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Sample records for steam coolant

  1. Steam as turbine blade coolant: Experimental data generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmsen, B.; Engeda, A.; Lloyd, J.R. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Steam as a coolant is a possible option to cool blades in high temperature gas turbines. However, to quantify steam as a coolant, there exists practically no experimental data. This work deals with an attempt to generate such data and with the design of an experimental setup used for the purpose. Initially, in order to guide the direction of experiments, a preliminary theoretical and empirical prediction of the expected experimental data is performed and is presented here. This initial analysis also compares the coolant properties of steam and air.

  2. Simulation of steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, Matjaž; Centrih, Vasilij; Uršič, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously in stratified configurations. • Considerable melt-coolant premixed layer formed in subcooled water with hot melts. • Analysis with MC3D code provided insight into stratified steam explosion phenomenon. • Up to 25% of poured melt was mixed with water and available for steam explosion. • Better instrumented experiments needed to determine dominant mixing process. - Abstract: A steam explosion is an energetic fuel coolant interaction process, which may occur during a severe reactor accident when the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. In nuclear reactor safety analyses steam explosions are primarily considered in melt jet-coolant pool configurations where sufficiently deep coolant pool conditions provide complete jet breakup and efficient premixture formation. Stratified melt-coolant configurations, i.e. a molten melt layer below a coolant layer, were up to now believed as being unable to generate strong explosive interactions. Based on the hypothesis that there are no interfacial instabilities in a stratified configuration it was assumed that the amount of melt in the premixture is insufficient to produce strong explosions. However, the recently performed experiments in the PULiMS and SES (KTH, Sweden) facilities with oxidic corium simulants revealed that strong steam explosions may develop spontaneously also in stratified melt-coolant configurations, where with high temperature melts and subcooled water conditions a considerable melt-coolant premixed layer is formed. In the article, the performed study of steam explosions in a stratified melt-coolant configuration in PULiMS like conditions is presented. The goal of this analytical work is to supplement the experimental activities within the PULiMS research program by addressing the key questions, especially regarding the explosivity of the formed premixed layer and the mechanisms responsible for the melt-water mixing. To

  3. Steam generator for a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, H.J.; Berger, W.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a steam generator which has a vertical cylindrical housing having a steam output outlet, a horizontal tube sheet closing the lower end of this housing, and an inverted U-shaped tube bundle inside of the housing and having vertical inlet and outlet legs with their ends mounted in the tube sheet. Beneath the tube sheet there are inlet and outlet manifolds for the respective ends of the tube bundle so that pressurized-water coolant from a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor can be circulated through the tube bundle

  4. Pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.; Schroder, H.J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized-water coolant nuclear reactor steam generator having a vertical housing for the steam generating water and containing an upstanding heat exchanger to which the pressurized-water coolant passes and which is radially surrounded by a guide jacket supporting a water separator on its top. By thermosiphon action the steam generating water flows upward through and around the heat exchanger within the guide chamber to the latter's top from which it flows radially outwardly and downwardly through a down draft space formed between the outside of the jacket and the housing. The water separator discharges separated water downwardly. The housing has a feedwater inlet opening adjacent to the lower portion of the heat exchanger, providing preheating of the introduced feedwater. This preheated feedwater is conveyed by a duct upwardly to a location where it mixes with the water discharged from the water separator

  5. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A.

    1997-01-01

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered

  6. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitrioukhin, A. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  7. Coolant rate distribution in horizontal steam generator under natural circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A; Leontieva, V; Mitrioukhin, A [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    In the presentation the major factors determining the conditions of NCC (Natural Coolant Circulation) in the primary circuit and in particular conditions of coolant rate distribution on the horizontal tubes of PGV-1000 in NPP with VVER-1000 under NCC are considered. 5 refs.

  8. Secondary coolant circuit operation tests: steam generator feedwater supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beroux, M.

    1985-01-01

    No one important accident occurred during the start-up tests of the 1300MWe P4 series, concerning the feedwater system of steam generators (SG). This communication comments on some incidents, that the tests allowed to detect very soon and which had no consequences on the operation of units: 1) Water hammer in feedwater tubes, and incidents met in the emergency steam generator water supply circuit. The technological differences between SG 900 and 1300 are pointed out, and the measures taken to prevent this problem are presented. 2) Incidents met on the emergency feedwater supply circuit of steam generators; mechanical or functional modifications involved by these incidents [fr

  9. Evaluation of steam as a potential coolant for nonbreeding blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, H.C.; Misra, B.; Youngdahl, C.K.

    1978-01-01

    A steam-cooled nonbreeding blanket design has been developed as an evolution of the Argonne Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) studies. This blanket concept complete with maintenance considerations is to function at temperatures up to 650 0 C utilizing nickel-based alloys such as Inconel 625. Thermo-mechanical analyses were carried out in conjunction with thermal hydraulic analysis to determine coolant chennel arrangements that permit delivery of superheated steam at 500 0 C directly to a modern fossil plant-type turbine. A dual-cycle system combining a pressurized water circuit coupled with a superheated steam circuit can produce turbine plant conversion efficiencies approaching 41.5%

  10. Zircaloy-steam reaction under a simulated loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Satoru; Furuta, Teruo; Hashimoto, Masao

    1975-07-01

    Under a simulated loss-of-coolant condition, the reaction between zircaloy and steam and the embrittlement of the zircaloy oxidized by this reaction have been studied. The parabolic rate constant, ksub(p), in the zircaloy-steam reaction is represented as ksub(p)=3.24x10 6 exp(-40500/RT) (mg 2 /cm 4 . sec) Ring compression test was made on the steam-reacted zircaloy tubes, and following results were obtained: Embrittlement of the steam-reacted zircaloy tube increases with oxidation at each oxidation temperature. For a given quantity of the oxidation, the incursion of α-phase into β-phase is more remarkable in the specimens reacted at low temperatures than those at high temperatures. The embrittlement, however, is larger in the specimens oxidized at high temperatures than those at low temperatures. (auth.)

  11. Description of steam condensation phenomena during the loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Furst, H.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.

    1981-01-01

    Study of results from the full scale multivent pressure suppression experiment conducted by the GKSS Laboratory has developed an improved understanding of the dynamic, oscillatory steam condensation events and related loading functions which occur during the hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident in a boiling water nuclear reactor. Due to the unique measurements systems which combines both cinematic and digital data, qualified correlation between the dynamic physical variables and the associated two-phase thermo-hydraulic phenomena has been obtained

  12. Theoretical work on melt-coolant interactions (steam explosions)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnecke, G.; Jacobs, H.; Stehle, B.; Thurnay, K.; Vaeth, L.; Lummer, M.

    1995-01-01

    The code IVA3 is used for modelling the physical processes related to steam explosions, i.e. the premixing phase preceding the explosion as well as the explosion itself. This code has been replaced by the updated version IVA-KA in May 1994, which encompasses all model and code improvements performed till the beginning of 1994. The following further work on and with IVA-KA has been performed: 1. Inclusion of friction at inner and outer walls, improvement on the drag model, improvement of boundary conditions for outgoing flow, optional inclusion of improved water material data, improvement of the numerical procedure, correction of coding errors. 2. Three FARO-experiments (investigating the behaviour of molten material falling into water) were recalculated with IVA-KA. The time dependent pressure increase is reproduced very well for one experiment, but is not quite satisfactory for a second one. The third one cannot be simulated satisfactorily because of the presence of metallic zirconium in the melt, which is not being modelled by IVA-KA at present. 3. One PREMIX-experiment (similar to FARO, but at 1 bar ambient pressure and with smaller amounts of melt) is also being analyzed with IVA-KA. First results show a good representation of the material distribution during the penetration of the melt into the water. 4. One of the first two QUEOS-experiments performed at KfK has been simulated with IVA-KA. Some results are well reproduced by IVA-KA, but there may be a deficiency of the drag laws. (orig./HP)

  13. The role of two-phase coolant in moderating fretting in nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper expands the principal of coolant-cushioning in Nuclear Steam Generators whereby the two-phase coolant, especially the bubble film on the tube surface, moderates the vibration of coolant tubes against their supports. The current paper addresses tube bundle and anti-vibration bars (AVB) geometry issues; examines the tube bundle-coolant-AVB interfaces and examines implications for recirculation flow, AVB design and boiler size. In a T(sat) fluid, the tube surface is uniformly coating with growing bubbles whose momentum is perpendicular to the surface at first, then they are swept away by the bulk flow. The combination of this momentum, the phase change and the water film remaining on the surface, counteract the vibration energy of the tube-AVB system, reducing the likelihood of metal-to-metal contact and consequent fretting. To maximize the benefit of the cushioning effect, the following design inputs are needed: 1) the AVB-tube interface should have sufficient clearance for the T(sat) solution to operate, 2) The AVB should be wide enough to generate the necessary cushioning force, and 3) the AVB should be thin enough to be flexible and absorb some of the transferred vibration energy. Furthermore, fretting and crude deposition at the AVB-tube interface can be reduced or eliminated by reducing the number of AVBs, increasing clearances and making the AVBs limber

  14. On possibility of application of the parallel-mixed type coolant flow scheme to NPP steam generators linked with superheaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkis, V.A.; Lokshin, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Optimum distribution of the coolant straight-through flow between the superheater, evaporator and economizer is determined and the parallel-mixed type flow scheme is compared with other schemes. The calculations are performed for the 250 MW(e) steam generator for the WWER-1000 reactor unit the inlet and outlet primary coolant temperature of which is 324 and 290 deg C, respectively, while the feed water and saturation temperatures are 220 and 278.5 deg C, respectively. The rated superheating temperature is 300 deg C. The comparison of different schemes has been performed according to the average temperature head value at the steam-generator under the condition of equality as well as essential difference in the heat transfer coefficients in certain steam-generator sections. The calculations have shown that the use of parallel-mixed type flow permits to essentially increase the temperature head of the steam generator. At a constant heat transfer coefficient in all steam generator sections the highest temperature head is reached. At relative flow rates in the steam generator, economizer and evaporator equal to 6, 8 and 86%, respectively. The superheated steam generator temperature head in this case by 12% exceeds the temperature head of the WWER-1000 reactor unit wet steam generator. In case of heat transfer coefficient reduction in the superheater by a factor of three, the choice of the primary coolant, optimum distribution permits to maintain the steam generator temperature head at the level of the WWER-1000 reactor unit wet-steam steam generator. The use of the parallel-mixed type flow scheme permits to design a steam generator of slightly superheated steam for the parameters of the WWER-1000 unit

  15. Influence of steam generator tube ruptures during semiscale loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzuol, J.M.; Larson, T.K.

    1978-01-01

    Tests which simulated rupture of steam generator tubes during loss-of-coolant experiments in a PWR type system have been conducted in the Semiscale Mod-1 system. Analysis of test data indicates that high rod cladding temperatures occured only for a band of tube ruptures (between 12 and 20 tubes) and that the peak cladding temperatures attained within this band were strongly dependent on the magnitude of the tube rupture flow rates. Maximum cladding temperature of about 1255 K was observed for tests which simulated tube ruptures within this narrow band. (author)

  16. Composite electric generator equipped with steam generator for heating reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Masaharu; Soman, Yoshindo; Kawanishi, Kohei; Ota, Masato.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a composite electric generator having coolants, as a heating source, of a PWR type reactor or a thermonuclear reactor. An electric generator driving gas turbine is disposed, and a superheater using a high temperature exhaust gas of the gas turbine as a heating source is disposed, and main steams are superheated by the superheater to elevate the temperature at the inlet of the turbine. This can increase the electric generation capacity as well as increase the electric generation efficiency. In addition, since the humidity in the vicinity of the exit of the steam turbine is reduced, occurrence of loss and erosion can be suppressed. When cooling water of the thermonuclear reactor is used, the electric power generated by the electric generator driven by the gas turbine can be used upon start of the thermonuclear reactor, and it is not necessary to dispose a large scaled special power source in the vicinity, which is efficient. (N.H.)

  17. Premixing and steam explosion phenomena in the tests with stratified melt-coolant configuration and binary oxidic melt simulant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudinov, Pavel, E-mail: pavel@safety.sci.kth.se; Grishchenko, Dmitry, E-mail: dmitry@safety.sci.kth.se; Konovalenko, Alexander, E-mail: kono@kth.se; Karbojian, Aram, E-mail: karbojan@kth.se

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration is studied experimentally. • Different binary oxidic melt simulant materials were used. • Five spontaneous steam explosions were observed. • Instability of melt-coolant interface and formation of premixing layer was observed. • Explosion strength is influenced by melt superheat and water subcooling. - Abstract: Steam explosion phenomena in stratified melt-coolant configuration are considered in this paper. Liquid corium layer covered by water on top can be formed in severe accident scenarios with (i) vessel failure and release of corium melt into a relatively shallow water pool; (ii) with top flooding of corium melt layer. In previous assessments of potential energetics in stratified melt-coolant configuration, it was assumed that melt and coolant are separated by a stable vapor film and there is no premixing prior to the shock wave propagation. This assumption was instrumental for concluding that the amount of energy that can be released in such configuration is not of safety importance. However, several recent experiments carried out in Pouring and Under-water Liquid Melt Spreading (PULiMS) facility with up to 78 kg of binary oxidic corium simulants mixtures have resulted in spontaneous explosions with relatively high conversion ratios (order of one percent). The instability of the melt-coolant interface, melt splashes and formation of premixing layer were observed in the tests. In this work, we present results of experiments carried out more recently in steam explosion in stratified melt-coolant configuration (SES) facility in order to shed some light on the premixing phenomena and assess the influence of the test conditions on the steam explosion energetics.

  18. Influence of steam generator tube ruptures during semiscale loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzuol, J.M.; Larson, T.K.

    1978-01-01

    Examination of the U-tubes in the steam generators of some large commercial pressurized water reactors (PWR) has revealed the existence of leakage and in some cases structural weakening of the tubes. This structural weakening enhances the possibility of tubes rupturing during a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Considerable interest has been shown in the analysis of tube ruptures concurrent with a hypothesized LOCA since the presence of tube ruptures has the potential to influence the system thermal-hydraulic response and could foreseeably result in a more severe core thermal behavior than might otherwise occur. To experimentally investigate the influence of steam generator tube ruptures on the thermal-hydraulic response of PWR type system, a series of experiments was conducted in the Semiscale Mod-1 system by EG and G Idaho, Inc., for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy. The primary objective of the experiments was to obtain data which could be used to evaluate the influence of the simulated tube ruptures on the system and core thermal-hydraulic response for a range of tube ruptures that was expected to provide the potential for high cladding temperatures in the Semiscale facility. The experiments were conducted assuming a variety in the number of tubes ruptured during large break loss-of-coolant conditions. The number of experiments conducted permitted determination of the range of tube ruptures for which high peak cladding temperatures could result in the Semiscale Mod-1 system. The paper contains a description of the Semiscale Mod-1 system and a discussion of the steam generator tube rupture tests conducted. The experimental results from the test series and the thermal-hydraulic phenomena found to influence the core thermal response during the experiments are discussed

  19. Description of steam-condensation phenomena during the loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCauley, E.W.; Holman, G.S.; Aust, E.; Schwan, H.; Vollbrandt, J.; Fuerst, H.

    1980-01-01

    The development and verification of advanced computer models which describe the boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression process for a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) require a clear description of basic steam condensation phenomena. The GKSS Research Center, in coordination with interested institutions of West Germany and the United States, is currently conducting a test program for such basic research on a multivent BWR-related pressure suppression system. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) acts as the principal US NRC liaison for this test program, with particular emphasis on development of GKSS data for confirmatory use regarding US Mark II nuclear power plants as well as to advanced code development. The multivent test facility, placed in operation in February 1979, is a three-pipe full-scale vent system modelling main features of both the West German KWU and United States G.E. Mk II BWR pressure suppression systems. The test facility and testing programs are described

  20. Simulation of a loss of coolant accident with rupture in the steam generator hot collector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The Central Research Institute for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences designed and constructed the PMK-NVH test facility, a scaled down model of the WWER-440 Paks nuclear power plant. Hungary made the PMK-NVH facility available to the IAEA. The IAEA, having identified the need for experimental data due to the difficulties of building integral test facilities and the high costs of these experiments, has accepted the offer of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and has organized three standard problem exercises. In these exercises, experimental data from the simulation of loss of coolant accidents were compared with analytical predictions of the behaviour of the facility, calculated with computer codes. The third standard problem exercise involved a test, in which the rupture was simulated to occur at the top of the hot collector of the steam generator, therefore creating a leak from primary to secondary side. Both hydroaccumulators and high pressure injection were allowed to actuate as prescribed in the actual plant. Eighteen organizations from 15 Member States took part in the exercise presenting pre-test and some post-test analyses which were discussed in a final meeting in Vienna in August, 1990. This document presents a complete overview of the third standard problem exercise, including description of the facility, the experiment, the codes and models used by the participants and a detailed intercomparison of calculated and experimental results. It is recognized that code assessment is a long process which involves many interrelated steps; therefore, no general conclusion or optimum code or best model was reached. However, the exercise was recognized as an important contributor to code validation. 42 refs, figs and tabs

  1. Material effect in the fuel-coolant interaction: structural characterization of the steam explosion debris and solidification mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrpekl, V.

    2012-01-01

    This work has been performed under joint supervision between Charles University in Prague (Czech Republic) and Strasbourg University (France). It also profited from the background and cooperation of Institute of Inorganic Chemistry Academy of Science of the Czech Republic and French Commission for Atomic and Alternative energies (CEA Cadarache). Results of the work contribute to the OECD/NEA project Serena 2 (Program on Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications). Presented thesis can be classed in the scientific field of nuclear safety and material science. It is aimed on the so-called 'molten nuclear Fuel - Coolant Interaction' (FCI) that belongs among the recent issues of the nuclear reactor severe accident R and D. During the nuclear reactor melt down accident the melted reactor load can interact with the coolant (light water). This interaction can be located inside the vessel or outside in the case of vessel break-up. These two scenarios are commonly called in- and ex-vessel FCI and they differ in the conditions such as initial pressure of the system, water sub-cooling etc. The Molten fuel - coolant interaction can progress into thermal detonation called 'steam explosion' that can challenge the reactor or containment integrity. Recent experiments have shown that the melt composition has a major effect on the occurrence and yield of such explosion. In particular, different behaviors have been observed between simulant material (alumina), which has important explosion efficiency, and some prototypic corium compositions (80 w. % UO 2 , 20% w. % ZrO 2 . This 'material effect' has launched a new interest in the post-test analyses of FCI debris in order to estimate the processes occurring during these extremely rapid phenomena. The thesis is organized in nine chapters. The chapter 1 gives the general introduction and context of the nuclear reactor accident. Major nuclear accidents (Three Miles Island 1979, Chernobyl 1986 and Fukushima 2011) are briefly

  2. Research of impact of kind resuperheat and structure of system regenerative feed water to thermodynamic efficiency of cycle with steam-coolant reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maykova Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The first key problems of modern nuclear reactors are inability of closed nuclear cycle, problems with spent nuclear fuel, poor effectiveness of nuclear fuel and heat-exchange equipment usage. Dealing with problems consists in usage of fast-neutron reactors with steam coolant. Scientific men analyzed neutron-physical processes in steam-cooled fast reactor and consulted that creation of the reactor is viable. In consequence of low steam activation a single-loop steam cycle may be create. The cycle is easy and fool-proof. Core thermomechanical equipment has mastered and has relatively low metal content. Results of calculation are showing that nuclear unit with steam-coolant fast neutron reactor is more efficient than widely used unit with reactor VVER. Usage of simple scheme with four regenerative feedwater heaters the absolute efficiency ratio is more than 43%.

  3. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B. [and others

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked & influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs.

  4. Phenomena identification and ranking tables for Westinghouse AP600 small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D.; Davis, C.B.

    1997-06-01

    This report revision incorporates new experimental evidence regarding AP600 behavior during small break loss-of-coolant accidents. This report documents the results of Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) efforts for the Westinghouse AP600 reactor. The purpose of this PIRT is to identify important phenomena so that they may be addressed in both the experimental programs and the RELAP5/MOD3 systems analysis computer code. In Revision of this report, the responses of AP600 during small break loss-of-coolant accident, main steam line break, and steam generator tube rupture accident scenarios were evaluated by a committee of thermal-hydraulic experts. Committee membership included Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory staff and recognized thermal-hydraulic experts from outside of the laboratory. Each of the accident scenarios was subdivided into separate, sequential periods or phases. Within each phase, the plant behavior is controlled by, at most, a few thermal-hydraulic processes. The committee identified the phenomena influencing those processes, and ranked ampersand influences as being of high, medium, low, or insignificant importance. The primary product of this effort is a series of tables, one for each phase of each accident scenario, describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena judged by the committee to be important, and the relative ranking of that importance. The rationales for the phenomena selected and their rankings are provided. This document issue incorporates an update of the small break loss-of-coolant accident portion of the report. This revision is the result of the release of experimental evidence from AP600-related integral test facilities (ROSA/AP600, OSU, and SPES) and thermal-hydraulic expert review. The activities associated with this update were performed during the period from June 1995 through November 1996. 8 refs., 26 figs., 42 tabs

  5. Steam generation device with heat exchange between a liquid metal coolant and the feedwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaval, C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is particularly applicable to a liquid metal fast breeder reactor plant, the liquid metal being sodium. The steam generation device is described in detail, it allows to get an upper liquid metal level without turbulence and an easier passage for the shock wave towards the steam generator up to the liquid metal level without being laterally reflected back to the intermediate heat exchangers [fr

  6. Secondary coolant circuit for liquid-metal cooled reactor and steam generator for such a circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachet, A.; Figuet, J.; Guidez, J.; Lions, N.; Traiteur, R.; Zuber, T.

    1984-01-01

    An upper buffer tank and downstream buffer tank are disposed inside the steam generators. The downstream briffer tank is annular and it surrounds and communicates with a zone of the steam generator through which the liquid metal flows towards the bottom between the exchange zone and the outlet nozzle. The pressure of the inert gas blanket in the downstream buffer volume is more important than this one in the upper buffer volume. The invention applies to fast neutron nuclear reactor cooled by sodium [fr

  7. AMPTRACT: an algebraic model for computing pressure tube circumferential and steam temperature transients under stratified channel coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulshani, P.; So, C.B.

    1986-10-01

    In a number of postulated accident scenarios in a CANDU reactor, some of the horizontal fuel channels are predicted to experience periods of stratified channel coolant condition which can lead to a circumferential temperature gradient around the pressure tube. To study pressure tube strain and integrity under stratified flow channel conditions, it is, necessary to determine the pressure tube circumferential temperature distribution. This paper presents an algebraic model, called AMPTRACT (Algebraic Model for Pressure Tube TRAnsient Circumferential Temperature), developed to give the transient temperature distribution in a closed form. AMPTRACT models the following modes of heat transfer: radiation from the outermost elements to the pressure tube and from the pressure to calandria tube, convection between the fuel elements and the pressure tube and superheated steam, and circumferential conduction from the exposed to submerged part of the pressure tube. An iterative procedure is used to solve the mass and energy equations in closed form for axial steam and fuel-sheath transient temperature distributions. The one-dimensional conduction equation is then solved to obtain the pressure tube circumferential transient temperature distribution in a cosine series expansion. In the limit of large times and in the absence of convection and radiation to the calandria tube, the predicted pressure tube temperature distribution reduces identically to a parabolic profile. In this limit, however, radiation cannot be ignored because the temperatures are generally high. Convection and radiation tend to flatten the parabolic distribution

  8. Analysis of steam condensation in APR1400 IRWST for loss of coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Young Suk

    2006-02-15

    The In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) of APR1400 is installed at the bottom of containment building to promote the plant safety functions during an accident. This design feature brings about uncertainty factors which may necessitate conventional prediction of temperature and pressure of containment building improved or revised when an accident occurs. The hot steam which is released from RCS break enters the IRWST through four Pressure Relief Dampers (PRDs). It is expected to be condensed with water stored in IRWST, in which water is colder than incoming steam. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of IRWST and pressure relief damper on back pressure and temperature in APR1400 containment codes such as CONTEMPT-LT and GOTHIC. The comparison of codes showed that GOTHIC code be more appropriate for the prediction of containment pressure and temperature under the condition of steam condensation occurring in confined water pool. Especially, the GOTHIC has superior capability to treat multi-compartmentalized geometry This study developed one-compartment (single) model, two-compartment (separated) model, and three-dimension (3-D) model, respectively. Two compartment model separates the IRWST from the other containment compartments. In 3-D model, only the IRWST is nodalized with Cartesian modeling. The single model is developed for comparison with two-compartment model which can analyze PRD's influence. The separated model for predicting PRD's influence divides the space between containment and IRWST. 3-D model for IRWST was generated because it is not symmetric considering location of sparger, pump, and suction sump. Therefore, IRWST is simulated with not only detailed three-dimensional behavior but also independent flow paths for four PRDs. Many experimental studies for the direct-contact heat transfer in stratified steam water flows, cocurrent or countercurrent, have been performed (Segev et al., 1981; Lim et al., 1981

  9. Analysis of steam condensation in APR1400 IRWST for loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Young Suk

    2006-02-01

    The In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) of APR1400 is installed at the bottom of containment building to promote the plant safety functions during an accident. This design feature brings about uncertainty factors which may necessitate conventional prediction of temperature and pressure of containment building improved or revised when an accident occurs. The hot steam which is released from RCS break enters the IRWST through four Pressure Relief Dampers (PRDs). It is expected to be condensed with water stored in IRWST, in which water is colder than incoming steam. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of IRWST and pressure relief damper on back pressure and temperature in APR1400 containment codes such as CONTEMPT-LT and GOTHIC. The comparison of codes showed that GOTHIC code be more appropriate for the prediction of containment pressure and temperature under the condition of steam condensation occurring in confined water pool. Especially, the GOTHIC has superior capability to treat multi-compartmentalized geometry This study developed one-compartment (single) model, two-compartment (separated) model, and three-dimension (3-D) model, respectively. Two compartment model separates the IRWST from the other containment compartments. In 3-D model, only the IRWST is nodalized with Cartesian modeling. The single model is developed for comparison with two-compartment model which can analyze PRD's influence. The separated model for predicting PRD's influence divides the space between containment and IRWST. 3-D model for IRWST was generated because it is not symmetric considering location of sparger, pump, and suction sump. Therefore, IRWST is simulated with not only detailed three-dimensional behavior but also independent flow paths for four PRDs. Many experimental studies for the direct-contact heat transfer in stratified steam water flows, cocurrent or countercurrent, have been performed (Segev et al., 1981; Lim et al., 1981; Kim and

  10. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A.; Leontieva, V.; Mitriukhin, A. [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  11. Coolant stratification and its thermohydrodynamic specificity under natural circulation in horizontal steam generator collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blagovechtchenski, A; Leontieva, V; Mitriukhin, A [Saint-Petersburg Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The experiments and the test facilities for the study of the stratification phenomenon in the hot plenum of reactor and the upper parts of the steam generator collectors in a nuclear power plant are described. The aim of the experiments was to define the conditions of the stratification initiation, to study the temperature field in the upper part, the definition of the characteristics in the stratification layer, and also to study the factors which cause the intensity of the stagnant volume cooling.

  12. The challenge of modeling fuel–coolant interaction: Part II – Steam explosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignen, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.meignen@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Raverdy, Bruno [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Picchi, Stephane; Lamome, Julien [Communication and Systèmes, 22 avenue Galilée, 92350 Le Plessis Robinson (France)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We present the status modeling of steam explosion in the computer code MC3D (a first paper is devoted to premixing stage of FCI). • We also propose a general state of the art, highlighting recent improvements in understanding and modeling, remaining difficulties, controversies and needs. • We highlight the need for improving the understanding of the melt fragmentation and oxidation. • The verification basis is presented. - Abstract: In the course of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant cooled or moderated by water, the core might melt and flow down into the water. Under certain circumstances, a steam explosion might develop during the mixing of the melt and the water. Such an explosion, if occurring in the reactor pit of a PWR or BWR, might challenge the containment integrity and is thus an important issue for nuclear safety. This paper aims at presenting both a status of research and understanding of the phenomenon and the main characteristics of the models developed in the 3-dimensional computer code MC3D. We make a particular emphasis on the underlying difficulties, uncertainties and needs for further improvements. We discuss more particularly the two major phenomena that are the fine fragmentation and the pressurization process. We also give insights on the impact of melt solidification on the fragmentation and on the issue of oxidation. The verification basis of the models is discussed and finally, an example of 3D calculation is presented to highlight the current code capabilities.

  13. The once-through mode of steam generator reflux condensation in loss of coolant accident scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Y.; Guentay, S.; Suckow, D.

    2009-01-01

    The once-through mode of steam generator reflux condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases and/or aerosols for LOCA scenarios is introduced. This phenomenon is planned to be investigated at Paul Scherrer Institute in the ARTIST/RFLX experimental program. The plausible accident scenarios associated with the once-through reflux condensation are analyzed with MELCOR to study the safety significance and the boundary conditions of this phenomenon. This work presents the recent PSI experimental and analytical work on reflux condensation: the progress of modification to the ARTIST test facility for the purpose to study reflux condensation, and the analytical model for the once-through reflux condensation in the presence of noncondensable gas using the heat and mass transfer analogy approach. Future experimental and analytical work on reflux condensation is also outlined. (author)

  14. Steam--water mixing in nuclear reactor safety loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, S.A.; Schwarz, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    Computer models used to predict the response of reactors to hypothesized accidents necessarily incorporate approximating assumptions. To verify the models by comparing predicted and measured responses in test facilities, these assumptions must be confirmed to be realistic. Recent experiments in facilities capable of repeatedly duplicating the transient behavior of a pressurized water reactor undergoing a pipe rupture show that the assumption of complete water-steam mixing during the transient results in the predicted decompression being faster than that observed. Water reactor safety studies currently in progress include programs aimed at the verification of computer models or ''codes'' used to predict reactor system responses to various hypothesized accidents. The approach is to compare code predictions of transients with the actual test transients in experimental facilities. The purpose of this paper is to explain an important instance in which predictions and data are not in complete agreement and to indicate the significance to water reactor safety studies

  15. Device for extracting steam or gas from the primary coolant line leading from a reactor pressure vessel to a straight through boiler or from the top primary boiler chamber of a water-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schatz, K.

    1982-01-01

    In such a nuclear reactor, a steam or gas cushion can form when the primary system is refilled, which can cause blocking of the natural circulation or filling of the system in the area of the hot primary coolant pipe or in the top primary boiler chamber. In order to remove such a steam or gas cushion, a ventilation pipe starting from the bend of the primary coolant line is connected to the feed pipe for introducing water into the primary system. The feed pipe is designed on the principle of the vacuum pump in the area of the opening of the ventilation pipe. There is a sub-pressure in the ventilation pipe, which makes it possible to extract the steam or gas. After mixing in the area of the opening, the steam condenses or is distributed with the gas in the primary coolant. (orig.) [de

  16. Potential for low fracture toughness and lamellar tearing on PWR steam generator and reactor coolant pump supports. Resolution of generic technical activity A-12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaider, R.P.; Hodge, J.M.; Levin, H.A.; Zudans, J.J.

    1979-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its contractor, Sandia Laboratories, in the resolution of Generic Technical Activity A-12, ''Potential for Low Fracture Toughness and Lamellar Tearing in PWR Steam Generator and Reactor Coolant Pump Supports.'' The report describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia describes the technical issues, the technical studies performed by Sandia Laboratories, the NRC staff's technical positions based on these studies, and the staff's plan for implementing its technical positions. It also provides recommendations for further work. The complete technical input from Sandia Laboratories is appended to the report

  17. The condensation of steam on the external surfaces of the shells of HIFAR heavy water heat exchangers during a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, A.G.

    1987-03-01

    A study of steam condensation rates on the HIFAR heavy water heat exchangers was undertaken to predict thermohydraulic conditions in the HIFAR containment during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The process of surface condensation from a mixture of air and steam, and methods for calculating the rate of condensation, are briefly reviewed. Suitable experimental data are used to estimate coefficients of condensation heat transfer to cool surfaces in a reactor containment during a LOCA. The relevance of the available data to a LOCA in the HIFAR materials testing reactor is examined, and two sets of data are compared. The differences between air/H 2 O and air/D 2 O mixtures are discussed. Formulae are derived for the estimation of the coefficient of heat transfer from the heat exchanger shells to the cooling water, and a method of calculating the rate of condensation per unit area of surface is developed

  18. About technical possibility to use VEERA facility for investigation of coolant stratification phenomenon in horizontal steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitioukov, V.; Mitrioukhine, A. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Korteniemi, V. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The presentation gives a brief insight on possibility of using the VEERA facility in studying the stratification phenomenon. The idea for such experiments is to use the facility upper plenum part to simulate the conditions in upper part of horizontal steam generator hot collector. The upper part of steam generator hot collector is one of the locations where the stratification can take part during natural circulation mode. 4 refs.

  19. About technical possibility to use VEERA facility for investigation of coolant stratification phenomenon in horizontal steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitioukov, V.; Mitrioukhine, A.; Korteniemi, V.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation gives a brief insight on possibility of using the VEERA facility in studying the stratification phenomenon. The idea for such experiments is to use the facility upper plenum part to simulate the conditions in upper part of horizontal steam generator hot collector. The upper part of steam generator hot collector is one of the locations where the stratification can take part during natural circulation mode

  20. About technical possibility to use VEERA facility for investigation of coolant stratification phenomenon in horizontal steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitioukov, V; Mitrioukhine, A [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Korteniemi, V [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1998-12-31

    The presentation gives a brief insight on possibility of using the VEERA facility in studying the stratification phenomenon. The idea for such experiments is to use the facility upper plenum part to simulate the conditions in upper part of horizontal steam generator hot collector. The upper part of steam generator hot collector is one of the locations where the stratification can take part during natural circulation mode. 4 refs.

  1. Suppression of steam explosions in tin and Fe-Al2O3 melts by increasing the viscosity of the coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.; Guay, K.P.

    1986-01-01

    Steam explosions, energetic interactions that sometimes occur when a melt and water come together, can be suppressed by increasing the viscosity of the aqueous phase. This has been demonstrated both in the laboratory with drops of molten tin released into aqueous glycerol or cellulose gum solutions, and in one field-scale experiment where 50 kg of molten Fe-Al 2 O 3 was released into a cellulose gum solution; vigorous spontaneous explosions occurred in both situations when the cold liquid was water alone. There is a threshold solution viscosity near 0.015 Pa s, above which spontaneous tin drop explosions no longer occur. Increase of coolant viscosity might prevent injury to workers and damage to equipment in industrial processes where melts are normally handled near cooling water. (author)

  2. Coolant Mixing in a Pressurized Water Reactor: Deboration Transients, Steam-Line Breaks, and Emergency Core Cooling Injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael; Grunwald, Gerhard; Hoehne, Thomas; Kliem, Soeren; Rohde, Ulrich; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2003-01-01

    The reactor transient caused by a perturbation of boron concentration or coolant temperature at the inlet of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) depends on the mixing inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Initial steep gradients are partially lessened by turbulent mixing with coolant from the unaffected loops and with the water inventory of the RPV. Nevertheless the assumption of an ideal mixing in the downcomer and the lower plenum of the reactor leads to unrealistically small reactivity inserts. The uncertainties between ideal mixing and total absence of mixing are too large to be acceptable for safety analyses. In reality, a partial mixing takes place. For realistic predictions it is necessary to study the mixing within the three-dimensional flow field in the complicated geometry of a PWR. For this purpose a 1:5 scaled model [the Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) facility] of the German PWR KONVOI was built. Compared to other experiments, the emphasis was put on extensive measuring instrumentation and a maximum of flexibility of the facility to cover as much as possible different test scenarios. The use of special electrode-mesh sensors together with a salt tracer technique provided distributions of the disturbance within downcomer and core entrance with a high resolution in space and time. Especially, the instrumentation of the downcomer gained valuable information about the mixing phenomena in detail. The obtained data were used to support code development and validation. Scenarios investigated are the following: (a) steady-state flow in multiple coolant loops with a temperature or boron concentration perturbation in one of the running loops, (b) transient flow situations with flow rates changing with time in one or more loops, such as pump startup scenarios with deborated slugs in one of the loops or onset of natural circulation after boiling-condenser-mode operation, and (c) gravity-driven flow caused by large density gradients, e.g., mixing of cold

  3. Steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenet, J.-C.

    1980-01-01

    Steam generator particularly intended for use in the coolant system of a pressurized water reactor for vaporizing a secondary liquid, generally water, by the primary cooling liquid of the reactor and comprising special arrangements for drying the steam before it leaves the generator [fr

  4. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  5. Theoretical work on melt-coolant interactions (steam explosions); Theoretische Arbeiten zu Schmelze-Kuehlmittel-Wechselwirkungen (Dampfexplosionen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnecke, G.; Jacobs, H.; Stehle, B.; Thurnay, K.; Vaeth, L.; Lummer, M.

    1995-08-01

    The code IVA3 is used for modelling the physical processes related to steam explosions, i.e. the premixing phase preceding the explosion as well as the explosion itself. This code has been replaced by the updated version IVA-KA in May 1994, which encompasses all model and code improvements performed till the beginning of 1994. The following further work on and with IVA-KA has been performed: 1. Inclusion of friction at inner and outer walls, improvement on the drag model, improvement of boundary conditions for outgoing flow, optional inclusion of improved water material data, improvement of the numerical procedure, correction of coding errors. 2. Three FARO-experiments (investigating the behaviour of molten material falling into water) were recalculated with IVA-KA. The time dependent pressure increase is reproduced very well for one experiment, but is not quite satisfactory for a second one. The third one cannot be simulated satisfactorily because of the presence of metallic zirconium in the melt, which is not being modelled by IVA-KA at present. 3. One PREMIX-experiment (similar to FARO, but at 1 bar ambient pressure and with smaller amounts of melt) is also being analyzed with IVA-KA. First results show a good representation of the material distribution during the penetration of the melt into the water. 4. One of the first two QUEOS-experiments performed at KfK has been simulated with IVA-KA. Some results are well reproduced by IVA-KA, but there may be a deficiency of the drag laws. (orig./HP)

  6. Modelling of the steam-water-countercurrent flow in the rewetting and flooding phase after loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curca-Tivig, F.

    1990-01-01

    A new interphase momentum exchange model has been developed to simulate the Refill- Reflood Phase after LOCAs. Special phenomena of steam/water- countercurrent flow - like limitation or onset of downward-watee penetration - have been modelled and integrated into a flooding model. The interphase momentum exchange model interconnected with the flooding model has been implemented into the advanced system code RELAP5/MOD1. The new version of this code can now be utilized to predict the hot leg emergency-core-cooling (ECC) injection for German PWRs. The interfacial momentum transfer model developed includes the interphase frictional drag, the force due to virtual mass and the momenta due to interphase mass transfer. The modelling of the interfacial shear or drag accounts for the effects of phase and velocity profiles. The flooding model predicts countercurrent-flow limitation, onset of water penetration and partial delivery. The flooding correlation specifies the maximum down flow liquid velocity in case of countercurrent flow through flow restrictions for a given vapor velocity. (orig./HP) [de

  7. Secondary coolant purification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiteler, F.Z.; Donohue, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    The present invention combines the attributes of volatile chemical addition, continuous blowdown, and full flow condensate demineralization. During normal plant operation (defined as no primary to secondary leakage) condensate from the condenser is pumped through a full flow condensate demineralizer system by the condensate pumps. Volatile chemical additions are made. Dissolved and suspended solids are removed in the condensate polishers by ion exchange and/or filtration. At the same time a continuous blowdown of approximately 1 percent of the main steaming rate of the steam generators is maintained. Radiation detectors monitor the secondary coolant. If these monitors indicate no primary to secondary leakage, the blowdown is cooled and returned directly to the condensate pump discharge. If one of the radiation monitors should indicate a primary to secondary leak, when the temperature of the effluent exiting from the blowdown heat exchanger is compatible with the resin specifications of the ion exchangers, the bypass valve causes the blowdown flow to pass through the blowdown ion exchangers

  8. Corrosion aspects in steam generators of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visoni, E.; Santos Pinto, M. dos

    1988-01-01

    Steam generators of pressurized water reactors (PWR), transfer heat from a primary coolant system to a secondary coolant system. Primary coolant water is heated in the core and passes through the steam generator that transfer heat to the secondary coolant water. However, the steam generator is dead for ionic impurities, corrosion products and fabrication/maintenence residues. These impurities concentrate between crevice and cracks. Many types of degradation mechanisms affect the tubes. The tubes are dented, craked, ovalized, wasted, etc. This paper describes the main corrosion problems in steam generators and includes the corrective actions to considered to reduce or eliminate these corrosion problems. (author) [pt

  9. Coolant clean up system in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Fumio; Iwami, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the amount of main steams and improve the plant heat efficiency by the use of condensated water as coolants for not-regenerative heat exchangers in a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor. Constitution: In a coolant clean up system of a nuclear reactor, a portion of condensates is transferred to the shell of a non-regenerative heat exchanger by way of a condensate pump for non-regenerative heat exchanger through a branched pipeway provided to the outlet of a condensate desalter for using the condensates as the coolants for the shell of the heat exchanger and the condensates are then returned to the inlet of a feedwater heater after the heat exchange. The branched flow rate of the condensates is controlled by the flow rate control valve mounted in the pipeway. Condensates passed through the heat exchanger and the condensates not passed through the heat exchanger are mixed and heated in a heater and then fed to the nuclear reactor. In a case where no feedwater is necessary to the nuclear reactor such as upon shutdown of the reactor, the condensates are returned by way of feedwater bypass pipeway to the condensator. By the use of the condensates as the coolants for the heat exchanger, the main steam loss can be decreased and the thermal load for the auxiliary coolant facility can be reduced. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Steam generator for PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Iwao; Hiyama, Nobuyuki.

    1994-01-01

    A steam generator of the present invention comprises a primary coolant chamber having primary coolants circulating therein, a secondary coolants chamber having secondary coolants and steams circulating therein, which are isolated from each other by a partition wall, and heat pipes disposed being passed through the partition wall. The heat pipes are disposed having an evaporation portion in the primary coolants chamber, a condensation portion in the secondary coolants chamber, and an intermediate heat insulating portion in the partition wall. Since the primary coolants containing radioactivity and the secondary coolants not containing radioactivity does not transfer heat directly by a heat transfer wall, a leakage accident of radioactivity to the secondary coolants can be prevented. Moreover, since the heat pipes are used, a great amount of heat can be transferred by a slight temperature difference by using steams of the heat transfer medium itself, latent heat due to coagulation, and capillary phenomenon. Since neither transferring power nor pumps are required, heat of the primary coolants can effectively be transferred to the secondary coolants. (N.H.)

  11. Transient behaviour of main coolant pump in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delja, A.

    1986-01-01

    A basic concept of PWR reactor coolant pump thermo-hydraulic modelling in transient and accident operational condition is presented. The reactor coolant pump is a component of the nuclear steam supply system which forces the coolant through the reactor and steam generator, maintaining design heat transfer condition. The pump operating conditions have strong influence on the flow and thermal behaviour of NSSS, both in the stationary and nonstationary conditions. A mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump is formed by using dimensionless homologous relations in the four-quadrant regimes: normal pump, turbine, dissipation and reversed flow. Since in some operational regimes flow of mixture, liquid and steam may occur, the model has additional correction members for two-phase homologous relations. Modular concept has been used in developing computer program. The verification is performed on the simulation loss of offsite power transient and obtained results are presented. (author)

  12. Coolant cleanup method in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Masayoshi; Nishimura, Shigeoki; Takahashi, Sankichi; Izumi, Kenkichi; Motojima, Kenji.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To effectively adsorb to remove low molecular weight organic substances from iron exchange resins for use in the removal of various radioactive nucleides contained in reactor coolants. Method : Reactor coolants are recycled by a main recyling pump in a nuclear reactor and a portion of the coolants is cooled and, thereafter, purified in a coolant desalter. While on the other hand, high pressure steams generated from the reactor are passed through a turbine, cooled in a condensator, eliminated with claddings or the likes by the passage through a filtration desalter using powderous ion exchange resins and then further passed through a desalter (filled with granular ion exchange resins). For instance, an adsorption and removing device for organic substances (resulted through the decomposition of ion exchange resins) precoated with activated carbon powder or filled with granular activated carbon is disposed at the downstream for each of the desalters. In this way, the organic substances in the coolants are eliminated to prevent the reduction in the desalting performance of the ion exchange resins caused by the formation of complexes between organic substances and cobalt in the coolants, etc. In this way, the coolant cleanup performance is increased and the amount of wasted ion exchange resins can be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Coolant channel module CCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, Alois

    2007-01-01

    A complete and detailed description of the theoretical background of an '(1D) thermal-hydraulic drift-flux based mixture-fluid' coolant channel model and its resulting module CCM will be presented. The objective of this module is to simulate as universally as possible the steady state and transient behaviour of the key characteristic parameters of a single- or two-phase fluid flowing within any type of heated or non-heated coolant channel. Due to the possibility that different flow regimes can appear along any channel, such a 'basic (BC)' 1D channel is assumed to be subdivided into a number of corresponding sub-channels (SC-s). Each SC can belong to only two types of flow regime, an SC with just a single-phase fluid, containing exclusively either sub-cooled water or superheated steam, or an SC with a two-phase mixture flow. After an appropriate nodalisation of such a BC (and therefore also its SC-s) a 'modified finite volume method' has been applied for the spatial discretisation of the partial differential equations (PDE-s) which represent the basic conservation equations of thermal-hydraulics. Special attention had to be given to the possibility of variable SC entrance or outlet positions (which describe boiling boundaries or mixture levels) and thus the fact that an SC can even disappear or be created anew. The procedure yields for each SC type (and thus the entire BC), a set of non-linear ordinary 1st order differential equations (ODE-s). To link the resulting mean nodal with the nodal boundary function values, both of which are present in the discretised differential equations, a special quadratic polygon approximation procedure (PAX) had to be constructed. Together with the very thoroughly tested packages for drift-flux, heat transfer and single- and two-phase friction factors this procedure represents the central part of the here presented 'Separate-Region' approach, a theoretical model which provides the basis to the very effective working code package CCM

  14. Device to measure level in a steam drum of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradov, Yu.A.

    1988-01-01

    Gravitation-hydrostatic device for measuring coolant level in a steam drum of NPP is described. The device enables to improve the accuracy and sensitivity of measuring coolant level above and below the submerged perforated sheet of the steam drum and decrease the amount of levelling vessels in the unit by 50%. 1 fig

  15. Steam generators for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tillequin, Jean

    1975-01-01

    The role and the general characteristics of steam generators in nuclear power plants are indicated, and particular types are described according to the coolant nature (carbon dioxide, helium, light water, heavy water, sodium) [fr

  16. Analysis of experimental characteristics of multistage steam-jet electors of steam turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, K. E.; Ryabchikov, A. Yu.; Brodov, Yu. M.; Brezgin, D. V.; Zhelonkin, N. V.; Murmanskii, I. B.

    2017-02-01

    A series of questions for specification of physical gas dynamics model in flow range of steam-jet unit and ejector computation methodology, as well as functioning peculiarities of intercoolers, was formulated based on analysis of experimental characteristics of multistage team-jet steam turbines. It was established that coefficient defining position of critical cross-section of injected flow depends on characteristics of the "sound tube" zone. Speed of injected flow within this tube may exceed that of sound, and pressure jumps in work-steam decrease at the same time. Characteristics of the "sound tube" define optimal axial sizes of the ejector. According to measurement results, the part of steam condensing in the first-stage coolant constitutes 70-80% of steam amount supplied into coolant and is almost independent of air content in steam. Coolant efficiency depends on steam pressure defined by operation of steam-jet unit of ejector of the next stage after coolant of steam-jet stage, temperature, and condensing water flow. As a rule, steam entering content of steam-air mixture supplied to coolant is overheated with respect to saturation temperature of steam in the mixture. This should be taken into account during coolant computation. Long-term operation causes changes in roughness of walls of the ejector's mixing chamber. The influence of change of wall roughness on ejector characteristic is similar to the influence of reverse pressure of the steam-jet stage. Until some roughness value, injection coefficient of the ejector stage operating in superlimiting regime hardly changed. After reaching critical roughness, the ejector switches to prelimiting operating regime.

  17. General Electric Company analytical model for loss-of-coolant analysis in accordance with 10CFR50 appendix K, amendment No. 3: effect of steam environment on BWR core spray distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    The core spray sparger designs of the BWR/2 through BWR/5 product lines were verified by means of full-scale mock-ups tested in air at various flow conditions. In 1974, an overseas technical partner of General Electric reported that a steam environment changed the individual core spray nozzle patterns when compared to patterns measured in air. This document describes preliminary findings of how a steam environment alters the core spray nozzle pattern, and the actions which General Electric is pursuing to quantify the steam effects

  18. Multirods burst tests under loss-of-coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, S.; Uetsuka, H.; Furuta, T.

    1983-01-01

    In order to know the upper limit of coolant flow area restriction in a fuel assembly under loss-of-coolant accidents in LWRs, burst tests of fuel bundles were performed. Each bundle consisted of 49 rods(7x7 rods), and bursts were conducted in flowing steam. In some cases, 4 rods were replaced by control rods with guide tubes in a bundle. After the burst, the ballooning behavior of each rod and the degree of coolant flow area restriction in the bundle were measured. Ballooning behavior of rods and degree of coolant flow channel restriction in bundles with control rods were not different from those without control rods. The upper limit of coolant flow channel restriction under loss-of-coolant conditions was estimated to be about 80%. (author)

  19. Coolant leakage detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely detect the coolant leakage at a time when the leakage amount is still low in the intra-reactor inlet pipeway of FBR type reactor. Constitution: Outside of the intra-reactor inlet piping for introducing coolants at low temperature into a reactor core, an outer closure pipe is furnished. The upper end of the outer closure pipe opens above the liquid level of the coolants in the reactor, and a thermocouple is inserted to the opening of the upper end. In such a structure, if the coolants in the in-reactor piping should leak to the outer closure pipe, coolants over-flows from the opening thereof, at which the thermocouple detects the temperature of the coolants at a low temperature, thereby enabling to detect the leakage of the coolants at a time when it is still low. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Containments for consolidated nuclear steam systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    A containment system for a consolidated nuclear steam system incorporating a nuclear core, steam generator and reactor coolant pumps within a single pressure vessel is described which is designed to provide radiation shielding and pressure suppression. Design details, including those for the dry well and wet well of the containment, are given. (UK)

  1. HANARO secondary coolant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon Duk.

    1998-02-01

    In this report, the basic theory for management of water quality, environmental factors influencing to the coolant, chemicals and its usage for quality control of coolant are mentioned, and water balance including the loss rate by evaporation (34.3 m 3 /hr), discharge rate (12.665 m 3 /hr), concentration ratio and feed rate (54.1 m 3 /hr) are calculated at 20 MW operation. Also, the analysis data of HANSU Limited for HANARO secondary coolant (feed water and circulating coolant) - turbidity, pH, conductivity, M-alkalinity, Ca-hardness, chloride ion, total iron ion, phosphoric ion and conversion rate are reviewed. It is confirmed that the feed water has good quality and the circulating coolant has been maintained within the control specification in general, but some items exceeded the control specification occasionally. Therefore it is judged that more regular discharge of coolant is needed. (author). 6 refs., 17 tabs., 18 figs

  2. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to coolant channels for pressurised water and boiling water reactors and the arrangement described aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel rods and the coolant. Baffle means extending axially within the channel are provided and disposed relative to the fuel rods so as to restrict flow oscillations occurring within the coolant from being propagated transversely to the axis of the channel. (UK)

  3. LWR primary coolant pipe rupture test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitoshi, Shyoji

    1978-01-01

    The rupture test rig for primary coolant pipes is constructed in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to verify the reliability of the primary coolant pipes for both PWRs and BWRs. The planned test items consisted of reaction force test, restraint test, whip test, jet test and continuous release test. A pressure vessel of about 4 m 3 volume, a circulating pump, a pressurizer, a heater, an air cooler and the related instrumentation and control system are included in this test rig. The coolant test condition is 160 kg/cm 2 g, 325 deg C for PWR test, and 70 kg/cm 2 g, saturated water and steam for BWR test, 100 ton of test load for the ruptured pipe bore of 8B Schedule 160, and 20 lit/min. discharge during 20 h for continuous release of coolant. The maximum pit internal pressure was estimated for various pipe diameters and time under the PWR and BWR conditions. The spark rupturing device was adopted for the rupture mechanics in this test rig. The computer PANAFACOM U-300 is used for the data processing. This test rig is expected to operate in 1978 effectively for the improvement of reliability of LWR primary coolant pipes. (Nakai, Y.)

