WorldWideScience

Sample records for standing shock waves

  1. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  2. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and ...

  3. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  4. INTERFERENCE OF UNIDIRECTIONAL SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider interference of unidirectional shock waves or, as they are called, catching up shock waves. The scope of work is to give a classification of the shock-wave structures that arise in this type of interaction of shock waves, and the area of their existence. Intersection of unidirectional shock waves results in arising of a shock-wave structure at the intersection point, which contains the main shock wave, tangential discontinuity and one more reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity of unknown beforehand type. The problem of determining the type of reflected discontinuity is the main problem that one has to solve in the study of catching shock waves interference. Main results.The paper presents the pictures of shock-wave structures arising at the interaction of catching up shock waves. The areas with a regular and irregular unidirectional interaction of shocks are described. Characteristic shock-wave structures are of greatest interest, where reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity degenerates into discontinuous characteristics. Such structures have a number of extreme properties. We have found the areas of existence for such shock-wave structures. There are also areas in which the steady-state solution is not available. The latter has determined revival of interest for the theoretical study of the problem, because the facts of sudden shock-wave structure destruction inside the air intake of supersonic aircrafts at high Mach numbers have been discovered. Practical significance.The theory of interference for unidirectional shock waves and design procedure are usable in the design of supersonic air intakes. It is also relevant for application possibility investigation of catching up oblique shock waves to create overcompressed detonation in perspective detonation air-jet and rocket engines.

  5. Residual Liquefaction under Standing Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study which deals with the residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves. It is shown that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although qualitatively similar, exhibits features different from that caused by progressive waves....... The experimental results show that the buildup of pore-water pressure and the resulting liquefaction first starts at the nodal section and spreads towards the antinodal section. The number of waves to cause liquefaction at the nodal section appears to be equal to that experienced in progressive waves for the same...... wave height. Recommendations are made as to how to assess liquefaction potential in standing waves. Copyright © 2012 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE)....

  6. Fascinating World of Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    The dissipation of mechanical, nuclear, chemi- cal, and electrical energy in a limited space will usually result in ... the vehicle and the shock wave usually referred to as the shock layer will be a region of high .... successfully visualized a shock wave during an electric spark discharge process using stroboscopic method.

  7. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  8. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  9. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... that at resonance a stationary state arise consisting of multiple oscillating shock waves. Off resonance driving leads to a nearly linear oscillating ground state but superimposed by bursts of a fast oscillating shock wave. Based on a travelling wave ansatz for the fluid velocity potential with an added 2'nd order...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  10. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  11. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  12. Students dance longitudinal standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2017-05-01

    A demonstration is presented that involves students dancing longitudinal standing waves. The resulting kinaesthetic experience and visualization both contribute towards an understanding of the natural modes of vibrations in open and closed pipes. A video of this fun classroom activity is provided (http://mjtruiz.com/ped/dance/).

  13. Flow behind concave shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is introduced and applied to calculate the flow behind concave shock waves. For sonic conditions, three characterizing types of flow are identified, based on the orientation of the sonic line, and it is shown that, depending on the ratio of shock curvatures, a continuously curving shock can exist with Type III flow, where the sonic line intercepts the reflected characteristics from the shock, thus preventing the formation of a reflected shock. The necessary shock curvature ratio for a Type III sonic point does not exist for a hyperbolic shock so that it will revert to Mach reflection for all Mach numbers. A demonstration is provided, by CFD calculations, at Mach 1.2 and 3.

  14. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study. We examined the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves. The necessity of counterpropagating shock waves studying occurs at designing of high Mach number modern internal compression air intakes, Ramjets with subsonic and supersonic combustion, in asymmetrical supersonic nozzles and in some other cases. In a sense, this problem is a generalization of the case of an oblique shock reflection from the wall or from the plane of symmetry. With the renewed vigor, the interest to this problem emerged at the end of the 90s. This was due to the start of the programs for flight study at hypersonic speeds. The first experiments performed with air intakes, which realized the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves have shown that the change in flow velocity is accompanied by abrupt alteration of shock-wave structure, the occurrence of nonstationary and oscillatory phenomena. With an increase of flow velocity these phenomena undesirable for aircraft structure became more marked. The reason is that there are two fundamentally different modes of interaction of counterpropagating shock waves: a four-wave regular and a five-wave irregular. The transition from one mode to another can be nonstationary abrupt or gradual, it can also be accompanied by hysteresis. Main results. Criteria for the transition from regular reflection of counterpropagating shock waves to irregular are described: the criterion of von Neumann and the stationary Mach configuration criterion. We described areas in which the transition from one reflection type to another is possible only in abrupt way, as well as areas of possible gradual transition. Intensity dependences of the reflected shock waves from the intensity of interacting counterpropagating shocks were given. Qualitative pictures of shock-wave structures arising from the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves were shown. Calculation results of the intensity of outgoing gas

  15. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY AS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2, 2002. 87-93. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY AS. MONOTHERAPY FOR STONES IN SOLITARY KIDNEY. K. MADBOULY, E. ELSOBKY, K.Z. SHEIR, l. ERAKY AND M. KENAWY. Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt. Objective To evaluate extracorporeal shock.

  16. Shock waves in polycrystalline iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C; Lomdahl, Peter S; Albers, Robert C; Wark, Justin S; Higginbotham, Andrew; Holian, Brad Lee

    2007-03-30

    The propagation of shock waves through polycrystalline iron is explored by large-scale atomistic simulations. For large enough shock strengths the passage of the wave causes the body-centered-cubic phase to transform into a close-packed phase with most structure being isotropic hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) and, depending on shock strength and grain orientation, some fraction of face-centered-cubic (fcc) structure. The simulated shock Hugoniot is compared to experiments. By calculating the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) directly from the atomic configurations, a comparison to experimental EXAFS measurements of nanosecond-laser shocks shows that the experimental data is consistent with such a phase transformation. However, the atomistically simulated EXAFS spectra also show that an experimental distinction between the hcp or fcc phase is not possible based on the spectra alone.

  17. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    for the lung, brain, abdomen and other organs is part of the investigation in this program. The best transition media for the shock wave is water and gelatin because of the similarity in the acoustic impedance to the tissue. These investigations and cooperation with physicians lead to the idea to disintegrate kidney stones with ...

  18. Attenuation of Shock Waves using Perforated Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, CH V. L. C. S.; Hitesh Reddy, C.; Rahul Sai, L.; Dharani Kumar, K. S. S.; Nagaraja, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    The shock/blast waves generated due to explosions cause wide spread damage to the objects in its path. Different techniques have been used to attenuate shock wave over pressure, to reduce the catastrophic effects. Perforated plates can be used effectively to attenuate the shock wave pressure. In this paper shock wave interaction with perforated plates is simulated using COMSOL multiphysics software. The pressure drop varied from 43.75% to 26% for porosity varying from 10% to 40.

  19. Model for Shock Wave Chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Kasimov, Aslan R.

    2013-03-08

    We propose the following model equation, ut+1/2(u2−uus)x=f(x,us) that predicts chaotic shock waves, similar to those in detonations in chemically reacting mixtures. The equation is given on the half line, x<0, and the shock is located at x=0 for any t≥0. Here, us(t) is the shock state and the source term f is taken to mimic the chemical energy release in detonations. This equation retains the essential physics needed to reproduce many properties of detonations in gaseous reactive mixtures: steady traveling wave solutions, instability of such solutions, and the onset of chaos. Our model is the first (to our knowledge) to describe chaos in shock waves by a scalar first-order partial differential equation. The chaos arises in the equation thanks to an interplay between the nonlinearity of the inviscid Burgers equation and a novel forcing term that is nonlocal in nature and has deep physical roots in reactive Euler equations.

  20. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  1. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  2. Magnetic Fields inside Extremely Fast Shock Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of my research on magnetic fields in extremely fast shock waves has been to predict the properties of shock waves that move almost with the speed of light. These shocks are created in the tenuous interstellar medium by catastrophic events such as the explosion of stars many times

  3. Focusing of shock waves induced by optical breakdown in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, Georgy N; Zhou, Yufeng; Zhong, Pei

    2008-06-01

    The focusing of laser-generated shock waves by a truncated ellipsoidal reflector was experimentally and numerically investigated. Pressure waveform and distribution around the first (F(1)) and second foci (F(2)) of the ellipsoidal reflector were measured. A neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser of 1046 nm wavelength and 5 ns pulse duration was used to create an optical breakdown at F(1), which generates a spherically diverging shock wave with a peak pressure of 2.1-5.9 MPa at 1.1 mm stand-off distance and a pulse width at half maximum of 36-65 ns. Upon reflection, a converging shock wave is produced which, upon arriving at F(2), has a leading compressive wave with a peak pressure of 26 MPa and a zero-crossing pulse duration of 0.1 mus, followed by a trailing tensile wave of -3.3 MPa peak pressure and 0.2 mus pulse duration. The -6 dB beam size of the focused shock wave field is 1.6 x 0.2 mm(2) along and transverse to the shock wave propagation direction. Formation of elongated plasmas at high laser energy levels limits the increase in the peak pressure at F(2). General features in the waveform profile of the converging shock wave are in qualitative agreement with numerical simulations based on the Hamilton model.

  4. SHOCK WAVE IN IONOSPHERE DURING EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Kuznetsov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud

  5. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  6. Whistler waves at the Earth bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hanying; Russell, Christopher T.; Strangeway, Rorbert J.; Schwartz, Steve J.; An, Xin; Fischer, David; Le Contel, Olivier; Argall, Matthew; Paterson, William R.; Torbert, Roy B.

    2017-04-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft, with their state-of-the-art plasma and field instruments onboard, allow us to investigate electromagnetic waves at the bow shock and their association with small-scale disturbances in the shocked plasmas. Understanding these waves could improve our knowledge on the heating of electrons and ions across the shock ramp and the energy dissipation of supercritical shocks. We have found broad-band and narrow band waves across the shock ramp and slightly downstream. The broad-band waves propagate obliquely to the magnetic field direction and have frequencies up to the electron cyclotron frequency. Simultaneously, the electrons have quite disturbed velocities and are anisotropic in velocity space, leading to multiple possible instabilities, such as kinetic cross-field streaming instability, low-hybrid drift instability, etc. In the same region with the broad-band wave, there are narrow-band waves at a few hundred Hertz with durations under a second. These waves are right-handed circularly polarized and propagate along the magnetic field lines. The broad-band waves are only observed at the shock ramp, but the narrow-band waves are observed more frequently further downstream in the magnetosheath. Both wave types are likely to be whistler mode with different generation mechanisms. In this paper, we examine the electric and magnetic fields of these waves, as well as the plasma observations to understand the wave generation and their effects on the shock and magnetosheath plasmas.

  7. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  8. Introduction to Shock Waves and Shock Wave Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, William Wyatt [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    M-9 and a number of other organizations at LANL and elsewhere study materials in dynamic processes. Often, this is described as “shock wave research,” but in reality is broader than is implied by that term. Most of our work is focused on dynamic compression and associated phenomena, but you will find a wide variety of things we do that, while related, are not simple compression of materials, but involve a much richer variety of phenomena. This tutorial will introduce some of the underlying physics involved in this work, some of the more common types of phenomena we study, and common techniques. However, the list will not be exhaustive by any means.

  9. The structure of steady shock waves in porous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnota, Christophe; Molinari, Alain; Mercier, Sébastien

    2017-10-01

    The paper aims at developing an understanding of steady shock wave propagation in a ductile metallic material containing voids. Porosity is assumed to be less than 0.3 and voids are not connected (foams are not considered). As the shock wave is traveling in the porous medium, the voids are facing a rapid collapse. During this dynamic compaction process, material particles are subjected to very high acceleration in the vicinity of voids, thus generating acceleration forces at the microscale that influence the overall response of the porous material. Analyzing how stationary shocks are influenced by these micro-inertia effects is the main goal of this work. The focus is essentially on the shock structure, ignoring oscillatory motion of pores prevailing at the tail of the shock wave. Following the constitutive framework developed by Molinari and Ravichandran (2004) for the analysis of steady shock waves in dense metals, an analytical approach of steady state propagation of plastic shocks in porous metals is proposed. The initial void size appears as a characteristic internal length that scales the overall dynamic response, thereby contributing to the structuring of the shock front. This key feature is not captured by standard damage models where the porosity stands for the single damage parameter with no contribution of the void size. The results obtained in this work provide a new insight in the fundamental understanding of shock waves in porous media. In particular, a new scaling law relating the shock width to the initial void radius is obtained when micro-inertia effects are significant.

