the solutions and at the temperature studied. The highest penetration rates produced by pitting attack, measured by optical microscopy examination after 11 month immersion, were 0.3 mm/yr and 0.4 mm/yr for the immersed and the vapor phase coupons respectively. The highest penetration rate produced by crevice corrosion on the immersed coupons, measured by optical microscopy examination after 11 month immersion, was 1,1 mm/yr. Stress corrosion cracking signs were not observed after 11 month immersion on the U-bend coupons. (author) [es

  16. Contribution of solution pH and buffer capacity to suppress intergranular stress corrosion cracking of sensitized type 304 stainless steel at 95 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.; Shibata, T.; Haruna, T.

    1999-01-01

    Controlling pH of high-temperature water to ∼pH 7 at 300 C by adding lithium hydroxide (LiOH) into the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) successfully has been mitigating the corrosion of PWR component materials. The effects of solution pH and buffer capacity on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of sensitized type 304 stainless steel ([SS] UNS S30400) was examined at 95 C by slow strain rate technique (SSRT) with an in-situ cracking observation system. It was found that an increase in solution pH or buffer capacity increased crack initiation time and decreased mean crack initiation frequency, but exerted almost no effect on crack propagation. This inhibition effect on IGSCC initiation was explained as resulting from a retarding effect of solution pH and buffer capacity on the decrease in pH at crack nuclei caused by the hydrolysis of metal ions dissolved when the passive film was ruptured by strain in SSRT

  17. Corrosion of steel tendons used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griess, J.C.; Naus, D.J.

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the corrosion behavior of a high strength steel (ASTM A416-74 grade 270), typical of those used as tensioning tendons in prestressed concrete pressure vessels, in several corrosive environments and to demonstrate the protection afforded by coating the steel with either of two commercial petroleum-base greases or Portland Cement grout. In addition, the few reported incidents of prestressing steel failures in concrete pressure vessels used for containment of nuclear reactors are reviewed. The susceptibility of the steel to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement and its general corrosion rate were determined in several salt solutions. Wires coated with the greases and grout were soaked for long periods in the same solutions and changes in their mechanical properties were subsequently determined. All three coatings appeared to give essentially complete protection but small flaws in the grease coatings were detrimental; flaws or cracks less than 1 mm wide in the grout were without effect

  18. Evaluation of corrosion resistance of microalloyed reinforcing steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The corrosion resistance of three microalloyed steels and two conventional reinforcing steels in concrete was evaluated. The microalloyed steels contain concentrations of chromium, copper, and phosphorus that, while low, are significantly higher than...

  19. Microbial Corrosion and Cracking in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    1998-01-01

    and for recommendations in regards to electrochemical monitoring of MIC. The work presented here and further studies are also planned to lead to a Ph.D. thesis on "MIC monitoring based on mechanisms of corrosion".The results of laboratory experiments conducted in the period 1995 to 1997 are summarised. Conclusions...... will be based on results from the entire 3 year period, but only selected experimental data primarily from the latest experiments will be presented in detail here.Microbial corrosion of carbon steel under influence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is characterised by the formation of both biofilm...... and corrosion products (ferrous sulphides) on the metal surface. Experiments have been conducted on carbon steel exposed in near neutral (pH 6 to 8.5) saline hydrogen sulphide environment (0 to 100 mg/l total dissolved sulphide) for a period of 14 days. Furthermore coupons have been exposed in a bioreactor...

  20. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  1. Report on Status of Shipment of High Fluence Austenitic Steel Samples for Characterization and Stress Corrosion Crack Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Scarlett R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Leonard, Keith J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) task in the LWRS Program is to conduct experimental research into understanding how multiple variables influence the crack initiation and crack growth in materials subjected to stress under corrosive conditions. This includes understanding the influences of alloy composition, radiation condition, water chemistry and metallurgical starting condition (i.e., previous cold work or heat treatments and the resulting microstructure) has on the behavior of materials. Testing involves crack initiation and growth testing on irradiated specimens of single-variable alloys in simulated Light Water Reactor (LWR) environments, tensile testing, hardness testing, microstructural and microchemical analysis, and detailed efforts to characterize localized deformation. Combined, these single-variable experiments will provide mechanistic understanding that can be used to identify key operational variables to mitigate or control IASCC, optimize inspection and maintenance schedules to the most susceptible materials/locations, and, in the long-term, design IASCC-resistant materials. In support of this research, efforts are currently underway to arrange shipment of “free” high fluence austenitic alloys available through Électricité de France (EDF) for post irradiation testing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and IASCC testing at the University of Michigan. These high fluence materials range in damage values from 45 to 125 displacements per atom (dpa). The samples identified for transport to the United States, which include nine, no-cost, 304, 308 and 316 tensile bars, were relocated from the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Russia, and received at the Halden Reactor in Halden, Norway, on August 23, 2016. ORNL has been notified that a significant amount of work is required to prepare the samples for further shipment to Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The

  2. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  3. Ultrasonic guided wave for monitoring corrosion of steel bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi; Qin, Lei; Huang, Bosheng

    2018-01-01

    Steel corrosion of reinforced concrete structures has become a serious problem all over the word. In this paper, the work aims at monitoring steel corrosion using ultrasonic guided wave (UGW). Ultrasonic guided wave monitoring is a dynamic and non-destructive testing technology. The advantages of ultrasonic guided wave monitoring for reinforcement corrosion are real-time, online and continuous. In addition, it can judge the different stages of steel bar corrosion, which achieved non-destructive detection.

  4. Corrosion product film-induced stress facilitates stress corrosion cracking

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic subst...

  5. Influence of thermal aging on primary water stress corrosion cracking of cast duplex stainless steel (second report). Consideration on fractography after slow strain rate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Chiba, Goro; Totsuka, Nobuo; Arioka, Koji

    2003-01-01

    In order to evaluate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of cast duplex stainless steel which is used for the main coolant pipe of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), the slow strain rate technique (SSRT) and the constant load test (CLT) of the materials were performed in simulated primary water at 360degC. The cast duplex stainless steel contains ferrite phase with ranging from 8 to 23% and its mechanical properties are affected by long time thermal aging. Therefore, we paid attention to the influence of its ferrite content and thermal aging on the SCC susceptibility of this unaged and aged stainless steel and prepared three kinds of specimen with different ferrite contents (23%, 15% and 8%). The brittle fracture of the unaged specimens after SSRT mainly consists of quasi-cleavage fracture in austenitic phase. After aging, it changes to a mixture of quasi-cleavage fracture in both austenitic and ferritic phases. Microcracks were observed on the unaged specimen surfaces and aged ones for 10,000 hours at 400degC after about 10,000 hours of the CLT under the load condition of 1.2∼2.0 times of yield strength. The crack initiation sites of CLT specimens are similar to SSRT fracture surfaces. The SCC susceptibility of this 23% ferrite material increases with aging time at 400degC. The SCC susceptibility of 15% and 23% ferrite materials are higher than that of 8% ferrite material with aging condition for 30,000h at 400degC. (author)

  6. Reducing Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Bearing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paton, N. E.; Dennies, D. P.; Lumsden, I., J.b.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in some stainless-steel alloys increased by addition of small amounts of noble metals. 0.75 to 1.00 percent by weight of palladium or platinum added to alloy melt sufficient to improve properties of certain stainless steels so they could be used in manufacture of high-speed bearings.

  7. Steel corrosion in radioactive waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, E.; Weier, Dennis R.

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study is being conducted by CNEA and USDOE (Department of Energy of the United States of America) to investigate the effects of tank waste chemistry on radioactive waste storage tank corrosion. Radioactive waste is stored in underground storage tanks that contain a combination of salts, consisting primarily of sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide. The USDOE, Office of River Protection at the Hanford Site, has identified a need to conduct a laboratory study to better understand the effects of radioactive waste chemistry on the corrosion of waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The USDOE science need (RL-WT079-S Double-Shell Tanks Corrosion Chemistry) called for a multi year effort to identify waste chemistries and temperatures within the double-shell tank (DST) operating limits for corrosion control and operating temperature range that may not provide the expected corrosion protection and to evaluate future operations for the conditions outside the existing corrosion database. Assessment of corrosion damage using simulated (non-radioactive) waste is being made of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloy. Evaluation of the influence of exposure time, and electrolyte composition and/or concentration is being also conducted. (author) [es

  8. New understanding of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yange; Zhang, Tao; Shao, Yawei; Meng, Guozhe; Wang, Fuhui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Stress distributions of pits under different hydrostatic pressures are simulated. •Corrosion model of Ni–Cr–Mo–V steel under hydrostatic pressure is established. •A novel understanding of the effect of hydrostatic pressure is proposed. -- Abstract: Corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel at different hydrostatic pressures is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and finite element analysis (FEA). The results indicate that corrosion pits of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel originate from inclusions in the steel and high hydrostatic pressures accelerate pit growth rate parallel to steel and the coalescence rate of neighbouring pits, which lead to the fast formation of uniform corrosion. Corrosion of Ni–Cr–Mo–V high strength steel under high hydrostatic pressure is the interaction result between electrochemical corrosion and elastic stress

  9. Corrosion of mild steel and stainless steel by marine Vibrio sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Wagh, A.B.

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steel and mild steel coupons exposed to media with and without a bacterial culture Vibrio sp. was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Pitting type of corrosion was noticed which was more...

  10. Investigation on the Recent Research Trend in the Corrosion Behaviour of Stainless Steel Weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol; Hwang, Woon Suk

    2011-01-01

    The research trend in the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel weldment has been reviewed. The welding technology plays an important role in the fabrication of structure such as chemical plant, power plant, because welding can influence various factors in the performance of plant and equipment. This has led to an increasing attention towards the corrosion behaviour of weldment which has been one of the major issues for both welding and corrosion research engineers. The aim of this paper is to give a short survey of the recent technical trends of welding and corrosion including the electrochemical corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue in connection with the welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrication. This study covers the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel weldment collected from the COMPENDEX DB analysis of published papers, research subject and research institutes

  11. Effect of Low-Temperature Environment on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Simulated Alkaline Soil Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Ming; Yu, Chengxiang; Sun, Dongxu; Yang, Xu; Xu, Changhao

    2018-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in simulated alkaline soil solution under different temperatures was investigated by slow-strain-rate testing, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Results showed that the fracture was transgranular and brittle at 273 K to 278 K (0 °C to 5 °C), and the metal surface was dissolved by a large number of chloride ions. Furthermore, hydrogen embrittlement was caused by the hydrogen atom extended to the high-stress region. The fracture process was controlled by hydrogen-induced cracking, and SCC was highly sensitive at this stage. At 288 K to 298 K (15 °C to 25 °C), the fracture morphology was attributed to the mixed mode of ductile and brittle fractures, the fracture process was controlled by the mechanism of hydrogen-induced cracking and anodic dissolution, and the susceptibility to SCC decreased. When the temperature reached 308 K to 318 K (35 °C to 45 °C), the fracture was mainly intergranular and ductile, the fracture process was controlled by anodic dissolution, and SCC sensitivity was the smallest in this temperature range.

  12. Effect of Low-Temperature Environment on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X80 Pipeline Steel in Simulated Alkaline Soil Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Ming; Yu, Chengxiang; Sun, Dongxu; Yang, Xu; Xu, Changhao

    2018-04-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of X80 pipeline steel in simulated alkaline soil solution under different temperatures was investigated by slow-strain-rate testing, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Results showed that the fracture was transgranular and brittle at 273 K to 278 K (0 °C to 5 °C), and the metal surface was dissolved by a large number of chloride ions. Furthermore, hydrogen embrittlement was caused by the hydrogen atom extended to the high-stress region. The fracture process was controlled by hydrogen-induced cracking, and SCC was highly sensitive at this stage. At 288 K to 298 K (15 °C to 25 °C), the fracture morphology was attributed to the mixed mode of ductile and brittle fractures, the fracture process was controlled by the mechanism of hydrogen-induced cracking and anodic dissolution, and the susceptibility to SCC decreased. When the temperature reached 308 K to 318 K (35 °C to 45 °C), the fracture was mainly intergranular and ductile, the fracture process was controlled by anodic dissolution, and SCC sensitivity was the smallest in this temperature range.

  13. Accelerated test for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking initiation characteristics of non-sensitized 316 austenitic stainless steel in simulated pressure water reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Xiangyu; Bali, Shirish Chandrakant; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Accelerated technique was developed for evaluation of stress corrosion cracking. • The effect of strain rate on stress corrosion cracking was investigated. • Typical intergranular crack feature was observed on the fracture surface. • The crack depth distribution shows two peaks feature. • The work hardened layer has a strong effect on stress corrosion cracking. - Abstract: Accelerated technique has been developed for evaluation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) initiation behavior of non-sensitized materials in pressure water reactor environment by means of the implementation of hollowed cylindrical specimens under slow strain rate tensile. Typical IGSCC feature was observed on the fracture surface. The crack depth distribution showed two peaks feature which relates to the worked hardened layer on the inner surface. The specimens tested at lower strain rate showed higher fraction of IGSCC, larger number of cracks initiation, shorter elongation and smaller crack opening displacement, suggesting the transition behavior of IGSCC initiation and short crack growth.

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steels in Fuel Grade Ethanol and Blends - Study to Evaluate Alternate Standard Tests and Phenomenological Understanding of SCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-30

    Main aim of this project was to evaluate alternate standard test methods for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and compare them with the results from slow strain rate test (SSRT) results under equivalent environmental conditions. Other important aim of...

  15. To the corrosion of austenitic steels in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, M.

    1978-03-01

    This report describes the comparison between experimental corrosion and calculated corrosion effects on austenitic steels exposed to liquid sodium. As basis for the calculations served a diffusion model. The comparison showed that the model is able to predict the corrosion effects. In addition the model was used to calculate the corrosion effect along an actual fuel rod. (orig.) [de

  16. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  17. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gismelseed, Abbasher; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Elzain, M.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Yousif, A.; Al-Saadi, S.; Al-Omari, I.; Widatallah, H.; Bouziane, K.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic study has been made of the initial corrosion products which form on mild steel capons exposed near the coastal region of Oman and at some industrial areas. The phases and compositions of the products formed at different periods of exposure were examined by using Moessbauer spectroscopy (295 and 78 K) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results show that lepidocorcite and maghemite are early corrosion products and goethite starts to form after 2 months of metal exposure to the atmosphere. Akaganeite is an early corrosion product but it forms in marine environments only, which reflects the role of chlorine effect in the atmosphere. The 12 months coupons showed the presence of goethite, lepidocorcite and maghemite, but no akaganeite being seen in the products of one of the studied areas.

  18. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel in Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gismelseed, Abbasher, E-mail: abbasher@squ.edu.om; Al-Harthi, S. H.; Elzain, M.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Yousif, A.; Al-Saadi, S.; Al-Omari, I.; Widatallah, H.; Bouziane, K. [College of Science, Department of Physics (Oman)

    2006-01-15

    A systematic study has been made of the initial corrosion products which form on mild steel capons exposed near the coastal region of Oman and at some industrial areas. The phases and compositions of the products formed at different periods of exposure were examined by using Moessbauer spectroscopy (295 and 78 K) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The results show that lepidocorcite and maghemite are early corrosion products and goethite starts to form after 2 months of metal exposure to the atmosphere. Akaganeite is an early corrosion product but it forms in marine environments only, which reflects the role of chlorine effect in the atmosphere. The 12 months coupons showed the presence of goethite, lepidocorcite and maghemite, but no akaganeite being seen in the products of one of the studied areas.

  19. Role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Electrochemical basis for differentiation between hydrogen embrittlement and active path corrosion or anodic dissolution crack growth mechanisms is examined. The consequences of recently demonstrated acidification in crack tip region irrespective of electrochemical conditions at the bulk surface of the sample are that the hydrogen can evolve within the crack and may be involved in the cracking process. There are basically three aspects of hydrogen involvement in stress corrosion cracking. In dissolution models crack propagation is assumed to be caused by anodic dissolution on the crack tip sustained by cathodic reduction of hydrogen from electrolyte within the crack. In hydrogen induced structural transformation models it is postulated that hydrogen is absorbed locally at the crack tip producing structural changes which facilitate crack propagation. In hydrogen embrittlement models hydrogen is absorbed by stressed metal from proton reduction from the electrolyte within the crack and there is interaction between lattice and hydrogen resulting in embrittlement of material at crack tip facilitating crack propagation. In the present paper, the role of hydrogen in stress corrosion crack growth in high strength steels, austenitic stainless steels, titanium alloys and high strength aluminium alloys is discussed. (author)

  20. Corrosion aspects of steel radioactive waste containers in cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Nick Smart from Serco, UK, gave an overview of the effects of cementitious materials on the corrosion of steel during storage and disposal of various low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. Steel containers are often used as an overpack for the containment of radioactive wastes and are routinely stored in an open atmosphere. Since this is an aerobic and typically humid environment, the steel containers can start to corrode whilst in storage. Steel containers often come into contact with cementitious materials (e.g. grout encapsulants, backfill). An extensive account of different steel container designs and of steel corrosion mechanisms was provided. Steel corrosion rates under conditions buffered by cementitious materials have been evaluated experimentally. The main conclusion was that the cementitious environment generally facilitates the passivation of steel materials. Several general and localised corrosion mechanisms need to be considered when evaluating the performance of steel containers in cementitious environments, and environmental thresholds can be defined and used with this aim. In addition, the consequences of the generation of gaseous hydrogen by the corrosion of carbon steel under anoxic conditions must be taken into account. Discussion of the paper included: Is crevice corrosion really significant in cementitious systems? Crevice corrosion is unlikely in the cementitious backfill considered because it will tend to neutralise any acidic conditions in the crevice. What is the role of microbially-induced corrosion (MIC) in cementitious systems? Microbes are likely to be present in a disposal facility but their effect on corrosion is uncertain

  1. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The existing test method used to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in : concrete, mainly ASTM G 109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, : and can be expensive. However, with corrosion...

  2. Corrosion performance tests for reinforcing steel in concrete : test procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    The existing test method to assess the corrosion performance of reinforcing steel embedded in concrete, mainly : ASTM G109, is labor intensive, time consuming, slow to provide comparative results, and often expensive. : However, corrosion of reinforc...

  3. Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement behaviour of high strength duplex and austenitic stainless steels in simulated concrete pore solution

    OpenAIRE

    GRIMAULT, Benoît; GAILLET, Laurent; DRISSI-HABTI, Monssef; MANTEL, Marc; CHAUVEAU, Eric; CHAUSSADENT, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steels are playing an increasingly role in civil engineering, especially in coastal and marine constructions, where the concentration of chloride ions is higher. Their use as concrete reinforcement rebar is an interesting example of that idea. However, although some studies about the use of stainless steels in prestressing are emerging, no realistic realization has been performed. This might be due to technical lock as the high mechanical strength needed for prestressing seems to be...

  4. Corrosion behaviour of AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to massive laser shock peening impacts with different pulse energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.Z.; Qi, H.; Luo, K.Y.; Luo, M.; Cheng, X.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Laser shock peening caused an obvious increase of corrosion resistance of 304 steel. •Corrosion resistance of stainless steel increased with increasing pulse energy. •Mechanism of laser shock peening on corrosion behaviour was also entirely determined. -- Abstract: Effects of massive laser shock peening (LSP) impacts with different pulse energies on ultimate tensile strength (UTS), stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, fracture appearance and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated by slow strain rate test, potentiodynamic polarisation test and scanning electron microscope observation. The influence mechanism of massive LSP impacts with different pulse energies on corrosion behaviour was also determined. Results showed that massive LSP impacts effectively caused a significant improvement on UTS, SCC resistance, and electrochemical corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel. Increased pulse energy can also gradually improve its corrosion resistance

  5. Corrosion of steels in sour gas environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twigg, R.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents a study on the effects of sour gas environments on steels. Emphasis is placed on alloys commonly used in the heavy water, sour gas and refining industries. In addition, 'high strength, low alloy' steels, known as 'oil country tubular goods', are included. Reference is made to the effects of hydrogen sulphide environments on austenitic steels and on certain specialty steels. Theories of hydrogen-related cracking mechanisms are outlined with emphasis placed on sulphide stress cracking and hydrogen induced cracking in carbon and low alloy steels. Methods of controlling sulphide stress cracking and hydrogen induced cracking are addressed separately. Case histories from the heavy water, refining, and sour gas industries are used to illustrate operating experience and failure mechanisms. Finally, recommendations, based largely on the author's industrial experience, are made with respect to quality assurance and inspection requirements for sour service components. Only published literature was surveyed. Abstracts were made of all references, reviewing the major sources in detail

  6. Study on corrosion of carbon steel in DEA aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun Han; Xie, Jia Lin; Zhang, Li

    2018-02-01

    Corrosion of carbon steel in the CO2 capture process using diethanolamine (DEA) aqueous solutions was investigated. The effects of the mass concentrations of DEA, solution temperature and CO2 loading on the corrosion rate of carbon steel were demonstrated. The experimental results provided comprehensive information on the appropriate concentration range of DEA aqueous solutions under which low corrosion of carbon steel can be achieved.

  7. The Stress Corrosion Resistance and the Cryogenic Temperature Mechanical Behavior of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33) Stainless Steel Parent and Welded Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The ambient and cryogenic temperature mechanical properties and the ambient temperature stress corrosion results of 18-3 Mn (Nitronic 33)stainless steel, longitudinal and transverse, as received and as welded (TIG) material specimens manufactured from 0.063 inch thick sheet material, were described. The tensile test results indicate an increase in ultimate tensile and yield strengths with decreasing temperature. The elongation remained fairly constant to -200 F, but below that temperature the elongation decreased to less than 6.0% at liquid hydrogen temperature. The notched tensile strength (NTS) for the parent metal increased with decreasing temperature to liquid nitrogen temperature. Below -320 F the NTS decreased rapidly. The notched/unnotched (N/U) tensile ratio of the parent material specimens remained above 0.9 from ambient to -200 F, and decreased to approximately 0.65 and 0.62, respectively, for the longitudinal and transverse directions at liquid hydrogen temperature. After 180 days of testing, only those specimens exposed to the salt spray indicated pitting and some degradation of mechanical properties.

  8. Microstructure and stress corrosion cracking of the fusion boundary region in an alloy 182-A533B low alloy steel dissimilar weld joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Juan; Peng, Qunjia; Takeda, Yoichi; Kuniya, Jiro; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → High-angle misorientation at FB, type-II and type-I boundaries. → Highest residual strain and hardness in the zone between FB and type-II boundary. → Type-II and type-I boundaries had lower resistance to SCC growth than the FB. → Crack growth blunted by pitting at the FB. → Reactivation of crack growth from the pitting by oxidation along the grain boundary. - Abstract: Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in the fusion boundary (FB) region of an Alloy 182-A533B low alloy steel (LAS) dissimilar weld joint in high temperature water doped with sulfate was studied following a microstructure characterization of the FB region. The microstructure characterization suggested the type-II and type-I boundaries in the dilution zone (DZ) adjacent to the FB had lower resistance to SCC growth than the FB. Crack propagating perpendicular to the FB in the DZ was observed to be blunted by pitting at the FB, followed by the reactivation from the pitting by localized oxidation along the grain boundary in LAS.

  9. Role of environmental variables on the stress corrosion cracking of sensitized AISI type 304 stainless steel (SS304) in thiosulfate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Ghosal, S. K.; de, P. K.

    2004-10-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of sensitized AISI type 304 stainless steel (SS304) has been studied in dilute thiosulfate solutions as a function of thiosulfate concentrations and applied potentials. The susceptibility to SCC was observed to increase with thiosulfate concentrations and applied potentials. The addition of boric acid produced the reverse effect. A critical potential was found to exist, below which no SCC took place. Potential fluctuations, as recorded in the tests under open circuit conditions, appeared to be correlated with crack initiation and propagation during SCC. Current fluctuations observed in the controlled potential tests also gave indications of crack nucleation; however, at higher applied potentials such fluctuations were absent. The formation and presence of martensite in the specimens seemed to have a minor role in the overall SCC process. The aggressiveness of the thiosulfate concentration was also an important factor in determining the degree of susceptibility to SCC. The results obtained in the slow strain rate tests under open circuit as well as under potential-controlled conditions suggested a film ruptureanodic dissolution type of mechanism operative during SCC of sensitized SS304 in thiosulfate solutions.

  10. Three-dimensional study of grain boundary engineering effects on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of 316 stainless steel in high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingguang; Xia, Shuang; Bai, Qin; Zhou, Bangxin; Zhang, Lefu; Lu, Yonghao; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2018-01-01

    The intergranular cracks and grain boundary (GB) network of a GB-engineered 316 stainless steel after stress corrosion cracking (SCC) test in high temperature high pressure water of reactor environment were investigated by two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) characterization in order to expose the mechanism that GB-engineering mitigates intergranular SCC. The 3D microstructure shown that the essential characteristic of the GB-engineered microstructure is formation of many large twin-boundaries as a result of multiple-twinning, which results in the formation of large grain-clusters. The large grain-clusters played a key role to the improvement of intergranular SCC resistance by GB-engineering. The main intergranular cracks propagated in a zigzag along the outer boundaries of these large grain-clusters because all inner boundaries of the grain-clusters were twin-boundaries (∑3) or twin-related boundaries (∑3n) which had much lower susceptibility to SCC than random boundaries. These large grain-clusters had tree-ring-shaped topology structure and very complex morphology. They got tangled so that difficult to be separated during SCC, resulting in some large crack-bridges retained in the crack surface.

  11. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    of high-strength pipeline steel and the concentration of hydrogen present in the steel. B. Determine the degree hydrogen absorption by cathodically protected steel exposed in natural soil sediment, which include activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). C. Compare the above points with fracture...... crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis......, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation...

  12. Stress corrosion (Astm G30-90 standard) in 08x18H10T stainless steel of nuclear fuel storage pool in WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, V.; Zamora R, L.

    1997-01-01

    At the water storage of the irradiated nuclear fuel has been an important factor in its management. The actual pools have its walls covered with inoxidable steel and heat exchangers to dissipate the residual heat from fuel. It is essential to control the water purity to eliminate those conditions which aid to the corrosion process in fuel and at related components. The steel used in this research was obtained from an austenitic inoxidizable steel standardized with titanium 08x18H10T (Type 321) similar to one of the two steel coatings used to cover walls and the pools floor. the test consisted in the specimen deformation through an U ply according to the Astm G30-90 standard. The exposition of the deformed specimen it was realized in simulated conditions to the chemical regime used in pools. (Author)

  13. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-06-11

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC.