  4. Coolant make-up device for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a coolant make-up device, an opening of a pressure equalizing pipeline in a pressure vessel is disposed in coolants above a reactor core and below a usual fluctuation range of a reactor vessel water level. Further, a float check valve is disposed to the pressure equalizing pipeline for preventing coolants in the pressure vessel flowing into the pipeline. If the water level in the pressure vessel is lowered than the setting position for the float check valve, the float drops by its own weight to open the opening of the pressure equalizing pipeline. Then, steams in the pressure vessel are flown into the pipeline, to equalize the pressure between a coolant storage tank and the pressure vessel of the reactor. Coolants in the coolant storage tank is injected to the pressure vessel by way of the water injection pipeline due to the difference of the pressure head between the water level in the coolants storage tank and the water level in the pressure vessel. If the coolants are lowered than the setting position for the float check value, the float check valve does not close unless the water level is recovered to the setting position for the float valve and, accordingly, the coolant make-up is continued. (N.H.)

  5. Coolant voiding analysis following SGTR for an HLMC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Concepts are under development at Argonne National Laboratory for a small, modular, proliferation-resistant nuclear power steam supply system. Of primary interest here is the simplified system design, featuring steam generators that are directly immersed in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant of the primary system. To support the safety case for this design approach, model development and analysis of transient coolant voiding during a postulated guillotine-type steam generator tube rupture event has been carried out. For the current design, the blowdown will occur from the steam generator shell into the ruptured 12.7-mm-inside-diameter tube through which the LBE coolant passes. The steam will expand biaxially in the tube, with a portion of the flow vented upward to eventually expand into the cover-gas region, while the balance of the flow is vented downward as a jet into the surrounding downward-flowing LBE. Coolant freezing is not an issue in this case because of high feedwater temperature in relation to the freezing point of the LBE. The specific objectives of the current work are to (a) determine the penetration behavior of the steam jet into the lower cold-leg region, (b) characterize the resultant void behavior in terms of coherent bubble versus breakup into a size distribution of small bubbles, and (c) characterize the motion of the bubbles with regard to rise to the cover-gas region (via the liner-to-coolant vessel gap) versus downward transport with the flowing LBE and subsequent upflow through the core to the cover-gas region

  6. Steam explosion studies review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Kim, Hee Dong

    1999-03-01

    When a cold liquid is brought into contact with a molten material with a temperature significantly higher than the liquid boiling point, an explosive interaction due to sudden fragmentation of the melt and rapid evaporation of the liquid may take place. This phenomenon is referred to as a steam explosion or vapor explosion. Depending upon the amount of the melt and the liquid involved, the mechanical energy released during a vapor explosion can be large enough to cause serious destruction. In hypothetical severe accidents which involve fuel melt down, subsequent interactions between the molten fuel and coolant may cause steam explosion. This process has been studied by many investigators in an effort to assess the likelihood of containment failure which leads to large scale release of radioactive materials to the environment. In an effort to understand the phenomenology of steam explosion, extensive studies has been performed so far. The report presents both experimental and analytical studies on steam explosion. As for the experimental studies, both small scale tests which involve usually less than 20 g of high temperature melt and medium/large scale tests which more than 1 kg of melt is used are reviewed. For the modelling part of steam explosions, mechanistic modelling as well as thermodynamic modelling is reviewed. (author)

  7. Natural circulation in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) natural circulation in a PWR is the buoyancy-driven coolant circulation between the core and the upper-plenum region (in-vessel circulation) with or without a countercurrent flow in the hot leg piping between the vessel and steam generators (ex-vessel circulation). This kind of multidimensional bouyancy-driven flow circulation serves as a means of transferring the heat from the core to the structures in the upper plenum, hot legs, and possibly steam generators. As a result, the RCS piping and other pressure boundaries may be heated to high temperatures at which the structural integrity is challenged. RCS natural circulation is likely to occur during the core uncovery period of the TMLB' accident in a PWR when the vessel upper plenum and hot leg are already drained and filled with steam and possibly other gaseous species. RCS natural circulation is being studied for the Surry plant during the TMLB' accident in which station blackout coincides with the loss of auxiliary feedwater and no operator actions. The effects of the multidimensional RCS natural circulation during the TMLB' accident are discussed

  8. Requirements of coolants in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abass, O. A. M.

    2014-11-01

    This study discussed the purposes and types of coolants in nuclear reactors to generate electricity. The major systems and components associated with nuclear reactors are cooling system. There are two major cooling systems utilized to convert the heat generated in the fuel into electrical power. The primary system transfers the heat from the fuel to the steam generator, where the secondary system begins. The steam formed in the steam generator is transferred by the secondary system to the main turbine generator, where it s converted into electricity after passing through the low pressure turbine. There are various coolants used in nuclear reactors-light water, heavy water and liquid metal. The two major types of water-cooled reactors are pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) but pressurized water reactors are more in the world. Also discusses this study the reactors and impact of the major nuclear accidents, in the April 1986 disaster at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was the product operators, and in the March 2011 at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan was the product of earthquake of magnitude 9.0, the accidents caused the largest uncontrolled radioactive release into the environment.(Author)

  9. Dimensional analysis of small-scale steam explosion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, K.; Corradini, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Dimensional analysis applied to Nelson's small-scale steam explosion experiments to determine the qualitative effect of each relevant parameter for triggering a steam explosion. According to experimental results, the liquid entrapment model seems to be a consistent explanation for the steam explosion triggering mechanism. The three-dimensional oscillatory wave motion of the vapor/liquid interface is analyzed to determine the necessary conditions for local condensation and production of a coolant microjet to be entrapped in fuel. It is proposed that different contact modes between fuel and coolant may involve different initiation mechanisms of steam explosions

  10. The sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    2004-01-01

    The sodium is the best appropriate coolant for the fast neutrons reactors technology. Thus the fast neutrons reactors development is intimately bound to the sodium technology. This document presents the sodium as a coolant point of view: atomic structure and characteristics, sodium impacts on the fast neutron reactors technology, chemical properties of the sodium and the consequences, quality control in a nuclear reactor, sodium treatment. (A.L.B.)

  11. Extended Life Coolant Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 06-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Interim Report 3. DATES COVERED ... Corrosion Testing of Traditional and Extended Life Coolants 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Hansen, Gregory A. T...providing vehicle specific coolants. Several laboratory corrosion tests were performed according to ASTM D1384 and D2570, but with a 2.5x extended time

  12. Research on coolant radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Jei Won; Kim, W. H.; Park, Y. J.; Im, J. K.; Jung, Y. J.; Jee, K. Y.; Choi, K. C.

    2004-04-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop the technology on the reduction of radioactive material formed in reactor coolant circuit. The contents of this study are composed of the simulation of primary cooling system, chemistry measurement technology in the high-temperature high-pressure environments, and coolant chemistry control technology. The main results are as follows; High-temperature and high-pressure loop system was designed and fabricated, which is to inducing CRUD growth condition on the surface of cladding. The high-temperature pH measurement system was established with YSZ sensing electrode and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The performance of pH electrode was confirmed in the temperature range 200∼280 .deg. C. Coolant chemistry control technologies such as the neutron irradiation technique of boric acid solution, the evaluation on high-temperature electrochemical behavior of coolant, and the measurement of physicochemical properties of micro-particles were developed. The results of this study can be useful for the understanding of chemical phenomena occurred in reactor coolant and for the study on the reduction of radioactive material in primary coolant, which will be carried out in the next research stage

  13. Steam generating system in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Katsutoshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the thermal shock loads to the structures of reactor system and secondary coolant system, for instance, upon plant trip accompanying turbine trip in the steam generation system of LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: Additional feedwater heater is disposed to the pipeway at the inlet of a steam generator in a steam generation system equipped with a closed loop extended from a steam generator by way of a gas-liquid separator, a turbine and a condensator to the steam generator. The separated water at high temperature and high pressure from a gas-liquid separator is heat exchanged with coolants flowing through the closed loop of the steam generation system in non-contact manner and, thereafter, introduced to a water reservoir tank. This can avoid the water to be fed at low temperature as it is to the steam generator, whereby the thermal shock loads to the structures of the reactor system and the secondary coolant system can be suppressed. (Moriyama, K.)

  14. Coolant degassing device for PWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kaoru; Takezawa, Kazuaki; Minemoto, Masaki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To efficiently decrease the rare gas concentration in primary coolants, as well as shorten the degassing time required for the periodical inspection in the waste gas processing system of a PWR type reactor. Constitution: Usual degassing method by supplying hydrogen or nitrogen to a volume control tank is replaced with a method of utilizing a degassing tower (method of flowing down processing liquid into the filled tower from above while uprising streams from the bottom of the tower thereby degassing the gases dissolved in the liquid into the steams). The degassing tower is combined with a hydrogen separator or hydrogen recombiner to constitute a waste gas processing system. (Ikeda, J.)

  15. CANDU steam generator tubing material service experience and allied development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, A.E.; Lesurf, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper covers the following aspects for the tube materials in CANDU-PHW steam generators: inservice performance with respect to tube leaks and coolant activity attributable to boiler tube corrosion, selection of tube materials for use with non-boiling and boiling primary coolants, supporting development on corrosion, vibration, fretting wear, tube inspection, leak detection and plugging of defective tubes. (author)

  16. A reassessment of the potential for an alpha-mode containment failure and a review of the current understanding of broader fuel-coolant interaction issues. Second steam explosion review group workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, S. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Ginsberg, T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This report summarizes the review and evaluation by experts of the current understanding of the molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) issues covering the complete spectrum of interactions, i.e., from mild quenching to very energetic interactions including those that could lead to the alpha-mode containment failure. Of the eleven experts polled, all but two concluded that the alpha-mode failure issue was resolved from a risk perspective, meaning that this mode of failure is of very low probability, that it is of little or no significance to the overall risk from a nuclear power plant, and that any further reduction in residual uncertainties is not likely to change the probability in an appreciable manner. To a lesser degree, discussions also took place on the broader FCI issues such as mild quenching of core melt during non-explosive FCI, and shock loading of lower head and ex-vessel support structures arising from explosive localized FCIs. These latter issues are relevant with regard to determining the efficacy of certain accident management strategies for operating reactors as well as for advanced light water reactors. The experts reviewed the status of understanding of the FCI phenomena in the context of these broader issues, identified residual uncertainties in the understanding, and recommended future research (both experimental and analytical) to reduce the uncertainties.

  17. A reassessment of the potential for an alpha-mode containment failure and a review of the current understanding of broader fuel-coolant interaction issues. Second steam explosion review group workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.; Ginsberg, T.

    1996-08-01

    This report summarizes the review and evaluation by experts of the current understanding of the molten fuel-coolant interaction (FCI) issues covering the complete spectrum of interactions, i.e., from mild quenching to very energetic interactions including those that could lead to the alpha-mode containment failure. Of the eleven experts polled, all but two concluded that the alpha-mode failure issue was resolved from a risk perspective, meaning that this mode of failure is of very low probability, that it is of little or no significance to the overall risk from a nuclear power plant, and that any further reduction in residual uncertainties is not likely to change the probability in an appreciable manner. To a lesser degree, discussions also took place on the broader FCI issues such as mild quenching of core melt during non-explosive FCI, and shock loading of lower head and ex-vessel support structures arising from explosive localized FCIs. These latter issues are relevant with regard to determining the efficacy of certain accident management strategies for operating reactors as well as for advanced light water reactors. The experts reviewed the status of understanding of the FCI phenomena in the context of these broader issues, identified residual uncertainties in the understanding, and recommended future research (both experimental and analytical) to reduce the uncertainties

  18. Steam condensation process in a power production cycle and heat exchanger for it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondeur, Gerard; Andro, Jean; Marjollet, Jacques; Pouderoux, Pierre.

    1982-01-01

    Steam condensation process in a power production cycle by expansion in turbines, characterized by the fact that this condensation is performed by the vaporization of a coolant with a vaporization temperature at atmospheric pressure lower than that of water, and that the vaporized coolant fluid is expanded in a turbine and then condensed by heat exchange with cold water being heated, while the liquefied coolant is recompressed and used for heat exchange with the steam to be condensed [fr

  19. Coolant leakage detecting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Katsunori; Ishihara, Yoshinao.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges an amount of leakage of primary coolants of a PWR power plant at high speed. Namely, a mass of coolants contained in a pressurizer, a volume controlling tank and loop regions is obtained based on a preset relational formula and signals of each of process amount, summed up to determine the total mass of coolants for every period of time. The amount of leakage for every period of time is calculated by a formula of Karman's filter based on the total mass of the primary coolants for every predetermined period of time, and displays it on CRT. The Karman's filter is formed on every formula for several kinds of states formed based on the preset amount of the leakage, to calculate forecasting values for every mass of coolants. An adaptable probability for every preset leakage amount is determined based on the difference between the forecast value and the observed value and the scattering thereof. The adaptable probability is compared with a predetermined threshold value, which is displayed on the CRT. This device enables earlier detection of leakage and identification of minute leakage amount as compared with the prior device. (I.S.)

  20. Forming a cohesive steam generator maintenance strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poudroux, G.

    1991-01-01

    In older nuclear plants, steam generator tube bundles are the most fragile part of the reactor coolant system. Steam generator tubes are subject to numerous types of loading, which can lead to severe degradation (corrosion and wear phenomena). Preventive actions, such as reactor coolant temperature reduction or increasing the plugging limit and their associated analyses, can increase steam generator service life. Beyond these preventive actions, the number of affected tubes and the different locations of the degradations that occur often make repair campaigns necessary. Framatome has developed and qualified a wide range of treatment and repair processes. They enable careful management of the repair campaigns, to avoid reaching the maximum steam generator tube plugging limit, while optimizing the costs. Most of the available repair techniques allow a large number of affected tubes to be treated. Here we look only at those techniques that should be taken into account when defining a maintenance strategy. (author)

  1. Reactor coolant cleanup device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Noboru.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to introduce reactor water at high temperature and high pressure as it is, as well as effectively adsorb to eliminate cobalt in reactor water. Constitution: The coolant cleanup device comprises a vessel main body inserted to coolant pipeway circuits in a water cooled reactor power plant and filters contained within the vessel main body. The filters are prepared by coating and baking powder of metal oxides such as manganese ferrite having a function capable of adsorbing cobalt in the coolants onto the surface of supports made of metals or ceramics resistant to strong acids and alkalies in the form of three-dimensional network structure, for example, zircaloy-2, SUS 303 and the zirconia (baking) to form a basic filter elements. The basic filter elements are charged in plurality to the vessel main body. (Kawaiami, Y.)

  2. Problems of hydrogen - water vapor - inert gas mixture use in heavy liquid metal coolant technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanov, V.V.; Martynov, P.N.; Gulevskij, V.A.; Teplyakov, Yu.A.; Fomin, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons of slag deposit formation in circulation circuits with heavy liquid metal coolants, which can cause reactor core blockage, are considered. To prevent formation of deposits hydrogen purification of coolant and surfaces of circulation circuit is used. It consists in introduction of gaseous mixtures hydrogen - water vapor - rare gas (argon or helium) directly into coolant flow. The principle scheme of hydrogen purification and the processes occurring during it are under consideration. Measures which make it completely impossible to overlap of the flow cross section of reactor core, steam generators, pumps and other equipment by lead oxides in reactor facilities with heavy liquid metal coolants are listed [ru

  3. Coolant system decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstine, L.D.; James, D.B.; Melaika, E.A.; Peterson, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method for decontaminating the coolant system of water cooled nuclear power reactors and for regenerating the decontamination solution is described. A small amount of one or more weak-acid organic complexing agents is added to the reactor coolant, and the pH is adjusted to form a decontamination solution which is circulated throughout the coolant system to dissolve metal oxides from the interior surfaces and complex the resulting metal ions and radionuclide ions. The coolant containing the complexed metal ions and radionuclide ions is passed through a strong-base anion exchange resin bed which has been presaturated with a solution containing the complexing agents in the same ratio and having the same pH as the decontamination solution. As the decontamination solution passes through the resin bed, metal-complexed anions are exchanged for the metal-ion-free anions on the bed, while metal-ion-free anions in the solution pass through the bed, thus removing the metal ions and regenerating the decontamination solution. (author)

  4. Sound velocity in the coolant of boiling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Parshin, D.A.; Novikov, K.S.; Galivec, E.Yu.

    2009-01-01

    To prevent resonant interaction between acoustic resonance and natural frequencies of FE, FA and RI oscillations, it is necessary to determine the value of EACPO. Based on results of calculations of EACPO and natural frequencies of FR, FA and RI oscillations values, it would be possible to reveal the dynamical loadings on metal that are dangerous for the initiation of cracking process in the early stage of negative condition appearance. To calculate EACPO it is necessary to know the Speed Velocity in Coolant. Now we do not have any data about real values of such important parameter as pressure pulsations propagation velocity in two phase environments, especially in conditions with variations of steam content along the length of FR, with taking into account the type of local resistances, flow geometry etc. While areas of resonant interaction of the single-phase liquid coolant with equipment and internals vibrations are estimated well enough, similar estimations in the conditions of presence of a gas and steam phase in the liquid coolant are inconvenient till now. Paper presents results of calculation of velocity of pressure pulsations distribution in two-phase flow formed in core of RBMK-1000 reactors. Feature of the developed techniques is that not only thermodynamic factors and effect of a speed difference between water and steam in a two phase flow but also geometrical features of core, local resistance, non heterogeneity in the two phase environment and power level of a reactor are considered. Obtained results evidence noticeable decreasing of velocity propagation of pressure pulsations in the presence of steam actions in the liquids. Such estimations for real RC of boiling nuclear reactors with steam-liquid coolant are obtained for the first time. (author)

  5. LWR and HTGR coolant dynamics: the containment of severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Gherson, P.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Hu, K.; Iyer, K.; Viskanta, R.; Lommers, L.

    1983-07-01

    This is the final report of a project containing three major tasks. Task I deals with the fundamental aspects of energetic fuel/coolant interactions (steam explosions) as they pertain to LWR core melt accidents. Task II deals with the applied aspects of LWR core melt accident sequences and mechanisms important to containment response, and includes consideration of energetic fuel/coolant interaction events, as well as non-explosive ones, corium material disposition and eventual coolability, and containment pressurization phenomena. Finally, Task III is concerned with HTGR loss of forced circulation accidents. This report is organized into three major parts corresponding to these three tasks respectively

  6. Research on Coolant Radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yeong Keong; Kim, W. H.; Yeon, J. W.; Jung, Y. J.; Choi, K. C.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.; Cho, Y. H.

    2007-06-01

    The final objective of this study is to develop a method for reducing radioactive materials formed in the reactor coolant circuit. This second stage research was categorized into the following three subgroups: the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical variation at high temperatures and pressures, the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures, and the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. First, in the development of the estimation technique of microscopic chemical change at high temperatures and pressures, the technique for measuring coolant chemistry such as pH, conductivity and Eh was developed to be appropriate for the high temperature and pressure condition. The coolant chemistry measuring system including the self-devised high temperature pH sensor can be applied to the field of nuclear reactor and contribute on a large scale in the automation of the coolant chemistry control and the establishment of the real-time on-line measuring technique. Secondly, the dissociation constant of water and the solubility of metal oxides were measured in the fundamental study on the thermodynamics at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, in the study on the deposition of metal oxides and the determination of the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD, the careful investigation of the deposition phenomena of micro particles on the cladding surface showed that subcooled boiling and the dissolved hydrogen are the main factors responsible for the growth of CRUD. In addition, the basis was provided for the construction of a new particle behavior model in the reactor coolant circuit

  7. Condensing heat transfer following a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krotiuk, W.J.; Rubin, M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A new method for calculating the steam mass condensation energy removal rates on cold surfaces in contact with an air-steam mixture has been developed. This method is based on the principles of mass diffusion of steam from an area of high concentration to the condensing surface, which is an area of low steam concentration. This new method of calculating mass condensation has been programmed into the CONTEMPT-LT Mod 26 computer code, which calculates the pressure and temperature transients inside a light water reactor containment following a loss-of-coolant accident. The condensing heat transfer coefficient predicted by the mass diffusion method is compared to existing semi-empirical correlations and to the experimental results of the Carolinas Virginia Tube Reactor Containment natural decay test. Closer agreement with test results is shown in the calculation of containment pressure, temperature, and heat sink surface temperature using the mass diffusion condensation method than when using any existing semi-empirical correlation

  8. Analysis of molten fuel-coolant interaction during a reactivity-initiated accident experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a reactivity-initiated accident experiment, designated RIA-ST-4, are discussed and analyzed with regard to molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI). In this experiment, extensive amounts of molten UO 2 fuel and zircaloy cladding were produced and fragmented upon mixing with the coolant. Coolant pressurization up to 35 MPa and coolant overheating in excess of 940 K occurred after fuel rod failure. The initial coolant conditions were similar to those in boiling water reactors during a hot startup (that is, coolant pressure of 6.45 MPa, coolant temperature of 538 K, and coolant flow rate of 85 cm 3 /s). It is concluded that the high coolant pressure recorded in the RIA-ST-4 experiment was caused by an energetic MFCI and was not due to gas release from the test rod at failure, Zr/water reaction, or to UO 2 fuel vapor pressure. The high coolant temperature indicated the presence of superheated steam, which may have formed during the expansion of the working fluid back to the initial coolant pressure; yet, the thermal-to-mechanical energy conversion ratio is estimated to be only 0.3%

  9. Identification of relevant conditions and experiments for fuel-coolant interactions in nuclear power plants - SERENA Co-ordinated Programme (Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications) Phase 1, Task 1 - Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magallon, D.; Scott de Martinville, E.; Chaumont, B.; Filippi, M.; Meignen, R.; Berthoud, G.; Ratel, G.; Melikhov, O.I.; Melikhov, V.I.; Jacobs, H.; Buerger, Manfred; Buck, Michael; Moriyama, K.; Nakamura, H.; Hirano, M.; Muramatsu, K.; Ishikawa, J.; Song, Jinho; Bang, Kwanghyun; Suh, Namduk; Sairanen, Risto; Lindholm, Ilona

    2004-01-01

    SERENA (Steam Explosion Resolution for Nuclear Applications) is an international OECD programme for the resolution of FCI remaining issues. The programme has origin the concerns expressed by the Senior Group Experts on Nuclear Safety Research and Programme (SESAR/FAP) about de-emphasis of FCI research all over the world, while uncertainties still exist on some aspects of FCI. After an evaluation of remaining needs by FCI experts in a meeting October 2000, a proposal was matured during 2001 following CSNI recommendations that existing knowledge should be carefully assessed before carrying out new experiments, and reactor application should be the focus of any new action. The work programme was approved by CSNI December 2001. The programme started January 2002. The overall objective of SERENA is to obtain convergence on the understanding of FCI processes and energetics, as well as on method(s) for reliable estimate of the magnitude of loadings for realistic reactor conditions, in order to bring understanding and predictability of FCI energetics to desirable levels for risk management. The work is performed in two phases: - Phase 1 analyses and evaluates knowledge and data on FCI by using available tools with the aim to identify areas where large uncertainties/ discrepancies still subsist and are important for predicting loads in reactors with a sufficient level of confidence, and work to be done, if any, to reduce these uncertainties/discrepancies. - Phase 2 will implement analytical and experimental actions to resolve these uncertainties/ discrepancies, if required. The objective of Phase 1 is reached through comparative calculations by available tools of existing experiments and reactor cases. It is divided into five tasks: 1. Identification of relevant conditions for FCI in reactor, 2. Comparison of various approaches for calculating jet break-up and pre-mixing, 3. Comparison of various approaches for calculating the explosion phase, 4. Reactor applications, 5

  10. Steam drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowder, R.

    1978-01-01

    Steam drums are described that are suitable for use in steam generating heavy water reactor power stations. They receive a steam/water mixture via riser headers from the reactor core and provide by means of separators and driers steam with typically 0.5% moisture content for driving turbines. The drums are constructed as prestressed concrete pressure vessels in which the failure of one or a few of the prestressing elements does not significantly affect the overall strength of the structure. The concrete also acts as a radiation shield. (U.K.)

  11. Effects of shutdown chemistry on steam generator radiation levels at Point Beach Unit 2. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kormuth, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    A refueling shutdown chemistry test was conducted at a PWR, Point Beach Unit 2. The objective was to yield reactor coolant chemistry data during the cooldown/shutdown process which might establish a relationship between shutdown chemistry and its effects on steam generator radiation fields. Of particular concern were the effects of the presence of hydrogen in the coolant as contrasted to an oxygenated coolant. Analysis of reactor coolant samples showed a rapid soluble release (spike) in Co-58, Co-60, and nickel caused by oxygenation of the coolant. The measurement of radioisotope specific activities indicates that the material undergoing dissolution during the shutdown originated from different sources which had varying histories of activation. The test program developed no data which would support theories that oxygenation of the coolant while the steam generators are full of water contributes to increased steam generator radiation levels

  12. Water vapor as a perspective coolant for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalafati, D.D.; Petrov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Based on analysis of foreign projects of nuclear power plants with steam-cooled fast reactors, it is shown that low breeding ratio and large doubling time were caused by using nickel alloys, high vapor pressure and small volume heat release. The possibility is shown of obtaining doubling time in the necessary limits of T 2 =10-12 years when the above reasons for steam-cooled reactors are eliminated. Favourable combination of thermophysical and thermodynamic properties of water vapor makes it perspective coolant for power fast reactors

  13. Compartmentalized safety coolant injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    A safety coolant injection system for nuclear reactors wherein a core reflood tank is provided to afford more reliable reflooding of the reactor core in the event of a break in one of the reactor coolant supply loops. Each reactor coolant supply loop is arranged in a separate compartment in the containment structure to contain and control the flow of spilled coolant so as to permit its use during emergency core cooling procedures. A spillway allows spilled coolant in the compartment to pass into the emergency water storage tank from where it can be pumped back to the reactor vessel. (author)

  14. Mitigation of steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor with passive safety systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Daniel J.; Schrader, Kenneth J.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of steam generator tube ruptures in a pressurized water reactor are mitigated by reducing the pressure in the primary loop by diverting reactor coolant through the heat exchanger of a passive heat removal system immersed in the in containment refueling water storage tank in response to a high feed water level in the steam generator. Reactor coolant inventory is maintained by also in response to high steam generator level introducing coolant into the primary loop from core make-up tanks at the pressure in the reactor coolant system pressurizer. The high steam generator level is also used to isolate the start-up feed water system and the chemical and volume control system to prevent flooding into the steam header. 2 figures.

  15. Steam 80 steam generator instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, W.H.; Harris, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes two special instrumentation packages in an integral economizer (preheater) steam generator of one of the first System 80 plants scheduled to go into commercial operation. The purpose of the instrumentation is to obtain accurate operating information from regions of the secondary side of the steam generator inaccessible to normal plant instrumentation. In addition to verification of the System 80 steam generator design predictions, the data obtained will assist in verification of steam generator thermal/hydraulic computer codes developed for generic use in the industry

  16. Selling steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, M.J.; Goodwin, L.M.

    1991-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of steam sales contract is in financing cogeneration facilities. The topics of the article include the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act provisions and how they affect the marketing of steam from qualifying facilities, the independent power producers market shift, and qualifying facility's benefits

  17. Steam condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Fujio

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safe steam condensation by providing steam condensation blades at the end of a pipe. Constitution: When high temperature high pressure steam flows into a vent pipe having an opening under water in a pool or an exhaust pipe or the like for a main steam eacape safety valve, non-condensable gas filled beforehand in the steam exhaust pipe is compressed, and discharged into the water in the pool. The non-condensable gas thus discharged from the steam exhaust pipe is introduced into the interior of the hollow steam condensing blades, is then suitably expanded, and thereafter exhausted from a number of exhaust holes into the water in the pool. In this manner, the non-condensable gas thus discharged is not directly introduced into the water in the pool, but is suitable expanded in the space of the steam condensing blades to suppress extreme over-compression and over-expansion of the gas so as to prevent unstable pressure vibration. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. Testing installation for a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubourg, M.

    1985-01-01

    The invention proposes a testing installation for a steam generator associated to a boiler, comprising a testing exchanger connected to a feeding circuit in secondary fluid and to a circuit to release the steam produced, and comprising a heating-tube bundle connected to a closed circuit of circulation of a primary coolant at the same temperature and at the pressure than the primary fluid. The heating-tube bundle of the testing exchanger has the same height than the primary bundle of the steam generator and the testing exchanger is at the same level and near the steam generator and is fed by the same secondary fluid such as it is subject to the same operation phases during a long period. The in - vention applies, more particularly, to the steam generators of pressurized water nuclear power plants [fr

  19. Trends and experiences in reactor coolant pump motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the requirements and features of these motors is given as background along with a discussion of trends and experiences. Included are a discussion of thrust bearings and a review of safety related requirements and design features. Primary coolant pump motors are vertical induction motors for pumps that circulate huge quantities of water through the reactor core to carry the heat generated there to steam generator heat exchangers. 4 refs

  20. Coolant circuit water chemistry of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilky, Peter; Doma, Arpad

    1985-01-01

    The numerous advantages of the proper selection of water chemistry parameters including low corrosion rate of the structural materials, hence the low-level activity build-up, depositions, radiation doses were emphasized. Major characteristics of water chemistry applied to the primary coolant of pressurized water reactors including neutral, slightly basic and strong basic ones are discussed. Boric acid is widely used to control reactivity. Primary coolant water chemistry of WWER type reactors which is based on the addition of ammonia and potassium hydroxide to boric acid is compared with that of other reactors. The demineralization of the total condensate of the steam turbines became a general trend in the water chemistry of the secondary coolant circuits. (V.N.)

  1. Steam explosions in sodium cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundell, B.

    1982-01-01

    Steam explosion is considered a physical process which transport heat from molten fuel to liquid coolant so fast that the coolant starts boiling in an explosion-like manner. The arising pressure waves transform part of the thermal energy to mechanical energy. This can stress the reactor tank and threaten its hightness. The course of the explosion has not been theoretical explained. Experimental results indicate that the probability of steam explosions in a breeder reactor is small. The efficiency of the transformation of the heat of fusion into mechanical energy in substantially lower than the theoretical maximum value. The mechanical stress from the steam explosion on the reactor tank does not seem to jeopardize its tightness. (G.B.)

  2. Characteristics of steam jet impingement on annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang H.; Kim, Won J.; Suh, Kune Y.; Song, Chul H.

    2004-01-01

    The steam jet impingement occurs when the steam through the cold leg from the steam generator strikes the inner reactor barrel during the reflood phase of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), which is a characteristic behavior for the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe). In the cold leg break LOCA, the steam and water flows in the downcomer are truly multidimensional. The azimuthal velocity distribution of the steam flow has an important bearing on the thermal hydraulic phenomena such as the emergency coolant water direct bypass, sweepout, steam condensation, and so forth. The investigation of jet flow is required to determine the steam path and momentum reduction rate after the impingement. For the observation of the steam behavior near the break, the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis has been carried out using CFX5.6. The flow visualization and analysis demonstrate the velocity profiles of the steam flow in the annulus region for the same boundary conditions. Pursuant to the CFD results, the micro-Pitot tubes were positioned at varying angles, and corrected for their sensitivity. The experiments were carried out to directly measure the pressure differential and to visualize the flow utilizing a smoke injection method. Results from this study are slated to be applied to MARS, which is a thermal hydraulic system code for the best-estimate analysis. The current one- or two-dimensional analysis in MARS was known to distort the local flow behavior. To enhance prediction capability of MARS, it is necessary to inspect the steam path in the break flow and mechanically simulate the momentum variation. The present experimental and analytical results can locally be applied to developing the engineering models of specific and essential phenomena. (author)

  3. System and method for determining coolant level and flow velocity in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Bruce William; Morris, William Guy; Zheng, Danian; Monk, David James; Fang, Biao; Surman, Cheryl Margaret; Anderson, David Deloyd

    2013-09-10

    A boiling water reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel having a feedwater inlet for the introduction of recycled steam condensate and/or makeup coolant into the vessel, and a steam outlet for the discharge of produced steam for appropriate work. A fuel core is located within a lower area of the pressure vessel. The fuel core is surrounded by a core shroud spaced inward from the wall of the pressure vessel to provide an annular downcomer forming a coolant flow path between the vessel wall and the core shroud. A probe system that includes a combination of conductivity/resistivity probes and/or one or more time-domain reflectometer (TDR) probes is at least partially located within the downcomer. The probe system measures the coolant level and flow velocity within the downcomer.

  4. The Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    An account is given of the SGHWR, the prototype of which was built by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority at Winfrith, under the following headings: Introduction; origin of the SGHWR concept; conceptual design (choice of reactor type, steam cycle, reactor coolant system, nuclear behaviour, fuel design, core design, and protective, auxiliary and containment systems); operation and control (integrity of core cooling, reactivity control, power trimming, long term reactivity control, xenon override, load following, power shaping, spatial stability control, void coefficient); protective systems (breached coolant circuit trip, intact coolant circuits trip, power set-back trip); dynamic characteristics; reactor control; station control (decoupled control system, coupled control system, rate of response); Winfrith prototype (design and safety philosophy, conceptual features and parameters, reactor coolant system, protective systems, emergency core cooling, core structure, fuel design, vented containment). (U.K.)

  5. SNR coolant system components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Haas Van Dorsser, A.H.; Mausbeck, H.

    1976-01-01

    The DEBENELUX prototype fast reactor power plant SNR 300 at Kalkar has a loop-type heat transfer system similar to that of the prototype LMFBR plants in the USA and Japan. There exist three 257 MW/sub th/ primary sodium loops, each with a hot leg centrifugal pump and three 85.6 MW/sub th/ intermediate heat exchangers in parallel. From there the heat is transferred to the steam generators via three secondary sodium loops with one cold leg sodium circulating pump in each. At a nominal reactor outlet temperature of 819 0 K and a turbine inlet power of 771 MW/sub th/ super heated steam of 166 bar and 733 0 K is produced, giving rise to a plant rating of 327 MW/sub e/ gross. The primary and secondary loops are described in detail

  6. Reactor coolant system and containment aqueous chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Fission products released from fuel during reactor accidents can be subject to a variety of environments that will affect their ultimate behavior. In the reactor coolant system (RCS), for example, neutral or reducing steam conditions, radiation, and surfaces could all have an effect on fission product retention and chemistry. Furthermore, if water is encountered in the RCS, the high temperature aqueous chemistry of fission products must be assessed to determine the quantity and chemical form of fission products released to the containment building. In the containment building, aqueous chemistry will determine the longer-term release of volatile fission products to the containment atmosphere. Over the past few years, the principles of physical chemistry have been rigorously applied to the various chemical conditions described above. This paper reviews the current state of knowledge and discusses the future directions of chemistry research relating to the behavior of fission products in the RCS and containment

  7. Analyses of Decrease in Reactor Coolant Flow Rate in SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Choi, Suhn

    2011-01-01

    SMART is a small integral reactor, which is under development at KAERI to get the standard design approval by the end of 2011. SMART works like a pressurized light-water reactor in principle though it is more compact than large commercial reactors. SMART houses major components such as steam generators, a pressurizer, and reactor coolant pumps inside the reactor pressure vessel. Due to its compact design, SMART adopts a canned-motor type reactor coolant pump which has much smaller rotational inertia than the ones used in commercial reactors. As a consequence, the reactor coolant pump has very short coastdown time and reactor coolant flow rate decreases more severely compared to commercial reactors. The transients initiated by reduction of reactor coolant flow rate have been analyzed to ensure that SMART can be safely shutdown on such transients. The design basis events in this category are complete loss of flow, single pump locked rotor with loss of offsite power, and single pump shaft break with loss of offsite power

  8. Full reactor coolant system chemical decontamination qualification programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, P.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Corrosion and wear products are found throughout the reactor coolant system (RCS), or primary loop, of a PWR power plant. These products circulate with the primary coolant through the reactor where they may become activated. An oxide layer including these activated products forms on the surfaces of the RCS (including the fuel elements). The amount of radioactivity deposited on the different surface varies and depends primarily on the corrosion rate of the materials concerned, the amount of cobalt in the coolant and the chemistry of the coolant. The oxide layer, commonly called crud, on the surfaces of nuclear plant systems leads to personnel radiation exposure. The level of the radiation fields from the crud increases with time from initial plant startup and typically levels off after 4 to 6 cycles of plant operation. Thereafter, significant personnel radiation exposure may be incurred whenever major maintenance is performed. Personnel exposure is highest during refueling outages when routine maintenance on major plant components, such as steam generators and reactor coolant pumps, is performed. Administrative controls are established at nuclear plants to minimize the exposure incurred by an individual and the plant workers as a whole.

  9. The installation welding of pressure water reactor coolant piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Feng

    2010-01-01

    Large pressure water reactor nuclear power plants are constructing in our country. There are three symmetry standard loops in reactor coolant system. Each loop possesses a steam generator and a primary poop, in which one of the loops is equipped with a pressurizer. These components are connected with reactor pressure vessel by installation welding of the coolant piping. The integrity of reactor coolant pressure boundary is the second barrier to protect the radioactive substance from release to outside, so the safe operation of nuclear power plant is closely related to the quality of coolant piping installation welding. The heavy tube with super low carbon content austenitic stainless steel is selected for coolant piping. This kind of material has good welding behavior, but the poor thermal conductivity, the big liner expansion coefficient and the big welding deformation will cause bigger welding stress. To reduce the welding deformation, to control the dimension precision, to reduce the residual stress and to ensure the welding quality the installation sequence should be properly designed and the welding technology should be properly controlled. (authors)

  10. Status of steam generator tubing integrity at Jaslovske Bohunice NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, S.

    1997-01-01

    Steam generator represents one of the most important component of nuclear power plants. Especially, loss of tubing integrity of steam generators can lead to the primary coolant leak to secondary circuit and in worse cases to the unit shut down or to the PTS events occurrence. Therefore, to ensure the steam generator tubing integrity and the current knowledge about tube degradation propagation and development is of the highest importance. In this paper the present status of steam generator tubing integrity in operated NPP in Slovak Republic is presented

  11. Dual coolant blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malang, S.; Schleisiek, K.

    1994-11-01

    A self-cooled liquid metal breeder blanket with helium-cooled first wall ('Dual Coolant Blanket Concept') for a fusion DEMO reactor is described. This is one of the four blanket concepts under development in the frame of the European fusion technology program with the aim to select in 1995 the two most promising ones for further development. Described are the design of the blankets including the ancillary loop system and the results of the theoretical and experimental work in the fields of neutronics, magnetohydrodynamics, thermohydraulics, mechanical stresses, compatibility and purification of lead-lithium, tritium control, safety, reliability, and electrically insulating coatings. The remaining open questions and the required R and D programme are identified. (orig.) [de

  12. 400-MWe consolidated nuclear steam system (CNSS): 1200-MWt/conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    A 1200-MWt consolidated nuclear steam system (CNSS) conceptual design is described. The concept, derived from nuclear merchant ship propulsion steam systems but distinctly different from those systems in detail, incorporates the steam generators within the reactor pressure vessel. This configuration eliminates primary coolant circulating piping external to the reactor pressure vessel since the primary coolant circulating pumps are mounted in the pressure vessel head. So arranged, the maximum piping break that must be assumed is that of the pressurizer surge line, which is substantially smaller than a primary coolant circulating line. A fracture of the pressurizer surge line would result in substantially lower mass and energy release rates of the primary coolant during the assumed loss-of-coolant accident. This in turn makes practical a pressure-suppression containment rather than the ''dry'' containment commonly used for pressurized water reactors

  13. An experimental study of steam explosions involving CORIUM melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millington, R.A.

    1984-05-01

    An experimental programme to investigate molten fuel coolant interactions involving 0.5 kg thermite-generated CORIUM melts and water has been carried out. System pressures and initial coolant subcoolings were chosen to enhance the probability of steam explosions. Yields and efficiencies of the interactions were found to be very close to those obtained from similar experiments using molten UO 2 generated from a Uranium/Molybdenum Trioxide thermite. (author)

  14. HTGR power plant hot reheat steam pressure control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    A control system for a high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is disclosed wherein such plant includes a plurality of steam generators. Dual turbine-generators are connected to the common steam headers, a high pressure element of each turbine receiving steam from the main steam header, and an intermediate-low pressure element of each turbine receiving steam from the hot reheat header. Associated with each high pressure element is a bypass line connected between the main steam header and a cold reheat header, which is commonly connected to the high pressure element exhausts. A control system governs the flow of steam through the first and second bypass lines to provide for a desired minimum steam flow through the steam generator reheater sections at times when the total steam flow through the turbines is less than such minimum, and to regulate the hot reheat header steam pressure to improve control of the auxiliary steam turbines and thereby improve control of the reactor coolant gas flow, particularly following a turbine trip. (U.S.)

  15. Design criteria of primary coolant chemistry in SMART-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byung Seon; Kim, Ah Young; Kim, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Ju Hyeon; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2005-01-01

    SMART-P differs significantly from commercially designed PWRs. Materials inventories used in SMART-P differ from that at PWRs. All surfaces of the primary circuit with the primary coolant are either made from or plated with stainless steel. The material of steam generator (SG) is also different from that of the standard material of the commercially operating PWRs: titanium alloy for the steam generator tubes. Also, SMART-P primary coolant technology differs from that in PWRs: ammonia is used as a pH raising agent and hydrogen formed due to radiolytic processes is kept in specific range by ammonia dosing. Nevertheless, main objectives of the SMART-P primary coolant are the same as at PWRs: to assure primary system pressure boundary integrity, fuel cladding integrity and to minimize out-of-core radiation buildup. The objective of this work is to introduce the design criteria for the primary water chemistry for SMART-P from the viewpoint of the system characteristics and the chemical design concept

  16. Steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, R.L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Steam generators for nuclear reactors are designed so that deposition of solids on the surface of the inlet side of the tubesheet or the inlet header with the consequent danger of corrosion and eventual tube failure is obviated or substantially reduced. (U.K.)

  17. The effect of outflowing water coolant with supercritical parameters on a barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekseev Maksim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The outflow of supercritical coolant with different initial parameters and its impact on the barrier have been numerically simulated. Spatial and axial distributions of pressure and steam quality are presented. The force acting on the barrier at different parameters of the outflow has been calculated.

  18. 10 CFR 50.46a - Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant system venting systems. 50.46a Section 50.46a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... function of these systems. High point vents are not required for the tubes in U-tube steam generators...

  19. Linear Dynamics Model for Steam Cooled Fast Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, H

    1968-04-15

    A linear analytical dynamic model is developed for steam cooled fast power reactors. All main components of such a plant are investigated on a general though relatively simple basis. The model is distributed in those parts concerning the core but lumped as to the external plant components. Coolant is considered as compressible and treated by the actual steam law. Combined use of analogue and digital computer seems most attractive.

  20. Decontamination of main coolant pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roofthooft, R.

    1988-01-01

    Last year a number of main coolant pumps in Belgian nuclear power plants were decontaminated. A new method has been developed to reduce the time taken for decontamination and the volume of waste to be treated. The method comprises two phases: Oxidation with permanganate in nitric acid and dissolution in oxalic acid. The decontamination of main coolant pumps can now be achieved in less than one day. The decontamination factors attained range between 15 and 150. (orig.) [de

  1. Qualification test of a main coolant pump for SMART pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Jin; Yoon, Eui Soo; Oh, Hyong Woo

    2006-01-01

    SMART Pilot is a multipurpose small capacity integral type reactor. Main Coolant Pump (MCP) of SMART Pilot is a canned-motor-type axial pump to circulate the primary coolant between nuclear fuel and steam generator in the primary system. The reactor is designed to operate under condition of 310 .deg. C and 14.7 MPa. Thus MCP has to be tested under same operating condition as reactor design condition to verify its performance and safety. In present work, a test apparatus to simulate real operating situations of the reactor has been designed and constructed to test MCP. And then functional tests, performance tests, and endurance tests have been carried out upon a prototype MCP. Canned motor characteristics, homologous head/torque curves, coast-down curves, NPSH curves and life-time performance variations were obtained from the qualification test as well as hydraulic performance characteristics of MCP

  2. Evaluation of CRUDTRAN code to predict transport of corrosion products and radioactivity in the PWR primary coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    CRUDTRAN code is to predict transport of the corrosion products and their radio-activated nuclides such as cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 in the PWR primary coolant system. In CRUDTRAN code the PWR primary circuit is divided into three principal sections such as the core, the coolant and the steam generator. The main driving force for corrosion product transport in the PWR primary coolant comes from coolant temperature change throughout the system and a subsequent change in corrosion product solubility. As the coolant temperature changes around the PWR primary circuit, saturation status of the corrosion products in the coolant also changes such that under-saturation in steam generator and super-saturation in the core. CRUDTRAN code was evaluated by comparison with the results of the in-reactor loop tests simulating the PWR primary coolant system and PWR plant data. It showed that CRUDTRAN could predict variations of cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 radioactivity with time, plant cycle and coolant chemistry in the PWR plant. (author)

  3. Materials performance in operating PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeks, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    The Inconel-600 tubing in operating PWR steam generators has developed leaks due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking or a general wastage attack, originating from the secondary side of the tubing. Corrosion has been limited to those areas of the steam generators where limited coolant circulation and high heat flux have caused impurities to concentrate. Wastage or pitting attack has always been associated with local concentration of sodium hydrogen phosphates, whereas stress corrosion has been associated with local concentration of sodium or potassium hydroxides. The only instance of stress corrosion originating from the primary side occurred on cold-worked tubing when hydrogen was not added to getter oxygen, and LiOH was not added to raise the pH of the primary coolant. All PWR manufacturers are now recommending that the phosphate treatment of the secondary coolant be abandoned in favor of an all-volatile treatment. Experience in operating plants has shown, however, that removal of phosphate-rich sludge deposits is difficult, and that further wastage and/or intergranular stress corrosion may develop; the residual sodium phosphates gradually convert by reaction with corrosion product hydroxides to sodium hydroxide, which remains concentrated in the limited flow areas. Improvements in circulation patterns have been achieved by inserting flow baffles in some PWR steam generators. Inservice monitoring by eddy current techniques is useful for detecting corrosion-induced defects in the tubing, but irreproducibility in field examinations can lead to uncertainties interpreting the results. (U.S.)

  4. Numerical study on coolant flow distribution at the core inlet for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lin; Peng, Min Jun; Xia, Genglei; Lv, Xing; Li, Ren [Fundamental Science on Nuclear Safety and Simulation Technology Laboratory, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin (China)

    2017-02-15

    When an integral pressurized water reactor is operated under low power conditions, once-through steam generator group operation strategy is applied. However, group operation strategy will cause nonuniform coolant flow distribution at the core inlet and lower plenum. To help coolant flow mix more uniformly, a flow mixing chamber (FMC) has been designed. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics methods have been used to investigate the coolant distribution by the effect of FMC. Velocity and temperature characteristics under different low power conditions and optimized FMC configuration have been analyzed. The results illustrate that the FMC can help improve the nonuniform coolant temperature distribution at the core inlet effectively; at the same time, the FMC will induce more resistance in the downcomer and lower plenum.

  5. Theoretical studying the stability of steady-state regime of a channel with a coolant condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savikhin, O.G.

    1987-01-01

    Based on the boiling channel stability theory, the channel steady-state stability with the coolant condensation is studied. Condensable coolants are used in the NPP steam-separator superheaters as well as in cryogenic technique. Under certain conditions the coolant flow rate and temperature fluctuations may be excited in the parallel channel system with coolant condensation, which produce a sufficient effect on the heat exchange equipment operation reliability. To describe unsteady processes of heat and mass transfer in the channel, a homogeneous two-phase flow one dimensional model is used. The results obtained allow one to make a conclusion concerning the effect of some parameters on condensing channel steady-state regime stability: reduction of inlet and outlet unheated communication length, pressure drop increase at the outlet plate and its reduction at the inlet one lead to the increase of stability margin

  6. Steam turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuzumi, Naoaki.

    1994-01-01

    In a steam turbine cycle, steams exhausted from the turbine are extracted, and they are connected to a steam sucking pipe of a steam injector, and a discharge pipe of the steam injector is connected to an inlet of a water turbine. High pressure discharge water is obtained from low pressure steams by utilizing a pressurizing performance of the steam injector and the water turbine is rotated by the high pressure water to generate electric power. This recover and reutilize discharged heat of the steam turbine effectively, thereby enabling to improve heat efficiency of the steam turbine cycle. (T.M.)