  10. Shock wave therapy in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Ali A; Ross, Kimberly M; Ogawa, Rei; Orgill, Dennis P

    2011-12-01

    Recently, shock wave therapy has been investigated as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. There are several devices with focused and unfocused shock waves that have been administered to a heterogenous group of wounds. Encouraging preclinical and clinical studies suggest that shock wave therapy may promote wound healing with little or no adverse events, prompting investigations into the mechanism of action and additional clinical trials. The peer-reviewed literature within the past 10 years was studied using an evidence-based approach. Preclinical studies demonstrate that shock wave therapy affects cellular function and leads to the expression of several genes and elaboration of growth factors known to promote wound healing. Limited clinical trials are encouraging for the use of shock wave therapy in the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. Serious complications, including wound infections, bleeding, hematomas, seromas, and petechiae, have not been reported in the largest of these studies. Shock wave therapy is an intriguing physical modality that may play an important role as an adjuvant therapy in wound healing. To date, there is no consensus on which wounds are most likely to benefit from shock wave therapy and what the optimal power, degree of focus, and frequency or number of cycles should be. Well-designed preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to better understand shock wave therapy in wound healing.

  11. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space....... A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through...... in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics....

  12. Reflection of curved shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  13. Residual liquefaction of seabed under standing waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the seabed liquefaction beneath standing waves. Silt (with d50 =0.070mm) was used in the experiments. Two kinds of measurements were carried out: pore water pressure measurements and water surface elevation measurements. These measurements...... were synchronized with video recording of the liquefaction process from the side. The ranges of the various quantities in the experiments were wave height H= 5.9-12.0 cm, wave period T= 1.09s, and water depth h=30 cm. The experiments show that the seabed liquefaction under standing waves, although...... qualitatively similar, show features different from that caused by progressive waves. The pore water pressure builds up (or accumulated) in the areas around the node and subsequently spreads out toward the antinodes. The experimental results imply that this transport is caused by a diffusion mechanism...

  14. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  15. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new

  16. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new

  17. 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The University of Manchester hosted the 28th International Symposium on Shock Waves between 17 and 22 July 2011. The International Symposium on Shock Waves first took place in 1957 in Boston and has since become an internationally acclaimed series of meetings for the wider Shock Wave Community. The ISSW28 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reacting Flows, Dense Gases and Rarefied Flows, Detonation and Combustion, Diagnostics, Facilities, Flow Visualisation, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Multiphase Flow, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov, Shockwave Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shockwave Phenomena and Applications, as well as Medical and Biological Applications. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 28 and individuals interested in these fields.

  18. Future directions in standing-wave photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alexander X., E-mail: axgray@temple.edu

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Probing magnetic properties at the buried interface with SW-MCD. • Probing electronic structure at the buried interface with resonant SW-XPS and SW-HAXPES. • Probing momentum-resolved electronic structure at a buried interface with SWARPES. • Adding depth resolution to photoemission microscopy with standing-wave excitation. • Standing-wave localization, total reflection and waveguide effects. - Abstract: Over the past decade, standing-wave photoemission (SW-XPS) has evolved into a powerful and versatile non-destructive technique for probing element-specific electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of buried layers and interfaces with sub-nanometer depth resolution. In this article, I will discuss several promising future directions in this emergent field stemming from experimental and theoretical studies wherein SW-XPS is combined with other X-ray techniques, such as magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HAXPES), angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES), and photoemission microscopy (PEEM), adding extra dimensions to the measurement and thus widening the scope of scientific and technological questions accessible via the use of standing waves. I will further discuss examples of recently developed methods for X-ray standing-wave data analysis, which yield layer-resolved matrix-element-weighted densities of states at interfaces as well as Ångstrom-level changes in periodicity of synthetic superlattices. Finally, I will explore the possibility of localizing the standing waves near the surface and within a buried layer by the use of aperiodic superlattices, total reflection, and X-ray waveguide effects.

  19. Overview of shock waves in medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A brief overview of three applications of shock waves is presented. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been in clinical use for more than 20 years. In the United States it is used to treat more than 80% of kidney stone cases and has wide acceptance with patients because it is a noninvasive procedure. Despite SWLs enormous success there is no agreement on how shock waves comminute stones. There is also a general acceptance that shock waves lead to trauma to the soft tissue of the kidney. Yet there has been little forward progress in developing lithotripters which provide comminution with less side-effects, indeed the original machine is still considered the gold standard. The last decade has seen the advent of new shock wave devices for treating principally musculoskeletal indications, such as plantar fasciitis, tennis elbow, and bone fractures that do not heal. This is referred to as shock wave therapy (SWT). The mechanisms by which SWT works are even less well understood than SWL and the consequences of bioeffects have also not been studied in detail. Shock waves have also been shown to be effective at enhancing drug delivery into cells and assisting with gene transfection. [Work partially supported by NIH.

  20. Standing Shocks in the Inner Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Chen, Yan-Jun; Li, Xing

    2011-05-01

    We examine whether the now tube along the edge of a coronal streamer supports standing shocks in the inner slow wind by solving an isothermal wind model in terms of the Lambert W function. It is shown that solutions with standing shocks do exist and they exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and now tube. In particular, streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance ≳ 3.2Rodot can readily support discontinuous slow winds with temperatures barely higher than 1 MK.

  1. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcowith, A; Bret, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O'C; Lembège, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasis is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in association with particle acceleration processes with regards to the properties of the background upstream medium. It appears that among the most important parameters the background magnetic field through the magnetization and its obliquity is the dominant one. The shock velocity that can reach relativistic speeds has also a strong impact over the development of the micro-instabilities and the fate of particle acceleration. Recent developments of laboratory shock experiments has started to bring some new insights in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics.

  2. Standing waves in fiber-optic interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, V.; Santbergen, R.; Tijssen, M.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented giving the response of three types of fiber-optic interferometers by which a standing wave through an object is investigated. The three types are a Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder and Michelson–Morley interferometer. The response of the Mach–Zehnder interferometer is similar to the Sagnac

  3. Medical and biomedical applications of shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loske, Achim M

    2017-01-01

    This book provides current, comprehensive, and clear explanations of the physics behind medical and biomedical applications of shock waves. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is one of the greatest medical advances of our time, and its techniques and clinical devices are continuously evolving. Further research continues to improve the understanding of calculi fragmentation and tissue-damaging mechanisms. Shock waves are also used in orthopedics and traumatology. Possible applications in oncology, cardiology, dentistry, gene therapy, cell transfection, transformation of fungi and bacteria, as well as the inactivation of microorganisms are promising approaches for clinical treatment, industrial applications and research. Medical and Biomedical Applications of Shock Waves is useful as a guide for students, technicians and researchers working in universities and laboratories. Chemists, biologists, physicians and veterinarians, involved in research or clinical practice will find useful advice, but also engineer...

  4. Shock waves: The Maxwell-Cattaneo case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, F J

    2016-03-01

    Several continuum theories for shock waves give rise to a set of differential equations in which the analysis of the underlying vector field can be done using the tools of the theory of dynamical systems. We illustrate the importance of the divergences associated with the vector field by considering the ideas by Maxwell and Cattaneo and apply them to study shock waves in dilute gases. By comparing the predictions of the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations with shock wave experiments we are lead to the following conclusions: (a) For low compressions (low Mach numbers: M) the results from the Maxwell-Cattaneo equations provide profiles that are in fair agreement with the experiments, (b) as the Mach number is increased we find a range of Mach numbers (1.27 ≈ M(1) M_{2}) shock wave solutions can be found though they differ significantly from experiments.

  5. Density shock waves in confined microswimmers

    CERN Document Server

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Motile and driven particles confined in microfluidic channels exhibit interesting emergent behavior from propagating density bands to density shock waves. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for these emergent structures is relevant to a number of physical and biomedical applications. Here, we study the formation of density shock waves in the context of an idealized model of microswimmers confined in a narrow channel and subject to a uniform external flow. Interestingly, these density shock waves exhibit a transition from `subsonic' with compression at the back to `supersonic' with compression at the front of the population as the intensity of the external flow increases. This behavior is the result of a non-trivial interplay between hydrodynamic interactions and geometric confinement, and is confirmed by a novel quasilinear wave model that properly captures the dependence of the shock formation on the external flow. These findings can be used to guide the development of novel mechan...

  6. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book, as a volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library, is primarily concerned with detonation waves or compression shock waves in reactive heterogeneous media, including mixtures of solid, liquid and gas phases. The topics involve a variety of energy release and control processes in such media - a contemporary research field that has found wide applications in propulsion and power, hazard prevention as well as military engineering. The six extensive chapters contained in this volume are: - Spray Detonation (SB Murray and PA Thibault) - Detonation of Gas-Particle Flow (F Zhang) - Slurry Detonation (DL Frost and F Zhang) - Detonation of Metalized Composite Explosives (MF Gogulya and MA Brazhnikov) - Shock-Induced Solid-Solid Reactions and Detonations (YA Gordopolov, SS Batsanov, and VS Trofimov) - Shock Ignition of Particles (SM Frolov and AV Fedorov) Each chapter is self-contained and can be read independently of the others, though, they are thematically interrelated. They offer a t...

  7. Experimental Investigation of Shock Wave Surfing

    CERN Document Server

    Parziale, N J; Hornung, H G; Shepherd, J E

    2010-01-01

    Shock wave surfing is investigated experimentally in GALCIT's Mach 4.0 Ludwieg Tube. Shock wave surfing occurs when a secondary free-body follows the bow shock formed by a primary free-body; an example of shock wave surfing occurs during meteorite breakup. The free-bodies in the current investigation are nylon spheres. During each run in the Ludwieg tube a high speed camera is used to capture a series of schlieren images; edge tracking software is used to measure the position of each sphere. Velocity and acceleration are had from processing the position data. The radius ratio and initial orientation of the two spheres are varied in the test matrix. The variation of sphere radius ratio and initial angle between the centers of gravity are shown to have a significant effect on the dynamics of the system.

  8. Exhaust Nozzle Plume and Shock Wave Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Raymond S.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Cliff, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the exhaust plume. Both the nozzle exhaust plume shape and the tail shock shape may be affected by an interaction that may alter the vehicle sonic boom signature. The plume and shock interaction was studied using Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation on two types of convergent-divergent nozzles and a simple wedge shock generator. The nozzle plume effects on the lower wedge compression region are evaluated for two- and three-dimensional nozzle plumes. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the deflected lower plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the wedge is modified by the presence of the plume, and the computational predictions show significant (8 to 15 percent) changes in shock amplitude.

  9. MICROSCALE METROLOGY USING STANDING WAVE PROBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauza, M B; Woody, S C; Smith, S T; Seugling, R M; Darnell, I; Florando, J N

    2008-08-04

    Miniaturization has been one of the driving forces in the development of new technologies leading to new products in a variety of industries. As a result, the integration of components over several orders of magnitude on the length scale poses enormous challenges for quality assurance and control. Therefore, new solutions are necessary to meet the growing need for more challenging metrology tasks and metrology requirements in nano- and micro-technology. However, with miniaturization, new challenges arise such as the increased influence of adhesion, electrostatic, Van der Waals and meniscus forces that affect the measurement process. Technical solutions to overcome these micro- and nano-metrology challenges will include the need for traceability, new calibration procedures and calibration artifacts. Over the past decade many new metrology tools have been proposed, however; for contact based measurements, adhesion between the measurement probe and the specimen still proves to be one of the more difficult challenges to overcome. To address this issue, a new class of tactile sensing probe referred to as standing wave sensor has been developed and was previously presented. Previous work introduced the principle of operation of the standing wave senor. This work presents new measurements showing applications of the standing wave probe as the sensing element in a microscale high aspect ratio profiling system.

  10. Standing Sound Waves in Air with DataStudio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments related to standing sound waves in air are adapted for using the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. First, the standing waves are created by reflection from a plane reflector. The distribution of the sound pressure along the standing wave is measured. Second, the resonance…

  11. A Fresh Look at Longitudinal Standing Waves on a Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Transverse standing waves produced on a string, as shown in Fig. 1, are a common demonstration of standing wave patterns that have nodes at both ends. Longitudinal standing waves can be produced on a helical spring that is mounted vertically and attached to a speaker, as shown in Fig. 2, and used to produce both node-node (NN) and node-antinode…

  12. Shock Wave Structure in Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauls, Michael; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2015-06-01

    Shock wave experiments are conducted on a particulate composite consisting of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix reinforced by glass beads. Such a composite with an impedance mismatch of 4.3 closely mimics heterogeneous solids of interest such as concrete and energetic materials. The composite samples are prepared using a compression molding process. The structure and particle velocity rise times of the shocks are examined using forward ballistic experiments. Reverse ballistic experiments are used to track how the interface density influences velocity overshoot above the steady state particle velocity. The effects of particle size (0.1 to 1 mm) and volume fraction of glass beads (30-40%) on the structure of the leading shock wave are investigated. It is observed that the rise time increases with increasing particle size and scales linearly for the range of particle sizes considered here. Results from numerical simulations using CTH are compared with experimental results to gain insights into wave propagation in heterogeneous particulate composites.