  14. Improvement of corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels by resurfacing using multifunction cavitation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Masataka; Yoshimura, Toshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Low-alloy steels are based on carbon steel in combination with several percent or less (in many cases, 1 mass%) alloying elements, and they offer improved resistance to corrosion at a cost slightly higher than that of carbon steel. However, these materials do not exhibit the same corrosion resistance as stainless steel. The authors have previously developed a novel multifunction cavitation (MFC) technique, which combines ultrasonic cavitation with water jet cavitation. In this study, MFC was used to modify the surface of Cr-Mo steel (SCM435) and Ni-Cr-Mo steel (SNCM630). MFC was found to improve the residual stress value of the material as the result of surface modification while also imparting high strength and superior corrosion resistance.

  15. A study on corrosive behavior of spring steel by shot-peening process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jae Pil; Park, Keyung Dong

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the influence of shot peening on the corrosion was investigated on spring steel immersed in 3.5% NaCl. The immersion test was performed on the two kinds of specimens. Corrosion potential, polarization curve, residual stress and etc. were investigated from experimental results. From test results, the effect of shot peening on the corrosion was evaluated. In case of corrosion potential, shot peened specimen shows more activated negative direction as compared with parent metal. Surface of specimen, which is treated with the shot peened, is placed as more activated state against inner base metal. It can cause the anti-corrosion effect on the base metal

  16. Recent Natural Corrosion Inhibitors for Mild Steel: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Chigondo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, reduction of corrosion has been managed by various methods including cathodic protection, process control, reduction of the metal impurity content, and application of surface treatment techniques, as well as incorporation of suitable alloys. However, the use of corrosion inhibitors has proven to be the easiest and cheapest method for corrosion protection and prevention in acidic media. These inhibitors slow down the corrosion rate and thus prevent monetary losses due to metallic corrosion on industrial vessels, equipment, or surfaces. Inorganic and organic inhibitors are toxic and costly and thus recent focus has been turned to develop environmentally benign methods for corrosion retardation. Many researchers have recently focused on corrosion prevention methods using green inhibitors for mild steel in acidic solutions to mimic industrial processes. This paper provides an overview of types of corrosion, corrosion process, and mainly recent work done on the application of natural plant extracts as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel.

  17. Atmospheric corrosion data of weathering steels. A review

    OpenAIRE

    Morcillo, Manuel; Chico, Belén; Cano, H.; Fuente, Daniel de la

    2013-01-01

    Extensive information on the atmospheric corrosion of weathering steel has been published in the scientific literature. The contribution of the present work is to provide a bibliographic review of the reported information, which mostly concerns the weathering steel ASTM A-242. This review addresses issues such as rust layer stabilisation times, steady-state steel corrosion rates, and situations where the use of unpainted weathering steel is feasible. It also analyses the effect of exposure co...

  18. Corrosion processes on weathering steel railway bridge in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Viktor; Křivý, Vít; Buchta, Vojtěch

    2016-01-01

    This contribution deals with experimental corrosion tests carried out on the weathering steel railway bridge in Prague. The basic specific property of the weathering steel is an ability to create in favourable environment a protective patina layer on its surface. Since 1968 weathering steel is used under the name “Atmofix” in the Czech Republic and can be used as a standard structural material without any corrosion protection. The weathering steel Atmofix is mostly used for bridge structures ...

  19. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC...... of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic...... corrosion rates, when biofilm and corrosion products cover the steel surface. However, EIS might be used for detection of MIC. EN is a suitable technique to characterise the type of corrosion attack, but is unsuitable for corrosion rate estimation. The concentric electrodes galvanic probe arrangement...

  20. Fundamental distribution of stress corrosion crack depth on Type 316L stainless steels induced by creviced bent beam test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Yuichi; Miura, Yasufumi; Kako, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    The creviced bent beam (CBB) test has been applied for many materials such as nickel base alloys and low carbon austenitic stainless steels. For sensitized austenitic stainless steels, fundamental distribution of crack depth induced by CBB tests was evaluated to establish SCC initiation model and lifetime prediction method. On the other hand, there are a few studies about distribution of crack depth on low carbon austenitic stainless steels. In this study, statistical analysis of crack depth was conducted in Type 316L stainless steels after CBB tests. The results are summarized as follows, (1) Distribution of grain boundary depth designated as distance from surface to triple point of grain boundary fit lognormal probability distribution and exponential probability distribution. (2) Distribution of crack depth approaches lognormal or exponential probability distribution with passage of test duration. Distribution of plastic strain on the specimen surface is not affect to type of crack depth distribution. (3) Inflection or bent point appears on the probability plot at depth of the median of grain boundary depth distribution. (4) Less than median of grain boundary depth, distribution of crack depth is identical to grain boundary depth distribution. More than median + standard deviation of grain boundary depth, crack depth distribution is described by the exponential distribution. (author)

  1. Investigating the Crevice Corrosion Behavior of Coated Stainless Steel in Seawater

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kain, Robert

    2000-01-01

    .... austenitic stainless steel. Testing in natural seawater has demonstrated that coatings can protect susceptible stainless steel from barnacle related crevice corrosion and localized corrosion at weldments...

  2. Alloy SCR-3 resistant to stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowaka, Masamichi; Fujikawa, Hisao; Kobayashi, Taiki

    1977-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel is used widely because the corrosion resistance, workability and weldability are excellent, but the main fault is the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in the environment containing chlorides. Inconel 600, most resistant to stress corrosion cracking, is not necessarily safe under some severe condition. In the heat-affected zone of SUS 304 tubes for BWRs, the cases of stress corrosion cracking have occurred. The conventional testing method of stress corrosion cracking using boiling magnesium chloride solution has been problematical because it is widely different from actual environment. The effects of alloying elements on stress corrosion cracking are remarkably different according to the environment. These effects were investigated systematically in high temperature, high pressure water, and as the result, Alloy SCR-3 with excellent stress corrosion cracking resistance was found. The physical constants and the mechanical properties of the SCR-3 are shown. The states of stress corrosion cracking in high temperature, high pressure water containing chlorides and pure water, polythionic acid, sodium phosphate solution and caustic soda of the SCR-3, SUS 304, Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 are compared and reported. (Kako, I.)

  3. Corrosion Behavior of New Cr-Ni-Cu Low Alloy Seawater Corrosion Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Piaopiao; Yang, Zhongmin; Chen, Ying; Wang, Huimin

    Two kinds of Cr-Ni-Cu low alloyed steels were designed, 0.1%C-0.7%Cr-1.2%Ni-0.7Cu and 0.1%C-0.7%Cr-0.3%Ni-0.5Cu. With the method of SEM, XRD and electrochemical analysis and testing technology, periodic immersion accelerated corrosion test was carried out to investigate the corrosion resistance of the designed steels in simulated marine environment. The steel with best corrosion resistance was selected, and then focused on the variation of its corrosion rate with time. The results indicated that the designed Cu-Cr-Ni low alloyed steels showed better corrosion resistance than 20MnSi, the ratio of their corrosion rates was 0.44. The corrosion rate of designed steels decreased gradually to 3 4 g/(mm2·h) with the elongation of test period, while the corrosion rate of 20MnSi kept downward trend, not reach stability, and the corrosion rate gap between them became smaller. The Cr element banding enriched in the inner rust can withstand the diffusion of Cl-. Besides, the addition of Ni raised the self-corrosion potential of the bare steels and promoted the transformation of γ-FeOOH to α-FeOOH, and consequently, improved the stability of the rust and the corrosion resistance of steels.

  4. Chromium steel corrosion rates and mechanisms in aqueous nickel chloride at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, J.E.; Broomfield, J.P.; Mitra, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of PWR steam generator carbon steel support structures and consequential denting of steam generator tubes led to investigation of alternative support designs and materials. In recent designs of steam generators the carbon steel drilled hole tube support plate has been replaced by one of quatrefoil or trefoil shape to minimize the contact area. These plates are now made of more corrosion resistant chromium steel (approx. 12%Cr) to ensure that they are less vulnerable to attack in the event of adverse boiler water chemistry. This study was initiated to examine the corrosion behavior of a range of chromium steels in the acid chloride environments characteristic of tube/support plate crevices under adverse boiler water conditions. Objectives of the study were to: 1) determine the relative susceptibility of candidate tube support plate steels to acid chloride corrosion; 2) investigate the corrosion product morphology and its relationship to the corrosion mechanism; 3) determine the effect of environment aggressiveness on 12%Cr (A405) steel corrosion rates and mechanisms; and 4) investigate the effect of restraint stress/environment on denting potential of A405. Experimental method and results are discussed

  5. Properties of corrosion resistance in C + Mo multi implanted steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Wu Yuguang; Wang Xiaoyan

    2001-01-01

    The influence of multi-implantation on the corrosion resistance of H13 steel was studied using multi-sweep cyclic voltammetry. The formation conditions of phases and its effects on corrosion resistance were studied. The mechanism of improvement in corrosion resistance was discussed. The experimental results show that the increase of Mo dose can improve corrosion resistance, however the increase of C dose can enhance pitting corrosion potential. Both effects were obtained using dual-and multi-implantation. The passivation layer consists of the phases of Fe 2 Mo, FeMo, MoC, Fe 5 C 3 and Fe 7 C 3 in dual implantation surface of steel. It can improve corrosion resistance and increase pitting corrosion potential. Multi-implantation can further improve corrosion and pitting corrosion resistance compared with dual implantation

  6. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  7. Evaluation of the susceptibility to pitting corrosion of structural steels, including steels with modified surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunarska, E.; Nikiforow, K.

    2001-01-01

    Although the low alloy ferrite-perlite and bainite-martensite steels mostly undergo the general corrosion, pitting corrosion occurring under certain conditions jeopardizes the safety of installations, causing perforation of walls or initiation of crack. On the basis of electrochemical, corrosion and microscopic examinations, the conditions simulating typical industrial corrosion environments, containing Cl - ions have been selected, to which the parts of machines, devices and installation are subjected. The test parameters provide the preferential pitting corrosion without prevailing general corrosion, and provide the similar type of corrosion of different kinds of ferrite-perlite and bainite-martensite steels, including steels with modified surface layer. The proposed express method allows to evaluate the susceptibility to pitting corrosion and to evaluate the effect of surface modification on susceptibility to pitting corrosion in environments containing Cl - ions. The method may be applied for the proper selection of materials exploited under pitting corrosion conditions and for preparation of precorroded samples for mechanical testing. (author)

  8. Marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morcillo, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Basic research on marine atmospheric corrosion of carbon steels is a relatively young scientific field and there continue to be great gaps in this area of knowledge. The presence of akaganeite in the corrosion products that form on steel when it is exposed to marine atmospheres leads to a notable increase in the corrosion rate. This work addresses the following issues: (a environmental conditions necessary for akaganeite formation; (b characterisation of akaganeite in the corrosion products formed; (c corrosion mechanisms of carbon steel in marine atmospheres; (d exfoliation of rust layers formed in highly aggressive marine atmospheres; (e long-term corrosion rate prediction; and (f behaviour of weathering steels. Field research has been carried out at Cabo Vilano wind farm (Camariñas, Galicia in a wide range of atmospheric salinities and laboratory work involving the use of conventional atmospheric corrosion techniques and near-surface and bulk sensitive analytical techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM/energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SEM/μRaman spectroscopy.La investigación fundamental en corrosión atmosférica marina de aceros al carbono es un campo científico relativamente joven que presenta grandes lagunas de conocimiento. La formación de akaganeíta en los productos de corrosión que se forman sobre el acero cuando se expone a atmósferas marinas conduce a un incremento notable de la velocidad de corrosión. En el trabajo se abordan las siguientes cuestiones: (a condiciones ambientales necesarias para la formación de akaganeíta, (b caracterización de la akaganeíta en los productos de corrosión formados, (c mecanismos de corrosión del acero al carbono en atmósferas marinas, (d exfoliación de las capas de herrumbre formadas en atmósferas marinas muy agresivas, (e predicción de la velocidad de corrosión a largo plazo, y (f comportamiento de aceros patinables. La

  9. Study on corrosion simulation device for marine structural steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. A corrosion simulation device was studied using offshore long scale hanging specimens. An Ni–. Cu–P steel specimen was studied by analysing its corrosion products and corrosion types. The appearance of the samples and the surface of the metallic substrate after the removal of the rust layer produced by these ...

  10. Study on corrosion simulation device for marine structural steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A corrosion simulation device was studied using offshore long scale hanging specimens. An Ni–Cu–P steel specimen was studied by analysing its corrosion products and corrosion types. The appearance of the samples and the surface of the metallic substrate after the removal of the rust layer produced by these two ...

  11. Monitoring Techniques for Microbially Influenced Corrosion of Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel

    2000-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) of carbon steel may occur in media with microbiological activity of especially sulphate-reducing bacteria, e.g. on pipelines buried in soil and on marine structures. MIC of carbon steel must be monitored on-line in order to provide an efficient protection...... and control the corrosion. A number of monitoring techniques is industrially used today, and the applicability and reliability of these for monitoring MIC is evaluated. Coupons and ER are recommended as necessary basic techniques even though localised corrosion rate cannot be measured. FSM measures general...... corrosion and detects localised corrosion, but the sensitivity is not high enough for monitoring initiation of pitting and small attacks. Electrochemical techniques as LPR and EIS give distorted data and unreliable corrosion rates, when biofilm and corrosion products cover the steel surface. However, EIS...

  12. A Study of Localized Corrosion in Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Weldments

    OpenAIRE

    Enerhaug, Jakob

    2002-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is concerned with pitting corrosion in super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) weldments in slightly sour service. Thee main objective with the present thesis has been to find out why pitting corrosion occurs in the heat affected zone (HAZ) at ambient rather than at elevated temperatures and how the corrosion mechanism depends on the welding process. The thesis is divided into six parts. Part I gives a general introduction to martensitic stainless steels, focusing on...

  13. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    This is the final report of a 2 year programme aimed at (1) determining the rate of anaerobic corrosion of steel in concrete, (2) investigating the nature of the corrosion products formed on carbon steel embedded in cementitious material under anaerobic conditions and (3) evaluating the effect of hydrogen over-pressures on the rate of anaerobic corrosion. All experiments have been carried out at temperatures in the range 20-30 0 C, ie ambient conditions. 4 refs.; 19 figs.; 6 tabs

  14. Corrosion behaviour of sintered duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utrilla, M. Victoria; Urena, Alejandro; Otero, Enrique; Munez, Claudio Jose [Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnologia, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Duplex austenite-ferrite stainless steels were prepared by mixing austenitic (316L) and ferritic (434L) atomized powders. Although different 316L/434L ratios were prepared, present work centred its study on 50% ferrite - 50% austenite sintered steel. The powders were mixed and pressed at 700 MPa and sintered at 1250 deg. C for 30 min in vacuum. The cooling rate was 5 deg. C/min. Solution treatment was carried out to homogenize the microstructure at 1100 deg. C during 20 min. A microstructural study of the material in solution was performed, evaluating the microstructure, proportion and shape of porosity, and ferrite percentage. This last was measured by two methods, quantitative metallography and Fischer ferrito-metry. The materials were heat treated in the range of 700 to 1000 deg. C, for 10, 30 and 60 min and water quenched, to study the microstructural changes and the influence on the intergranular corrosion resistance. The method used to evaluate the sensitization to the intergranular corrosion was the electrochemical potentio-kinetic reactivation procedure (EPR). The test solution was 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 0,01 M KSCN at 30 deg. C. The criterion used to evaluate the sensitization was the ratio between the maximum reactivation density (Ir) and the maximum activation density (Ia). The results of the electrochemical tests were discussed in relation with the microstructures observed at the different heat treatments. (authors)

  15. Pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion of an advanced chromium-based stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alloy 33 is a (wt. %) 33 Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6CU-0.4N austenitic stainless steel combining high yield strength of min. 380 N/mm 2 (55 KSI) with high resistance to local corrosion and superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Ranking the material according to its PRE (pitting resistance equivalent) value, the new alloy fits in between the advanced 6% Mo superaustenitics and the nickel-base Alloy 625 but due to the balanced chemical composition the alloy shows a lot less sensitivity to segregation in the base material as well as in welded structures. It is recommended to weld the material with matching filler. The critical pitting temperature of such joints in the 10% FeCl 3 · 6H 2 O solution is reduced by only 10 C in comparison to the base material. Corrosion tests in artificial seawater (20 g/l Cl - ) with additions of chloride up to 37 g/l as well as in a NaCl-CaCl 2 , solution with 62 g/l Cl - --revealed that the critical pitting temperature does not differentiate from the 6% Mo austenitic steel Alloy 926. With respect to crevice corrosion the depassivation pH value has been determined in 1 M NaCl solution according to Crolet and again there was no difference between Alloy 33 and Alloy 926. SCC tests performed on Alloy 33 in the solution annealed condition as well as after heavy cold work up to R PO,2 ∼ 1,100--1,200 N/mm 2 (160--174 KSI) indicate the high resistance to stress corrosion cracking in hot sodium chloride solutions

  16. Steel fibre corrosion in cracks:durability of sprayed concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Nordström, Erik

    2000-01-01

    Steel fibre reinforced sprayed concrete is common practice for permanent linings in underground construction. Today there is a demand on "expected technical service life" of 120 years. Thin steel fibres could be expected to discontinue carrying load fast with a decrease of fibre diameter caused by corrosion, especially in cracks. The thesis contains results from inspections on existing sprayed concrete structures and a literature review on corrosion of steel fibres in cracked concrete. To stu...

  17. Stress corrosion of austenitic steels mono and polycrystals in Mg Cl{sub 2} medium: micro fractography and study of behaviour improvements; Corrosion sous contrainte de mono et polycristaux d`aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu MgCI{sub 2}: analyse microfractographique et recherche d`ameliorations du comportement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambreuil-Paret, A

    1997-09-19

    The austenitic steels in a hot chlorinated medium present a rupture which is macroscopically fragile, discontinuous and formed with crystallographic facets. The interpretation of these facies crystallographic character is a key for the understanding of the stress corrosion damages. The first aim of this work is then to study into details the micro fractography of 316 L steels mono and polycrystals. Two types of rupture are observed: a very fragile rupture which stresses on the possibility of the interatomic bonds weakening by the corrosive medium Mg Cl{sub 2} and a discontinuous rupture (at the micron scale) on the sliding planes which is in good agreement with the corrosion enhanced plasticity model. The second aim of this work is to search for controlling the stress corrosion by the mean of a pre-strain hardening. Two types of pre-strain hardening have been tested. A pre-strain hardening with a monotonic strain is negative. Indeed, the first cracks starts very early and the cracks propagation velocity is increased. This is explained by the corrosion enhanced plasticity model through the intensifying of the local corrosion-deformation interactions. On the other hand, a cyclic pre-strain hardening is particularly favourable. The first micro strains starts later and the strain on breaking point levels are increased. The delay of the starting of the first strains is explained by a surface distortion structure which is very homogeneous. At last, the dislocations structure created in fatigue at saturation is a planar structure of low energy which reduces the corrosion-deformation interactions, source of micro strains. (O.M.) 139 refs.

  18. Stress-Assisted Corrosion in Boiler Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preet M Singh; Steven J Pawel

    2006-05-27

    A number of industrial boilers, including in the pulp and paper industry, needed to replace their lower furnace tubes or decommission many recovery boilers due to stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) on the waterside of boiler tubes. More than half of the power and recovery boilers that have been inspected reveal SAC damage, which portends significant energy and economic impacts. The goal of this project was to clarify the mechanism of stress-assisted corrosion (SAC) of boiler tubes for the purpose of determining key parameters in its mitigation and control. To accomplish this in-situ strain measurements on boiler tubes were made. Boiler water environment was simulated in the laboratory and effects of water chemistry on SAC initiation and growth were evaluated in terms of industrial operations. Results from this project have shown that the dissolved oxygen is single most important factor in SAC initiation on carbon steel samples. Control of dissolved oxygen can be used to mitigate SAC in industrial boilers. Results have also shown that sharp corrosion fatigue and bulbous SAC cracks have similar mechanism but the morphology is different due to availability of oxygen during boiler shutdown conditions. Results are described in the final technical report.

  19. A simulation of corrosion fatigue life distribution in low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masaki; Kunieda, Hisashi; Tokaji, Keiro

    1992-07-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of corrosion fatigue life distributions was conducted in a low alloy steel, SNCM439, by assuming that the scatter of fatigue life resulted from the variation in the growth characteristics of corrosion pits and fatigue cracks. The parameters used in the simulation were obtained experimentally. The results showed that the experimental distributions were expressed satisfactorily by the simulation in which the parameters obtained from fatigue tests at the same stress were used. Therefore, it is concluded that corrosion fatigue life distribution can be predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation taking account of the statistical properties in the growth processes of corrosion pits and fatigue cracks.

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Corrosion of Weld Regions in API X52 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Cerecero G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of gas metal arc welding (GMAW regions has been studied using potentiodynamic polarization and polarization resistance (LPR techniques. Experiments were conducted in hydrogen sulfide (H2S-containing brine and in H2S-free brine. Welds were made on API 5L X52 steel. Due to differences in their microstructure, chemical composition and residual stress level, weld regions exhibited different responses under H2S corrosion. Base metal exhibited the highest corrosion rate (CR and the most cathodic corrosion potential.

  1. Mechanism of corrosion resistance for C + W dual implanted steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tonghe; Wu Yuguang; Liu Andong; Zhang Xu; Wang Xiaoyan

    2003-01-01

    The properties of corrosion resistance for C and W dual-implanted H13 steel were studied using multi-sweep cyclic voltammetry. The corrosion morphologies were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that after corrosion for 30 voltage scanning-loops, serious corrosion morphology appears on the surface of H13 steel: dense corrosion pits are distributed on the surface. Both shape and distribution morphology of these pits indicate the crystal properties: some pits are triangle or rectangle, and the pits are located along grain boundaries. But after corrosion of the W and C dual implanted steel samples, surface corrosion pits are shallow and small. Shallow corrosion pits are dislocated random, their shape and distribution are not provided with crystal properties. When the fluence is increased and after corrosion for 88 voltage scanning-loops, the surface corrosion pits are still shallow and small, showing the corrosion resistance to be enhanced further. Finally the mechanism of corrosion resistance was discussed

  2. Influence of stress relieve heat treatment on fatigue crack propagation in structural steel resistant to atmospheric corrosion welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Geraldo de Paula; Villela, Jefferson Jose; Rabello, Emerson Giovani [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mails: gpm@cdtn.br; jjv@cdtn.br; egr@cdtn.br; Cimini Junior, Carlos Alberto[Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: cimini@demet.ufmg.br; Godefroid, Leonardo Barbosa [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia]. E-mails: leonardo@demet.em.ufop.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work, the influence of stress relieve heat treatment (SRHT) on the fatigue crack propagation in USI-SAC 50 structural welded joints at the heat affected zone (HAZ) region was studied. Hardness measurements before and after the SRHT were made and crack propagation tests in specimens as welded (AW) and in specimens that were submitted to SRHT, which were accomplished. A reduction in hardness at the regions of HAZ and melted zone (MZ) after the SRHT were observed. It were also verified that the crack propagation rates (da/dN) versus DK on the specimens AW presented regions of retardation on the crack propagation rate, and in the specimens that were submitted to SRHT the crack propagation rate were homogeneous. (author)

  3. Atmospheric corrosion of mild steel. Pt. II. Marine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, E.; Morcillo, M.; Rosales, B.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results obtained in the MICAT project for mild steel specimens exposed for 1 to 4 years in 47 marine atmospheres in the Ibero-American region. All these atmospheres were characterized for climatology, pollution and corrosion rates according to ISO standards. Complementary morphological and chemical characterization of the steel corrosion product layers (SCPLs) formed in these atmospheres was carried out. The overall analysis of results contributes to understanding, in a systematic way, how atmospheric corrosivity categories can be correlated with corrosion mechanisms. Special aspects of the atmospheres, from pure to mixed marine, were considered. (orig.)

  4. Corrosion inhibition of mild steel by Capsicum annuum fruit paste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan M. Reddy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The anti-corrosive property of Capsicum annuum fruit paste (CFP on mild steel was investigated. Weight loss and SEM analysis showed that the aqueous and ethanolic solutions of CFP exhibits excellent corrosion inhibition in 2 M HCl. Contact angle, surface atomic composition and FTIR studies verified the presence of an organic film on the mild steel surface. The FTIR spectra also indicated the formation of active compound-Fe complex. CFP thus shows potential as an inexpensive environment friendly corrosion inhibitor for mild steel.

  5. CORROSION RATE OF STEELS DX51D AND S220GD IN DIFFERENT CORROSION ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Crina CIUBOTARIU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion in the marine environment is an important issue because the costs causes by marine corrosion increased year upon year. It is necessary a correctly approach to materials selection, protection and corrosion control to reduce this burden of wasted materials, wasted energy and wasted money. Many different types of corrosion attack can be observed to structures, ships and other equipment used in sea water service. Shipping containers are exposed to various corrosive mediums like as airborne salt, industrial pollutants, rain and saltwater. Transport damage during loading onto and unloading off trucks, train beds and ships breaches the paint coating which further contributes to corrosion. The result is shortened container life and high costs for container repair or replacement. The paper intends to evaluate, by gravimetric method, the corrosion rate and corrosion penetration rate of two types of carbon steel DX51D and S220GD. Carbon steel DX51D and hot-dip galvanized steel S220GD are used in marine and industrial applications for buildings cargo vessels, container ships and oil tankers. For testing it was used different corrosive environments: 5% NaOH solution; 5% HCL solution and 0.5M NaCl solution. The samples were immersed in 400mL of testing solution for exposure period of 28 days. Periodically at 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days and 28 days was measured de mass loss and evaluate the corrosion rate and corrosion stability coefficient. The steel DX51D was stable in 5% NaOH solution for 28 days, the values of corrosion stability coefficient was 7 after 3 days and 6 after 28 days of immersion in corrosive medium. In 5% HCL solution steels DX51D and S220GD was completely corroded in 21 days with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 9 for 7 days and 8 for 21 days of immersion in corrosive solution. It was observed a good resistance for 3 days in 0.5M NaCl solution with a corrosion stability coefficient equal with 5, but after that

  6. Study of the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steels during Conversion of Waste to Biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, Marina; Lorenzi, Sergio; Pastore, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Simone; Burattini, Mauro; Miglio, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with the corrosion behavior of stainless steels as candidate materials for biofuel production plants by liquefaction process of the sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Corrosion tests were carried out on AISI 316L and AISI 304L stainless steels at 250 °C in a batch reactor during conversion of raw material to bio-oil (biofuel precursor), by exposing specimens either to water/oil phase or humid gas phase. General corrosion rate was measured by weight loss tests. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was evaluated by means of U-bend specimens and slow stress rate tests at 10−6 or 10−5 s−1 strain rate. After tests, scanning electron microscope analysis was carried out to detect cracks and localized attacks. The results are discussed in relation with exposure conditions. They show very low corrosion rates strictly dependent upon time and temperature. No stress corrosion cracking was observed on U-bend specimens, under constant loading. Small cracks confined in the necking cone of specimens prove that stress corrosion cracking only occurred during slow strain rate tests at stresses exceeding the yield strength. PMID:28772682

  7. Study of the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steels during Conversion of Waste to Biofuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, Marina; Lorenzi, Sergio; Pastore, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Simone; Burattini, Mauro; Miglio, Roberta

    2017-03-22

    The paper deals with the corrosion behavior of stainless steels as candidate materials for biofuel production plants by liquefaction process of the sorted organic fraction of municipal solid waste. Corrosion tests were carried out on AISI 316L and AISI 304L stainless steels at 250 °C in a batch reactor during conversion of raw material to bio-oil (biofuel precursor), by exposing specimens either to water/oil phase or humid gas phase. General corrosion rate was measured by weight loss tests. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was evaluated by means of U-bend specimens and slow stress rate tests at 10 -6 or 10 -5 s -1 strain rate. After tests, scanning electron microscope analysis was carried out to detect cracks and localized attacks. The results are discussed in relation with exposure conditions. They show very low corrosion rates strictly dependent upon time and temperature. No stress corrosion cracking was observed on U-bend specimens, under constant loading. Small cracks confined in the necking cone of specimens prove that stress corrosion cracking only occurred during slow strain rate tests at stresses exceeding the yield strength.