  7. Combined gas and steam power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D T; Davis, J P

    1977-06-02

    The invention concerns a combination of internal combustion engine and steam turbine, where not only the heat of the hot exhaust gases of the internal combustion engine, but also the heat in the coolant of the internal combustion engine is used for power generation. The working fluid of the steam turbine is an organic fluid of low boiling point. A mixture of 85 mol% of tri-fluoro ethanol and 15 mol% of water is the most suitable fluid. The combustion engine (a Diesel engine is the most suitable), drives a working machine, e.g. a generator. The hot combustion exhaust gases produce evaporation of the working fluid in an HP evaporator. The superheated steam gives up its energy in the HP turbine stage, flows through the feed preheater of the fluid, and is condensed in the condenser. A pump pumps the fluid via control valve to heat the feed preheater of the fluid, from which it returns to the HP evaporator. At the same time evaporated coolant flows into an LP evaporator in counter-flow to the working fluid, condenses, and is returned to the cooling circuit of the combustion engine. The working fluid in the LP evaporator is heated to its boiling point, gives up its energy in the LP stage of the steam turbine is condensed, pumped to the preheater and returns to the LP evaporator. The two rotors of the turbine stages (HP and LP stages) are mounted on the same shaft, which drives a working machine or a generator.

  8. Analysis and design of flow limiter used in steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shixun; Gao Yongjun

    1995-10-01

    Flow limiter is an important safety component of PWR steam generator. It can limit the blowdown rate of steam generator inventory in case of the main steam pipeline breaks, so that the rate of the primary coolant temperature reduction can be slowed down in order to prevent fuel element from burn-out. The venturi type flow limiter is analysed, its flow characteristics are delineated, physical and mathematical models defined; the detail mathematical derivation provided. The research lays down a theoretic basis for flow limiter design. The governing equations and formulas given can be directly applied to computer analysis of the flow limiter. (3 refs., 3 figs.)

  9. Responses to Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Kyoo Hwan; Kim, Hee C.; Chang, Moon H.; Zee, Sung Q.; Kim, Si-Hwan; Lee, Un-Chul

    2004-01-01

    The SMART NSSS adopts the design characteristics of containing most of the primary circuit components, such as the reactor core, main coolant pumps (MCPs), steam generators (SGs), and N 2 gas pressurizer (PZR) in a single leak-tight Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) with a relatively large ratio of the primary coolant inventory to the core power compared to the conventional loop-type PWR. Due to these design characteristics, the SMART can fundamentally eliminate the possibility of Large Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (LBLOCAs), improve the natural circulation capability, and assure a sufficient time to mitigate the possibility of core uncover. Also, SMART adopts inherent safety improving features and passive engineered safety systems such as the substantially large negative moderator temperature coefficients, passive residual heat removal system, emergency core cooling system, and a steel-made leak-tight Safeguard Vessel (SV) housing the RPV. This paper presents the results of the safety analyses using a MARS/SMR code for the instantaneous guillotine ruptures of the major pipelines penetrating the RPV. The analysis results, employing conservative initial/boundary conditions and assumptions, show that the safety systems of the SMART basic design adequately remove the core decay heat without causing core uncover for all the cases of the Small Break Loss of Coolant Accidents (SBLOCAs). The sensitivity study results with variable SV conditions show that the reduced SV net free volume can shorten the time for reaching the thermal and mechanical equilibrium condition between the RPV and SV. Under these boundary conditions, the primary system inventory loss can be minimized and the core remains covered for a longer period of time without any makeup of the coolant. (authors)

  10. Reactor coolant pump transportation incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noce, D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an incident, which occurred on August 27, 1991, in which a Reactor Coolant Pump motor en route from Surry Power Station to Westinghouse repair facilities struck the overpass at the junction of Interstate 64 and Jefferson Avenue in Newport News, Virginia. The transport container that housed the reactor coolant pump motor failed to clear the overpass. The force of the impact dislodged the container and motor from the truck bed, and it landed on the acceleration land and road shoulder. Upon impact, the container broke open and exposed the reactor coolant pump motor. Incidental radioactively contaminated water that remained in the motor coolers drained onto the road, contaminating the aggregate as well as the underlying gravel

  11. Upgradation of design features of primary coolant pumps of Indian 220 MWe PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.S.; Mhetre, S.G.; Manna, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Evolution in the design features of Primary Coolant Pump (PCP) had started in fifties for catering to stringent specification requirements of reactor coolant systems of larger capacity reactors of various kinds. Primary coolant pumps of PWR and PHWR are employed for circulating radioactive, pressurized hot water in a circuit consisting of reactor (heat source) and steam generator (heat sink). As primary coolant pump capacity decides the station capacity, larger capacity primary coolant pumps have been evolved. Since primary coolant pump pressure containing parts are part of Primary Heat Transport system envelope, the parts are designed, manufactured, inspected and tested in accordance with the applicable system guidelines. Flywheel is mounted on the motor shaft for increasing mass moment of inertia of pump motor rotor to meet the coast down requirements of reactor cooling system under Class-IV electrical power supply failure. Due to limited accessibility of the PCP (PCP installed in shut down accessible area), quick maintenance, condition monitoring, reliable shaft seal system/bearing system aspects have been of great concern to reactor owners and pump manufacturers. In this paper upgradation of design features of RAPS, MAPS and NAPS primary coolant pumps have been covered. (author). 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications.

  13. Integrity of the reactor coolant boundary of the European pressurized water reactor (EPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, D.; Bieniussa, K.; Schulz, H.; Jalouneix, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an abstract of the work performed in the frame of the development of the IPSN/GRS approach in view of the EPR conceptual safety features. EPR is a pressurized water reactor which will be based on the experience gained by utilities and designers in France and in Germany. The reactor coolant boundary of a PWR includes the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), those parts of the steam generators (SGs) which contain primary coolant, the pressurizer (PSR), the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs), the main coolant lines (MCLs) with their branches as well as the other connecting pipes and all branching pipes including the second isolation valves. The present work covering the integrity of the reactor coolant boundary is mainly restricted to the integrity of the main coolant lines (MCLs) and reflects the design requirements for the main components of the reactor coolant boundary. In the following the conceptual aspects, i.e. design, manufacture, construction and operation, will be assessed. A main aspect is the definition of break postulates regarding overall safety implications

  14. Conceptual design of the integral test loop (I): Reactor coolant system and secondary system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Lee, Seong Je; Kwon, Tae Soon; Moon, Sang Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of the primary coolant system and the secondary system of the Integral Test Loop (ITL) which simulates overall thermal hydraulic phenomena of the primary system of a nuclear power plant during postulated accidents or transients. The design basis for the primary coolant system and secondary system is as follows ; Reference plant: Korean Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP), Height ratio : 1/1, Volume ratio : 1/200, Power scale : Max. 15% of the scaled nominal power, Temperature, Pressure : Real plant conditions. The primary coolant system includes a reactor vessel, which contains a core simulator, a steam generator, a reactor coolant pump simulator, a pressurizer and piping, which consists of two hot legs, four cold legs and four intermediate legs. The secondary system consists of s steam discharge system, a feedwater supply system and a steam condensing system. This conceptual design report describes general configuration of the reference plant, and major function and operation of each system of the plant. Also described is the design philosophy of each component and system of the ITL, and specified are the design criteria and technical specifications of each component and system of the ITL in the report. 17 refs., 43 figs., 51 tabs. (Author)

  15. Thermal-hydraulic model of the primary coolant circuits for the full-scale training facility with WWER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroshilin, A.E.; Zhukavin, A.P.; Pryakhin, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical model realized in the full-scale educational facility for NPP operator training is described. The RETACT computational complex providing real time process simulation for all regimes including the maximum credible accident is used for calculation of thermohydraulic parameters of the primary coolant circuits and steam generator under stationary and transient conditions. The two-velocity two-temperature model of one-dimensional steam-water flow containing uncondensed gases is realized in the program

  16. Steam line break analysis in CAREM-25 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanocco, Pablo; Gimenez, Marcelo O.; Vertullo, Alicia; Schlamp, Miguel A.; Garcia, Alicia E.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this report is to analyze the reactor response during a steam line break postulated accident with RELAP5, a plant code using a separated flow model. The steam line break caused a rapid blowdown of the secondary coolant increasing the heat removal in the steam generator. As a consequence and due to reactor features the core power is also increased. As maximum removed power in the secondary side is highly dependant on the total water volume evaporated during the accident a detailed model of feed water and outlet steam pipes is provided. Different cases are analyzed with and without feedwater system and considering the fail or success of the First Shutdown System. In all the sequences the DNBR and CPR remain above the minimum safety values established by design. Further calculations concerning depressurization ramps and steam generator feed water pumps response during depressurization are advised. (author)

  17. Steam Line Break Analysis in CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanocco, Pablo; Gimenez, Marcelo; Vertullo, Alicia; Garcia, A; Schlamp, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this report is to analyze the reactor response during a steam line break postulated accident with RELAP5, a plant code using a separated flow model.The steam line break caused a rapid blowdown of the secondary coolant increasing the heat removal in the steam generator.As a consequence and due to reactor features the core power is also increased.As maximum removed power in the secondary side is highly dependant on the total water volume evaporated during the accident a detailed model of feed water and outlet steam pipes is provided.Different cases are analyzed with and without feedwater system and considering the fail or success of the First Shutdown System.In all the sequences the DNBR and CPR remain above the minimum safety values established by design.Further calculations concerning depressurization ramps and steam generator feed water pumps response during depressurization are advised

  18. Specific properties of the electrical equipment in the nuclear steam supply system; Specificnosti elektricne opreme u primarnom djelu nuklearne elektrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smiljanic, D [Rade Koncar Institut, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)

    1979-07-01

    The paper presents description of reactor coolant pump motor in the primary coolant loop. The motor is treated as a representative of all electrical equipment in the nuclear steam supply system that has to meet all the requirements concerning reliability, minimum maintenance, radiation, seismic etc. (author)

  19. Sodium as a reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, S.B.G.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the use of sodium as a reactor coolant, to the advantages and problems related to its use, its mechanical, thermophysics, eletronical, magnetic and nuclear properties. It is mainly a bibliographic review, with the aim of gathering the necessary information to persons initiating in the study of sodium and also as reference source. (author) [pt

  20. Vertical reactor coolant pump instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    The investigation conducted at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Nuclear Power Plant to determine and correct increasing vibrations in the vertical reactor coolant pumps is described. Diagnostic procedures to determine the vibration causes and evaluate the corractive measures taken are also described

  1. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M. [Kansai Electric Power Company, Osaka (Japan); Urabe, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  2. Steaming ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    An example of the development of geothermal power in Indonesia is described. Wells are being drilled into the Salak volcano on Java, about 60km south of Jakarta. These let out high pressure hot water trapped 1 to 3km below the surface which can be flashed into steam for driving turbines. The hot water field has already produced 110MW of power since 1994 and is currently being expanded to 330MW. Some details of the drilling and civil engineering are given. Since Indonesia sits on the edge of giant tectonic boundary known as the ''Pacific ring of fire'', the potential for further development is enormous. Ultimately volcanic activity could release an estimated 27,000MW capacity. More realistically, 2,000MW of crustal power by 2020 is spoken of. (UK)

  3. Dual turbine power plant and method of operating such plant, especially one having an HTGR steam supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    A power plant including dual steam turbine-generators connected to pass superheat and reheat steam from a steam generator which derives heat from the coolant gas of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor is described. Associated with each turbine is a bypass line to conduct superheat steam in parallel with a high pressure turbine portion, and a bypass line to conduct superheat steam in parallel with a lower pressure turbine portion. Auxiliary steam turbines pass a portion of the steam flow to the reheater of the steam generator and drive gas blowers which circulate the coolant gas through the reactor and the steam source. Apparatus and method are disclosed for loading or unloading a turbine-generator while the other produces a steady power output. During such loading or unloading, the steam flows through the turbine portions are coordinated with the steam flows through the bypass lines for protection of the steam generator, and the pressure of reheated steam is regulated for improved performance of the gas blowers. 33 claims, 5 figures

  4. Nuclear reactor coolant and cover gas system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.A.; Redding, A.H.; Tower, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    A core cooling system is disclosed for a nuclear reactor of the type utilizing a liquid coolant with a cover gas above free surfaces of the coolant. The disclosed system provides for a large inventory of reactor coolant and a balanced low pressure cover gas arrangement. A flow restricting device disposed within a reactor vessel achieves a pressure of the cover gas in the reactor vessel lower than the pressure of the reactor coolant in the vessel. The low gas pressure is maintained over all free surfaces of the coolant in the cooling system including a coolant reservoir tank. Reactor coolant stored in the reservoir tank allows for the large reactor coolant inventory provided by the invention

  5. Oxidation of SiC cladding under Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.; Yue, C.; Arnold, R. P.; McKrell, T. J.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental assessment of Silicon Carbide (SiC) cladding oxidation rate in steam under conditions representative of Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA) in light water reactors (LWRs) was conducted. SiC oxidation tests were performed with monolithic alpha phase tubular samples in a vertical quartz tube at a steam temperature of 1140 deg. C and steam velocity range of 1 to 10 m/sec, at atmospheric pressure. Linear weight loss of SiC samples due to boundary layer controlled reaction of silica scale (SiO 2 volatilization) was experimentally observed. The weight loss rate increased with increasing steam flow rate. Over the range of test conditions, SiC oxidation rates were shown to be about 3 orders of magnitude lower than the oxidation rates of zircaloy 4. A SiC volatilization correlation for developing laminar flow in a vertical channel is formulated. (authors)

  6. Numerical FEM Analyses of primary coolant system at NPP Temelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junek, L.; Slovacek, M.; Ruzek, L.; Moulis, P.

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to inform about the beginning and first steps of implementation of an aging management system at the Temelin NPP. The aging management system is important not only for achieving the current safety level but also for reaching operational reliability of a production unit equipment above the life time assumed by the original design, typically over 40 years. A method to locate the most prominent degradation regions is described. A global shell model of the primary coolant system including all loops and their components - reactor pressure vessel (RPV), steam generator (SG), main coolant pump (MCP), pressurizer, feed water and steam pipelines system is presented. The results of stress-strain analysis on the measured service parameters base are given. Validation of the results is very important and the method to compare the service measurement data with the numerical results is described. The global/local approach is mentioned and discussed. The effects of the complete global system on the individual components under monitoring are transformed into more accurate local spatial models. The local spatial models are used to analyze the gradual lifetime exhaustion of a facility during its service operation. Two spatial local models are presented, viz. feed water nozzle of SG and main coolant piping system T-brunch. The results of analysis of the local spatial models are processed by the neural network computing method, which is also described. The actual gradual damage of the material of the components under monitoring can be obtained based on the analyses performed and on the results from the neural network in combination with the knowledge of the real material characteristics. The procedures applied are included in the DIALIFE diagnostic system

  7. Tritium permeation through helium-heated steam generators of ceramic breeder blankets for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuetterer, M.A.; Raepsaet, X.; Proust, E.

    1994-01-01

    The specifications of permeation barriers, tritium recovery process maintaining a very low tritium activity in the coolant, and control of the coolant chemistry, required the evaluation of the tritium losses through the steam generators and include the definition of its operating conditions by thermodynamic cycle calculations and its thermal-hydraulic design. For both tasks specific computer tools were developed. The obtained geometry, surface area, and temperature profiles along the heat exchanger tubes were then used to estimate the daily tritium permeation into the steam cycle. Steam oxidized Incoloy 800 austenitic stainless steel was identified as the best suited existing material; in nominal steady-state operation, the tritium escape into the steam cycle could be restricted to less than 10 Ci/d. Tritium permeation during temperature and pressure transients in the steam generator (destruction and possible self-healing of the permeation barrier) is identified to bear a large tritium release potential. Solutions are proposed. (from authors). 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. Tritium permeation through helium-heated steam generators of ceramic breeder blankets for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetterer, M A; Raepsaet, X; Proust, E

    1994-12-31

    The specifications of permeation barriers, tritium recovery process maintaining a very low tritium activity in the coolant, and control of the coolant chemistry, required the evaluation of the tritium losses through the steam generators and include the definition of its operating conditions by thermodynamic cycle calculations and its thermal-hydraulic design. For both tasks specific computer tools were developed. The obtained geometry, surface area, and temperature profiles along the heat exchanger tubes were then used to estimate the daily tritium permeation into the steam cycle. Steam oxidized Incoloy 800 austenitic stainless steel was identified as the best suited existing material; in nominal steady-state operation, the tritium escape into the steam cycle could be restricted to less than 10 Ci/d. Tritium permeation during temperature and pressure transients in the steam generator (destruction and possible self-healing of the permeation barrier) is identified to bear a large tritium release potential. Solutions are proposed. (from authors). 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Coolant monitoring systems for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzhnov, A.M.; Morozov, V.V.; Tsypin, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The ways of improving information capacity of existing monitoring systems and the necessity of designing new ones for coolant monitoring are reviewed. A wide research program on development of coolant monitoring systems in PWR reactors is analyzed. The possible applications of in-core and out-of-core detectors for coolant monitoring are demonstrated

  10. Phenomenological modelling of steam explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Drumheller, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    During a hypothetical core meltdown accident, an important safety issue to be addressed is the potential for steam explosions. This paper presents analysis and modelling of experimental results. There are four observations that can be drawn from the analysis: (1) vapor explosions are suppressed by noncondensible gases generated by fuel oxidation, by high ambient pressure, and by high water temperatures; (2) these effects appear to be trigger-related in that an explosion can again be induced in some cases by increasing the trigger magnitude; (3) direct fuel liquid-coolant liquid contact can explain small scale fuel fragmentation; (4) heat transfer during the expansion phase of the explosion can reduce the work potential

  11. Steam generator replacement at Surry Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    The purposes of the steam generator repair program at Surry Power Station were to repair the tube degradation caused by corrosion-related phenomena and to restore the integrity of the steam generators to a level equivalent to new equipment. The repair program consisted of (1) replacing the existing lower-shell assemblies with new ones and (2) adding new moisture separation equipment to the upper-shell assemblies. These tasks required that several pieces of reactor coolant piping, feedwater piping, main steam piping, and the steam generator be cut and refurbished for reinstallation after the new lower shell was in place. The safety implications and other potential effects of the repair program both during the repair work and after the unit was returned to power were part of the design basis of the repair program. The repair program has been completed on Unit 2 without any adverse effects on the health and safety of the general public or to the personnel engaged in the repair work. Before the Unit 1 repair program began, a review of work procedures and field changes for the Unit 2 repair was conducted. Several major changes were made to avoid recurrence of problems and to streamline procedures. Steam generator replacements was completed on June 1, 1981, and the unit is presently in the startup phase of the outrage

  12. Specificities of reactor coolant pumps units with lead and lead-bismuth coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Anotonenkov, M.A.; Bokov, P.A.; Baranova, V.S.; Kustov, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis results of impact of lead and lead-bismuth coolants specific properties on the coolants flow features in flow channels of the main and auxiliary circulating pumps are presented. Impossibility of cavitation initiation in flow channels of vane pumps pumping lead and lead-bismuth coolants was demonstrated. The experimental research results of discontinuity of heavy liquid metal coolant column were presented and conditions of gas cavitation initiation in coolant flow were discussed. Invalidity of traditional calculation methods of water and sodium coolants circulation pumps calculations for lead and lead-bismuth coolants circulation pumps was substantiated [ru

  13. Draining down of a nuclear steam generating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawor, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The method is described of draining down contained reactor-coolant water from the inverted vertical U-tubes of a vertical-type steam generator in which the upper, inverted U-shaped ends of the tubes are closed and the lower ends thereof are open. The steam generator is part of a nuclear powered steam generating system wherein the reactor coolant water is normally circulated from and back into the reactor via a loop comprising the steam generator and inlet and outlet conduits connected to the lower end of the steam generator. The method comprises continuously introducing a gas which is inert to the system and which is under pressure above atmospheric pressure into at least one of the downwardly facing open ends of each of the U-tubes from below the tube sheet in which the open ends of the U-tubes are mounted adjacent the lower end of the steam generator, while permitting the water to flow out from the open ends of the U-tubes

  14. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Grunwald, G.; Rohde, U.

    1998-10-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam like break scenarios the modelling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important. The reactivity insertion due to overcooling or deboration depends strongly on the coolant temperature and boron concentration. The three-dimensional flow distribution in the downcomer and the lower plenum of PWR's was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (CFX-4). Calculations were performed for the PWR's of SIEMENS KWU, Westinghouse and VVER-440 / V-230 type. The following important factors were identified: exact representation of the cold leg inlet region (bend radii etc.), extension of the downcomer below the inlet region at the PWR Konvoi, obstruction of the flow by the outlet nozzles penetrating the downcomer, etc. The k-ε turbulence model was used. Construction elements like perforated plates in the lower plenum have large influence on the velocity field. It is impossible to model all the orifices in the perforated plates. A porous region model was used to simulate perforated plates and the core. The porous medium is added with additional body forces to simulate the pressure drop through perforated plates in the VVER-440. For the PWR Konvoi the whole core was modelled with porous media parameters. The velocity fields of the PWR Konvoi calculated for the case of operation of all four main circulation pumps show a good agreement with experimental results. The CFD-calculation especially confirms the back flow areas below the inlet nozzles. The downcomer flow of the Russian VVER-440 has no recirculation areas under normal operation conditions. By CFD calculations for the downcomer and the lower plenum an analytical mixing model used in the reactor dynamic code DYN3D was verified. The measurements, the analytical model and the CFD-calculations provided very well agreeing results particularly for the inlet region. The difficulties of analytical solutions and the uncertainties of turbulence

  15. Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit No.1 at the implementation and feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yuhua; Xiao Bo; He Liu; Huang Min

    2014-01-01

    The article introduces the Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.l purpose, range of experience, experiment preparation, implementation, feedback and response. Turn of nuclear steam turbo-generator set flush, using the main reactor coolant pump and regulator of the heat generated by the electric heating element and the total heat capacity in secondary circuit of reactor coolant system (steam generator secondary side) of saturated steam turbine rushed to 1500 RPM, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 implementation of the performance of the inspection of steam turbine and its auxiliary system, through the test problems found in the clean up in time, the nuclear steam sweep turn smooth realization has accumulated experience. At the same time, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 at turn is half speed steam turbine generator non-nuclear turn at the first, with its smooth realization of other nuclear power steam turbine generator set in the field of non-nuclear turn play a reference role. (authors)

  16. A study on ex-vessel steam explosion for a flooded reactor cavity of reactor scale - 15216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.; Yoon, E.; Kim, Y.; Cho, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A steam explosion can occur when a molten corium is mixed with a coolant, more volatile liquid. In severe accidents, corium can come into contact with coolant either when it flows to the bottom of the reactor vessel and encounters the reactor coolant, or when it breaches the reactor vessel and flows into the reactor containment. A steam explosion could then threaten the containment structures, such as the reactor vessel or the concrete walls/penetrations of the containment building. This study is to understand the shortcomings of the existing analysis code (TEXAS-V) and to estimate the steam explosion loads on reactor scale and assess the effect of variables, then we compared results and physical phenomena. Sensitivity study of major parameters for initial condition is performed. Variables related to melt corium such as corium temperature, falling velocity and diameter of melt are more important to the ex-vessel steam explosion load and the steam explosion loads are proportional to these variables related to melt corium. Coolant temperature on reactor cavity has a specific area to increase the steam explosion loads. These results will be used to evaluate the steam explosion loads using ROAAM (Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology) and to develop the evaluation methodology of ex-vessel steam explosion. (authors)

  17. Molten fuel-coolant interactions resulting from power transients in aluminium plate/water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storr, G.J.

    1989-08-01

    The behaviour of two reactors SL1 and SPERT D12, which underwent fast nuclear power transients prior to core destruction by a molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) has been analysed and the results compared with measured data. The calculated spatial melt distribution and the mechanical work done during the events leads to high (∼ 250 kJ/kg) conversion efficiencies for this type of interaction when compared with molten drop experiments. A simple model for the steam explosion, using static thermodynamic properties of high temperature and pressure steam is used to calculate the dynamics of the reactors following the MFCI. 26 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Trace organics in AGR coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.; Green, L.O.; Johnson, P.A.V.

    1980-01-01

    Several analytical techniques have been employed in previous studies of the stable organic compounds arising from the radiolysis of methane/carbon monoxide/carbon dioxide coolants. The majority of this early information was collected from the Windscale AGR prototype. Analyses were also carried out on the liquors obtained from the WAGR humidryers. Three classes of compound were found in the liquors; aliphatic acids in the aqueous phase and methyl ketones and aromatic hydrocarbons in the oily phase. Acetic acid was found to be the predominant carboxylic acid. This paper outlines the major findings from a recent analytical survey of coolants taken over a wide range of dose rate, pressure, temperature and composition, from materials testing reactor facilities, WAGR and CAGR. (author)

  19. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Song Kyu [Korea Power Engineering Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation.

  20. Design of Reactor Coolant Pump Seal Online Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ah, Sang Ha; Chang, Soon Heung; Lee, Song Kyu

    2008-01-01

    As a part of a Department of Korea Power Engineering Co., (KOPEC) Project, Statistical Quality Control techniques have been applied to many aspects of industrial engineering. An application to nuclear power plant maintenance and control is also presented that can greatly improve plant safety. As a demonstration of such an approach, a specific system is analyzed: the reactor coolant pumps (RCPs) and the fouling resistance of heat exchanger. This research uses Shewart X-bar, R charts, Cumulative Sum charts (CUSUM), and Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT) to analyze the process for the state of statistical control. And the Control Chart Analyzer (CCA) has been made to support these analyses that can make a decision of error in process. The analysis shows that statistical process control methods can be applied as an early warning system capable of identifying significant equipment problems well in advance of traditional control room alarm indicators. Such a system would provide operators with enough time to respond to possible emergency situations and thus improve plant safety and reliability. RCP circulates reactor coolant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. RCP seals are in the pressure part of reactor coolant system, so if it breaks, it can cause small break LOCA. And they are running on high pressure, and high temperature, so they can be easily broken. Since the reactor coolant pumps operate within the containment building, physical access to the pumps occurs only during refueling outages. Engineers depend on process variables transmitted to the control room and through the station's data historian to assess the pumps' condition during normal operation

  1. Steam Digest 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2003-11-01

    Steam Digest 2002 is a collection of articles published in the last year on steam system efficiency. DOE directly or indirectly facilitated the publication of the articles through it's BestPractices Steam effort. Steam Digest 2002 provides a variety of operational, design, marketing, and program and program assessment observations. Plant managers, engineers, and other plant operations personnel can refer to the information to improve industrial steam system management, efficiency, and performance.

  2. Analysis of material effect in molten fuel-coolant interaction, comparison of thermodynamic calculations and experimental observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tyrpekl, Václav; Piluso, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 46, AUGUST (2012), s. 197-203 ISSN 0306-4549 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Nuclear reactor severe accident * Fuel -Coolant Interaction * Material effect * Steam explosion Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.800, year: 2012

  3. Proposed model for fuel-coolant mixing during a core-melt accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    If complete failure of normal and emergency coolant flow occurs in a light water reactor, fission product decay heat would eventually cause melting of the reactor fuel and cladding. The core melt may then slump into the lower plenum and later into the reactor cavity and contact residual liquid water. A model is proposed to describe the fuel-coolant mixing process upon contact. The model is compared to intermediate scale experiments being conducted at Sandia. The modelling of this mixing process will aid in understanding three important processes: (1) fuel debris sizes upon quenching in water, (2) the hydrogen source term during fuel quench, and (3) the rate of steam production. Additional observations of Sandia data indicate that the steam explosion is affected by this mixing process

  4. Coolant clean-up and recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the service life of mechanical seals in a shaft sealing device, eliminate leakages and improve the safety by providing a recycle pump for feeding coolants to a coolant clean-up device upon reactor shut-down and adapting the pump treat only low temperature and low pressure coolants. Constitution: The system is adapted to partially take out coolants from the pipeways of a recycling pump upon normal operation and feed them to a clean-up device. Upon reactor shut-down, the recycle pump is stopped and coolants are extracted by the recycle pump for shut-down into the clean-up device. Since the coolants are not fed to the clean-up device by the recycle pump during normal operation as conducted so far, high temperature and high pressure coolants are not directly fed to the recycle pump, thereby enabling to avoid mechanical problems in the pump. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Clad-coolant chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Desgranges, C.; Toffolon, C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the kinetics for zircaloy clad oxidation behaviour in steam and air during reactor accident conditions. The generation of chemical heat from metal/water reaction is considered. Low-temperature oxidation of zircaloy due to water-side corrosion is further described. (authors)

  6. Single failure effects of reactor coolant system large bore hydraulic snubbers for Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, T.S.; Park, S.H.; Sung, K.K.; Kim, T.W.; Jheon, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    A potential snubber single failure is one of the safety significances identified in General Safety Issue 113 for Large Bore Hydraulic Snubber (LBHS) dynamic qualification. This paper investigates dynamic structural effects of single failures of the steam generator and reactor coolant pump snubbers in Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant by performing the time history dynamic analyses for the reactor coolant system under seismic and postulated pipe break events. The seismic input motions considered are the synthesized ground time histories conforming to SRP 3.7.1, and he postulated pipe break input loadings result from steam generator main seam line and feedwater line pipe breaks which govern pipe breaks remaining after applying LBB to the main coolant line and primary side ranch lines equal to and greater than 12 inch nominal pipe size

  7. Thermal circuit and supercritical steam generator of the BGR-300 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, B.P.; Godik, I.B.; Komarov, N.F.; Kurochnkin, Yu.P.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary coolant circuit and a steam generator for supercritical steam parameters of the BGR-300 reactor plant are described. The BGR-300 plant with a 300 MW(e) high-temperature gas-cooled fast reactor is developed as a pilot commercial plant. It is shown that the use of a supercritical pressure steam increases the thermal efficiency of the plant and descreases thermal releases to the environment, permits to use home-made commercial turbine plants of large unit power. The proposed supercritical pressure steam generator has considerable advantages from the viewpoint of heat transfer and hydrodynamical processes

  8. Development of an automated system for CANDU secondary coolant circuit chemistry control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, J.R.; Stewart, R.B.

    1978-04-01

    This report is a summary of work done to develop a means for automated control of the secondary coolant chemistry of CANDU 600 MW(e) power reactors using on-line analyzers and a minicomputer. The development work was carried out in cooperation with Saskatchewan Power Corporation at Estevan. Results and conclusions of the program are included, as are recommendations for a prototype installation in a domestic CANDU 600 MW steam generator. (author)

  9. Consequences in a long time of the forced loss of coolant in a pool type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The fuel and pool water temperatures are calculated as a function of time using unidimensional models of heat conduction and momentum conservation, to simulate the natural convection flow of the coolant. The reactor building pressure due to the pool water evaporation is calculated using a homogeneous model with thermal equilibrium. The heat loss from the three main components of the building volume (liquid water, air, and steam) to solid surfaces such as the building walls are taking into account. (Author) [pt

  10. Steam turbine installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bainbridge, A.

    1976-01-01

    The object of the arrangement described is to enable raising steam for driving steam turbines in a way suited to operating with liquid metals, such as Na, as heat transfer medium. A preheated water feed, in heat transfer relationship with the liquid metals, is passed through evaporator and superheater stages, and the superheated steam is supplied to the highest pressure stage of the steam turbine arrangement. Steam extracted intermediate the evaporator and superheater stages is employed to provide reheat for the lower pressure stage of the steam turbine. Only a major portion of the preheated water feed may be evaporated and this portion separated and supplied to the superheater stage. The feature of 'steam to steam' reheat avoids a second liquid metal heat transfer and hence represents a simplification. It also reduces the hazard associated with possible steam-liquid metal contact. (U.K.)

  11. Assessment of effects of Fort St. Vrain HTGR primary coolant on Alloy 800. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trester, P.W.; Johnson, W.R.; Simnad, M.T.; Burnette, R.D.; Roberts, D.I.

    1982-08-01

    A comprehensive review was conducted of primary helium coolant chemistry data, based on current and past operating histories of helium-cooled, high-temperature reactors (HTGRs), including the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) HTGR. A reference observed FSV reactor coolant environment was identified. Further, a slightly drier expected FSV coolant chemistry was predicted for reactor operation at 100% of full power. The expected environment was compared with helium test environments used in the US, United Kingdom, Germany, France, and Japan. Based on a comprehensive review and analysis of mechanical property data reported for Alloy 800 tested in controlled-impurity helium environments (and in air when appropriate for comparison), an assessment was made of the effect of FSV expected helium chemistry on material properties of alloy 800, with emphasis on design properties of the Alloy 800 material utilized in the FSV steam generators

  12. Coolant radiolysis studies in the high temperature, fuelled U-2 loop in the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliot, A.J.; Stuart, C.R.

    2008-06-01

    An understanding of the radiolysis-induced chemistry in the coolant water of nuclear reactors is an important key to the understanding of materials integrity issues in reactor coolant systems. Significant materials and chemistry issues have emerged in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and CANDU reactors that have required a detailed understanding of the radiation chemistry of the coolant. For each reactor type, specific computer radiolysis models have been developed to gain insight into radiolysis processes and to make chemistry control adjustments to address the particular issue. In this respect, modelling the radiolysis chemistry has been successful enough to allow progress to be made. This report contains a description of the water radiolysis tests performed in the U-2 loop, NRU reactor in 1995, which measured the CHC under different physical conditions of the loop such as temperature, reactor power and steam quality. (author)

  13. Fuel assembly stress and deflection analysis for loss-of-coolant accident and seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMars, R.V.; Steinke, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    Babcock and Wilcox has evaluated the capability of the fuel assemblies to withstand the effects of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) blowdown, the operational basis earthquake (OBE) and design basis earthquake (DBE), and the simultaneous occurrence of the DBE and LOCA. This method of analysis is applicable to all of B and W's nuclear steam system contracts that specify the skirt-supported pressure vessel. Loads during the saturated and subcooled phases of blowdown following a loss-of-coolant accident were calculated. The maximum loads on the fuel assemblies were found to be below allowable limits, and the maximum deflections of the fuel assemblies were found to be less than those that could prevent the insertion of control rods or the flow of coolant through the core. (U.S.)

  14. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels

  15. Digital simulation for nuclear once-through steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.T.

    1976-01-01

    Mathematical models for calculating the dynamic response of the Oconee type once through steam generator (OTSG) and the integral economizer once through steam generator (IEOTSG) was developed and presented in this dissertation. Linear and nonlinear models of both steam generator types were formulated using the state variable, lumped parameter approach. Transient and frequency responses of system parameters were calculated for various perturbations from both the primary coolant side and the secondary side. Transients of key parameters, including primary outlet temperature, superheated steam outlet temperature, boiling length/subcooled length and steam pressure, were generated, compared and discussed for both steam generator types. Frequency responses of delta P/sub s//deltaT/sub pin/ of the linear OTSG model were validated by using the dynamic testing results obtained at the Oconee I nuclear power station. A sensitivity analysis in both the time and the frequency domains was performed. It was concluded that the mathematical and computer models developed in this dissertation for both the OTSG and the IEOTSG are suitable for overall plant performance evaluation and steam generator related component/system design analysis for nuclear plants using either type of steam generator

  16. Influence of liquid holdup in steam generator U-tubes on small break LOCA severity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, M.T.; Perryman, J.L.; Johnson, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The severity of small cold leg break loss-of-coolant accidents has been shown to be influenced by liquid holdup in steam generator U-tubes during pump suction loop seal formation in two experiments performed in the Semiscale Mod-2A facility. The core coolant level can be depressed lower than previously thought possible due to a positive hydrostatic head across the steam generators caused by delayed drainage of liquid from the upflow side of the U-tubes. The significance of a lower core coolant level depression is the potential for a more severe temperature excursion occurring during the coolant boiloff phase subsequent to loop seal clearing and prior to accumulator injection. Presented in this paper are the experimental data analysis and supporting computer code calculations that led to these conclusions

  17. Investigation of coolant mixture in pressurized water reactors at the Rossendorf mixing test facility ROCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunwald, G.; Hoehne, T.; Prasser, H.M.; Richter, K.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    During the so-called boron dilution or cold water transients at pressurized water reactors too weakly borated water or too cold water, respectively, might enter the reactor core. This results in the insertion of positive reactivity and possibly leads to a power excursion. If the source of unborated or subcooled water is not located in all coolant loops but in selected ones only, the amount of reactivity insertion depends on the coolant mixing in the downcomer and lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Such asymmetric disturbances of the coolant temperature or boron concentration might e.g. be the result of a failure of the chemical and volume control system (CVCS) or of a main steam line break (MSLB) that does only affect selected steam generators (SG). For the analysis of boron dilution or MSLB accidents coupled neutron kinetics/thermo-hydraulic system codes have been used. To take into account coolant mixing phenomena in these codes in a realistic manner, analytical mixing models might be included. These models must be simple and fast running on the one hand, but must well describe the real mixing conditions on the other hand. (orig.)

  18. Steam explosion simulation code JASMINE v.3 user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Maruyama, Yu; Nakamura, Hideo

    2008-07-01

    A steam explosion occurs when hot liquid contacts with cold volatile liquid. In this phenomenon, fine fragmentation of the hot liquid causes extremely rapid heat transfer from the hot liquid to the cold volatile liquid, and explosive vaporization, bringing shock waves and destructive forces. The steam explosion due to the contact of the molten core material and coolant water during severe accidents of light water reactors has been regarded as a potential threat to the integrity of the containment vessel. We developed a mechanistic steam explosion simulation code, JASMINE, that is applicable to plant scale assessment of the steam explosion loads. This document, as a manual for users of JASMINE code, describes the models, numerical solution methods, and also some verification and example calculations, as well as practical instructions for input preparation and usage of the code. (author)

  19. Technical development and its application on steam generator replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Sadahiko; Hanzawa, Katsumi; Sato, Hajime; Kannoto, Yasuo.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-two PWR nuclear power plants are now under commercial operation in Japan. Eight of these plants are scheduled to have their steam generators replaced by up-graded units as a social responsibility for improved reliability, economy and easier maintenance. To carry out steam generator replacement, main coolant pipe cutting and restoration techniques, remote controlled welding machines and other remote controlled equipment, templating techniques with which the new steam generator primary nozzles will fit the existing primary pipes correctly were developed. An adequate training program was carried out to establish these techniques and they were then applied in replacement work on site. The steam generators of the three plants were replaced completely in 1994. These newly developed techniques are to be applied in upcoming plants and replaced plants will be much reliable. (author)

  20. Steam-generator replacement sets new marks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    This article describes how, in one of the most successful steam-generator replacement experiences at PWRs worldwide, the V C Summer retrofit exceeded plant goals for critical-path duration, radiation, exposure, and radwaste generation. Intensive planning and teamwork, combined with the firm support of station management and the use of mockups to prepare the work crews for activity in a radiological environment, were key factors in the record performance achieved by South Carolina Electric and Gas Co (SCE and G) in replacing three steam generators at V C Summer nuclear station. The 97-day, two-hour breaker-to-breaker replacement outage -- including an eight-day delay for repair of leak in a small-bore seal-injection line of a reactor coolant pump (unrelated to the replacement activities) -- surpassed the project goal by over one day. Moreover, the outage was only 13 hours shy of the world record held by Virginia Power Co's North Anna Unit 1

  1. Expandable antivibration bar for a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagally, H.O.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a steam generator for a nuclear power plant comprising a shell, a plurality of tubes having a U-shaped configuration arranged in successive columns within the shell. The tubes are adapted to heat feedwater flowing around the outside of the tubes by the flow of hot reactor coolant within the tubes, and antivibration bars any vibrations of the tubes as a result of steam between the columns of tubes. The improvement described here comprises means for varying the thickness of the antivibration bars to fit substantially the actual space between the columns of tubes comprising first and second bars, with at least one bar being movable, and with at least one mating inclined surface between the first and second bars

  2. Investigation of separation and hydrodynamic characteristics of steam generators used at the NPPs running on PWR-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageev, A.G.; Korolkov, B.M.; Nigmatulin, B.I.; Vasileva, R.V.; Nekrasov, A.V.; Titiv, V.F.; Tarankov, G.A.

    1997-01-01

    The tests were accomplished at the steam generator of unit 5 of the Novovoronezh nuclear power plant. The outbursts of the steam-water mixture from the gap between the steam generator housing and the submerged perforated screen rim at the side of the inlet coolant manifold were investigated. Tests of the steam generator with a modified steam separation system were carried out on the Balakovo nuclear power plant. The gilled separator of the steam generator was replaced with a steam collecting perforated screen, while the gap between the steam generator housing and the heat exchange bundle rim was closed with additional perforated screens at the side of the inlet manifold. This new solution of moisture separation is better. (M.D.)

  3. Steam generator with perfected dryers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenet, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This steam generator has vertically superposed array of steam dryers. These dryers return the steam flow of 180 0 . The return of the water is made by draining channels to the steam production zone [fr

  4. Coolant inlet device for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Hiroshi; Abe, Yasuhiro; Iwabuchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kenji.

    1969-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a coolant inlet device for liquid-metal cooled reactors which employs a coolant distributor serving also as a supporting means for the reactor core. The distributor is mounted within the reactor vessel so as to slide horizontally on supporting lugs, and is further slidably connected via a junction pipe to a coolant inlet conduit protruding through the floor of the vessel. The distributor is adapted to uniformly disperse the highly pressured coolant over the reactor core so as to reduce the stresses sustained by the reactor vessel as well as the supporting lugs. Moreover, the slidable nature of the distributor allows thermal shock and excessive coolant pressures to be prevented or alleviated, factors which posed major difficulties in conventional coolant inlet devices. (Owens, K. J.)

  5. HTGR steam generator development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetzenduebel, W.G.; Hunt, P.S.; Weber, M.

    1976-01-01

    More than 40 gas-cooled reactor plants have produced in excess of 400 reactor years of operating experience which have proved a reasonably high rate of gas-cooled reactor steam generator availability. The steam generators used in these reactors include single U-tube and straight-tube steam generators as well as meander type and helically wound or involute tube steam generators. It appears that modern reactors are being equipped with helically wound steam generators of the once-through type as the end product of steam generator evolution in gas-cooled reactor plants. This paper provides a general overview of gas-cooled reactor steam generator evolution and operating experience and shows how design criteria and constraints, research and development, and experience data are factored into the design/development of modern helically wound tube steam generators for the present generation of gas-cooled reactors

  6. Steam Digest 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-01-01

    Steam Digest 2001 chronicles BestPractices Program's contributions to the industrial trade press for 2001, and presents articles that cover technical, financial and managerial aspects of steam optimization.

  7. Steam generator tube extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, H.

    1985-05-01

    To enable tube examination on steam generators in service, Framatome has now developed a process for removing sections of steam generator tubes. Tube sections can be removed without being damaged for treating the tube section expanded in the tube sheet

  8. Steam sterilization does not require saturated steam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doornmalen Gomez Hoyos, J. P.C.M.; Paunovic, A.; Kopinga, K.

    2017-01-01

    The most commonly applied method to sterilize re-usable medical devices in hospitals is steam sterilization. The essential conditions for steam sterilization are derived from sterilization in water. Microbiological experiments in aqueous solutions have been used to calculate various time–temperature

  9. Fission product retention during faults involving steam generator tube rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodliffe, R.S.

    1983-08-01

    In some PWR fault conditions, such as stuck open safety relief valve in the secondary circuit or main steam line break, the release of fission products to the atmosphere may be increased by the leakage of primary coolant into the secondary circuit following steam generator tube rupture. The release may be reduced by retention either within the primary circuit or within the affected steam generator unit (SGU). The mechanisms leading to retention are reviewed and quantified where possible. The parameters on which any analysis will be most critically dependent are identified. Fission product iodine and caesium may be retained in the secondary side of a SGU either by partition to retained water or by droplet deposition on surfaces and subsequent evaporation to dryness. Two extreme simplifications are considered: SGU 'dry', i.e. the secondary side is steam filled, and SGU 'wet', i.e. the tube bundle is covered with water. Consideration is given to: the distribution of fission products between gaseous and aerosol forms; mechanisms for droplet formation, deposition and resuspension; fission product retention during droplet or film evaporation primary coolant mixing and droplet scrubbing in a wet SGU; and the performance of moisture separators and steam driers. (author)

  10. Organic coolant for ARIES-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.; Sviatoslavsky, I.; Sawan, M.; Gierszewski, P.; Hollies, R.; Sharafat, S.; Herring, S.

    1991-04-01

    ARIES-III is a D-He 3 reactor design study. It is found that the organic coolant is well suited for the D-He 3 reactor. This paper discusses the unique features of the D-He 3 reactor, and the reason that the organic coolant is compatible with those features. The problems associated with the organic coolant are also discussed. 8 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Physical properties of organic coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbage, A.G.; Garton, D.A.; Kinneir, J.H.

    1963-03-01

    Density, viscosity, specific heat, vapour pressure and calorific value were measured within the temperature range 100 - 400 deg C for mixtures of Santowax R with pyrolytic high boiler and Santowax R with O.M.R.E. radiolytic high boiler; in addition measurements were made on Santowax OM, X-7 standard, X-7 loop coolant and O.M.R.E. coolant supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The accuracy of the measurements made were density (± 1/4%), viscosity (± 2%), specific heat (± 2%), vapour pressure (± 2%) and calorific value (± 1/2%). Thermal conductivity was calculated from an improved form of the Smiths equation with an accuracy within ± 6%. Equations fitted to the vapour pressure results were used to provide data outside the experimental range for burnout correlation purposes. The general effect of high boiler content on the specific heat and calorific values was small. The differences in physical property values for corresponding values of either pyrolytic or radiolytic high boiler were small for density (0.3%) and specific heat (2%), but quite large for viscosity (70%) with the pyrolytic high boiler mixture giving the higher value. The chemical analysis of all materials was based on gas chromatography and the relationship between this and an earlier distillation method established. (author)

  12. SIMMER-III applications to fuel-coolant interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, K.; Kondo, Sa.; Tobita, Y.; Brear, D.J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the SIMMER-III code is to provide a numerical simulation of complex multiphase, multicomponent flow problems essential to investigate core disruptive accidents in liquid-metal fast reactors (LMFRs). However, the code is designed to be sufficiently flexible to be applied to a variety of multiphase flows, in addition to LMFR safety issues. In the present study, some typical experiments relating to fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs) have been analyzed by SIMMER-III to demonstrate that the code is applicable to such complex and highly transient multiphase flow situations. It is shown that SIMMER-III can reproduce the premixing phase both in water and sodium systems as well as the propagation of steam explosion. It is thus demonstrated the code is basically capable of simulating integral multiphase thermal-hydraulic problems included in FCI experiments. (author)

  13. Reactor coolant pump shaft seal behavior during station blackout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittmer, C.A.; Wensel, R.G.; Rhodes, D.B.; Metcalfe, R.; Cotnam, B.M.; Gentili, H.; Mings, W.J.

    1985-04-01

    A testing program designed to provide fundamental information pertaining to the behavior of reactor coolant pump (RCP) shaft seals during a postulated nuclear power plant station blackout has been completed. One seal assembly, utilizing both hydrodynamic and hydrostatic types of seals, was modeled and tested. Extrusion tests were conducted to determine if seal materials could withstand predicted temperatures and pressures. A taper-face seal model was tested for seal stability under conditions when leaking water flashes to steam across the seal face. Test information was then used as the basis for a station blackout analysis. Test results indicate a potential problem with an elastomer material used for O-rings by a pump vendor; that vendor is considering a change in material specification. Test results also indicate a need for further research on the generic issue of RCP seal integrity and its possible consideration for designation as an unresolved safety issue

  14. Fuel -coolant interactions in LWRs and LMFBRs: relationships and distinctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, R B; Lellouche, G S [Nuclear Safety and Analysis Department, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1979-10-15

    The question of fuel-coolant interaction and of potential vapor explosion is raised here. lt is the contention of the authors that there is in fact no need to study this question vis a vis Light Water Reactors (LWR) except from an academic point of view since it does not impact on safety considerations. As for LMFBRs, the design basis whole core accidents for LWRs are derived from the fundamental concern of maintaining core geometry to provide for convective cooling. However, the important distinction is that the core is in its most reactive configuration, and core and fuel rearrangement is therefore not of such concern. The author's thesis is that even if the probability of steam explosion following core melt were two orders of magnitude greater than currently assumed (10{sup -2}) the total LWR risk would increase only by a factor of 2-6 for BWRs and less a factor of 10 for PWRs

  15. Steam blowdown experiments with the condensation pool test rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purhonen, H.; Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Vihavainen, J.

    2005-01-01

    During a possible loss-of-coolant accident (Local) a large amount of non-condensable (nitrogen) and condensable (steam) gas is blown from the upper drywell of the containment to the condensation pool through the blowdown pipes at the boiling water reactors (BWRs). The wet well pool serves as the major heat sink for condensation of steam. The blowdown causes both dynamic and structural loads to the condensation pool. There might also be a risk that the gas discharging to the pool could push its way to the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) and undermine their performance. (author)

  16. Radiation leakage monitoring method and device from primary to secondary coolant systems in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Yoshiaki; Umehara, Toshihiro; Yamada, Masataka.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention monitors radiation leaked from any one of primary cooling systems to secondary cooling systems in a plurality of steam generators. That is, radiation monitoring means each corresponding to steam each generators are disposed to the upstream of a position where main steam pipes are joined. With such a constitution, since the detection object of each of radiation monitoring means is secondary coolants before mixing with secondary coolants of other secondary loops or dilution, lowering of detection accuracy can be avoided. Except for the abnormal case, that is, a case neither of radiation leakage nor of background change, the device is adapted as a convenient measuring system only with calculation performance. Once abnormality occurs, a loop having a value exceeding a standard value is identified by a single channel analyzer function. The amount of radiation leakage from the steam generator belonging to the specified loop is monitored quantitatively by a multichannel analyzer function. According to the method of the present invention, since specific spectrum analysis is conducted upon occurrence of abnormality, presence of radiation leakage and the scale thereof can be judged rapidly. (I.S.)

  17. Cleaning of aluminum after machining with coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roop, B.

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray photoemission spectroscopic study was undertaken to compare the cleaning of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) aluminum extrusion storage ring vacuum chambers after machining with and without water soluble coolants. While there was significant contamination left by the coolants, the cleaning process was capable of removing the residue. The variation of the surface and near surface composition of samples machined either dry or with coolants was negligible after cleaning. The use of such coolants in the machining process is therefore recommended

  18. The Invisibility of Steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Almost everyone "knows" that steam is visible. After all, one can see the cloud of white issuing from the spout of a boiling tea kettle. In reality, steam is the gaseous phase of water and is invisible. What you see is light scattered from the tiny droplets of water that are the result of the condensation of the steam as its temperature…

  19. Strategies for steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennagir, T.

    1996-01-01

    This article is a review of worldwide developments in the steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator markets. The Far East is driving the market in HRSGs, while China is driving the market in orders placed for steam turbine prime movers. The efforts of several major suppliers are discussed, with brief technical details being provided for several projects

  20. Steam Digest: Volume IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  1. Steam Digest Volume IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-07-01

    This edition of the Steam Digest is a compendium of 2003 articles on the technical and financial benefits of steam efficiency, presented by the stakeholders of the U.S. Department of Energy's BestPractices Steam effort.