  13. Shock wave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This book is the second of several volumes on solids in the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library. These volumes are primarily concerned with high-pressure shock waves in solid media, including detonation and high-velocity impact and penetration events. Of the four extensive chapters in this volume, the first two describe the reactive behavior of condensed phase explosives, - Condensed-Phase Explosives: Shock Initiation and Detonation Phenomena (SA Sheffield and R Engelke) - First Principles Molecular Simulations of Energetic Materials at High-Pressures (F Zhang, S Alavi, and TK Woo), and the remaining two discuss the inert, mechanical response of solid materials. - Combined Compression and Shear Plane Waves (ZP Tang and JB Aidun), and - Dynamic Fragmentation of Solids (D Grady). All chapters are each self-contained, and can be read independently of each other. They offer a timely reference, for beginners as well as professional scientists and engineers, on the foundations of detonation phenomen...

  14. Laser Light Scattering by Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Adamovsky, G.

    1995-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light as it propagates parallel to a shock wave, formed in front of a bluff cylindrical body placed in a supersonic stream, is studied experimentally and numerically. Two incident optical fields are considered. First, a large diameter collimated beam is allowed to pass through the shock containing flow. The light intensity distribution in the resultant shadowgraph image, measured by a low light CCD camera, shows well-defined fringes upstream and downstream of the shadow cast by the shock. In the second situation, a narrow laser beam is brought to a grazing incidence on the shock and the scattered light, which appears as a diverging sheet from the point of interaction, is visualized and measured on a screen placed normal to the laser path. Experiments are conducted on shocks formed at various free-stream Mach numbers, M, and total pressures, P(sub 0). It is found that the widths of the shock shadows in a shadowgraph image become independent of M and P(sub 0) when plotted against the jump in the refractive index, (Delta)n, created across the shock. The total scattered light measured from the narrow laser beam and shock interaction also follows the same trend. In the numerical part of the study, the shock is assumed to be a 'phase object', which introduces phase difference between the upstream and downstream propagating parts of the light disturbances. For a given shape and (Delta)n of the bow shock the phase and amplitude modulations are first calculated by ray tracing. The wave front is then propagated to the screen using the Fresnet diffraction equation. The calculated intensity distribution, for both of the incident optical fields, shows good agreement with the experimental data.

  15. Shock waves from nonspherical cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Tinguely, Marc; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Farhat, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    We present detailed observations of the shock waves emitted at the collapse of single cavitation bubbles using simultaneous time-resolved shadowgraphy and hydrophone pressure measurements. The geometry of the bubbles is systematically varied from spherical to very nonspherical by decreasing their distance to a free or rigid surface or by modulating the gravity-induced pressure gradient aboard parabolic flights. The nonspherical collapse produces multiple shocks that are clearly associated with different processes, such as the jet impact and the individual collapses of the distinct bubble segments. For bubbles collapsing near a free surface, the energy and timing of each shock are measured separately as a function of the anisotropy parameter ζ , which represents the dimensionless equivalent of the Kelvin impulse. For a given source of bubble deformation (free surface, rigid surface, or gravity), the normalized shock energy depends only on ζ , irrespective of the bubble radius R0 and driving pressure Δ p . Based on this finding, we develop a predictive framework for the peak pressure and energy of shock waves from nonspherical bubble collapses. Combining statistical analysis of the experimental data with theoretical derivations, we find that the shock peak pressures can be estimated as jet impact-induced hammer pressures, expressed as ph=0.45 (ρc2Δ p ) 1 /2ζ-1 at ζ >10-3 . The same approach is found to explain the shock energy decreasing as a function of ζ-2 /3.

  16. Propagation of a compression shock wave in He II induced by shock impingement

    OpenAIRE

    村上, 正秀; 上田, 康裕; 谷中, 一喜; 永井, 大樹; Masahide, MURAKAMI; Yasuhiro, UETA; Kazuyoshi, YANAKA; Hiroki, NAGAI; Hung Suk, YANG; 筑波大; Institute of Engineering Mechanics and Systems, University of Tsukuba

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of a compression shock wave in superfluid helium (He II) was experimentally investigated by using the superfluid shock tube facility. A shock wave is generated in He II by the impingement of a gas dynamic shock wave onto vapor-He II interface. In fact, upon the impingement two modes of shock waves, a compression and a thermal shock waves, are induced in He II. Here, we are only interested in the former. One of our research target is the shock-compressed phase transition (He II...

  17. Droplets bouncing on a standing wave field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Giuseppe; Tambasco, Lucas; Harris, Daniel; Bush, John

    2017-11-01

    A liquid bath subject to a vertical vibration becomes unstable to standing surface waves at a critical vibrational acceleration known as the Faraday threshold. We examine the behavior of a millimetric droplet bouncing on the surface of a quasi-one-dimensional fluid channel above the Faraday threshold. We identify a sequence of bifurcations that occurs as the vibrational acceleration is increased progressively, ultimately leading to the erratic, diffusive motion of the droplet along the length of the channel. A simple theoretical model is presented. This work was supported by the US National Science Foundation through Grants CMMI-1333242 and DMS-1614043.

  18. Observation and control of shock waves in individual nanoplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickstein, Daniel D; Dollar, Franklin; Gaffney, Jim A; Foord, Mark E; Petrov, George M; Palm, Brett B; Keister, K Ellen; Ellis, Jennifer L; Ding, Chengyuan; Libby, Stephen B; Jimenez, Jose L; Kapteyn, Henry C; Murnane, Margaret M; Xiong, Wei

    2014-03-21

    Using an apparatus that images the momentum distribution of individual, isolated 100-nm-scale plasmas, we make the first experimental observation of shock waves in nanoplasmas. We demonstrate that the introduction of a heating pulse prior to the main laser pulse increases the intensity of the shock wave, producing a strong burst of quasimonoenergetic ions with an energy spread of less than 15%. Numerical hydrodynamic calculations confirm the appearance of accelerating shock waves and provide a mechanism for the generation and control of these shock waves. This observation of distinct shock waves in dense plasmas enables the control, study, and exploitation of nanoscale shock phenomena with tabletop-scale lasers.

  19. Shock wave compression of condensed matter a primer

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Jerry W

    2012-01-01

    This book introduces the core concepts of the shock wave physics of condensed matter, taking a continuum mechanics approach to examine liquids and isotropic solids. The text primarily focuses on one-dimensional uniaxial compression in order to show the key features of condensed matter’s response to shock wave loading. The first four chapters are specifically designed to quickly familiarize physical scientists and engineers with how shock waves interact with other shock waves or material boundaries, as well as to allow readers to better understand shock wave literature, use basic data analysis techniques, and design simple 1-D shock wave experiments. This is achieved by first presenting the steady one-dimensional strain conservation laws using shock wave impedance matching, which insures conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Here, the initial emphasis is on the meaning of shock wave and mass velocities in a laboratory coordinate system. An overview of basic experimental techniques for measuring pressure...

  20. Physics and applications with laser-induced relativistic shock waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Eliezer; J M Martinez-Val; Z Henis; N Nissim; S V Pinhasi; A Ravid; M Werdiger; E Raicher

    2016-01-01

    The laser-induced relativistic shock waves are described. The shock waves can be created directly by a high irradiance laser or indirectly by a laser acceleration of a foil that collides with a second static foil...

  1. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  2. Shear Shock Waves Observed in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, David; Lee, Stephen; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2017-10-01

    The internal deformation of the brain is far more complex than the rigid motion of the skull. An ultrasound imaging technique that we have developed has a combination of penetration, frame-rate, and motion-detection accuracy required to directly observe the formation and evolution of shear shock waves in the brain. Experiments at low impacts on the traumatic-brain-injury scale demonstrate that they are spontaneously generated and propagate within the porcine brain. Compared to the initially smooth impact, the acceleration at the shock front is amplified up to a factor of 8.5. This highly localized increase in acceleration suggests that shear shock waves are a previously unappreciated mechanism that could play a significant role in traumatic brain injury.

  3. Flow control for oblique shock wave reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepman, R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave-boundary layer interactions are prevalent in many aerospace applications that involve transonic or supersonic flows. Such interactions may lead to boundary layer separation, flow unsteadiness and substantial losses in the total pressure. Flow control techniques can help to mitigate these

  4. Success of electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter asmonotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the success of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) as monotherapy for solitary renalstones larger than 2 cm without ureteral stenting. Hence, if our study result demonstrates acceptable successand safety, we can recommend ESWL as a treatment option for patients with large renal calculi. Subjects and ...

  5. Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannen, N.R.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2014-01-01

    From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the

  6. Nonequilibrium recombination after a curved shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chihyung; Hornung, Hans

    2010-02-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium recombination after a curved two-dimensional shock wave in a hypervelocity dissociating flow of an inviscid Lighthill-Freeman gas is considered. An analytical solution is obtained with the effective shock values derived by Hornung (1976) [5] and the assumption that the flow is ‘quasi-frozen’ after a thin dissociating layer near the shock. The solution gives the expression of dissociation fraction as a function of temperature on a streamline. A rule of thumb can then be provided to check the validity of binary scaling for experimental conditions and a tool to determine the limiting streamline that delineates the validity zone of binary scaling. The effects on the nonequilibrium chemical reaction of the large difference in free stream temperature between free-piston shock tunnel and equivalent flight conditions are discussed. Numerical examples are presented and the results are compared with solutions obtained with two-dimensional Euler equations using the code of Candler (1988) [10].

  7. Shock wave equation of state of powder material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A model is proposed to predict the following quantities for powder materials compacted by shock waves: the pressure, the specific volume, the internal energy behind the shock wave, and the shock-wave velocity U-s. They are calculated as a function of flyerplate velocity u(p) and initial powder

  8. High Temperature Phenomena in Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The high temperatures generated in gases by shock waves give rise to physical and chemical phenomena such as molecular vibrational excitation, dissociation, ionization, chemical reactions and inherently related radiation. In continuum regime, these processes start from the wave front, so that generally the gaseous media behind shock waves may be in a thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium state. This book presents the state of knowledge of these phenomena. Thus, the thermodynamic properties of high temperature gases, including the plasma state are described, as well as the kinetics of the various chemical phenomena cited above. Numerous results of measurement and computation of vibrational relaxation times, dissociation and reaction rate constants are given, and various ionization and radiative mechanisms and processes are presented. The coupling between these different phenomena is taken into account as well as their interaction with the flow-field. Particular points such as the case of rarefied flows an...

  9. Shock wave structure in heterogeneous reactive media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, M.R.

    1997-06-01

    Continuum mixture theory and mesoscale modeling are applied to describe the behavior of shock-loaded heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Detailed wave fields are resolved in numerical simulations of impact on a lattice of discrete explosive {open_quotes}crystals{close_quotes}. It is shown that rapid distortion first occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress over several particle pathlengths. Localization of energy causes {open_quotes}hot-spots{close_quotes} due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions.

  10. Standing wave tube electro active polymer wave energy converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Philippe; Wattez, Ambroise; Ardoise, Guillaume; Melis, C.; Van Kessel, R.; Fourmon, A.; Barrabino, E.; Heemskerk, J.; Queau, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 4 years SBM has developed a revolutionary Wave Energy Converter (WEC): the S3. Floating under the ocean surface, the S3 amplifies pressure waves similarly to a Ruben's tube. Only made of elastomers, the system is entirely flexible, environmentally friendly and silent. Thanks to a multimodal resonant behavior, the S3 is capable of efficiently harvesting wave energy from a wide range of wave periods, naturally smoothing the irregularities of ocean wave amplitudes and periods. In the S3 system, Electro Active Polymer (EAP) generators are distributed along an elastomeric tube over several wave lengths, they convert wave induced deformations directly into electricity. The output is high voltage multiphase Direct Current with low ripple. Unlike other conventional WECs, the S3 requires no maintenance of moving parts. The conception and operating principle will eventually lead to a reduction of both CAPEX and OPEX. By integrating EAP generators into a small scale S3, SBM achieved a world first: direct conversion of wave energy in electricity with a moored flexible submerged EAP WEC in a wave tank test. Through an extensive testing program on large scale EAP generators, SBM identified challenges in scaling up to a utility grid device. French Government supports the consortium consisting of SBM, IFREMER and ECN in their efforts to deploy a full scale prototype at the SEMREV test center in France at the horizon 2014-2015. SBM will be seeking strategic as well as financial partners to unleash the true potentials of the S3 Standing Wave Tube Electro Active Polymer WEC.