  8. Corrosion of construction steel in pore simulated solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes, Matias; Vasquez, Marcela

    2004-01-01

    The corrosion of steel for reinforcing reinforced cement structures is a common problem particularly in structures that are exposed to a marine environment. Loosened masonry originating by the diametrical stress that iron oxides place on the cement is not unusual. These situations involve risk to people and goods and make it necessary to repair the structure to prolong its useful service life. Some preliminary results are presented from the reproduction of the corrosive process with the use of a solution that simulates the chemical surroundings in the concrete pores. These results will help to evaluate the incidence of contaminants (CO 2 , chloride ions), inhibitors and coatings, among others, in the following stages by conveniently adjusting the solution's composition. The composition of the chosen solution is: 0.01 mol NaOH - 0.002 mol/l Ca(OH) 2 . The effect was evaluated of a passive film generated on the surface of the steel of the reinforcements at 100 mV for 14 minutes and for 12 hours. This potential corresponds to the passive region, as determined by recording tests with cyclic volt amperometry and in accordance with the Pourbaix diagram for steel. The corrosion current was defined by recording the resistance to polarization using different electrochemical methods: potential sweep, potentiostatic jump and sweep electrochemical impedance. The results show that neither of the two times selected are enough to generate the metal's passive state and that the potential of 100 mV used to generate the passive film may be too low to produce a compact and long lasting layer, considering that the passive zone interval comes to 700 mV, according to the volt amperometry readings (CW)

  9. Corrosion Behavior of Aqua-Blasted and Laser-Engraved Type 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, B.; Cook, P.; Hobbs, J.; Engelberg, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of aqua blasting and laser engraving on surface microstructure development, residual stress and corrosion resistance of type 316L stainless steel has been investigated. Aqua blasting resulted in a deformed near-surface microstructure containing compressive residual stresses. Subsequent laser engraving produced a surface layer with tensile residual stresses reaching to a depth of 200 microns. Changes of surface roughness topography were accompanied by the development of a thick oxide/hydroxide film after laser engraving. The atmospheric corrosion behavior of all surfaces with MgCl2-laden droplets was compared to their electrochemical response in 1M NaCl and 0.7 M HCl aqueous solutions. The measured total volume loss after atmospheric corrosion testing was similar for all investigated surface conditions. Laser-engraved surface exhibited the smallest number of corrosion sites, but the largest mean corrosion depth.

  10. The method for measuring residual stress in stainless steel pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimov, Georgy; Rozenbaum, Mikhail; Serebryakov, Alexandr; Serebryakov, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The main reason of appearance and growth of corrosion damages of the nuclear steam generator heat exchanger tubes is the process of stress-corrosion cracking of metal under the influence of residual tensile stress. Methods used in the production for estimating residual stresses (such as a method of ring samples) allow measuring only the average tangential stress of the pipe wall. The method of ring samples does not allow to assess the level of residual stress in the surface layer of the pipe. This paper describes an experimental method for measuring the residual stresses on the pipe surface by etching a thin surface layer of the metal. The construction and working principle of a trial installation are described. The residual stresses in the wall of the tubes 16 × 1.5 mm (steel AISI 321) for nuclear steam generators is calculated. Keywords: heat exchange pipes, stress corrosion cracking, residual stresses, stress distribution, stress measurement.

  11. The effect of organic matter associated with the corrosion products on the corrosion of mild steel in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Wagh, A.B.

    The corrosion of mild steel immersed at various depths (0-100 m) from three stations of the Arabian Sea was investigated. The corrosion of mild steel decreased with increasing immersion depth. Significant positive relationships were observed between...

  12. Prediction of external corrosion for steel cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, B.F.

    1997-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently manages the UF 6 Cylinder Program (the program). The program was formed to address the depleted-uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) stored in approximately 50,000 carbon steel cylinders. The cylinders are located at three DOE sites: the K-25 site (K-25) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) in Portsmouth, Ohio. The System Requirements Document (SRD) (LMES 1996a) delineates the requirements of the program. The appropriate actions needed to fulfill these requirements are then specified within the System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP) (LMES 1996b). The report presented herein documents activities that in whole or in part satisfy specific requirements and actions stated in the UF 6 Cylinder Program SRD and SEMP with respect to forecasting cylinder conditions. The wall thickness projections made in this report are based on the assumption that the corrosion trends noted will continue. Some activities planned may substantially reduce the rate of corrosion, in which case the results presented here are conservative. The results presented here are intended to supersede those presented previously, as the quality of several of the datasets has improved

  13. Effect of Carbon Steel Composition and Microstructure on CO2 Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeer, Emad S.

    The environmental conditions encountered in oil and gas wells and pipelines can cause severe localized corrosion to mild steel. The utility of carbon steel in oil and gas pipelines depends on formation of protective corrosion product layers. However, the microstructure and chemical composition of steel are considered to be important variables that affect the ability of these layers to protect steel from corrosion. The present study investigated the effect of alloying elements and metallurgy of five different pipeline steels, with different chemical composition and microstructure, on CO2 corrosion in flowing conditions with focus on the iron carbonate layer formed and related corrosion phenomena that could lead to localized corrosion. The microstructure of tested steels was examined using optical microscopy and etching. Preliminary experiments were conducted using a glass cell, which is a very well known and widely used apparatus. Then a comparison was done with the newly developed thin channel flow cell (TCFC) to validate whether the TCFC can be used instead of glass cell in this study, which required very high velocity and wall shear stresses. It was found that there are no significant effects of alloying elements and steel microstructure on corrosion rate in experiments done at pH 4.0 at 25°C and 80°C. Further experiments were then conducted in the TCFC to study the effect of alloying elements and microstructure under conditions where a protective FeCO3 4 corrosion product layer forms, using very high liquid flow rates. For each of the studied steels, an FeCO3 corrosion product layer was formed within two days of exposure at low wall shear stress at 80°C, pH 6.6, and partial pressure of CO2 of 1.5 bar (1.5 bar pCO 2). For all tested steels, the FeCO3 layer reduced the general corrosion rate to less than 1.0 mm/y. These "pre-formed" FeCO3 layers were then exposed to high liquid flow velocity and wall shear stress (535 Pa) for 3 days. This caused partial loss of

  14. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion. PMID:24558346

  15. Monitoring corrosion of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Bhadauria, Sudhir Singh; Akhtar, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC) structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP) method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  16. Corrosion of Steel in Concrete – Thermodynamical Aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küter, Andre; Møller, Per; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2004-01-01

    The present understanding of selected corrosion phenomena in reinforced concrete is reviewed. Special emphasis is given to chloride induced corrosion. There is a general acceptance of the basic corrosion mechanism for steel in concrete. However different anodic reactions governing the subsequent...... formation and composition of corrosion products have been proposed. Suggested reactions, except half-cell reactions, are verified or rejected based on their Gibbs free energy, while the electrode potential is calculated for half-cell reactions. Corrosion products postulated to form are related...

  17. Monitoring Corrosion of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of steel bars embedded in reinforced concrete (RC structures reduces the service life and durability of structures causing early failure of structure, which costs significantly for inspection and maintenance of deteriorating structures. Hence, monitoring of reinforcement corrosion is of significant importance for preventing premature failure of structures. This paper attempts to present the importance of monitoring reinforcement corrosion and describes the different methods for evaluating the corrosion state of RC structures, especially hal-cell potential (HCP method. This paper also presents few techniques to protect concrete from corrosion.

  18. Corrosion of a carbon steel covered by treated bentonites in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results prove that tungstate reduces iron and chlorides ions transport through the clay. This deduction is supported also by microscopic observations. Keywords: Corrosion inhibitor, Carbon steel, Electrochemical Impedances Spectroscopy; Algerian bentonites; Tungstate ...

  19. An Evaluation of Carbon Steel Corrosion Under Stagnant Seawater Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Jason

    2004-01-01

    Corrosion, of 1020 carbon steel coupons in, natural seawater over a six-month period was more aggressive under stagnant anaerobic conditions than stagnant aerobic conditions as measured by weight loss...

  20. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  1. Super-Hydrophobic Green Corrosion Inhibitor On Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.; Soon, C. F.

    2017-06-01

    There are many examples of organic coatings used for corrosion protection. In particular, hydrophobic and super-hydrophobic coatings are shown to give good protection because of their enhanced ability to slow down transport of water and ions through the coating. The purpose of this research is to develop water repellent coating to avoid direct contact between metal and environment corrosive and mitigate corrosion attack at pipeline system. This water repellent characteristic on super-hydrophobic coating was coated by electrodeposition method. Wettability of carbon steel with super-hydrophobic coating (cerium chloride and myristic acid) and oxidized surface was investigated through contact angle and inhibitor performance test. The inhibitor performance was studied in 25% tannin acid corrosion test at 30°C and 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl). The water contact angle test was determined by placing a 4-μL water droplet of distilled water. It shows that the wettability of contact angle super-hydrophobic with an angle of 151.60° at zero minute can be classified as super-hydrophobic characteristic. By added tannin acid as inhibitor the corrosion protection on carbon steel becomes more consistent. This reveals that the ability of the coating to withstand with the corrosion attack in the seawater at different period of immersions. The results elucidate that the weight loss increased as the time of exposure increased. However, the corrosion rates for uncoated carbon steel is high compared to coated carbon steel. As a conclusion, from both samples it can be seen that the coated carbon steel has less corrosion rated compared to uncoated carbon steel and addition of inhibitor to the seawater provides more protection to resist corrosion attack on carbon steel.

  2. Local corrosion of high alloy steels under biodeposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovyakova, M.D.; Nikitin, V.M.; Speshneva, N.V.

    1999-01-01

    Impact of the bacteriozenosis different structural-functional state under biodeposits on corrosion resistance of the 12Kh18N10T and Kh18N10T high-alloy steels in the natural seawater is studied. It is shown that saturation of natural micro communities by separate aerobic and facultative-anaerobic bacterial monocultures increases corrosion resistance of these steels by their overgrow with biodeposits [ru

  3. Weathering steel: Five-year atmospheric corrosion performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pianca, F.

    1994-01-01

    In 1984, a research study was initiated to quantify the corrosion rates of weathering steel coupons. This report presents the results of long-term outdoor corrosion tests performed on A588 weathering steel in a variety of environments representative of those in which bridges are situated. Data were obtained over five years from approximately 50 coupons exposed at five separate sites in southern Ontario. The data are compared to findings from other jurisdictions.

  4. Corrosion Inhibition of High Speed Steel by Biopolymer HPMC Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chen Shi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion inhibition characteristics of the derivatives of biopolymer hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP, and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS film are investigated. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, the corrosion inhibition performance of high speed steel coated with HPMC derivatives is evaluated. The Nyquist plot and Tafel polarization demonstrate promising anti-corrosion performance of HPMC and HPMCP. With increasing film thickness, both materials reveal improvement in corrosion inhibition. Moreover, because of a hydrophobic surface and lower moisture content, HPMCP shows better anti-corrosion performance than HPMCAS. The study is of certain importance for designing green corrosion inhibitors of high speed steel surfaces by the use of biopolymer derivatives.

  5. Improvement of corrosion resistance in austenitic stainless steel by grain boundary character distribution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun; Kaneda, Junya; Kasahara, Shigeki; Shigenaka, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Strauss test, Coriou test and Huey test were conducted on a Type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Improvement in grain boundary corrosion resistance was verified after raising low Σ coincidence site lattice (CSL) grain boundary (GB) frequency by controlling grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). During crevice corrosion test under gamma-ray irradiation, initiation frequency of GB corrosion after GBCD controlled specimens decreased to 1/10 of GBCD uncontrolled counterpart along with lower depth of corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation rate of GBCD controlled specimen decreased to less than 1/2 of GBCD uncontrolled specimen in high temperature and high pressure water. Based on these results, we expect that GBCD control will improve corrosion resistance of austenitic material in a wide range of application and environment. (author)

  6. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect......Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...

  7. Corrosion of Ultrasonic spot Welded Joints of Magnesium to Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tsung-Yu; Santella, Michael L.

    Mixed-metal joining, especially between magnesium and steel, is one of the critical technologies in achieving light-weighting vehicle body construction. However, galvanic corrosion between mixed metal joints is inevitable but not well quantified. In this study, 1.6 mm thick Mg AZ31B-H24 was joined to 0.8 mm thick hot-dipped galvanized (HDG) mild steel by ultrasonic spot welding in lap-shear configuration. No specific corrosion protection was applied in order to study worst-case conditions for corrosion behavior. The approach used an automotive cyclic corrosion test — Ford Arizona Proving Ground Equivalent Corrosion Cycle (APGE), which includes cycles of dipping in a salt bath, air drying, then holding in constant humidity environment. Lap-shear strength of the joints decreased linearly with the exposure cycles. All the joints were either taken out of test cycle for mechanical test or they separated within the humidity chamber before 25th cycle. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formation of Mg(OH)2 deposit in the crevice between the AZ31 and steel sheets and on the surface of the AZ31. The deposit grew thicker with cycles with exerting enough force to deform the AZ31 and HDG steel and causing a gradual opening of joints. The corrosion of the AZ31 was localized and nonuniform. The most severe corrosion occurred not at the intersection of AZ31 and the steel but rather 15-20 mm away from the spot welds.

  8. Corrosion Protection of Steels by Conducting Polymer Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Ohtsuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion protection of steels by conducting polymer coating is reviewed. The conducting polymer such as polyaniline, polypyrrole, and polythiophen works as a strong oxidant to the steel, inducing the potential shift to the noble direction. The strongly oxidative conducting polymer facilitates the steel to be passivated. A bilayered PPy film was designed for the effective corrosion protection. It consisted of the inner layer in which phosphomolybdate ion, PMo12O3−40 (PMo, was doped and the outer layer in which dodecylsulfate ion (DoS was doped. The inner layer stabilized the passive oxide and the outer possessed anionic perm-selectivity to inhibit the aggressive anions such as chloride from penetrating through the PPy film to the substrate steel. By the bilayered PPy film, the steel was kept passive for about 200 h in 3.5% sodium chloride solution without formation of corrosion products.

  9. Inhibitor for the Corrosion of Mild Steel in H SO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    KEYWORDS. Terminalia chebula, acid corrosion inhibitor, electrochemical polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, mild steel. 1. Introduction. Large amounts of sulphuric acid are used in the chemical in- dustry for the removal of undesired scale and rust. The addition of corrosion inhibitors effectively protects ...

  10. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    called steel strip laminated Glass Re-inforced Epoxy. (SSL-GRE) pipeline materials with acceptably higher strength and rigidity (tensile strength =31MPa). These new materials appear to be very corrosion resistant but their performance has not yet been fully explored. Until these new corrosion resistant structural materials ...

  11. Pitting corrosion protection of low nickel stainless steel by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    corrosive medium. The low value of Rct for uncoated speci- men is due to the easy penetration of the corrosive chloride ions through stainless steel surface. The double layer capacitance (Cdl) of PoPD decreases to a lower value than that of PANi and uncoated specimen, indi- cating the thickening of the PoPD polymer film.

  12. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seabed sediment (SBS) is a special soil that is covered by seawater. With the developments in marine oil exploitation and engineering, more and more steel structures have been buried in SBS. SBS corrosion has now become a serious problem in marine environment and an important issue in corrosion science. In this ...

  13. Effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Buried Steel Pipeline Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spark, Amy J; Law, David W; Ward, Liam P; Cole, Ivan S; Best, Adam S

    2017-08-01

    Buried steel infrastructure can be a source of iron ions for bacterial species, leading to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Localized corrosion of pipelines due to MIC is one of the key failure mechanisms of buried steel pipelines. In order to better understand the mechanisms of localized corrosion in soil, semisolid agar has been developed as an analogue for soil. Here, Pseudomonas fluorescens has been introduced to the system to understand how bacteria interact with steel. Through electrochemical testing including open circuit potentials, potentiodynamic scans, anodic potential holds, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy it has been shown that P. fluorescens increases the rate of corrosion. Time for oxide and biofilms to develop was shown to not impact on the rate of corrosion but did alter the consistency of biofilm present and the viability of P. fluorescens following electrochemical testing. The proposed mechanism for increased corrosion rates of carbon steel involves the interactions of pyoverdine with the steel, preventing the formation of a cohesive passive layer, after initial cell attachment, followed by the formation of a metal concentration gradient on the steel surface.

  14. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  15. Corrosion of Carbon Steel and Corrosion-Resistant Rebars in Concrete Structures Under Chloride Ion Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nedal; Boulfiza, Mohamed; Evitts, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Corrosion of reinforced concrete is the most challenging durability problem that threatens reinforced concrete structures, especially structures that are subject to severe environmental conditions (i.e., highway bridges, marine structures, etc.). Corrosion of reinforcing steel leads to cracking and spalling of the concrete cover and billions of dollars are spent every year on repairing such damaged structures. New types of reinforcements have been developed to avoid these high-cost repairs. Thus, it is important to study the corrosion behavior of these new types of reinforcements and compare them to the traditional carbon steel reinforcements. This study aimed at characterizing the corrosion behavior of three competing reinforcing steels; conventional carbon steel, micro-composite steel (MMFX-2) and 316LN stainless steel, through experiments in carbonated and non-carbonated concrete exposed to chloride-laden environments. Synthetic pore water solutions have been used to simulate both cases of sound and carbonated concrete under chloride ions attack. A three-electrode corrosion cell is used for determining the corrosion characteristics and rates. Multiple electrochemical techniques were applied using a Gamry PC4™ potentiostat manufactured by Gamry Instruments (Warminster, PA). DC corrosion measurements were applied on samples subjected to fixed chloride concentration in the solution.

  16. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Electrochemical corrosion response of a low carbon heat treated steel in a NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, W.R.; Peixoto, L.C.; Garcia, L.R.; Garcia, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Dual-phase (DP) steels are produced from a specific heat treatment procedure and have recently emerged as a potential class of engineering materials for a number of structural and automobile applications. Such steels have high strength-to-weight ratio and reasonable formability. The present study aims to investigate the effects of four different and conventional heat treatments (i.e., hot rolling, normalizing, annealing, and intercritical annealing) on the resulting microstructural patterns and on the electrochemical corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel plots were carried out on heat treated steel samples in a 0.5 M NaCl solution at 25 C with neutral pH. An equivalent circuit analysis was also used to provide quantitative support for the discussions. The normalizing and the annealing heat treatments have provided the highest and the lowest corrosion resistances, respectively. The intercritical annealing and as-received (hot rolled) low carbon steel samples have shown similar corrosion behavior. Although a deleterious effect on the corrosion resistance has been verified for DP steel due to the residual stress from the martensite formation, it combines good mechanical properties with intermediate electrochemical corrosion resistance. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Corrosion performance of mechanically fastened aluminum/steel joints: Influence of fastener type and aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunkel, R.W.; Moran, J.P. [Aluminum Co. of America, Alcoa Center, PA (United States). Alcoa Technical Center

    1995-11-01

    This paper discusses the corrosion test results for aluminum to steel lap-shear joints fabricated from three aluminum alloys using four different mechanical fasteners. The evaluations included exposure to alternate immersion (AI) and 100% relative humidity (RH) corrosion tests after phosphating and applying a 25 {micro}m E-Coat (i.e., electrolytic coating) to the completed assembly. Lap-shear test results showed that specimens fabricated using self-piercing rivets and solid rivets exhibited strengthening after 30--60 days exposure to AI or RH testing, which was subsequently followed by a decrease in tensile strength as aluminum base metal deterioration began to control the mechanical properties. Metallographic examination suggested the strengthening effect resulted from corrosion product buildup which produced compressive stresses on the joint members. The data indicated that stainless steel fasteners do not limit the corrosion performance of mechanically fastened aluminum to steel joints fabricated from bare sheets which are primed after assembly. The data also indicated that utilization of sealants in mechanically fastened aluminum/steel joints significantly improve corrosion performance of aluminum/steel joints.

  19. Mechanistic studies of carbon steel corrosion inhibition by cashew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The phenoxide, R-Ar-O- ions from the CNSL inhibitor were found to be responsible for the reduction of the corrosion rate of the carbon steel. Also, it was observed that the surface charge of the carbon steel electrodes was positive with respect to the solutions containing CNSL inhibitor. It is likely that the mechanism of the ...

  20. Anticorrosion potential of hydralazine for corrosion of mild steel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anticorrosion potential of mild steel by Hydralazine as corrosion inhibitor for mild steel in 1M hydrochloric acid was investigated by chemical and electrochemical measurements at 303-333 K temperature. The maximum inhibition efficiency of inhibitor by Weight loss method is around 90%, Tafel polarization method is ...

  1. Atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel resulting from short term exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Cook, D.C.; Perez, T.; Reyes, J.

    1998-01-01

    The study of corrosion products from short term atmospheric exposures of carbon steel, is very important to understand the processes that lead to corrosion of steels, and ultimately improve the performance of such steel in highly corrosive environments. Many regions along the Gulf of Mexico have extremely corrosive environments due to high mean annual temperature, humidity, time-of-wetness and every high atmospheric pollutants. The process the formation of corrosion products resulting from short term exposure of carbon steel, both as a function of environmental conditions and exposure time, has been investigated. Two sets of coupons were exposed at marine and marine locations, in Campeche, Mexico. Each set was exposed between 1 and 12 months to study the corrosion as a function of time. During the exposure periods, the relative humidity, rainfall, mean temperature, wind speed and wind direction were monitored along with the chloride and sulfur dioxide concentrations in the air. The corroded coupons were analyzed by Moessbauer, Raman, Infrared spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction in order to completely identify the oxides and map their location in the corrosion coating. Scattering and transmission Moessbauer analysis showed some layering of the oxides with lepidocrocite and akaganeite closer to the surface. The fraction of akaganeite phase increased at sites with higher chloride concentrations. A detailed analysis on the development of the oxide phases as a function of exposure time and environmental conditions will be presented. (Author)

  2. Electrochemical and crystallographic aspects of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in concentrated hot soda solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarini, G.; Boos, J.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Some electrochemical and crystallographic aspects of stainless steel corrosion in concentrated hot soda are presented. Caustic cracking appears when the metallic surface presents an active behavior as immerged; the initial activity induces a selective dissolution of iron and chromium, and appearance of a pure nickel layer, which, by galvanic coupling, displaces the underlying surface potential towards a pseudo-passivity area; pseudo-passivity is due to the formation of a mixed oxide of the NaMO 2 type, which requires a revision of the thermodynamics bases of the alkaline corrosion interpretations. The crystallographic aspects of the mixed oxide growth enables a better understanding of the stress corrosion mechanisms [fr

  3. Electrochemical evaluation of crevice corrosion in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flyg, J.; Jargelius-Pettersson, R.F.A.

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical method for the evaluation of crevice corrosion in stainless steels is described. Specimens are carefully abraded in order to give a large number of microcrevices when the specimen is placed in contact with a rubber o-ring. Twelve specimens are tested simultaneously in a purpose-built electrochemical cell. A constant potential is applied to the specimens and the temperature automatically raised at intervals until a current increase indicates the onset of crevice corrosion and thereby defines the critical crevice corrosion temperature (CCT). Testing has been performed on a wide range of stainless steels in 3.5% NaCl at +700 mV SCE. The temperature was raised by 5 C every 70 minutes. Results show good reproducibility with a typical standard deviation of below 5 C. There is also excellent agreement with the ranking of crevice corrosion resistance for different steel grades which is obtained by immersion testing in 6% FeCl 3 solution. (orig.)

  4. Influence of inclusions on the local corrosion in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grall, L.; Mahieu, C.

    1978-01-01

    A synthesis of the work relating to the influence of inclusions on the pitting corrosion of steels, shows that pitting mainly occurs preferentially at precipitate levels, particularly sulfur precipitates. However oxidized inclusions can also cause this condition which is found on austenitic steels as well as on slightly alloyed or non alloyed steels. The method of refining as well as the morphology of inclusions can also play a part in this [fr

  5. PITTING CORROSION OF STAINLESS STEEL AT THE VARIOUS SURFACE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Zatkalíková

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The stainless steel surface treatment is very important with regard to its pitting corrosion susceptibility. An effect of various types surfacing on pitting corrosion resistance of AISI 304stainless steel is investigated in this work. The samples of the tested material are turned, blasted, peened, grinded and a half of them are pickled to achieve higher purity of surfaces and better quality of passive film. Eight types of different finished surfaces are tested by electrochemical and immersion tests to determine corrosion behaviour in conditions where pitting is evoked by controlled potential and second by solution with high redox potential. By this way the effect of mechanical and chemical surface treatment on the resistance to pitting corrosion, character, size and shape of pits are compared in the conditions of different mechanisms of corrosion process.

  6. Corrosion of carbon steel nuclear waste containers in marine sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, G.P.; Taylor, K.J.; Harker, A.H.