  2. Coolant clean-up system in the primary coolant circuit for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Michio.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the quality of coolants at a prescribed level by distillating coolants in the primary coolant circuit for a BWR type reactor to remove impurities therefrom, taking out the condensates from the top of the distillation column and extracting impurities in a concentrated state from the bottom. Constitution: Coolant water for cooling the core is recycled by a recycling pump by way of a recycling pipeway in a reactor. The coolants extracted from an extraction pipeway connected to the recycling pipeway are fed into a distillation column, where distillation is taken place. Impurities in the coolants, that is, in-core corrosion products, fission products generated in the reactor core, etc. are separated by the distillation, concentrated and solidified in the bottom of the distillation column. While on the other hand, condensates removed with the impurities, that is, coolants cleaned-up are recycled to the coolant water for cooling the reactor core. (Moriyama, K.)

  3. Analysis of containment pressure and temperature changes following loss of coolant accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Thai; Kieu Ngoc Dung

    2015-01-01

    This paper present a preliminary thermal-hydraulics analysis of AP1000 containment following loss of coolant accident events such as double-end cold line break (DECLB) or main steam line break (MSLB) using MELCOR code. A break of this type will produce a rapid depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (primary system) and release initially high pressure water into the containment followed by a much smaller release of highly superheated steam. The high pressure liquid water will flash and rapidly pressurize the containment building. The performance of passive containment cooling system for steam removal by condensation on large steel containment structure is a major contributing process, controlling the pressure and temperature maximum reached during the accident event. The results are analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar work done by Sandia National Laboratories. (author)

  4. Transient Temperature Distribution in a Reactor Core with Cylindrical Fuel Rods and Compressible Coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, H

    1968-04-15

    Applying linearization and Laplace transformation the transient temperature distribution and weighted temperatures in fuel, canning and coolant are calculated analytically in two-dimensional cylindrical geometry for constant material properties in fuel and canning. The model to be presented includes previous models as special cases and has the following novel features: compressibility of the coolant is accounted for. The material properties of the coolant are variable. All quantities determining the temperature field are taken into account. It is shown that the solution for fuel and canning temperature may be given by the aid of 4 basic transfer functions depending on only two variables. These functions are calculated for all relevant rod geometries and material constants. The integrals involved in transfer functions determining coolant temperatures are solved for the most part generally by application of coordinate and Laplace transformation. The model was originally developed for use in steam cooled fast reactor analysis where the coolant temperature rise and compressibility are considerable. It may be applied to other fast or thermal systems after suitable simplifications.

  5. Design on Hygrometry System of Primary Coolant Circuit of HTR-PM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yanfei; Zhong Shuoping; Huang Xiaojin

    2014-01-01

    Helium is the primary coolant in HTR-PM. If vapor get into the helium in primary coolant circuit because of some special reasons, such as the broken of steam-generator tube, chemical reaction will take effect between the graphite in reactor core and vapor in primary coolant circuit, and the safety of the reactor operation will be influenced. So the humidity of the helium in primary coolant circuit is one key parameter of HTR-PM to be monitored in-line. Once the humidity is too high, trigger signal of turning off the reactor must be issued. The hygrometry system of HTR-PM is consisting of filter, cooler, hygrometry sensor, flow meter, and some valves and tube. Helium with temperature of 250℃ is lead into the hygrometry system from the outlet of the main helium blower. After measuring, the helium is re-injected back to the primary circuit. No helium loses in this processing, and no other pump is needed. Key factors and calculations in design on hygrometry system of HTR-PM are described. A sample instrument has been made. Results of experiments proves that this hygrometry system is suitable for monitoring the humidity of the primary coolant of HTR-PM. (author)

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of the coolant mixing during fast deboration transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Rohde, U.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam line break scenarios the modeling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important, because the reactivity insertion strongly depends on boron acid concentration or the coolant temperature distribution. Calculations for steady state flow conditions for the VVER-440 were performed with a CFD code (CFX-4). The comparison with experimental data and an analytical mixing model which is implemented in the neutron-kinetic code DYN3D showed a good agreement for near-nominal conditions. First experiments at the Rossendorf Mixing Test Facility ROCOM were performed simulating the start-up of the first main coolant pump. The reference reactor for the geometrically 1:5 scaled Plexiglas model is the German Konvoi type PWR. After demonstrating the capability of the CFD code to simulate these complicated flow transients, calculations were performed for the start-up of the first pump in a VVER-440 type reactor. These calculations are a first step of understanding the coolant mixing in the RPV of a VVER-440 type reactor under transient conditions. The results of the calculation show a very complex flow in the downcomer. A high downcomer of VVER-440 and the existence of the lower control rod chamber support coolant mixing is concluded. (author)

  7. Integrated equipment for increasing and maintaining coolant pressure in primary circuit of PWR nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, D.

    1986-01-01

    An open heat pump circuit is claimed connected to the primary circuit. The pump circuit consists of a steam pressurizer with a built-in steam distributor, a compressor, an expander, a reducing valve, an auxiliary pump, and of water and steam pipes. The operation is described and a block diagram is shown of integrated equipment for increasing and maintaining pressure in the nuclear power plant primary circuit. The appropriate entropy diagram is also shown. The advantage of the open pump circuit consists in reducing the electric power input and electric power consumption for the steam pressurizers, removing entropy loss in heat transfer with high temperature gradient, in the possibility of inserting, between the expander and the auxiliary pump, a primary circuit coolant treatment station, in simplified design and manufacture of the high-pressure steam pressurizer vessel, reducing the weight of the steam pressurizer by changing its shape from cylindrical to spherical, increasing the rate of pressure growth in the primary circuit. (E.S.)

  8. Design and fabrication of magnetic coolant filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, B. N.

    2017-07-01

    Now a day's use of coolants in industry has become dominant because of high production demands. Coolants not only help in speeding up the production but also provide many advantages in the metal working operation. As the consumption of coolants is very high a system is badly in need, so as to recirculate the used coolant. Also the amount of hazardous waste generated by industrial plants has become an increasingly costly problem for the manufactures and an additional stress on the environment. Since the purchase and disposal of the spent cutting fluids is becoming increasingly expensive, fluid recycling is a viable option for minimizing the cost. Separation of metallic chips from the coolants by using magnetic coolant separation has proven a good management and maintenance of the cutting fluid. By removing the metallic chips, the coolant life is greatly extended, increases the machining quality and reduces downtime. Above being the case, a magnetic coolant filter is developed which utilizes high energy permanent magnets to develop a dense magnetic field along a narrow flow path into which the contaminated coolant is directed. The ferromagnetic particles captured and aligned by the dense magnetic field, from the efficient filter medium. This enables the unit to remove ferromagnetic particles from the coolant. Magnetic coolant filters use the principle of magnetic separation to purify the used coolant. The developed magnetic coolant separation has the capability of purifying 40 litres per minute of coolant with the size of the contaminants ranging from 1 µm to 30 µm. The filter will be helpful in saving the production cost as the cost associated with the proposed design is well justified by the cost savings in production. The magnetic field produced by permanent magnets will be throughout the area underneath the reservoir. This produces magnetic field 30mm above the coolant reservoir. Very fine particles are arrested without slip. The magnetic material used will not

  9. Contact condensation effects in the main coolant pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, W.; Fischer, K.

    1990-01-01

    Contact condensation effects may occur in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) after a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) when emergency core cooling (ECC) water is injected contact with escaping steam which is generated within the core. The condensation which takes place may cause a sudden depressurization leading to the formation of water slugs. The interaction between the transient condensation and the inertia of the flow may also result in large amplitude flow and pressure oscillations. These contact condensation effects are of great importance for the mass flow distribution and the coolant water supply to the reactor core. To examine those complex processes, large computer codes are necessary. The development and verification of analytical models requires greatly simplified flow boundary conditions from experiments and a sufficiently large base of experimental data. Separate models have been developed for interfacial exchange of mass, momentum and energy with respect to the associated flow regime. Therefore, an adequate description of the condensation process requires the modeling of two different topics: the prediction of the flow regime and the calculation of the interfacial exchange. (author)

  10. Multi-objective optimization of the reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lei; Yan Changqi; Wang Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    Background: Weight and size are important criteria in evaluating the performance of a nuclear power plant. It is of great theoretical value and engineering significance to reduce the weight and volume of the components for a nuclear power plant by the optimization methodology. Purpose: In order to provide a new method for the optimization of nuclear power plant multi-objective, the concept of the non-dominated solution was introduced. Methods: Based on the parameters of Qinshan I nuclear power plant, the mathematical models of the reactor core, the reactor vessel, the main pipe, the pressurizer and the steam generator were built and verified. The sensitivity analyses were carried out to study the influences of the design variables on the objectives. A modified non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm was proposed and employed to optimize the weight and the volume of the reactor coolant system. Results: The results show that the component mathematical models are reliable, the modified non-dominated sorting generic algorithm is effective, and the reactor inlet temperature is the most important variable which influences the distribution of the non-dominated solutions. Conclusion: The optimization results could provide a reference to the design of such reactor coolant system. (authors)

  11. Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCA): Study of CAREM Reactor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Gimenez, Marcelo

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the neutronic and thermohydraulic response of CAREM25 reactor and the safety systems involved in a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA).This parametric analysis considers several break diameters (1/2inch, 3/4inch, 1inch, 1.1/2inch and 2inches) in the vapor zone of the Reactor Pressure Vessel.For each accidental sequence, the successful operation of the following safety systems is modeled: Second Safety System (SSS), Residual Heat Removal System (RHRS) and Safety Injection System (SIS). Availability of only one module is postulated for each system.On the other hand, the unsuccessful operation of all safety systems is postulated for each accidental sequence.In both cases the First Shutdown System (FSS) actuates, and the loss of Steam Generator secondary flow and Chemical and Control of Volume System (CCVS) unavailability are postulated.Maximum loss of coolant flow, reactor power and time for safety systems operation are analyzed, as well as its set point parameters.We verified that safety systems are dimensioned to satisfy the 48 hours cooling criteria

  12. Steam generator tube rupture effects on a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaChance, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    A problem currently experienced in commercial operating pressurized water reactors (PWR) in the United States is the degradation of steam generator tubes. Safety questions have arisen concerning the effect of these degraded tubes rupturing during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). To determine the effect of a small number of tube ruptures on the behavior of a large PWR during a postulated LOCA, a series of computer simulations was performed. The primary concern of the study was to determine whether a small number (10 or less of steam generator tubes rupturing at the beginning surface temperatures. Additional reflood analyses were performed to determine the system behavior when from 10 to 60 tubes rupture at the beginning of core reflood. The FLOOD4 code was selected as being the most applicable code for use in this study after an extensive analysis of the capabilities of existing codes to perform simulations of a LOCA with concurrent steam generator tube ruptures. The results of the study indicate that the rupturing of 10 or less steam generator tubes in any of the steam generators during a 200% cold leg break will not result in a significant increase in the peak cladding temperature. However, because of the vaporization of the steam generator secondary water in the primary side of the steam generator, a significant increase in the core pressure occurs which retards the reflooding process

  13. Review of steam jet condensation in a water pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. S.; Song, C. H.; Park, C. K.; Kang, H. S.; Jeon, H. G.; Yoon, Y. J.

    2002-01-01

    In the advanced nuclear power plants including APR1400, the SDVS is adopted to increase the plant safety using the concept of feed-and-bleed operation. In the case of the TLOFW, the POSRV located at the top of the pressurizer is expected to open due to the pressurization of the reactor coolant system and discharges steam and/or water mixture into the water pool, where the mixture is condensed. During the condensation of the mixture, thermal-hydraulic loads such as pressure and temperature variations are induced to the pool structure. For the pool structure design, such thermal-hydraulic aspects should be considered. Understanding the phenomena of the submerged steam jet condensation in a water pool is helpful for system designers to design proper pool structure, sparger, and supports etc. This paper reviews and evaluates the steam jet condensation in a water pool on the physical phenomena of the steam condensation including condensation regime map, heat transfer coefficient, steam plume, steam jet condensation load, and steam jet induced flow

  14. Introduction to the modified TROI test facility for fuel coolant interaction under a submerged reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Young Su; Hong, Seong-Wan; Song, Jin Ho; Hong, Seong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) can threaten the integrity of the reactor cavity under a severe accident. A steam explosion can be occurred by the rapid energy transfer in the high-temperature corium melt jet penetrating into water, which makes the dynamic load applying to the surrounding structure. Before a steam explosion, the corium melt jet breaks into small-sized particles, and the steam is generated continuously by the film boiling on the hot surface of the melt contacting with water. The premixing phase consisting of the corium melt, water, and steam can determine the intensity of the steam explosion. Unfortunately, the previous experimental studies on the FCI phenomena have carried out under a free fall of the corium melt jet in a gas phase before interacting with water. The previous TROI (Test for Real cOrium Interaction with water) test facility, that is a well-known test facility for the FCI phenomena in the world, has observed a steam explosion under a free fall of a corium melt jet in a gas phase before contacting a coolant since 2000, which is changing to simulate the FCI phenomena under a submerged reactor vessel. This study introduces the modified TROI test facility as shown in Fig. 1 and the considerations for the experiment with success. The previous TROI test facility, that has observed the molten Fuel-Coolant Interaction (FCI) with a free fall of the prototypic corium melt in a gas phase before contacting a coolant, was modified to simulate the FCI phenomena under a submerged reactor vessel for the assessment of the In-Vessel Retention (IVR) concept, i.e., without a free-fall distance of the corium melt before contacting water. The superheated prototypic corium melt created by the cold crucible melting method moves on a releasing valve newly installed just above the water level in the interaction vessel. The corium melt will stay on a releasing valve in less than 0.2 seconds to reduce heat loss for preventing the solidification, and

  15. Reactor having coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Tadashi; Karatsuka, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Hajime.

    1991-01-01

    In a coolant recycling pump for an LMFBR type reactor, vertical grooves are formed to a static portion which surrounds a pump shaft as far as the lower end thereof. Sodium mists present in an annular gap of the pump shaft form a rotational flow, lose its centrifugal force at the grooved portion and are collected positively to the grooved portion. Further, since the rotational flow in the grooved channel is in a state of a cavity flow, the pressure is released in the grooved portion and a secondary eddy current is formed thereby providing a depressurized state. Accordingly, by a synergestic effect of the centrifugal force and the cavity flow, sodium mists can be recovered completely. (T.M.)

  16. Mathematical model of the reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozuh, M.

    1989-01-01

    The mathematical model of reactor coolant pump is described in this paper. It is based on correlations for centrifugal reactor coolant pumps. This code is one of the elements needed for the simulation of the whole NPP primary system. In subroutine developed according to this model we tried in every possible detail to incorporate plant specific data for Krsko NPP. (author)

  17. Model studies of the vertical steam generator thermal-hydraulic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desyatun, V.F.; Moskvichev, V.F.; Ulasov, V.M.; Morozov, V.G.; Burkov, V.K.; Grebennikov, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    Results of investigations conducted to clarify the calculation technique and to test the workability of the main elements and units of the PGV-250 vertical steam generator of saturated steam are considered. The steam generating capacity of the plant is 1486 t/h, thermal power is 792 MW. Steam generation follows a multiple circulation scheme. The heat surface comprises 330-shields. The investigations are carried out with a model which reproduces all the main elements of the steam generator xcluding the economizer section. The flow rates of feed water, generated steam and coolant of the first circuit as well as temperature, pressure and humidity of the generated steam past the separator are determined. The average heat transfer factors of the heat surface are calculated on the base of the data obtained and a conclusion is drawn on the correctness of the thermohydraulic calculation technique used in development of the PGV-250 steam generator design. Temperature pulsations and heat surface steaming are not observed. The steam humidity at the outlet and steam capture into sinking tubes are within permissible values

  18. Condition monitoring of steam generator by estimating the overall heat transfer coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Hiroaki; Gofuku, Akio

    2013-01-01

    This study develops a technique for monitoring in on-line the state of the steam generator of the fast-breeder reactor (FBR) “Monju”. Because the FBR uses liquid sodium as coolant, it is necessary to handle liquid sodium with caution due to its chemical characteristics. The steam generator generates steam by the heat of secondary sodium coolant. The sodium-water reaction may happen if a pinhole or crack occurs at the thin metal tube wall that separates the secondary sodium coolant and water/steam. Therefore, it is very important to detect an anomaly of the wall of heat transfer tubes at an early stage. This study aims at developing an on-line condition monitoring technique of the steam generator by estimating overall heat transfer coefficient from process signals. This paper describes simplified mathematical models of superheater and evaporator to estimate the overall heat transfer coefficient and a technique to diagnose the state of the steam generator. The applicability of the technique is confirmed by several estimations using simulated process signals with artificial noises. The results of the estimations show that the developed technique can detect the occurrence of an anomaly. (author)

  19. WWER-1000/320 steam generator collector rupture. Radiological consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, A; Sartmadzhiev, A; Balabanov, E [Energoproekt, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    A model describing a hypothetical accident with direct release of primary coolant to the atmosphere is proposed. Cover lifting of the primary collector due to a rupture of the fixing bolts leads to a coolant release. The initial and boundary conditions of the accident scenario have been selected to provide for the most unfavorable conditions. The total release of primary coolant during the first 15 min of transient are estimated to 50.8 tons, of these 48.5 t with the initial activity in the primary coolant circuit. Without evacuation or sheltering, after 7 days of exposure, the expected dose at the boundary of the restricted zone is 0.0182 Sv for the whole body and 0.184 Sv for the thyroid gland. The effective equivalent dose on the site would be 0.0521 Sv. As a result of the analysis it is concluded that the steam generator collector rupture is not jeopardizing the core heat removal even with a minimum configuration of ECCS as the cooling is accomplished through the steam generators. The radiological consequences of the accident would be relatively small if an emergency procedure is applied at the 15-th minute of the transient. 1 ref.

  20. Organic coolant in Winnipeg riverbed sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.E.; Acres, O.E.

    1979-03-01

    Between January and May 1977 a prolonged leak of organic coolant occurred from the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment's nuclear reactor, and a minimum of 1450 kg of coolant entered the Winnipeg River and was deposited on the riverbed. The level of radioactivity associated with this coolant was low, contributing less than 0.2 μGy (0.02 mrad) a year to the natural background gamma radiation field from the riverbed. The concentration of coolant in the water samples never exceeded 0.02 mg/L, the lower limit of detection. The mortality of crayfish, held in cages where the riverbed was covered with the largest deposits of coolant, was not significantly different from that in the control cages upstream of the outfall. No evidence of fish kill was found. (author)

  1. Primary coolant circuits in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutani, Masushiro.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the requirement of a pump for the forcive circulation of primary coolants and avoid the manufacturing difficulty of equipments. Constitution: In primary coolant circuits of an LMFBR type reactor having a recycling path forming a closed loop between a reactor core and a heat exchanger, coolants recycled through the recycling path are made of a magnetic fluid comprising liquid sodium incorporated with fine magnetic powder, and an electromagnet is disposed to the downstream of the heat exchanger. In the above-mentioned structure, since the magnetic fluid as the primary coolants losses its magnetic property when heated in the reactor core but recovers the property at a lower temperature after the completion of the heat exchange, the magnetic fluid can forcively be flown through the recycling path under the effect of the electromagnet disposed to the down stream of the heat exchanger to thereby forcively recycle the primary coolants. (Kawakami, Y.)

  2. Integrated main coolant pumps for pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieser, R.

    1975-01-01

    The efficiency of an integrated main coolant pump for PWR's is increased. For this purpose, the pump is installed eccentric relative to the vertical axis of the U-type steam generator in the three-section HP chamber in such a way that its impeller wheel and the shell of the latter penetrate into the outlet chamber. The axis of the pump lies in the vertical plane of symmetry of the outlet chamber of the steam generator. The suction tube is arranged in the outlet chamber. To allow it to be installed, it is manufactured out of several parts. The diffusor tube, which is also made of several components, is attached to the horizontal separation plate between the outlet chamber and the pressure chamber so as to penetrate into it. To improve the outflow conditions at the diffusor tube, a plowshare-shaped baffle shield is installed between the diffusor tube and the HP chamber. Moreover, in order to improve the outflow conditions from the pump and from the pressure chamber, the outflow opening of the pressure chamber is put into the cylindrical shell of the HP chamber. In this way, the tensioning anchor is located between the pump and the outlet opening. (DG/RF) [de

  3. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.H.

    1995-01-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C 4 F 10 and C 4 F 8 , were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C 4 F 10 mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C 4 F 10 weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd

  4. Continuous surveillance of reactor coolant circuit integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Continuous surveillance is important to assuring the integrity of a reactor coolant circuit. It can give pre-warning of structural degradation and indicate where off-line inspection should be focussed. These proceedings describe the state of development of several techniques which may be used. These involve measuring structural vibration, core neutron noise, acoustic emission from cracks, coolant leakage, or operating parameters such as coolant temperature and pressure. Twenty three papers have been abstracted and indexed separately for inclusion in the data base

  5. Condensation of steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prisyazhniuk, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    An equation for nucleation kinetics in steam condensation has been derived, the equation taking into account the concurrent and independent functioning of two nucleation mechanisms: the homogeneous one and the heterogeneous one. The equation is a most general-purpose one and includes all the previously known condensation models as special cases. It is shown how the equation can be used in analyzing the process of steam condensation in the condenser of an industrial steam-turbine plant, and in working out new ways of raising the efficiency of the condenser, as well as of the steam-turbine plant as a whole. (orig.)

  6. EPRI steam generator programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, L.J.; Passell, T.O.; Bryant, P.E.C.; Rentler, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes the current overall EPRI steam generator program plan and some of the ongoing projects. Because of the recent occurrence of a corrosion phenomenon called ''denting,'' which has affected a number of operating utilities, an expanded program plan is being developed which addresses the broad and urgent needs required to achieve improved steam generator reliability. The goal of improved steam generator reliability will require advances in various technologies and also a management philosophy that encourages conscientious efforts to apply the improved technologies to the design, procurement, and operation of plant systems and components that affect the full life reliability of steam generators

  7. Condensation of the steam in the horizontal steam line during cold water flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strubelj, L.; Tiselj, I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct contact condensation and condensation induced water-hammer in a horizontal pipe was experimentally investigated at PMK-2 test facility of the Hungarian Atomic Energy Research Institute KFKI. The experiment is preformed in the horizontal section of the steam line of the PMK-2 integral test facility. As liquid water floods the horizontal part of the pipeline, the counter current horizontally stratified flow is being observed. During the flooding of the steam line, the vapour-liquid interface area increases and therefore the vapour condensation rate and the vapour velocity also increase. Similar phenomena can occur in the cold/hot leg of the primary loop of PWR nuclear power plant during loss of coolant accident, when emergency core cooling system is activated. Water level at one cross-section and four local void fraction and temperature at the top of steam line was measured and compared with simulation. Condensed steam increases the water temperature that is why the local temperature measurements are the most important information, from which condensation rate can be estimated, since mass of condensed steam was not measured. Free surface simulation of the experiment with thermal phase change model is presented. Surface renewal concept with small eddies is used for calculation of heat transfer coefficient. With surface renewal theory we did not get results similar to experiment, that is why heat transfer coefficient was increased by factor 20. In simulation with heat transfer coefficient calculated with surface renewal concept bubble entrapment is due to reflection of the wave from the end of the pipe. When heat transfer coefficient is increased, condensation rate and steam velocity are also increased, bubble entrapment is due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the free surface, and the results become similar to the measurements. (author)

  8. Numerical Study on the Helium Flow Characteristics for Steam Generator Subsystem of HTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Hoon; Ham, Jin Ki; Ki, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won Jae

    2014-01-01

    The High Temperature Reactor (HTR), one of the 4th generation reactors, utilizes helium as the primary coolant. A Steam Generator Subsystem (SGS) is installed to transfer heat from the primary coolant to feed water and subsequently produce steam so that it supplies electricity as well as process heat over a wide range. The SGS is composed of a helical heat exchanger, shrouds directing the flow of the shell side helium and support systems, which are located within the steam generator vessel. In this study, helium flow characteristics in the SGS were investigated at various operating conditions using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). A full-scale 3-D model of the SGS was developed and the reynolds stress model with standard wall treatment was used as a turbulence model. The CFD result was compared to that of the concept design of the steam cycle modular helium reactor for the design verification of the SGS. From the CFD analysis, it was found that the primary coolant flow had non-uniform distribution while it passed the inlet in the helical heat exchanger. In order to make the uniform primary coolant flow uniform, a special type of screen was suggested in front of the helical heat exchanger. As a result, the overall design adequacy of the SGS has been evaluated. (author)

  9. Steam CFD simulation of injection in suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Samad, A.M.; Ghosh, Sumana

    2015-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) is one of the common types of electricity generating nuclear reactor. Suppression pool system is a major component of the BWR which has to be designed efficiently for the safe operations. During some accidents like Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) large amount of steam are injected to the pressure suppression system resulting in increase in temperature of the pool and thereby increasing the pressure. The present work discuss about the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of steam injected to the wet well of BWR through the blow down pipes and there by investigating the hydrodynamic and thermal characteristics of the system. The simulations were carried out for three different steam injection velocities. The numerical simulations were performed with ANSYS FLUENT using multiphase 3D Volume of Fluid (VOF) model and k-ε model was adopted for modelling turbulence flow. (author)

  10. Effect of high-temperature filtration on impurity composition in the primary circuit coolant of power units with WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, A.A.; Moskvin, L.N.; Gusev, B.A.; Leont'ev, G.G.; Nekrest'yanov, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of high-temperature filtration on changes in dispersive, chemical, radioisotope and phase compositions of impurities in primary circuit coolant of NPP with the WWER-1000 reactor are studied. Special filters are used for the studies. The data obtained confirm the applicability of high-temperature filtration for purification of WWER reactor water and steam separators at NPPs with RBMK reactors

  11. Integral nuclear power reactor with natural coolant circulation. Investigation of passive RHR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoilov, O.B.; Kuul, V.S.; Malamud, V.A.; Tarasov, G.I.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a small power (up to 240 MWe) integral PWR for nuclear co-generation power plants has been carried out. The distinctive features of this advanced reactor are: primary circuit arrangement in a single pressure vessel; natural coolant circulation; passive safety systems with self-activated control devices; use of a second (guard) vessel housing the reactor; favourable conditions for the most severe accident management. A passive steam condensing channel has been developed which is activated by the direct action of the primary circuit pressure without an automatic controlling action or manual intervention for emergency cooling of an integral reactor with an in-built pressurizer. In an emergency situation as pressure rises in the reactor a self-activated device blows out non-condensable gases from the condenser tube bundle and returns them in the steam-condensing mode of the operation with the returing primary coolant condensate into the reactor. The thermo-physical test facility is constructed and the experimental development of the steam-condensing channels is performed aiming at the verification of mathematical models for these channels operation in integral reactors both at loss-of-heat removal and LOCA accidents. (orig.)

  12. Prediction of loop seal formation and clearing during small break loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Suk Ho; Kim, Hho Jung

    1992-01-01

    Behavior of loop seal formation and clearing during small break loss of coolant accident is investigated using the RELAP5/MOD2 and /MOD3 codes with the test of SB-CL-18 of the LSTF(Large Scale Test Facility). The present study examines the thermal-hydraulic mechanisms responsible for early core uncovery includeing the manometric effect due to an asymmetric coolant holdup in the steam generator upflow and downflow side. The analysis with the RELAP5/ MOD2 demonstrates the main phenomena occuring in the depressurization transient including the loop seal formation and clearing with sufficient accuracy. Nevertheless, several differences regarding the evolution of phenomena and their timing have been pointed out in the base calculations. The RELAP5/MOD3 predicts overall phenomena, particularly the steam generator liquid holdup better than the RELAP5/MOD2. The nodalization study in the components of the steam generator U-tubes and the cross-over legs with the RELAP5/MOD3 results in good prediction of the loop seal clearing phenomena and their timing. (Author)

  13. Condition monitoring of main coolant pumps, Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, V.; Satheesh, C.; Acharya, V.N.; Tikku, A.C.; Mishra, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Dhruva is a 100 MW research reactor with natural uranium fuel, heavy water as moderator and primary coolant. Three Centrifugal pumps circulate the primary coolant across the core and the heat exchangers. Each pump is coupled to a flywheel (FW) assembly in order to meet operational safety requirements. All the 3 main coolant pump (MCP) sets are required to operate during operation of the reactor. The pump-sets are in operation since the year 1984 and have logged more than 1,00,000 hrs. Frequent breakdowns of its FW bearings were experienced during initial years of operation. Condition monitoring of these pumps, largely on vibration based parameters, was initiated on regular basis. Break-downs of main coolant pumps reduced considerably due to the fair accurate predictions of incipient break-downs and timely maintenance efforts. An effort is made in this paper to share the experience

  14. Coolant processing device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizawa, Hideo; Funakoshi, Toshio; Izumoji, Yoshiaki

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce an entire facility cost by concentrating and isolating tritium accumulated in coolants, removing the tritium out of the system, and returning hydrogen gas generated at a reactor accident to a recombiner in a closed loop by the switching of a valve. Constitution: Coolant from a reactor cooling system processed by a chemical volume control system facility (CVCS) and coolant drain from various devices processed by a liquid waste disposing system facility (LWDS) are fed to a tritium isolating facility, in which they are isolated into concentrated tritium water and dilute tritium water. The concentrated tritium water is removed out of the system and stored. The dilute tritium water is reused as supply water for coolant. If an accident occurs to cause hydrogen to be generated, a closed loop is formed between the containment vessel and the recombiner, the hydrogen is recombined with oxygen in the air of the closed loop to be thus returned to water. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Fatigue management considering LWR coolant environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Heung Bae; Jin, Tae eun

    2000-01-01

    Design fatigue curve for structural material in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments has been a concern ever since the early 1970's. And, recent fatigue test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue lives of carbon steels, low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. For these reasons, fatigue of major components has been identified as a technical issue remaining to be resolved for life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. In the present paper, results of recent investigations by many organizations are reviewed to provide technical justification to support the development of utility approach regarding the management of fatigue considering LWR coolant environments for the purpose of life management and license renewal of nuclear power plants. (author)

  16. Selection of nuclear reactor coolant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Lisheng; Wang Bairong

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear material is nuclear material or materials used in nuclear industry, the general term, it is the material basis for the construction of nuclear power, but also a leader in nuclear energy development, the two interdependent and mutually reinforcing. At the same time, nuclear materials research, development and application of the depth and breadth of science and technology reflects a nation and the level of the nuclear power industry. Coolant also known as heat-carrier agent, is an important part of the heart nuclear reactor, its role is to secure as much as possible to the economic output in the form fission energy to heat the reactor to be used: the same time cooling the core, is controlled by the various structural components allowable temperature. This paper described the definition of nuclear reactor coolant and characteristics, and then addressed the requirements of the coolant material, and finally were introduced several useful properties of the coolant and chemical control. (authors)

  17. Standardized sampling system for reactor coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divine, J.R.; Munson, L.F.; Nelson, J.L.; McDowell, R.L.; Jankowski, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    A three-pronged approach was developed to reach the objectives of acceptable coolant sampling, assessment of occupational exposure from corrosion products, and model development for the transport and buildup of corrosion products. Emphasis is on sampler design

  18. Deformation, oxidation and embrittlement of PWB fuel cladding in a loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, P.D.; Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1986-09-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the oxidation, embrittlement and deformation of PWB fuel in a loss of coolant accident in which the emergency core coolant systems operate in accordance with the design, ie accidents within the design basis of the plant. A brief description is given of the thermal hydraulic events during large and small breaks of the primary circuit, followed by the correct functioning and remedial action of the emergency core cooling systems. The possible damage to the fuel cladding during these events is also described. The basic process of oxidation of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding by steam, and the reaction kinetics of the oxidation are reviewed in detail. Variables having a possible influence on the oxidation kinetics are also considered. The embrittlement of zircaloy-4 cladding by oxidation is also reviewed in detail. It is related to fracture during the thermal shock of rewetting or by the ambient impact forces as a result of post-accident fuel handling. Criteria based both on total oxidation and on the detailed distribution of oxygen through the oxidised cladding wall are considered. The published computer codes for the calculation of oxygen concentration are reviewed in terms of the model employed and the limitations apparent in these models when calculating oxygen distribution in cladding in the actual conditions of a loss of coolant accident. The factors controlling the deformation and rupture of cladding in a loss of coolant accident are reviewed in detail.

  19. The deformation, oxidation and embrittlement of PWB fuel cladding in a loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, P.D.; Hindle, E.D.; Mann, C.A.

    1986-09-01

    The scope of this report is limited to the oxidation, embrittlement and deformation of PWB fuel in a loss of coolant accident in which the emergency core coolant systems operate in accordance with the design, ie accidents within the design basis of the plant. A brief description is given of the thermal hydraulic events during large and small breaks of the primary circuit, followed by the correct functioning and remedial action of the emergency core cooling systems. The possible damage to the fuel cladding during these events is also described. The basic process of oxidation of zircaloy-4 fuel cladding by steam, and the reaction kinetics of the oxidation are reviewed in detail. Variables having a possible influence on the oxidation kinetics are also considered. The embrittlement of zircaloy-4 cladding by oxidation is also reviewed in detail. It is related to fracture during the thermal shock of rewetting or by the ambient impact forces as a result of post-accident fuel handling. Criteria based both on total oxidation and on the detailed distribution of oxygen through the oxidised cladding wall are considered. The published computer codes for the calculation of oxygen concentration are reviewed in terms of the model employed and the limitations apparent in these models when calculating oxygen distribution in cladding in the actual conditions of a loss of coolant accident. The factors controlling the deformation and rupture of cladding in a loss of coolant accident are reviewed in detail. (author)

  20. High-temperature process heat reactor with solid coolant and radiant heat exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.M.; Bulkin, Yu.M.; Vasil'ev, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    The high temperature graphite reactor with the solid coolant in which heat transfer is realized by radiant heat exchange is described. Neutron-physical and thermal-technological features of the reactor are considered. The reactor vessel is made of sheet carbon steel in the form of a sealed rectangular annular box. The moderator is a set of graphite blocks mounted as rows of arched laying Between the moderator rows the solid coolant annular layings made of graphite blocks with high temperature nuclear fuel in the form of coated microparticles are placed. The coolant layings are mounted onto ring movable platforms, the continuous rotation of which is realizod by special electric drives. Each part of the graphite coolant laying consecutively passes through the reactor core neutron cut-off zones and technological zone. In the core the graphite is heated up to the temperature of 1350 deg C sufficient for effective radiant heat transfer. In the neutron cut-off zone the chain reaction and further graphite heating are stopped. In the technological zone the graphite transfers the accumulated heat to the walls of technological channels in which the working medium moves. The described reactor is supposed to be used in nuclear-chemical complex for ammonia production by the method of methane steam catalytic conversion

  1. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  2. Power plant and system for accelerating a cross compound turbine in such plant, especially one having an HTGR steam supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaegtnes, K.O.; Braytenbah, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    An electric power plant having a cross compound steam turbine and a steam source that includes a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor is described. The steam turbine includes high and intermediate-pressure portions which drive a first generating means, and a low-pressure portion which drives a second generating means. The steam source supplies superheat steam to the high-pressure turbine portion, and an associated bypass permits the superheat steam to flow from the source to the exhaust of the high-pressure portion. The intermediate and low-pressure portions use reheat steam; an associated bypass permits reheat steam to flow from the source to the low-pressure exhaust. An auxiliary turbine driven by steam exhausted from the high-pressure portion and its bypass drives a gas blower to propel the coolant gas through the reactor. While the bypass flow of reheat steam is varied to maintain an elevated pressure of reheat steam upon its discharge from the source, both the first and second generating means and their associated turbines are accelerated initially by admitting steam to the intermediate and low-pressure portions. The electrical speed of the second generating means is equalized with that of the first generating means, whereupon the generating means are connected and acceleration proceeds under control of the flow through the high-pressure portion. 29 claims, 2 figures

  3. STEAM by Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Linda; Keane, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We live in a designed world. STEAM by Design presents a transdisciplinary approach to learning that challenges young minds with the task of making a better world. Learning today, like life, is dynamic, connected and engaging. STEAM (Science, Technology, Environment, Engineering, Art, and Math) teaching and learning integrates information in…

  4. Steampunk: Full Steam Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    Steam-powered machines, anachronistic technology, clockwork automatons, gas-filled airships, tentacled monsters, fob watches, and top hats--these are all elements of steampunk. Steampunk is both speculative fiction that imagines technology evolved from steam-powered cogs and gears--instead of from electricity and computers--and a movement that…

  5. Safety Picks up "STEAM"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This column shares safety information for the classroom. STEAM subjects--science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics--are essential for fostering students' 21st-century skills. STEAM promotes critical-thinking skills, including analysis, assessment, categorization, classification, interpretation, justification, and prediction, and are…

  6. Steam-water separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modrak, T.M.; Curtis, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    A two-stage steam-water separating device is introduced, where the second stage is made as a cyclone separator. The water separated here is collected in the first stage of the inner tube and is returned to the steam raising unit. (TK) [de

  7. Steam power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.E.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to power plant forced flow boilers operating with water letdown. The letdown water is arranged to deliver heat to partly expanded steam passing through a steam reheater connected between two stages of the prime mover. (U.K.)

  8. TRAC analysis of steam-generator overfill transients for TMI-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, B.

    1983-01-01

    A reactor safety issue concerning the overfilling of once-through steam generators leading to combined primary/secondary blowdown has been raised recently. A series of six calculations, performed with the LWR best-estimate code, TRAC-PD2, on a Babcock and Wilcox Plant (TMI-1), was performed to investigate this safety issue. The base calculation assumed runaway main feedwater to one steam generator causing it to overfill and to break the main steam line. Four additional calculations build onto the base case with combinations of a pump-seal failure, a steam-generator tube rupture, and the pilot-operated relief valve not reseating. A sixth calculation involved only the rupture of a single steam-generator tube. The results of these analyses indicate that for the transients investigated, the emergency cooling system provided an adequate make-up coolant flow to mitigate the accidents

  9. Q-factor of coolant flow in the primary circuit of NPP with pressurised water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proskuryakov, K.N.; Belikov, S.O.; Novikov, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Systems of preoperational vibration dynamic monitoring in of WWER are presented. The results of measurements during commission of NPP with WWER are presented. The paper provides the result of the research, that estimation of coolant fluctuations caused by pulse perturbation of pressure in the primary circuit NPP. It is shown that results could be received at known value of a Q - factor of acoustical oscillatory system only. The research demonstrates the results of dependence of the sound speed from the mass steam content in the coolant flow thru reactor core. The worked out results can be used for identification of the reasons of abnormal growth of level of vibrations of fuel assembly, fuel rod, equipment and internals, and for forecasting the operation conditions which provide of vibration - acoustical resonances in the primary loop equipment. (author)

  10. Study on primary coolant system depressurization effect factor in pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Duan; Cao Xuewu

    2006-01-01

    The progression of high-pressure core melting severe accident induced by very small break loss of coolant accident plus the loss of main feed water and auxiliary feed water failure is studied, and the entry condition and modes of primary cooling system depressurization during the severe accident are also estimated. The results show that the temperature below 650 degree C is preferable depressurization input temperature allowing recovery of core cooling, and the available and effective way to depressurize reactor cooling system and to arrest very small break loss of coolant accident sequences is activating pressurizer relief valves initially, then restoring the auxiliary feedwater and opening the steam generator relief valves. It can adequately reduce the primary pressure and keep the capacity loop of long-term core cooling. (authors)

  11. The calculation of coolant leak rate through the cracks using RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krungeleviciute, V.; Kaliatka, A.

    2001-01-01

    For reason to choose method of leak detection first of all it is necessary to perform evaluating thermal-hydraulic calculations. These calculations allow to determine flow rate of discharged coolant. For coolant leak rate calculations through possible cracks in Ignalina NPP pipes SQUIRT and RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic codes were used. SQUIRT is well known as computer program that predicts the leakage for cracked pipes in NPP. As this code calculates only water (at subcooled or saturated conditions) leak rate, RELAP5 code model, that calculates water and steam leak rate, was created. For model validation comparison of SQUIRT, RELAP5 and experimental results was performed. Analysis shows RELAP5 code model suitability for calculations of leak through through-wall cracks in pipes. (author)

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of the coolant mixing during fast deboration transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehne, T.; Rohde, U.; Weiss, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    For the analysis of boron dilution transients and main steam line break scenarios the modeling of the coolant mixing inside the reactor vessel is important, because the reactivity insertion strongly depends on boron acid concentration or the coolant temperature distribution. Calculations for steady state flow conditions for the WWER-440 were performed with a CFD code (CFX-4). For this calculation the RPV from the cold legs inlet through the downcomer, the lower plenum and the lower core support plate was nodulized in detail. The comparison with experimental data and analytical mixing model which is implemented in the neutron kinetic code DYN3D showed a good agreement for near-nominal conditions (all MCPs are running). The comparison between the CFD-results and the analytical model revealed differences for MSLB conditions[1]. (Authors)

  13. Pulsed high-pressure (PHP) drain-down of steam generating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrusek, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an improved method of draining down contained reactor-coolant water from the inverted vertical U-tubes of at least one vertical-type steam generator in which the upper inverted U-shaped ends of the tubes are closed and the lower ends thereof are open, the steam generator having a channel head at its lower end including a vertical dividing wall defining a primary water inlet side and a primary water outlet side of the generator, the steam generator having chemical volume control system means and residual heat removal system means, and the steam generator being part of a nuclear-powered steam generating system wherein the reactor-coolant water is normally circulated from and back into the reactor via a loop comprising the steam generator and inlet and outlet conduits connected to the lower end of the steam generator, and the reactor being in communication with pressurizer means and comprising the steps of introducing a gas which is inert to the system and which is under pressure above atmospheric pressure into at least one of the downwardly facing open ends of each of the U-tubes from below the tubesheet in which the open ends of the U-tubes are mounted adjacent the lower end of the steam generator while permitting the water to flow out from the open ends of the U-tubes, the improvement in combination therewith for substantially increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of such water removal from the tubes. It includes determining the parameters effecting a first average volumetric rate of removal for a predetermined period of time, infra, of the reactor-coolant water from the inverted vertical U-tubes, the specific unit for the first average volumetric rate expressing properties identical with the properties expressed in a second average volumetric rate maintained in a later mentioned step

  14. An Isothermal Steam Expander for an Industrial Steam Supplying System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Kuang Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Steam is an essential medium used in the industrial process. To ensure steam quality, small and middle scale boilers are often adopted. However, because a higher steam pressure (compared to the necessary steam pressure is generated, the boiler’s steam pressure will be reduced via a pressure regulator before the steam is directed through the process. Unfortunately, pressure is somewhat wasted during the reducing process. Therefore, in order to promote energy efficiency, a pressure regulator is replaced by a steam expander. With this steam expander, the pressure will be transformed into mechanical energy and extracted during the expansion process. A new type of isothermal steam expander for an industrial steam supplying system will be presented in the paper. The isothermal steam expander will improve the energy efficiency of a traditional steam expander by replacing the isentropic process with an isothermal expansion process. With this, steam condensation will decrease, energy will increase, and steam quality will be improved. Moreover, the mathematical model of the isothermal steam expander will be established by using the Schmidt theory, the same principle used to analyze Stirling engines. Consequently, by verifying the correctness of the theoretical model for the isothermal steam expander using experimental data, a prototype of 100 c.c. isothermal steam expander is constructed.

  15. Air water loop - an experimental facility to study thermal hydraulics of AHWR steam drum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagul, R.K.; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Jain, V.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2014-05-01

    In the proposed Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) the coolant recirculation in the primary system is achieved by two-phase natural circulation. The two-phase steam-water mixture from the reactor core is separated in steam drum by gravity. Gravity separation of phases may lead to undesirable phenomena - carryover and carryunder. Carryover is the entrainment of liquid droplets in the vapor phase.Carryover needs to be minimized to avoid erosion corrosion of turbine blades. Carryunder is the entrainment of vapor bubbles with liquid flowing back to reactor core. Significant carryunder may in turn lead to reduced flow resulting in reduced CHF margin and stability in the coolant channel. An Air-Water Loop (AWL) has been designed to carry out the experiments relevant to AHWR steam drum. The design features and scaling philosophy is described in this report. (author)

  16. Steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Nickerson, J.; Spekkens, P.; Maruska, C.

    1998-01-01

    Steam generators are a critical component of a nuclear power reactor, and can contribute significantly to station unavailability, as has been amply demonstrated in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). CANDU steam generators are not immune to steam generator degradation, and the variety of CANDU steam generator designs and tube materials has led to some unexpected challenges. However, aggressive remedial actions, and careful proactive maintenance activities, have led to a decrease in steam generator-related station unavailability of Canadian CANDUs. AECL and the CANDU utilities have defined programs that will enable existing or new steam generators to operate effectively for 40 years. Research and development work covers corrosion and mechanical degradation of tube bundles and internals, chemistry, thermal hydraulics, fouling, inspection and cleaning, as well as provision for specially tool development for specific problem solving. A major driving force is development of CANDU-specific fitness-for-service guidelines, including appropriate inspection and monitoring technology to measure steam generator condition. Longer-range work focuses on development of intelligent on-line monitoring for the feedwater system and steam generator. New designs have reduced risk of corrosion and fouling, are more easily inspected and cleaned, and are less susceptible to mechanical damage. The Canadian CANDU utilities have developed programs for remedial actions to combat degradation of performance (Gentilly-2, Point Lepreau, Bruce A/B, Pickering A/B), and have developed strategic plans to ensure that good future operation is ensured. This report shows how recent advances in cleaning technology are integrated into a life management strategy, discusses downcomer flow measurement as a means of monitoring steam generator condition, and describes recent advances in hideout return as a life management tool. The research and development program, as well as operating experience, has identified

  17. Steam Oxidation Testing in the Severe Accident Test Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    After the March 2011 accident at Fukushima Daiichi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) began conducting high temperature steam oxidation testing of candidate materials for accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding in August 2011 [1-11]. The ATF concept is to enhance safety margins in light water reactors (LWR) during severe accident scenarios by identifying materials with 100× slower steam oxidation rates compared to current Zr-based alloys. In 2012, the ORNL laboratory equipment was expanded and made available to the entire ATF community as the Severe Accident Test Station (SATS) [4,12]. Compared to the current UO2/Zr-based alloy fuel system, an ATF alternative would significantly reduce the rate of heat and hydrogen generation in the core during a coolant-limited severe accident [13-14]. The steam oxidation behavior of candidate materials is a key metric in the evaluation of ATF concepts and also an important input into models [15-17]. However, initial modeling work of FeCrAl cladding has used incomplete information on the physical properties of FeCrAl. Also, the steam oxidation data being collected at 1200°-1700°C is unique as no prior work has considered steam oxidation of alloys at such high temperatures. Also, because many accident scenarios include steadily increasing temperatures, the required data are not traditional isothermal exposures but exposures with varying “ramp” rates. In some cases, the steam oxidation behavior has been surprising and difficult to interpret. Thus, more fundamental information continues to be collected. In addition, more work continues to focus on commercially-manufactured tube material. This report summarizes recent work to characterize the behavior of candidate alloys exposed to high temperature steam, evaluate steam oxidation behavior in various ramp scenarios and continue to collect integral data on FeCrAl compared to conventional Zr-based cladding.

  18. The module CCM for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic situation within a coolant channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, A.

    2000-01-01

    A coolant channel module (Cc) will be presented which aim is to simulate, in a very general way, the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of single- and two-phase fluids flowing along a heated (or cooled) vertical, inclined or horizontal coolant channel. It is based on a theoretical drift-flux supported 3-equation mixture-fluid model describing the steady state and transient behaviour of characteristic thermal-hydraulic parameters of a single- and two-phase flow within such a channel. The module can be applied as an element within an overall theoretical model for large and complex plant assemblies (PWR and BWR core channels, parallel channels in 3D cores, primary and secondary sides of different steam generators types etc.). The model refers to a general (basic) coolant channel (BC) which can consists of different flow regimes. The BC has thus to be subdivided accordingly into a number of subchannels (SC-s). All of them can belong, however, to only two types of SC-s (single-phase fluid with subcooled water or superheated steam or a two-phase flow regime). For both of them the possibility of variable entrance or outlet positions has to be considered. For discretization purposes the BC (and thus also the SC-s) have to be subdivided into a number of (BC and SC) nodes, discretizing thus the conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum along these nodes by applying a very general spatial procedure, namely a 'modified finite volume method'. A special quadratic polygon approximation method (PAX procedure) helps then to establish a connection between nodal boundary and mean nodal parameters. Considering their constitutive equations (among them an adequate drift-flux correlation package) yields finally a set of non-linear algebraic and non-linear ordinary differential equations for the characteristic parameters of each of these SC nodes (mass flow, pressure drop, coolant temperature and/or void fraction). Based on this theory a code package (CCM) could be established

  19. Mixing Characteristics during Fuel Coolant Interaction under Reactor Submerged Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. W.; Na, Y. S.; Hong, S. H.; Song, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    A molten material is injected into an interaction chamber by free gravitation fall. This type of fuel coolant interaction could happen to operating plants. However, the flooding of a reactor cavity is considered as SAM measures for new PWRs such as APR-1400 and AP1000 to assure the IVR of a core melt. In this case, a molten corium in a reactor is directly injected into water surrounding the reactor vessel without a free fall. KAERI has carried out fuel coolant interaction tests without a free fall using ZrO 2 and corium to simulate the reactor submerged conditions. There are four phases in a steam explosion. The first phase is a premixing phase. The premixing is described in the literature as follows: during penetration of melt into water, hydrodynamic instabilities, generated by the velocities and density differences as well as vapor production, induce fragmentation of the melt into particles; the particles fragment in turn into smaller particles until they reach a critical size such that the cohesive forces (surface tension) balance exactly the disruptive forces (inertial); and the molten core material temperature (>2500 K) is such that the mixing always occurs in the film boiling regime of the water: It is very important to qualify and quantify this phase because it gives the initial conditions for a steam explosion This paper mainly focuses on the observation of the premixing phase between a case with 1 m free fall and a case without a free fall to simulate submerged reactor condition. The premixing behavior between a 1m free fall case and reactor case submerged without a free fall is observed experimentally. The average velocity of the melt front passing through 1m water pool; - Case without a free fall: The average velocity of corium, 2.7m/s, is faster than ZrO 2 , 2.3m/s, in water. - Cases of with a 1 m free fall and without a free fall : The case without a free fall is about two times faster than a case with a 1 m free fall. Bubble characteristics; - Case

  20. Loss of Coolant Accident Simulation for the Top-Slot break at Cold Leg Focusing on the Loop Seal Reformation under Long Term Cooling with the ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Rok; Park, Yu Sun; Bae, Byoung Uhn; Choi, Nam Hyun; Kang, Kyoung Ho; Choi, Ki Yong [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In the present paper, loss of coolant accident for the top-slot break at cold leg was simulated with the ATLAS, which is a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for evolutionary pressurized water reactors (PWRs) of an advanced power reactor of 1400 MWe (APR1400). The simulation was focused on the loop seal reformation under long term cooling condition. During a certain class of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a PWR like an advanced power reactor of 1400 MWe (APR1400), the steam volume in the reactor vessel upper plenum and/or upper head may continue expanding until steam blows liquid out of the intermediate leg (U-shaped pump suction cold leg), called loop seal clearing (LSC), opening a path for the steam to be relieved from the break. Prediction of the LSC phenomena is difficult because they are varies for many parameters, which are break location, type, size, etc. This LSC is the major factor that affects the coolant inventory in the small break LOCA (SBLOCA) or intermediate break LOCA (IBLOCA). There is an issue about the loop seal reformation that liquid refills intermediate leg and blocks the steam path after LSC. During the SBLOCA or IBLOCA, the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) is operated. For long term of the top slot small or intermediate break at cold leg, the primary steam condensation by SG heat transfer or SIP, SIT water flooding (reverse flow to loop seal) make loop seal reformation possibly. The primary pressure increase at the top core region due to the steam release blockage by loop seal reformation. And then core level decreases and partial core uncover may occur. The loss of coolant accident for the top-slot break at cold leg was simulated with the ATLAS. The loop seal clearing and loop seal reformation were occurred repeatedly.