  11. Confining standing waves in optical corrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayan, Yelizaveta; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Li, Shuzhou; Gray, Stephen K; Schatz, George C; Odom, Teri W

    2009-03-24

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy images of solid wall, circular, and elliptical microscale corrals show standing wave patterns confined inside the structures with a wavelength close to that of the incident light. The patterns inside the corrals can be tuned by changing the size and material of the walls, the wavelength of incident light, and polarization direction for elliptical corrals. Finite-difference time-domain calculations of the corral structures agree with the experimental observations and reveal that the electric and magnetic field intensities are out of phase inside the corral. A theoretical modal analysis indicates that the fields inside the corrals can be attributed to p- and s-polarized waveguide modes, and that the superposition of the propagating and evanescent modes can explain the phase differences between the fields. These experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that electromagnetic fields on a dielectric surface can be controlled in a predictable manner.

  12. A model for shock wave chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Luiz; Kasimov, Aslan; Rosales, Rodolfo

    2012-11-01

    We propose the following simple model equation that describes chaotic shock waves: ut +1/2 (u2 -uus)x = f (x ,us) . It is given on the half-line x = 0 . Here us(t) is the shock state and f is a given source term [1]. The equation is a modification of the Burgers equation that includes non-locality via the presence of the shock-state value of the solution in the equation itself. The model predicts steady-state solutions, their instability through a Hopf bifurcation, and a sequence of period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos. This dynamics is similar to that observed in the one-dimensional reactive Euler equations that describe detonations. We present nonlinear numerical simulations as well as a complete linear stability theory for the equation. Supported by DMS-0907955 and KAUST Office of Competitive Research Grants.

  13. Shock waves in binary oxides memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesler, Federico; Tang, Shao; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Rozenberg, Marcelo

    2017-09-01

    Progress of silicon based technology is nearing its physical limit, as minimum feature size of components is reaching a mere 5 nm. The resistive switching behavior of transition metal oxides and the associated memristor device is emerging as a competitive technology for next generation electronics. Significant progress has already been made in the past decade and devices are beginning to hit the market; however, it has been mainly the result of empirical trial and error. Hence, gaining theoretical insight is of essence. In the present work we report a new connection between the resistive switching and shock wave formation, a classic topic of non-linear dynamics. We argue that the profile of oxygen ions that migrate during the commutation in insulating binary oxides may form a shock wave, which propagates through a poorly conductive region of the device. We validate the scenario by means of model simulations.

  14. Study of thermal shock wave in shock-compressed He II induced by gas dynamic shock wave impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. S.; Ueta, Y.; Nagai, H.; Murakami, M.; Yanaka, K.

    2002-05-01

    Strong thermal shock waves induced by the impingement of a gas dynamic shock wave onto a He II free surface in the superfluid shock tube facility were investigated by measuring temperature variation with superconductive temperature sensors and by Schlieren visualization method with an ultra high-speed video camera (40,500 pictures/sec). The heat transfer from shock-compressed high temperature vapor to He II forming a thermal shock wave is considered. The temperature rise ratio of an induced thermal shock to that of an incident gas dynamic shock wave was found to be very small, as small as 0.003 at 1.80 K. It is seen that the most part of the heat do not be transmitted into bulk He II because a high density quantized vortex layer is rapidly developed in a thermal boundary layer in the immediate vicinity of the vapor-He II interface. The existence of a thermal boundary layer with a large temperature gradient in which the physical state varies from supercritical helium to He II temperature and the rapid growth up to about 1 mm in thickness of the layer with such as thermal conduction process are measured with the temperature measurements. Besides, it is also found that high compressibility of He II results in formation of a dark zone near the interface region that is extended toward bulk He II.

  15. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaus B M Császár; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Stefan Milz; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Philippe Kobel; Mohamed Farhat; Furia, John P.; Christoph Schmitz

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical...

  16. Scattering of shock waves in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Balitsky

    2004-09-01

    The cross section of heavy-ion collisions is represented as a double functional integral with the saddle point being the classical solution of the Yang-Mills equations with boundary conditions/sources in the form of two shock waves corresponding to the two colliding ions. I develop the expansion of this classical solution in powers of the commutator of the Wilson lines describing the colliding particles and calculate the first two terms of the expansion.

  17. Ionospheric shock waves triggered by rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Lin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional structure of the shock wave signatures in ionospheric electron density resulting from a rocket transit using the rate of change of the total electron content (TEC derived from ground-based GPS receivers around Japan and Taiwan for the first time. From the TEC maps constructed for the 2009 North Korea (NK Taepodong-2 and 2013 South Korea (SK Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II (KSLV-II rocket launches, features of the V-shaped shock wave fronts in TEC perturbations are prominently seen. These fronts, with periods of 100–600 s, produced by the propulsive blasts of the rockets appear immediately and then propagate perpendicularly outward from the rocket trajectory with supersonic velocities between 800–1200 m s−1 for both events. Additionally, clear rocket exhaust depletions of TECs are seen along the trajectory and are deflected by the background thermospheric neutral wind. Twenty minutes after the rocket transits, delayed electron density perturbation waves propagating along the bow wave direction appear with phase velocities of 800–1200 m s−1. According to their propagation character, these delayed waves may be generated by rocket exhaust plumes at earlier rocket locations at lower altitudes.

  18. Bacterial transformation using micro-shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya Prakash, G; Anish, R V; Jagadeesh, G; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2011-12-15

    Shock waves are one of the most competent mechanisms of energy dissipation observed in nature. We have developed a novel device to generate controlled micro-shock waves using an explosive-coated polymer tube. In this study, we harnessed these controlled micro-shock waves to develop a unique bacterial transformation method. The conditions were optimized for the maximum transformation efficiency in Escherichia coli. The maximum transformation efficiency was obtained when we used a 30 cm length polymer tube, 100 μm thick metal foil, 200 mM CaCl(2), 1 ng/μl plasmid DNA concentration, and 1×10(9) cell density. The highest transformation efficiency achieved (1×10(-5) transformants/cell) was at least 10 times greater than the previously reported ultrasound-mediated transformation (1×10(-6) transformants/cell). This method was also successfully employed for the efficient and reproducible transformation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhimurium. This novel method of transformation was shown to be as efficient as electroporation with the added advantage of better recovery of cells, reduced cost (40 times cheaper than a commercial electroporator), and growth phase independent transformation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Shock Waves and Commutation Speed of Memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao; Tesler, Federico; Marlasca, Fernando Gomez; Levy, Pablo; Dobrosavljević, V.; Rozenberg, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Progress of silicon-based technology is nearing its physical limit, as the minimum feature size of components is reaching a mere 10 nm. The resistive switching behavior of transition metal oxides and the associated memristor device is emerging as a competitive technology for next-generation electronics. Significant progress has already been made in the past decade, and devices are beginning to hit the market; however, this progress has mainly been the result of empirical trial and error. Hence, gaining theoretical insight is of the essence. In the present work, we report the striking result of a connection between the resistive switching and shock-wave formation, a classic topic of nonlinear dynamics. We argue that the profile of oxygen vacancies that migrate during the commutation forms a shock wave that propagates through a highly resistive region of the device. We validate the scenario by means of model simulations and experiments in a manganese-oxide-based memristor device, and we extend our theory to the case of binary oxides. The shock-wave scenario brings unprecedented physical insight and enables us to rationalize the process of oxygen-vacancy-driven resistive change with direct implications for a key technological aspect—the commutation speed.

  20. The Shock Wave in the ionosphere during an Earthquake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentally new model of the shock wave (SW generation in atmosphere and ionosphere during earthquake is proposed. The model proceeds from the idea of cooperative shock water crystallization in a cloud.

  1. Shock Waves Science and Technology Library

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book, as a volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library, is primarily concerned with the fundamental theory of detonation physics in gaseous and condensed phase reactive media. The detonation process involves complex chemical reaction and fluid dynamics, accompanied by intricate effects of heat, light, electricity and magnetism - a contemporary research field that has found wide applications in propulsion and power, hazard prevention as well as military engineering. The seven extensive chapters contained in this volume are: - Chemical Equilibrium Detonation (S. Bastea and LE Fried) - Steady One-Dimensional Detonations (A Higgins) - Detonation Instability (HD Ng and F Zhang) - Dynamic Parameters of Detonation (AA Vasiliev) - Multi-Scaled Cellular Detonation (D Desbordes and HN Presles) - Condensed Matter Detonation: Theory and Practice (C Tarver) - Theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (JB Bdzil and DS Stewart) The chapters are thematically interrelated in a systematic descriptive appro...

  2. Supersonic shock wave/vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settles, G. S.; Cattafesta, L.

    1993-01-01

    Although shock wave/vortex interaction is a basic and important fluid dynamics problem, very little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, a detailed experimental study of the interaction between a supersonic streamwise turbulent vortex and a shock wave was carried out at the Penn State Gas Dynamics Laboratory. A vortex is produced by replaceable swirl vanes located upstream of the throat of various converging-diverging nozzles. The supersonic vortex is then injected into either a coflowing supersonic stream or ambient air. The structure of the isolated vortex is investigated in a supersonic wind tunnel using miniature, fast-response, five-hole and total temperature probes and in a free jet using laser Doppler velocimetry. The cases tested have unit Reynolds numbers in excess of 25 million per meter, axial Mach numbers ranging from 2.5 to 4.0, and peak tangential Mach numbers from 0 (i.e., a pure jet) to about 0.7. The results show that the typical supersonic wake-like vortex consists of a non-isentropic, rotational core, where the reduced circulation distribution is self similar, and an outer isentropic, irrotational region. The vortex core is also a region of significant turbulent fluctuations. Radial profiles of turbulent kinetic energy and axial-tangential Reynolds stress are presented. The interactions between the vortex and both oblique and normal shock waves are investigated using nonintrusive optical diagnostics (i.e. schlieren, planar laser scattering, and laser Doppler velocimetry). Of the various types, two Mach 2.5 overexpanded-nozzle Mach disc interactions are examined in detail. Below a certain vortex strength, a 'weak' interaction exists in which the normal shock is perturbed locally into an unsteady 'bubble' shock near the vortex axis, but vortex breakdown (i.e., a stagnation point) does not occur. For stronger vortices, a random unsteady 'strong' interaction results that causes vortex breakdown. The vortex core reforms downstream of

  3. When shock is shocked: Riemann problem dynamics at pulse ionization of a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshchenko, Igor; Znamenskaya, Irina; Koroteev, Dmitry; Kuli-zade, Tahir

    2017-10-01

    We study the dynamics of the gas flow discontinuities after pulse ionization of a half space in front of a flat shock wave moving in a channel. Pulse volumetric electric discharge initiated in the vicinity of the shock concentrates in front of the shock and heats the gas there. The heating is shown to be very rapid. We use the shadow imaging technique and a high speed camera to study the flow pattern evolution after the discharge. The pattern consists of two shocks separated by a contact surface. This structure corresponds to the classical Riemann problem formulation. Based on the observed pattern, we estimate the amount of discharge energy converted to heat during the discharge time: the rate of temperature increase is in the order of several degrees K per nanosecond.

  4. Solitary versus Shock Wave Acceleration in Laser-Plasma Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed.

  5. Solitary versus shock wave acceleration in laser-plasma interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchi, Andrea; Nindrayog, Amritpal Singh; Pegoraro, Francesco

    2012-04-01

    The excitation of nonlinear electrostatic waves, such as shock and solitons, by ultraintense laser interaction with overdense plasmas and related ion acceleration are investigated by numerical simulations. Stability of solitons and formation of shock waves is strongly dependent on the velocity distribution of ions. Monoenergetic components in ion spectra are produced by "pulsed" reflection from solitary waves. Possible relevance to recent experiments on "shock acceleration" is discussed.

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in urology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojecki, Grzegorz Lukasz; Thiessen, Stefan; Osther, Palle Jörn Sloth

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective was to evaluate high-level evidence studies of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for urological disorders. METHODS: We included randomized controlled trials reporting outcomes of ESWT in urology. Literature search on trials published in English using EMBASE, Medline......i) responders in 2 of 4 trials and 3 of 4 trials, respectively. Three studies on chronic pelvic pain (CPP) engaging 200 men reported positive changes in National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI). There was considerable heterogeneity between trials both with regard...

  7. On the interplay between cosmological shock waves and their environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Alvarez, Sergio; Planelles, Susana; Quilis, Vicent

    2017-05-01

    Cosmological shock waves are tracers of the thermal history of the structures in the Universe. They play a crucial role in redistributing the energy within the cosmic structures and are also amongst the main ingredients of galaxy and galaxy cluster formation. Understanding this important function requires a proper description of the interplay between shocks and the different environments where they can be found. In this paper, an Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) Eulerian cosmological simulation is analysed by means of a shock-finding algorithm that allows to generate shock wave maps. Based on the population of dark matter halos and on the distribution of density contrast in the simulation, we classify the shocks in five different environments. These range from galaxy clusters to voids. The shock distribution function and the shocks power spectrum are studied for these environments dynamics. We find that shock waves on different environments undergo different formation and evolution processes, showing as well different characteristics. We identify three different phases of formation, evolution and dissipation of these shock waves, and an intricate migration between distinct environments and scales. Shock waves initially form at external, low density regions and are merged and amplified through the collapse of structures. Shock waves and cosmic structures follow a parallel evolution. Later on, shocks start to detach from them and dissipate. We also find that most of the power that shock waves dissipate is found at scales of k ˜0.5 Mpc^{-1}, with a secondary peak at k ˜8 Mpc^{-1}. The evolution of the shocks power spectrum confirms that shock waves evolution is coupled and conditioned by their environment.