    1987-08-01

    The report describes a study of the corrosion of carbon steel nuclear waste containers in deep ocean sediments, which had the objective of estimating the metal allowance needed to ensure that the containers were not breached by corrosion for 1000 years. It was concluded that under such disposal conditions carbon steel would not be subject to localised corrosion or hydrogen embrittlement, and therefore the study concentrated on evaluating the rate of general attack. This was carried out by developing a mechanistically based mathematical model which was formulated on the conservative assumption that the corrosion would be under activation control, and would not be impeded by the formation of corrosion product layers. This model predicted that an allowance of 33 mm would be required for a 1000 year life. (author)

  7. Corrosion in lithium-stainless steel thermal-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Selle, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion of types 304L and 316 austenitic stainless steel by flowing lithium was studied in thermal-convection loops operated at 500 to 650 0 C. Both weight and compositional changes were measured on specimens distributed throughout each loop and were combined with metallographic examinations to evaluate the corrosion processes. The corrosion rate and mass transfer characteristics did not significantly differ between the two austenitic stainless steels. Addition of 500 or 1700 wt ppM N to purified lithium did not increase the dissolution rate or change the attack mode of type 316 stainless steel. Adding 5 wt % Al to the lithium reduced the weight loss of this steel by a factor of 5 relative to a pure lithium-thermal-convection loop

  8. Corrosion Resistance of Some Stainless Steels in Chloride Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprzyk D.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work compares corrosion behaviour of four types of S30403, S31603, S32615 austenitic and S32404 austenitic-ferritic stainless steels in chloride solutions (1%, 3% NaCl and in Ringer solution, at 37°C temperature. Corrosion resistance was determined by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and a thirty day immersion test conducted in Ringer solution. The immersion test was performed in term of biomedical application. These alloy were spontaneously passivated in all electrolytes, wherein S30403, S31603 and S32404 undergo pitting corrosion. Only S32615 containing 5.5% Si shows resistance to pitting corrosion.

  9. Effect of segregation bands on corrosion of steel plate for ship hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in the manufacturing of sheet metal ships carried both by optimizing the chemical compositions of steel mills as well as rolling and heat treatment, it still fails to remove the effects of persistent segregation. As a result we observed anisotropy of mechanical properties of the material which essentially complicates the process of construction for shipbuilding industry. Anisotropy of mechanical properties occurring in sheet metal hull is even more dangerous, that during their work, they are exposed to continuous exposure variable charges arising from sea surface waves. Another factor weakening the resistance to cracking metal ship is sea-water, which in the surface layer is highly aerated and very aggressive corrosion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of the segregation bands in the process of corrosion of low alloy steels used for ship hull. It was estimate a rate of corrosion in aerated sea water areas of the metal with or without segregation bands. After corrosion tests were made observations of specimens surfaces. Inside the segregation bands were found phosphorus. The contents of it were exceeded the average this element content in the steel. At the same time areas of the sheet metal with segregation bands were slowly corroded than areas without bands, although the changes of corrosion rate was similar in nature.Corrosion activity of rich in phosphorus segregation band is similar to phosphate corrosion inhibitors. These are effective in the presenceof chloride in seawater to form a protective layer that protects against corrosion segregation band. Under the observation on scanningelectron microscope there was no change in the appearance of surface samples after corrosion tests. A future direction of research will be estimate the stress corrosion in the same species – with and without segregation bands.

  10. A study on the behaviour of stress-corrosion crack initiation and propagation of type 304 stainless steel in aqueous 35wt% MgCl2 solution by electrical potential method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Kyo; Pyun, Su Il; Rhee, Woo Bong

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of stress corrosion(SC) crack initiation and propagation of Type 304 stainless steel in 35 wt% MgCl 2 has been studied as a function of temperature and applied stress at the applied electrochemical potential of -106mV SHE by using electrical potential method. In the present study, the electrical potential method allows to differentiate the incubation period from the propagation period for SC crack. The optical microscopy revealed that the pit is a primary source of SC crack initiation under the applied stress lower than yield strength. SC crack initiation stage is composed of three steps; 1) pit initiation, 2) pit growth to critical size, and 3) crack propagation in the lateral and the through-thickness directions. The portion of anodic dissolution trenches to pits as sites of SC crack initiation increased with applied stress higher than yield strength. The activation energy of the electrochemical reaction contribution to the SC crack initiation and the energy of the stress contribution to the SC crack initiation under 212MPa are evaluated to be 30.5 kJ/mol and 14.0 kJ/mol, respectively. The fractography of SC crack propagation showed the transition of fracture mode from fully transgranular mode to the mixed zone with intergranular mode in the interior of the specimen. The intergranular portion is nearly independent of temperature, however it increases with the applied stress. (Author)

  11. Corrosion of steel tanks in liquid nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, Ricardo M.; Giordano, Celia M.; Saenz, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand how solution chemistry would impact on the corrosion of waste storage steel tanks at the Hanford Site. Future tank waste operations are expected to process wastes that are more dilute with respect to some current corrosion inhibiting waste constituents. Assessment of corrosion damage and of the influence of exposure time and electrolyte composition, using simulated (non-radioactive) wastes, of the double-shell tank wall carbon steel alloys is being conducted in a statistically designed long-term immersion experiment. Corrosion rates at different times of immersion were determined using both weight-loss determinations and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Localized corrosion susceptibility was assessed using short-term cyclic potentiodynamic polarization curves. The results presented in this paper correspond to electrochemical and weight-loss measurements of the immersed coupons during the first year of immersion from a two year immersion plan. A good correlation was obtained between electrochemical measurements, weight-loss determinations and visual observations. Very low general corrosion rates ( -1 ) were estimated using EIS measurements, indicating that general corrosion rate of the steel in contact with liquid wastes would no be a cause of tank failure even for these out-of-chemistry limit wastes. (author) [es

  12. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. II : Properties of Steel Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Ye, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface (using as-received low carbon construction steel) in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP).

  13. Corrosion of mild steel, copper and brass in crude oil / seawater mixture

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi, S.; Sawant, S.S.; Wagh, A.B.

    Mild steel, copper and brass coupons were introduced in natural seawater containing varying amount of crude oil. Mild steel showed higher rate of corrosion in seawater containing oil and lower corrosion rate in natural as well as artificial seawater...

  14. Coated steel rebar for enhanced concrete-steel bond strength and corrosion resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This report summarizes the findings and recommendations on the use of enamel coating in reinforced concrete structures both for bond strength and : corrosion resistance of steel rebar. Extensive laboratory tests were conducted to characterize the pro...

  15. Corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goel, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on alloy corrosion cracking. Topics considered at the conference included the effect of niobium addition on intergranular stress corrosion cracking, corrosion-fatigue cracking in fossil-fueled-boilers, fracture toughness, fracture modes, hydrogen-induced thresholds, electrochemical and hydrogen permeation studies, the effect of seawater on fatigue crack propagation of wells for offshore structures, the corrosion fatigue of carbon steels in seawater, and stress corrosion cracking and the mechanical strength of alloy 600

  16. Study of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of type 304 austenitic stainless steel in aqueous solution of MgCl2 at 1250C using the slow - strain - rate technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heck, N.C.

    1981-01-01

    A study has been made of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of type 304 austenitic stainless steel mainly in aqueous solution of MgCl 2 at 125 0 C using the slow strain-rate technique. A system is built up of a tensile test machine and the peripheric equipment. The efficacy of this system has been tested by running experiments for determination of critical potentials in MgCl 2 with or without aditions of NaNO 3 . Critical potentials are found to be between -145 and -160 mV sub(H) for pure MgCl 2 and between -90 and -100 mV sub(H) for MgCl 2 plus 2,5% NaNO 3 . Comparing these results with others of constant load tests, good agreement is found. (Author) [pt

  17. Corrosion of carbon steel in oxidizing caustic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A series of tests have been completed on a range of proposed waste compositions at temperatures up to 100 0 C. These tests have sought data on uniform corrosion, pitting, and stress corrosion cracking. No indication of the latter two types of corrosion was observed within the test matrix. Corrosion rates after four months were generally below 25μm/y. By the end of twelve months all results, except for very concentrated mixtures, were below 13 μm/y. Prediction equations were generated from a model fitted to the data. The equations provide a rapid means of estimating the corrosion rate for waste compositions and temperatures within the test limits

  18. Corrosion resistance of martensitic stainless steels in moderately sour oilfield environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barteri, M.; Cristofaro, N. De; Scoppio, L. [Centro Sviluppo Materiali S.p.A., Roma (Italy); Cumino, G.; Pina, G.D. [Dalmine Tubi Industriali S.r.l. (Italy)

    1995-10-01

    Martensitic and duplex steels are increasingly used in the gas and oil industries when high CO{sub 2} (sweet) environments are encountered. Nevertheless, very often the field conditions make duplex too expensive and traditional 13% Cr steel insufficient due to its poor corrosion resistance. Some new martensitic stainless steel tubing for Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) with improved general and localized corrosion resistance in sweet environments, were developed. Exposure tests in autoclave were carried out in environments typical of the North Sea oil fields containing small amounts of H{sub 2}S to determine sulphide stress cracking (SSC) and localized corrosion resistance. In the tested conditions, the supermartensitic steels 15Cr and 13Cr5Ni2MoN showed no susceptibility to crevice corrosion and was immune to SCC. Supermartensitic steels proved to be an interesting alternative to the traditional CRAs for use in high chloride, high CO{sub 2} gas and oil wells containing H{sub 2}S in very low concentrations.

  19. Initiation and inhibition of pitting corrosion on reinforcing steel under natural corrosion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd El Wanees, S., E-mail: s_wanees@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519 (Egypt); Bahgat Radwan, A. [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha 2713 (Qatar); Alsharif, M.A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk (Saudi Arabia); Abd El Haleem, S.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig 44519 (Egypt)

    2017-04-01

    Initiation and inhibition of pitting corrosion on reinforcing steel in saturated, naturally aerated Ca(OH){sub 2} solutions, under natural corrosion conditions, are followed through measurements of corrosion current, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and SEM investigation. Induction period for pit initiation and limiting corrosion current for pit propagation are found to depend on aggressive salt anion and cation-types, as well as, concentration. Ammonium chlorides and sulfates are more corrosive than the corresponding sodium salts. Benzotriazole and two of its derivatives are found to be good inhibitors for pitting corrosion of reinforcing steel. Adsorption of these compounds follows a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The thermodynamic functions ΔE{sup ∗}, ΔH{sup ∗} and ΔS{sup ∗} for pitting corrosion processes in the absence and presence of inhibitor are calculated and discussed. - Highlights: • Cl{sup −} and SO{sub 4} {sup 2-} induce pitting corrosion on passive reinforcing steel. • Initiation and propagation of pitting depend on cation and anion types. • Inhibition is based on adsorption according to Langmuir isotherm.

  20. Corrosion Behavior and Durability of Low-Alloy Steel Rebars in Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Yue, Pan; Li, Jun

    2016-11-01

    The corrosion resistance of Cr-modified low-alloy steels and HRB400 carbon steel was estimated using the open-circuit potential, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic, and weight loss methods in simulated concrete pore solution. Results show that Cr-modified steels exhibit a higher corrosion resistance with a higher critical chloride level (CTL), lower corrosion current density, and higher impedance than carbon steel. The CTL of the steels significantly reduces with increasing temperature. Weight loss measurement shows that the Cr-modified steels exhibit low corrosion rates and small corrosion pitting. The primary constituents of the corrosion scales are Fe2O3, Fe3O4, β-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and α-FeOOH. A large amount of α-FeOOH could be detected in the Cr-modified steel corrosion products. Moreover, the Cr-modified steels demonstrate a higher durability than HRB400 carbon steel.

  1. Method of preventing stress corrosion cracks of reactor pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oonaka, Noriyuki; Shoji, Saburo; Kikuchi, Eiji; Tanno, Kazuo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: In a case where, at the time of the transient operation of the reactor, the pH in reactor water and the concentration of oxidants are monitored, and the monitoring signals depart from the reference values or the welding heat affected portions of the pipeline are monitored by a non-destructive detector, and stress corrosion cracks are detected, these portions are protected from corrosion by a cathode current, and the generation and development of cracks are prevented. Method: The concentrations of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide in reactor water are monitored by a sensitized SUS 304 stainless steel electrode and a silver/silver chloride electrode. When monitoring signals depart from the reference values at temperatures with respect to the natural potential of stainless steel, memorized in the control system, a cathod current is caused to flow to the welding heat affected portions thereby to protect the same from corroding. Furthermore, the welding heat affected portions are monitored by the non-destructive detector, and even when stress corrosion cracks have been detected, the welding heat affected portions are prevented from corroding by a cathode current, thereby to prevent the development of stress corrosion cracks of the primary pipeline system. (Sekiya, K.)

  2. Inorganic coatings on stainless steel for protection against crevice corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henrikson, Sture

    1989-12-01

    In order to create protection against crevice corrosion stainless steel test specimens of type 316 steel with various inorganic coatings applied on crevice surfaces were tested for 3-50 months at 25 and 30 degree C in natural seawater containing 0.2-1.5 ppm free chlorine. Various metallic coatings, Ni base alloys with Cr and Mo, Ni with W, pure Ag and pure Mo, as well as ceramic coatings - Cr 2 O 3 , TiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - were studied. All the coatings tested, except pure Molybdenum applied by plasma spraying in a max 0.1 mm thick layer were found to promote crevice corrosion of the stainless steel. A significant reduction of the crevice corrosion susceptibility was obtained with Molybdenum. The result is considered promising enough to justify full scale tests in seawater on flange joints of pipes, valves or pumps. (author)

  3. Corrosion studies of a stainless steel structure for the ITER aqueous lithium salt blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrisley, K.L.; Duquette, D.J.; Steiner, D.; Motyka, E.F.; Coomer, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    The aqueous lithium salt blanket (ALSB) employs water, with a dissolved lithium compound, as both the coolant and tritium breeding medium. The ALSB concept is one of three blanket options currently being examined for breeding tritium in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). To provide data and recommendations for materials and chemistry selection relevant to application of the ALSB in ITER, corrosion studies have been initiated, focusing on type 316 stainless steel in lithium hydroxide and lithium nitrate solutions. This paper presents the preliminary results of these corrosion studies. The results to date, while preliminary, suggest that even at 90degC, a blanket utilizing 10% LiOH (the current lithium salt of choice for ITER ALSB applications) will not cause catastrophic failure of 316 stainless steel by either stress corrosion cracking or localized corrosion; that the general corrosion rate will not exceed about 40 μm/y and transport of material will certainly be much less than this value since most of the corrosion product will be included in the strong adherent surface film; and that, although hydrogen may be evolved due to electrolysis, the maximum amount of hydrogen is small compared to that expected to be produced by radiolysis. These observations are predicated on the assumption that the blanket will be completely deaerated, and that the corrosion potential of the alloy will be similar to that observed in the laboratory. (orig.)

  4. Corrosion of nickel and stainless steels in concentrated lithium hydroxide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graydon, J.W.; Kirk, D.W.

    1990-06-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four alloys in 3 and 5 mol/L lithium hydroxide solutions under a hydrogen atmosphere at 95 degrees C was investigated. Corrosion of Nickel 200 and the stainless steels 316, 316L, and E-Brite 26-1 was assessed in two sets of immersion tests lasting 10 and 136 days. Corrosion rates were determined by weight loss, susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was evaluated using U-bends, and the details of the corrosion process were studied on specimens with a mirror finish using light and electron microscopy, x-ray spectrometry and mapping, and x-ray diffraction. The long term corrosion rates were low for all alloys ( 2 , β-LiFeO 2 , and a very iron-rich β-LiFe 5 0 8 . The passivating layer on the nickel was Ni(OH) 2 . The underlying metal corroded evenly except for the 316 stainless steels. These showed a uniform intergranular corrosion with minor drop-out of smaller grains likely because of segregation of impurities to the grain boundaries. The walls of these intergranular crevices were covered with a passivating layer of chromium oxide. (8 figs., 5 tabs., 11 refs.)

  5. Influence of localized deformation on A-286 austenitic stainless steel stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water; Influence de la localisation de la deformation sur la corrosion sous contrainte de l'acier inoxydable austenitique A-286 en milieu primaire des REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoie, M

    2007-01-15

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is known to be a critical issue for structural components of nuclear reactor cores. The deformation of irradiated austenitic stainless steels is extremely heterogeneous and localized in deformation bands that may play a significant role in IASCC. In this study, an original approach is proposed to determine the influence of localized deformation on austenitic stainless steels SCC in simulated PWR primary water. The approach consists in (i) performing low cycle fatigue tests on austenitic stainless steel A-286 strengthened by {gamma}' precipitates Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al) in order to shear and dissolve the precipitates in intense slip bands, leading to a localization of the deformation within and in (ii) assessing the influence of these {gamma}'-free localized deformation bands on A-286 SCC by means of comparative CERT tests performed on specimens with similar yield strength, containing or not {gamma}'-free localized deformation bands. Results show that strain localization significantly promotes A-286 SCC in simulated PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. Moreover, A-286 is a precipitation-hardening austenitic stainless steel used for applications in light water reactors. The second objective of this work is to gain insights into the influence of heat treatment and metallurgical structure on A-286 SCC susceptibility in PWR primary water. The results obtained demonstrate a strong correlation between yield strength and SCC susceptibility of A-286 in PWR primary water at 320 and 360 C. (author)

  6. 21 CFR 178.3300 - Corrosion inhibitors used for steel or tinplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Corrosion inhibitors used for steel or tinplate... AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3300 Corrosion inhibitors used for steel or tinplate. Corrosion inhibitors may be safely used for steel or tinplate intended for use in, or...

  7. An evaluation method for corrosion fatigue life of steel structure considering mechanical factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huili; Qin, Sifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Steel structures in corrosive environment are often subjected to coupling effect and damage caused by corrosion and fatigue. This paper proposed a new assessment method to study corrosion fatigue life of steel structure, including the effect of cyclic loading and corrosion damage. Based on mechanical factors, the corrosion depth of structure under cyclic loading at different time intervals was defined by a mathematical model for corrosion damage. A finite element model was established to calc...

  8. Intergranular Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel by Aging and UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano-crystal Surface Modification) treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many engineering fields because of their high corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties. However, welding or aging treatment may induce intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, pitting, etc. Since these types of corrosion are closely related to the formation of chromium carbide in grain boundaries, the alloys are controlled using methods such as lowering the carbon content, solution heat treatment, alloying of stabilization elements, and grain boundary engineering. This work focused on the effects of aging and UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano-crystal Surface Modification) on the intergranular corrosion of commercial 316L stainless steel and the results are discussed on the basis of the sensitization by chromium carbide formation and carbon segregation, residual stress, grain refinement, and grain boundary engineering

  9. Corrosion behaviour of some conventional stainless steels in electrolyzing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal NASSAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to increase the amount of hydrogen generated from the water electrolysis process. Some conventional stainless steels (316; 409; 410 and 430 were used as anode and cathode in electrolysis process. Further study was carried out on the corrosion trend in all the investigated metals. It is observed that the electrode material can effect on the amount of hydrogen generate by electrolyzing process and metal composition of the stainless steels effects on the rate of corrosion.

  10. Corrosion of 316L stainless steels MAVL wastes containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helie, M.

    2003-01-01

    The long lived and medium activity wastes are conditioned or could be re-conditioned in primary drums of 316L stainless steels. In the framework of wastes storage, these drums will be placed in concrete containers; each containers would contain one or more drums. This document recalls global information on the corrosion of stainless steels, analyzes specific conditions bond to the drums conditioning in concrete containers and the nature of the wastes, and details the consequences on the possible risks of external and internal corrosion of the drums. (A.L.B.)

  11. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  12. Research on corrosion mechanism of suspension insulator steel foot of direct current system and measures for corrosion inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He; Yang, Yueguang; Su, Guolei; Wang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hourong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fan, Youping

    2017-09-01

    There are increasingly serious electrocorrosion phenomena on insulator hardware caused by direct current transmission due to the wide-range popularization of extra high voltage direct current transmission engineering in our country. Steel foot corrosion is the main corrosion for insulators on positive polarity side of transmission lines. On one hand, the corrosion leads to the tapering off of steel foot diameter, having a direct influence on mechanical property of insulators; on the other hand, in condition of corrosion on steel foot wrapped in porcelain ware, the volume of the corrosion product is at least 50% more than that of the original steel foot, leading to bursting of porcelain ware, threatening safe operation of transmission lines. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct research on the phenomenon and propose feasible measures for corrosion inhibition. Starting with the corrosion mechanism, this article proposes two measures for corrosion inhibition, and verifies the inhibition effect in laboratory conditions, providing reference for application in engineering.

  13. Characterization of Corrosion Products on Carbon Steel Exposed to Natural Weathering and to Accelerated Corrosion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Altobelli Antunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the corrosion products formed on carbon steel plates submitted to atmospheric corrosion in urban and industrial atmospheres with those formed after accelerated corrosion tests. The corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The specimens were exposed to natural weathering in both atmospheres for nine months. The morphologies of the corrosion products were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The main product found was lepidocrocite. Goethite and magnetite were also found on the corroded specimens but in lower concentrations. The results showed that the accelerated test based on the ASTM B117 procedure presented poor correlation with the atmospheric corrosion tests whereas an alternated fog/dry cycle combined with UV radiation exposure provided better correlation.

  14. Corrosion resistance of zinc-magnesium coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosking, N.C.; Stroem, M.A.; Shipway, P.H.; Rudd, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    A significant body of work exists in the literature concerning the corrosion behaviour of zinc-magnesium coated steel (ZMG), describing its enhanced corrosion resistance when compared to conventional zinc-coated steel. This paper begins with a review of the literature and identifies key themes in the reported mechanisms for the attractive properties of this material. This is followed by an experimental programme where ZMG was subjected to an automotive laboratory corrosion test using acidified NaCl solution. A 3-fold increase in time to red rust compared to conventional zinc coatings was measured. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the corrosion products formed. The corrosion products detected on ZMG included simonkolleite (Zn 5 Cl 2 (OH) 8 . H 2 O), possibly modified by magnesium uptake, magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH) 2 ) and a hydroxy carbonate species. It is proposed that the oxygen reduction activity at the (zinc) cathodes is reduced by precipitation of alkali-resistant Mg(OH) 2 , which is gradually converted to more soluble hydroxy carbonates by uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. This lowers the surface pH sufficiently to allow thermodynamically for general precipitation of insoluble simonkolleite over the corroding surface thereby retarding the overall corrosion reactions, leaving only small traces of magnesium corrosion products behind. Such a mechanism is consistent with the experimental findings reported in the literature

  15. Corrosion behavior of Carbon Steels in CCTS Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrini, Marina; Lorenzi, Sergio; Pastore, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental work on the effect of steel microstructures on morphology and protectiveness of the corrosion scale formed in water saturated by supercritical CO2. Two HSLA steels were tested. The microstructures were modified by means of different heat treatments. Weight loss was measured after exposure at CO2 partial pressure of 80 bar and 60°C temperature. The morphology of the scale was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) energy-dispers...

  16. Pitting Corrosion Susceptibility of AISI 301 Stainless Steel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptibility of austenitic (AISI 301) stainless steel to pitting corrosion was evaluated in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions - 0.1M, 0.2M, 0.3M, 0.5M and 0.7M and 1.0M. Tensile tests and microscopic examinations were performed on samples prepared from the steel after exposure in the various environments.

  17. The corrosion of steels by hot sodium melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currie, R.

    1996-01-01

    Considerable research has been performed by AEA Technology on the corrosion of steels by hot sodium melts containing sodium hydroxide and sodium oxide. This research has principally been in support of understanding the effects of sodium-water reactions on the internals of fast reactor steam generators. The results however have relevance to sodium fires. It has been determined that the rate of corrosion of steels by melts of pure NaOH can be significantly increased by the addition of Na 2 O. In the case of a sodium-water reaction jet created by a leak of steam into sodium, the composition of the jet varies from 100% sodium through to 100% steam, with a full range of concentrations of NaOH and Na 2 O, depending on axial and radial position. The temperature in the jet also varies with position, ranging from bulk sodium temperature on one boundary to expanded steam temperature on the other boundary, with internal temperatures ranging up to 1300 deg. C, depending on the local pre-reaction mole ratio of steam to sodium. In the case of sodium-water reaction jets, it has been possible to develop a model which predicts the composition of the reaction jet and then, using the data generated on the corrosivity of sodium melts, predict the rate of corrosion of a steel target in the path of the jet. In the case of a spray sodium fire, the sodium will initially contain a concentration of NaOH and the combustion process will generate Na 2 O. If there is sufficient humidity, conversion of some of the Na 2 O to NaOH will also occur. There is therefore the potential for aggressive mixtures of NaOH and Na 2 O to exist on the surface of the sodium droplets. It is therefore possible that the rate of corrosion of steels in the path of the spray may be higher than expected on the basis of assuming that only Na and Na 2 O were present. In the case of a pool sodium fire, potentially corrosive mixtures of NaOH and Na 2 O may be formed at some locations on the surface. This could lead to

  18. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foct, F.; Dridi, W. [EDF R and D MMC, Site des Renardieres, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Cabrera, J.; Savoye, S. [IRSN/DEI/SARG, bat 76/2, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux Roses (France)

    2004-07-01

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  19. Corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in the Tournemire clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Dridi, W.; Cabrera, J.; Savoye, S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon steels are possible materials for the fabrication of nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal in argillaceous environments. Experimental studies of the corrosion behaviour of such materials has been conducted in various conditions. Concerning the numerous laboratory experiments, these conditions (water and clay mixture or compacted clay) mainly concern the bentonite clay that would be used for the engineered barrier. On the opposite, only few in-situ experiments has been conducted directly in the local clay of the repository site (such as Boom clay, etc.). In order to better estimate the corrosion behaviour of carbon steels in natural clay site conditions, an experimental study has been conducted jointly by EDF and IRSN in the argillaceous French site of Tournemire. In this study, A42 carbon steel specimens have been exposed in 3 different zones of the Tournemire clay formation. The first type of environmental conditions concerns a zone where the clay has not been affected by the excavation (EDZ) of the main tunnel neither by the main fracture zone of the clay formation. The second and third ones are located in the EDZ of the tunnel. In the second zone, an additional aerated water flows from the tunnel, whereas it does not in the third place. Some carbon steel specimens have been extracted after several years of exposure to these conditions. The average corrosion rate has been measured by the weight loss technique and the pitting corrosion depth has been evaluated under an optical microscope. Corrosion products have also been characterised by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction technique. Results are then discussed regarding the surrounding environmental conditions. Calculations of the oxygen transport from the tunnel through the clay and of the clay re-saturation can explain, in a first approach, the corrosion behaviour of the carbon steel in the different tested zones. (authors)

  20. Localized deformation as a key precursor to initiation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels employed in nuclear power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Wade; Diego, Gonzalo; Devrient, Bastian

    2010-11-01

    Cold-work has been associated with the occurrence of intergranular cracking of stainless steels employed in light water reactors. This study examined the deformation behavior of AISI 304, AISI 347 and a higher stacking fault energy model alloy subjected to bulk cold-work and (for 347) surface deformation. Deformation microstructures of the materials were examined and correlated with their particular mechanical response under different conditions of temperature, strain rate and degree of prior cold-work. Select slow-strain rate tensile tests in autoclaves enabled the role of local strain heterogeneity in crack initiation in pressurized water reactor environments to be considered. The high stacking fault energy material exhibited uniform strain hardening, even at sub-zero temperatures, while the commercial stainless steels showed significant heterogeneity in their strain response. Surface treatments introduced local cold-work, which had a clear effect on the surface roughness and hardness, and on near-surface residual stress profiles. Autoclave tests led to transgranular surface cracking for a circumferentially ground surface, and intergranular crack initiation for a polished surface.