  1. Development of technologies on innovative-simplified nuclear power plant using high-efficiency steam injectors. (6) Operating characteristics of center water jet type supersonic steam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Yujiro; Abe, Yutaka; Iwaki, Chikako; Narabayashi, Tadashi; Mori, Michitsugu; Ohmori, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    One of the most interesting devices for next generation reactor systems aiming at simplified system and improvement of safety and credibility is the steam injector which is a passive pump without large motor or turbo-machinery. One of the applications of the steam injector is the passive water injection system to inject the coolant water into the core. The system can be started up merely by injecting the steam without any outer power supply. Since the steam injector is a simple, compact and passive device for water injection, if the steam injector is applied to the actual reactor, it is expected to make the system simple and to reduce the construction cost. Although non-condensable gases are well known for reducing heat transfer between water and steam, the effect of the non-condensable gas on the condensation of supersonic steam on high-speed water jet has not been cleared. The present paper reports about the experimental apparatus, measurement instrument and experimental results of observing the phenomenon inside the test section supplying water and steam to the test by using both the high-speed camera and the video camera and measuring the temperature and the pressure distribution n the test section. (author)

  2. Validation of advanced NSSS simulator model for loss-of-coolant accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, S.P.; Chang, S.K.; Huang, H.C. [Nuclear Training Branch, Northeast Utilities, Waterford, CT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The replacement of the NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) model on the Millstone 2 full-scope simulator has significantly increased its fidelity to simulate adverse conditions in the RCS. The new simulator NSSS model is a real-time derivative of the Nuclear Plant Analyzer by ABB. The thermal-hydraulic model is a five-equation, non-homogeneous model for water, steam, and non-condensible gases. The neutronic model is a three-dimensional nodal diffusion model. In order to certify the new NSSS model for operator training, an extensive validation effort has been performed by benchmarking the model performance against RELAP5/MOD2. This paper presents the validation results for the cases of small-and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA). Detailed comparisons in the phenomena of reflux-condensation, phase separation, and two-phase natural circulation are discussed.

  3. Loss of coolant accident analysis (thermal hydraulic analysis) - Japanese industries experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabe, K.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of LOCA analysis in Japanese industry is presented. The BASH-M code, developed for large scale LOCA reflooding analysis, is given as an example of verification and improvement of US computer programs are given. The code's application to the operational safety analysis concerns the following main areas: 1D drift flux model base computer program CANAC; CANAC-based advanced training simulator; emergency operating procedures. The author considers also the code application to the following new PWR safety design concepts: use of steam generators for decay heat removal at LOCA conditions; use of horizontal type steam generator for maintaining two-phase natural circulation under the reactor coolant system submerged. 9 figs

  4. Corrosion particles in the primary coolant of VVER-440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajda, N.; Molnar, Z.; Macsik, Z.; Szeles, E.; Hargittai, P.; Csordas, A.; Pinter, T.; Pinter, T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion and activity build-up processes are of major concern in ageing and life-extension of nuclear power reactors. Researches to study the migration of radioactive corrosion particles have been initiated at Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary in order to better understand the corrosion of the primary circuit surfaces, the transport and activation of the particles of corrosion origin and their deposition on in-core and out-of-core surfaces. Radioactive corrosion particles were collected from the primary coolant and the steam generator surfaces of the 4 reactor units and subjected to detailed microanalytical and radioanalytical investigations. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX) were used to study the morphology and the composition of the matrix elements in the particles and the deposited corrosion layers. Particles identified by SEM-EDX were re-located under optical microscope by means of a coordinate transformation algorithm and were separated with a micromanipulator for further studies. Activities of γ emitting radionuclides were determined by high resolution γ spectrometry, and those of β decaying isotopes were measured by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometry after radiochemical processing. High sensitivity of the nuclear measuring techniques allowed us to determine the low activity concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides, i.e. 60 Co, 54 Mn, 63 Ni, 55 Fe in the individual particles. Finally, high resolution sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was applied to determine the ultralow concentrations of Co, Fe, Ni in the same particles. Specific activities of 60 Co/Co, 54 Mn/Fe, 55 Fe/Fe and 63 Ni/Ni were derived from the measured activity and concentration data. Specific activities of the radioactive corrosion products reveal the history of activity buildup processes in the particle. Typically, Fe-Cr-Ni oxide particles formed as a result of corrosion of the steel

  5. Steam generator tube failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service

  6. Chemical sensors for monitoring non-metallic impurities in liquid sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Rajesh; Jayaraman, V.; Rajan Babu, S.; Sridharan, R.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for fast breeder reactors. Liquid sodium is highly compatible with structural steels when the concentration of dissolved non-metallic impurities such as oxygen and carbon are low. However, when their concentrations are above certain threshold limits, enhanced corrosion and mass transfer and carburization of the steels would occur. The threshold concentration levels of oxygen in sodium are determined by thermochemical aspects of various ternary oxides of Na-M-O systems (M alloying elements in steels) which take part in corrosion and mass transfer. Dissolved carbon also influences these threshold levels by establishing relevant carbide equilibria. An event of steam leak into sodium at the steam generator, if undetected at its inception itself, can lead to extensive wastage of the tubes of the steam generator and prolonged shutdown. Air ingress into the argon cover gas and leak of hydrocarbon oil used as cooling fluids of the shafts of the centrifugal pumps of sodium are the sources of oxygen and carbon impurities in sodium. Continuous monitoring of the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in sodium coolant will help identifying their ingress at inception itself. An electrochemical hydrogen sensor based on CaHBr-CaBr 2 hydride ion conducting solid electrolyte has been developed for detecting the steam leak during normal operating conditions of the reactor. A nickel diffuser based sensor system using thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and Pd-doped tin oxide thin film sensor has been developed for use during low power operations of the reactor or during its start up. For monitoring carbon in sodium, an electrochemical sensor with molten Na 2 CO 3 -LiCO 3 as the electrolyte and pure graphite as reference electrode has been developed. Yttria Doped Thoria (YDT) electrolyte based oxygen sensor is under development for monitoring dissolved oxygen levels in sodium. Fabrication, assembly, testing and performance of

  7. Steam content of the two-phase flow in the Vk-50 boiling water cooled reactor draught section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedulin, V.N.; Shmelev, V.E.; Solodkij, V.A.; Bartolomej, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of experimental investigation of the two-phase steam-water coolant flow hydrodynamics within the VK-50 reactor draught section. On the basis of the analysis of the obtained data a two-phase coolant flow model in a large diameter channel is proposed. It is shown that the steam-content distribution in the volume of the draught section has a pronounced non-equilibrium character manifested in the steam migration from the periphery to the central region. A minimum value of the steam content at the periphery is attained at the 0.7-1.0 m height; it is followed by a partial steam content levelling over the section. However the total steam content levelling over the cross section of the draught section does not take place. The steam distribution in the water layer over the draught section (overflow zone) is also nonuniform over the reactor section. The non-uniform steam distribution enchances with reduction nn pressure

  8. PMK-2. Experimental study on steam generator behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezsoel, G.; Szabados, L.; Trosztel, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budabest (Hungary)

    1995-12-31

    The PMK-2 is a full pressure scaled-down model of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, with a 1:2070 scaling ratio for the volume and power. It has a steam generator model which is a vertical section of the horizontal steam generator. The model has hot and cold collectors similarly to the steam generators of the plant. The heat transfer tubes are horizontal tubes. There are 82 rows of tubes and the elevations, as well as the heat transfer surface distribution is the same as in the plant. The elevation of the feed water supply is similar to that of the plant. To study the temperature distribution in both the primary and the secondary side several thermocouples are built in, in addition to the overall instrumentation of the loop which has again a high number of measurement channels. Paper gives a description and results of SPE-4, with special respect to the steam generator behaviour in both steady state and transient conditions. Axial distribution of coolant and feedwater temperatures are given for the primary and the secondary side of hot and cold collectors and the temperature distribution in the centre of steam generator. (orig.).

  9. Thermo-hydraulic stability study of a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magni, M C; Marcel, C P; Delmastro, D F

    2012-01-01

    In this work a mathematical model developed to investigate the thermalhydraulic stability of a helically coiled steam generator is presented. Such a steam generator is prone to experiment density wave oscillations. The model is therefore used to analyze the stability of the CAREM-25 reactor steam generators. The model is linear, numerically non-diffusive and nodal. In addition, it is able to represent non-uniform heat transfer fluxes between the primary and secondary coolant circuits. By using this model the marginal stability condition is found by varying the inlet friction coefficient for different conditions. The results are then compared with those obtained with a different model for which a simple uniform heat flux profiled is assumed. It is found that with such simplification the density waves instability mechanism is overestimated in a wide range of operating powers. For very low powers, in the contrary, the so-called uniform model underestimates the stabilizing inlet friction and therefore it gives non-conservative results. With the use of the more realistic non-uniform power profile model, it was possible to determine that, for a CAREM-25 steam generator, the most stable conditions is found at 60MW when the reactor operates at nominal pressure. Moreover, it is found that at high power levels the stability performance is dominated by the two-phase friction component while at low power levels the friction component originated in the over heated steam region prevail (author)

  10. PMK-2. Experimental study on steam generator behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezsoel, G; Szabados, L; Trosztel, I [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budabest (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    The PMK-2 is a full pressure scaled-down model of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, with a 1:2070 scaling ratio for the volume and power. It has a steam generator model which is a vertical section of the horizontal steam generator. The model has hot and cold collectors similarly to the steam generators of the plant. The heat transfer tubes are horizontal tubes. There are 82 rows of tubes and the elevations, as well as the heat transfer surface distribution is the same as in the plant. The elevation of the feed water supply is similar to that of the plant. To study the temperature distribution in both the primary and the secondary side several thermocouples are built in, in addition to the overall instrumentation of the loop which has again a high number of measurement channels. Paper gives a description and results of SPE-4, with special respect to the steam generator behaviour in both steady state and transient conditions. Axial distribution of coolant and feedwater temperatures are given for the primary and the secondary side of hot and cold collectors and the temperature distribution in the centre of steam generator. (orig.).

  11. ORTURB, HTGR Steam Turbine Dynamic for FSV Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ORTURB was written specifically to calculate the dynamic behavior of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) steam turbines. The program is divided into three main parts: the driver subroutine; turbine subroutines to calculate the pressure-flow balance of the high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines; and feedwater heater subroutines. 2 - Method of solution: The program uses a relationship derived for ideal gas flow in an iterative fashion that minimizes computational time to determine the pressure and flow in the FSV steam turbines as a function of plant transient operating conditions. An important computer modeling characteristic, unique to FSV, is that the high-pressure turbine exhaust steam is used to drive the reactor core coolant circulators prior to entering the reheater. A feedwater heater dynamic simulation model utilizing seven state variables for each of the five heaters is included in the ORTURB computer simulation of the regenerative Rankine cycle steam turbines. The seven temperature differential equations are solved at each time- step using a matrix exponential method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The turbine shaft is assumed to rotate at a constant (rated) speed of 3600 rpm. Energy and mass storage of steam in the high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines is assumed to be negligible. These limitations exclude the use of ORTURB during a turbine transient such as startup from zero power or very low turbine flows

  12. Evolution of design of steam generator for sodium cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetal, S.C.; Vaidyanathan

    1997-01-01

    The first sodium cooled reactor was the experimental breeder reactor (EBR-I) in usa which was commissioned in 1951 and was incidentally the first nuclear reactor to generate electrical energy. This was followed by fast breeder reactors in USSR, UK, france, USA, japan, germany and India. The use of sodium as a coolant is due to its low moderation which helps in breeding fissile fuel from fertile materials and also its high heat transfer coefficient at comparatively low velocities. The good heat transfer properties introduce thermal stresses when there are rapid changes in the sodium temperatures. Also sodium has a chemical affinity with air and water. The steam generators for sodium cooled reactors have to allow for these novel conditions and in addition, unlike other components. Choices have to be made whether it is a recirculation type as in most fossil plants or an once through unit, the power rating, shape of the tube (straight, helical, U-tube), materials (Ferritic or austenitic), with free level of sodium or not, sodium on tube side or shell side and so on. With higher pressures and steam temperatures reheating steam after partial expansion in the turbine becomes essential as in conventional turbines. For this purpose the choice of reheating fluid viz sodium or live main steam has to be made. This paper traces the evolution of steam generator designs in the different sodium cooled reactors (chronologically) and the operation experience. 16 figs., 1 tab

  13. Steam explosion - physical foundations and relation to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, U.

    1982-08-01

    'Steam explosion' means the sudden evaporation of a fluid by heat exchange with a hotter material. Other terms are 'vapour explosion', 'thermal explosion', and 'energetic fuel-coolant interaction (FCI)'. In such an event a large fraction of the thermal energy initially stored in the hot material may possibly be converted into mechanical work. For pressurized water reactors one discusses (e.g. in risk analysis studies) a core melt-down accident during which molten fuel comes into contact with water. In the analysis of the consequences one has to investigate steam explosions. In this report an overview over the state of the knowledge is given. The overview is based on an extensive literature review. The objective of the report is to provide the basic knowledge which is required for understanding of the most important theories on the process of steam explosions. Following topics are treated: overview on steam explosion incidents, work potential, spontaneous nucleation, concept of detonation, results of some typical experiments, hydrodynamic fragmentation of drops, bubbles and jets, coarse mixtures, film-boiling, scenario of a core melt-down accident with possible steam-explosion in a pressurized water reactor. (orig.) [de

  14. Analysis of ex-vessel steam explosion with MC3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, M.; Mavko, B.

    2007-01-01

    An ex-vessel steam explosion may occur when, during a severe reactor accident, the reactor vessel fails and the molten core pours into the water in the reactor cavity. A steam explosion is a fuel coolant interaction process where the heat transfer from the melt to water is so intense and rapid that the timescale for heat transfer is shorter than the timescale for pressure relief. This can lead to the formation of shock waves and production of missiles that may endanger surrounding structures. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. In the paper, different scenarios of ex-vessel steam explosions in a typical pressurized water reactor cavity are analyzed with the code MC3D, which was developed for the simulation of fuel-coolant interactions. A comprehensive parametric study was performed varying the location of the melt release (central, left and right side melt pour), the cavity water subcooling, the primary system overpressure at vessel failure and the triggering time for explosion calculations. The main purpose of the study was to determine the most challenging ex-vessel steam explosion cases in a typical pressurized water reactor and to estimate the expected pressure loadings on the cavity walls. The performed analysis shows that for some ex-vessel steam explosion scenarios significantly higher pressure loads are predicted than obtained in the OECD programme SERENA Phase 1. (author)

  15. Method for extending the unrestricted operating range of condensing steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csaba, G.; Bannerth, Cs.

    2009-01-01

    The allowed condenser temperature of the condensing steam turbines is determined by the design parameters of the steam turbine (casing geometry, exhaust area, blade length, blade angle, blade profile etc.). The fluctuations of condenser temperature may lead to reduced power output of the condensing steam turbine. Solutions where the low pressure turbine casings have the same exhaust area can be kept in operation at narrow condenser temperature range without restrictions. Exceeding the mentioned temperature range the exhaust hood temperature restriction, undergoing the temperature range choking point restriction appears causing increased operation cost. The aim of the paper is to present a condensing steam turbine - direct-contact condenser system that can extend the unrestricted operating range. The examined system consists of more parallelly connected low pressure turbine casings so-called diabolo that having at least two exhausts separated at the steam side. The exhausts, utilizing varying input-temperature coolant, are connected to the condensers that are separated at the steam side and serially connected at the coolant side. The casings have the same inlet areas while the exhausts have different areas resulting different volume flows and temperature operating range. The economic advantage of this solution approaches the savings between the serially connected direct-contact condensers and condensers in parallel of a dry cooling system. It can be proven by a simple calculation using the ambient air temperature duration diagram that is presented in the paper. (author)

  16. Simulation of first SERENA KROTOS steam explosion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, Matjaz; Ursic, Mitja

    2009-01-01

    A steam explosion may occur when, during a severe reactor accident, the molten core comes into contact with the coolant water. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. To resolve the open issues in steam explosion understanding and modeling, the OECD program SERENA Phase 2 was launched at the end of year 2007, focusing on nuclear applications. SERENA comprises an experimental program, which is being carried out in the complementary KROTOS and TROI corium facilities, accompanied by a comprehensive analytical program, where also pre- and post-test calculations are foreseen. In the paper the sensitivity post-test calculations of the first SERENA KROTOS experiment KS-1, which were performed with the code MC3D, are presented and discussed. Since the results of the SERENA tests are restricted to SERENA members, only the various calculation results are given, not comparing them to experimental measurements. Various premixing and explosion simulations were performed on a coarse and a fine numerical mesh, applying two different jet breakup models (global, local) and varying the minimum bubble diameter in the explosion simulations (0.5 mm, 5 mm). The simulations revealed that all varied parameters have a significant influence on the calculation results, as was expected since the fuel coolant interaction process is a highly complex phenomenon. The results of the various calculations are presented in comparison and the observed differences are discussed and explained. (author)

  17. Assessment of steam explosion impact on KNGR plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Park, Soo Yong; Park, Ik Kyu

    1999-03-01

    In present day light water reactors, if complete and prolonged failure of normal and emergency coolant flow occurs, fission product decay heat could cause melting of the reactor fuel. If the molten fuel mass accumulates it may relocate into reactor lower plenum and if the lower head fails it may eventually be brought into the reactor cavity. In such course of core melt relocation, the opportunity for fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) arises as the core melt relocates into water pool in reactor vessel as well as in reactor cavity and also, as a consequence of implementing accident management strategies involving water addition to a degraded or molten core. This report presents the methodologies and their results for assessment of steam explosion impact on KNGR plant integrity. Both in-vessel and ex-vessel phenomena are addressed. For in-vessel steam explosion, TRACER-II code is used for assessment of pressure load, while bounding calculations are applied for ex-vessel analysis. Analysis shows that the integrity of reactor pressure vessel lower head is preserved during the in-vessel event and the probability that the containment integrity is challenged is very low, even when ex-vessel steam explosion is allowed due to reactor vessel failure. (Author). 15 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Assessment of steam explosion impact on KNGR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Park, Soo Yong; Park, Ik Kyu

    1999-03-01

    In present day light water reactors, if complete and prolonged failure of normal and emergency coolant flow occurs, fission product decay heat could cause melting of the reactor fuel. If the molten fuel mass accumulates it may relocate into reactor lower plenum and if the lower head fails it may eventually be brought into the reactor cavity. In such course of core melt relocation, the opportunity for fuel-coolant interactions (FCI) arises as the core melt relocates into water pool in reactor vessel as well as in reactor cavity and also, as a consequence of implementing accident management strategies involving water addition to a degraded or molten core. This report presents the methodologies and their results for assessment of steam explosion impact on KNGR plant integrity. Both in-vessel and ex-vessel phenomena are addressed. For in-vessel steam explosion, TRACER-II code is used for assessment of pressure load, while bounding calculations are applied for ex-vessel analysis. Analysis shows that the integrity of reactor pressure vessel lower head is preserved during the in-vessel event and the probability that the containment integrity is challenged is very low, even when ex-vessel steam explosion is allowed due to reactor vessel failure. (Author). 15 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  19. Safety significance of steam generator tube degradation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, G; Mignot, P [AIB-Vincotte Nuclear - AVN, Brussels (Belgium)

    1991-07-01

    Steam generator (SG) tube bundle is a part of the Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary (RCPB): this means that its integrity must be maintained. However, operating experience shows various types of tube degradation to occur in the SG tubing, which may lead to SG tube leaks or SG tube ruptures and create a loss of primary system coolant through the SG, therefore providing a direct path to the environment outside the primary containment structure. In this paper, the major types of known SG tube degradations are described and analyzed in order to assess their safety significance with regard to SG tube integrity. In conclusion: The operational reliability and the safety of the PWR steam generator s requires a sufficient knowledge of the degradation mechanisms to determine the amount of degradation that a tube can withstand and the time that it may remain in operation. They also require the availability of inspection techniques to accurately detect and characterize the various degradations. The status of understanding of the major types of degradation summarized in this paper shows and justifies why efforts are being performed to improve the management of the steam generator tube defects.

  20. French steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remond, A.

    1986-01-01

    After recalling the potential damage mode of tubes of steam generator, the author recalls the safety criteria used in France. The improvements and the process of damage prejudice and reparation for tubular bundle are presented [fr

  1. Steam purity in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkinson, J.

    1982-01-01

    Impurities enter the secondary loop of the PWR through both makeup water from lake or well and cooling-water leaks in the condenser. These impurities can be carried to the steam generator, where they cause corrosion deposits to form. Corrosion products in steam are swept further through the system and become concentrated at the point in the low-pressure turbine where steam begins to condense. Several plants have effectively reduced impurities, and therefore corrosion, by installing a demineralizer for the makeup water, a resin-bed system to clean condensed steam from the condenser, and a deaerator to remove oxygen from the water and so lower the risk of system metal oxidation. 5 references, 1 figure

  2. Liquid metal steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowodiuk, W.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid metal heated steam generator is described which in the event of a tube failure quickly exhausts out of the steam generator the products of the reaction between the water and the liquid metal. The steam is generated in a plurality of bayonet tubes which are heated by liquid metal flowing over them between an inner cylinder and an outer cylinder. The inner cylinder extends above the level of liquid metal but below the main tube sheet. A central pipe extends down into the inner cylinder with a centrifugal separator between it and the inner cylinder at its lower end and an involute deflector plate above the separator so that the products of a reaction between the liquid metal and the water will be deflected downwardly by the deflector plate and through the separator so that the liquid metal will flow outwardly and away from the central pipe through which the steam and gaseous reaction products are exhausted. (U.S.)

  3. Steam cleaning device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaki, Mikio; Muraoka, Shoichi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To clean complicated and long objects to be cleaned having a structure like that of nuclear reactor fuel assembly. Constitution: Steams are blown from the bottom of a fuel assembly and soon condensated initially at the bottom of a vertical water tank due to water filled therein. Then, since water in the tank is warmed nearly to the saturation temperature, purified water is supplied from a injection device below to the injection device above the water tank on every device. In this way, since purified water is sprayed successively from below to above and steams are condensated in each of the places, the entire fuel assembly elongated in the vertical direction can be cleaned completely. Water in the reservoir goes upward like the steam flow and is drained together with the eliminated contaminations through an overflow pipe. After the cleaning has been completed, a main steam valve is closed and the drain valve is opened to drain water. (Kawakami, Y.)

  4. Steam generator water lancing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamler, F.; Schneider, W.

    1992-01-01

    The tubesheet and tube support plate deposits in CANDU steam generators are notable for their hardness. Also notable is the wide variety of steam generator access situations. Because of the sludge hardness and the difficulty of the access, traditional water lancing processes which directed jets from the central tube free lane or from the periphery of the bundle have proven unsuitable. This has led to the need for some very unique inter tube water lancing devices which could direct powerful water jets directly onto the deposits. This type of process was applied to the upper broached plates of the Bruce A steam generators, which had become severely blocked. It has since been applied to various other steam generator situations. This paper describes the flexlance equipment development, qualification, and performance in the various CANDU applications. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  5. Nuclear reactor of pressurized liquid coolant type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor comprises a vertical concrete pressure vessel, a bell-housing having an open lower end and disposed coaxially with the interior of the pressure vessel so as to delimit therewith a space filled with gas under pressure for the thermal insulation of the internal vessel wall, a pressurizing device for putting the coolant under pressure within the bell-housing and comprising a volume of control gas in contact with a large free surface of coolant in order that an appreciable variation in volume of liquid displaced within the coolant circuit inside the bell-housing should correspond to a small variation in pressure of the control gas. 9 claims, 3 drawing figures

  6. ENVIRONMENTALLY REDUCING OF COOLANTS IN METAL CUTTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veijo KAUPPINEN

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Strained environment is a global problem. In metal industries the use of coolant has become more problematic in terms of both employee health and environmental pollution. It is said that the use of coolant forms approximately 8 - 16 % of the total production costs.The traditional methods that use coolants are now obviously becoming obsolete. Hence, it is clear that using a dry cutting system has great implications for resource preservation and waste reduction. For this purpose, a new cooling system is designed for dry cutting. This paper presents the new eco-friendly cooling innovation and the benefits gained by using this method. The new cooling system relies on a unit for ionising ejected air. In order to compare the performance of using this system, cutting experiments were carried out. A series of tests were performed on a horizontal turning machine and on a horizontal machining centre.

  7. Iron crud supply device to reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Takao.

    1993-01-01

    In a device for supplying iron cruds into reactor coolants in a BWR type power plant, a system in which feed water containing iron cruds is supplied to the reactor coolants after once passing through an ion exchange resin is disposed. As a result, iron cruds having characteristics similar with those of naturally occurring iron cruds in the plant are obtained and they react with ionic radioactivity, to form composite oxides. Then, iron cruds having high performance of being secured to the surface of a fuel cladding tube can be supplied to the reactor coolants, thereby enabling to greatly reduce the density of reactor water ionic radioactivity. In its turn, dose rate on the surface of pipelines can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce operators' radiation exposure dose in the plant. Further, contamination of a condensate desalting device due to iron cruds can be prevented, and further, the density of the iron cruds supplied can easily be controlled. (N.H.)

  8. Limits to fuel/coolant mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Moses, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    The vapor explosion process involves the mixing of fuel with coolant prior to the explosion. A number of analysts have identified limits to the amount of fuel/coolant mixing that could occur within the reactor vessel following a core melt accident. Past models are reviewed and a sim plified approach is suggested to estimate the upper limit on the amount of fuel/coolant mixing pos sible. The approach uses concepts first advanced by Fauske in a different way. The results indicat that water depth is an important parameter as well as the mixing length scale D /SUB mix/ , and for large values of D /SUB mix/ the fuel mass mixed is limited to <7% of the core mass

  9. Steam-water separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modrak, T.M.; Curtis, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The steam-water separator connected downstream of a steam generator consists of a vertical centrifugal separator with swirl blades between two concentric pipes and a cyclone separator located above. The water separated in the cyclone separator is collected in the inner tube of the centrifugal separator which is closed at the bottom. This design allows the overall height of the separator to be reduced. (DG) [de

  10. Main coolant pump testing at Ontario Hydro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartlen, R.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes Ontario Hydro Research Division's experience with a computerized data acquisition and analysis system for monitoring mechanical vibration in reactor coolant pumps. The topics covered include bench-marking of the computer system and the coolant pumps, signatures of normal and malfunctioning pumps, analysis of data collected by the monitoring system, simulation of faults, and concerns that have been expressed about data interpretation, sensor types and locations, alarm/shutdown limits and confirmation of nondestructive examination testing. This presentation consists of overheads only

  11. Comparative design study of FR plants with various coolants. 1. Studies on Na coolant FR, Pb-Bi coolant FR, gas coolant FR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konomura, Mamoru; Shimakawa, Yoshio; Hori, Toru; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Enuma, Yasuhiro; Kida, Masanori; Kasai, Shigeo; Ichimiya, Masakazu

    2001-01-01

    In Phase I of the Feasibility Studies on the Commercialized Fast Reactor (FR) Cycle System, plant designs on FR were performed with various coolants. This report describes the plant designs on FR with sodium, lead-bismuth, CO 2 gas and He gas coolants. A construction cost of 0.2 million yen/kWe was set up as a design goal. The result is as follows: The sodium reactor has a capability to obtain the goal, and lead-bismuth and gas reactors may satisfy the goal with further improvements. (author)

  12. On-Line Coolant Chemistry Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LM Bachman

    2006-01-01

    Impurities in the gas coolant of the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) can provide valuable indications of problems in the reactor and an overall view of system health. By monitoring the types and amounts of these impurities, much can be implied regarding the status of the reactor plant. However, a preliminary understanding of the expected impurities is important before evaluating prospective detection and monitoring systems. Currently, a spectroscopy system is judged to hold the greatest promise for monitoring the impurities of interest in the coolant because it minimizes the number of entry and exit points to the plant and provides the ability to detect impurities down to the 1 ppm level

  13. Leak detection device for reactor coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Koichiro.

    1990-01-01

    In a light water cooled reactor, if reactor coolants are leaked from pipelines in a pipeline chamber, activated products (N-16) are diffused together to an atmosphere in the pipeline chamber. N-16 is sucked from an extracting tube which is always sucking the atmosphere in the pipeline chamber to a sucking blower. Then, β-rays released from N-16 are monitored by a radiation monitor in a measuring chamber which is radiation-shielded from the pipeline chamber. Accordingly, since the radiation monitor can detect even slight leakage, the slight leakage of reactor coolants in the pipelines can be detected at an early stage. (I.N.)

  14. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  15. Decontamination of Steam Generator tube using Abrasive Blasting Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, B. Y.; Kim, G. N.; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, B. T.

    2010-01-01

    As a part of a technology development of volume reduction and self disposal for large metal waste project, We at KAERI and our Sunkwang Atomic Energy Safety (KAES) subcontractor colleagues are demonstrating radioactively contaminated steam generator tube by abrasive blasting technology at Kori-1 NPP. A steam generator is a crucial component in a PWR (pressurized Water Reactor). It is the crossing between the primary, contaminated, circuit and the secondary waste-steam circuit. The heat from the primary reactor coolant loop is transferred to the secondary side in thousands of small tubes. Due to several problems in the material of those tube, like SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking), insufficient control in water chemistry, which can be cause of tube leakage, more and more steam generators are replaced today. Only in Korea, already 2 of them are replaced and will be replaced in the near future. The retired 300 ton heavy Steam generator was stored at the storage waste building of Kori NPP site. The steam generator waste has a large volume, so that it is necessary to reduce its volume by decontamination. A waste reduction effect can be obtained through decontamination of the inner surface of a steam generator. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an optimum method for decontamination of the inner surface of bundle tubes. The dry abrasive blasting is a very interesting technology for the realization of three-dimensional microstructures in brittle materials like glass or silicon. Dry abrasive blasting is applicable to most surface materials except those that might be shattered by the abrasive. It is most effective on flat surface and because the abrasive is sprayed and can also applicable on 'hard to reach' areas such as inner tube ceilings or behind equipment. Abrasive decontamination techniques have been applied in several countries, including Belgium, the CIS, France, Germany, Japan, the UK and the USA

  16. ESBWR long term containment response to loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamgir, M. D.; Marquino, W.; Diaz-Quiroz, J.; Tucker, L.

    2010-01-01

    ESBWR is a 4500 MWt generation III+ natural circulation reactor with an array of robust passive safety systems to keep the reactor safe during postulated transients and accidents. With the submittal of the latest revision of the Design Control Document (DCD) to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ESBWR is nearing the completion of the US certification process. This paper focuses on the bounding licensing analysis of the long-term (30-day) response of the ESBWR containment to limiting Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) performed with the TRACG code. It is shown that using only passive systems available during the first 72 hours after the limiting Main Steam Line Break LOCA, the predicted peak containment pressure in the ESBWR containment remain well below the design limits with good margin. After 72 hours of LOCA initiation, PCCS Vent Fans (non-safety system) become available that remove non-condensable gases from, and further enhance the effectiveness of, PCCS heat exchangers to reduce the containment pressure and temperature to values substantially below the design limits. During the post- 72 hour period, the beneficial effects of the Vent Fan operation, combined with the available operator action to refill of PCCS pools, continue to maintain the containment pressure to about 30% below the design limit at 30 days after a limiting ESBWR LOCA. (authors)

  17. Method for Calculation of Steam-Compression Heat Transformers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zditovetckaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a method for joint numerical analysis of cycle parameters and heatex-change equipment of steam-compression heat transformer contour that takes into account a non-stationary operational mode and irreversible losses in devices and pipeline contour. The method has been realized in the form of the software package and can be used while making design or selection of a heat transformer with due account of a coolant and actual equipment being included in its structure.The paper presents investigation results revealing influence of pressure loss in an evaporator and a condenser from the side of the coolant caused by a friction and local resistance on power efficiency of the heat transformer which is operating in the mode of refrigerating and heating installation and a thermal pump. Actually obtained operational parameters of the thermal pump in the nominal and off-design operatinal modes depend on the structure of the concrete contour equipment.

  18. Safety analysis of increase in heat removal from reactor coolant system with inadvertent operation of passive residual heat removal at no load conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Ge; Cao, Xuewu [School of Mechanical and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    The advanced passive pressurized water reactor (PWR) is being constructed in China and the passive residual heat removal (PRHR) system was designed to remove the decay heat. During accident scenarios with increase of heat removal from the primary coolant system, the actuation of the PRHR will enhance the cooldown of the primary coolant system. There is a risk of power excursion during the cooldown of the primary coolant system. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the thermal hydraulic behavior of the reactor coolant system (RCS) at this condition. The advanced passive PWR model, including major components in the RCS, is built by SCDAP/RELAP5 code. The thermal hydraulic behavior of the core is studied for two typical accident sequences with PRHR actuation to investigate the core cooling capability with conservative assumptions, a main steam line break (MSLB) event and inadvertent opening of a steam generator (SG) safety valve event. The results show that the core is ultimately shut down by the boric acid solution delivered by Core Makeup Tank (CMT) injections. The effects of CMT boric acid concentration and the activation delay time on accident consequences are analyzed for MSLB, which shows that there is no consequential damage to the fuel or reactor coolant system in the selected conditions.

  19. Composition and concentration of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant of the reactor primary cooling system of the Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Garcia Rodenas, Luis; La Gamma, Ana M.; Villegas, Marina; Fernandez, Alberto N.; Allemandi, Walter; Manera, Raul; Rosales, Hugo

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants type PWR and PHWR (pressurized water reactor and pressurized heavy water reactor) have three coolant circuits which only exchange energy among them. The primary circuit, whose coolant extracts the reactor energy, the secondary circuit or water-steam cycle and the tertiary circuit which could be lake, river or sea water. The chemistry of the primary and secondary coolants is carefully controlled with the aim of minimizing the corrosion of structural materials. However, very low rates of corrosion are inevitable and one of the consequences of the corrosion processes is the presence of soluble and particulate matter in the coolant from where several problems associated with mass transfer arisen. In this way radioactive nuclides are transported out of the core to the steam generators, hydraulic resistance increases and heat transfer capability degrades. In the present paper some alternative techniques are proposed for the quantification of both, the particulate and soluble matter present in the coolant and their correspondent composition. Some results are also included and discussed. (author)

  20. Steam generator design requirements for ACR-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subash, S.; Hau, K.

    2006-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the ACR-1000 (Advanced CANDU Reactor-1000 ) to meet market expectations for enhanced safety of plant operation, high capacity factor, low operating cost, increased operating life, simple component replacement, reduced capital cost, and shorter construction schedule. The ACR-1000 design is based on the use of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, the same feature as in all CANDU reactors. The major innovation in the ACR-1000 is the use of low enriched uranium fuel, and light water as the coolant, which circulates in the fuel channels. This results in a compact reactor core design and a reduction of heavy water inventory, both contributing to a significant decrease in capital cost per MWe produced. The ACR-1000 plant is a two-unit, integrated plant with each unit having a nominal gross output of about 1165 MWe with a net output of approximately 1085 MWe. The plant design is adaptable to a single unit configuration, if required. This paper focuses on the technical considerations that went into developing some of the important design requirements for the steam generators for the ACR-1000 plant and how these requirements are specified in the Technical Specification, which is the governing document for the steam generator (SG) detail design. Layout of these SGs in the plant is briefly described and their impacts on the SG design. (author)

  1. Steam leak detection in advance reactors via acoustics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raj Kumar; Rao, A. Rama

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Steam leak detection system is developed to detect any leak inside the reactor vault. → The technique uses leak noise frequency spectrum for leak detection. → Testing of system and method to locate the leak is also developed and discussed in present paper. - Abstract: Prediction of LOCA (loss of coolant activity) plays very important role in safety of nuclear reactor. Coolant is responsible for heat transfer from fuel bundles. Loss of coolant is an accidental situation which requires immediate shut down of reactor. Fall in system pressure during LOCA is the trip parameter used for initiating automatic reactor shut down. However, in primary heat transport system operating in two phase regimes, detection of small break LOCA is not simple. Due to very slow leak rates, time for the fall of pressure is significantly slow. From reactor safety point of view, it is extremely important to find reliable and effective alternative for detecting slow pressure drop in case of small break LOCA. One such technique is the acoustic signal caused by LOCA in small breaks. In boiling water reactors whose primary heat transport is to be driven by natural circulation, small break LOCA detection is important. For prompt action on post small break LOCA, steam leak detection system is developed to detect any leak inside the reactor vault. The detection technique is reliable and plays a very important role in ensuring safety of the reactor. Methodology developed for steam leak detection is discussed in present paper. The methods to locate the leak is also developed and discussed in present paper which is based on analysis of the signal.

  2. Primary coolant feed and bleed operating regions for the Midland Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Operating regions for primary coolant feed and bleed cooling are developed for the Midland Plant using core decay heat, the high-pressure injection (HPI) system capacity, and flow rate relief through the power-operated relief valve (PORV). This mode of cooling is used for accident scenarios in which the normal core cooling means of a nuclear power plant is lost because of loss of water inventory in the steam generators. The HPI flow is based on the capacities of one and two pumps. Saturated steam, saturated water, and subcooled water are considered to be possible states of the fluid being relieved through the PORV. In estimating the PORV relief rate, flow equations are derived from the Electric Power Research Institute test data obtained from the same model and size valve that is used in the Midland Plant. For easy reference by operators, the operating region is displayed on a plane of reactor coolant system pressure and temperature. The technique developed for the Midland Plant provides a convenient method for examining the feed and bleed cooling capability for a nuclear power plant that employs a pressurized water reactor system

  3. Coolant cleanup system for BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Araki, Hidefumi.

    1993-01-01

    The cleanup system of the present invention removes impurity ions and floating materials accumulated in a reactor during evaporation of coolants in the nuclear reactor. That is, coolants pass pipelines from a pressure vessel using pressure difference between a high pressure in the pressure vessel and a low pressure at the upstream of a condensate filtration/desalting device of a condensate/feed water system as a driving source, during which cations and floating materials are removed in a high temperature filtration/desalting device and coolants flow into the condensate/feedwater system. Impurities containing anions are removed here by the condensates filtration/desalting device. Then, they return to the pressure vessel while pressurized and heated by a condensate pump, a feed water pump and a feed water heater. At least pumps, a heat exchanger for heating, a filtration/desalting device for removing anions and pipelines connecting them used exclusively for the coolant cleanup system are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  4. Fission product release into the primary coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The analytic evaluation of steady state primary coolant activity is discussed. The reported calculations account for temperature dependent fuel failure in two particle types and arbitrary radioactive decay chains. A matrix operator technique implemented in the SUVIUS code is used to solve the simultaneous equations. Results are compared with General Atomic Company's published results

  5. In-service inspection of nuclear reactor vessels and steam generators. Results and evolution of the technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapin, Michel; Saglio, Robert.

    1978-01-01

    Methods and original technics have been developed by the CEA for inspection of the primary coolant circuit of PWR. Multifrequency Eddy currents for inspection of steam generators tubes gudgeons and bolts; focussed ultrasonics to test all the welds of the reactor vessel and its cover of mixed welds of tanks and steam generators, pressurizer welds and gudgeons from the inside; gamma radiography of vessel mixed welds, televisual examination of the stainless steel lining of the reactor vessel and its cover. Use of these technics is made with specific automatic machines designed either for inspection of steam generator tubes or for complete inspection of the vessel. Several reactors were inspected with these devices [fr

  6. On the method of heat exchange calculation for critical and postcritical regimes in sodium-water steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudasko, V.V.; Kardash, D.Yu.; Grachev, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for calculating heat exchange in sodium-water steam generators with provisions for steam-water flow non-equilibrium character and moisture additional evaporation in pipes is suggested. Zone of heat exchange crisis representing the zone of transition from developed boiling to postcritical zone is considered. Comparison of estimated and experimental data performed for the following ranges of steame generator parameters: pressure p=7.8-14.0 MPa, coolant flow rate ρw=350-1000 kg/(m 2 xs), inlet sodium temperature T=590-825 K shows their good agreement

  7. Dual turbine power plant and a reheat steam bypass flow control system for use therein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegtnes, K.O.

    1977-01-01

    An electric power plant having dual turbine-generators connected to a steam source that includes a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is described. Each turbine comprises a high pressure portion operated by superheat steam and an intermediate-low pressure portion operated by reheat steam; a bypass line is connected across each turbine portion to permit a desired minimum flow of steam from the source at times when the combined flow of steam through the turbine is less than the minimum. Coolant gas is propelled through the reactor by a circulator which is driven by an auxiliary turbine which uses steam exhausted from the high pressure portions and their bypass lines. The pressure of the reheat steam is controlled by a single proportional-plus-integral controller which governs the steam flow through the bypass lines associated with the intermediate-low pressure portions. At times when the controller is not in use its output signal is limited to a value that permits an unbiased response when pressure control is resumed, as in event of a turbine trip. 25 claims, 2 figures

  8. A single-stage high pressure steam injector for next generation reactors: test results and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattadori, G.; Galbiati, L.; Mazzocchi, L.; Vanini, P.

    1995-01-01

    Steam injectors can be used in advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for high pressure makeup water supply; this solution seems to be very attractive because of the ''passive'' features of steam injectors, that would take advantage of the available energy from primary steam without the introduction of any rotating machinery. The reference application considered in this work is a high pressure safety injection system for a BWR; a water flow rate of about 60 kg/s to be delivered against primary pressures covering a quite wide range up to 9 MPa is required. Nevertheless, steam driven water injectors with similar characteristics could be used to satisfy the high pressure core coolant makeup requirements of next generation PWRs. With regard to BWR application, an instrumented steam injector prototype with a flow rate scaling factor of about 1:6 has been built and tested. The tested steam injector operates at a constant inlet water pressure (about 0.2 MPa) and inlet water temperature ranging from 15 to 37 o C, with steam pressure ranging from 2.5 to 8.7 MPa, always fulfilling the discharge pressure target (10% higher than steam pressure). To achieve these results an original double-overflow flow rate-control/startup system has been developed. (Author)

  9. Long-term security of electrical and control engineering equipment in nuclear power stations to withstand a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and control engineering equipment, which has to function even after many years of operation in the event of a fault in a saturated steam atmosphere of 160 C maximum, is essential in nuclear power stations in order to control a loss of coolant accident. The nuclear power station operators have, for this purpose, developed verification strategies for groups of components, by means of which it is ensured that the electrical and control engineering components are capable of dealing with a loss of coolant accident even at the end of their planned operating life. (orig.) [de

  10. Laboratory simulation of rod-to-rod mechanical interactions during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents in a PWR involving cladding oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.; Haste, T.J.; Harrison, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Creep deformation of Zircaloy cladding in postulated PWR loss-of-coolant accidents may lead to rod-to-rod mechanical interactions. Tests have been performed in the electrically heated FOURSQUARE rig at 750 0 C and 850 0 C in steam to investigate this effect. Conservatisms inherent in a simple 'square with rounded corners' coolant channel blockage model have been quantified; about 5-10% flow area may remain even at strains which in ideal circumstances would give total blockage. Reduction of average burst strains produced by an oxide layer (up to 13 μm) has been demonstrated, resulting from strain concentration at oxide cracks. (author)

  11. Thermal Behavior of the Coolant in the Emergency Cooldown Tank for an Integral Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hyung; Kim, Seok; Kim, Woo Shik; Jung, Seo Yoon; Kim, Young In [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) is one of the passive safety systems which should be activated after an accident to remove the residual heat from the core and the sensible heat of the reactor coolant system (RCS) through the steam generators until the safe shutdown conditions are reached. In the previous study presented at the last KNS Autumn Meeting, transient behavior of the RCS temperature and the cooling performance of the PRHRS were investigated numerically by using newly developed in-house code based on MATLAB software. By using the program, the steady-state and transient (quasi-steady state) characteristics during the operation of the PRHRS had been reported. In this program, the temperature of the coolant in the Emergency Cooldown Tank (ECT) was assumed to be constant at saturated state and pool boiling heat transfer mechanism was applied through the entire time domain. The coolant of the ECT reached at a saturated state in early time. It was revealed that the assumption made in the previous study was reasonable.

  12. Rupture behaviour of nuclear fuel cladding during loss-of-coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suman, Siddharth [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Khan, Mohd Kaleem, E-mail: mkkhan@iitp.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Pathak, Manabendra [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Patna 801 103 (India); Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K. [Mechanical Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Modelling of nuclear fuel cladding during loss-of-coolant accident transient. • Phase transformation, corrosion, and creep combined to evaluate burst criterion. • Effect of oxygen concentration on burst stress and burst strain. • Effect of heating rate, internal pressure fluctuation, shear modulus incorporated. - Abstract: A burst criterion model accounting the simultaneous phenomena of corrosion, solute-strengthening effect of oxygen, oxygen concentration based non-isothermal phase transformation, and thermal creep has been developed to predict the rupture behaviour of zircaloy-4 nuclear fuel cladding during the loss-of-coolant accident transients. The present burst criterion model has been validated using experimental data obtained from single-rod transient burst tests performed in steam environment. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed computational analysis has been performed to assess the role of different parameters in the rupture of zircaloy cladding during loss-of-coolant accidents. This model reveals that at low temperatures, lower heating rates produce higher burst strains as oxidation effect is nominal. For high temperatures, the lower heating rates produce less burst strains, whereas higher heating rates yield greater burst strains.

  13. Distribution and behavior of tritium in the Coolant-Salt Technology Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Smith, A.N.; Engel, J.R.

    1977-04-01

    A 1000-MW(e) Molten-Salt Breeder Reactor (MSBR) is expected to produce 2420 Ci/day of tritium. As much as 60 percent of the tritium produced may be transported to the reactor steam system (assuming no retention by the secondary coolant salt), where it would be released to the environment. Such a release rate would be unacceptable. Experiments were conducted in an engineering-scale facility--the Coolant-Salt Technology Facility (CSTF)--to examine the potential of sodium fluoroborate, the proposed coolant salt for an MSBR, for sequestering tritium. The salt was believed to contain chemical species capable of trapping tritium. A series of 5 experiments--3 transient and 2 steady-state experiments--was conducted from July of 1975 through June of 1976 where tritium was added to the CSTF. The CSTF circulated sodium fluoroborate at temperatures and pressures typical of MSBR operating conditions. Results from the experiments indicated that over 90 percent of tritium added at steady-state conditions was trapped by sodium fluoroborate and appeared in the off-gas system in a chemically combined (water-soluble) form and that a total of approximately 98 percent of the tritium added at steady-state conditions was removed through the off-gas system overall

  14. The impact of NPP Krsko steam generator tube plugging on minimum DNBR at nominal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajtman, S.

    1996-01-01

    Typically, steam generator tube plugging (SGTP) both decreases the reactor coolant system (RCS) flow rate and the heat transfer surface area of the steam generator. At a constant thermal power and vessel outlet temperature, as tube plugging increases, the vessel average temperature, vessel inlet temperature and steam generator secondary side steam pressure decrease. This paper presents the analysis of impact of SGTP on Minimum Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (MDNBR) at NPP Krsko (NEK), using the Improved Thermal Design Procedure (ITDP), WRB-1 correlation, and COBRA-III-C computer code. No credit was given to high plugging percentage region power reduction resulting from turbine volumetric flow limitations. MDNBR is found to be decreasing with increasing plugging, but not under the limiting values. (author)

  15. PACTEL: Experiments on the behaviour of the new horizontal steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhia, J.; Riikonen, V.; Purhonen, H. [VTT Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Experiments were performed to study the behaviour of the PACTEL facility, a medium scale integral test loop simulating VVER 440 pressurized water reactors. The study focused on the operation of the new horizontal steam generator model installed in PACTEL. Three experiments were conducted: a small-break test to observe the steam generator behaviour over a range of primary coolant inventories, a hot leg loop seal experiment to study the cyclic behaviour of a loop seal and a loss of secondary side feedwater test to examine the effect of uncovered tubes in the steam generator. A reverse flow was observed in the lower part of the U-tube bundle of the steam generator during natural circulation. The flow reversal point dropped when the tubes uncovered, during secondary inventory reduction. (orig.). 5 refs.

  16. Fast reactor fuel failures and steam generator leaks: Transient and accident analysis approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This report consists of a survey of activities on transient and accident analysis for the LMFR. It is focused on the following subjects: Fuel transient tests and analyses in hypothetical incident/accident situations; sodium-water interaction in steam generators, and sodium fires: test and analyses. There are also sections dealing with the experimental and analytical studies of: fuel subassembly failures; sodium boiling, molten fuel-coolant interaction; molten material movement and relocation in fuel bundles; heat removal after an accident or incident; sodium-water reaction in steam generator; steam generator protection systems; sodium-water contact in steam generator building; fire-fighting methods and systems to deal with sodium fires. Refs, figs, tabs

  17. PACTEL: Experiments on the behaviour of the new horizontal steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouhia, J; Riikonen, V; Purhonen, H [VTT Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Experiments were performed to study the behaviour of the PACTEL facility, a medium scale integral test loop simulating VVER 440 pressurized water reactors. The study focused on the operation of the new horizontal steam generator model installed in PACTEL. Three experiments were conducted: a small-break test to observe the steam generator behaviour over a range of primary coolant inventories, a hot leg loop seal experiment to study the cyclic behaviour of a loop seal and a loss of secondary side feedwater test to examine the effect of uncovered tubes in the steam generator. A reverse flow was observed in the lower part of the U-tube bundle of the steam generator during natural circulation. The flow reversal point dropped when the tubes uncovered, during secondary inventory reduction. (orig.). 5 refs.