  8. Shock wave equation of state of powder material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijken, D. K.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    1994-01-01

    A model is proposed to predict the following quantities for powder materials compacted by shock waves: the pressure, the specific volume, the internal energy behind the shock wave, and the shock-wave velocity Us. They are calculated as a function of flyerplate velocity up and initial powder specific volume V00. The model is tested on Cu, Al2024, and Fe. Calculated Us vs up curves agree well with experiments provided V00 is smaller than about two times the solid specific volume. The model can be used to predict shock-wave state points of powder or solid material with a lower or higher initial temperature than room temperature.

  9. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Császár, Nikolaus B M; Angstman, Nicholas B; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that "kick-starts" the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating massage devices and should be used with due caution in clinical practice.

  10. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus B M Császár

    Full Text Available Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues.We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA. To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans worms.FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device.The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices.Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that "kick-starts" the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating massage devices and should be used with due caution in clinical

  11. Observation and control of shock waves in individual nanoplasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hickstein, Daniel D; Gaffney, Jim A; Foord, Mark E; Petrov, George M; Palm, Brett B; Keister, K Ellen; Ellis, Jennifer L; Ding, Chengyuan; Libby, Stephen B; Jimenez, Jose L; Kapteyn, Henry C; Murnane, Margaret M; Xiong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In a novel experiment that images the momentum distribution of individual, isolated 100-nm-scale plasmas, we make the first experimental observation of shock waves in nanoplasmas. We demonstrate that the introduction of a heating pulse prior to the main laser pulse increases the intensity of the shock wave, producing a strong burst of quasi-monochromatic ions with an energy spread of less than 15%. Numerical hydrodynamic calculations confirm the appearance of accelerating shock waves, and provide a mechanism for the generation and control of these shock waves. This observation of distinct shock waves in dense plasmas enables the control, study, and exploitation of nanoscale shock phenomena with tabletop-scale lasers.

  12. Shock Wave Diffraction Phenomena around Slotted Splitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Gnani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of aerospace engineering, the study of the characteristics of vortical flows and their unsteady phenomena finds numerous engineering applications related to improvements in the design of tip devices, enhancement of combustor performance, and control of noise generation. A large amount of work has been carried out in the analysis of the shock wave diffraction around conventional geometries such as sharp and rounded corners, but the employment of splitters with lateral variation has hardly attracted the attention of researchers. The investigation of this phenomenon around two-dimensional wedges has allowed the understanding of the basic physical principles of the flow features. On the other hand, important aspects that appear in the third dimension due to the turbulent nature of the vortices are omitted. The lack of studies that use three-dimensional geometries has motivated the current work to experimentally investigate the evolution of the shock wave diffraction around two splitters with spike-shaped structures for Mach numbers of 1.31 and 1.59. Schlieren photography was used to obtain an insight into the sequential diffraction processes that take place in different planes. Interacting among them, these phenomena generate a complicated turbulent cloud with a vortical arrangement.

  13. Methane and Ethanol Ignition Behind Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Matveeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toughening environmental standards for concentration of emitting greenhouse gas (GHG and soot particulates in combustion of the hydrocarbon fuels initiate development of new fuels. One of the perspectives for development is the partial or complete replacement of fossil fuels with biofuel. Alcohols and, in particular, ethanol are the promising types of biofuel. A number of publications experimentally show the use of ethanol as an additive to the traditional fuels in internal combustion engines with forced ignition and self-ignition. The paper carries out an experimental study of the ignition of stoichiometric mixtures of methane / oxygen, ethanol / oxygen and methane / ethanol / oxygen behind shock waves. The experiments were conducted in a shock tube of standard construction behind reflected shock waves in the range of temperatures and pressures, respectively, 1140-1825 K and 4.82-5.98 bars. The temperature dependences of the ignition delays were measured for mixtures of 3.3% CH4 + 6.7% O2 + Ar, 2.5% C2H5OH + 7.5% O2 + Ar, 1.5% CH4 + 1.5% C2H5OH + 7.5% O2 + Ar. It is shown that the addition of ethanol to the methane / oxygen mixture reduces a value of the ignition delays. A kinetic simulation of the ignition process of the combustible compositions under study was carried out. The experimental data were used to try out the kinetic mechanisms from the literature. For one mechanism, we failed to reach a good agreement with experimental data for all three variants of the mixtures studied. The paper analyses the change in the kinetic ways of ethanol consumption and formation in combustion of the ethanol-methane mixture and shows a disagreement between the existing kinetic mechanisms. The new experimental data obtained in the paper can further help when developing the kinetic mechanisms of combustion of various traditional fuel mixtures with alcohols, in particular, with ethanol.

  14. Page 1 Shock-wave-turbulent-boundary-layer interaction & its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shock .. rehabilitation shock with a turbulent boundary phase asºn: phase layer: M., + 1.47 (from Seddon. p x / So 1960). al 1977). Figures 16 and 17 show some of the important features of the separated flow and the surface pressure distributions as observed by Seddon (1960). The strong normal shock wave bifurcates near ...

  15. Multiple structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    The structure of a laser-induced underwater shock wave is examined. Plasma formation, shock-wave expansion, and temporal evolution of shock pressure are observed simultaneously using a combined measurement system that obtains high-resolution nanosecond-order image sequences. In contrast to a well-known spherical-shock model, these detailed measurements reveal a non-spherically-symmteric distribution of pressure peak for a wide range of experimental parameters. The structure is determined to be a collection of multiple spherical shocks originated from elongated plasmas.

  16. Stationary Density Variation Produced by a Standing Plasma Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    Measurements are presented of a stationary density modulation produced by a standing electron plasma wave. The experimental results are well explained by taking into account the ponderomotive forces on the electrons exerted by the high frequency field.......Measurements are presented of a stationary density modulation produced by a standing electron plasma wave. The experimental results are well explained by taking into account the ponderomotive forces on the electrons exerted by the high frequency field....

  17. Interplanetary shock waves and the structure of solar wind disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Observations and theoretical models of interplanetary shock waves are reviewed, with emphasis on the large-scale characteristics of the associated solar wind disturbances and on the relationship of these disturbances to solar activity. The sum of observational knowledge indicates that shock waves propagate through the solar wind along a broad, roughly spherical front, ahead of plasma and magnetic field ejected from solar flares. Typically, the shock front reaches 1 AU about two days after its flare origin, and is of intermediate strength. Not all large flares produce observable interplanetary shock waves; the best indicator of shock production appears to be the generation of both type 2 and type 4 radio bursts by a flare. Theoretical models of shock propagation in the solar wind can account for the typically observed shock strength, transit time, and shape.

  18. Shock wave focusing in water inside convergent structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiments on shock focusing in water-filled convergent structures have been performed. A shock wave in water is generated by means of a projectile, launched from a gas gun, which impacts a water-filled convergent structure. Two types of structures have been tested; a bulk material and a thin shell structure. The geometric shape of the convergent structures is given by a logarithmic spiral, and this particular shape is chosen because it maximizes the amount of energy reaching the focal region. High-speed schlieren photography is used to visualize the shock dynamics during the focusing event. Results show that the fluid-structure interaction between the thin shell structure and the shock wave in the water is different from that of a bulk structure; multiple reflections of the shock wave inside the thin shell are reflected back into the water, thus creating a wave train, which is not observed for shock focusing in a bulk material.

  19. Unfocused Extracorporeal Shock Waves Induce Anabolic Effects in Rat Bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.P. van der Jagt (Olav); T.M. Piscaer (Tom); W. Schaden (Wolfgang); J. Li; N. Kops (Nicole); H. Jahr (Holger); J.C. van der Linden (Jacqueline); J.H. Waarsing (Jan); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. de Jong (Marion); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract. BACKGROUND: Extracorporeal shock waves are known to stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells toward osteoprogenitors and induce the expression of osteogenic-related growth hormones. The aim of this study was to investigate if and how extracorporeal shock waves

  20. The mechanism of shock wave treatment in bone healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Jen

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological mechanism of shock wave treatment in bone healing in rabbits. A closed fracture of the right femur was created with a three-point bend method and the fracture was stabilized with an intra-medullary pin. Shock waves were applied one week after the fracture. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1 (the control) received no shock waves; group 2 received low-energy and group 3 high-energy shock waves. The animals were sacrificed at 24 weeks, and a 5-cm segment of the femur bone including the callus was harvested. The specimens were studied with histomorphological examination, biomechanical analysis and immunohistochemical stains. The results showed that high-energy shock waves improved bone healing with significant increases in cortical bone formation and the number neovascularization in histomorphology, better bone strength and bone mass in biomechanics, and increased expressions of angiogenic growth markers including BMP-2, eNOS, VEGF and PCNA than the control and low-energy shock wave groups. The effect of shock wave treatment appears to be dose-dependent. In conclusion, high-energy shock waves promote bone healing associated with ingrowth of neovascularization and increased expressions of angiogenic growth factors.

  1. Shock Mechanism Analysis and Simulation of High-Power Hydraulic Shock Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of regular shock wave (e.g., half-sine can be achieved by the traditional rubber shock simulator, but the practical high-power shock wave characterized by steep prepeak and gentle postpeak is hard to be realized by the same. To tackle this disadvantage, a novel high-power hydraulic shock wave simulator based on the live firing muzzle shock principle was proposed in the current work. The influence of the typical shock characteristic parameters on the shock force wave was investigated via both theoretical deduction and software simulation. According to the obtained data compared with the results, in fact, it can be concluded that the developed hydraulic shock wave simulator can be applied to simulate the real condition of the shocking system. Further, the similarity evaluation of shock wave simulation was achieved based on the curvature distance, and the results stated that the simulation method was reasonable and the structural optimization based on software simulation is also beneficial to the increase of efficiency. Finally, the combination of theoretical analysis and simulation for the development of artillery recoil tester is a comprehensive approach in the design and structure optimization of the recoil system.

  2. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-López, L; Ocaña, R; Porro, J A; Morales, M; Ocaña, J L

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  3. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  4. THE ROLE OF SUPERLUMINAL ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES IN PULSAR WIND TERMINATION SHOCKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Takanobu [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kirk, John G., E-mail: amano@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-06-10

    The dynamics of a standing shock front in a Poynting-flux-dominated relativistic flow is investigated by using a one-dimensional, relativistic, two-fluid simulation. An upstream flow containing a circularly polarized, sinusoidal magnetic shear wave is considered, mimicking a wave driven by an obliquely rotating pulsar. It is demonstrated that this wave is converted into large-amplitude electromagnetic waves with superluminal phase speeds by interacting with the shock when the shock-frame frequency of the wave exceeds the proper plasma frequency. The superluminal waves propagate in the upstream, modify the shock structure substantially, and form a well-developed precursor region ahead of a subshock. Dissipation of Poynting flux occurs in the precursor as well as in the downstream region through a parametric instability driven by the superluminal waves. The Poynting flux remaining in the downstream region is carried entirely by the superluminal waves. The downstream plasma is therefore an essentially unmagnetized, relativistically hot plasma with a non-relativistic flow speed, as suggested by observations of pulsar wind nebulae.

  5. A new shock wave assisted sandalwood oil extraction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, A. N.; Srinivasa, Y. B.; Ravikumar, G.; Shankaranarayana, K. H.; Rao, K. S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    A new shock wave assisted oil extraction technique from sandalwood has been developed in the Shock Waves Lab, IISc, Bangalore. The fragrant oil extracted from sandalwood finds variety of applications in medicine and perfumery industries. In the present method sandal wood specimens (2.5mm diameter and 25mm in length)are subjected to shock wave loading (over pressure 15 bar)in a constant area shock tube, before extracting the sandal oil using non-destructive oil extraction technique. The results from the study indicates that both the rate of extraction as well as the quantity of oil obtained from sandal wood samples exposed to shock waves are higher (15-40 percent) compared to non-destructive oil extraction technique. The compressive squeezing of the interior oil pockets in the sandalwood specimen due to shock wave loading appears to be the main reason for enhancement in the oil extraction rate. This is confirmed by the presence of warty structures in the cross-section and micro-fissures in the radial direction of the wood samples exposed to shock waves in the scanning electron microscopic investigation. In addition the gas chromatographic studies do not show any change in the q uality of sandal oil extracted from samples exposed to shock waves.