  1. Indoor accelerated corrosion test and marine field test of corrosion-resistant low-alloy steel rebars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrocell corrosion test and accelerated alternating wet–dry experiment combined with marine field test were employed to study the corrosion behavior of HRB400 carbon steel, 1.5Cr steel, and 5Cr steel in a simulated concrete pore solution and mortar. The macrocell current significantly decreases in samples added with Cr compared with that in HRB400 steel. The corrosion rate is decreased by Cr but increased by Cl−; as a consequence, the corrosion rates of 1.5Cr and 5Cr steel are lower than that of HRB400 steel. However, the corrosion products differ slightly in terms of the contents of α-FeOOH (goethite, γ-FeOOH (lepidocrocite, γ-Fe2O3, and Fe3O4 (maghemite or magnetite. The addition of Cr increases the content of the protective α-FeOOH and reduces the content of γ-FeOOH. Both ordinary and high-performance epoxy coatings remain intact after 1 year of marine field test. Among the bare steel rebars, HRB400 steel shows extensive localized corrosion on the surface, whereas 1.5Cr steel exhibits less severe corrosion. The scarcely visible corroded areas in 5Cr steel indicate that this rebar is in the passive state, consistent with results of the indoor accelerated test. Hence, the durability of concrete structures can be prolonged with the utilization of corrosion-resistant low-alloy rebars.

  2. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Wang; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700–900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350–550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs. PMID:28788129

  3. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplex stainless steels (DSSs with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700–900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350–550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs.

  4. Effect of Secondary Phase Precipitation on the Corrosion Behavior of Duplex Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Wang; Tjong, Sie Chin

    2014-07-22

    Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) with austenitic and ferritic phases have been increasingly used for many industrial applications due to their good mechanical properties and corrosion resistance in acidic, caustic and marine environments. However, DSSs are susceptible to intergranular, pitting and stress corrosion in corrosive environments due to the formation of secondary phases. Such phases are induced in DSSs during the fabrication, improper heat treatment, welding process and prolonged exposure to high temperatures during their service lives. These include the precipitation of sigma and chi phases at 700-900 °C and spinodal decomposition of ferritic grains into Cr-rich and Cr-poor phases at 350-550 °C, respectively. This article gives the state-of the-art review on the microstructural evolution of secondary phase formation and their effects on the corrosion behavior of DSSs.

  5. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  6. Corrosion investigations of high-alloyed steels carried out in different marine area organized by European Federation of Corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birn, J.; Skalski, I.

    1999-01-01

    Research works arranged by EFC Working Party on Marine Corrosion are described. The research was performed in sea areas of Norway, Finland, Sweden, France, Italy, Poland and Netherlands. Subjected to test were three corrosion resistant steel grades; 316, 904 and UNS S 31524. Two corrosion tests were carried out in the years 1993 and 1994 each of min. 6 month duration. The results show that chemical composition of water at salinity level of more than 0.7% has not great effect on corrosion aggressivity in relation to corrosion resistant steels. On the other hand temperature of sea water has great influence on corrosion process. (author)

  7. Corrosion monitoring of reinforcement steel using galvanostatically induced potential transients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; Nutma, J.S.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Investigation and results on a dynamic measurement technique to qualitatively evaluate the status of corrosion of reinforcement steel are presented. The sensing method is based on the measurement of the time constant of the relaxation of the current-induced polarization potential. This time constant

  8. Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel in Tropical Road Mud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion damages in Steel and Cast- Iron frequently occur in automobile and other vehicle undercarriage parts as a result of regular road mud and other dirt deposits on those components on those vehicles operating on the poorly maintained roads in the developing countries. These ultimately result in Deposit and Pilling ...

  9. Pitting corrosion protection of low nickel stainless steel by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pitting corrosion protection of low nickel stainless steel by electropolymerized conducting polymer coating in 0·5 M NaCl solution. T DHANABAL, G AMIRTHAGANESAN. ∗ and J RAVICHANDRAN. Post Graduate and Research Department of Chemistry, Sri Ramakrishna Mission Vidyalaya College of Arts and Science,.

  10. INHIBITION OF THE CORROSION OF MILD STEEL IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The inhibition of corrosion of mild steel in hydrochloric acid by isatin glycine (ING) and isatin (IN) at 30-60 oC and concentrations of 0.0001 M to 0.0005 M was studied via weight loss method. At the highest inhibitor concentration studied ING exhibited inhibition efficiency of 87% while IN exhibited 84% at 60 oC.

  11. Microgalvanic corrosion of laser-welded HSLA steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looi, Y.M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser welding of galvanized high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels leads to the evaporation of zinc at the weld and the formation of a heat-affected-zone (HAZ). High heat input due to welding generates macro galvanic coupling between the weld and the parent metal as well as micro galvanic corrosion

  12. Structural Characterization of Highly Corrosion-resistant Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lančok, Adriana; Kmječ, T.; Štefánik, M.; Sklenka, L.; Miglierini, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2015), s. 355-361 ISSN 0011-1643 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12449S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Mossbauer spectroscopy * corrosion-resistant steel * LC200 * CEMS Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.732, year: 2015

  13. Corrosion of X60 steel influenced by iron oxidizing bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion of X60 steel influenced by iron oxidizing bacteria (Leptothrix Descophora). A Rim-Rukeh, Y T Puyate. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Engineering Research Vol. 6 (1) 2007: pp. 51-56. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Crude Oil Corrosion Fatigue of L485MB Pipeline Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Bystrianský, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 137, č. 5 (2015), 051401 ISSN 0094-9930 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE02000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : corrosion fatigue * crude oil * pipeline steel * S–N curve * separated water Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.476, year: 2015 http://pressurevesseltech.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/article.aspx?articleID=2107675

  15. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    A.N.Enetanya. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of. Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. Corrosion damages in Steel and Cast- Iron frequently occur in automobile and other vehicle undercarriage parts as a result of regular road mud and other dirt deposits on those components on those vehicles ...

  16. Investigations on the corrosion of constructional steels in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The corrosion behavior of three constructional steels used in Senegal, S235, S275 and S355, was studied in simulated atmospheric conditions in an exposure chamber above distilled water and above 3% NaCl solution representing marine atmosphere by comparing the ratio of rusted to unrusted area. Electrochemical test ...

  17. Inhibition Effect of Deanol on Mild Steel Corrosion in Dilute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The influence of deanol on the corrosion behaviour of mild steel in dilute sulphuric acid with sodium chloride addition was studied by means of mass-loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrode potential monitoring, scanning electron microscopy and statistical analysis. Results show that deanol performed excellently with ...

  18. Stress corrosion of alloy 600: mechanism proposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnin, T.

    1993-01-01

    A fissuring model by stress corrosion based on interactions corrosion-plasticity on the fissure top is proposed to describe the generally intergranular bursting of INCONEL 600 in the PWR. The calculation shows, and some observations check experimentally, that a pseudo intergranular cracking bound to the zigzag micro facets formation along the joints may be so that a completely intergranular bursting. This pseudo intergranular mode makes up a signature of the proposed mechanism. It may be suggested that it may exist one continuity mechanism between the trans and intergranular cracking by stress corrosion of ductile cubic centered faces materials. 2 figs

  19. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, < 1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. Further work is presently underway to investigate the effects of elevated temperatures and chloride levels on the anaerobic corrosion reaction and the rate of hydrogen gas production. (author)

  20. Influence of Changes in Water-to-Cement Ratio, Alkalinity, Concrete Fluidity, Voids, and Type of Reinforcing Steel on the Corrosion Potential of Steel in Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    "Research on steel corrosion has demonstrated that the concentrations of chloride and hydroxide ion at the concrete/steel : interface influence the susceptibility of the steel to corrosive attack. This study used electrochemical means and changes in ...

  1. Corrosion behavior of prestressing steel in a solution of 20% ammonium thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiba, Mikiyuki; Abe, Keisuke; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2015-01-01

    1400-MPa class high-strength PC wires are used for pre-stressed concrete structures. One of trusted hydrogen embrittlement tests for steel is a testing method that is provided in the FIP Report and defined in JSCE S 1201 for a test procedure. This test includes a constant load test in a 20% NH 4 SCN at 50degC for up to 200 hours to measure the rupture time. The test examined corrosion behavior in the early stage of the test when hydrogen concentration in steel would show a rapid increase. It was recognized that dissolved oxygen accelerated a corrosion reaction in pure oxygen atmosphere, but a 6-hour immersion test showed no notable difference in corrosion rate and corrosion potential in air and deaerated atmosphere. Polarization measurements suggested that a cathodic reaction independent of dissolved oxygen exerted a profound effect on a corrosion reaction. The analysis of corrosion products and iron ion led to a presumption that the iron-sulfide and iron oxide would precipitate concurrently in the early stage of immersion in 20% NH 4 SCN. (author)

  2. Study of the corrosion fatigue resistance of steel grades for automotive suspension springs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougin, J. [Ascometal CREAS, BP70045, F-57301 Hagondange Cedex (France); Mostacchi, A. [Ascometal Developpement, BP17, F-38570 Le Cheylas (France); Hersart, Y. [Allevard Rejna Autosuspensions CRDT, 201 Rue de Sin-le-Noble, BP629, F-59506 Douai Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to reduce the total weight of vehicles for ecological and economical reasons, the car makers use down-sizing for several components of the cars. Concerning helical suspension springs, the size of the bar diameter and the number of spring coils are decreased, leading to an increase of the stress level applied on the spring. In this respect, steels with high mechanical properties are required, to achieve a good fatigue resistance of the springs. The corrosion resistance is also important for this application. Indeed, during service, the protective coating applied on the springs can be scratched by gravels, and bare underlying metal can be put in contact with the atmosphere, including humidity, drops of rain but also de-icing salts. Generally speaking, an increase of mechanical properties decreases the corrosion fatigue resistance of the steels. In this respect, a compromise needs to be found, that is why the study of corrosion fatigue resistance is very important. In order to study the corrosion fatigue resistance of spring steels, an original device and test procedure have been set up. Torsional fatigue on specimens is used to simulate the stress applied on each spring coil. The stress levels are chosen to be representative of the actual inservice loads. The specimens are shot-peened and coated in a same way as the actual springs. Scratching of the painting is performed, giving rise to small areas of bare metal. Three types of tests are performed: fatigue in air (taken as the reference level), fatigue on specimens which have been corroded previously (test similar to the spring-makers practice) and coupled corrosion fatigue. The mechanisms involved in corrosion fatigue have been studied. For all the specimens, crack initiated on corrosion pits. For the specimens corroded prior fatigue testing, the corrosion pits can be quite severe. In this case, these pits act as a surface defect which increases locally the stress concentration and accelerates the crack

  3. Temperature factors effect on occurrence of stress corrosion cracking of main gas pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarova, M. N.; Akhmetov, R. R.; Krainov, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of the article is to analyze and compare the data in order to contribute to the formation of an objective opinion on the issue of the growth of stress corrosion defects of the main gas pipeline. According to available data, a histogram of the dependence of defects due to stress corrosion on the distance from the compressor station was constructed, and graphs of the dependence of the accident density due to stress corrosion in the winter and summer were also plotted. Data on activation energy were collected and analyzed in which occurrence of stress corrosion is most likely constructed, a plot of activation energy versus temperature is plotted, and the process of occurrence of stress corrosion by the example of two different grades of steels under the action of different temperatures was analyzed.

  4. The Corrosion of High Performance Steel in Adverse Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Desmond C.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion products that have formed on weathering steel bridges exposed to different weather conditions in the United States have been evaluated. They have been analyzed by spectroscopic techniques to determine the relationship between protective and non-protective rust coatings, and their relationship to the exposure conditions. Bridges constructed recently using High Performance Steel, as well as older bridges built with Type A588B weathering steel, were evaluated for corrosion performance of the rust coatings. In locations where the steel is subjected to regular wet-dry cycling, where the surface is wet for less than about 20% of the time, a protective patina starts to form after a few months exposure, and continues to an adherent, impervious coating after a decade. The protective patina is characterized by the formation of only goethite and lepidocrocite. The goethite makes up about 80% of the rust, and itself consists of a nanophase component, 40%, or infrequent drying cycles (regions close to waterways, fog or having high humidity), the weathering steel forms a rust coating that consists of a large amount of maghemite, and goethite that contains very little of the nanophase component. The rust coating ex-foliates from the steel and is not protective. Under exposure conditions in which chlorides are deposited onto the weathering steel surface (marine or de-icing salt locations), the protective patina also does not form. Instead, the rust coating consists of a large fraction of akaganeite that forms at the expense of the lepidocrocite and nanophase goethite. The bridges exposed to high chloride concentrations, 1.5 wt%, and therefore having no protective patina, have corrosion rates measured to be 6 times larger than expected for weathering steel with the protective patina

  5. Marine Atmospheric Corrosion of Carbon Steel: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Jenifer; Fuente, Daniel de la; Chico, Belén; Simancas, Joaquín; Díaz, Iván; Morcillo, Manuel

    2017-04-13

    The atmospheric corrosion of carbon steel is an extensive topic that has been studied over the years by many researchers. However, until relatively recently, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the action of marine chlorides. Corrosion in coastal regions is a particularly relevant issue due the latter's great importance to human society. About half of the world's population lives in coastal regions and the industrialisation of developing countries tends to concentrate production plants close to the sea. Until the start of the 21st century, research on the basic mechanisms of rust formation in Cl - -rich atmospheres was limited to just a small number of studies. However, in recent years, scientific understanding of marine atmospheric corrosion has advanced greatly, and in the authors' opinion a sufficient body of knowledge has been built up in published scientific papers to warrant an up-to-date review of the current state-of-the-art and to assess what issues still need to be addressed. That is the purpose of the present review. After a preliminary section devoted to basic concepts on atmospheric corrosion, the marine atmosphere, and experimentation on marine atmospheric corrosion, the paper addresses key aspects such as the most significant corrosion products, the characteristics of the rust layers formed, and the mechanisms of steel corrosion in marine atmospheres. Special attention is then paid to important matters such as coastal-industrial atmospheres and long-term behaviour of carbon steel exposed to marine atmospheres. The work ends with a section dedicated to issues pending, noting a series of questions in relation with which greater research efforts would seem to be necessary.

  6. Microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunaru, Mariana; Dragomir, Maria; Voicu, Anca

    2008-01-01

    Microbiologically induced corrosion is the label generally applied to corrosion involving the action of bacteria on metal surfaces. While different combinations of bacterial species, materials and chemical constituents are interrelated factors, stagnant water is the factor most often mentioned in reported cases. This paper presents the results obtained regarding the testing of microbiologically induced corrosion of carbon steel under continuous flow conditions in the presence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. The tests were performed on coupons of SA106gr.B exposed both in stagnant conditions and in flow conditions. The surfaces of these coupons were studied by metallographic technique, while the developed biofilms were analysed using microbiological technique. The correlation of all the results which were obtained emphasized that the minimizing the occurrence of stagnant or low-flow conditions can prove effective in reducing the risk of microbiologically induced corrosion in plant cooling-water systems. (authors)

  7. Laser Peening for Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welds in Marine Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    and propagate in other alloys systems, such as austenitic Alloys 600, 800, and AISI type 304 stainless steel. Potential zones of susceptibility for...MITIGATION OF STRESS CORROSION CRACKING AT WELDS IN MARINE ALUMINUM by Heather R. Mattern June 2011 Thesis Advisor: Luke N. Brewer...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laser Peening for Mitigation of Stress Corrosion Cracking at Welds in Marine

  8. Microbiological Corrosion in Low Carbon Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Medina–Custodio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Microbiologically Induced Corrosion affects several industries, such as oil industry where it is estimated that 20% to 30% pipes failures are related with microorganism . The chemical reactions generate ions transfer, this validate the use of electrochemical techniques for its analysis. Coupons submerged in a nutritional medium with presence and absence of three different microorganisms during two periods, 48 hours and 28 days we restudied. Polarization resistance (Rp and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS techniques we re applied to determine the corrosivity of the systems. The results show a greater corrosive effect of abiotic system, this indicates a microorganisms protection effect to the metal, opposite to the first hypothesis. This result was ratified observing surfaces coupons by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM technique. A possible mechanism based on Evans – Tafel graph is proposed to explain inhibitor microorganism effect.

  9. AFM study of the early corrosion of a high strength steel in a diluted sodium chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Javier; Fullea, Jose; Andrade, Carmen; Gaitero, Juan J.; Porro, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    The high strength steels employed as reinforcement in pre-stressed concrete structures are drawn wire steels of eutectoid composition with a pearlitic microstructure. This work is focused on the study, by atomic force microscopy, of the early stages of the corrosion of such steels as a consequence of their exposition to a sodium chloride solution. The obtained images show the pearlitic microstructure of the steel, with a preferential attack of the ferrite phase and the cementite acting as a cathode. The corrosion rate was determined by calculating the amount of material lost from a roughness analysis. The obtained results are in good agreement with the predictions of Galvelel's theory, according to which the corrosion rate slows down as the pit depth increases

  10. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel and zirconium in nitric acid containing highly oxidizing species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Fujita, Tomonari

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of 304ELC, 310Nb stainless steels and Zirconium was investigated in the simulated dissolver solution of a reprocessing plant to obtain fundamental data for life prediction. Corrosion of heat transfer surface was also investigated in nitric acid solutions containing Ce ion. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Stainless steels showed intergranular corrosion in the simulated dissolver solution. The corrosion rate increased with time and reached to a constant value after several hundred hours of immersing time. The constant corrosion rate changed depending on potential suggesting that corrosion potential dominates the corrosion process. 310Nb showed superior corrosion resistance to 304ELC. (2) Corrosion rate of stainless steels increased in the heat transfer condition. The causes of corrosion enhancement are estimated to be higher corrosion potential and higher temperature of heat transfer surface. (3) Zirconium showed perfect passivity in all the test conditions employed. (author)

  11. The anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naish, C.C.; Balkwill, P.H.; O'Brien, T.M.; Taylor, K.J.; Marsh, G.P.

    1990-11-01

    The report describes the work of a two year programme investigating the anaerobic corrosion of carbon steel embedded in a range of candidate repository cements and concretes at laboratory ambient temperatures. The factors investigated in the study were the rate of the anaerobic corrosion reaction, the effect of hydrogen overpressure on the reaction rate and the form of the corrosion product. Both electrochemical and sample weight loss corrosion rate measurements were used. The cements and concretes used were prepared both with and without small additions of chloride (2% by weight of mix water). The results indicate that the corrosion rate is low, <1 μm/year, the effect of hydrogen overpressure is not significant over the range of pressures investigated, 1-100 atmospheres, and that the corrosion product is dependent on the cement used to cast the samples. Magnetite was identified in the case of blast furnace slag replacement cements but for pulverised fuel ash and ordinary Portland cements no corrosion product was evident either from X-ray diffraction or laser Raman measurements. (Author)

  12. AE signal characteristics of the initial Stress Corrosion Crack in the STS 304 pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Seong; Kang, Sung Sik; Lee, Bo Young

    2011-01-01

    The stress corrosion crack is one of the life-limiting mechanisms in nuclear power plant conditions. During the operation of a power plant stress corrosion cracks can initiate and grow in dissimilar metal weld pipe joints of primary loop components. In particular, stress corrosion cracking usually occurs when the following three factors exist at the same time; susceptible material, corrosive environment, and tensile stress (including residual stress). Thus, residual stress becomes very critical for stress-corrosion cracking when it is difficult to improve the material corrosivity of the components and their environment under operating conditions. Since the research conducted by Coriou et al., it is well known that Ni-based alloy and stainless steel are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in deaerated pure water at high temperature and the SCC is difficult to be reproduced in laboratory. In this study, stress corrosion crack was artificially produced on STS 304 pipe. And a characteristic of the AE (acoustic emission) signal, which is generated at crack initiation time, was investigated

  13. 3-D simulation of intergranular stress corrosion crack interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Marrow, T.J.; Sherry, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steels is a potential failure mechanism, which is result of local grain boundary chromium depletion by carbide precipitation or irradiation-induced segregation. Reliable models of crack nucleation and growth, and their sensitivity to microstructure, are required to underpin lifetime prediction and develop more resistant materials. A model for 3-D IGSCC crack growth has been developed which reproduces the interactions between the microstructure, the mechanical driving force for cracking and the kinetics of crack growth. In this paper, this model is used to investigate the interaction between adjacent initiating cracks, to observe the growth of those cracks before/after coalescence, and examine the sensitivity of short crack behaviour to random variations in microstructure. The model predictions are assessed against experimental observations of short intergranular stress corrosion crack behaviour, obtained by in-situ digital image correlation techniques

  14. Corrosion Testing of Stainless Steel Fuel Cell Hardware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1998-11-01

    Metal hardware is gaining increasing interest in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) development as a possible alternative to machined graphite hardware because of its potential for low-cost manufacturing combined with its intrinsic high conductivity, minimal permeability and advantageous mechanical properties. A major barrier to more widespread use of metal hardware has been the susceptibility of various metals to corrosion. Few pure metals can withstand the relatively aggressive environment of a fuel cell and thus the choices for hardware are quite limited. Precious metals such as platinum or gold are prohibitively expensive and so tend to be utilized as coatings on inexpensive substrates such as aluminum or stainless steel. The main challenge with coatings has been to achieve pin-hole free surfaces that will remain so after years of use. Titanium has been used to some extent and though it is very corrosion-resistant, it is also relatively expensive and often still requires some manner of surface coating to prevent the formation of a poorly conducting oxide layer. In contrast, metal alloys may hold promise as potentially low-cost, corrosion-resistant materials for bipolar plates. The dozens of commercially available stainless steel and nickel based alloys have been specifically formulated to offer a particular advantage depending upon their application. In the case of austenitic stainless steels, for example, 316 SS contains molybdenum and a higher chromium content than its more common counterpart, 304 SS, that makes it more noble and increases its corrosion resistance. Likewise, 316L SS contains less carbon than 316 SS to make it easier to weld. A number of promising corrosion-resistant, highly noble alloys such as Hastelloy{trademark} or Duplex{trademark} (a stainless steel developed for seawater service) are available commercially, but are expensive and difficult to obtain in various forms (i.e. wire screen, foil, etc.) or in small amounts for R and D

  15. Corrosion protection by sonoelectrodeposited organic films on zinc coated steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Et Taouil, Abdeslam; Mahmoud, Mahmoud Mourad; Lallemand, Fabrice; Lallemand, Séverine; Gigandet, Marie-Pierre; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    A variety of coatings based on electrosynthesized polypyrrole were deposited on zinc coated steel in presence or absence of ultrasound, and studied in terms of corrosion protection. Cr III and Cr VI commercial passivation were used as references. Depth profiling showed a homogeneous deposit for Cr III, while SEM imaging revealed good surface homogeneity for Cr VI layers. These chromium-based passivations ensured good protection against corrosion. Polypyrrole (PPy) was also electrochemically deposited on zinc coated steel with and without high frequency ultrasound irradiation in aqueous sodium tartrate-molybdate solution. Such PPy coatings act as a physical barrier against corrosive species. PPy electrosynthesized in silent conditions exhibits similar properties to Cr VI passivation with respect to corrosion protection. Ultrasound leads to more compact and more homogeneous surface structures for PPy, as well as to more homogeneous distribution of doping molybdate anions within the film. Far better corrosion protection is exhibited for such sonicated films. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The corrosion behaviour of carbon steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Since gas production is mainly due to the corrosion of carbon steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible on the corrosion rate of steel in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities lie in the range 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 .a). Corrosion rates of this order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, with the result that there is very little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. Given the current situation, it would appear somewhat risky to accept the lower value for hydrogen production as proven. Proposals are made for experiments which would reduce this element of uncertainty. (author) 10 figs., 35 refs

  17. Stainless steel corrosion in French LMFBR - Feedback and prevention against risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabon, V.; Brissonneau, L.; Billey, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the mechanisms and the conditions leading to the most threatening corrosion risks specific to the use of sodium at high temperature as coolant in FBR (Fast Breeder Reactors) - apart from wastage (rapid erosion-corrosion of the steam generator tubes by sodium hydroxide due to steam-water leaks in sodium): Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) induced in sodium polluted by sodium hydroxide (following sodium-water reaction or incomplete cleaning of component), SCC induced by caustic solution during maintenance operations (cleaning of component or repair on drained sodium circuit inducing moist air ingress), and Intergranular Attack (IGA) induced on sensitized stainless steels by acid solutions used during maintenance operations (decontamination of component, chemical cleaning). These risks are illustrated by some examples of corrosion encountered through Phenix experience or in CEA sodium loops. The paper also describes the solutions and the preventive measures that have been put in place against these corrosion risks, in the form of design rules and operating procedures. Generally the plant operator cannot control the material parameters (metal composition, aging, stress) during the lifetime of the facility. Thus most of the time preventive measures consist in excluding at least one of the two other factors related to the chemical environment and/or to the operating conditions. Moreover corrosion of the primary components during cleaning and decontamination operations before repairing should be carefully examined to authorize their reuse in the reactor

  18. Pitting corrosion of low-Cr austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Albany Research Center has investigated the pitting corrosion resistance of experimental low-Cr stainless steels and several commercial stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous and atmospheric environments. Previous research had shown the experimental alloys to be as corrosion resistant as commercial stainless steels in chloride-free acid environments. The alloys studied were Fe-8Cr-16Ni-5.5Si-1Cu-(0-1)Mo, 304 SS, and 316 SS. These alloys were examined by immersion and electrochemical tests in 3.5 wt. pct. NaCl and 6 wt.pct.FeCl 3 . Results of these tests showed that the addition of one weight percent Mo improved the pitting resistance of the low-Cr alloy and that the Mo-containing experimental alloy was as resistant to pitting as the commercial alloys. Electrochemical tests did, however, show the experimental alloys to be slightly less resistant to pitting than the commercial alloys. Because of these results, the low-Cr alloy with one weight percent Mo and 304 SS were exposed for one year to a marine atmospheric environment on the coast of Oregon. The marine atmospheric corrosion resistance of the low-Cr alloy was found to be comparable to that for type 304 stainless steel

  19. Research on atmospheric corrosion of steel using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, M.; Uchida, H.; Konishi, H.; Mizuki, J.