  18. Design of segmental ultrasonic cleaning equipment for removing the sludge in a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Woo Tae; Byeon, Min Suk; Lee, Ho One

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, the water in the coolant system is managed to be clean but metallic sludge is accumulated on the top of tube-sheet in a steam generator. The sludge causes the corrosion of the tubesheet. The electric utility company in Korea removes the sludge with a lancing system for every outage of nuclear power plants. But the sludge is not perfectly removed with lancing system because the pressurized water of the lancing system cannot reach all area in a steam generator. Therefore the steam generator cleaning system with ultrasonic energy has been developed in KEPCO Research Institute. In this paper, the ultrasonic cleaning system is designed for removing the sludge on the steam generator

  19. Analysis of Coolant Options for Advanced Metal Cooled Nuclear Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Can, Levent

    2006-01-01

    .... The overall focus of this study is the build up of induced radioactivity in the coolant of metal cooled reactors as well as the evaluation of other physical and chemical properties of such coolants...

  20. Investigation of a steam generator tube rupture sequence using VICTORIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixler, N.E.; Erickson, C.M.; Schaperow, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    VICTORIA-92 is a mechanistic computer code for analyzing fission product behavior within the reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe reactor accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radionuclides and nonradioactive materials from the core and transport of these materials within the RCS. The modeling accounts for the chemical and aerosol processes that affect radionuclide behavior. Coupling of detailed chemistry and aerosol packages is a unique feature of VICTORIA; it allows exploration of phenomena involving deposition, revaporization, and re-entrainment that cannot be resolved with other codes. The purpose of this work is to determine the attenuation of fission products in the RCS and on the secondary side of the steam generator in an accident initiated by a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR). As a class, bypass sequences have been identified in NUREG-1150 as being risk dominant for the Surry and Sequoyah pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants

  1. Steam generator arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ssinegurski, E.

    1981-01-01

    A steam flow path arrangement for covering the walls of the rear gas pass of a steam generator is disclosed. The entire flow passes down the sidewalls with a minor portion then passing up through the rear wall to a superheater inlet header at an intermediate elevation. The major portion of the flow passes up the front wall and through hanger tubes to a roof header. From there the major portion passes across the roof and down the rear wall to the superheater inlet header at the intermediate elevation

  2. Symposium on operational and environmental issues concerning use of water as a coolant in power plants and industries: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-12-01

    The symposium is organised to bring together researchers, plant operators and regulatory agencies working in the area of operational and environmental problems associated with use of water as a coolant in power plants and other allied industries. The symposium targets chemists, biologists, environmental scientists, power plant operating engineers and plant designers working in various academic, governmental and non-governmental organisations. The major themes of the symposium are: water chemistry of coolant systems in power plants and other industries, chemistry of primary and moderator systems in nuclear power plants and research reactors, corrosion issues including Flow-Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) and its control in water coolant systems, chemistry of steam and water at elevated temperature in nuclear power plants, once through steam generator chemistry, industrial fire water systems, ion-exchange purification, innovative water treatment in power and industrial units, chemical cleaning and chemical decontamination, biofouling and biocorrosion, cooling water treatment chemicals and their environmental fate and environmental impact of thermal effluents. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  3. Steam generator sludge removal apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schafer, B.W.; Werner, C.E.; Klahn, F.C.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates to equipment for cleaning steam generators and in particular to a high pressure fluid lance for cleaning sludge off the steam generator tubes away from an open tube lane. 6 figs

  4. Study of steam, helium and supercritical CO2 turbine power generations in prototype fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Shintaro; Muto, Yasushi; Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nishio, Satoshi; Hayashi, Takumi; Nomoto, Yasunobu

    2008-01-01

    Power generation systems such as steam turbine cycle, helium turbine cycle and supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) turbine cycle are examined for the prototype nuclear fusion reactor. Their achievable cycle thermal efficiencies are revealed to be 40%, 34% and 42% levels for the heat source outlet coolant temperature of 480degC, respectively, if no other restriction is imposed. In the current technology, however, low temperature divertor heat source is included. In this actual case, the steam turbine system and the S-CO 2 turbine system were compared in the light of cycle efficiency and plant cost. The values of cycle efficiency were 37.7% and 36.4% for the steam cycle and S-CO 2 cycle, respectively. The construction cost was estimated by means of component volume. The volume became 16,590 m 3 and 7240 m 3 for the steam turbine system and S-CO 2 turbine system, respectively. In addition, separation of permeated tritium from the coolant is much easier in S-CO 2 than in H 2 O. Therefore, the S-CO 2 turbine system is recommended to the fusion reactor system than the steam turbine system. (author)

  5. Failures of fine tubes of steam generators and the essential defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Shinji; Ebisawa, Toru; Sato, Susumu.

    1976-01-01

    Light water reactors were sold to Japan as their economy and safety have been established, but the average availability of 11 reactors in Japan during 7 year operation is only 53%, and it is being proved that there are questions in the safety and economy. In this report, the failures of fine tubes of steam generators are discussed from the standpoint of the corrosion of materials. First, the functions and construction of the fine tubes of steam generators in PWRs are explained. The failures of the fine tubes of steam generators became frequent since the beginning of 1970s as large capacity nuclear power stations have started the operation. When the fine tubes are pierced with holes during operation and the radioactivity in primary coolant leaks into secondary coolant, it is detected with radioactivity monitors. In order to find out the broken tubes, eddy current flaw detectors are used, and the tubes on which flaws were detected we plugged by explosion welding. In these works, many manual operations are included, and the radiation exposure of workers and the difficulties in the operations are the problems. The cases of the tube failures in Japan and foreign countries, the causes and the countermeasures are described. Chemical corrosion, thermal stress cycle, shaving off due to eddy flow, and stress corrosion are the probable causes. The safety of steam generators is essentially in extremely poor state. The seriousness of the tube failures in steam generators is emphasized. (Kako, I.)

  6. Steam generators - problems and prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.

    1997-05-01

    Steam-generator problems, largely a consequence of corrosion and fouling, have resulted in increased inspection requirements and more regulatory attention to steam-generator integrity. In addition, utilities have had to develop steam-generator life-management strategies, including cleaning and replacement, to achieve design life. This paper summarizes the pertinent data to 1993/1994, and presents an overview of current steam-generator management practices. (author)

  7. Fragmentation of low-melting metals by collapsing steam bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, R.

    1979-08-01

    When a hot melt meets a vaporable liquid of lower temperature, explosive vaporisation of the cooler liquid may be the result. This is called a steam explosion if a substantial amount of thermal energy is converted into mechanical energy. One important step in understanding about steam explosions is to explain the surface increase of the hot melt. There are several competing fragmentation hypotheses, but so far there has been no model to describe fragmentation criteria as well as the time curve of surface increase on the basis of physical processes. An overall model is now given for one of the possible fragmentation mechanisms, i.e. the division of the melt by collapsing steam bubbles. The model estimates the surface increase of the melt on the basis of heavy supercooled boiling, the heat transfer connected with it, the transfer of mechanical energy during steam bubble collapse, and the solidification of the melt. The results of the calculations have shown that basic experimental observations, e.g. time and extent of fragmentation, are well presented in the model with regard to their order of magnitude. The model presents a qualitatively correct description of the effects of important influencing factors, e.g. supercooling of the coolant or initial temperature of the melt. (orig.) [de

  8. The decommissioning of the BR3 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denissen, L.

    2006-01-01

    A steam generator is a crucial component in a PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). It is the crossing between the primary, contaminated, circuit and the secondary water-steam circuit. The heat from the primary reactor coolant loop is transferred to the secondary side in thousands of small tubes. Due to several problems in the material of those tubes, like SCC (Stress Corrosion Cracking), insufficient control in water chemistry, which can be the cause of tube leakage, more and more steam generators are replaced today. Only in Belgium, already 17 of them are replaced. The old 300 ton heavy SGs are stored at the 2 nuclear power plants of Doel and Tihange . While it was foreseen in the BR3 strategy to dismantle the steam generator (only 30 ton), we took the opportunity to search for a complete package in the decommissioning of a steam generator. The complete management consists of a decontamination of the primary side followed by the complete dismantling. The first step, the decontamination with MEDOC (water box + tube bundle) has already been achieved in 2002. It has led to an important DF (Decontamination Factor) between 100 and 1000 and an important dose rate reduction. This hard chemical decontamination process has been described earlier in the scientific report 2002 (The BR3 steam generator decontamination with the MEDOC process - M. Ponnet). The second step, the complete dismantling of the SG has been executed in 2005. With the BR3 SG, the main goal was to dismantle it in a safe way and to free release a maximum of material. We've used two cutting tools to perform the job: A HPWJC (High Pressure Water Jet Cutting) tool in combination with a hydraulic robot and a water cooled diamond cable. The last technique was done in close collaboration with the external company Husqvarna. It was important to have an idea of the performance, the efficiency of the cable and the quantity and the type of secondary waste

  9. Oxidation of zircaloy-2 in high temperature steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Seiichi; Ito, Goro; Ohashi, Shigeo

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation tests were conducted for zircaloy-2 in steam at temperature ranging from 900 to 1300 0 C to clarify its oxidation kinetics as a nuclear fuel cladding materials in case of a loss-of-coolant accident. The influence of maximum temperature and heating rate of the specimen on its oxidation rate in steam was investigated. The changes in mechanical properties of the specimens after oxidation tests are also studied. The results obtained were summarized as follows: (1) The weight of the specimen after oxidation in steam increased two times as the time required to reach the maximum temperature increased from 1 to 10 mins. (2) The kinetics of oxidation of zircaloy-2 in steam were not affected by the difference in the surface condition before test such as chemical polishing or pre-oxidation in steam. (3) The dominant growth of oxide film on the surface of zircaloy-2 was observed at the initial stage of oxidation in steam. However, the thickness of oxygen-rich solid solution layer under the film increased gradually with the progress of oxidation and the ratio of oxygen in oxide to that in solid solution has a constant value of 8:2. (4) The breakaway took place only in the specimen subjected to 900 0 C repeated heating. This penomenon was caused by the local growth of the oxide below a crack of the oxide film resulting from the reheating of the specimen. (5) The results of bending tests showed that the deflection until fracture of the specimen was smaller for the one heated at a higher temperature even if the weight increase was of the same order of magnitude for both specimens. (6) It was concluded that the ductility of zircaloy-2 decreased remarkably at a heating temperature in excess of 1100 0 C for more than 5 min. (auth.)

  10. Effect of steam quality on two—phase flow in a netural circulation loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾海军; 吴少融; 等

    1996-01-01

    Test pressures are 1.0-4.0MPa,heating powers 27-190kW,inlet subcoolings 5-80℃,water used as coolant,and steam quality at the outlet of test section is less than 0.05,These test conditions cover the parameters for a typical 200MW heating reactor.The experimental results show that the stema quality is the dominant factor in a natural circulation system with low pressure and low steam quality about the effect of system pressure,heating power and inlet subcooling on the flow rate,relative oscilatroy amplitude and oscilatory region of flow rate.

  11. Development of a nuclear steam generator system for gas-cooled reactors for application in oil sands extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.; Hart, R.; Lazic, L.

    2009-01-01

    Canada has vast energy reserves in the Oil Sands regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Present extraction technologies, such as strip mining, where oil deposits are close to the surface, and Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) technologies for deeper deposits consume significant amounts of energy to produce the bitumen and upgraded synthetic crude oil. Studies have been performed to assess the feasibility of using nuclear reactors as primary energy sources to produce, in particular the steam required for the SAGD deeper deposit extraction process. Presently available reactors fall short of meeting the requirements, in two areas: the steam produced in a 'standard' reactor is too low in pressure and temperature for the SAGD process. Requirements can be for steam as high as 12MPa pressure with superheat; and, 'standard' reactors are too large in total output. Ideally, reactors of output in the range of 400 to 500 MWth, in modules are better suited to Oil Sands applications. The above two requirements can be met using gas-cooled reactors. Generally, newer generation gas-cooled reactors have been designed for power generation, using Brayton Cycle gas turbines run directly from the heated reactor coolant (helium). Where secondary steam is required, heat recovery steam generators have been used. In this paper, a steam generating system is described which uses the high temperature helium from the reactor directly for steam generation purposes, with sufficient quantities of steam produced to allow for SAGD steam injection, power generation using a steam turbine-generator, and with potential secondary energy supply for other purposes such as hydrogen production for upgrading, and environmental remediation processes. It is assumed that the reactors will be in one central location, run by a utility type organization, providing process steam and electricity to surrounding Oil Sands projects, so steam produced is at very high pressure (12 MPa), with superheat, in order to

  12. Revised Mark 22 coolant temperature coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Coolant temperature coefficients for the Mark 22 charge published previously are non-conservative because of the neglect of a significant mechanism which has a positive contribution to reactivity. Even after correcting for this effect, dynamic tests made on a Mark VIB charge in the early 60's suggest the results are still non-conservative. This memorandum takes both of these sources of information into account in making a best estimate of the prompt (coolant plus metal) temperature coefficient. Although no safety issues arise from this work (the overall temperature coefficient still strongly contributes to reactor stability), it is obviously desirable to use best estimates for prompt coefficients in limits and other calculations

  13. Freeform Deposition Method for Coolant Channel Closeout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul R. (Inventor); Reynolds, David Christopher (Inventor); Walker, Bryant H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating a coolant channel closeout jacket on a structure having coolant channels formed in an outer surface thereof. A line of tangency relative to the outer surface is defined for each point on the outer surface. Linear rows of a metal feedstock are directed towards and deposited on the outer surface of the structure as a beam of weld energy is directed to the metal feedstock so-deposited. A first angle between the metal feedstock so-directed and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 20-90.degree.. The beam is directed towards a portion of the linear rows such that less than 30% of the cross-sectional area of the beam impinges on a currently-deposited one of the linear rows. A second angle between the beam and the line of tangency is maintained in a range of 5-65 degrees.

  14. CAREM-25: considerations about primary coolant chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; Villegas, Marina

    2000-01-01

    World operating experience, in conjunction with basic studies has been modifying chemistry specifications for the primary coolant of water cooled nuclear reactors along with the reactor type and structural materials involved in the design. For the reactor CAREM-25, the following sources of information have been used: 1) Experience gained by the Chemistry Department of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA, Argentina); 2) Participation of the Chemistry Department (CNEA) in international cooperation projects; 3) Guidelines given by EPRI, Siemens-KWU, AECL, etc. Given the main objectives: materials integrity, low radiation levels and personnel safety, which are in turn a balance between the lowest corrosion and activity transport achievable and considering that the CAREM-25 is a pressurized vessel integrated reactor, a group of guidelines for the chemistry and additives for the primary coolant have been given in the present work. (author)

  15. Recovery studies for plutonium machining oil coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, J.D.; Baldwin, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    Lathe coolant oil, contaminated with plutonium and having a carbon tetrachloride diluent, is generated in plutonium machining areas at Rocky Flats. A research program was initiated to determine the nature of plutonium in this mixture of oil and carbon tetrachloride. Appropriate methods then could be developed to remove the plutonium and to recycle the oil and carbon tetrachloride. Studies showed that the mixtures of spent oil and carbon tetrachloride contained particulate plutonium and plutonium species that are soluble in water or in oil and carbon tetrachloride. The particulate plutonium was removed by filtration; the nonfilterable plutonium was removed by adsorption on various materials. Laboratory-scale tests indicated the lathe-coolant oil mixture could be separated by distilling the carbon tetrachloride to yield recyclable products

  16. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  17. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  18. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  19. Additional requirements for leak-before-break application to primary coolant piping in Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, G. [AIB Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium)

    1997-04-01

    Leak-Before-Break (LBB) technology has not been applied in the first design of the seven Pressurized Water Reactors the Belgian utility is currently operating. The design basis of these plants required to consider the dynamic effects associated with the ruptures to be postulated in the high energy piping. The application of the LBB technology to the existing plants has been recently approved by the Belgian Safety Authorities but with a limitation to the primary coolant loop. LBB analysis has been initiated for the Doel 3 and Tihange 2 plants to allow the withdrawal of some of the reactor coolant pump snubbers at both plants and not reinstall some of the restraints after steam generator replacement at Doel 3. LBB analysis was also found beneficial to demonstrate the acceptability of the primary components and piping to the new conditions resulting from power uprating and stretch-out operation. LBB analysis has been subsequently performed on the primary coolant loop of the Tihange I plant and is currently being performed for the Doel 4 plant. Application of the LBB to the primary coolant loop is based in Belgium on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. However the Belgian Safety Authorities required some additional analyses and put some restrictions on the benefits of the LBB analysis to maintain the global safety of the plant at a sufficient level. This paper develops the main steps of the safety evaluation performed by the Belgian Safety Authorities for accepting the application of the LBB technology to existing plants and summarizes the requirements asked for in addition to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission rules.

  20. Evaluation of stress histories of reactor coolant loop piping for pipe rupture prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, S.C.; Larder, R.A.; Ma, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the analyses used to evaluate stress histories in the primary coolant loop piping of a selected four-loop PNR power station. In order to make the simulation as realistic as possible, best estimates rather than conservative assumptions were considered throughout. The best estimate solution, however, was aided by a sensitivity study to assess the possible variation of outcomes resulted from uncertainties associated with these assumptions. Sources of stresses considered in the evaluation were pressure, dead weight, thermal expansion, thermal gradients through the pipe wall, residual welding, pump vibrations, and finally seismic excitations. The best estimates of pressure and thermal transient histories arising from plant operations were based on actual plant operation records supplemented by specified plant design conditions. Seismic motions were generated from response spectrum curves developed specifically for the region surrounding the plant site. Stresses due to dead weight and thermal expansion were computed from a three dimensional finite element model which used a combination of pipe, truss, and beam elements to represent the coolant loop piping, the pressure vessel, coolant pumps, steam generators, and the pressurizer. Stresses due to pressure and thermal gradients were obtained by closed form solutions. Seismic stress calculations considered the soil structure interaction, the coupling effect between the containment structure and the reactor coolant system. A time history method was employed for the seismic analysis. Calculations of residual stresses accounted for the actual heat impact, welding speed, weld preparation geometry, and pre- and post-heat treatments. Vibrational stresses due to pump operation were estimated by a dynamic analysis using existing measurements of pump vibrations. (orig./HP)

  1. Reactor coolant pump seal leakage monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, D.M.; Spencer, J.W.; Morris, D.J.; James, W.; Shugars, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Problems with reactor coolant pump seals have historically accounted for a large percentage of unscheduled outages. Studies performed for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have shown that the replacement of coolant pump seals has been one of the leading causes of nuclear plant unavailability over the last ten years. Failures of coolant pump seals can lead to primary coolant leakage rates of 200-500 gallons per minute into the reactor building. Airborne activity and high surface contamination levels following these failures require a major cleanup effort and increases the time and personnel exposure required to refurbish the pump seals. One of the problems in assessing seal integrity is the inability to accurately measure seal leakage. Because seal leakage flow is normally very small, it cannot be sensed directly with normal flow instrumentation, but must be inferred from several other temperature and flow measurements. In operating plants the leakage rate has been quantified with a tipping-bucket gauge, a device which indicates when one quart of water has been accumulated. The tipping-bucket gauge has been used for most rainfall-intensity monitoring. The need for a more accurate and less expensive gauge has been addressed. They have developed a drop-counter precipitation sensor has been developed and optimized. The applicability of the drop-counter device to the problem of measuring seal leakage is being investigated. If a review of system specification and known drop-counter performance indicates that this method is feasible for measuring seal leak rates, a drop-counter gauge will be fabricated and tested in the laboratory. If laboratory tests are successful the gauge will be demonstrated in a pump test loop at Ontario Hydro and evaluated under simulated plant conditions. 3 references, 2 figures

  2. Enhancing resistance to burnout via coolant chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Theofanous, T. G. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Boiling Crisis (BC) on horizontal, upwards-facing copper and steel surfaces under the influence of various coolant chemistries relevant to reactor containment waters is considered. In addition to Boric Acid (BA) and TriSodium Phosphate (TSP), pure De-Ionized Water (DIW) and Tap Water (TW) are included in experiments carried out in the BETA facility. The results are related to a companion paper on the large scale ULPU facility.

  3. Steam reforming of ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trane-Restrup, Rasmus; Dahl, Søren; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2013-01-01

    Steam reforming (SR) of oxygenated species like bio-oil or ethanol can be used to produce hydrogen or synthesis gas from renewable resources. However, deactivation due to carbon deposition is a major challenge for these processes. In this study, different strategies to minimize carbon deposition...

  4. Consolidated nuclear steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.; Schluderberg, D.C.; Paulson, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved system of providing power has a unique generating means for nuclear reactors with a number of steam generators in the form of replaceable modular units of the expendable type to attain the optimum in effective and efficient vaporization of fluid during the generating power. The system is most adaptable to undrground power plants and marine usage

  5. Steam generators and furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swoboda, E

    1978-04-01

    The documents published in 1977 in the field of steam generators for conventional thermal power plants are classified according to the following subjects: power industry and number of power plants, planning and operation, design and construction, furnaces, environmental effects, dirt accumulation and corrosion, conservation and scouring, control and automation, fundamental research, and materials.

  6. Watt steam governor stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2002-05-01

    The physics of the fly-ball governor, introduced to regulate the speed of steam engines, is here analysed anew. The original analysis is generalized to arbitrary governor geometry. The well-known stability criterion for the linearized system breaks down for large excursions from equilibrium; we show approximately how this criterion changes.

  7. Steam purity in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkinson, J.; Passell, T.

    1982-01-01

    Reports that 2 EPRI studies of PWRs prove that impure steam triggers decay of turbine metals. Reveals that EPRI is attempting to improve steam monitoring and analysis, which are key steps on the way to deciding the most cost-effective degree of steam purity, and to upgrade demineralizing systems, which can then reliably maintain that degree of purity. Points out that 90% of all cracks in turbine disks have occurred at the dry-to-wet transition zone, dubbed the Wilson line. Explains that because even very clean water contains traces of chemical impurities with concentrations in the parts-per-billion range, Crystal River-3's secondary loop was designed with even more purification capability; a deaerator to remove oxygen and prevent oxidation of system metals, and full-flow resin beds to demineralize 100% of the secondary-loop water from the condenser. Concludes that focusing attention on steam and water chemistry can ward off cracking and sludge problems caused by corrosion

  8. VAMCIS, a new measuring channel for continuous monitoring of leak rates inside PWR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, G.; Dubail, A.; Lefevre, F.

    1988-01-01

    In order to assess the primary to secondary leakage, radioactive isotopes, formed in the primary coolant as a result of fission or neutron capture, are usually monitored in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) secondary coolant. Conventional methods mainly based on the detection of 133 Xe, tritium, and 41 Ar are widely used on French Electricite de France (EdF) PWRs. Some years ago, it appeared necessary to improve both leak rate assessments and steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) detection. A volumetric activity measuring channel inside steam (VAMCIS) has been developed for this purpose. The SGTR that occurred at the North Anna PWR has focused the attention of safety authorities on this new measuring channel. It is planned to implement VAMCIS at North Anna in order to check the leak rate variations more accurately

  9. Minimizing secondary coolant blowdown in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y. C.; Woo, J. S.; Ryu, J. S.; Cho, Y. G.; Lim, N. Y.

    2000-01-01

    There is about 80m 3 /h loss of the secondary cooling water by evaporation, windage and blowdown during the operation of HANARO, 30MW research reactor. The evaporation and the windage is necessary loss to maintain the performance of cooling tower, but the blowdown is artificial lose to get rid of the foreign material and to maintain the quality of the secondary cooling water. Therefore, minimizing the blowdown loss was studied. It was confirmed, through the relation of the number of cycle and the loss rate of secondary coolant, that the number of cycle is saturated to 12 without blowdown because of the windage loss. When the secondary coolant is treated by high Ca-hardness treatment program (the number of cycle > 10) to maintain the number of cycle around 12 without blowdown, only the turbidity exceeds the limit. By adding filtering system it was confirmed, through the relation of turbidity and filtering rate of secondary cooling water, that the turbidity is reduced below the limit (5 deg.) by 2% of filtering rate without blowdown. And it was verified, through the performance test of back-flow filtering unit, that this unit gets rid of foreign material up to 95% of the back-flow and that the water can be reused as coolant. Therefore, the secondary cooling water can be treated by the high Ca-hardness program and filter system without blowdown

  10. Reactor coolant pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Richter, G.; Tschoepel, G.

    1975-01-01

    A brake for the pump rotor of a main coolant pump or a shutoff member on the pump are provided in order to prevent excess speeds of the pump rotor. Such excess speeds may occur in PWR type reactors with water at a pressure below, e.g., 150 bars if there is leakage from a coolant line associated with the main coolant pump. As a brake, a centrifugal brake depending upon the pump speed or a brake ring arranged on the pump housing and acting on the pump rotor, which ring would be activated by pressure differentials in the pump, may be used. If the pressure differences between suction and pressure sockets are very small, a controlled hydraulic increase of the pressure force on the brake may also be provided. Furthermore, a turbine brake may be provided. A slide which is automatically movable in closing position along the pump rotor axis is used as a shutoff element. It is of cylindrical configuration and is arranged concentrically with the rotor axis. (DG) [de

  11. Design of automotive engine coolant hoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrishikesh D BACHCHHAV

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we are present the performance of engine coolant hoses (radiator hoses used in passenger cars by checking various physical behaviours such as hose leakage, hose burst, hose collapse or any mechanical damage as studied-thru design guidelines, CFD analysis and product validation testing and also check pressure drop of the hoses when engine will be running. The design term is more likely used for technical part modelling using CAD tool. Later on, we will focus on the transformation of the part design to process design. The process design term is more likely used for "tooling design" for manufacturing of the product using CAD Tool. Then inlet hose carries coolant from engine to radiator inlet tank, then coolant circulated in radiator and passed through radiator outlet tank to water pump of engine with the help of outlet hose. After that …nding any leakage, Burst, damage or collapse of hose and pressure drop of the hose with the help of design checklist, CFD Analysis and product validation testing.

  12. Numerical computation of underwater explosions due to fuel-coolant interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.S.; Frost, D.L.; Knystautas, R.; Teodorczyk, A.; Ciccarelli, G.; Thibault, P.; Penrose, J.

    1989-03-01

    If coarse molten material is released into a coolant the possibility exists for a violent steam explosion. A detailed quantitative description of the processes involved in steam explosions is currently beyond the capabilities of the scientific community. However, a conservative estimate of the pressure transients resulting from a steam explosion can be obtained by studying the dynamics of the shock associated with the expansion of a high-pressure vapour bubble. In this study, the hydrodynamic equations governing the shock propagation of an expanding bubble were integrated numerically using the Flux Corrected Transport code. Simpler acoustic models based on experience with underwater explosions were also developed and used to estimate pressure transients and to calculate the peak pressures for benchmark cases. The results were found to be an order of magnitude higher than the corresponding pressures obtained using a complex model developed by Henry. A simplified version of the Henry model was developed by neglecting the complex description of the two-phase flow inside the ruptured tube and the arbitrarily assumed heat transfer and condensation rates. Results from the simplified model were found to be generally similar to, but had higher peak pressures than those obtained using the Henry model. It is concluded that the results produced by simple acoustic models, or by a simplified Henry model, are more conservative than the corresponding results obtained with the original Henry model

  13. Fuel performance in NPD while operating with two-phase coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, A.S.

    1978-03-01

    The NPD reactor operated as a boiling heavy water reactor from October 27, 1968 to April 18, 1971. At 25 MWe the steam quality at the steam generator inlet was 13 wt%, and fuel channel outlet steam qualities ranged from 2 to 22 wt%. During this period ammonia was used for oxygen suppression and pH control. At equilibrium the coolant had 7 mg NH 3 /kg D 2 O, 60 ml D 2 /kg D 2 O and 20 ml N 2 /kg D 2 O. The performance of the fuel was excellent during the time that NPD operated in the boiling mode. No indications were observed of dimensional changes, inter-element fretting, fuel/sheath interaction, excessive oxidation, excessive deuterium concentrations, or unusual migration of hydrogen and deuterium to the cooler end plugs. One element defected; although the defect mechanism could not be identified at the time, we now believe the defect was associated with faulty bar stock for end plugs. The behaviour of the defective element was similar to that for other defective elements in CANDU reactors. No problems were encountered in removing the defected bundle from the reactor. (author)

  14. RELAP5/MOD 3.3 analysis of Reactor Coolant Pump Trip event at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencik, V.; Debrecin, N.; Foretic, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the paper the results of the RELAP5/MOD 3.3 analysis of the Reactor Coolant Pump (RCP) Trip event at NPP Krsko are presented. The event was initiated by an operator action aimed to prevent the RCP 2 bearing damage. The action consisted of a power reduction, that lasted for 50 minutes, followed by a reactor and a subsequent RCP 2 trip when the reactor power was reduced to 28 %. Two minutes after reactor trip, the Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIV) were isolated and the steam dump flow was closed. On the secondary side the Steam Generator (SG) pressure rose until SG 1 Safety Valve (SV) 1 opened. The realistic RELAP5/MOD 3.3 analysis has been performed in order to model the particular plant behavior caused by operator actions. The comparison of the RELAP5/MOD 3.3 results with the measurement for the power reduction transient has shown small differences for the major parameters (nuclear power, average temperature, secondary pressure). The main trends and physical phenomena following the RCP Trip event were well reproduced in the analysis. The parameters that have the major influence on transient results have been identified. In the paper the influence of SG 1 relief and SV valves on transient results was investigated more closely. (author)

  15. CANDU with supercritical water coolant: conceptual design features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced CANDU reactor, with supercritical water as coolant, has many attractive design features. The pressure exceeds 22 MPa but coolant temperatures in excess of 370 degrees C can be reached without encountering the two-phase region with its associated fuel-dry-out and flow-instability problems. Increased coolant temperature leads to increased plant thermodynamic efficiency reducing unit energy cost through reduced specific capital cost and reduced fueling cost. Increased coolant temperature leads to reduced void reactivity via reduced coolant in-core density. Light water becomes a coolant option. To preserve neutron economy, an advanced fuel channel is needed and is described below. A supercritical-water-cooled CANDU can evolve as fuel capabilities evolve to withstand increasing coolant temperatures. (author)

  16. Implementation status of performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jong; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Nam, Min Woo; Hong, Sung Yull

    2013-01-01

    Some essential components in nuclear power plants are periodically inspected using non destructive examinations, for example ultrasonic, eddy current and radiographic examinations, in order to determine their integrity. These components include nuclear power plant items such as vessels, containments, piping systems, pumps, valves, tubes and core support structure. Steam generator tubes have an important safety role because they constitute one of the primary barriers between the radioactive and non radioactive sides of the nuclear power plant. There is potential that if a tube bursts while a plant is operating, radioactivity from the primary coolant system could escape directly to the atmosphere. Therefore, in service inspections are critical in maintaining steam generator tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due to its high inspection speed and flaw detectability on non magnetic tubes. However, it is not easy to analyze correctly eddy current signals because they are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the performance of eddy current data analysts for steam generator tubing should be demonstrated comprehensively. In Korea, the performance of steam generator tubing analysts has been demonstrated using the Qualified Data Analyst program. This paper describes the performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts and its implementation results in Korea. The pass rate of domestic analysts for this program was 71.4%

  17. Steam generator materials performance in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chafey, J.E.; Roberts, D.I.

    1980-11-01

    This paper reviews the materials technology aspects of steam generators for HTGRs which feature a graphite-moderated, uranium-thorium, all-ceramic core and utilizes high-pressure helium as the primary coolant. The steam generators are exposed to gas-side temperatures approaching 760 0 C and produce superheated steam at 538 0 C and 16.5 MPa (2400 psi). The prototype Peach Bottom I 40-MW(e) HTGR was operated for 1349 EFPD over 7 years. Examination after decommissioning of the U-tube steam generators and other components showed the steam generators to be in very satisfactory condition. The 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain HTGR, now in the final stages of startup, has achieved 70% power and generated more than 1.5 x 10 6 MWh of electricity. The steam generators in this reactor are once-through units of helical configuration, requiring a number of new materials factors including creep-fatigue and water chemistry control. Current designs of larger HTGRs also feature steam generators of helical once-through design. Materials issues that are important in these designs include detailed consideration of time-dependent behavior of both base metals and welds, as required by current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code rules, evaluation of bimetallic weld behavior, evaluation of the properties of large forgings, etc

  18. Implementation status of performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chan Hee; Lee, Hee Jong; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Nam, Min Woo [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Yull [Yeungnam Univ., Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Some essential components in nuclear power plants are periodically inspected using non destructive examinations, for example ultrasonic, eddy current and radiographic examinations, in order to determine their integrity. These components include nuclear power plant items such as vessels, containments, piping systems, pumps, valves, tubes and core support structure. Steam generator tubes have an important safety role because they constitute one of the primary barriers between the radioactive and non radioactive sides of the nuclear power plant. There is potential that if a tube bursts while a plant is operating, radioactivity from the primary coolant system could escape directly to the atmosphere. Therefore, in service inspections are critical in maintaining steam generator tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due tube integrity. In general, the eddy current testing is widely used for the inspection of steam generator tubes due to its high inspection speed and flaw detectability on non magnetic tubes. However, it is not easy to analyze correctly eddy current signals because they are influenced by many factors. Therefore, the performance of eddy current data analysts for steam generator tubing should be demonstrated comprehensively. In Korea, the performance of steam generator tubing analysts has been demonstrated using the Qualified Data Analyst program. This paper describes the performance demonstration program for steam generator tubing analysts and its implementation results in Korea. The pass rate of domestic analysts for this program was 71.4%.

  19. Development of Coolant Radioactivity Interpretation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kiyoung; Jung, Youngsuk; Kim, Kyounghyun; Kim, Jangwook

    2013-01-01

    In Korea, the coolant radioactivity analysis has been performed by using the computer codes of foreign companies such as CADE (Westinghouse), IODYNE and CESIUM (ABB-CE). However, these computer codes are too conservative and have involved considerable errors. Furthermore, since these codes are DOS-based program, their easy operability is not satisfactory. Therefore it is required development of an enhanced analysis algorithm applying an analytical method reflecting the change of operational environments of domestic nuclear power plants and a fuel failure evaluation software considering user' conveniences. We have developed a nuclear fuel failure evaluation code able to estimate the number of failed fuel rods and the burn-up of failed fuels during nuclear power plant operation cycle. A Coolant Radio-activity Interpretation Code (CRIC) for LWR has been developed as the output of the project 'Development of Fuel Reliability Enhanced Technique' organized by Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP). The CRIC is Windows based-software able to evaluate the number of failed fuel rods and the burn-up of failed fuel region by analyzing coolant radioactivity of LWR in operation. The CRIC is based on the model of fission products release commonly known as 'three region model' (pellet region, gap region, and coolant region), and we are verifying the CRIC results based on the cases of domestic fuel failures. CRIC users are able to estimate the number of failed fuel rods, burn-up and regions of failed fuel considered enrichment and power distribution of fuel region by using operational cycle data, coolant activity data, fuel loading pattern, Cs-134/Cs-137 ratio according to burn-up and U-235 enrichment provided in the code. Due to development of the CRIC, it is secured own unique fuel failure evaluation code. And, it is expected to have the following significant meaning. This is that the code reflecting a proprietary technique for quantitatively

  20. Probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant loop of a PWR plant. Volume 3: nonseismic stress analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, A.L.; Curtis, D.J.; Rybicki, E.F.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    This volume describes the analyses used to evaluate stresses due to loads other than seismic excitations in the primary coolant loop piping of a selected four-loop pressurized water reactor nuclear power station. The results of the analyses are used as input to a simulation procedure for predicting the probability of pipe fracture in the primary coolant system. Sources of stresses considered in the analyses are pressure, dead weight, thermal expansion, thermal gradients through the pipe wall, residual welding, and mechanical vibrations. Pressure and thermal transients arising from plant operations are best estimates and are based on actual plant operation records supplemented by specified plant design conditions. Stresses due to dead weight and thermal expansion are computed from a three-dimensional finite element model that uses a combination of pipe, truss, and beam elements to represent the reactor coolant loop piping, reactor pressure vessel, reactor coolant pumps, steam generators, and the pressurizer. Stresses due to pressure and thermal gradients are obtained by closed-form solutions. Calculations of residual stresses account for the actual heat impact, welding speed, weld preparation geometry, and pre- and post-heat treatments. Vibrational stresses due to pump operation are estimated by a dynamic analysis using existing measurements of pump vibrations

  1. The chemical kinetics of the reactions of lithium with steam-air mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.S.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    This work involved the experimental and analytical determination of the consequences of lithium fires in the presence of steam. Experiments were performed to characterize the chemical reactions of lithium with steam-nitrogen and steam-air mixtures. Models were introduced in the LITFIRE code to describe lithium fires in the presence of steam inside the containment building and plasma chamber of a hypothetical fusion reactor. The code was also equipped with the capability to determine the effects of decay heat and lithium fire on the temperature response of the reactor first wall in the event of a coolant disturbance. Forty-two kinetics experiments were performed in which a stream of steam-nitrogen or steam-air was passed over and reacted with approximately three grams of lithium heated to a predetermined temperature. The lithium reaction rates with the constituent gases were measured and characterized for a wide range of lithium temperatures and gas compositions. Experiments were performed with steam molar concentrations of 5, 15 and 30% and lithium temperatures ranging from 400 to 1100 degree C, inclusive. The LITFIRE code was modified to enable it to model the interactions of lithium with steam-air atmospheres. Results of the reaction kinetics experiments were used in the reaction model, and the heat transfer model was expanded to allow it to handle condensible atmospheres. Three groups of accidents were investigated: a spill on the containment building floor, a spill inside the reactor plasma chamber, and a spill inside the plasma chamber with steam injection to the containment building simulating a steam line break. The results were compared to dry air cases under the same conditions. 23 refs., 66 figs., 18 tabs

  2. Characteristics of U-tube assembly design for CANDU 6 type steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jun Su; Jeong, Seung Ha

    1996-06-01

    Since the first operation of nuclear steam generator early 1960s, its performance requirements have been met but the steam generator problems have been met but the steam generator problems have been major cause of reducing the operational reliability, plant safety and availability. U-tube assembly of steam generator forms the primary system pressure boundary of the plant and have experienced several types of tube degradation problems. Tube failure and leakage resulting from the degradation will cause radioactive contamination of secondary system by the primary coolant, and this may lead to unplanned plant outages and costly repair operations such as tube plugging or steam generator replacement. For the case of steam generators for heavy water reactors, e.g. Wolsong 2, 3, and 4 NPP, a high cost of heavy water will be imposed additionally. During the plant operation, steam generator tubes can potentially be subject to adverse environmental conditions which will cause damages to U-tube assembly. Types of the damage depend upon the combined effects of design factors, materials and chemical environment of steam generator, and they are the pure water stress corrosion cracking, intergranular attack, pitting, wastage, denting, fretting and fatigue, etc. In this report, a comprehensive review of major design factors of recirculating steam generators has been performed against the potential tube damages. Then the design characteristics of CANDU-type Wolsong steam generator were investigated in detail, including tube material, thermalhydraulic aspects, tube-to-tubesheet joint, tube supports, water chemistry and sludge management. 9 tabs., 18 figs., 38 refs. (Author) .new

  3. A summary of the assessment of fuel behaviour, fission product release and pressure tube integrity following a postulated large loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langman, V.J.; Weaver, K.R.

    1984-05-01

    The Ontario Hydro analyses of fuel and pressure tube temperatures, fuel behaviour, fission product release and pressure tube integrity for large break loss-of-coolant accidents in Bruce A or Pickering A have been critically reviewed. The determinations of maximum fuel temperatures and fission product release are very uncertain, and pressure tube integrity cannot be assured where low steam flows are predicted to persist for times on the order of minutes

  4. PWR steam generator tubes. Corrosion in primary coolant circuit. Evolution of knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard Legry, G.

    1986-12-01

    Cracks can occur in nickel rich austenitic alloys in pure water at 350 0 C after few months. Influence of composition, microstructure stresses, corrosive effect of the medium, hydrogen embrittlement and temperature dependence on stress corrosion of alloy 600 are studied. A model is presented for the mechanism of crack formation [fr

  5. Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-07-31

    The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

  6. Steam generator secondary pH during a steam generator tube rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.; Peterson, E.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires utilizes to determine the response of a pressurized water reactor to a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) as part of the safety analysis for the plant. The SGTR analysis includes assumptions regarding the partitioning of iodine between liquid and vapor in steam generator secondary. Experimental studies have determined that the partitioning of iodine in water is very sensitive to the pH. Based on this experimental evidence, the NRC requested the INEL to perform an analytical assessment of secondary coolant system (SCS) pH during an SGTR. Design basis thermal and hydraulic calculations were used together with industry standard chemistry guidelines to determine the SCS chemical concentrations during an SGTR. These were used as input to the Facility for Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computer system to calculate the equilibrium pH in the SCS at various discrete time during an SGTR. The results of this analysis indicate that the SCS pH decreases from the initial value of 8.8 to approximately 6.5 by the end of the transient, independent of PWR design

  7. Dynamic Analysis of Coolant Channel and Its Internals of Indian 540 MWe PHWR Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rama Rao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The horizontal coolant channel is one of the important parts of primary heat transport system in PHWR type of reactors. There are in all 392 channels in the core of Indian 540 MWe reactor. Each channel houses 13 natural uranium fuel bundles and shielding and sealing plugs one each on either side of the channel. The heavy water coolant flows through the coolant channel and carries the nuclear heat to outside the core for steam generation and power production in the turbo-generator. India has commissioned one 540 MWe PHWR reactor in September 2005 and another similar unit will be going into operation very shortly. For a complete dynamic study of the channel and its internals under the influence of high coolant flow, experimental and modeling studies have been carried out. A good correlation has been achieved between the results of experimental and analytical models. The operating life of a typical coolant channel typically ranges from 10 to 15 full-power years. Towards the end of its operating life, its health monitoring becomes an important activity. Vibration diagnosis plays an important role as a tool for life management of coolant. Through the study of dynamic characteristics of the coolant channel under simulated loading condition, an attempt has been made to develop a diagnostics to monitor the health of the coolant channel over its operating life. A study has been also carried out to characterize the fuel vibration under different flow condition.

  8. Fuel-coolant interactions: preliminary experiments on the effect of gases dissolved in the 'coolant'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, R.C.; Davies, D.; Jones, P.G.

    1976-12-01

    A simple apparatus has been used to study fuel-coolant interactions under reasonably well controlled conditions. Preliminary experiments have used water as the 'coolant' and molten tin at 800 0 C as the 'fuel' and have investigated how the violence of the interaction is affected by dissolving gases (oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide) in the water. It was found that saturating the water with carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide completely suppresses the violent interaction. Experiments in which the concentrations of these gases were varied showed that a certain critical concentration was needed; below this concentration the dissolved gas has no significant effect but above it the suppression is

  9. Steam generators in PWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, R.

    1974-01-01

    The steam generator of the PWR operates according to the principle of natural circulation. It consists of a U-shaped tube bundle whose free ends are welded to a bottom plate. The tube bundle is surrounded by a cylinder jacket which has slots closely above the bottom or tube plate. The feed water mixed with boiling water enters the tube bundle through these slots. Because of its buoyancy, the steam-water mixture flows upwards. Below the tube plate there are chambers for distributing and collecting pressurized water separated by means of a partition wall. By omitting some tubes, a free alloy is created so that the tubes in the center get sufficient water, too. By asymmetrical arrangement of the partition wall it is further possible to limit the tube alloy only to the inlet side for pressurized water. The flow over the tube plate is thus improved on the inlet side. (DG) [de

  10. Vertical steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuda, F.; Kondr, M.; Kresta, M.; Kusak, V.; Manek, O.; Turon, S.

    1982-01-01

    A vertical steam generator for nuclear power plants and dual purpose power plants consists of a cylindrical vessel in which are placed heating tubes in the form upside-down U. The heating tubes lead to the jacket of the cylindrical collector placed in the lower part of the steam generator perpendicularly to its vertical axis. The cylindrical collector is divided by a longitudinal partition into the inlet and outlet primary water sections of the heating tubes. One ends of the heating tube leads to the jacket of the collector for primary water feeding and the second ends of the heating tubes into the jacket of the collector which feeds and offtakes primary water from the heating tubes. (B.S.)

  11. Ex-Vessel Steam Explosion Analysis of Central Melt Pour Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ursic, M.; Leskovar, M.

    2008-01-01

    An ex-vessel steam explosion may develop during a severe reactor accident when the reactor vessel fails and the molten core interacts with the coolant in the reactor cavity. At this process part of the corium energy is intensively transferred to water in a very short time scale. The water vaporizes at high pressure and expands, doing work on its surrounding. Although the steam explosion has probably a low probability of occurrence, it is an important nuclear safety issue in case of a severe reactor accident. Namely, the formed very high pressure region induces dynamic loadings on the surrounding structures that may potentially lead to an early release of the radioactive material into the environment. Although the steam explosion events have being studied for several years, the level of the process and consequences understanding is still not adequate. To increase the level of confidence the OECD programme SERENA (Steam Explosion REsolution for Nuclear Applications) was established in 2002. The objectives of the program were to evaluate capabilities of the current generation of the FCI (Fuel-Coolant Interaction) computer codes in predicting the steam explosion induced loads, identifying key FCI phenomena and associated uncertainties impacting the predictability of the steam explosion energetics in the reactor situations and proposing confirmatory research to reduce the uncertainties to acceptable levels for the steam explosion risk assessment. To get a better insight into the most challenging ex-vessel steam explosions, analyses for different locations of the melt release, the cavity water sub-cooling, the primary system pressure overpressure and the triggering time were preformed for a typical pressurized water reactor cavity. The results of some scenarios revealed that significantly higher pressure loads are predicted than obtained in the OECD programme SERENA Phase 1. Among the performed analyses for the central melt pour scenarios, the maximum pressure loads were

  12. Steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.; McGillivray, R.; Reinhardt, W.; Millman, J.; King, B.; Schneider, W.

    2003-01-01

    'Full-Text:' Steam Generator Life Management responsibility embodies doing whatever is necessary to maintain the steam generation equipment of a nuclear plant in effective, reliable service. All comes together in that most critical deliverable, namely the submission of the documentation which wins approval for return to service after an outage program. Life management must address all aspects of SG reliability over the life of the plant. Nevertheless, the life management activities leading up to return to service approval is where all of it converges. Steam Generator Life Management activities entail four types of work, all equally important in supporting the objective of successful operation. These activities are i) engineering functions; including identification of inspection and maintenance requirements, outage planning and scope definition plus engineering assessment, design and analysis as necessary to support equipment operation, ii) fitness of service work; including the expert evaluation of degradation mechanisms, disposition of defects for return to service or not, and the fitness for service analysis as required to justify ongoing operation with acceptable defects, iii) inspection work; including large scale eddy current inspection of tubing, the definition of defect size and character, code inspections of pressure vessel integrity and visual inspections for integrity and iv) maintenance work; including repairs, retrofits, cleaning and modifications, all as necessary to implement the measures defined during activities i) through iii). The paper discusses the approach and execution of the program for the achievement of the above objectives and particularly of items i) and ii). (author)

  13. Coolant Void Reactivity Analysis of CANDU Lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Su; Lee, Hyun Suk; Tak, Tae Woo; Lee, Deok Jung [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Models of CANDU-6 and ACR-700 fuel lattices were constructed for a single bundle and 2 by 2 checkerboard to understand the physics related to CVR. Also, a familiar four factor formula was used to predict the specific contributions to reactivity change in order to achieve an understanding of the physics issues related to the CVR. At the same time, because the situation of coolant voiding should bring about a change of neutron behavior, the spectral changes and neutron current were also analyzed. The models of the CANDU- 6 and ACR-700 fuel lattices were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP6 using the ENDF/B-VII.0 continuous energy cross section library based on the specification from AECL. The CANDU fuel lattice was searched through sensitivity studies of each design parameter such as fuel enrichment, fuel pitch, and types of burnable absorber for obtaining better behavior in terms of CVR. Unlike the single channel coolant voiding, the ACR-700 bundle has a positive reactivity change upon 2x2 checkerboard coolant voiding. Because of the new path for neutron moderation, the neutrons from the voided channel move to the no-void channel where they lose energy and come back to the voided channel as thermal neutrons. This phenomenon causes the positive CVR when checkerboard voiding occurs. The sensitivity study revealed the effects of the moderator to fuel volume ratio, fuel enrichment, and burnable absorber on the CVR. A fuel bundle with low moderator to fuel volume ratio and high fuel enrichment can help achieve negative CVR.

  14. EDF PWRs primary coolant purification strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gressier, Frederic; Mascarenhas, Darren; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Bretelle, Jean-Luc; Ranchoux, Gilles

    2012-09-01

    In order to achieve a good physico-chemical quality of the primary coolant fluid, the primary water is continuously treated by the Chemical and Volume Control System (CVCS). This system is composed of a treatment chain containing filters and ion-exchange resins. In the EDF design, an upstream filter is placed before the resin so as to prevent it from being saturated with insoluble particles. Then, the fluid passes through several resin beds (up to 3 depending on the configuration) and again through a downstream filter that prevents resin fines dissemination into the reactor coolant. Much work has been conducted in the last 5 years on the homogenisation of products and usage on French EDF NPP primary coolant treatment, while taking into account the compromise between source term reduction, liquid and solid waste, and buying and disposal costs. Two national markets have been created, and two operational documents for chemists on site have been published: a filtration guideline and an ion-exchange resin guideline. Both documents give general information about the products used, how are they characterized and selected for national market (technical requirements, standards and tests), how they should be used and what are the change-out criteria. They are also periodically updated based on feedback from sites. The positive impact on resin and filter lifetime (extension of some, limitation of others), homogenisation of products and usage will be presented. Moreover, EDF is constantly in the process of improving the current purification methods, as well as researching the use of existing and novel technologies. In this field, recent experiments on short loading of resin during reactor shutdown has been tested on site with success. In addition, work is done on silica free filters, filter consumption and filter chemical release. An overview of these optimization methods will be given. (authors)

  15. What is geothermal steam worth?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorhallsson, S.; Ragnarsson, A.

    1992-01-01

    Geothermal steam is obtained from high-temperature boreholes, either directly from the reservoir or by flashing. The value of geothermal steam is similar to that of steam produced in boilers and lies in its ability to do work in heat engines such as turbines and to supply heat for a wide range of uses. In isolated cases the steam can be used as a source of chemicals, for example the production of carbon dioxide. Once the saturated steam has been separated from the water, it can be transported without further treatment to the end user. There are several constraints on its use set by the temperature of the reservoir and the chemical composition of the reservoir fluid. These constraints are described (temperature of steam, scaling in water phase, gas content of steam, well output) as are the methods that have been adopted to utilize this source of energy successfully. Steam can only be transported over relatively short distances (a few km) and thus has to be used close to the source. Examples are given of the pressure drop and sizing of steam mains for pipelines. The path of the steam from the reservoir to the end user is traced and typical cost figures given for each part of the system. The production cost of geothermal steam is estimated and its sensitivity to site-specific conditions discussed. Optimum energy recovery and efficiency is important as is optimizing costs. The paper will treat the steam supply system as a whole, from the reservoir to the end user, and give examples of how the site-specific conditions and system design have an influence on what geothermal steam is worth from the technical and economic points of view

  16. Determination of an optimum reactor coolant system average temperature within the licensed operating window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaulez, F.; Basic, I.; Vrbanic, I.