  6. Cytoplasmic molecular delivery with shock waves: importance of impulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, T; Hamblin, M R; Doukas, A G

    2000-10-01

    Cell permeabilization using shock waves may be a way of introducing macromolecules and small polar molecules into the cytoplasm, and may have applications in gene therapy and anticancer drug delivery. The pressure profile of a shock wave indicates its energy content, and shock-wave propagation in tissue is associated with cellular displacement, leading to the development of cell deformation. In the present study, three different shock-wave sources were investigated; argon fluoride excimer laser, ruby laser, and shock tube. The duration of the pressure pulse of the shock tube was 100 times longer than the lasers. The uptake of two fluorophores, calcein (molecular weight: 622) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (molecular weight: 71,600), into HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cells was investigated. The intracellular fluorescence was measured by a spectrofluorometer, and the cells were examined by confocal fluorescence microscopy. A single shock wave generated by the shock tube delivered both fluorophores into approximately 50% of the cells (p shock waves from the lasers did not. The cell survival fraction was >0.95. Confocal microscopy showed that, in the case of calcein, there was a uniform fluorescence throughout the cell, whereas, in the case of FITC-dextran, the fluorescence was sometimes in the nucleus and at other times not. We conclude that the impulse of the shock wave (i.e., the pressure integrated over time), rather than the peak pressure, was a dominant factor for causing fluorophore uptake into living cells, and that shock waves might have changed the permeability of the nuclear membrane and transferred molecules directly into the nucleus.

  7. Experimental investigation of stress wave propagation in standing trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang; Juan Su

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how a stress wave travels in a standing tree as it is introduced into the tree trunk through a mechanical impact. A series of stress wave time-of-flight (TOF) data were obtained from three freshly-cut red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) logs by means of a two-probe stress wave timer. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (...

  8. Medical applications and bioeffects of extracorporeal shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delius, M.

    1994-09-01

    Lithotripter shock waves are pressure pulses of microsecond duration with peak pressures of 35 120 MPa followed by a tensile wave. They are an established treatment modality for kidney and gallstone disease. Further applications are pancreatic and salivary stones, as well as delayed fracture healing. The latter are either on their way to become established treatments or are currently under investigation. Shock waves generate tissue damage as a side effect which has been extensively investigated in the kidney, the liver, and the gallbladder. The primary adverse effects are local destruction of blood vessels, bleedings, and formation of blood clots in vessels. Investigations on the mechanism of shock wave action revealed that lithotripters generate cavitation both in vitro and in vivo. An increase in tissue damage at higher pulse administration rates, and also at shock wave application with concomitant gas bubble injection suggested that cavitation is a major mechanism of tissue damage. Disturbances of the heart rhythm and excitation of nerves are further biological effects of shock waves; both are probably also mediated by cavitation. On the cellular level, shock waves induce damage to cell organelles; its extent is related to their energy density. They also cause a transient increase in membrane permeability which does not lead to cell death. Administered either alone or in combination with drugs, shock waves have been shown to delay the growth of small animal tumors and even induce tumor remissions. While the role of cavitation in biological effects is widely accepted, the mechanism of stone fragmentation by shock waves is still controversial. Cavitation is detected around the stone and hyperbaric pressure suppresses fragmentation; yet major cracks are formed early before cavitation bubble collapse is observed. The latter has been regarded as evidence for a direct shock wave effect.

  9. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  10. Geometry of fast magnetosonic rays, wavefronts and shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Manuel, E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2016-11-25

    Fast magnetosonic waves in a two-dimensional plasma are studied in the geometrical optics approximation. The geometry of rays and wavefronts influences decisively the formation and ulterior evolution of shock waves. It is shown that the curvature of the curve where rays start and the angle between rays and wavefronts are the main parameters governing a wide variety of possible outcomes. - Highlights: • Magnetosonic waves are studied in a genuinely multidimensional setting. • Curvature and the angle between rays and wavefronts are the main parameters. • Shock waves may exist or not, depending on initial conditions. • Both velocity and shape of those waves present a large variety of possible outcomes.

  11. Attenuation of laser-generated shock waves in Plexiglas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Xu, Rong-Qing; Yang, Bo; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2006-01-10

    A simple analytic model is derived for describing the attenuation of a shock wave in a Plexiglas plate. At the same time, experimental measurements are presented with a well-designed optical-fiber sensor based on detection-beam deflection. The amplitude of the shock-wave pressure is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for analytic expressions at different distances from the region of the surface breakdown by the radiation of a single-pulse Nd:YAG laser. Good agreement between the experimental and the calculated values of the shock-wave pressure is established.

  12. Electromagnetic shock wave in nonlinear vacuum: exact solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovachev, Lubomir M; Georgieva, Daniela A; Kovachev, Kamen L

    2012-10-01

    An analytical approach to the theory of electromagnetic waves in nonlinear vacuum is developed. The evolution of the pulse is governed by a system of nonlinear wave vector equations. An exact solution with its own angular momentum in the form of a shock wave is obtained.

  13. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  14. Standing Waves and Inquiry Using Water Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Dina; Vondracek, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Most high school and introductory college physics classes study simple harmonic motion and various wave phenomena. With the majority of states adopting the Next Generation Science Standards and pushing students to explore the scientific process for themselves, there is a growing demand for hands-on inquiry activities that involve and develop more…

  15. A Standing-Wave Experiment with a Guitar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Fred W.

    2006-10-01

    When teaching standing waves, one often uses as examples musical instruments with strings, e.g., pianos, violins, and guitars. In today's popular music culture, young people may be more familiar with guitars than any other string instrument. I was helping my 15-year-old granddaughter make some repairs and adjustments to her electric guitar, and the subject of the spacing between the frets on the fingerboard was raised. I told her that the physics of standing waves and the equal tempered musical scale dictate the location of the frets. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that students might be introduced to the physics of standing waves using a guitar and to the formula for the fret locations. By measuring the positions of the frets, this formula can be tested.

  16. Shock-wave micron-size diamond synthesis from fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epanchintsev, O.G.; Zubchenko, A.S.; Kobelev, N.N. [Federal Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Shock-wave synthesis of micron-size diamond is performed from fullerenes C{sub 60} -- C {sub 150} powders using the explosive compaction technique with plane shock-wave loading at different pressures in the range of 24-40 GPa. The compacts of different initial compositions consisted of diamond, fcc fullerite C{sub 60}, graphite and amorphous carbon. The most coarse diamond grains sized up to 6 {mu}n were formed at the shock pressure of 24 and 40 GPa in the compacts of initial powder mixture copper-5 mass.% fullerite and at shock pressure of 40 GPa in the compact of initial powder mixture copper - 10 mass.% fullerite. Shock-wave synthesis of diamond is performed without forming intermediate diamond-like phases, such as n-diamond and lonsdaleite (hexagonal diamond) in the final products.

  17. Propagation and dispersion of shock waves in magnetoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, R. S.; Domann, J. P.; Carman, G. P.; Gupta, V.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies examining the response of magnetoelastic materials to shock waves have predominantly focused on applications involving pulsed power generation, with limited attention given to the actual wave propagation characteristics. This study provides detailed magnetic and mechanical measurements of magnetoelastic shock wave propagation and dispersion. Laser generated rarefacted shock waves exceeding 3 GPa with rise times of 10 ns were introduced to samples of the magnetoelastic material Galfenol. The resulting mechanical measurements reveal the evolution of the shock into a compressive acoustic front with lateral release waves. Importantly, the wave continues to disperse even after it has decayed into an acoustic wave, due in large part to magnetoelastic coupling. The magnetic data reveal predominantly shear wave mediated magnetoelastic coupling, and were also used to noninvasively measure the wave speed. The external magnetic field controlled a 30% increase in wave propagation speed, attributed to a 70% increase in average stiffness. Finally, magnetic signals propagating along the sample over 20× faster than the mechanical wave were measured, indicating these materials can act as passive antennas that transmit information in response to mechanical stimuli.

  18. High-speed imaging of dynamic shock wave reflection phenomena

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, K

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic shock wave reflection generated by a rapidly pitching wedge in a steady supersonic free stream has been studied with numerical simulation previously. An experimental facility was developed for the investigation of these dynamic phenomena...

  19. Shock Waves in the Treatment of Muscle Hypertonia and Dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997, focused shock waves therapy (FSWT has been reported to be useful in the treatment of muscle hypertonia and dystonia. More recently, also radial shock wave therapy (RSWT has been successfully used to treat muscle hypertonia. The studies where FSWT and RSWT have been used to treat muscle hypertonia and dystonia are reviewed in this paper. The more consistent and long lasting results were obtained in the lower limb muscles of patients affected by cerebral palsy with both FSWT and RSWT and in the distal upper limb muscles of adult stroke patients using FSWT. The most probable mechanism of action is a direct effect of shock waves on muscle fibrosis and other nonreflex components of muscle hypertonia. However, we believe that up to now the biological effects of shock waves on muscle hypertonia and dystonia cannot be clearly separated from a placebo effect.

  20. Multi-layer protective armour for underwater shock wave mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hawass

    2015-12-01

    The strain gauge data and displacement sensors results showed that the multi-layer plates have higher level of underwater shock wave mitigation than the triple aluminum plates with strain and deflection of nearly 50%.

  1. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P...

  2. Shock wave propagation in soda lime glass using optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Propagation of shock waves in soda lime glass, which is a transparent material, has been studied using the optical shadowgraphy technique. The time-resolved shock velocity information has been obtained (1) in single shot, using the chirped pulse shadowgraphy technique, with a temporal resolution of tens of picoseconds ...

  3. Shock wave propagation in soda lime glass using optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-16

    Jun 16, 2016 ... ties, they create a near discontinuity in material prop- erties like pressure, temperature, and density across the shock front. These material properties, before and after the shock wave propagation, are related to each other through the well-known Rankine–Hugoniot equations. [10]. ρ0Us = ρ1(Us − Up),. (1).

  4. Tracking kidney stones with sound during shock wave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracht, Jonathan M.

    The prevalence of kidney stones has increased significantly over the past decades. One of the primary treatments for kidney stones is shock wave lithotripsy which focuses acoustic shock waves onto the stone in order to fragment it into pieces that are small enough to pass naturally. This typically requires a few thousand shock waves delivered at a rate of about 2 Hz. Although lithotripsy is the only non-invasive treatment option for kidney stories, both acute and chronic complications have been identified which could be reduced if fewer shock waves were used. One factor that could be used to reduce the number of shock waves is accounting for the motion of the stone which causes a portion of the delivered shock waves to miss the stone, yielding no therapeutic benefit. Therefore identifying when the stone is not in focus would allow tissue to be spared without affecting fragmentation. The goal of this thesis is to investigate acoustic methods to track the stone in real-time during lithotripsy in order to minimize poorly-targeted shock waves. A relatively small number of low frequency ultrasound transducers were used in pulse-echo mode and a novel optimization routine based on time-of-flight triangulation is used to determine stone location. It was shown that the accuracy of the localization may be estimated without knowing the true stone location. This method performed well in preliminary experiments but the inclusion of tissue-like aberrating layers reduced the accuracy of the localization. Therefore a hybrid imaging technique employing DORT (Decomposition of the Time Reversal Operator) and the MUSIC (Multiple Signal Classification) algorithm was developed. This method was able to localize kidney stories to within a few millimeters even in the presence of an aberrating layer. This would be sufficient accuracy for targeting lithotripter shock waves. The conclusion of this work is that tracking kidney stones with low frequency ultrasound should be effective clinically.

  5. ULF waves upstream of the Venus bow shock - Properties of one-hertz waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.

    1991-01-01

    Pioneer Venus Orbiter data are used here to study the properties of a class of ULF upstream waves with relatively high observed frequencies. These waves show significant similarity to 'one-Hz' waves identified at earth in the ISEE 1 and 2 observations and the whistler waves identified earlier by IMP 6 observations. The waves appear almost immediately after the spacecraft crosses the magnetic field tangent line to the bow shock surface into the region of connected field lines. The wave amplitude decreases with distance from the shock measured along the magnetic field line. Group velocities calculated using the cold plasma dispersion relation indicate that the waves have sufficient upstream velocities to propagate form the shock into the solar wind. The totality of observations seem best explained by a source of right-handed whistler mode waves at the bow shock.