    2004-01-01

    Correlation between local structure around Cr in the protective rust layer on weathering steel and protective performance of the rust layer is presented as an example of corrosion research using synchrotron radiation which has recently been applied in various research fields as a useful tool. In addition, in situ observation of initial process of rust formation on steel is also mentioned. It was pointed out by considering the X-ray absorption fine structure spectra that the nanostructure of the protective rust layer on weathering steel primarily comprises of small Cr-goethite crystals containing surface adsorbed and/or intergranular CrO x 3-2X complex anions. This CrO x 3-2X explains the protective performance of the rust layer originated by dense aggregation of fine crystals with cation selectivity of the Cr-goethite. It is very advantageous to employ white X-rays for in situ observation of rusting process of a carbon steel covered with electrolyte thin films because rust structure might change very quickly. This in situ observation revealed the effect of ion species on the change in rust phase during wet/dry repeating. It can be said that application of synchrotron radiation on corrosion research is so useful to understand the nanostructure of surface oxides which closely relate to corrosion behavior of metals and alloys. (author)

  20. Effect of magnetite as a corrosion product on the corrosion of carbon steel overpack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, N.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism of the acceleration of the corrosion of carbon steel due to the presence of magnetite was studied. Immersion tests of carbon steel in the presence of magnetite powder were performed using sealed glass ampoules. Hydrogen gas enclosed in the ampoule was analysed by gas chromatography, and the material balance of hydrogen gas and reduced Fe(III) in the magnetite against the weight loss of the specimens was analysed. The analysis showed that the main cathodic reaction in the presence of magnetite powder was the reduction of Fe(III). The effect of magnetite on the lifetime of carbon steel overpacks is also discussed in this paper. (author)

  1. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  2. Seacoast stress corrosion cracking of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking resistance of high strength, wrought aluminum alloys in a seacoast atmosphere was investigated and the results were compared with those obtained in laboratory tests. Round tensile specimens taken from the short transverse grain direction of aluminum plate and stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths were exposed to the seacoast and to alternate immersion in salt water and synthetic seawater. Maximum exposure periods of one year at the seacoast, 0.3 or 0.7 of a month for alternate immersion in salt water, and three months for synthetic seawater were indicated for aluminum alloys to avoid false indications of stress corrosion cracking failure resulting from pitting. Correlation of the results was very good among the three test media using the selected exposure periods. It is concluded that either of the laboratory test media is suitable for evaluating the stress corrosion cracking performance of aluminum alloys in seacoast atmosphere.

  3. Development of New Type Seawater Resistant Steel and the Research of Its Structure and Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Baoliang; Yin, Shaojiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Wang, Yunge; Yu, Hao; Li, Haixu; Zhou, Tao

    This paper investigated two kinds of corrosion resistant low alloy steels depending on the environment of the North China see (Steel S) and South China sea (Steel N), respectively. The mechanical and corrosion properties of the two steels were analyzed in this paper. Tin was added into both steels to improve the corrosion resistance. Structure and mechanical properties of the two steels were detected, and the results revealed that the microstructures of both steels were ferrite and little divorced pearlite. The yield strength and impact toughness at -40°C of the steel S are 423MPa and 98 J, respectively. The yield strength and impact toughness at -40°C of the steel N are 437 MPa and 70 J, respectively. The properties mentioned above met or even exceeded the requirement (yield strength 355 MPa, toughness 34 J) in these areas. The corrosion resistant properties of the two steels were also investigated via the means of immersion test and electrochemical experiment. The immersion test indicated that the corrosion rate of steel S and steel N was 0.00938 mg/h·cm2 and 0.00838 mg/h·cm2, respectively, when completely immersed for 168 hours, and the corrosion rate was much lower than that of E36. The Electrochemical experiments showed that the corrosion potential (Ecorr) of both steels was higher in contrast to E36, which indicated a lower corrosion trend.

  4. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  5. Influence of silicon, copper and cobalt on corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion in 03Kh18N30 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, Eh.T.; Ul'yanin, E.A.; Kazakova, G.V.; Sorokina, N.A.; Gal'tsov, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of alloying low carbon 18Cr-30Ni steel with silicon (up to 5.1%), copper (up to 5.4%), cobalt (up to 15.3%) on the resistance to corrosion cracking and pitting corrosion, is studied. Tests on uniaxial tension are carried out in 42% MgCl 2 solution and gravimetric studies in 10% FeCl 3 x6H 2 O. It is established that alloying steel of the Kh18N30 type with silicon increases strength and resistance to corrosion cracking. Copper and cobalt decrease a resistance to pitting corrosion but somewhat increase a resistance to corrosion cracking

  6. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steel Carburized at Low Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F. J.; Natishan, P. M.; Lemieux, E. J.; Newbauer, T. M.; Rayne, R. J.; Bayles, R. A.; Kahn, H.; Michal, G. M.; Ernst, F.; Heuer, A. H.

    2009-08-01

    The pitting corrosion resistance of surface-modified 316L austenitic stainless steel and N08367 (a “superaustenitic” stainless steel) were evaluated in 0.6 M NaCl solutions and compared to untreated samples of the same materials. The surface modification process used to treat the surfaces was a low-temperature carburization technology termed “low-temperature colossal supersaturation” (LTCSS). The process typically produces surface carbon concentrations of ~15 at. pct without the formation of carbides. The pitting potential of the LTCSS-treated 316L stainless steel in the NaCl solution substantially increased compared to untreated 316L stainless steel, while the pitting behavior of the LTCSS-treated N08367 was unchanged compared to the untreated alloy.

  7. CORROSION ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS USED IN NUCLEAR MATERIALS EXTRACTION AND SEPARATION PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Louthan, M.; Sindelar, R.

    2012-12-17

    This paper illustrated the magnitude of the systems, structures and components used at the Savannah River Site for nuclear materials extraction and separation processes. Corrosion issues, including stress corrosion cracking, pitting, crevice corrosion and other corrosion induced degradation processes are discussed and corrosion mitigation strategies such as a chloride exclusion program and corrosion release testing are also discussed.

  8. Study and characterization by acoustic emission and electrochemical measurements of the stress corrosion cracking of the 304L steel in chloride environment; Etude et caracterisation par emission acoustique et mesures electrochimiques de la corrosion sous contrainte de l'acier 304L en milieu chlorure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshimombo, A.; Delaunois, F. [UMONS, Faculte Polytechnique, Mons (Belgium); Tshimombo, A.; Idrissi, H. [INSA-Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-03-15

    As the prediction of stress corrosion cracking risks is a matter of interest, the authors report the development and the application of the acoustic emission technique to characterize and control this corrosion mode. They describe the choice of an accelerated test as experiment conditions, comment and discuss the correlation between acoustic emission and corrosion current density measurements

  9. Corrosion in PWR stainless steel components: a TSO perspective based on operating experience and expertises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curieres, I. de

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steels are used commonly in many circuits of a nuclear power plant. Particularly, they are the prime materials for the inside surface of the primary circuit. Their operating experience has been good, though a number of cases of degradations due to corrosion have been reported the last ten years. This number of events is increasing and many studies of damaged parts become available. Based on the operating experience and these studies, IRSN will provide its perspective on the safety-related issues associated with the corrosion of stainless steel components. It appears that today's knowledge is not sufficient to define relevant criteria or to determine the exact set of parameters which leads to SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking) of stainless steels. As a consequence, the best strategy remains an inspection and repair/replacement one. Moreover many cases show the influence of pollutants in the SCC events. This emphasizes the fact that chemistry parameters are strongly connected to safety issues, with respect to the stainless steels integrity

  10. Increased resistance to stress corrosion of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, S. B.; Cocks, F. H.

    1970-01-01

    Stress corrosion resistance is increased by distorting surface grain-boundary structure and by interrupting the corrosion and stress corrosion. The first is accomplished by machining or shot peening and the second by removal from and later reexposure to the corrosive environment.

  11. Structural steel coatings for corrosion mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Task 1 of this project was to survey the performance of coating systems for steel bridges in Missouri and to evaluate coating and : recoating practices. Task 1 was led under the direction of Dr. Glenn Washer from the University of Missouri located in...

  12. Prevention of stress corrosion cracking in nuclear waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant, stress corrosion of carbon steel storage tanks containing alkaline nitrate radioactive waste is prevented by stress relief and specification of limits on waste composition and temperature. Actual cases of cracking have occurred in the primary steel shell of tanks designed and built before 1960 and were attributed to a combination of high residual stresses from fabrication welding and aggressiveness of fresh wastes from the reactor fuel reprocessing plants. The fresh wastes have the highest concentration of nitrate, which has been shown to be the cracking agent. Also, as the waste solutions age and are reduced in volume by evaporation of water, nitrite and hydroxide ions become more concentrated and inhibit stress corrosion. Thus, by providing a heel of aged evaporated waste in tanks that receive fresh wastes, concentrations of the inhibitor ions are maintained within specific ranges to protect against nitrate cracking. The concentration and temperature range limits to prevent cracking were determined by a series of statistically designed experiments

  13. Corrosion behavior of novel 3%Cr pipeline steel in CO2 Top-of-Line Corrosion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Yun; Xu, Lining; Gao, Chunliang; Chang, Wei; Lu, Minxu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CO 2 Top-of-Line Corrosion environment in wet gas pipelines was simulated. ► Compared with X70, the resistance to CO 2 TLC of novel 3%Cr pipeline steel is better. ► The effect of Cr enrichment in the corrosion scale on CO 2 TLC is confirmed. -- Abstract: CO 2 Top-of-Line Corrosion (TLC) of carbon steel pipelines is a serious problem for wet gas transportation. We have studied the corrosion behavior of novel 3%Cr (3Cr) pipeline steel and conventional carbon steel (X70) in the simulated CO 2 TLC environment. The composition and morphology of the corrosion scale are characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses. The results indicate that 3Cr pipeline steel shows superior resistance to CO 2 TLC, exhibiting uniform corrosion with duplex corrosion layer, while X70 suffers severe localized corrosion. It was suggested that the inner Cr enriched layer enhanced the protective ability of the scale to steel substrate and improved the resistance to localized corrosion in CO 2 TLC environment.

  14. Review of the corrosion fatigue performance of medium to high strength structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, J.; Billingham, J. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom); Stacey, A.; Simpson, R.; Patel, R. [Health and Safety Executive, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01

    Despite the increasing application in recent years of high strength steels in the offshore industry, their use in the fabrication of conventional jacket structures is generally restricted to steels with yield strengths in the range 450--550 MPa and to topside applications. One reason is the uncertainty associated with the performance of these materials and the concern that such steels have inferior fatigue performance compared to conventional structural steels with typical yield strengths of 350 MPa, particularly when welded and cathodically protected. In this paper, published work from Europe, USA and Japan is reviewed to provide a judgment as to the suitability of these higher strength steels for offshore applications. Fatigue crack propagation data for a range of steels in the yield strength range 400--600 MPa are compared with data for conventional BS4360:50D structural steels. Information for parent plate and heat affected zones is included. The influence of environment is examined and test data for in-air, free corrosion, and cathodic protection potentials ranging from {minus}800 to {minus}1100mV (SCE) are considered. The data for parent materials suggest that comparable or slightly improved performance compared with that of structural Grade 50D steels can be obtained in both air and seawater environments. However, the review highlights the combined detrimental influence of high mean stress and overprotection levels, (i.e., {minus}1100mV), which can cause crack growth rates to be increased by a factor of 10 compared with those observed in-air. The results suggest that welding under controlled conditions does not significantly affect fatigue crack propagation in these steels, with similar corrosion fatigue performance and crack growth mechanisms observed in parent material and in the HAZ.

  15. Clays valorization as corrosion inhibitors for E400 reinforcing steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gassama Diadioly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of E400 steel, a constructional steel widely used in Senegal, was studied in aqueous NaCl solution in the presence of two types of clay: volcanic tuffs, and sedimentary montmorillonite. The protection efficiency of these compounds were electrochemically assessed (corrosion potential variation curves, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at various inhibitor contents. The results obtained showed that these inhibitors present an inhibitory efficacy of about 70% for an optimal concentration of 0.60% for the tuffs and 62% for a maximum content of 0.50% for montmorillonite.

  16. Monitoring of hydrogen generated by corrosion reactions of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbassi, A.; Mihi, A.; Benbouta, R. [Corrosion Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Science, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria)

    2008-12-15

    A solid-state sensor has been constructed and used for the detection of hydrogen generated during corrosion of steel in pH2 solutions. In addition to that, weight loss, AC impedance measurements and selected slow strain rate tests were performed under the same conditions as the hydrogen measurements in order to ascertain the degree of embrittlement of steel. The use of such a device in cathodic protection by impressed current in artificial seawater was also investigated. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens: (I) Corrosion behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Sha; Tian Jintao; Chen Shougang; Lei Yanhua; Chang Xueting; Liu Tao; Yin Yansheng

    2009-01-01

    The microbially influenced corrosion of stainless steel (SS) by marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens (V. natriegens) was investigated using surface analysis (atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA)) and electrochemical techniques (the open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and potentiodynamic polarization curves ). AFM images corroborated the results from the EIS models which show biofilm attachment and subsequent detachment over time. The SEM images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the metal surface after the biofilm removal. The presence of carbon, oxygen, phosphor and sulfur obtained from EDXA proved the formation of biofilm. The electrochemical results showed that the corrosion of SS was accelerated in the presence of V. natriegens based on the decrease in the resistance of the charge transfer resistance (R ct ) obtained from EIS and the increase in corrosion current densities obtained from potentiodynamic polarization curves.

  18. A Corrosion Sensor for Monitoring the Early-Stage Environmental Corrosion of A36 Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An innovative prototype sensor containing A36 carbon steel as a capacitor was explored to monitor early-stage corrosion. The sensor detected the changes of the surface- rather than the bulk- property and morphology of A36 during corrosion. Thus it was more sensitive than the conventional electrical resistance corrosion sensors. After being soaked in an aerated 0.2 M NaCl solution, the sensor’s normalized electrical resistance (R/R0 decreased continuously from 1.0 to 0.74 with the extent of corrosion. Meanwhile, the sensor’s normalized capacitance (C/C0 increased continuously from 1.0 to 1.46. X-ray diffraction result indicates that the iron rust on A36 had crystals of lepidocrocite and magnetite.

  19. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  20. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  1. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  2. High-temperature corrosion of alloyed steels in molten sodium tetraborate under atmosphere of air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochergin, V.P.; Zvegintseva, G.E.; Vinyarskaya, I.N.; Demidenko, O.V.; Sazonova, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Results of corrosion process investigation at 1123-1223 K in molten sodium tetraborate on the surface of samples produced of steels alloyed by 1-6 mas.% of Mn, chromium-nickel steels containing 0.35 mas.% of C, 1-3 mas.% of Cr and Ni, as well as of a group of corrosion resistant steels are generalized

  3. Comparative Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behaviour of DMR 249A Steel and its welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Dilkush; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    DMR249A Medium strength (low carbon) Low-alloy steels are used as structural components in naval applications due to its low cost and high availability. An attempt has been made to weld the DMR 249A steel plates of 8mm thickness using shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welds were characterized for metallography to carry out the microstructural changes, mechanical properties were evaluated using vickers hardness tester and universal testing machine. Potentio-dynamic polarization tests were carried out to determine the pitting corrosion behaviour. Constant load type Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was done to observe the cracking tendency of the joints in a 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present study established that SMA welds resulted in formation of relatively higher amount of martensite in ferrite matrix when compared to gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). It is attributed to faster cooling rates achieved due to high thermal efficiency. Improved mechanical properties were observed for the SMA welds and are due to higher amount of martensite. Pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking resistance of SMA welds were poor when compared to GTA welds.

  4. Pitting corrosion behaviour of diamond coated tool steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Rao, R.V.S.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Gebert, A.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2005-01-01

    Using a hot filament chemical vapour deposition reactor, diamond films of approximately 2-3 mum in thickness were deposited on tool steel specimens with three different interlayer systems, namely CrN, Si and borided steel. The morphology, defect densities and residual stresses of the diamond films

  5. Utilization of the molecular dynamic to study the effect of hydrogen in the stress corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoux, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many microscopic and theoretical models of stress corrosion have been proposed, in particularly to explain the grain boundary cracking of stainless steels and nickel base. In this work calculus of molecular dynamic have been used to propose a mechanism of stress corrosion at the atomic scale. The author aims to reproduce, by molecular dynamic, the mechanism of an open crack in irradiated stainless steel in PWR reactor and show that the growth of the oxide at the crack back produce hydrogen. (A.L.B.)

  6. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  7. Corrosion behaviour of hyper duplex stainless steel in various metallurgical conditions for sea water cooled condensers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Umesh Pratap; Kain, Vivekanand; Chandra, Kamlesh

    2011-01-01

    The sea water cooled condensers have to resist severe corrosion as marine environment is the most corrosive natural environment. Copper alloys are being phased out due to difficulties in water chemistry control and Titanium base alloys are extremely expensive. Austenitic stainless steels (SS) remain prone to localized corrosion in marine environments hence not suitable. These heat exchangers operate at temperatures not exceeding 50 deg C and at very low pressures. The tubes of these heat exchangers are joined to the carbon steel tube sheets by roll expansion or by roll expansion followed by seam welding. These conditions are expected to affect the localized corrosion resistance of the tube in roll joined region due to cold working and in the tube-tube sheet welded joint due to thermal effects of welding. In this study, the localized corrosion behaviour of a Hyper Duplex Stainless Steel (HDSS) has been evaluated, and compared with other materials e.g. types 304L SS, 316L SS, Duplex SS 2205, Titanium grade - 2, and Al Brass. The evaluation is done in three metallurgical conditions (a) as received, (b) cold rolled and (c) welded condition in synthetic sea water at room temperature and at 50 deg C to assess the resistance to crevice, pitting and stress corrosion cracking using standard ASTM exposure and electrochemical techniques. The results provide comparative assessment of these alloys and show their susceptibility in the three metallurgical conditions as encountered in condensers. Hyper-duplex SS has been shown to be highly resistant in sea water for the condenser tubing application. (author)

  8. Some Clarifications Regarding Literature on Atmospheric Corrosion of Weathering Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, I.; Cano, H.; Chico, B.; de la Fuente, D.; Morcillo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research work has thrown light on the requisites for a protective rust layer to form on weathering steels (WSs) in the atmosphere, one of the most important is the existence of wet/dry cycling. However, the abundant literature on WS behaviour in different atmospheres can sometimes be confusing and lacks clear criteria regarding certain aspects that are addressed in the present paper. What corrosion models best fit the obtained data? How long does it take for the rust layer to stabil...

  9. Corrosion studies on casing steel in CO2 storage environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Benedictus, T.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of casing steel N80 in brine plus CO2 was studied in autoclave to simulate the CO2 storage environment. The brine solution used in the study contained 130 g/l NaCl, 22.2 g/l CaCl2 and 4 g/l MgCl2. The CO2 was charged in the autoclave at different pressures (60, 80 and 100 bar)

  10. Bacillus sp. Acting as Dual Role for Corrosion Induction and Corrosion Inhibition with Carbon Steel (CS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K. Karn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Present work investigated the role of five different bacteria species as a corrosion inducer as well as corrosion inhibitor with carbon steel (CS. We observed the ability of different bacteria species on the metal surface attachment, biofilm formation, and determined Peroxidase, Catalase enzyme activity in the detached biofilm from the CS surface. We found that each strain has diverse conduct for surface attachment like DS1 3.3, DS2 2.5, DS3 4.3, DS4 4.0, and DS5 4.71 log cfu/cm2 and for biofilm 8.3 log cfu/cm2. The enzyme Peroxidase, Catalase was found in huge concentration inside the biofilm Peroxidase was maximum for DS4 36.0 U/ml and least for DS3 19.54 U/ml. Whereas, Catalase was highest for DS4, DS5 70.14 U/ml and least 57.2 U/ml for DS2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was conducted to examine the biofilm and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS were utilized to observe corrosion in the presence of bacteria. The electrochemical results confirmed that DS1, DS3, DS4, and DS5 strains have statistically significant MIC-factors (Microbially Influenced Corrosion of 5.46, 8.51, 2.36, and 1.04, while DS2 protective effect factor of 0.89. Weight reduction results with carbon steel likewise supports that corrosion was initiated by DS1 and DS3, while DS2 and DS5 have no any impact though with DS4 we watched less weight reduction however assumed no role in the corrosion. We established the relation of Peroxidase enzyme activity of the isolates. DS1, DS3 and having Peroxidase in the range 22.18, 19.54 U/ml which induce the corrosion whereas DS2 and DS5 having 28.57 and 27.0 U/ml has no any effect and DS4 36 U/ml has inhibitory effect, increasing concentration inhibiting the corrosion. For Catalase DS1, DS3 have 67.28, 61.57 U/ml which induce corrosion while DS2 and DS5 57.71 and 59.14 U/ml also has no effect whereas DS4 70.14 U/ml can inhibit corrosion. Results clearly express that in a specific range both enzymes can induce the corrosion

  11. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel weldments in physiological solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, A.; Azam, M.; Deen, K. M.

    2018-01-01

    In this study corrosion behavior of TIG welded 316L stainless steel plates in simulated biological solutions is investigated. The mechanical testing results showed slight decrease in ductility after welding and the fracture surface represented mixed cleavage and inclusions containing dimple structure. The heat affected and weld zone (WZ) demonstrated higher corrosion potential and relatively large pitting tendency than base metal (BM) in both Hank’s and Ringer’s solution. The formation of delta (δ) ferrite in the heat affected and WZ decreased the corrosion resistance as confirmed from potentiodynamic Tafel scans. The decrease in pitting resistance and lower protection tendency of the WZ compared to BM and heat affected zone was also quantified from the cyclic polarization trends.

  12. Alternatives to reduce corrosion of carbon steel storage drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, L.R.; Beitel, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    The major tasks of this research were (a) pollution prevention opportunity assessments on the overpacking operations for failed or corroded drums, (b) research on existing container corrosion data, (c) investigation of the storage environment of the new Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Type II storage modules, (d) identification of waste streams that demonstrate deleterious corrosion affects on drum storage life, and (e) corrosion test cell program development. Twenty-one waste streams from five US Department of Energy (DOE) sites within the DOE Complex were identified to demonstrate a deleterious effect to steel storage drums. The major components of these waste streams include acids, salts, and solvent liquids, sludges, and still bottoms. The solvent-based waste streams typically had the shortest time to failure: 0.5 to 2 years. The results of this research support the position that pollution prevention evaluations at the front end of a project or process will reduce pollution on the back end

  13. Influence of remanent magnetization on pitting corrosion in pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H. [ESIME Zacatenco, SEPI Electronica Instituto Politecnico Nacional Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [DIM-ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perez-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Region Sur Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Statistical studies performed in Mexico indicate that leakage due to external pitting corrosion is the most likely cause of failure of buried pipelines. When pipelines are inspected with the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technology, which is routinely used, the magnetization level of every part of the pipeline changes as the MFL tool travels through it. Remanent magnetization stays in the pipeline wall after inspection, at levels that may differ from a point to the next. This paper studies the influence of the magnetic field on pitting corrosion. Experiments were carried out on grade 52 steel under a level of remanent magnetization and other laboratory conditions that imitated the conditions of a pipeline after an MLF inspection. Non-magnetized control samples and magnetized samples were subjected to pitting by immersion in a solution containing chlorine and sulfide ions for seven days, and then inspected with optical microscopy. Results show that the magnetic field in the pipeline wall significantly increases pitting corrosion.

  14. Atmospheric corrosion evaluation of galvanised steel by thin layer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroosnijder, M.F.; Brugnoni, C.; Laguzzi, G.; Luvidi, L.; De Cristofaro, N

    2004-09-01

    The release of certain metals, such as zinc, from outdoor constructions due to atmospheric corrosion is of some concern. For risk assessments the evaluation of the amount of released metal is of importance. Various methods can be used to study the release of metals. These include those using radiotracers, such as thin layer activation (TLA). To verify the reliability of TLA with respect to conventional techniques in the evaluation of atmospheric corrosion, galvanised steel was exposed to a mild marine environment. The amount of zinc in the corrosion products, released through artificial leaching, at different time intervals was evaluated by TLA and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). A good correlation between the results was found indicating the feasibility of TLA for these release studies.

  15. Effect of water impurities on stress corrosion cracking in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungbery, L.G.; Cubicciotti, D

    1985-01-01

    A series of stress corrosion tests, including corrosion potential and water chemistry measurements, has been performed in the Swedish Ringhals-1 boiling water reactor. Tests have been run under reactor start-up and reactor power operation with normal reactor water conditions and with alternate water chemistry in which hydrogen is added to the feedwater to suppress stress corrosion cracking. During one alternate water chemistry test, there was significant intergranular corrosion cracking of sensitized stainless specimens. It is shown that nitrate and sulfate, arising from an accidental resin intrusion, are likely causes. Nitrate increases the oxidizing power of the water, and sulfate enhances cracking under oxidizing conditions. During another test under start-up conditions, enhanced transgranular stress corrosion cracking in low alloy steels and possibly initiation of cracking in a nickel base alloy was observed as a result of resin intrusion into the reactor water. The intrusion produced acid and sulfate, which are believed to enhance hydrogen cracking conditions

  16. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  17. Corrosion protection service life of epoxy-coated reinforcing steel in Virginia bridge decks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion protection service life extension provided by epoxy-coated reinforcement (ECR) was determined by comparing ECR and bare steel bars from 10 Virginia bridge decks built between 1981 and 1995. The objective was to determine the corrosion p...

  18. Corrosion Prediction Model of Q235 Steel in Polluted Marine Atmospheric Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Q235 steel in Qingdao and Wanning of China,the two kinds of polluted marine environment were simulated by cyclic immersion test, and the correlation of indoor cyclic immersion test and outdoor marine atmospheric corrosion test of Q235 steel were studied. The corrosion morphologies, corrosion products, corrosion kinetics of Q235 steel were investigated with methods of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and mass loss. The results reveal that the corrosion morphologies and compositions of corrosion products after cyclic immersion test agree with those after the real atmospheric test. Corrosion prediction model of Q235 steel in two kinds of marine atmospheric environment was built combined with Grey correlation method: T QD=137.002 t 1.093, T WN=102.398 t 0.952.