    2003-01-01

    The Krsko modernization power uprate analyses have been performed in such a way as to cover plant operation in a range of average reactor coolant temperatures (Tavg) of 301.7 deg C to 307.4 deg C, with steam generator tube plugging levels of up to 5%. The upper bound is temporarily restricted to 305.7 deg C, as long as Zirc-4 fuel is present in the core. (It is, however,acceptable to operate at 307.4 deg C with a few Zirc-4 assemblies, if meeting certain conditionsand subjected to a corrosion and rod internal pressure evaluation in the frame of the cyclespecificnuclear core design.) The Tavg optimization method takes into account two effects, that are opposed to each other: the impact of steam pressure on the electrical power output versus the impact of Tavg on the cost of reactor fuel. The positive economical impact of a Tavg increase through the increase in MWe output is around 6 to 8 times higher than the corresponding negative impact on the fuel cost. From this perspective, it is desirable to have Tavg as high as possible. This statement is not affected by a change in the relationship between steam pressure and Tavg level. However, there are also other considerations intervening in the definition of the optimum. This paper discusses the procedure for selection of optimal Tavg for the forthcoming cycle in relation to the impacts of change in Tavg level and/or variations of the steam pressure versus Tavg relationship. (author)

  17. Microstructural characterization of primary coolant pipe steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.; Bentley, J.

    1986-01-01

    Atom probe field-ion microscopy, analytical electron microscopy, and optical microscopy have been used to investigate the changes that occur in the microstructure of cast CF 8 primary coolant pipe stainless steel after long term thermal aging. The cast duplex microstructure consisted of austenite with 15% delta-ferrite. Investigation of the aged material revealed that the ferrite spinodally decomposed into a fine scaled network of α and α'. A fine G-phase precipitate was also observed in the ferrite. The observed degradation in mechanical properties is probably a consequence of the spinodal decomposition in the ferrite

  18. Calorimetric and reactor coolant system flow uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, L.; McLean, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the quantification of errors associated with the determination of a feedwater flow, secondary power, and Reactor Coolant System (RCS) flow used at the Trojan Nuclear Plant to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. The sources of error in Plant indications and process measurement are identified and tracked, using examples, through the mathematical processes necessary to calculate the uncertainty in the RCS flow measurement. An error of approximately 1.4 percent is calculated for secondary power. This error results, along with the consideration of other errors, in an uncertainty of approximately 3 percent in the RCS flow determination

  19. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  20. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1996-06-07

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  1. Reactor auxiliary cooling facility and coolant supplying method therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro.

    1996-01-01

    A reactor auxiliary cooling facility of the present invention comprises a coolant recycling line for recycling coolants by way of a reactor auxiliary coolant pump and a cooling load, a gravitational surge tank for supplying coolants to the coolant recycling line and a supplemental water supplying line for supplying a supply the supplemental water to the tank. Then, a pressurization-type supply water surge tank is disposed for operating the coolant recycling line upon performing an initial system performance test in parallel with the gravitational surge tank. With such a constitution, the period of time required from the start of the installation of reactor auxiliary cooling facilities to the completion of the system performance test can be shortened at a reduced cost without enlarging the scale of the facility. (T.M.)

  2. Effect of parameter variation of reactor coolant pump on loss of coolant accident consequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Gaojian; Huang Daishun; Gao Yingxian; He Xiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the analyses were carried out on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II to study the consequence of the loss of coolant accident when the homologous characteristic curves and free volumes of the reactor coolant pump changed. Two different pumps used in the analysis were 100D (employed on Ling'ao nuclear power station phase II) and ANDRITZ. The thermal characteristics in the large break LOCA accident were analyzed using CATHRE GB and CONPATE4, and the reactor coolant system hydraulics load during blow-clown phase of LOCA accident was analyzed using ATHIS and FORCET. The calculated results show that the homologous characteristic curves have great effect on the thermal characteristics of reactor core during the reflood phase of the large break LOCA accident. The maximum cladding surface temperatures are quite different when the pump's homologous characteristic curves change. On the other hand, the pump's free volume changing results in the variation of the LOCA rarefaction wave propagation, and therefore, the reactor coolant system hydraulic load in LOCA accident would be different. (authors)

  3. Steam generators, turbines, and condensers. Volume six

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume six covers steam generators (How steam is generated, steam generation in a PWR, vertical U-tube steam generators, once-through steam generators, how much steam do steam generators make?), turbines (basic turbine principles, impulse turbines, reaction turbines, turbine stages, turbine arrangements, turbine steam flow, steam admission to turbines, turbine seals and supports, turbine oil system, generators), and condensers (need for condensers, basic condenser principles, condenser arrangements, heat transfer in condensers, air removal from condensers, circulating water system, heat loss to the circulating water system, factors affecting condenser performance, condenser auxiliaries)

  4. Steam turbines for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trassl, W.

    1988-01-01

    Approximately 75% of the electrical energy produced in the world is generated in power plants with steam turbines (fossil and nuclear). Although gas turbines are increasingly applied in combined cycle power plants, not much will change in this matter in the future. As far as the steam parameters and the maximum unit output are concerned, a certain consolidation was noted during the past decades. The standard of development and mathematical penetration of the various steam turbine components is very high today and is applied in the entire field: For saturated steam turbines in nuclear power plants and for steam turbines without reheat, with reheat and with double reheat in fossil-fired power plants and for steam turbines with and without reheat in combined cycle power plants. (orig.) [de

  5. Intentional back flow effects on ruptured steam generator cooldown during a SGTR event for KSNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Jeong Park; Cheol, Woo Kim; Chul, Jin Choi; Jong, Tae Seo

    2001-01-01

    For an optimum recovery from a Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) event, the operators are directed to isolate the steam generator (SG) with ruptured tube(s) as early as possible in order to minimize the radioactive material release. However, the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) cooldown and depressurization to the Residual Heat Removal (RHR) System operation conditions using the intact SG only can not be readily achievable unless the affected SG is properly cooled since the isolated SG remains at high temperature even though the RCS has been cooled down. Therefore, a study on the intentional back flow from the ruptured SG secondary side to the RCS was performed to evaluate its effectiveness on the ruptured SG cooldown during a SGTR event for the pressurized light water reactor, especially for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP). In order to evaluate the intentional back flow effect, a series of analyses was conducted by using RELAP5/MOD3 computer code. In these analyses, the primary and secondary systems of KSNP are modeled including the major Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) components such as the reactor vessel, steam generators, hot and cold legs, pressurizer, and reactor coolant pumps. Also, the key safety systems and control systems are modeled. Using this model, two possible methods of the ruptured SG cooldown by using back flow after RCS cooldown were evaluated: the first method is a tube uncover method, and the second method is a SG drain (back flow) and fill method. (author)

  6. CFD analyses of coolant channel flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagley, Jennifer A.; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    The flowfield characteristics in rocket engine coolant channels are analyzed by means of a numerical model. The channels are characterized by large length to diameter ratios, high Reynolds numbers, and asymmetrical heating. At representative flow conditions, the channel length is approximately twice the hydraulic entrance length so that fully developed conditions would be reached for a constant property fluid. For the supercritical hydrogen that is used as the coolant, the strong property variations create significant secondary flows in the cross-plane which have a major influence on the flow and the resulting heat transfer. Comparison of constant and variable property solutions show substantial differences. In addition, the property variations prevent fully developed flow. The density variation accelerates the fluid in the channels increasing the pressure drop without an accompanying increase in heat flux. Analyses of the inlet configuration suggest that side entry from a manifold can affect the development of the velocity profile because of vortices generated as the flow enters the channel. Current work is focused on studying the effects of channel bifurcation on the flow field and the heat transfer characteristics.

  7. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetzer, Renate; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  8. Chemistry of liquid metal coolants and sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasekaran, T.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for the current generation fast breeder reactors. When sodium contains low levels of dissolved non-metallic impurities, it is highly compatible with structural steels. When the dissolved oxygen level is high, corrosion and mass transfer in sodium-steel circuits are enhanced and this involves formation of NaxMyOz type of species (M = alloying components in steels). Experience has shown that this enhancement of corrosion in a sodium circuit with all austenitic steel structural materials would not be encountered if oxygen level in sodium is below ~ 5ppm. For understanding this observation, a complete knowledge on the phase diagrams of Na-M-O systems and the thermochemical data of all relevant NaxMyOz compounds is essential. This presentation would highlight the work carried out at IGCAR on the chemistry of liquid sodium and heavy liquid metal coolants. Work carried out on various sensors for their use in these liquid metal circuits would be described and their current status would be discussed

  9. Efficiency of water coolant for DEMO divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetzer, Renate, E-mail: renate.fetzer@kit.edu; Igitkhanov, Yuri; Bazylev, Boris

    2015-10-15

    Up to now, water-cooled divertor concepts have been developed for limited incident fluxes without taking into account transient power loadings. In this paper we analyzed the efficiency of water as a coolant for the particular PFC tungsten monoblock shield with a cooling tube made from Cu alloy (Cu OFHC) as a laminate adjacent to W and a low activation martensitic steel (Eurofer) as inner tube contacting the coolant. Thermal analysis is carried out by using the code MEMOS, which simulates W armour damage under the repetitive ELM heat loads. We consider cooling conditions which allow one to keep relatively high material temperatures (in the range 300–600 °C) thus minimizing Eurofer embrittlement under neutron irradiation. Expected DEMO I and DEMO II heat loads including type I ELMs are found to cause melting of the W surface during unmitigated ELMs. By mitigation of the ELMs melting of W is avoided. DEMO I operation under these conditions is save for cooling at water pressure 15.5 MPa and temperature 325 °C, while for DEMO II with mitigated ELMs the critical heat flux is exceeded and safe operation is not provided.

  10. Kids Inspire Kids for STEAM

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyvesi, Kristof; Houghton, Tony; Diego-Mantecón, José Manuel; Crilly, Elizabeth; Oldknow, Adrian; Lavicza, Zsolt; Blanco, Teresa F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The goal of the Kids Inspiring Kids in STEAM (KIKS) project was to raise students' awareness towards the multi- and transdisciplinary connections between the STEAM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Mathematics), and make the learning about topics and phenomena from these fields more enjoyable. In order to achieve these goals, KIKS project has popularized the STEAM-concept by projects based on the students inspiring other students-approach and by utilizing new tec...

  11. Correlation between Ni base alloys surface conditioning and cation release mitigation in primary coolant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clauzel, M.; Guillodo, M.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP SAS, Technical Centre, Le Creusot (France); Engler, N.; Chahma, F.; Brun, C. [AREVA NP SAS, Chemistry and Radiochemistry Group, Paris La Defense (France)

    2010-07-01

    The mastering of the reactor coolant system radioactive contamination is a real stake of performance for operating plants and new builds. The reduction of activated corrosion products deposited on RCS surfaces allows minimizing the global dose integrated by workers which supports the ALARA approach. Moreover, the contamination mastering limits the volumic activities in the primary coolant and thus optimizes the reactor shutdown duration and environment releases. The main contamination sources on PWR are due to Co-60 and Co-58 nuclides which come respectively Co-59 and Ni-58, naturally present in alloys used in the RCS. Co is naturally present as an impurity in alloys or as the main component of hardfacing materials (Stellites™). Ni is released mainly by SG tubes which represent the most important surface of the RCS. PWR steam generators (SG), due to the huge wetted surface are the main source of corrosion products release in the primary coolant circuit. As corrosion products may be transported throughout the whole circuit, activated in the core, and redeposited all over circuit surfaces, resulting in an increase of activity buildup, it is of primary importance to gain a better understanding of phenomenon leading to corrosion product release from SG tubes before setting up mitigation measures. Previous studies have shown that SG tubing made of the same material had different release rates. To find the origin of these discrepancies, investigations have been performed on tubes at the as-received state and after exposure to a nominal primary chemistry in titanium recirculating loop. These investigations highlighted the existence of a correlation between the inner surface metallurgical properties and the release of corrosion products in primary coolant. Oxide films formed in nominal primary chemistry are always protective, their morphology and their composition depending strongly on the geometrical, metallurgical and physico-chemical state of the surface on which they

  12. Loss of coolant analysis for CIRENE-LATINA heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiantore, B.; Dubbini, M.; Proto, G.

    1978-01-01

    CIRENE is a heavy-water moderated, boiling water cooled pressure tube reactor. Fuel is natural uranium. A variety of breaks in the primary coolant system have been postulated for the analysis of the CIRENE Latina Plant (now under construction) such as double-end break of inlet header, downcomer, steam line and inlet feeders. The basic tool for analysis is the TILT-N Code which has been purposely developed for simulating the nuclear, thermal and hydrodynamic behaviour of the CIRENE core and associated heat transport system. An extensive full-scale test programme has been carried out by CNEN and CISE which fully confirms the adequacy of the model. The main results of the analysis show that maximum temperatures are far from those leading to significant fuel damage and that adequate core cooling is provided over the whole transient. (author)

  13. Analysis of multi-dimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a BWR provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in co-current and countercurrent flow under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the Steam Sector Test Facility (SSTF) which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests and integral transients with vessel blowdown and refill were performed. The present of multi-dimensional and parallel channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of multidimensional and countercurrent effects in a BWR loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiralkar, B.S.; Dix, G.E.; Alamgir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of parallel enclosed channels in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides opportunities for multiple flow regimes in cocurrent and countercurrent flow under loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. To address and understand these phenomena, an integrated experimental and analytical study has been conducted. The primary experimental facility was the steam sector test facility (SSFT), which simulated a full scale 30deg sector of a BWR/6 reactor vessel. Both steady-state separate effects tests an integral transients with vessel vlowdown and refill were performed. The presence of multidimensional and parallel-channel effects was found to be very beneficial to BWR LOCA performance. The best estimate TRAC-BWR computer code was extended as part of this study by incorporation of a phenomenological upper plenum mixing model. TRAC-BWR was applied to the analysis of these full scale experiments. Excellent predictions of phenomena and experimental trends were achieved. (orig.)

  15. Estimation of break location and size for loss of coolant accidents using neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Man Gyun; Shin, Sun Ho; Jung, Dong Won; Kim, Soong Pyung; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Lee, Byung Chul

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a probabilistic neural network (PNN) that has been applied well to the classification problems is used in order to identify the break locations of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) such as hot-leg, cold-leg and steam generator tubes. Also, a fuzzy neural network (FNN) is designed to estimate the break size. The inputs to PNN and FNN are time-integrated values obtained by integrating measurement signals during a short time interval after reactor scram. An automatic structure constructor for the fuzzy neural network automatically selects the input variables from the time-integrated values of many measured signals, and optimizes the number of rules and its related parameters. It is verified that the proposed algorithm identifies very well the break locations of LOCAs and also, estimate their break size accurately

  16. Comparison of gamma densitometer detectors used in loss of coolant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipp, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Ionization chamber type gamma detectors are used in water-steam density measurements in loss of coolant studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Ionization chambers have replaced current-mode scintillation detectors to obtain stability and freedom from magnetic field interference. However, this change results in some loss of fast transient response. Results of studies comparing the transient response of ionization chamber detectors, plastic scintillation detectors, and sodium iodide (NaI) detectors to rapid changes in gamma intensity demonstrate that plastic scintillation detectors have the fastest response and most closely reproduce the transient; ionization chambers have an initial fast response followed by a slower response, which may produce errors in fast transient measurements; and NaI scintillation detectors have a moderately fast initial response followed by an extremely slow response, which produces errors in even slow transient measurements

  17. Preliminary evaluation of the stress analysis reports for Angra I reactor coolant loop - part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, S.V.G.; Andrade, J.E.L. de

    1980-03-01

    A methodology that will allow CNEN to approve the stress analysis reports of the components of the Brazilian nuclear power plants, was developed. The reactor coolant loop (RCL)of Angra I was checkd. This is the first part of the complete report and consists of the approval of the design documents, the approval of the equipment support models and the aproval of the steam generator dynamic model. The second part of this work is under way now and should contain the approval of the RCL stress and fatigue analysis according to ASME code section III. As shown in section 7 it appears necessary additional information from Westinghouse about the design of the RCL. (Author) [pt

  18. System for mitigating consequences of loss of coolant accident at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukrinsky, A.M.; Rzheznikov, J.V.; Shvyryaev, J.V.; Zlatin, D.A.; Kuznetsov, J.A.; Babenko, E.A.; Tatarnikov, V.P.; Lapshin, A.L.; Sanovich, V.I.

    1981-01-01

    The system according to the invention comprises a first room which accommodates a reactor plant and an active-type sprinkler means. As pressure rises in the first room due to a release of steam from the lost coolant, most of the air contained in this first room is driven out through holes provided in walls of the first room in immediate proximity to a floor of the first room, wherefrom it proceeds to a second room through channels and a basin-type condenser accommodated in the second room. The length of the channels is selected so as to form a water seal in these channels to prevent the back-flow of air from the second room to the first room and thus produce rarefaction in the first room. (author)

  19. Vessel coolant mass depletion during a 5% SBLOCA in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.A.; Loomis, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from two 5% small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) simulations in the Semiscale Mod-2C facility. In performing the simulated 5% SBLOCAs, boundary conditions scaled from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were used. The experiment was run with initial conditions typical of a PWR (15.6 MPa pressure and 35 K core differential temperature). The Mod-2C facility represents the state-of-the-art in small facilities scaled from PWRs. Phenomena which occurred during the transient included: primary fluid saturation (change from subcooled to saturated blowdown), break uncovery (a centerline break was simulated), condensation-induced liquid hold-up in the steam generator primary tubes, pump suction liquid seal formation and core level depression with resulting core rod temperature excursion, pump suction liquid seal clearance, loop fluid mass redistribution, and gradual core rewet. The influence of core bypass flow is also discussed. 11 refs., 13 figs

  20. Radionuclide analyses taken during primary coolant decontamination at Three Mile Island indicate general circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Baston, V.F.; Hitz, C.G.; Malinauskas, A.P.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclide concentration data taken during decontamination of the primary reactor coolant system at Three Mile Island by a feed-and-bleed process have provided information on future defueling operations. Analysis of the radiocesium concentrations in samples taken at the letdown point indicates general circulation within the primary system, including the reactor vessel and both steam generators. A standard dilution model with parameters consistent with engineering estimates (volume, flow rate, etc.) accurately predicts the radiocesium decontamination rates. Unlike cesium, the behavior of other principal soluble radionuclides ( 90 Sr and 3 H) cannot be readily described by dilution theory. A significant appearance rate is observed for 90 Sr suggesting a chemical solubility mechanism. The use of processed water containing high 3 H for makeup causes uncertainty in the interpretation of the 3 H analysis

  1. Upper internals of PWR with coolant flow separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevereau, G.; Heuze, A.

    1989-01-01

    The upper internals for a PWR has a collecting volume for the coolant merging from the core and an apparatus for separating the flow of coolant. This apparatus has a guide for the control rods, a lower plate perforated to allow the coolant through from the core, an upper plate also perforated to allow the coolant through to the collecting volume and a peripheral binding ring joining the two plates. Each guide comprises an envelope without holes and joined perceptibly tight to the plates [fr

  2. Upgrade of reliability of NPP steam generators by way of improving water-chemical mode of second loop, modernizing and restructuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fol'tov, Yi.M.

    2004-01-01

    Ukraine's NPPs are equipped with power units and reactors of VVER-type, in which the heat exchange between the first second loop coolants is made through the steam generators (SG), that is not only an important element of NPP heat scheme, but also a barrier for spreading radioactive substances

  3. Advances in Forecasting and Prevention of Resonances Between Coolant Acoustical Oscillations and Fuel Rod Vibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proskuryakov, Konstantin Nicolaevich [NPP, NPEI, 14, Krasnokazarmennaya str. Moscow, 111250 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    would be important for NPP life time management purposes. In a similar way it is possible to lead estimation of EFCPO, Q - factors of coolant acoustic oscillatory circuit and PBF for any of updating NPP with PWR including NPP with supercritical parameters. Certainly, the quantitative characteristics of EFCPO, Q - factors and PBF will be various for each class of the nuclear reactor. Paper shows what operating control influences are necessary to remove EFCPO from area of resonant interaction with vibrations FR, FA etc. It is offered to use instrumentation and control systems to prevent operating of NPP at capacity level which provides increasing in amplitudes of pulsations of pressure. The increase in demand of the safety of NPP requires further increase of adequacy between a model and an object. The integrated PSB-VVER test facility is the 1:300 replica of the prototype reactor VVER with respect to power capacity and volume. The height evaluations of the test facility are the same as those of the original. The maximum power of heat released by an assembly of fuel rod simulators is 10 MW. PSB-VVER consists of four loops closed to the reactor model; the latter consists of a down comer section with the lower mixing chamber, a model of the reactor core (a channel with fuel rod simulators), a bypass of the reactor core model, and the upper mixing chamber. Each loop contains a reactor coolant pump, a steam generator, and a cold and hot pipeline. The test facility also includes a pressurizer and an ECCS consisting of three subsystems: a passive one, which incorporates four hydro accumulators and two active ones (a high-pressure ECCS and a low pressure ECCS). Test facility description, scheme and the measuring system are presented. Using such systems the transient processes have been investigated in accident with loss of coolant from the primary cooling system. The basic mathematical models for calculation of EFCPO are achieved. These models are intended for both one-phase and

  4. Sensitivity of measured steam oxidation kinetics to atmospheric control and impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sooby Wood, E., E-mail: sooby@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Terrani, K.A. [Nuclear Fuels Materials Group, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nelson, A.T. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The most direct means of improving the ability of water cooled reactors to withstand excessive cladding oxidation during a loss of coolant accident is to either modify or replace zirconium cladding. It is important to understand what level of agreement is to be expected as a function of systematic differences in steam oxidation testing techniques and instrumentation among testing facilities. The present study was designed to assess the sensitivities of some of the current and proposed reactor cladding materials. Steam oxidation sensitivity of Zircaloy-2, FeCrAl and Mo to O{sub 2} impurities in steam were examined. It was shown that the effect of O{sub 2} impurities is negligible for the two former materials while significant in the case of Mo.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics validation study of steam condensation on the containment walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gera, B.; Sharma, P.K.; Singh, R.K.; Vaze, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    In water cooled power reactors, significant quantities of hydrogen could be produced following a severe accident (loss-of-coolant-accident along with non availability of emergency core cooling system). A sound understanding of dispersion, stratification and diffusion of released hydrogen during severe accidents is, therefore, of practical importance and use to better understand the possibility of ignition, combustion and explosion of such releases within the context of containment safety. The presence of air and steam in the containment atmosphere also affects the hydrogen distribution as steam condensation takes place at containment walls in presence of non condensable and bulk of the mixture diffuses towards wall. The application of general purpose CFD codes for the analysis of the hydrogen behaviour within NPP containments during severe accidents has been increasing over past few years. The commercial CFD codes generally do not have built-in steam condensations models. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial multipurpose code to this kind of problem is explained, i.e. by the implementation of models for steam condensation onto walls in presence of non-condensable gases. Steam condensation was modeled using the Uchida correlation, which was originally developed to be used for 'lumped' (volume-averaged) modeling of steam condensation in the presence of non-condensable gases. The Uchida correlation is based on experiments on natural convection from relatively small vertical plates. The present methodology has been validated against experimental data from the TOSQAN and COPAIN experimental facilities. (orig.)

  6. Effect of heat transfer tube leak on dynamic characteristic of steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Baozhi; Shi Jianxin; Li Na; Zheng Lusong; Liu Shanghua; Lei Yu

    2015-01-01

    Taking the steam generator of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station as the research object, one-dimensional dynamic model of the steam generator based on drift flux theory and leak model of heat transfer tube were established. Steady simulation of steam generator under different conditions was carried out. Based on verifying the drift flux model and leak model of heat transfer tube, the effect of leak location and flow rate under different conditions on steam generator's key parameters was studied. The results show that the drift flux model and leak model can reflect the law of key parameter change accurately such as vapor mass fraction and steam pressure under different leak cases. The variation of the parameters is most apparent when the leak is at the entrance of boiling section and vapor mass fraction varies from 0.261 to 0.163 when leakage accounts for 5% of coolant flow rate. The successful prediction of the effect of heat transfer tube leak on dynamic characteristics of the steam generator based on drift flux theory supplies some references for monitoring and taking precautionary measures to prevent heat transfer tube leak accident. (authors)

  7. Analysis of Precooling Injection Transient of Steam Generator for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a postulated design basis accident leads high temperature gas cooled reactor to emergency shutdown, steam generator still remains with high temperature level and needs to be cooled down by a precooling before reactor restarts with clearing of fault. For the large difference of coolant temperature between inlet and outlet of steam generator in normal operation, the temperature distribution on the components of steam generator is very complicated. Therefore, the temperature descending rate of the components in steam generator needs to be limited to avoid the potential damage during the precooling stage. In this paper, a pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor is modeled by thermal-hydraulic system analysis code and several postulated precooling injection transients are simulated and compared to evaluate their effects, which will provide support for the precooling design. The analysis results show that enough precooling injection is necessary to satisfy the precooling requirements, and larger mass flow rate of precooling water injection will accelerate the precooling process. The temperature decrease of steam generator is related to the precooling injection scenarios, and the maximal mass flow rate of the precooling injection should be limited to avoid the excessively quick temperature change of the structures in steam generator.

  8. Verification of computer code for calculation of coolant radiolysis in the VVER reactor core with regard for boiling in its upper part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, O.P.; Kabakchi, S.A. [OKB Gidropress, Podolsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-01

    Code Bora for WWER coolant radiolysis calculation considering single jets boiling in the reactor core top part is developed on the basis of computer codes MOPABA-H2 (radiolysis of aqueous solutions) and SteamRad (radiolysis of vapor). Physico-chemical processes taking place in boiling core coolant are complex and diversified. Still, for the solution of certain problems their simulation can be simplified. The approach of reasonable simplification was used for development of code Bora: mathematical model assumed is purposed for simulation of phenomena only in the area of interest; the number of simulated chemical reactions and particles shall be reasonably minimum; complexity of interphase mass transfer calculation procedure shall be adequate to actually available accuracy of modeling. The analysis of new experimental initial yields of water radiolysis products data and kinetic parameters of elementary chemical reactions with their participation has been carried out. Some changes have been introduced in the mechanism of liquid water and aqueous solutions of ammonia radiolysis have been significantly revised on the basis of this analysis. Examples of the calculations provided for code Bora verification are presented. Despite of very simple simulation of interphase mass transfer, Bora allows to obtain average chemical composition of two-phase coolant at BWR core outlet with the accuracy sufficient for engineering calculations. The report also presents the results of two-phase coolant chemical composition test calculation for reactor core top part coolant boiling in pressurized water reactor. (author)

  9. Analysis of steam generator loss-of-feedwater experiments with APROS and RELAP5/MOD3.1 computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, E.; Haapalehto, T.; Kouhia, J.

    1997-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to study the behaviour of the new horizontal steam generator construction of the PACTEL test facility. In the experiments the secondary side coolant level was reduced stepwise. The experiments were calculated with two computer codes RELAP5/MOD3.1 and APROS version 2.11. A similar nodalization scheme was used for both codes so that the results may be compared. Only the steam generator was modeled and the rest of the facility was given as a boundary condition. The results show that both codes calculate well the behaviour of the primary side of the steam generator. On the secondary side both codes calculate lower steam temperatures in the upper part of the heat exchange tube bundle than was measured in the experiments. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of steam generator loss-of-feedwater experiments with APROS and RELAP5/MOD3.1 computer codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, E.; Haapalehto, T. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Kouhia, J. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1995-09-01

    Three experiments were conducted to study the behavior of the new horizontal steam generator construction of the PACTEL test facility. In the experiments the secondary side coolant level was reduced stepwise. The experiments were calculated with two computer codes RELAP5/MOD3.1 and APROS version 2.11. A similar nodalization scheme was used for both codes to that the results may be compared. Only the steam generator was modelled and the rest of the facility was given as a boundary condition. The results show that both codes calculate well the behaviour of the primary side of the steam generator. On the secondary side both codes calculate lower steam temperatures in the upper part of the heat exchange tube bundle than was measured in the experiments.

  11. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in 116 water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 54 (46 percent) of the reactors. The number of tubes removed from service decreased from 4 692 (0.30 percent) in 1981 to 3 222 (0.20 percent) in 1982. The leading causes of tube failures were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side, stress corrosion cracking (or intergranular attack) from the secondary side and pitting corrosion. The lowest incidence of corrosion-induced defects from the secondary side occurred in reactors that have used only volatile treatment, with or without condensate demineralization

  12. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Tapping, R.L.; Stipan, L.

    1992-03-01

    A survey of steam generator operating experience for 1986 has been carried out for 184 pressurized water and pressurized heavy-water reactors, and 1 water-cooled, graphite-moderated reactor. Tubes were plugged at 75 of the reactors (40.5%). In 1986, 3737 tubes were plugged (0.14% of those in service) and 3148 tubes were repaired by sleeving. A small number of reactors accounted for the bulk of the plugged tubes, a phenomenon consistent with previous years. For 1986, the available tubesheet sludge data for 38 reactors has been compiled into tabular form, and sludge/deposit data will be incorporated into all future surveys

  13. Steam generator auxiliary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, A.

    1982-01-01

    The author deals with damage and defect types obtaining in auxiliary systems of power plants. These concern water/steam auxiliary systems (feed-water tank, injection-control valves, slide valves) and air/fluegas auxiliary systems (blowers, air preheaters, etc.). Operating errors and associated damage are not dealt with; by contrast, weak spots are pointed out which result from planning and design. Damage types and events are collected in statistics in order to facilitate damage evaluation for arriving at improved design solutions. (HAG) [de

  14. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION STEAM TECH ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steam Enhanced Remediation is a process in which steam is injected into the subsurface to recover volatile and semivolatile organic contaminants. It has been applied successfully to recover contaminants from soil and aquifers and at a fractured granite site. This SITE demonstra...

  15. Steam generators: critical components in nuclear steam supply systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens-Guille, P D

    1974-02-28

    Steam generators are critical components in power reactors. Even small internal leaks result in costly shutdowns for repair. Surveys show that leaks have affected one half of all water-cooled reactors in the world with steam generators. CANDU reactors have demonstrated the highest reliability. However, AECL is actively evolving new technology in design, manufacture, inspection and operation to maintain reliability. (auth)

  16. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  17. Experimental and analytical studies of melt jet-coolant interactions: a synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Green, J.A.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Power Safety

    1998-01-01

    Instability and fragmentation of a core melt jet in water have been actively studied during the past ten years. Several models, and a few computer codes, have been developed. However, there are, still, large uncertainties, both, in interpreting experimental results and in predicting reactor-scale processes. Steam explosion and debris coolability, as reactor safety issues, are related to the jet fragmentation process. A better understanding of the physics of jet instability and fragmentation is crucial for assessments of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). This paper presents research, conducted at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS), Stockholm, concerning molten jet-coolant interactions, as a precursor for premixing. First, observations were obtained from scoping experiments with simulant fluids. Second, the linear perturbation method was extended and applied to analyze the interfacial-instability characteristics. Third, two innovative approachs to CFD modeling of jet fragmentation were developed and employed for analysis. The focus of the studies was placed on (a) identifying potential factors, which may affect the jet instability, (b) determining the scaling laws, and (c) predicting the jet behavior for severe accidents conditions. In particular, the effects of melt physical properties, and the thermal hydraulics of the mixing zone, on jet fragmentation were investigated. Finally, with the insights gained from a synthesis of the experimental results and analysis results, a new phenomenological concept, named `macrointeractions concept of jet fragmentation` is proposed. (author)

  18. AGING MANAGMENT OF REACTOR COOLANT SYSTEM MECHANICAL COMPONENTS FOR LICENSE RENEWAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUBUDHI, M.; MORANTE, R.; LEE, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    The reactor coolant system (RCS) mechanical components that require an aging management review for license renewal include the primary loop piping and associated connections to other support systems, reactor vessel, reactor vessel internals, pressurizer. steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, and all other inter-connected piping, pipe fittings, valves, and bolting. All major RCS components are located inside the reactor building. Based on the evaluation findings of recently submitted license renewal applications for pressurized water reactors, this paper presents the plant programs and/or activities proposed by the applicants to manage the effects of aging. These programs and/or activities provide reasonable assurance that the intended function(s) of these mechanical components will be maintained for the period of extended operation. The license renewal application includes identification of RCS subcomponents that are within the scope of license renewal and are vulnerable to age-related degradation when exposed to environmental and operational conditions. determination of the effects of aging on their intended safety functions. and implementation of the aging management programs and/or activities including both current and new programs. Industry-wide operating experience, including generic communication by the NRC, is part of the aging management review for the RCS components. In addition, this paper discusses time-limited aging analyses associated with neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline region and thermal fatigue

  19. An investigation of core liquid level depression in small break loss-of-coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, R.R.; Watkins, J.C.; Motley, F.E.; Stumpf, H.; Chen, Y.S.

    1991-08-01

    Core liquid level depression can result in partial core dryout and heatup early in a small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) transient. Such behavior occurs when steam, trapped in the upper regions of the reactor primary system (between the loop seal and the core inventory), moves coolant out of the core region and uncovers the rod upper elevations. The net result is core liquid level depression. Core liquid level depression and subsequent core heatups are investigated using subscale data from the ROSA-IV Program's 1/48-scale Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and the 1/1705-scale Semiscale facility. Both facilities are Westinghouse-type, four-loop, pressurized water reactor simulators. The depression phenomena and factors which influence the minimum core level are described and illustrated using examples from the data. Analyses of the subject experiments, conducted using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 (Version 12.7) thermal-hydraulic code, are also described and summarized. Finally, the response of a typical Westinghouse four-loop plant (RESAR-3S) was calculated to qualitatively study coal liquid level depression in a full-scale system. 31 refs., 37 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Experimental and analytical studies of melt jet-coolant interactions: a synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R.; Green, J.A.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Instability and fragmentation of a core melt jet in water have been actively studied during the past 10 years. Several models, and a few computer codes, have been developed. However, there are, still, large uncertainties, both, in interpreting experimental results and in predicting reactor-scale processes. Steam explosion and debris coolability, as reactor safety issues, are related to the jet fragmentation process. A better understanding of the physics of jet instability and fragmentation is crucial for assessments of fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs). This paper presents research, conducted at the Division of Nuclear Power Safety, Royal Institute of Technology (RIT/NPS), Stockholm, concerning molten jet-coolant interactions, as a precursor for premixing. First, observations were obtained from scoping experiments with simulant fluids. Second, the linear perturbation method was extended and applied to analyze the interfacial-instability characteristics. Third, two innovative approaches to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of jet fragmentation were developed and employed for analysis. The focus of the studies was placed on (a) identifying potential factors, which may affect the jet instability, (b) determining the scaling laws, and (c) predicting the jet behavior for severe accident conditions. In particular, the effects of melt physical properties, and the thermal hydraulics of the mixing zone, on jet fragmentation were investigated. Finally, with the insights gained from a synthesis of the experimental results and analysis results, a new phenomenological concept, named 'macrointeractions concept of jet fragmentation' is proposed. (orig.)

  1. 14C Behaviour in PWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, Howard; Dickinson Shirley; Garbett, Keith

    2012-09-01

    Although 14 C is produced in relatively small amounts in PWR coolant, it is important to know its fate, for example whether it is released by gaseous discharge, removed by absorption on ion exchange (IX) resins or deposited on the fuel pin surfaces. 14 C can exist in a range of possible chemical forms: inorganic carbon compounds (probably mainly CO 2 ), elemental carbon, and organic compounds such as hydrocarbons. This paper presents results from a preliminary survey of the possible reactions of 14 C in PWR coolant. The main conclusions of the study are: - A combination of thermal and radiolytic reactions controls the chemistry of 14 C in reactor coolant. A simple chemical kinetic model predicts that CH 3 OH would be the initial product from radiolytic reactions of 14 C following its formation from 17 O. CH 3 OH is predicted to arise as a result of reactions of OH . with CH 4 and CH 3 , and it persists because there is no known radiation chemical reduction mechanism. - Thermodynamic considerations show that CH 3 OH can be thermally reduced to CH 4 in PWR conditions, although formation of CO 2 from small organics is the most thermodynamically favourable outcome. Such reactions could be catalysed on active nickel surfaces in the primary circuit. - Limited plant data would suggest that CH 4 is the dominant form in PWR and CO 2 in BWR. This implies that radiation chemistry may be important in determining the speciation. - Addition of acetate does not affect the amount of 14 C formed, but the addition of large amounts of stable carbon would lead to a large range of additional products, some of which would be expected to deposit on fuel pin surfaces as high molecular weight hydrocarbons. However, the subsequent thermal decomposition reactions of these products are not known. - Acetate addition may represent a small input of 12 C compared with organic material released from CVCS resins, although the importance of this may depend on whether that is predominantly soluble

  2. Analysis of accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Accidental loss of pool coolant due to leakage in a PWR SFP was studied using MAAP5. • The effect of emergency ventilation on the accident progression was investigated. • The effect of emergency injection on the accident progression was discussed. - Abstract: A large loss of pool coolant/water accident may be caused by extreme accidents such as the pool wall or bottom floor punctures due to a large aircraft strike. The safety of SFP under this circumstance is very important. Large amounts of radioactive materials would be easily released into the environment if a severe accident happened in the SFP, because the spent fuel pool (SFP) in a PWR nuclear power station (NPS) is often located in the fuel handing building outside the reactor containment. To gain insight into the loss of pool coolant accident progression for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) SFP, a computational model was established by using the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP5). Important factors such as Zr oxidation by air, air natural circulation and thermal radiation were considered for partial and complete drainage accidents without mitigation measures. The calculation indicated that even if the residual water level was in the active fuel region, there was a chance to effectively remove the decay heat through axial heat conduction (if the pool cooling system failed) or steam cooling (if the pool cooling system was working). For sensitivity study, the effects of emergency ventilation and water injection on the accident progression were analyzed. The analysis showed that for the current configuration of high-density storage racks, it was difficult to cool the spent fuels by air natural circulation. Enlarging the space between the adjacent assemblies was a way of increasing air natural circulation flow rate and maintaining the coolability of SFP. Water injection to the bottom of the SFP helped to recover water inventory, quenching the high temperature assemblies to prevent

  3. The challenge of modeling fuel–coolant interaction: Part I – Premixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meignen, Renaud, E-mail: renaud.meignen@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Picchi, Stephane; Lamome, Julien [Communication and Systèmes, 22 avenue Galilée, 92350 Le Plessis Robinson (France); Raverdy, Bruno [IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP3, 92362 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Escobar, Sebastian Castrillon [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP 3, 13115 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Nicaise, Gregory [IRSN/PSN-RES/SAG, BP3, 92362 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We present the status modeling of the fuel–coolant interaction premixing stage in the computer code MC3D. • We also propose a general state of the art, highlighting recent improvements in understanding and modeling, remaining difficulties, controversies and needs. • We highlight the need for improving the understanding of the melt fragmentation and oxidation. • The verification basis is presented. - Abstract: Fuel–coolant interaction is a complex mixing process that can occur during the course of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant involving core melting and relocation. Under certain circumstances, a steam explosion might develop during the mixing of the melt and the water and induce a loss of integrity of the containment. Even in the absence of an explosion, studying the mixing phenomenon is also of high interest due to its strong impact on the progression of the accident (debris bed formation, hydrogen production). This article is the first of two aiming at presenting both a status of research and understanding of fuel–coolant interaction and the main characteristics of the model developed in the 3-dimensional computer code MC3D. It is devoted to the premixing phase whereas the second is related to the explosion phase. A special attention is given to major difficulties, uncertainties and needs for further improvements in knowledge and modeling. We discuss more particularly the major phenomena that are melt fragmentation and film boiling heat transfer and the challenges related to modeling melt solidification and oxidation. Some highlights related to the code verification are finally given.

  4. Steam-Generator Integrity Program/Steam-Generator Group Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The Steam Generator Integrity Program (SGIP) is a comprehensive effort addressing issues of nondestructive test (NDT) reliability, inservice inspection (ISI) requirements, and tube plugging criteria for PWR steam generators. In addition, the program has interactive research tasks relating primary side decontamination, secondary side cleaning, and proposed repair techniques to nondestructive inspectability and primary system integrity. The program has acquired a service degraded PWR steam generator for research purposes. This past year a research facility, the Steam Generator Examination Facility (SGEF), specifically designed for nondestructive and destructive examination tasks of the SGIP was completed. The Surry generator previously transported to the Hanford Reservation was then inserted into the SGEF. Nondestructive characterization of the generator from both primary and secondary sides has been initiated. Decontamination of the channelhead cold leg side was conducted. Radioactive field maps were established in the steam generator, at the generator surface and in the SGEF

  5. Experimental study on thermal-hydraulic behaviors of a pressure balanced coolant injection system for a passive safety light water reactor JPSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Takashi; Watanabe, Hironori; Araya, Fumimasa; Nakajima, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Iwamura, Takamichi; Murao, Yoshio

    1998-02-01

    A conceptual design study of a passive safety light water reactor JPSR has been performed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI. A pressure balanced coolant injection experiment has been carried out, with an objective to understand thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a passive coolant injection system which has been considered to be adopted to JPSR. This report summarizes experimental results and data recorded in experiment run performed in FY. 1993 and 1994. Preliminary experiments previously performed are also briefly described. As the results of the experiment, it was found that an initiation of coolant injection was delayed with increase in a subcooling in the pressure balance line. By inserting a separation device which divides the inside of core make-up tank (CMT) into several small compartments, a diffusion of a high temperature region formed just under the water surface was restrained and then a steam condensation was suppressed. A time interval from an uncovery of the pressure balance line to the initiation of the coolant injection was not related by a linear function with a discharge flow rate simulating a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) condition. The coolant was injected intermittently by actuation of a trial fabricated passive valve actuated by pressure difference for the present experiment. It was also found that the trial passive valve had difficulties in setting an actuation set point and vibrations noises and some fraction of the coolant was remained in CMT without effective use. A modification was proposed for resolving these problems by introducing an anti-closing mechanism. (author)

  6. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbett, K.; Mendler, O.J.; Gardner, G.C.; Garnsey, R.; Young, M.Y.

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated

  7. Electricity from geothermal steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheatcroft, E L.E.

    1959-01-01

    The development of the power station at Wairakei geothermal field is described. Wairakei is located at the center of New Zealand's volcanic belt, which lies within a major graben which is still undergoing some degree of downfaulting. A considerable number of wells, some exceeding 610 m, have been drilled. Steam and hot water are produced from both deep and shallow wells, which produce at gauge pressures of 1.5 MPa and 0.6 MPa, respectively. The turbines are fed by low, intermediate, and high pressure mains. The intermediate pressure turbine bank was installed as a replacement for a heavy water production facility which had originally been planned for the development. Stage 1 includes a 69 MW plant, and stage 2 will bring the capacity to 150 MW. A third stage, which would bring the output up to 250 MW had been proposed. The second stage involves the installation of more high pressure steam turbines, while the third stage would be powered primarily by hot water flashing. Generation is at 11 kV fed to a two-section 500 MVA board. Each section of the board feeds through a 40 MVA transformer to a pair of 220 V transmission lines which splice into the North Island grid. Other transformers feed 400 V auxiliaries and provide local supply.

  8. Steam generator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joung Soo; Han, J. H.; Kim, H. P.; Lim, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Suh, J. H.; Hwang, S. S.; Hur, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, Y. H.

    2002-05-01

    In order to keep the nuclear power plant(NPP)s safe and increase their operating efficiency, axial stress corrosion cracking(SCC)(IGA/IGSCC, PWSCC, PbSCC) test techniques were developed and SCC property data of the archive steam generator tubing materials having been used in nuclear power plants operating in Korea were produced. The data obtained in this study were data-based, which will be used to clarify the damage mechanisms, to operate the plants safely, and to increase the lifetime of the tubing. In addition, the basic technologies for the improvement of the SCC property of the tubing materials, for new SCC inhibition, for damaged tube repair, and for manufacturing processes of the tubing were developed. In the 1 phase of this long term research, basic SCC test data obtained from the archive steam generator tubing materials used in NPPs operating in Korea were established. These basic technologies developed in the 1 phase will be used in developing process optimization during the 2 phase in order to develop application technologies to the field nuclear power plants

  9. Coolant mixing in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, T; Grunwald, G

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of PWRs during cold water or boron dilution transients is strongly influenced by the distribution of coolant temperature and boron concentration at the core inlet. This distribution is the needed input to 3-dimensional neutron kinetics to calculate the power distribution in the core. It mainly depends on how the plugs of cold or unborated water formed in a single loop are mixed in the downcomer and in the lower plenum. To simulate such mixture phenomena requires the application of 3-dimensional CFD (computational fluid dynamics) codes. The results of the simulation have to be validated against mixture experiments at scaled facilities. Therefore, in the framework of a research project funded by BMBF, the institute creates a 1:5 mixture facility representing first the geometry of a German pressurized water reactor and later the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) geometry. The calculations are based on the CFD Code CFX-4. (orig.)

  10. Slow coolant phaseout could worsen warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, April

    2018-03-01

    In the summer of 2016, temperatures in Phalodi, an old caravan town on a dry plain in northwestern India, reached a blistering 51°C—a record high during a heat wave that claimed more than 1600 lives across the country. Wider access to air conditioning (AC) could have prevented many deaths—but only 8% of India's 249 million households have AC. As the nation's economy booms, that figure could rise to 50% by 2050. And that presents a dilemma: As India expands access to a life-saving technology, it must comply with international mandates—the most recent imposed just last fall—to eliminate coolants that harm stratospheric ozone or warm the atmosphere.

  11. Automated surveillance of reactor coolant pump performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1992-01-01

    An artificial intelligence based expert system has been developed for continuous surveillance and diagnosis of centrifugal-type reactor coolant pump (RCP) performance and operability. The expert system continuously monitors digitized signals from a variety of physical variables (speed, vibration level, motor power, discharge pressure) associated with RCP performance for annunciation of the incipience or onset of off-normal operation. The system employs an extremely sensitive pattern-recognition technique, the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for rapid identification of pump operability degradation. The sequential statistical analysis of the signal noise has been shown to provide the theoretically shortest sampling time to detect disturbances and thus has the potential of providing incipient fault detection information to operators sufficiently early to avoid forced plant shutdowns. The sensitivity and response time of the expert system are analyzed in this paper using monte carlo simulation techniques

  12. Power module assemblies with staggered coolant channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Mann, Brooks S; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-16

    A manifold is provided for supporting a power module assembly with a plurality of power modules. The manifold includes a first manifold section. The first face of the first manifold section is configured to receive the first power module, and the second face of the first manifold section defines a first cavity with a first baseplate thermally coupled to the first power module. The first face of the second manifold section is configured to receive the second power module, and the second face of the second manifold section defines a second cavity with a second baseplate thermally coupled to the second power module. The second face of the first manifold section and the second face of the second manifold section are coupled together such that the first cavity and the second cavity form a coolant channel. The first cavity is at least partially staggered with respect to second cavity.

  13. Reactor coolant flow measurements at Point Lepreau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenciaglia, G.; Gurevich, Y.; Liu, G.

    1996-01-01

    The CROSSFLOW ultrasonic flow measurement system manufactured by AMAG is fully proven as reliable and accurate when applied to large piping in defined geometries for such applications as feedwater flows measurement. Its application to direct reactor coolant flow (RCF) measurements - both individual channel flows and bulk flows such as pump suction flow - has been well established through recent work by AMAG at Point Lepreau, with application to other reactor types (eg. PWR) imminent. At Point Lepreau, Measurements have been demonstrated at full power; improvements to consistently meet ±1% accuracy are in progress. The development and recent customization of CROSSFLOW to RCF measurement at Point Lepreau are described in this paper; typical measurement results are included. (author)

  14. Steam hydrocarbon cracking and reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golombok, M.

    2004-01-01

    Many industrial chemical processes are taught as distinct contrasting reactions when in fact the unifying comparisons are greater than the contrasts. We examine steam hydrocarbon reforming and steam hydrocarbon cracking as an example of two processes that operate under different chemical reactivity

  15. Channel type reactors with supercritical water coolant. Russian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Y.N.; Gabaraev, B.A.

    2003-01-01

    Transition to coolant of supercritical parameters allows for principle engineering-andeconomic characteristics of light-water nuclear power reactors to be substantially enhanced. Russian experience in development of channel-type reactors with supercritical water coolant has demonstrated advantages and practical feasibility of such reactors. (author)

  16. Automatic coolant flow control device for a nuclear reactor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Ernest

    1986-01-01

    A device which controls coolant flow through a nuclear reactor assembly comprises a baffle means at the exit end of said assembly having a plurality of orifices, and a bimetallic member in operative relation to the baffle means such that at increased temperatures said bimetallic member deforms to unblock some of said orifices and allow increased coolant flow therethrough.