  6. Deconvolution of acoustically detected bubble-collapse shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Kristoffer; Song, Jae Hee; Johnston, Keith; Prentice, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The shock wave emitted by the collapse of a laser-induced bubble is detected at propagation distances of 30, 40and50mm, using a PVdF needle hydrophone, with a non-flat end-of-cable frequency response, calibrated for magnitude and phase, from 125kHz to 20MHz. High-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 5×106 frames per second, 10nstemporal resolution and 256 frames per sequence, records the bubble deflation from maximum to minimum radius, the collapse and shock wave generation, and the subsequent rebound in unprecedented detail, for a single sequence of an individual bubble. The Gilmore equation for bubble oscillation is solved according to the resolved bubble collapse, and simulated shock wave profiles deduced from the acoustic emissions, for comparison to the hydrophone recordings. The effects of single-frequency calibration, magnitude-only and full waveform deconvolution of the experimental data are presented, in both time and frequency domains. Magnitude-only deconvolution increases the peak pressure amplitude of the measured shock wave by approximately 9%, from single-frequency calibration, with full waveform deconvolution increasing it by a further 3%. Full waveform deconvolution generates a shock wave profile that is in agreement with the simulated profile, filtered according to the calibration bandwidth. Implications for the detection and monitoring of acoustic cavitation, where the role of periodic bubble collapse shock waves has recently been realised, are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Orbital stability of standing waves for some nonlinear Schroedinger equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazenave, T.; Lions, P.L.

    1982-08-01

    We present a general method which enables as to prove the orbital stability of some standing waves in nonlinear Schroedinger equations. For example, we treat the cases of nonlinear Schroedinger equations arising in laser beams, of time-dependent Hartree equations.

  8. Magnetosonic shock wave in collisional pair-ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adak, Ashish, E-mail: ashish-adak@yahoo.com; Khan, Manoranjan, E-mail: mkhan.ju@gmail.com [Department of Instrumentation Science, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Sikdar, Arnab, E-mail: arnabs.ju@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Calcutta Institute of Engineering and Management, 24/1A Chandi Ghosh Road, Kolkata 700040 (India); Ghosh, Samiran, E-mail: sran-g@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India)

    2016-06-15

    Nonlinear propagation of magnetosonic shock wave has been studied in collisional magnetized pair-ion plasma. The masses of both ions are same but the temperatures are slightly different. Two fluid model has been taken to describe the model. Two different modes of the magnetosonic wave have been obtained. The dynamics of the nonlinear magnetosonic wave is governed by the Korteweg-de Vries Burgers' equation. It has been shown that the ion-ion collision is the source of dissipation that causes the Burgers' term which is responsible for the shock structures in equal mass pair-ion plasma. The numerical investigations reveal that the magnetosonic wave exhibits both oscillatory and monotonic shock structures depending on the strength of the dissipation. The nonlinear wave exhibited the oscillatory shock wave for strong magnetic field (weak dissipation) and monotonic shock wave for weak magnetic field (strong dissipation). The results have been discussed in the context of the fullerene pair-ion plasma experiments.

  9. Generation of Focused Shock Waves in Water for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukeš, Petr; Šunka, Pavel; Hoffer, Petr; Stelmashuk, Vitaliy; Beneš, Jiří; Poučková, Pavla; Zadinová, Marie; Zeman, Jan

    The physical characteristics of focused two-successive (tandem) shock waves (FTSW) in water and their biological effects are presented. FTSW were ­generated by underwater multichannel electrical discharges in a highly conductive saline solution using two porous ceramic-coated cylindrical electrodes of different diameter and surface area. The primary cylindrical pressure wave generated at each composite electrode was focused by a metallic parabolic reflector to a common focal point to form two strong shock waves with a variable time delay between the waves. The pressure field and interaction between the first and the second shock waves at the focus were investigated using schlieren photography and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) shock gauge sensors. The largest interaction was obtained for a time delay of 8-15 μs between the waves, producing an amplitude of the negative pressure phase of the second shock wave down to -80 MPa and a large number of cavitations at the focus. The biological effects of FTSW were demonstrated in vitro on damage to B16 melanoma cells, in vivo on targeted lesions in the thigh muscles of rabbits and on the growth delay of sarcoma tumors in Lewis rats treated in vivo by FTSW, compared to untreated controls.

  10. PENETRATION OF A SHOCK WAVE IN A FLAME FRONT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan PANTAZOPOL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the interactions between a fully supersonic flame front, situated in a supersonic two-dimensional flow of an ideal homogeneous combustible gas mixture, and an incident shock wawe, which is penetrating in the space of the hot burnt gases. A possible configuration, which was named ,,simple penetration” is examined. For the anlysis of the interference phenomena, shock polar and shock-combustion polar are used. At the same time, the paper shows the possibility to produce similar but more complicated configurations, which may contain expansion fans and reflected shock waves.

  11. Hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, C.-D.; Chang, C.-J.

    2009-04-01

    A chute contraction is a common structure used in hydraulic engineering for typical reasons such as increase of bottom slope, transition from side channel intakes to tunnel spillways, reduction of chute width due to bridges, transition structures in flood diversion works, among others. One of the significant chute contractions in Taiwan is that used in the Yuanshantzu Flood Diversion Project of Keelung River. The diversion project is designed to divert flood water from upper Keelung River into East Sea with a capasity of 1,310 cubic meters per second for mitigating the flood damage of lower part of Keelung River basin in Northern Taiwan. An inclined chute contraction is used to connect Keelung River and a diversion turnel. The inlet and outlet works of the diversion project is located at Ruifang in the Taipei County of north Taiwan. The diameter of diversion tunnel is 12 meters and the total length of tunnel is 2,484 meters. The diversion project has been completed and successfully executed many times since 2004 to lower the water level of Keelung River in typhoon seasons for avioding flooding problems in the lower part of Keelung River basin. Flow in a chute contraction has complicated flow pattern due to the existence of shock waves in it. A simple and useful calculation procedure for the maximum height and its position of shock waves is essentially needed for the preliminary design stage of a chute contraction. Hydraulic shock waves in an inclined chute contraction were experimentally and numerically investigated in this study with the consideration of the effects of sidewall deflection angle, bottom inclination angle and Froude number of approaching flow. The flow pattern of hydraulic shock waves in a chute contraction was observed. The main issue of designing chute contraction is to estimate the height and position of maximum shock wave for the consideration of freeboards. Achieving this aim, the experimental data are adopted and analyzed for the shock angle

  12. Nonlinear reflection of shock shear waves in soft elastic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Gianmarco; Coulouvrat, François; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickaël

    2010-02-01

    For fluids, the theoretical investigation of shock wave reflection has a good agreement with experiments when the incident shock Mach number is large. But when it is small, theory predicts that Mach reflections are physically unrealistic, which contradicts experimental evidence. This von Neumann paradox is investigated for shear shock waves in soft elastic solids with theory and simulations. The nonlinear elastic wave equation is approximated by a paraxial wave equation with a cubic nonlinear term. This equation is solved numerically with finite differences and the Godunov scheme. Three reflection regimes are observed. Theory is developed for shock propagation by applying the Rankine-Hugoniot relations and entropic constraints. A characteristic parameter relating diffraction and non-linearity is introduced and its theoretical values are shown to match numerical observations. The numerical solution is then applied to von Neumann reflection, where curved reflected and Mach shocks are observed. Finally, the case of weak von Neumann reflection, where there is no reflected shock, is examined. The smooth but non-monotonic transition between these three reflection regimes, from linear Snell-Descartes to perfect grazing case, provides a solution to the acoustical von Neumann paradox for the shear wave equation. This transition is similar to the quadratic non-linearity in fluids.

  13. Prediction dynamic model of shock train with complex background waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Chang, Jun-Tao; Xu, Ke-Jing; Yu, Da-Ren; Bao, Wen; Song, Yan-Ping

    2017-11-01

    Oblique shock waves are unavoidable in a rectangular hypersonic inlet, leading to a non-uniform flow field. While a significant body of the literature exists regarding the shock train modeling in a uniform incoming flow condition, few efforts have focused on the shock train behavior considering the influence of the shock wave boundary layer interactions. A low-order dynamic model of the shock train has been constructed with the help of the free interaction theory and a 1-D analysis approach. Experimental and numerical investigations have been carried out to evaluate the low-order model. The results show that the model has the capability of qualitatively analyzing the shock train behavior. In the cases with incident shocks, the rapid forward movement of the shock train has been observed by experiment. Besides this phenomenon was also modeled using the low-order model. Schlieren images show that when the shock train approaches the interaction zone, its behavior is characterized by oscillation and then follows a rapid forward movement with a linear increasing backpressure at 2.7 Ma. This phenomenon is analyzed theoretically based on the free interaction theory. Meanwhile with the help of the direct numerical simulation results from some existing studies, the flow structures in the interaction region and the following boundary layer also provide the evidence.

  14. Dispersive nature of high mach number collisionless plasma shocks: Poynting flux of oblique whistler waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundkvist, David; Krasnoselskikh, V; Bale, S D; Schwartz, S J; Soucek, J; Mozer, F

    2012-01-13

    Whistler wave trains are observed in the foot region of high Mach number quasiperpendicular shocks. The waves are oblique with respect to the ambient magnetic field as well as the shock normal. The Poynting flux of the waves is directed upstream in the shock normal frame starting from the ramp of the shock. This suggests that the waves are an integral part of the shock structure with the dispersive shock as the source of the waves. These observations lead to the conclusion that the shock ramp structure of supercritical high Mach number shocks is formed as a balance of dispersion and nonlinearity.

  15. Dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers (KdV–Burgers) equation and modified Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers equation are derived in strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing nonthermal ions and Boltzmann distributed electrons. It is found that solitary waves and shock waves can be produced in this medium. The effects of ...

  16. Dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers (KdV–Burgers) equation and modified. Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers equation are derived in strongly coupled dusty plasmas con- taining nonthermal ions and Boltzmann distributed electrons. It is found that solitary waves and shock waves can be produced in this medium.

  17. The Characteristic Response of Whistler Mode Waves to Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chao; Chen, Lunjin; Bortnik, Jacob; Ma, Qianli; Thorne, Richard M.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Li, Jinxing; An, Xin; Zhou, Chen; Kletzing, Craig; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.

    2017-10-01

    Magnetospheric whistler mode waves play a key role in regulating the dynamics of the electron radiation belts. Recent satellite observations indicate a significant influence of interplanetary (IP) shocks on whistler mode wave power in the inner magnetosphere. In this study, we statistically investigate the response of whistler mode chorus and plasmaspheric hiss to IP shocks based on Van Allen Probes and THEMIS satellite observations. Immediately after the IP shock arrival, chorus wave power is usually intensified, often at postmidnight to prenoon sector, while plasmaspheric hiss wave power predominantly decreases near the dayside but intensifies near the nightside. We conclude that chorus wave intensification outside the plasmasphere is probably associated with the suprathermal electron flux enhancement caused by the IP shock. Through a simple ray tracing modeling assuming the scenario that plasmaspheric hiss is originated from chorus, we find that the solar wind dynamic pressure increase changes the magnetic field configuration to favor ray penetration in the nightside and promote ray refraction away from the dayside, potentially explaining the magnetic local time-dependent responses of plasmaspheric hiss waves following IP shock arrivals.

  18. Dispersive shock waves in nonlinear and atomic optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamchatnov Anatoly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review is given of dispersive shock waves observed in nonlinear optics and dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates. The theory of dispersive shock waves is developed on the basis of Whitham modulation theory for various situations taking place in these two fields. In particular, the full classification is established for types of wave structures evolving from initial discontinuities for propagation of long light pulses in fibers with account of steepening effect and for dynamics of the polarization mode in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates.

  19. Study on miss distance based on projectile shock wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Guohua; Cheng, Gang; Zhang, Chenjun; Zhou, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The paper establishes miss distance models based on physical characteristic of shock-wave. The aerodynamic theory shows that the shock-wave of flying super-sonic projectile is generated for the projectile compressing and expending its ambient atmosphere. It advances getting miss distance according to interval of the first sensors, which first catches shock-wave, to solve the problem such as noise filtering on severe background, and signals of amplifier vibration dynamic disposal and electromagnetism compatibility, in order to improves the precision and reliability of gathering wave N signals. For the first time, it can identify the kinds of pills and firing units automatically, measure miss distance and azimuth when pills are firing. Application shows that the tactics and technique index is advanced all of the world.

  20. Standing Shocks around Black Holes and Estimation of Outflow Rates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We self-consistently obtain shock locations in an accretion flow by using an analytical method. One can obtain the spectral properties, quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and the outflowrates when the inflow parameters are known. Since temperature of the CENBOL decides the spectral states of the black hole, and also ...

  1. Standing Shocks around Black Holes and Estimation of Outflow ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. We self-consistently obtain shock locations in an accretion flow by using an analytical method. One can obtain the spectral properties, quasi-periodic oscillation frequencies and the outflow rates when the inflow parameters are known. Since temperature of the CENBOL decides the spectral states of the black hole, ...