  19. Performance evaluation of corrosion inhibitors and galvanized steel in concrete exposure specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Corrosion inhibitor admixtures (CIA) and galvanized reinforcing steel (GS) are used for the corrosion protection for reinforced concrete bridges. The results of a 3.5-year evaluation of exposure specimens containing CIA from three different manufactu...

  20. Corrosion resistance of hsla steel after various surface treatments in chloride environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borko, K.; Pastorek, F.; Fintová, Stanislava; Hadzima, B.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 4 (2016), s. 99-102 ISSN 1335-4205 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Corrosion properties * Iron phosphating * S355J steel Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  1. Prevention of Crevice Corrosion of STS 304 Stainless Steel by a Mg-alloy Galvanic Anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, U. J.; Yun, B. D.; Kim, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of crevice corrosion was studied for STS 304 stainless steel using a Mg-alloy galvanic anode in solutions with various specific resistivity. The crevice corrosion and corrosion protection characteristics of the steel was investigated by the electrochemical polarization and galvanic corrosion tests. Experimental results show that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel does not occur in solutions of high specific resistivity, but it occurs in solutions of low specific resistivity like in solutions with resistivities of 30, 60 and 115 Ω · m. With decreasing specific resistivity of the solution, the electrode potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice is lowered. The potential of STS 304 stainless steel in the crevice after coupling is cathodically polarized more by decreasing specific resistivity indicating that the crevice corrosion of STS 304 stainless steel is prevented by the Mg-alloy galvanic anode

  2. Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jae-Won; Ha, Young-Kyoung; Choi, In-Kyu; Chun, Kwan-Sik

    1996-01-01

    Corrosion behaviors of carbon steel in wet Na-bentonite medium were studied. Corrosion rate of carbon steel in wet bentonite was measured to be 20 μm/yr at 25 deg C using the AC impedance technique. This value is agreed with that obtained by weight loss at 40 deg C for 1 year. The effect of bicarbonate ion on the corrosion of carbon steel in wet bentonite was also evaluated. The carbon steels in wet bentonite having 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 M concentration of bicarbonate ion gave corrosion rates of 20, 8, and 0.2 μm/yr, respectively. Corrosion potentials of specimens were also measured and compared with the AC impedance results. Both results indicated that bicarbonate ion could effectively reduce the corrosion rate of carbon steels in bentonite due to the formation of protective layer on the carbon steel. (author)

  3. Effects of Heat Input on Microstructure, Corrosion and Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghusoon Ridha Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of input heat of different welding processes on the microstructure, corrosion, and mechanical characteristics of welded duplex stainless steel (DSS are reviewed. Austenitic stainless steel (ASS is welded using low-heat inputs. However, owing to differences in the physical metallurgy between ASS and DSS, low-heat inputs should be avoided for DSS. This review highlights the differences in solidification mode and transformation characteristics between ASS and DSS with regard to the heat input in welding processes. Specifically, many studies about the effects of heat energy input in welding process on the pitting corrosion, intergranular stress, stresscorrosion cracking, and mechanical properties of weldments of DSS are reviewed.

  4. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li-83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400 0 C in flowing anisothermal 17Li-83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li-83Pb at 400 0 C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450 0 C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions. (orig.)

  5. Electrochemistry of stress corrosion cracking of brass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleet, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of pure copper and two brass (copper-zinc alloy) compositions (80/20 and 60/39) was studied in several ammoniacal and nonammoniacal aqueous solutions at open circuit potential, applying a constant load technique. The SCC tests, using tensile stress and loop specimens, showed pure copper to be immune in all solutions tested, the αΒ'-brass (60/39) alloy to be most susceptible to SCC, and the (80/20) alloy to have intermediate SCC susceptibility. The electrochemical tests (corrosion potential and Tafel plots) were utilized to prove the validity of the dissolution mechanism for the SCC propagation in solution with intermediate corrosion rates (∼0.1 2 ). The electrochemical tests were also used to predict the preferential dissolution of zinc (dezincification) in noncomplexing solutions, and the higher dissolution of copper (than that of zinc) in complexing solutions. The formation of intermediate cuprous complexes was detected using a rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) composed of a brass (80/20) disc and platinum ring, in ammonium chloride-cupric chloride solution. At very low corrosion rates, the stress corrosion cracking (is present) is assumed to operate by the brittle mechanical fracture mechanism in solution where ammonium ions (NH 4 + ) can be generated

  6. Design and fabrication of an apparatus to study stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscarlet, Carol

    1977-01-01

    In this research thesis, the author first gives a large overview of tests methods of stress corrosion cracking: definition and generalities, stress corrosion cracking in the laboratory (test methods with imposed deformation, load or strain rate, theories of hydrogen embrittlement, of adsorption, of film breaking, and electrochemical theories), stress corrosion cracking in alkaline environment (in light water reactors, of austenitic stainless steels), and conventional tests on polycrystals and monocrystals of stainless steels in sodium hydroxide. The next parts address the core of this research, i.e. the design of an autoclave containing a tensile apparatus, the fabrication of this apparatus, the stress application device, the sample environment, pressurization, control and command, preliminary tests in a melt salt, and the first cracking tests [fr

  7. Corrosion behaviour of the welded steel sheets used in automotive industry

    OpenAIRE

    D. Katundi; A. Tosun-Bayraktar; E. Bayraktar; D. Toueix

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is to characterise the corrosion resistance in the steel sheets (Hot dip galvanizing of steel sheets) used in automotive industry. In fact, corrosion of automotive components by road salt is a widely known problem. The different parts under the car body and the interior surface of body panels suffer easily from the corrosive products deposited on roads and used mainly to melt snow. A comparison in a chemical investigation of the corrosion rate for base metals (without w...

  8. Silane coatings for mitigation of microbiologically influenced corrosion of mild steel

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saadi, Saad Hamood Mohaissn

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mild steel continues to be the most extensively used construction material in several industries. However, steels suffer from corrosion in aqueous solutions. Coating is one of the common measures to circumvent corrosion. Silane coating is among the recent and promising measures to improve the corrosion resistance of metallic materials in corrosive environments. Silane coatings are becoming increasingly popular particularly over the traditional chromate conversion co...

  9. Evaluation of corrosion of prestressing steel in concrete using non-destructive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, M.G.; Maddocks, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    Use of high strength steel in pre-stressed concrete structures has been in use in Australia for many decades. Highway bridges, among other structures, have extensively used pre-stress-ing and post-tensioning techniques. Although prestressing offers many competitive edges to it's traditional rival reinforced concrete, the consequence of damage to prestressing tendons could be catastrophic. Periodic visual inspections of prestressed concrete bridges throughout the world have demonstrated the growing problem of deterioration of prestressing steel as a result of corrosion. Early detection of damage to prestressing steel therefore is of paramount importance. Unfortunately no reliable and practical non-destructive evaluation technique has been available for assessing the condition of prestressing steel within concrete although a number of techniques appear promising. The following inspection methods have been highlighted in recent literature for their use as non-destructive inspection methods for prestressed concrete structures. In addition to the techniques discussed, a number of destructive, or invasive techniques also exist for determination of the corrosion status of prestressing tendons in prestressed structures. The following non-destructive techniques are discussed in some detail: Radiography; Computed Tomography; Surface Penetrating Radar; Impact Echo; Acoustic Emission Monitoring; Magnetic Field Disturbance Technique; Remnant Magnetism Method; Linear Polarisation Method; Electrical Resistance and Surface Potential Survey. The portability, limitations and use in Australia of these techniques are summarised in a table

  10. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  11. An Industrial Perspective on Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Some Commercially Used Carbon Steels and Corrosion-Resistant Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Yugo; Daigo, Yuzo; Sugahara, Katsuo

    2017-08-01

    Commercial metals and alloys like carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-based super alloys frequently encounter the problem of environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) and resulting failure in engineering components. This article aims to provide a perspective on three critical industrial applications having EAC issues: (1) corrosion and cracking of carbon steels in automotive applications, (2) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in salt production and processing, and (3) EAC of iron- and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water. The review focuses on current industrial-level understanding with respect to corrosion fatigue, hydrogen-assisted cracking, or stress corrosion cracking, as well as the dominant factors affecting crack initiation and propagation. Furthermore, some ongoing industrial studies and directions of future research are also discussed.

  12. A New Understanding on AC Corrosion of Pipeline Steel in Alkaline Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M.; Du, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of X80 pipeline steel at various frequencies AC was investigated in carbonate/bicarbonate solution using the polarization curve, EIS test, Mott-Schottky curve and immersion tests. A new understanding on AC corrosion of the steel in alkaline environment is proposed. Decreasing AC frequency negatively shifts the corrosion potential and increases the corrosion rate of steel, as well as corrosion pits occur more readily. The superimposed AC shifts the critical pitting potential negatively and degrades the passivity of the steel. AC reduces the compactness and uniformity of the passive film formed on the steel and increases the possibility of the breakdown of the film, as well decreases the film thickness. The application of AC could prevent the passive film forming on the surface of X80 steel and result in a destructive effect on the film formed on the steel surface, especially at the low-frequency AC.

  13. Corrosion Inhibitor of Carbon Steel from Onion Peel Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Samsudin Asep

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon steels composed by two main elements, they are iron (Fe and carbon (C elements which widely used in industrial because of its resistance and more affordable than stainless steel, but their weakness is they have low corrosion resistance. One way to modify carbon steel is by coating them with antioxidant compounds that can delay, slow down, and prevent lipid oxidation process, which obtained from onion peel extract. Several studies on corrosion inhibitors have been performed. However, the efficiency was not reach the optimum. This study aims to examine the effect of onion peel extract concentration on the efficiency of corrosion inhibitor and characterization of the green corrosion inhibitor from onion peel extract. This research method begins by extracting onion peel to 200 ml solvent which we use aquadest and methanol and mixed with 5 grams of crushed onion peel, then let them be extracted for 60 minutes with room temperature. Once it was filtered and the solution obtained, followed by evaporating process with rotary evaporator to decrease the content of solvent. The product is ready to be used as a green corrosion inhibitor of carbon steel in 1 mol/L HCl. While the analysis used is HPLC qualitative analysis, and electroplatting process. The impedance is measured at a frequency of 100 kHz to 4 mHz with an AC current of 10mV. Inhibitor concentrations are vary between 2 ml and 4 ml of onion peel extract. Electroplatting is done within 30 minutes with 10 minutes each checking time. Furthermore, quantitative analysis was done for the analysis of corrosion rate and weight loss. Based on HPLC analysis, it is known that the extract of onion peel contains 1mg/L of quercetin, which is belong to flavonoid group as green inhibitor. While electroplatting process, aquadest solvent having average efficiency of 99,57% for 2 ml of extract, and 99,60% for 4 ml of extract. Methanol solvent having average efficiency of 99,52% for 2 ml of extract and 99

  14. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-04-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 a). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  15. Corrosion behaviour of unalloyed steel in Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauer, R.

    1988-01-01

    The production of hydrogen can cause problems in a repository for low and intermediate level waste. Since the production of gas is mainly due to the corrosion of unalloyed steel, it is important to have as reliable data as possible for the corrosion rate in anaerobic cement. A review of the literature shows that the corrosion current densities are in the range of 0.01 to 0.1 μA/cm 2 (corresponding to corrosion rates between 0.1 and 1.2 μm/a). This implies hydrogen production rates between 0.022 and 0.22 mol/(m 2 xa). Corrosion rates of the abovementioned order of magnitude are technically irrelevant, so that there is little interest in determining them accurately. Furthermore, their determination entails problems of measurement technique. In the present situation it would therefore appear risky to accept the lower value as proven. Experiments are proposed to reduce the present uncertainty. (author) 35 refs., 10 figs

  16. Effect of corrosion and sandblasting on the high cycle fatigue behavior of reinforcing B500C steel bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C. Vasco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a series of applications, steel reinforced concrete structures are subjected to fatigue loads during their service life, what in most cases happens in corrosive environments. Surface treatments have been proved to represent proper processes in order to improve both fatigue and corrosion resistances. In this work, the effect of corrosion and sandblasting on the high cycle fatigue behavior reinforcing steel bars is investigated. The investigated material is the reinforcing steel bar of technical class B500C, of nominal diameter of 12 mm. Steel bars specimens were first exposed to corrosion in alternate salt spray environment for 30 and 60 days and subjected to both tensile and fatigue tests. Then, a series of specimens were subjected to common sandblasting, corroded and mechanically tested. Metallographic investigation and corrosion damage evaluation regarding mass loss and martensitic area reduction were performed. Tensile tests were conducted after each corrosion exposure period prior to the fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were performed at a stress ratio, R, of 0.1 and loading frequency of 20 Hz. All fatigue tests series as well as tensile test were also performed for as received steel bars to obtain the reference behavior. The results have shown that sandblasting hardly affects the tensile behavior of the uncorroded material. The effect of sandblasting on the tensile behavior of pre-corroded specimens seems to be also limited. On the other hand, fatigue results indicate an improved fatigue behavior for the sandblasted material after 60 days of corrosion exposure. Martensitic area reductions, mass loss and depth of the pits were significantly smaller for the case of sandblasted materials, which confirms an increased corrosion resistance

  17. Effect of Wall Shear Stress on Corrosion Inhibitor Film Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto Maya, Christian M.

    In oil and gas production, internal corrosion of pipelines causes the highest incidence of recurring failures. Ensuring the integrity of ageing pipeline infrastructure is an increasingly important requirement. One of the most widely applied methods to reduce internal corrosion rates is the continuous injection of chemicals in very small quantities, called corrosion inhibitors. These chemical substances form thin films at the pipeline internal surface that reduce the magnitude of the cathodic and/or anodic reactions. However, the efficacy of such corrosion inhibitor films can be reduced by different factors such as multiphase flow, due to enhanced shear stress and mass transfer effects, loss of inhibitor due to adsorption on other interfaces such as solid particles, bubbles and droplets entrained by the bulk phase, and due to chemical interaction with other incompatible substances present in the stream. The first part of the present project investigated the electrochemical behavior of two organic corrosion inhibitors (a TOFA/DETA imidazolinium, and an alkylbenzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride), with and without an inorganic salt (sodium thiosulfate), and the resulting enhancement. The second part of the work explored the performance of corrosion inhibitor under multiphase (gas/liquid, solid/liquid) flow. The effect of gas/liquid multiphase flow was investigated using small and large scale apparatus. The small scale tests were conducted using a glass cell and a submersed jet impingement attachment with three different hydrodynamic patterns (water jet, CO 2 bubbles impact, and water vapor cavitation). The large scale experiments were conducted applying different flow loops (hilly terrain and standing slug systems). Measurements of weight loss, linear polarization resistance (LPR), and adsorption mass (using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance, EQCM) were used to quantify the effect of wall shear stress on the performance and integrity of corrosion inhibitor

  18. Quick corrosion cracking test methods for high strength stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnich, L.Ya.; Shubadeeva, L.I.; Erofeeva, V.L.; Lashchevskij, V.B.

    1994-01-01

    Quicks method for testing high strength stainless steels during 10h under atmospheric and sea conditions has been developed. It is shown that (NH 4 ) 2 Se 2 O 8 - 13.5+-1 g/l, NaCl - 40+-2g/l, H 2 SO 4 -5g/l solution at 50+-2 C temperature is recommended for quick tests for tendency to corrosion cracking during. Development of steels and technologies of their treatment. Tests of steels of 08Kh15N5D2T, 07Kh16N6, 20Kh13, 40Kh13, 13Kh15N4AMD and other types can be performed in boiling solutions: H 2 SO 4 (55 ml/l)+CuSO 4 (110 g/l) or MgCl 2 (200 g/l hexahydrate)

  19. Characterization of the corrosion behavior of the carbon steel liner in Hanford Site single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Schwenk, E.B.; Danielson, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    Six safety initiatives have been identified for accelerating the resolution of waste tank safety issues and closure of unreviewed safety questions. Safety Initiative 5 is to reduce safety and environmental risk from tank leaks. Item d of Safety Initiative 5 is to complete corrosion studies of single-shell tanks to determine failure mechanisms and corrosion control options to minimize further degradation by June 1994. This report has been prepared to fulfill Safety Initiative 5, Item d. The corrosion mechanisms that apply to Hanford Site single-shell tanks are stress corrosion cracking, pitting/crevice corrosion, uniform corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. The corrosion data relevant to the single-shell tanks dates back three decades, when results were obtained from in-situ corrosion coupons in a few single-shell tanks. Since that time there have been intertank transfers, evaporation, and chemical alterations of the waste. These activities have changed the character and the present composition of the waste is not well characterized. All conclusions and recommendations are made in the absence of relevant laboratory experimental data and tank inspection data. The report attempts to identify the failure mechanisms by a literature survey of carbon steel data in environments similar to the single-shell tank wastes, and by a review of the work performed at the Savannah River Site where similar wastes are stored in similar carbon steel tanks. Based on these surveys, and in the absence of data specific to Hanford single-shell tanks, it may be concluded that the single-shell tanks identified as leakers failed primarily by stress corrosion cracking due to the presence of high nitrate/low hydroxide wastes and residual stresses. In addition, some failures may be attributed to pitting under crevices in low hydroxide locations

  20. Steel corrosion in ammonia solutions studied by Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibicu, I.; Samide, A.; Preda, M.

    2002-01-01

    The corrosive action of diluted ammonia solutions has been thoroughly studied until 90s. A particular interest towards studying it after this time arisen from problems relating to environment protection. We have initiated a programme which involves the study of steel samples in ammoniac solutions. The steel samples were obtained from industrial Fe-C steel with C of low concentration. The surface of the samples was diamond polished, subsequently degreased and desiccated. The corrosion process of the samples was performed in an electrolytic cell with diluted ammonia solutions of concentration ranging within 10 -1 - 10 -4 N. Moessbauer measurements were performed at room temperature in the transmission (TMS) and conversion electron spectroscopy (CEMS) using a conventional constant-acceleration spectrometer with a 57 Co-Rh source. The TMS spectrum shows the presence of a single sextet: α-iron. The best fit of the CEMS spectra uses an addition wide line to the sextet. The parameters of the wide line correspond to a non-stoichiometric oxide with (probably) small particles. Also the line parameters prove that we have studied the early stage of the corrosion process. All CEMS spectra show that on the surface the directions of the γ-ray and the magnetic moments are nearly perpendicular. There is a magnetic anisotropy on the surface of the samples, which remains even in the corroded samples. In contrast TMS spectrum shows that in the interior of the sample the magnetic moments are in a random arrangement. The result of the corrosion is the layer appearance (non-stoichiometric iron oxide) on the sample surface. The layer thickness increases with the change of the NH 3 concentration from 10 -1 to 10 -4 N. (authors)

  1. Kinetic studies of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1977-01-01

    Use of time-to-failure curves for stress-corrosion cracking processes may lead to incorrect estimates of structural life, if material is strongly dependent upon prestress levels. Technique characterizes kinetics of crackgrowth rates and intermediate arrest times by load-level changes.

  2. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Certain Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasse, K. R.; Dorward, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    SC resistance of new high-strength alloys tested. Research report describes progress in continuing investigation of stress corrosion (SC) cracking of some aluminum alloys. Objective of program is comparing SC behavior of newer high-strength alloys with established SC-resistant alloy.

  3. Estimation of atmospheric corrosion of high-strength, low-alloy steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    This data analysis was undertaken to investigate the weatherability of steels : whose compositions do not fall in the range of ASTM Standard G101, Estimating : the Atmospheric Corrosion Resistance of Low-Alloy Steels.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels in Lithium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in various concentrations of lithium, bromide solution was investigated by using the conventional weight loss measurement method. The results obtained show that corrosion of these steels occurred due to the aggressive bromide ion in the medium. Duplex stainless steel shows a greater resistance to corrosion than austenitic stainless steel in the medium. This was attributed to equal volume proportion of ferrite and austenite in the structure of duplex stainless steel coupled with higher content of chromium in its composition. Both steels produced electrochemical noise at increased concentrations of lithium bromide due to continuous film breakdown and repair caused by reduction in medium concentration by the alkaline corrosion product while surface passivity observed in duplex stainless steel is attributed to film stability on this steel.

  5. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu [Politehnica Univ. Timisoara (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  6. Microstructure characterization and corrosion testing of MAG pulsed duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitelea, Ion; Utu, Ion Dragos; Urlan, Sorin Dumitru; Karancsi, Olimpiu

    2017-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels are extremely attractive construction materials for their usage in intense aggressive environments. They offer numerous advantages compared to the austenitic stainless steels having an excellent behavior to pitting and cavernous corrosion, and a high resistance to stress cracking corrosion in chlorides media. However, their corrosion properties are largely dependent on the microstructural factors such as: the quantitative ratio of the two phases ferrite/austenite (F/A), the presence of intermetallic compounds and the distribution of the alloying elements between the ferrite and austenite. As a result of the thermal cycles experienced by the base metal without a post-weld heat treatment, the mechanical properties are significantly different in the heat affected zone and the deposited metal compared with the properties of the base metal. The present paper highlights the effect of the post-weld solution treatment in order to restore the balance between austenite and ferrite in the welded joint areas and also to limit undesirable precipitation of secondary phases with implications for increasing the corrosion resistance.

  7. Progress in the Research of Fatigue of Weathering Steel after Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianyu, Liang; Jian, Yao; Youwu, Xu

    2017-12-01

    Weathering steel has a good corrosion resistance in the atmosphere, and the application of weathering steel in civil structure also reduces the cost of painting and maintenance. It is also possible for the bare weathering steel to bear the fatigue load with a rust layer. This paper summarizes the fatigue researches after corrosion of weathering steel, including the shape of specimens, failure modes of fatigue and the conclusions obtained through experimental investigations. It is also introduced the fatigue model of weathering steel after corrosion, which can be useful for the engineering application or further researches.

  8. Preventive effect of shot peening on stress corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okido, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Toshihiko; Enomoto, Kunio; Saito, Hideyo; Morinaka, Ren; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    The effect of shot peening (SP) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) prevention was evaluated from the viewpoints of crack initiation and propagation. It was found that the residual stress in a Type-304 stainless-steel specimen is changed - from tensile of 300 MPa to compressive of -800 MPa - by shot peening, and the effective SP depth is 0.35 mm. It was also found that the crack initiation and propagation were prevented by shot peening. The mechanism by which the shot peening prevents these phenomena is explained according to the theory of superposition and loading history. That is, the prevention of crack initiation and propagation results from the fact that the compressive residual stress caused by SP decreases the applied load on the crack surface and prevents rupturing of the oxide film on the surface. Moreover, the effects of SCC prevention were shown to be valid when cyclic loading is applied after peening. (author)

  9. The use of different techniques for determination of pitting corrosion potential of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskelinen, P.; Forsen, O.; Onnela, J.; Ylaesaari, S.; Haenninen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Three different techniques for pitting corrosion potential measurement on austenitic stainless steel (Fe18Cr10Ni) were compared: conventional polarization method, a new Avesta electrochemical corrosion measurement cell and a scratch technique. Special attention was paid to the effects of crevice corrosion during pitting corrosion potential measurement and to their elimination. Development of a rapid test technique for reliable pitting corrosion potential determination was aimed at and resulted from comparison of the different techniques

  10. Apollo experience report: The problem of stress-corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Stress-corrosion cracking has been the most common cause of structural-material failures in the Apollo Program. The frequency of stress-corrosion cracking has been high and the magnitude of the problem, in terms of hardware lost and time and money expended, has been significant. In this report, the significant Apollo Program experiences with stress-corrosion cracking are discussed. The causes of stress-corrosion cracking and the corrective actions are discussed, in terminology familiar to design engineers and management personnel, to show how stress-corrosion cracking can be prevented.

  11. Tunneling corrosion mechanism of the hot forged austenitic stainless steel in highly oxidizing nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Hiroo; Kajimura, Haruhiko

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic Stainless Steels have been used for reprocessing plants where spent nuclear fuels are dealt with in hot nitric acid. Conventional stainless steels are resistant enough to nitric acid. However, they are prone to localized corrosion when nitric acid becomes highly oxidizing with birth of oxidants such as Ce 4+ or Cr 6+ ion during the reprocessing. Pitting type corrosion, so-called tunneling or end-grain corrosion occurred on the forgings of 25%-20%-Nb stainless steel (310Nb stainless steel) in such nitric acid solutions because of transpassive corrosion. It has been well known that metal surfaces of steel products casted, forged or rolled are susceptible to the tunneling corrosion in aggressive corrosion media. Nevertheless, neither clear explanations of the mechanism nor definite countermeasures have been proposed yet. This paper describes the mechanism and countermeasures on the tunneling corrosion of stainless steels in nitric acid relevant to spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. The results obtained are as follows: both general and intergranular corrosion occur on austenitic stainless steels in boiling 8N HNO 3 with Cr 6+ ions. Tunneling corrosion is initiated and propagates at the metal surfaces of 310Nb stainless steel forgings along chromium depleted areas vertical to metal flows. The grooves due to the tunneling corrosion are of diameters of 0.5 to 2 mm with a maximum depth of 6mm depending on exposure time and Cr 6+ concentration in nitric acid. Tunneling corrosion proceeds by build up of galvanic corrosion cells with Cr depleted parts as anodes and their neighborhoods as cathodes. The Cr depleted parts are formed during solidification of ingots and still retained parallel to the metal flow even after forging. The ESR (Electro Slag Remelting) is one of the useful preventive methods to tunneling corrosion from the view point of steel homogenization

  12. Hydrogen sulfide corrosion of weld regions in API X52 steel; Corrosion por acido sulfhidrico de las regiones de soldadura en acero API X52

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas-Martinez, L.F [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: fernando.arenas@uadec.edu.mx; Garcia-Cerecero, G. [Corporacion Mexicana de Investigacion en Materiales S.A. de C.V., Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: ggarcia@comimsa.com

    2012-10-15

    The corrosion behavior of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) regions has been studied using potentiodynamic polarization and polarization resistance (LPR) techniques. Experiments were conducted in hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S)-containing brine and in H{sub 2}S-free brine. Welds were made on API 5L X52 steel. Due to differences in their microstructure, chemical composition and residual stress level, weld regions exhibited different responses under H{sub 2}S corrosion. Base metal exhibited the highest corrosion rate (CR) and the most cathodic corrosion potential. [Spanish] Se estudio el comportamiento ante la corrosion de las regiones de soldadura de un cordon realizado por arco metalico con gas (GMAW) sobre un acero grado API X52 mediante las tecnicas de polarizacion potencio dinamica y resistencia a la polarizacion (LPR). Los experimentos se realizaron utilizando salmuera con 300 ppm de acido sulfhidrico (H{sub 2}S) y salmuera libre de H{sub 2}S como electrolitos. Debido a las diferencias en su microestructura, composicion quimica y el nivel de esfuerzos residuales, las regiones de soldadura mostraron diferentes respuestas a la corrosion por H{sub 2}S. El metal base exhibio la velocidad de corrosion (VC) mas alta y el potencial de corrosion mas catodico.