  17. Fuel coolant interaction experiment by direct electrical heating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tsuneo; Hirano, Kenmei

    1979-01-01

    In the PCM (Power Cooling Mismatch) experiments, the FCI (Fuel Coolant Interaction) test is one of necessary tests in order to predict various phenomena that occur during PCM in the core. A direct electrical heating method is used for the FCI tests for fuel pellet temperature of over 1000 0 C. Therefore, preheating is required before initiating the direct electrical heating. The fuel pin used in the FCI tests is typical LWR fuel element, which is surrounded by coolant water. It is undersirable to heat up the coolant water during preheating of the fuel pin. Therefore, a zirconia (ZrO 2 ) pellet which is similar to a UO 2 pellet in physical and chemical properties is used. Electric property (electric conductivity) of ZrO 2 is particularly suitable for direct electrical heating as in the case of UO 2 . In this experiment, ZrO 2 pellet (melting point 2500 0 C) melting was achieved by use of both preheating and direct electrical heating. Temperature changes of coolant and fuel surface, as well as the pressure change of coolant water, were measured. The molten fuel interacted with the coolant and generated shock waves. A portion of this molten fuel fragmented into small particles during this interaction. The peak pressure of the observed shock wave was about 35 bars. The damaged fuel pin was photographed after disassembly. This report shows the measured coolant pressure changes and the coolant temperature changes, as well as photographs of damaged fuel pin and fuel fragments. (author)

  18. Steam generator reliability improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.C.; Green, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Upon successful completion of its research and development technology transfer program, the Electric Power Research Institute's Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG II) will disband in December 1986 and be replaced in January 1987 by a successor project, the Steam Generator Reliability Project (SGRP). The new project, funded in the EPRI base program, will continue the emphasis on reliability and life extension that was carried forward by SGOG II. The objectives of SGOG II have been met. Causes and remedies have been identified for tubing corrosion problems, such as stress corrosion cracking and pitting, and steam generator technology has been improved in areas such as tube wear prediction and nondestructive evaluation (NDE). These actions have led to improved reliability of steam generators. Now the owners want to continue with a centrally managed program that builds on what has been learned. The goal is to continue to improve steam generator reliability and solve small problems before they become large problems

  19. Steam generator reliability improvement project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomgren, J.C.; Green, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Upon successful completion of its research and development technology transfer program, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Steam Generator Owners Group (SGOG II) will disband in December 1986, and be replaced in January 1987, by a successor project, the Steam Generator Reliability Project (SGRP). The new project, funded in the EPRI base program, will continue to emphasize reliability and life extension, which were carried forward by SGOG II. The objectives of SGOG II have been met. Causes and remedies have been identified for tubing corrosion problems such as stress corrosion cracking and pitting, and steam generator technology has been improved in areas such as tube wear prediction and nondestructive evaluation. These actions have led to improved reliability of steam generators. Now the owners want to continue with a centrally managed program that builds on what has been learned. The goal is to continue to improve steam generator reliability and to solve small problems before they become large problems

  20. Steam generator tube integrity program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new research program on steam generator tubing degradation is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at Argonne National Laboratory. This program is intended to support a performance-based steam generator tube integrity rule. Critical areas addressed by the program include evaluation of the processes used for the in-service inspection of steam generator tubes and recommendations for improving the reliability and accuracy of inspections; validation and improvement of correlations for evaluating integrity and leakage of degraded steam generator tubes, and validation and improvement of correlations and models for predicting degradation in steam generator tubes as aging occurs. The studies will focus on mill-annealed Alloy 600 tubing, however, tests will also be performed on replacement materials such as thermally-treated Alloy 600 or 690. An overview of the technical work planned for the program is given

  1. Dynamic performance investigation of once-through-type steam generator for NPP using a large-scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kats, F.M.; Ostrovskij, L.A.; Ehskin, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental bench is described as well as the results of dynamic performance investigation of mass- and heat transfer of the once-through type steam generator for the NPP with weak superheat. Coolant for the primary and secondary circuit is water. Under investigation conditions the possibility of changin.o primary and secondary circuit temperatures has been supphed as well as the primary circuit flow rate and the secondary circuit pressure changes. Transients for differen.t operating conditions are considered. The possibility for construction of the steam generator automatic control system is based

  2. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok [Kerea Nuclear Fuel., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  3. Method of charging instruments into liquid metal coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To alleviate the thermal shock of a reactor charging machine when charging the machine into liquid metal coolant after the machine is preheated in cover gas. Method: When a reactor fueling machine reaches at the lowermost portion the position immediately above liquid metal coolant surface level, the machine is stopped moving down. The reactor fueling machine is heated at the lowermost portion by thermal radiation from the surface of the liquid metal coolant. After the machine is thus preheated in cover gas, it is again steadily moved down by a winch and charged into the liquid metal coolant. Therefore, the thermal shock of the machine becomes low when charging the machine into the liquid metal coolant to eliminate the damage and deformation at the machine. (Yoshihara, H.)

  4. Stress Analysis of Fuel Rod under Axial Coolant Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hai Lan; Lee, Young Shin; Lee, Hyun Seung; Park, Num Kyu; Jeon, Kyung Rok

    2010-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor(PWR) fuel assembly, is a typical bundle structure, which uses light water as a coolant in most commercial nuclear power plants. Fuel rods that have a very slender and long clad are supported by fuel assembly which consists of several spacer grids. A coolant is a fluid which flows through device to prevent its overheating, transferring the heat produced by the device to other devices that use or dissipate it. But at the same time, the coolant flow will bring out the fluid induced vibration(FIV) of fuel rods and even damaged the fuel rod. This study has been conducted to investigate the flow characteristics and nuclear reactor fuel rod stress under effect of coolant. Fluid structure interaction(FSI) analysis on nuclear reactor fuel rod was performed. Fluid analysis of the coolant which flow along the axial direction and structural analysis under effect of flow velocity were carried out under different output flow velocity conditions

  5. Device for preventing coolant in a reactor from being lost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent all of coolant from being lost from the core at the time of failure in rupture of pipe in a recirculation system to cool the core with the coolant remained within the reactor. Structure: A valve, which will be closed when a water level of the coolant within the core is in a level less than a predetermined level, is provided on a recirculating water outlet nozzle in a pressure vessel to thereby prevent the coolant from being lost when the pipe is broken, thus cooling the core by means of reduced-pressure boiling of coolant remained within the core and boiling due to heat, and restraining core reactivity by means of void produced at that time. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Optimization of reactor coolant shutdown chemistry practices for crud inventory management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellers, B.; Barnette, J.; Stevens, J.; Perkins, D.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes reactor coolant shutdown chemistry control practices at Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES, TXU-Generation, USA). The shutdown evolution is managed from a process control perspective to achieve conditions most favorable to crud decomposition and to avoiding re-precipitation of metals. The report discusses the evolution of current industry practices and the necessity for greater emphasis on shutdown chemistry control in response to Axial Offset Anomaly and growth of ex-core radiation fields during outage conditions. Nuclear Industry experience with axial offset anomaly (AOA), radiation field growth and unexpected behavior of crud during reactor shutdowns has encouraged the refinement of chemistry control practices during plant shutdown and startup. The strong implication of nickel rich crud as a cause of AOA and unexpected crud behavior has resulted in a focus on nickel inventory management. The goals for Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station (CPSES) include maintaining solubility of metals and radioisotopes, maximizing nickel removal and effective cleanup with demineralizers. This paper provides results and lessons learned from long term efforts to optimize the shutdown process. (authors)

  7. Multi-rod burst test under a loss-of coolant accident condition, (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otomo, Takashi; Hashimoto, Masao; Kawasaki, Satoru; Furuta, Teruo; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1983-06-01

    Multi-rod burst test of No.7808 bundle was performed in steam to estimate quantitative coolant flow channel restriction caused by the ballooning of zircaloy claddings in a fuel assembly during a LOCA transient in LWRs. The test was conducted under the condition that the initial internal pressure in each rod was 35kg/cm 2 (RT) and the heating rate was 9 0 C/s in steam with flow rate of 0.4g/cm 2 .min. The following results were obtained; (1) Maximum and burst pressures in rods were in the range 45 to 48kg/cm 2 and 41 to 45kg/cm 2 , respectively. The burst temperature of cladding were estimated to be 850 to 880 0 C. (2) Axial portions of tubes with greater than 34% strain were observed in the range 0 to 40mm in most rod. The mean length was 19mm in the bundle. (3) The degree of maximum increase in cross-sectional area is 54.2% in the bundle(7 x 7) and 66.9% in the internal rods(5 x 5). (4) Maximum channel area restriction was 40.5% in the bundle(7 x 7) and 51.4% in the internal rods(5 x 5). (author)

  8. The effect of coolant quantity on local fuel–coolant interactions in a molten pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Songbai; Matsuba, Ken-ichi; Isozaki, Mikio; Kamiyama, Kenji; Suzuki, Tohru; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate local fuel–coolant interactions in a molten pool. • As water volume increases, limited pressurization and mechanical energy observed. • Only a part of water is evaporated and responsible for the pressurization. - Abstract: Studies on local fuel–coolant interactions (FCI) in a molten pool are important for severe accident analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Motivated by providing some evidence for understanding this interaction, in this study several experimental tests, with comparatively larger difference in coolant volumes, were conducted by delivering a given quantity of water into a simulated molten fuel pool (formed with a low-melting-point alloy). Interaction characteristics including the pressure-buildup as well as mechanical energy release and its conversion efficiency are evaluated and compared. It is found that as water quantity increases, a limited pressure-buildup and the resultant mechanical energy release are observable. The performed analyses also suggest that only a part of water is probably vaporized during local FCIs and responsible for the pressurization and mechanical energy release, especially for those cases with much larger water volumes

  9. OECD/DOE/CEA VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark. Summary Record of the First Workshop (V1000-CT1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The first workshop for the VVER-1000 Coolant Transient Benchmark TT Benchmark was hosted by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre d'Etudes de Saclay, France. The V1000CT benchmark defines standard problems for validation of coupled three-dimensional (3-D) neutron-kinetics/system thermal-hydraulics codes for application to Soviet-designed VVER-1000 reactors using actual plant data without any scaling. The overall objective is to access computer codes used in the safety analysis of VVER power plants, specifically for their use in reactivity transient simulations in a VVER-1000. The V1000CT benchmark consists of two phases: V1000CT-1 - simulation of the switching on of one main coolant pump (MCP) while the other three MCP are in operation, and V1000CT- 2 - calculation of coolant mixing tests and Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) scenario. Further background information on this benchmark can be found at the OECD/NEA benchmark web site . The purpose of the first workshop was to review the benchmark activities after the Starter Meeting held last year in Dresden, Germany: to discuss the participants' feedback and modifications introduced in the Benchmark Specifications on Phase 1; to present and to discuss modelling issues and preliminary results from the three exercises of Phase 1; to discuss the modelling issues of Exercise 1 of Phase 2; and to define work plan and schedule in order to complete the two phases

  10. An Improved Steam Injection Model with the Consideration of Steam Override

    OpenAIRE

    He , Congge; Mu , Longxin; Fan , Zifei; Xu , Anzhu; Zeng , Baoquan; Ji , Zhongyuan; Han , Haishui

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The great difference in density between steam and liquid during wet steam injection always results in steam override, that is, steam gathers on the top of the pay zone. In this article, the equation for steam override coefficient was firstly established based on van Lookeren’s steam override theory and then radius of steam zone and hot fluid zone were derived according to a more realistic temperature distribution and an energy balance in the pay zone. On this basis, th...

  11. Thermal-hydraulics of wave propagation and pressure distribution under hypothetical steam explosion conditions in the ANS reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; N-Valenit, S.; Kim, S.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes salient aspects of the modeling and analysis framework for evaluation of dynamic loads, wave propagation, and pressure distributions (under hypothetical steam explosion conditions) around key structural boundaries of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor core region. A staged approach was followed, using simple thermodynamic models for bounding loads and the CTH code for evaluating realistic estimates in a staged multidimensional framework. Effects of nodalization, melt dispersal into coolant during explosion, single versus multidirectional dissipation, energy level of melt, and rate of energy deposition into coolant were studied. The importance of capturing multidimensional effects that simultaneously account for fluid-structural interactions was demonstrated. As opposed to using bounding loads from thermodynamic evaluations, it was revealed that the ANS reactor system will not be vulnerable to vertically generated missiles that threaten containment if realistic estimates of energetics are used (from CTH calculations for thermally generated steam explosions without significant aluminum ignition).

  12. Experiment data report for Semiscale Mod-1 test S-28-3 (steam generator tube rupture test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillins, R.L.; Sackett, K.E.

    1977-10-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-28-3 of the Semiscale Mod-1 steam generator tube rupture test series. These tests are among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Test S-28-3 was conducted from initial conditions of 15621 kPa and 555 K to investigate the response of the Semiscale Mod-1 system to a depressurization and reflood transient following a simulated double-ended offset shear of the broken loop cold leg piping. During the test, cooling water was injected into the cold leg of the intact and broken loops to simulate emergency core coolant injection in a PWR. Twelve steam generator tube ruptures were simulated by a controlled injection from a heated accumulator into the intact loop hot leg

  13. Experiment data report for Semiscale Mod-1 Test S-28-1 (steam generator tube rupture test series)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, B.L.; Coppin, C.E.; Sackett, K.E.

    1977-10-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-28-1 of the Semiscale Mod-1 steam generator tube rupture test series. These tests are among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Test S-28-1 was conducted from initial conditions of 15 767 kPa and 557 K to investigate the response of the Semiscale Mod-1 system to a depressurization and reflood transient following a simulated double-ended offset shear of the broken loop cold leg piping. During the test, cooling water was injected into the cold leg of the intact and broken loops to simulate emergency core coolant injection in a PWR. Sixty steam generator tube ruptures were simulated by a controlled injection from a heated accumulator into the intact loop hot leg

  14. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 test S-28-2 (steam generator tube rupture test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, M.L.; Sackett, K.E.

    1977-10-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-28-2 of the Semiscale Mod-1 steam generator tube rupture test series. These tests are among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Test S-28-2 was conducted from initial conditions of 15 936 kPa and 558 K to investigate the response of the Semiscale Mod-1 system to a depressurization and reflood transient following a simulated double-ended offset shear of the broken loop cold leg piping. During the test, cooling water was injected into the cold leg of the intact and broken loops to simulate emergency core coolant injection in a PWR. For Test S-28-2, accumulator injection into the intact loop hot leg was provided to simulate simulate the rupture of six steam generator tubes

  15. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 test S-28-4 (steam generator tube rupture test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza, V.; Sackett, K.E.

    1977-10-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-28-4 of the Semiscale Mod-1 steam generator tube rupture test series. These tests are among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) system. Test S-28-4 was conducted from initial conditions of 15 646 kPa and 557 K to investigate the response of the Semiscale Mod-1 system to a depressurization and reflood transient following a simulated double-ended offset shear of the broken loop cold leg piping. During the test, cooling water was injected into the cold leg of the intact and broken loops to simulate emergency core coolant injection in a PWR. Thirty steam generator tube ruptures were simulated by a controlled injection from a heated accumulator into the intact loop hot leg

  16. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1982-04-01

    The performance of steam generator tubes in water-cooled nuclear power reactors has been reviewed for 1980. Tube defects occurred at 38% of the 97 reactors surveyed. This is a marginal improvement over 1979 when defects occurred at 41% of the reactors. The number of failed tubes was also lower, 0.14% of the tubes in service in 1980 compared with 0.20% of those in service in 1979. Analysis of the causes of these failures indicates that stress corrosion cracking was the leading failure mechanism. Reactors that used all-volatile treatment of secondary water, with or without full-flow condensate demineralization since start-up showed the lowest incidence of corrosion-related defects

  17. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1983-08-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in 110 water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 46 (42 percent) of the reactors. The number of tubes removed from service increased from 1900 (0.14 percent) in 1980 to 4692 (0.30 percent) in 1981. The leading causes of tube failures were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side, stress corrosion cracking (or intergranular attack) from the secondary side and pitting corrosion. The lowest incidence of corrosion-induced defects from the secondary side occurred in reactors that used all-volatile treatment since start-up. At one reactor a large number of degraded tubes were repaired by sleeving which is expected to become an important method of tube repair in the future

  18. Evaluation of alternate secondary (and tertiary) coolants for the molten-salt breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmers, A.D.; Baes, C.F.; Bettis, E.S.; Brynestad, J.; Cantor, S.; Engel, J.R.; Grimes, W.R.; McCoy, H.E.; Meyer, A.S.

    1976-04-01

    The three most promising coolant selections for an MSBR have been identified and evaluated in detail from the many coolants considered for application either as a secondary coolant in 1000-MW(e) MSBR configurations using only one coolant, or as secondary and tertiary coolants in an MSBR dual coolant configuration employing two different coolants. These are, as single secondary coolants: (1) a ternary sodium--lithium--beryllium fluoride melt; (2) the sodium fluoroborate--sodium fluoride eutectic melt, the present reference design secondary coolant. In the case of the dual coolant configuration, the preferred system is molten lithium--beryllium fluoride (Li 2 BeF 4 ) as the secondary coolant and helium gas as the tertiary coolant

  19. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavast, J.

    1988-03-01

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  20. CANDU steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapping, R.L.; Nickerson, J.; Spekkens, P.; Maruska, C.

    1998-01-01

    Steam generators are a critical component of a nuclear power reactor, and can contribute significantly to station unavailability, as has been amply demonstrated in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). CANDU steam generators are not immune to steam generator degradation, and the variety of CANDU steam generator designs and tube materials has led to some unexpected challenges. However, aggressive remedial actions, and careful proactive maintenance activities, have led to a decrease in steam generator-related station unavailability of Canadian CANDUs. AECL and the CANDU utilities have defined programs that will enable existing or new steam generators to operate effectively for 40 years. Research and development work covers corrosion and mechanical degradation of tube bundles and internals, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, fouling, inspection and cleaning, as well as provision for specially tool development for specific problem solving. A major driving force is development of CANDU-specific fitness-for-service guidelines, including appropriate inspection and monitoring technology to measure steam generator condition. Longer-range work focuses on development of intelligent on-line monitoring for the feedwater system and steam generator. New designs have reduced risk of corrosion and fouling, are more easily inspected and cleaned, and are less susceptible to mechanical damage. The Canadian CANDU utilities have developed programs for remedial actions to combat degradation of performance (Gentilly-2, Point Lepreau, Bruce A/B, Pickering A/B), and have developed strategic plans to ensure that good future operation is ensured. The research and development program, as well as operating experience, has identified where improvements in operating practices and/or designs can be made in order to ensure steam generator design life at an acceptable capacity factory. (author)

  1. High-temperature deformation and rupture behavior of internally-pressurized Zircaloy-4 cladding in vacuum and steam enivronments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Garde, A.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    The high-temperature diametral expansion and rupture behavior of Zircaloy-4 fuel-cladding tubes have been investigated in vacuum and steam environments under transient-heating conditions that are of interest in hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident situations in light-water reactors. The effects of internal pressure, heating rate, axial constraint, and localized temperature nonuniformities in the cladding on the maximum circumferential strain have been determined for burst temperatures between approximately 650 and 1350 0 C

  2. Advanced technologies on steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kaoru; Nakamura, Yuuki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Takasago (Japan); Nakamori, Nobuo; Mizutani, Toshiyuki; Uwagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Itaru [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Kobe (Japan); Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Yokohama (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic tests for a horizontal steam generator of a next-generation PWR (New PWR-21) were performed. The purpose of these tests is to understand the thermal-hydraulic behavior in the secondary side of horizontal steam generator during the plant normal operation. A test was carried out with cross section slice model simulated the straight tube region. In this paper, the results of the test is reported, and the effect of the horizontal steam generator internals on the thermalhydraulic behavior of the secondary side and the circulation characteristics of the secondary side are discussed. (orig.). 3 refs.

  3. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  4. Advanced technologies on steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kaoru; Nakamura, Yuuki [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Takasago (Japan); Nakamori, Nobuo; Mizutani, Toshiyuki; Uwagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Itaru [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Kobe (Japan); Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Co., Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    The thermal-hydraulic tests for a horizontal steam generator of a next-generation PWR (New PWR-21) were performed. The purpose of these tests is to understand the thermal-hydraulic behavior in the secondary side of horizontal steam generator during the plant normal operation. A test was carried out with cross section slice model simulated the straight tube region. In this paper, the results of the test is reported, and the effect of the horizontal steam generator internals on the thermalhydraulic behavior of the secondary side and the circulation characteristics of the secondary side are discussed. (orig.). 3 refs.

  5. Triboengineering problems of lead coolant in innovative fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beznosov, A.V.; Novozhilova, O.O.; Shumilkov, A.I.; Lvov, A.V.; Bokova, T.A.; Makhov, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Models of experimental sites for research of processes tribology in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Highlights: • The contact a pair of heavy liquid metal coolant for reactors on fast neutrons. • The hydrostatic bearings main circulation pumps. • Oxide coating and degree of wear of friction surfaces in heavy liquid metal coolant. -- Abstract: So far, there are plenty of works dedicated to studying the phenomenon of friction. However, there are none dedicated to functioning of contact pairs in heavy liquid-metal coolants for fast neutron, reactor installations (Kogaev and Drozdov, 1991; Modern Tribology, 2008; Drozdov et al., 1986). At the Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University, such research is conducted in respect to friction, bearings of main circulating pumps, interaction of sheaths of neutron absorber rods with their covers, of the reactor control and safety system, refueling systems, and interaction of coolant flows with, channel borders. As a result of experimental studies, the characteristic of friction pairs in the heavy, liquid metal coolant shows the presence dependences of oxide film on structural materials of the wear. The inapplicability of existing calculation methods for assessing the performance of the bearing nodes, in the heavy liquid metal coolant is shown

  6. ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Coolant Remediation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Russell H.; Holt, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The IATCS coolant has experienced a number of anomalies in the time since the US Lab was first activated on Flight 5A in February 2001. These have included: 1) a decrease in coolant pH, 2) increases in inorganic carbon, 3) a reduction in phosphate buffer concentration, 4) an increase in dissolved nickel and precipitation of nickel salts, and 5) increases in microbial concentration. These anomalies represent some risk to the system, have been implicated in some hardware failures and are suspect in others. The ISS program has conducted extensive investigations of the causes and effects of these anomalies and has developed a comprehensive program to remediate the coolant chemistry of the on-orbit system as well as provide a robust and compatible coolant solution for the hardware yet to be delivered. The remediation steps include changes in the coolant chemistry specification, development of a suite of new antimicrobial additives, and development of devices for the removal of nickel and phosphate ions from the coolant. This paper presents an overview of the anomalies, their known and suspected system effects, their causes, and the actions being taken to remediate the coolant.

  7. Device for preventing coolant outflow in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu; Mochizuki, Keiichi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent outflow of coolant from a reactor vessel even in an occurrence of leaking trouble at a low position in a primary cooling system or the like in the reactor vessel. Structure: An inlet at the foremost end of a coolant inlet pipe inserted into a reactor vessel is arranged at a level lower than a core, and a check valve is positioned at a level higher than the core in a rising portion of the inlet. In normal condition, the check valve is pushed up by discharge pressure of a main circulating pump and remains closed, and hence, producing no flow loss of coolant, sodium. However, when a trouble such as rupture occurs at the lower position in the primary cooling system, the attractive force for allowing the coolant to back-flow outside the reactor vessel and the load force of the coolant within the reactor vessel cause the check valve to actuate, as a consequence of which a liquid level of the coolant downwardly moves to the position of the check valve to intake the cover gases into a gas intake, thereby cutting off a flow passage of the coolant to stop outflow thereof. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Development of lead-bismuth coolant technology for nuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, Kin-ya; Kitano, Teruaki; Ono, Mikinori

    2004-01-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth is a promising material as a future fast reactor coolant or an intensive neutron source material for accelerator driven transmutation system (ADS). To develop nuclear plants and their installations using lead-bismuth coolant for practical use, both coolant technologies, inhabitation process of steels and quality control of coolant, and total operation system for liquid lead-bismuth plants are required. Based on the experience of liquid metal coolant, Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. (MES) has completed the liquid lead-bismuth forced circulation loop and has acquired various engineering data on main components including economizer. As a result of tis operation, MES has developed key technologies of lead-bismuth coolant such as controlling of oxygen content in lead-bismuth and a purification of lead-bismuth coolant. MES participated in the national project, ''The Development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation System'', together with JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and started corrosion test for beam window of ADS. (author)

  9. Liquid metal coolant disposal from UKAEA reactors at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, E.R.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the United Kingdom's Fast Reactor Development programme two reactors were built and operated at Dounreay in the North of Scotland. DFR (Dounreay Fast Reactor) was operated from 1959-1977 and PFR (Prototype Fast Reactor) was operated from 1974-1994. Both reactors are currently undergoing Stage 1 Decommissioning and are installing plant to dispose of the bulk coolant (DFR ∼ 60 tonne; PFR ∼ 1500 tonne). The coolant (NaK) remaining at DFR is mainly in the primary circuit which contains in excess of 500 TBq of Cs137. Disposal of 40 tonnes of secondary coolant has already been carried out. The paper will describe the processes used to dispose of this secondary circuit coolant and how it is intended the remaining primary circuit coolant will be handled. The programme to process the primary coolant will also be described which involves the conversion of the liquid metal to caustic and its decontamination. No PFR coolant Na has been disposed off to date. The paper will describe the current decommissioning programme activities relating to liquid metal disposal and treatment describing the materials to be disposed of and the issue of decontamination of the effluents. (author)

  10. Use of mock-up training to reduce personnel exposure at the North Anna Unit 1 Steam Generator Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, H.G. [Virginia Power, Mineral, VA (United States); Reilly, B.P. [Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The North Anna Power Station is located on the southern shore of Lake Anna in Louisa County, approximately forty miles northwest of Richmond, Virginia. The two 910 Mw nuclear units located on this site are owned by Virginia Electric and Power Company (Virginia Power) and Old Dominion Electric Cooperative and operated by Virginia Power. Fuel was loaded into Unit 1 in December 1977, and it began commercial operation in June 1978. Fuel was loaded into Unit 2 in April 1980 and began commercial operation in December 1980. Each nuclear unit includes a three-coolant-loop pressurized light water reactor nuclear steam supply system that was furnished by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Included within each system were three Westinghouse Model 51 steam generators with alloy 600, mill-annealed tubing material. Over the years of operation of Unit 1, various corrosion-related phenomena had occurred that affected the steam generators tubing and degraded their ability to fulfill their heat transfer function. Advanced inspection and repair techniques helped extend the useful life of the steam generators, but projections based on the results of the inspections indicated that the existing steam generators tubing and degraded their ability to fullfill their heat transfer function. Advanced inspection and repair techniques helped extend the useful life of the steam generators, but projections based on the results of the inspections indicated that the existing steam generators would not last their design life and must be repaired. To this end Virginia Power determined that a steam generator replacement (SGR) program was necessary to remove the old steam generator tube bundles and lower shell sections, including the channel heads (collectively called the lower assemblies), and replace them with new lower assemblies incorporating design features that will prevent the degradation problems that the old steam generators had experienced.

  11. HTCC - a heat transfer model for gas-steam mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadimitriou, P.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical model HTCC (Heat Transfer Coefficient in Containment) has been developed for RALOC after a loss-of-coolant accident in order to determine the local heat transfer coefficients for transfer between the containment atmosphere and the walls of the reactor building. The model considers the current values of room and wall temperature, the concentration of steam and non-condensible gases, geometry data and those of fluid dynamics together with thermodynamic parameters and from these determines the heat transfer mechanisms due to convection, radiation and condensation. The HTCC is implemented in the RALOC program. Comparative analyses of computed temperature profiles, for HEDL Standard problems A and B on hydrogen distribution, and of computed temperature profiles determined during the heat-up phase in the CSE-A5 experiment show a good agreement with experimental data. (orig.) [de

  12. Replacement of steam generators at Dampierre 1 France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacot, J.; Chorain, M.; Collot, Y.; Dorimini, G.

    1991-01-01

    1990 was the year of the first steam generator replacement operation on EdF's facilities. The site chosen was Dampierre 1 (900 MW PWR unit with 3 primary coolant loops). The project was a thorough success characterized by: (1) A work schedule which was entirely met and even improved on: 70 work days from the end of fuel unloading authorizing start of work in the reactor building up to the end of refitting in readiness for the primary circuit hydraulic tests, i.e. a gain of one week compared with the forecast work schedule, (2) A final dosimetry less than 230 man-rem for a target of 450 man-rem, (3) Safety: no serious accidents during the 300,000 hours worked. It also provided practical proof of French industry's capacity to undertake an SGR operation. (author)

  13. Anti-vibration bars for nuclear steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowda, B.V.; Wilson, R.M.; Wepfer, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes anti-vibrations bars structurally supporting tubes carrying high-temperature coolant in a steam generator, the antivibration bars being disposed between adjacent rows of tubes and expanded from a rest state to an expanded state as pressure is applied to the interior of the anti-vibration bars, each of the anti-vibration bars being configured as a hollow member of a rectangular shape. The rectangular shape comprising a pair of opposing wall lengths and a pair of opposing wall widths, each of the wall lengths have a thickness greater than that of the wall widths to facilitate expansion of the opposing wall lengths away from each other and into contact respectively with tubes of adjacent rows, the wall lengths having sufficient rigidity to resist deformation as the bars are expanded to their expanded state so that the wall lengths make a line contact with their respective tubes

  14. Seismic analysis of steam generator and parameter sensitivity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Hao; Xu Dinggen; Yang Ren'an; Liang Xingyun

    2013-01-01

    Background: The steam generator (SG) serves as the primary means for removing the heat generated within the reactor core and is part of the reactor coolant system (RCS) pressure boundary. Purpose: Seismic analysis in required for SG, whose seismic category is Cat. I. Methods: The analysis model of SG is created with moisture separator assembly and tube bundle assembly herein. The seismic analysis is performed with RCS pipe and Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). Results: The seismic stress results of SG are obtained. In addition, parameter sensitivities of seismic analysis results are studied, such as the effect of another SG, support, anti-vibration bars (AVBs), and so on. Our results show that seismic results are sensitive to support and AVBs setting. Conclusions: The guidance and comments on these parameters are summarized for equipment design and analysis, which should be focused on in future new type NPP SG's research and design. (authors)

  15. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  16. Power supplyer for reactor coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, Hiroshi; Okinaka, Yo.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a variable voltage/variable frequency static power source (static power source) used as a power source for a coolants recycling pump motor of a nuclear power plant. That is, during lower power operation such as start up or shutdown in which stoppage of the power source gives less effect to a reactor core, power is supplied from a power system, a main power generator connected thereto or a high voltage bus in the plant or a common high voltage bus to the static power source. However, during rated power operation, power is supplied from the output of an axially power generator connected with a main power generator having an extremely great inertia moment to the static power device. With such a constitution, the static power device is not stopped by the lowering of the voltage due to a thunderbolt falling accident or the like to a power-distribution line suddenly occurred in the power system. Accordingly, reactor core flowrate is free from rapid decrease caused by the reduction of rotation speed of the recycling pump. Accordingly, disadvantgages upon operation control in the reactor core is not caused. (I.S.)

  17. Characterization of reactor coolant by XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legreid, G.; Beverskog, B. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    2002-07-01

    The analyzes of membrane filters is of utmost importance in characterizing the coolant chemistry in nuclear power plants. Traditional analyzes of filters includes oxidative digestion followed by instrumental analyzes. XRF (X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry) can analyze without digestion of the filters. The method is much faster and demands only a cutting step as sample preparation. By use of XRF the analytical laboratory at the Halden Reactor Project will get increased capacity, which makes it possible to analyze more samples and improve the characterization of the water. The method has shown to give more stable results than other methods in use, and has proved to have good precision. New calibration methods have been developed and tested successfully against other methods. A round robin test, attending seven laboratories from nuclear power plants, was initiated by the Halden Project to verify the instrument. The test of standard cation exchange filters showed that conventional filter digestion results in too low values. The XRF methodology shows very good agreement with the standard values. The round robin test for particle filters could not confirm that filter digestion results in too low values. This was mainly due to lack of standard particle filters and large scatter in the reported data. (author)

  18. Characterization of reactor coolant by XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legreid, G.; Beverskog, B.

    2002-01-01

    The analyzes of membrane filters is of utmost importance in characterizing the coolant chemistry in nuclear power plants. Traditional analyzes of filters includes oxidative digestion followed by instrumental analyzes. XRF (X-ray Fluorescence spectrometry) can analyze without digestion of the filters. The method is much faster and demands only a cutting step as sample preparation. By use of XRF the analytical laboratory at the Halden Reactor Project will get increased capacity, which makes it possible to analyze more samples and improve the characterization of the water. The method has shown to give more stable results than other methods in use, and has proved to have good precision. New calibration methods have been developed and tested successfully against other methods. A round robin test, attending seven laboratories from nuclear power plants, was initiated by the Halden Project to verify the instrument. The test of standard cation exchange filters showed that conventional filter digestion results in too low values. The XRF methodology shows very good agreement with the standard values. The round robin test for particle filters could not confirm that filter digestion results in too low values. This was mainly due to lack of standard particle filters and large scatter in the reported data. (author)

  19. Numerical model simulation of atmospheric coolant plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of humid atmospheric coolants on the atmosphere is simulated by means of a three-dimensional numerical model. The atmosphere is defined by its natural vertical profiles of horizontal velocity, temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Effluent discharge is characterised by its vertical velocity and the temperature of air satured with water vapour. The subject of investigation is the area in the vicinity of the point of discharge, with due allowance for the wake effect of the tower and buildings and, where application, wind veer with altitude. The model equations express the conservation relationships for mometum, energy, total mass and water mass, for an incompressible fluid behaving in accordance with the Boussinesq assumptions. Condensation is represented by a simple thermodynamic model, and turbulent fluxes are simulated by introduction of turbulent viscosity and diffusivity data based on in-situ and experimental water model measurements. The three-dimensional problem expressed in terms of the primitive variables (u, v, w, p) is governed by an elliptic equation system which is solved numerically by application of an explicit time-marching algorithm in order to predict the steady-flow velocity distribution, temperature, water vapour concentration and the liquid-water concentration defining the visible plume. Windstill conditions are simulated by a program processing the elliptic equations in an axisymmetrical revolution coordinate system. The calculated visible plumes are compared with plumes observed on site with a view to validate the models [fr

  20. Speed control device for coolant recycling pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Takao.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention intends to increase a margin relative of the oscillations of neutron fluxes when the temperature of feedwater is lowered in a compulsory recycling type BWR reactor. That is, when the operation point represented by a reactor thermal power and a reactor core inlet flow rate is in a state approximate to an oscillation limit of the reactor power, the device of the present invention controls the recycling pump speed in the increasing direction depending on the lowering range of the feedwater temperature from a stationary state. With such a constitution, even if the reactor power is in the operation region near the oscillation limit in the BWR type reactor and a feedwater heating loss is caused, the speed of the coolant recycling pump is increased by 10% at the maximum depending on the extent of the reduction of the feedwater temperature, so that the oscillation of the reactor power can be prevented from lasting for a long period of time even if a reactivity external disturbance should occur in the reactor. (I.S.)

  1. Reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, R.M.; Gross, K.C.; Walsh, M.; Humenik, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    In order to reliably and safely operate a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to continuously monitor the performance of numerous subsystems to confirm that the plant state is within its prescribed limits. An important function of a properly designed monitoring system is the detection of incipient faults in all subsystems (with the avoidance of false alarms) coupled with an information system that provides the operators with fault diagnosis, prognosis of fault progression and recommended (either automatic or prescriptive) corrective action. In this paper, such a system is described that has been applied to reactor coolant pumps. This system includes a sensitive pattern-recognition technique based upon the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) that detects incipient faults from validated signals, an expert system embodying knowledge bases on pump and sensor performance, extensive hypertext files containing operating and emergency procedures as well as pump and sensor information and a graphical interface providing the operator with easily perceived information on the location and character of the fault as well as recommended corrective action. This system is in the prototype stage and is currently being validated utilizing data from a liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (EBR-II). 3 refs., 4 figs

  2. Reactor Coolant Temperature Measurement using Ultrasonic Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon [KEPCO International Nuclear graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, YongSun; Bechue, Nicholas [Krohne Messtechnik GmbH, Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In NPP, the primary piping temperature is detected by four redundant RTDs (Resistance Temperature Detectors) installed 90 degrees apart on the RCS (Reactor Coolant System) piping circumferentially. Such outputs however, if applied to I and C systems would not give balanced results. The discrepancy can be explained by either thermal stratification or improper arrangement of thermo-wells and RTDs. This phenomenon has become more pronounced in the hot-leg piping than in the cold-leg. Normally, the temperature difference among channels is in the range of 1°F in Korean nuclear power Plants. Consequently, a more accurate pipe average temperate measurement technique is required. Ultrasonic methods can be used to measure average temperatures with relatively higher accuracy than RTDs because the sound wave propagation in the RCS pipe is proportional to the average temperature around pipe area. The inaccuracy of RCS temperature measurement worsens the safety margin for both DNBR and LPD. The possibility of this discrepancy has been reported with thermal stratification effect. Proposed RCS temperature measurement system based on ultrasonic technology offers a countermeasure to cope with thermal stratification effect on hot-leg piping that has been an unresolved issue in NPPs. By introducing ultrasonic technology, the average internal piping temperature can be measured with high accuracy. The inaccuracy can be decreased less than ±1℉ by this method.

  3. Alternative protections for loss of coolant accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevez, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    One way to mitigate a small loss of coolant accident (LOCA) is by depressurizing the primary system, in order to turn the accident into a sequence where water is fed to a low pressure system. It can be achieved by two different ways: by incorporating a valve system (ADS - Automatic Depressurization System) to the design, which helps to diminish the pressure, obtaining a bigger LOCA, or by extracting heat from the system. Our analysis is centered in integrated reactors. The first characterization performed was on CAREM reactor. The idea was then to observe its behavior with LOCAs for different thermal power relations, water volume and rupture area. A simple depressurization model is presented, which enables us to find the parameter relationships which characterize this process, from which some particular cases will arise. ADS implementation is then analyzed, giving the criteria for the triggering time. A study on its reliability and the probability of a spurious opening is made, taking into account independent and dependent failures. An analysis on heat extraction as alternative for depressurizing is also made. Finally, the different reasons to choose between ADS or heat extraction as alternative are given, and the meaning of the parameters found are discussed. An alternative to classify LOCAs, instead of the traditional classification, by fracture size, is suggested. (author)

  4. Method of decontaminating primary coolant circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Masaru; Sumi, Masao.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate hard contaminated layers as well as soft contaminated layers without injuring substrate materials, upon decontamination of radiation contaminated portions in equipments and pipeways constituting primary coolant circuits. Constitution: High pressure water from a high pressure pump is jetted out from the nozzle of a spray gun to the radiation contaminated portions in equipments, for example, to the surface of water chamber in a vapor evaporator. High pressure pure water or aqueous boric acid is jetted out from the periphery and boric oxide particles (of about 1 - 100 μ particle size) are jetted out from the center of the nozzle of the spray gun. The particles (blasting material) jetted out together with the high pressure water impinge on the contaminated surfaces to remove the contaminated layers. Upon impingement, the high pressure water acts as the shock absorber for the blasting material and, after the impingement, it flows down to the bottom of the water chamber, and the blasting material is dissolved in the high pressure water. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. Precipitation of iron species on the cold side of PWR steam generator and its possible correlation to dose rate elevation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, Bernt; Chen, Jiaxin; Andersson, Petter

    2014-01-01

    For the last 10 years of service of Ringhals PWR unit 4, operating with Alloy-600MA steam generator tubing materials and a coolant pH of 7.2 (a)300°C, the cold water channel heads experienced continuous dose rate elevation. In the hot parts, however, it remained stable. Similar observations were made in Ringhals unit 2 and 3 after SGR to Alloy 690 and sometimes in other PWRs operated at similarly 'low' pH-regime. Following the introduction of elevated pH regime at Ringhals PWRs the cold side dose rates dropped to the similar levels as on the hot side. The phenomena are analysed in this paper from three different aspects: (1) the general plant observations in dose rate development under different coolant pH regimes; (2) the concentrations of dissolved and soluble iron species at the low and high coolant pH values and (3) the microstructures of the oxide films formed on the cold and hot sides of a steam generator tube pulled from a retired steam generator. Based on the analyses a hypothesis is elaborated that the formation of a thin but highly radioactive layer of iron-rich oxide deposit on the cold side may be responsible for the dose rate elevation and that its formation may be harder at the elevated pH regime. (author)

  6. Preliminary Analysis of Ex-Vessel Steam Explosion using TEXAS-V code for APR1400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Chu; Lee, Jung Jae; Cho, Yong Jin; Hwang, Taesuk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to explore input development and the audit calculation using TEXAS-V code for ex-vessel steam explosion for a flooded reactor cavity of APR1400. TEXAS computational models are one of the simplified tools for simulations of fuel-coolant interaction during mixing, triggering and explosion phase. The models of TEXAS code were validated by performing the fundamental experimental investigation in the KROTOS facility at JRC, Ispra. The experiments such as KROTOS and FARO experiment are aimed at providing benchmark data to examine the effect of fuel-coolant initial conditions and mixing on explosion energetics with alumina and prototypical core material. TEXAS-V code used in this study was to analyze and predict the ex-vessel steam explosion for a reactor scale. The input deck to simulate the flooded reactor cavity of APR1400 is developed and base case calculation is performed. This study will provide a base for further study. The code will be of use for the evaluation and sensitivity study of ex-vessel steam explosion for ERVC strategy in the future studies. Analysis result of this study is similar to the result of other study. Through this study, it is found that TEXAS-V could be the used as a tool for predicting the steam explosion load on a reactor scale, as fast running computer code. In addition, TEXAS-V code could be to evaluate the impact of various uncertainties, which are not clearly understood yet, to provide a conservative envelope for the steam explosion.

  7. Preliminary Analysis of Ex-Vessel Steam Explosion using TEXAS-V code for APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sung Chu; Lee, Jung Jae; Cho, Yong Jin; Hwang, Taesuk

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore input development and the audit calculation using TEXAS-V code for ex-vessel steam explosion for a flooded reactor cavity of APR1400. TEXAS computational models are one of the simplified tools for simulations of fuel-coolant interaction during mixing, triggering and explosion phase. The models of TEXAS code were validated by performing the fundamental experimental investigation in the KROTOS facility at JRC, Ispra. The experiments such as KROTOS and FARO experiment are aimed at providing benchmark data to examine the effect of fuel-coolant initial conditions and mixing on explosion energetics with alumina and prototypical core material. TEXAS-V code used in this study was to analyze and predict the ex-vessel steam explosion for a reactor scale. The input deck to simulate the flooded reactor cavity of APR1400 is developed and base case calculation is performed. This study will provide a base for further study. The code will be of use for the evaluation and sensitivity study of ex-vessel steam explosion for ERVC strategy in the future studies. Analysis result of this study is similar to the result of other study. Through this study, it is found that TEXAS-V could be the used as a tool for predicting the steam explosion load on a reactor scale, as fast running computer code. In addition, TEXAS-V code could be to evaluate the impact of various uncertainties, which are not clearly understood yet, to provide a conservative envelope for the steam explosion

  8. Design and construction features of steam generators at a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, A.K.; Gupta, K.N.; Bapat, C.N.; Sharma, V.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Indian nuclear power programme is based on Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) using natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as reactor coolant as well as moderator. The nuclear heat is generated in the fuel located in the pressure tubes. Pressurised heavy water in the primary heat transport (PHT) system is circulated through the tubes which picks up the heat from the fuel and transfers it to ordinary water in steam generators (SGs) to produce steam. The steam is used for providing power to the turbine. The steam generator is a critical equipment in the nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) of a nuclear reactor. SG tube surface area constitute about 80% of total primary circuit surface area. A typical value in a 220 MWe reactor is 9000 m 2 which can release considerable amount of corrosion products unless very low corrosion rates are achieved by proper design, material selection and water chemistry control. Design and construction features of SGs are given. 1 tab

  9. Development of compressible density-based steam explosion simulation code ESE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, M.

    2004-01-01

    A steam explosion is a fuel coolant interaction process by which the energy of the corium is transferred to water in a time-scale smaller than the time-scale for system pressure relief and induces dynamic loading of surrounding structures. A strong enough steam explosion in a nuclear power plant could jeopardize the containment integrity and so lead to a direct release of radioactive material to the environment. To help finding answers on open questions regarding steam explosion understanding and modelling, the steam explosion simulation code ESE-2 is being developed. In contrast to the developed simulation code ESE-1, where the multiphase flow equations are solved with pressure-based numerical methods (best suited for incompressible flow), in ESE-2 densitybased numerical methods (best suited for compressible flow) are used. Therefore ESE-2 will enable an accurate treatment of the whole steam explosion process, which consists of the premixing, triggering, propagation and expansion phase. In the paper the basic characteristics of the mathematical model and the numerical solution procedure in ESE-2 are described. The essence of the numerical treatment is that the convective terms in the multiphase flow equations are calculated with the AUSM+ scheme, which is very time efficient since no field-by-field wave decomposition is needed, using second order accurate discretization. (author)

  10. Patchouli Oil Production for Fixative Aromatheraphy: A Case Study Design of Condenser for Steam Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egi Agustian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patchouli oil is an important material for aromatherapy industries and made from patchouli leaves by steam distillation. The important parts of steam distillation is condenser. The problem is process of farmer's patchouli based on experience not used chemical process of steam distillation cause not effective and efficient. The study was designed of condensers on steam distillation for patchouli leaves. Specification of condenser type is shell and tube, stainless steel material and water as coolant. Tubing sized is ¼ inch with 500 mm of length and 24 pieces. Shell measuring 2.5 inch and 600 mm of length. The performance of condenser gave the efficiency at 94.51%. The process condition of ratio stems to leaves is 5:6 and 4.5 hours was considered ideal for steam distillation. The used of energy is lowest cause the efficiency condenser and yield will be higher. Patchouli oil yield of 2.39% and patchouli alcohol content is 35.65%.

  11. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A review of French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all occurred leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by the compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  12. Evaluation of primary coolant leaks and assessment of detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, P.; Giroux, C.; Roche, H.; Seveon, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A review of the French PWR situation concerning primary coolant leaks is presented, including a description of operating technical specifications, of the collecting system of primary coolant leakage into the containment and of the detection methods. It is mainly based on a compilation over three years, 1981 to 1983, of almost all actual leaks, their natures, causes, consequences and methods used for their detection. By analysing these data it is possible to evaluate the efficiency of the primary coolant leak detection system and the problems raised by compliance with the criteria defined in the operating technical specifications

  13. Evaluation of filtration and distillation methods for recycling automotive coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, P.M.; Gavaskar, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    Government regulations and high waste disposal cost of spent automotive coolant have driven the vehicle maintenance industry to explore on-site recycling. The USEPA in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) and the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) evaluated two commercially available technologies that have potential for reducing the volume of spent automotive coolant. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the recycled coolant, the pollution prevention potential, and the economic feasibility of the technologies

  14. Low-activation lead coolant for advanced small modular NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasanov, G.L.; Ivanov, A.P.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is in studying perspectives of a new heavy liquid metal coolant for a small fast reactor (FR) concept. To reduce the post irradiation activity of the coolant the using of lead isotope, Pb-206, instead of natural lead, Pb-nat, is offered. In this case the accumulation of such hazardous radionuclides, as Po-210, Bi-208, Bi-207, essentially decreases. The interval of the lead-206 coolant cost which does not exceed 20% of the overall FR cost is estimated. The possibility of lead-206 obtaining for FR needs with the centrifugal separation technique is pointed out. (author)

  15. Long-term recovery of pressurized water reactors following a large break loss-of-coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.; Callow, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The USNRC recently identified a possible safety concern for PWR's. Following the reflood phase of a large break loss-of-coolant accident, long-term cooling of the reactor core may not be ensured. Specifically, the concern is that, for a pump discharge cold leg break, the loop seals in the reactor coolant pump suction piping will refill with liquid and the post-reflood steam production may depress the liquid levels in the downflow sides of the loop seals. A loop seal depression would cause a corresponding depression of the core liquid levels and possibly a fuel rod heatup in the upper core region. This paper is intended as an introduction of the safety issue that: 1) describes the important aspects of the problem, 2) provides an initial analysis of the consequences, and 3) discusses ongoing work in this area. Because the elevation of the loop seals is near the mid-core elevation in plants of WE design, the concern is greatest for those plants. There is less concern for most plants of CE design, and likely no concern for plants of BW design. This issue was addressed by employing both steady-state and transient systems analysis approaches. Two approaches were used because of uncertainties regarding actual reactor coolant system behavior during the post-reflood period. The steady-state approach involved the development and application of a simple computer program to investigate reactor coolant system behavior assuming quiescent post-reflood conditions. The transient systems approach involved investigating this behavior using the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code and a comprehensive RELAP5 model of a WE PWR. The steady-state analysis indicated only a moderate fuel rod heatup is possible. The transient systems analysis indicated boiling and condensation-induced flow oscillations are sufficient to prevent fuel rod heatup. Analysis uncertainties are discussed. (orig./HP)

  16. Regulation of ageing steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarman, B.L.; Grant, I.M.; Garg, R.

    1998-01-01

    Recent years have seen leaks and shutdowns of Canadian CANDU plants due to steam generator tube degradation by mechanisms including stress corrosion cracking, fretting and pitting. Failure of a single steam generator tube, or even a few tubes, would not be a serious safety related event in a CANDU reactor. The leakage from a ruptured tube is within the makeup capacity of the primary heat transport system, so that as long as the operator takes the correct actions, the off-site consequences will be negligible. However, assurance that no tubes deteriorate to the point where their integrity could be seriously breached as result of potential accidents, and that any leakage caused by such an accident will be small enough to be inconsequential, can only be obtained through detailed monitoring and management of steam generator condition. This paper presents the AECB's current approach and future regulatory directions regarding ageing steam generators. (author)

  17. Model of reverse steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malasek, V.; Manek, O.; Masek, V.; Riman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The claim of Czechoslovak discovery no. 239272 is a model designed for the verification of the properties of a reverse steam generator during the penetration of water, steam-water mixture or steam into liquid metal flowing inside the heat exchange tubes. The design may primarily be used for steam generators with a built-in inter-tube structure. The model is provided with several injection devices configured in different heat exchange tubes, spaced at different distances along the model axis. The design consists in that between the pressure and the circumferential casings there are transverse partitions and that in one chamber consisting of the circumferential casings, pressure casing and two adjoining partitions there is only one passage of the injection device through the inter-tube space. (Z.M.). 1 fig

  18. Steam generator thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inch, W.W.; Scott, D.A.; Carver, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses a code for detailed numerical modelling of steam generator thermal-hydraulics, and describes related experimental programs designed to promote in-depth understanding of three-dimensional two-phase flow. (auth)

  19. French steam generator design developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginier, R.; Campan, J.L.; Pontier, M.; Leridon, A.; Remond, A.; Castello, G.; Holcblat, A.; Paurobally, H.

    1986-01-01

    From the outset of the French nuclear power program, a significant R and D effort has been invested in improvement of the design and operation of Pressurized Water Reactors including a special committment to improving steam generators. The steam generator enhancement program has spawned a wide variety of specific R and D resources, e.g., low temperature hydraulic models for investigation of areas with single-phase flow, and freon-filled models for simulation of areas of steam generators experiencing two-phase flow (tube bundles and moisture separators). For the moisture separators, a large scale research program using freon-filled models and highly sophisticated instrumentation was used. Tests at reactor sites during startup of both 900 MWe and 1300 MWe have been used to validate the assumptions made on the basis of loop tests. These tests also demonstrated the validity of using freon to simulate two-phase flow conditions. The wealth of knowledge accumulated by the steam generator R and D program has been used to develop a new design of steam generators for the N4 plants. The current R and D effort is aimed at qualifying the N4 steam generator model and developing more comprehensive models. One prong of the R and D effort is the Megeve program. Megeve is a 25 MW steam generator which simulates operating conditions of the N4 model. The other prong is Clotaire, a freon-filled steam generator model which will be used to qualify thermal/hydraulic design codes used for multidimensional calculations for design of tube bundles

  20. Research program plan: steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscara, J.; Serpan, C.Z. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    This document presents a plan for research in Steam Generators to be performed by the Materials Engineering Branch, MEBR, Division of Engineering Technology, (EDET), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. It is one of four plans describing the ongoing research in the corresponding areas of MEBR activity. In order to answer the questions posed, the Steam Generator Program has been organized with the three elements of non-destructive examination; mechanical integrity testing; and corrosion, cleaning and decontamination