  13. Inhibition of mild steel corrosion using Jatropha Curcas leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLORUNFEMI MICHAEL AJAYI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha Curcas leaf was investigated as a green inhibitor on the degradation of mild steel in 4 M HCl and 4 M H2SO4 aqueous solutions using gasometric technique. Mild steel coupons of dimension 2 × 1.5 cm were immersed in test solutions of uninhibited acid and also those with extract concentrations of 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml and 10 ml at 30 oC, for up to 30 minutes. The results showed that as the concentration of the extract increases, there was reduction in the corrosion rate. As the extract concentration increased from 4 ml to 10 ml at 30 minutes exposure, the volume of hydrogen gas evolved decreased from 19.1 cm3 to 11.2 cm3 in H2SO4 medium, while it reduced to 5 cm3 from 9 cm3 in HCl medium. Also, the metal surface-phytoconstituent interaction mechanism showed that 6 minutes is the best exposure time for the adsorption of the extract in both acidic media. The Jatropha Curcas leaf extract was adsorbed on the mild steel surface to inhibit corrosion, while the experimental data obtained at 30 minutes exposure in both acidic media were well fitted with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Hence, Jatropha Curcas leaf extract is a good and safe inhibitor in both acidic solutions.

  14. In situ AFM study of pitting corrosion and corrosion under strain on a 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.A. [CEA de Saclay, DRECAM/SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Cousty, J.; Masson, J-L. [CEA de Saclay, DRECAM/SPCSI, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Bataillon, C. [CEA de Saclay, DEN/DPC/LECA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    Our study is centred on surface localised corrosion under strain of a standard stainless steel (304L). The interest we take in these corrosion phenomena is led by the general misunderstanding of its primary initiation steps. The goal of this study is to determine precisely the relationships between local geometrical defects (grain boundaries, dislocation lines, etc) or chemical defects (inclusions) with the preferential sites of corrosion on the strained material. By combining three techniques at the same time: Atomic Force Microscopy, an electrochemical cell and a traction plate, we can observe in situ the effect of localised stress and deformation on the sample surface exposed to a corrosive solution. We managed to build an original set-up compatible with all the requirements of these three different techniques. Furthermore, we prepared the surface of our sample as flat as possible to decrease at maximum the topographical noise in order to observe the smallest defect on the surface. By using a colloidal suspension of SiO{sub 2}, we obtained surfaces with a typical corrugation (RMS) of about 1 A for areas of at least 1 {mu}m{sup 2}. Our experimental study has been organised in two primary investigations: - In situ study of the morphology evolution of the surface under a corrosive chloride solution (borate buffer with NaCl salt). The influence of time, NaCl concentration, and potential was investigated; - In situ exploration of a 304L strained surface. It revealed the first stages of the surface plastic evolutions like activation of sliding dislocations, materialized by parallel steps of about 2 nm high in the same grain. The secondary sliding plane systems were also noticeable for higher deformation rates. Recent results concerning in situ AFM observation of corroded surfaces under strain in a chloride media will be presented. (authors)

  15. In situ AFM study of pitting corrosion and corrosion under strain on a 304L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.A.; Cousty, J.; Masson, J-L.; Bataillon, C.

    2004-01-01

    Our study is centred on surface localised corrosion under strain of a standard stainless steel (304L). The interest we take in these corrosion phenomena is led by the general misunderstanding of its primary initiation steps. The goal of this study is to determine precisely the relationships between local geometrical defects (grain boundaries, dislocation lines, etc) or chemical defects (inclusions) with the preferential sites of corrosion on the strained material. By combining three techniques at the same time: Atomic Force Microscopy, an electrochemical cell and a traction plate, we can observe in situ the effect of localised stress and deformation on the sample surface exposed to a corrosive solution. We managed to build an original set-up compatible with all the requirements of these three different techniques. Furthermore, we prepared the surface of our sample as flat as possible to decrease at maximum the topographical noise in order to observe the smallest defect on the surface. By using a colloidal suspension of SiO 2 , we obtained surfaces with a typical corrugation (RMS) of about 1 A for areas of at least 1 μm 2 . Our experimental study has been organised in two primary investigations: - In situ study of the morphology evolution of the surface under a corrosive chloride solution (borate buffer with NaCl salt). The influence of time, NaCl concentration, and potential was investigated; - In situ exploration of a 304L strained surface. It revealed the first stages of the surface plastic evolutions like activation of sliding dislocations, materialized by parallel steps of about 2 nm high in the same grain. The secondary sliding plane systems were also noticeable for higher deformation rates. Recent results concerning in situ AFM observation of corroded surfaces under strain in a chloride media will be presented. (authors)

  16. Inter granular stress corrosion cracking of Ignalina NPP austenitic piping of outside diameter 325 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedzinskas, L.; Klimasauskas, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Inter Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of Ignalina NPP main circulation circuit piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel is presented covering current performances and further 'Ageing Management' related actions and plans as well as experience (lessons learned) on solving IGSCC phenomenon, which is currently under investigations and no yet comprehensive answer how to avoid it. (author)

  17. Investigation into the corrosion of high alloy steels in industrially important halogenated hydrocarbons, using a radionuclide method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vehlow, J.

    1980-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of some steels (1.4021, 1.4439, 1.4462, 1.4571) was tested in 1.1.1-C 2 H 3 Cl 3 and C 2 HCl 3 . There is no weight loss to be observed in dry and water saturated halogenated hydrocarbons. In the two-phase systems with water the hydrolysis product HCl attacks the steels. Stabilizers against hydrolysis in the halogenated hydrocarbons effect no inhibition of corrosion. In stabilized 1.1.1-C 2 H 3 Cl 3 first corrosion attack is found after incubation times, after which the stabilizer is used up. If stabilizers are removed partially incubation times decrease. The stabilizers in C 2 HCl 3 are more stable than in 1.1.1-C 2 H 3 Cl 3 but they are easier to be removed. Refined C 2 HCl 3 shows immediate weigth loss in the water phase and in the gas phase. UV-irradiaton increases the corrosiveness of both two-phase-systems. The double bond of C 2 HCl 3 is violently attacked with result of rapid decomposition and high corrosion rates. Stress corrosion cracking was not to be found on steels 1.4439 and 1.4571 in both halogenated hydrocarbons. (orig.) 891 IHOE/orig. 892 MKO [de

  18. Interaction between corrosion crack width and steel loss in RC beams corroded under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malumbela, Goitseone; Alexander, Mark; Moyo, Pilate

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results and discussions on an experimental study conducted to relate the rate of widening of corrosion cracks with the pattern of corrosion cracks as well as the level of steel corrosion for RC beams (153 x 254 x 3000 mm) that were corroded whilst subjected to varying levels of sustained loads. Steel corrosion was limited to the tensile reinforcement and to a length of 700 mm at the centre of the beams. The rate of widening of corrosion cracks as well as strains on uncracked faces of RC beams was constantly monitored during the corrosion process, along the corrosion region and along other potential cracking faces of beams using a demec gauge. The distribution of the gravimetric mass loss of steel along the corrosion region was measured at the end of the corrosion process. The results obtained showed that: the rate of widening of each corrosion crack is dependent on the overall pattern of the cracks whilst the rate of corrosion is independent of the pattern of corrosion cracks. A mass loss of steel of 1% was found to induce a corrosion crack width of about 0.04 mm.

  19. Evaluation of susceptibility of high strength steels to delayed fracture by using cyclic corrosion test and slow strain rate test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Songjie; Zhang Zuogui; Akiyama, Eiji; Tsuzaki, Kaneaki; Zhang Boping

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate susceptibilities of high strength steels to delayed fracture, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) of notched bar specimens of AISI 4135 with tensile strengths of 1300 and 1500 MPa and boron-bearing steel with 1300 MPa have been performed after cyclic corrosion test (CCT). During SSRT the humidity around the specimen was kept high to keep absorbed diffusible hydrogen. The fracture stresses of AISI 4135 steels decreased with increment of diffusible hydrogen content which increased with CCT cycles. Their delayed fracture susceptibilities could be successfully evaluated in consideration of both influence of hydrogen content on mechanical property and hydrogen entry.

  20. Some Clarifications Regarding Literature on Atmospheric Corrosion of Weathering Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research work has thrown light on the requisites for a protective rust layer to form on weathering steels (WSs in the atmosphere, one of the most important is the existence of wet/dry cycling. However, the abundant literature on WS behaviour in different atmospheres can sometimes be confusing and lacks clear criteria regarding certain aspects that are addressed in the present paper. What corrosion models best fit the obtained data? How long does it take for the rust layer to stabilize? What is the morphology and structure of the protective rust layer? What is an acceptable corrosion rate for unpainted WS? What are the guideline environmental conditions, time of wetness (TOW, SO2, and Cl−, for unpainted WS? The paper makes a review of the bibliography on this issue.

  1. Effect of mechanical pre-loadings on corrosion resistance of chromium-electroplated steel rods in marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubina Helbert, Varvara; Dhondt, Matthieu; Homette, Remi; Arbab Chirani, Shabnam; Calloch, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    Providing high hardness, low friction coefficient, as well as, relatively good corrosion resistance, chromium-plated coatings (∼20 μm) are widely used for steel cylinder rods in marine environment. However, the standardized corrosion test method (ISO 9227, NSS) used to evaluate efficiency of this type of coatings does not take into account in-service mechanical loadings on cylinder rods. Nevertheless, the uniform initial network of microcracks in chromium coating is changing under mechanical loadings. Propagation of these microcracks explains premature corrosion of the steel substrate. The aim of the study was to evaluate relationship between mechanical loadings, propagation of microcracks network and corrosion resistance of chromium coatings. After monotonic pre-loading tests, it was demonstrated by microscopic observations that the microcracks propagation started at stress levels higher than the substrate yield stress (520 MPa). The microcracks become effective, i.e. they have instantly undergone through the whole coating thickness to reach the steel substrate. The density of effective microcracks increases with the total macroscopic level, i.e. the intercrack distance goes from 60 ± 5 μm at 1% of total strain to approximately 27 ± 2 μm at 10%. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the higher the plastic strain level applied during mechanical loading, the more the corrosion potential of the sample decreased until reaching the steel substrate value of approximately ‑0.65 V/SCE after 2 h of immersion. The polarization curves have also highligthed an increase in the corrosion current density with the strain level. Therefore, electrochemical measurements could be used to realize quick and comprehensive assesment of the effect of monotonic pre-loadings on corrosion properties of the chromium coating.

  2. Hydrogen assisted cracking and CO2 corrosion behaviors of low-alloy steel with high strength used for armor layer of flexible pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenguang; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu; Li, Jianping; Zhou, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaonan; Wang, Yuxin; Liu, Chuan; Xu, Guoxiang; Misra, R. D. K.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), sulfide stress corrosion cracking (SSCC) and hydrogen embrittlement (HE) were carried out to study hydrogen assisted cracking behavior (HIC, SSCC and HE) of high strength pipeline steel used for armor layer of flexible pipe in ocean. The CO2 corrosion behavior of designed steel with high strength was studied by using immersion experiment. The experimental results demonstrate that the corrosion resistance of designed steel with tempered martensite to HIC, SSCC and HE is excellent according to specific standards, which contributes to the low concentration of dislocation and vacancies previously formed in cold rolling process. The corrosion mechanism of hydrogen induced cracking of designed steel, which involves in producing process, microstructure and cracking behavior, is proposed. The designed steel with tempered martensite shows excellent corrosion resistance to CO2 corrosion. Cr-rich compound was first formed on the coupon surface exposed to CO2-saturated brine condition and chlorine, one of the corrosion ions in solution, was rich in the inner layer of corrosion products.

  3. The effects of martensite morphology on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and hydrogen assisted cracking in A516 grade steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, M.; Tayyaba, Q.; Manzoor, T.; ud-din, Rafi; Subhani, T.; Qureshi, A. H.

    2018-01-01

    A low carbon A516 steel (0.2% C) having 0.9% Mn content has been annealed at 760 °C with predominantly austenite and martensite input structure. This treatment lead to a dual phase (DP) ferrite–martensite microstructures with 50% martensite volume fraction in two morphologies, i.e. bulk martensite (BM) and fibrous martensite (FM) respectively. The ferrite–martensite DP steels exhibits much higher strength (∼2 times) than ferrite–pearlite (FP) steel albeit with lower elongation (50%). The martensite morphology does not affect the uniform elongation but FM morphology exhibits higher strain to fracture. However, the corrosion rate is effected by the fraction of interfaces rather than the type of constituent phase. The BM condition with minimum interfaces has the least corrosion rate in weak acidic solution. The DP steels are more disposed to hydrogen embrittlement than FP steel. This phenomena causes a lowering of flow stress and strain fracture, the former is more progressive with rise in temperature than the latter. The crack nucleation is directly related to the corrosion rate, however despite twofold higher corrosion rate in BM condition, the extent of hydrogen embrittlement in both morphologies is similar because of the connected ferrite–martensite boundaries in BM morphology.

  4. Determination of susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of stainless steels type X5CrNi18-10 in field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the DL EPR method (electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop was modified and used to study the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of a stainless steel type X5CrNi18-10. The tests were performed in a special electrochemical cell, with the electrolyte in the gel form. Modified DL EPR method is characterized by simple and high accuracy measurements as well as repeatability of the test results. The indicator of susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (Qr/QpGBA obtained by modified DL EPR method is in a very good agreement with the same indicator obtained by standard DL EPR method. The modified DL EPR method is quantitative and highly selective method. Small differences in the susceptibility of the stainless steel type CrNi18-10 to intergranular corrosion and stress corrosion cracking can be determined. Test results can be obtained in a short time. The cost of tests performed by modified DL EPR method is much lower than the cost of tests by conventional chemical methods. Modified DL EPR method can be applied in the field on the stainless steels constructions.

  5. Characterization of corrosion scale formed on stainless steel delivery pipe for reclaimed water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Yu, Kanghua; Hu, Hongying; Jiang, Wei; Li, Yuhong

    2016-01-01

    To reveal corrosion behavior of stainless steel delivery pipe used in reclaimed water treatment, this research focused on the morphological, mineralogical and chemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scale and corroded passive film. Corrosion scale and coupon samples were taken from a type 304 pipe delivering reclaimed water to a clear well in service for more than 12 years. Stainless steel corrosion scales and four representative pipe coupons were investigated using mineralogy and material science research methods. The results showed corrosion scale was predominantly composed of goethite, lepidocrocite, hematite, magnetite, ferrous oxide, siderite, chrome green and chromite, the same as that of corroded pipe coupons. Hence, corrosion scale can be identified as podiform chromite deposit. The loss of chromium in passive film is a critical phenomenon when stainless steel passive film is damaged by localized corrosion. This may provide key insights toward improving a better comprehension of the formation of stainless steel corrosion scale and the process of localized corrosion. The localized corrosion behavior of stainless steel is directly connected with reclaimed water quality parameters such as residual chlorine, DO, Cl(-) and SO4(2-). In particular, when a certain amount of residual chlorine in reclaimed water is present as an oxidant, ferric iron is the main chemical state of iron minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Corrosion of Steel in High-Strength Self-Compacting Concrete Exposed to Saline Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana A. Yousif

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A research work was carried out to investigate the effectiveness of high-strength self-compacting concrete (SF-R in controlling corrosion of embedded steel. Reinforced concrete cylinders and plain cubes were subjected to 5% NaCl solution. Slump flow, J-ring, V-funnel, compressive strength, electrical resistance, and electrochemical tests were conducted. Corrosion resisting characteristics of steel were examined by monitoring corrosion potential, polarization resistance, corrosion currents, and Tafel plots. The relationship between corrosion current density and corrosion potential was established. Results were compared with characteristics of a grade 40 MPa reference concrete (R and grade 70 MPa conventional self-compacting concrete (SP. Results indicated that at 270 days of exposure, the corrosion currents for steel in SF-R were 63- and 16-fold lower compared to those of steel in R and SP concretes, respectively. This concrete showed a considerable increase in electrical resistance and compressive strength of 96 MPa at 28 days of exposure. Relying on corrosion risk classification based on corrosion current densities and corrosion potentials, the steel in SF-R concrete is definitely in the passive condition. The splendid durability performance of steel in SF-R concrete linked to adorable self-compacting features could furnish numerous opportunities for future structural applications in severe environmental conditions.

  7. Corrosion fatigue of pressure vessel steel A533B. Part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, K.

    1978-08-01

    A survey is presented of the current work, both reported and in progress, to study the corrosion fatigue of the pressure vessel steel A533B C1 1 in a BWR environment. This report is based on the available literature, laboratory visits, and attendance at the Metals Society conference (April 1978). The parameters which are considered to have the most influence on the fatigue crack growth rate are considered in turn. Because of the sparsity of the available information an International Cooperative Group on Cyclic Crack Growth Rate Testing and Evaluation has been established. The initial work of the group and Swedish participation are described. (author)

  8. Electrochemical methods for characterisation of thermal spray corrosion resistant stainless steel coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Vreijling, M.P.W.; Ferrari, G.M.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal spray stainless steel coatings for protection of low alloyed steels against different types of corrosion is limited due to high porosity levels and oxide inclusions. In this paper electrochemical methods like corrosion potential monitoring and cyclic voltammetry are reported to

  9. CORROSION INHIBITION OF CARBON STEEL XC70 IN H2SO4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-31

    Dec 31, 2012 ... In this work, we studied the efficiency of corrosion inhibition of carbon steel XC70 in H2SO4. 0.5 M aqueous solution using ... Keywords: Corrosion, carbon steel XC70, Inhibition, ferrocene derivative, Adsorption. 1. INTRODUCTION ... oxide film which may be present on the surface. The electrode was then ...

  10. Corrosion of pipe steel in CO2 containing impurities and possible solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Spruijt, M.P.N.; Borys, M.

    2013-01-01

    CO2 flue gases acquired from different sources contain a significant amount of impurities and water, which are corrosive to the pipeline steel. To design the pipelines for large scale of CO2 flue gas transport, the corrosion of pipeline steels has to be investigated in the realistic conditions. In

  11. Electrochemical study of corrosion inhibition of stainless steel in phosphoric medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnini, K.; Chtaini, A. [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Bio Corrosion, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco); Khouili, M.; Elbouadili, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Analytique, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Beni-Mellal (Morocco)

    2004-07-01

    The corrosion of metals represents a terrible waste of both natural resources and money, the failure of some stainless steel resulting from pitting corrosion is some times considered a technological problem, consequently, much effort has been expended in attempting to understand and overcome the corrosion therefore, many stainless steel/ environment combinations have been studied. The use of heterocyclic compounds as inhibitors is one of the most practical methods for protection against corrosion in acidic media. In continuation of our work on development of macrocyclic compounds as corrosion inhibitors we report in our study the corrosion inhibiting behaviour of organic compound Methoxy-2-Allyl-4 Phenol (MAP) containing coordinating and conjugation groups, at three forms (natural, polymerized and chemically treated) on the corrosion of stainless steel in phosphoric acid. This study focused on the comparison for corrosion inhibition proprieties of these different applications using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and SEM. The specimen was evaluated to determine change in his corrosion potential and resistance polarization; These MAP products have exhibited corrosion inhibition by maintaining a high resistance polarization (low corrosion rate) in each application. These results reveal that this compound is efficient inhibitor in all forms; the most inhibition efficiency is obtained with polymerized form. To further evaluate the test data, the steel surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, SEM observations of surface treated concrete confirmed presence of inhibitor on the steel surfaces. (authors)

  12. Corrosion of AISI 304 stainless steel in polluted seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brankevich, G.; Guiamet, P.; Videla, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    The sequence of microbiofouling settlement on AISI 304 stain steel samples exposed to polluted harbor sea water of a power cooling water intake is studied. The firts sates of bacterial colonization are followed by means of scanning electron microscopy during two weeks of exposure. The relation between microbiofouling and corrosion is also followed by scanning electron microscopy and evaluated through electrochemical polarization experiments. The results obtained show that microbial colonization and extracellular polimeric substances forming the biofilms have a marked influence on the electrochemical behaviour of stainless steel in sea water. Laboratory experiments using inorganic chloride solutions or artificial sea water show a considerably lesser attack of the metal than those performed 'in situ' with natural sea water. Passivity breadown is highly facilitated when complex biological and inorganic deposits (fouling) have settled on the metal surface. (Author) [pt

  13. Detection of localized and general corrosion of mild steel in simulated defense nuclear waste solutions using electrochemical noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgemon, G.L.; Ohl, P.C.; Bell, G.E.C.; Wilson, D.F.

    1995-12-01

    Underground waste tanks fabricated from mild steel store more than 60 million gallons of radioactive waste from 50 years of weapons production. Leaks are suspected in a significant number of tanks. The probable modes of corrosion failures are reported to be localized corrosion (e.g. nitrate stress corrosion cracking and pitting). The use of electrochemical noise (EN) for the monitoring and detection of localized corrosion processes has received considerable attention and application over the last several years. Proof of principle laboratory tests were conducted to verify the capability of EN evaluation to detect localized corrosion and to compare the predictions of general corrosion obtained from EN with those derived from other sources. Simple, pre-fabricated flat and U-bend specimens of steel alloys A516-Grade 60 (UNS K02100) and A537-CL 1 (UNS K02400) were immersed in temperature controlled simulated waste solutions. The simulated waste solution was either 5M NaNO 3 with 0.3M NaOH at 90 C or 11M NaNO 3 with 0.15M NaOH at 95 C. The electrochemical noise activity from the specimens was monitored and recorded for periods ranging between 140 and 240 hours. At the end of each test period, the specimens were metallographically examined to correlated EN data with corrosion damage

  14. Corrosion studies of a stainless steel structure for the ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] aqueous lithium salt blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquette, D.J.; Wrisley, K.L.; Motyka, E.; Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1990-10-01

    The aqueous lithium slat blanket (ALSB) employs water, with a dissolved lithium compound, as both the coolant and tritium breeding medium. The ALSB concept is one of three blanket options currently being examined for breeding tritium in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). To provide data and recommendations for materials and chemistry selection relevant to application of the ALSB in ITER, corrosion studies have been initiated, focusing on Type 316 stainless steel in lithium hydroxide and lithium nitrate solutions. This report presents the preliminary results of these corrosion studies. The results to date, while preliminary, suggest that even at 90 C, a blanket utilizing 10% LiOH (the current lithium salt of choice for ITER ALSB applications) will not cause catastrophic failure of 316 stainless steel by either stress corrosion cracking or localized corrosion; that the general corrosion rate will not exceed about 40 μm/yr and transport of material will certainly be much less than this value since most of the corrosion product will be included in the strong adherent surface film; and that, although hydrogen may be evolved due to electrolysis, the maximum amount of hydrogen is small compared to that expected to be produced by radiolysis. These observations are predicated on the assumption that the blanket will be completely deaerated, and that the corrosion potential of the alloy will be similar to that observed in the laboratory

  15. Effect of nitrogen alloying of stainless steels on their corrosion stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chigal, V.; Knyazheva, V.M.; Pitter, Ya.; Babich, S.G.; Bogolyubskij, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    Results of corrosion tests and structural investigations of 03Cr18Ni10 and 03Cr18Ni10Mo3 steels without nitrogen and with nitrogen content of 0.15-0.3% are presented. Corrosion-electrochemical behaviour of Cr20Ni20 steel with ultralow carbon content (0.004-0.006%) and nitrogen content with 0-0.5% as well as Cr 2 N nitride behaviour are investigated. A conclusion is made on nitrogen and excessive nitride phase effect on corrosion stability of steel in corrosive media with different reduction-oxidation properties

  16. Demonstration and Validation of Two Coat High Performance Coating System for Steel Structures in Corrosive Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Corrosion and anti-corrosives, Storage tanks, SteelCorrosion, Military bases, Fort Bragg (N.C.) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...System for Steel Structures in Corrosive Environments Final Report on Project F12-AR06 Co ns tr uc tio n En gi ne er in g R es ea rc h La bo ra...Prevention and Control Program ERDC/CERL TR-16-27 December 2016 Demonstration and Validation of Two-Coat High- Performance Coating System for Steel

  17. CORROSION AND CHEMICAL WASTE IN SAWBLADES STEEL USED IN WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernando Trugilho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective this work was to evaluate the chemical waste provoked by the wood on the sheets of steel used in the making of the mountains and cut tools. It was certain the correlationbetween the chemical waste and the extractive soluble in cold water, hot water and in the sequencetoluene and ethanol content. Two types of steel and twenty-seven species different from wood wereused. The corrosive agent, constituted of 50 g of fresh sawdust (moist mixed to 50 ml of distilledwater, it was prepared and placed inside of the plastic box, hermetically closed, on the samples ofsteel, which were totally immersed. The box was placed in a water bath pre-heated to 75°C, that themedium temperature of reaction is considered, that affects the sheet of the sawblade in operation. Thisgroup was operated to 80 rotations per minute (rpm. The time of reaction was of four hours. Afterthat time the corrosive agent was discarded and the samples were washed, dried and weighed. At theend, each sample was processed by a total period of forty hours. The chemical waste was evaluated by the weight difference suffered from beginning at the end of the experiment. For theresults it was observed that the Eucalyptus tradryphloia and the Eucalyptus phaeotricha the speciesthat provoked were, respectively, the largest and smaller chemical waste for the two types of steelappraised. Great variation exists in the chemical waste due to the effect of the species. The corrosionand chemical waste are especially related with the quality of the material solved in ethanol. The 1070steel were more attached than the 6170 steel.

  18. Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking Using Laser Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is a phenomenon where metals, when subjected to a combination of suitable loads, corrosive environment and susceptible metallurgy, develop crack-clusters that may lead to a failure. Pipeline systems all-over the world ...

  19. Study made of corrosion resistance of stainless steel and nickel alloys in nuclear reactor superheaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, S.; Hart, R. K.; Lee, R. H.; Ruther, W. E.; Schlueter, R. R.

    1967-01-01

    Experiments performed under conditions found in nuclear reactor superheaters determine the corrosion rate of stainless steel and nickel alloys used in them. Electropolishing was the primary surface treatment before the corrosion test. Corrosion is determined by weight loss of specimens after defilming.

  20. Effect of Cl on the corrosive wear of AISI 321 stainless steel in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2002-07-25

    Jul 25, 2002 ... 1994). It was found that the accelerating effect of Cl– on corrosive wear was caused by the Cl– assisted surface film cracking. In addition, there are controversies about the role of surface film in corrosive wear. In this work, the effect of Cl– on the corrosive wear behaviour of AISI. 321 stainless steel in H2SO4 ...