  2. Implications of heterogeneity in the shock wave propagation of dynamically shocked materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJeunesse, Jeff

    The field of shock physics as a whole has only recently begun to pay particular attention to modeling heterogeneous materials under shock loading. These materials are important because of their practicality in terms of creating stronger, more shock resistant materials. To understand why they absorb shock impact energy better than homogeneous materials means that the small-scale processes that occur during the shock loading of these heterogeneous materials needs to be understood. Recent computational experiments, called mesoscale simulations, have shown that explicitly incorporating small-scale heterogeneous features into hydrocode simulations allows the bulk shock response of the heterogeneous material to be observed while not requiring the use of empirically determined constitutive equations. Including these features in simulations can offer insights into the irreversible mechanisms that dominate the propagation of shock waves in heterogeneous materials. Three cases where the mesoscale approach for modeling the dynamic shock loading of heterogeneous materials are presented. These materials fall into three categories: granular - dry sand, granular with binder - concrete, and granular contained in a metal foam with a binder - granular explosive contained in an aluminum foam. The processes in which shock waves propagate through each material are addressed and relationships between the three materials are discussed. Particle velocity profiles for dry sand and concrete was obtained from Harvard University and Eglin Air Force Base, respectively. Mesoscale simulations using CTH are conducted for each type of heterogeneous material and the results are compared to the experimental data.

  3. Rogue and shock waves in nonlinear dispersive media

    CERN Document Server

    Resitori, Stefania; Baronio, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    This self-contained set of lectures addresses a gap in the literature by providing a systematic link between the theoretical foundations of the subject matter and cutting-edge applications in both geophysical fluid dynamics and nonlinear optics. Rogue and shock waves are phenomena that may occur in the propagation of waves in any nonlinear dispersive medium. Accordingly, they have been observed in disparate settings – as ocean waves, in nonlinear optics, in Bose-Einstein condensates, and in plasmas. Rogue and dispersive shock waves are both characterized by the development of extremes: for the former, the wave amplitude becomes unusually large, while for the latter, gradients reach extreme values. Both aspects strongly influence the statistical properties of the wave propagation and are thus considered together here in terms of their underlying theoretical treatment. This book offers a self-contained graduate-level text intended as both an introduction and reference guide for a new generation of scientists ...

  4. Cylindrical sound wave generated by shock-vortex interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribner, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    The passage of a columnar vortex broadside through a shock is investigated. This has been suggested as a crude, but deterministic, model of the generation of 'shock noise' by the turbulence in supersonic jets. The vortex is decomposed by Fourier transform into plane sinusoidal shear waves disposed with radial symmetry. The plane sound waves produced by each shear wave/shock interaction are recombined in the Fourier integral. The waves possess an envelope that is essentially a growing cylindrical sound wave centered at the transmitted vortex. The pressure jump across the nominal radius R = ct attenuates with time as 1/(square root of R) and varies around the arc in an antisymmetric fashion resembling a quadrupole field. Very good agreement, except near the shock, is found with the antisymmetric component of reported interferometric measurements in a shock tube. Beyond the front r approximately equals R is a precursor of opposite sign, that decays like 1/R, generated by the 1/r potential flow around the vortex core. The present work is essentially an extension and update of an early approximate study at M = 1.25. It covers the range (R/core radius) = 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000 for M = 1.25 and (in part) for M = 1.29 and, for fixed (R/core radius) = 1000, the range M = 1.01 to infinity.

  5. Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment harms developing chicken embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Maren C.; Milz, Stefan; Frank, Hans-Georg; Korbel, Rüdiger; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Radial extracorporeal shock wave treatment (rESWT) has became one of the best investigated treatment modalities for cellulite, including the abdomen as a treatment site. Notably, pregnancy is considered a contraindication for rESWT, and concerns have been raised about possible harm to the embryo when a woman treated with rESWT for cellulite is not aware of her pregnancy. Here we tested the hypothesis that rESWT may cause serious physical harm to embryos. To this end, chicken embryos were exposed in ovo to various doses of radial shock waves on either day 3 or day 4 of development, resembling the developmental stage of four- to six-week-old human embryos. We found a dose-dependent increase in the number of embryos that died after radial shock wave exposure on either day 3 or day 4 of development. Among the embryos that survived the shock wave exposure a few showed severe congenital defects such as missing eyes. Evidently, our data cannot directly be used to draw conclusions about potential harm to the embryo of a pregnant woman treated for cellulite with rESWT. However, to avoid any risks we strongly recommend applying radial shock waves in the treatment of cellulite only if a pregnancy is ruled out. PMID:25655309

  6. Effects of low-dose extracorporeal shock waves on microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Walaa; Goertz, Ole; Lauer, Henrik; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Hauser, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    The extended wounds of burn patients remain a challenge due to wound infection and following septicemia. The aim of this study was to analyze microcirculation, angiogenesis and leukocyte endothelium interaction after burn injury with and without extracorporeal shock wave application (ESWA). A novel shockwave system was developed based on a commercially available device for orthopedics (Dornier Aries®) that was equipped with a newly developed applicator. This system is based on the electromagnetic shock wave emitter (EMSE) technology and was introduced to accomplish a localized treatment for wound healing. The system includes a novel field of focus for new applications, with high precision and ease of use. In the animal study, full-thickness burns were inflicted on to the ears of hairless mice (n=51). Intravital fluorescent microscopy was used to assess microcirculatory parameters, angiogenesis and leukocyte behavior. ESWA was performed on day 1, 3 and 7. Values were obtained immediately after burn, as well as at days 1, 3, 7, and 12 post burn. All shockwave treated groups showed an accelerated angiogenesis with a less non-perfused area and an improved blood flow after burn injury compared to the placebo control group. After three treatments, the shock waves increased the number of rolling leukocytes significantly compared to the non-treated animals. Shock waves seem to have a positive effect on several parameters of wound healing after burn injury. However, further investigations are necessary to detect positive influence of shock waves on microcirculation after burn injuries.

  7. The nonadiabatic dust charge variation on dust acoustic solitary and shock waves in strongly coupled dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yunliang, E-mail: ylwang@ustb.edu.cn; Guo, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yanzhen; Wang, Xiaodan

    2016-01-08

    The combined effects of nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and strongly coupled dust particles on the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic (DA) waves in dusty plasma consisting of nonthermal electrons and trapped ions with vortex-like distribution are presented here. We use generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic model for dust particles. In the weak nonlinearity limit, a modified Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation with a damping term and a KdV–Burger equation have been derived in the kinetic regime and hydrodynamic regime, respectively. The approximate analytical solitary solution of modified KdV equation is derived in the weak nonadiabatic dust charge variation limit, which shows that the amplitude of DA solitary waves decreases with time. The presence of viscosity due to strong coupling stands for the formation of DA shock waves in the hydrodynamic regime. The results show that the DA shock waves will be oscillating one for weak viscosity and will become monotonic ones for large viscosity. - Highlights: • Solitary and shock waves can be excited in kinetic and hydrodynamic regime, respectively. • Nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation stands for the damping of solitary waves. • Dust viscosity accounts for the formation of dust acoustic shock waves.

  8. Stress wave propagation on standing trees. Part 2, Formation of 3D stress wave contour maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Su; Houjiang Zhang; Xiping Wang

    2009-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of wood quality in standing trees is an important procedure in the forest operational value chain worldwide. The goal of this paper is to investigate how a stress wave travel in a tree stem as it is introduced into the tree through a mechanical impact. Experimental stress wave data was obtained on freshly cut red pine logs in the...

  9. Experimental study of wall conductivity influence on shock wave reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skews, Beric; Berry, Richard

    2017-12-01

    In the conventional von Neumann theoretical treatment of two-dimensional shock wave reflection off a surface, it is assumed that the flow is inviscid and that the reflecting surface is perfectly smooth, rigid, non-porous, and adiabatic. These theoretical predictions have been found to be good predictions of reflection over a significant range where regular reflection exists and for a limited range around Mach 2 for strong shocks in the case of Mach reflection. However, experiments on regular reflection have shown that this pattern persists to a small extent beyond what the theory predicts. This effect has been ascribed to the development of a viscous boundary layer behind the point of reflection, and some studies have been done on the effect of surface roughness on reflection topology. The possibility of thermal effects and heat transfer from the shock-heated gas to the wall and on the boundary layer has, on the other hand, been almost totally neglected. To study this, two surfaces of different conductivities have been placed at the same angle, symmetrically in a shock tube, and impacted by a single plane shock wave and the reflection patterns examined. Tests were conducted over a range of Mach numbers between 1.28 and 1.4, and incident shock wave angles between 36° and 70° covering both regular and Mach reflection. Both quantitative and qualitative tests show that there is a difference in the angles between the reflected waves and the reflecting surfaces based on the material thermal conductivity. In the quantitative tests the value of this angle was larger for materials with a lower thermal conductivity, and vice versa. A material, such as aluminium, with mid-range thermal conductivity had angles that lay within the limits of the two extreme values for glass and copper. The qualitative images supported these findings, showing asymmetry in reflection topography, with the intersection of the two reflected shock waves lying closer to the material with a higher

  10. Tandem shock waves to enhance genetic transformation of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loske, Achim M; Fernández, Francisco; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Ortíz-Vázquez, Elizabeth; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-08-01

    Filamentous fungi are used in several industries and in academia to produce antibiotics, metabolites, proteins and pharmaceutical compounds. The development of valuable strains usually requires the insertion of recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid; however, the protocols to transfer DNA to fungal cells are highly inefficient. Recently, underwater shock waves were successfully used to genetically transform filamentous fungi. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that the efficiency of transformation can be improved significantly by enhancing acoustic cavitation using tandem (dual-pulse) shock waves. Results revealed that tandem pressure pulses, generated at a delay of 300 μs, increased the transformation efficiency of Aspergillus niger up to 84% in comparison with conventional (single-pulse) shock waves. This methodology may also be useful to obtain new strains required in basic research and biotechnology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Shock Wave Energy Dissipation using Polymerized Ionic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaejun; Ren, Yi; Evans, Christopher; Moore, Jeffrey; Sottos, Nancy

    2017-06-01

    Polymerized ionic liquids composed of alkyl-imidazolium cations and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide anions exhibit intriguing shock wave energy absorption performance. In prior work, we observed a shock-induced disorder-to-order change in network forming ionic liquids. We hypothesize that this shock-induced ordering is strongly associated with the microstructure of the ionic liquids. Polymerized ionic liquids, which have similar microstructures but slower relaxation times compared to the ionic liquids, are prepared to demonstrate the ordering transition mechanism and to exploit relaxation processes for the energy dissipation. By employing size-tunable alkyl backbone spacers between cations, we explore the effect of the relative microstructural heterogeneity on the activation of shock-induced ordering. Relaxation time, which is adjustable by the alkyl spacer length, also plays an important role in the energy dissipation process. Absorption properties of a series of thin film (ca. 50 μm) polymerized ionic liquids are evaluated using a laser-induced shock wave testing protocol. Superior shock wave mitigating performance of polymerized ionic liquids was achieved compared to polyurea films.

  12. Direct visualization of laser-driven focusing shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeril, T; Saini, G; Veysset, D; Kooi, S; Fidkowski, P; Radovitzky, R; Nelson, Keith A

    2011-05-27

    Direct real-time visualization and measurement of laser-driven shock generation, propagation, and 2D focusing in a sample are demonstrated. A substantial increase of the pressure at the convergence of the cylindrical acoustic shock front is observed experimentally and simulated numerically. Single-shot acquisitions using a streak camera reveal that at the convergence of the shock wave in water the supersonic speed reaches Mach 6, corresponding to the multiple gigapascal pressure range ∼30 GPa. © 2011 American Physical Society

  13. Shock wave mitigation using Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xingtian; Colvert, Brendan; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. High-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors allow measurement during the relevant shock interaction time periods of the liquid-gas interface. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. In particular, the effects of viscous properties of the fluid are considered when using non-Newtonian dilatant and pseudoplastic fluids. Experiments have been performed with both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The impact of a shock waves on Non-newtonian fluids is compared to that of Newtonian fluids. Experiments show that non-Newtonian fluids have very strong reflection properties, acting like solid walls under the impact of a shock wave. Further work is to be performed to compare quantitatively the properties of Newtonian vs. non-Newtonian fluids.

  14. Lower hybrid waves at the shock front: a reassessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Walker

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary process occurring at a collisionless shock is the redistribution of the bulk upstream energy into other degrees of freedom. One part of this process results in the acceleration of electrons at the shock front. Accelerated electrons are observed at the terrestrial and other planetary shocks, comets, and their effects are observed in astrophysical phenomena such as supernova remnants and jets in the form of X-ray bremsstrahlung radiation. One of the physical models for electron acceleration at supercritical shocks is based on low-hybrid turbulence due to the presence of reflected ions in the foot region. Since lower hybrid waves propagate almost perpendicular to the magnetic field they can be simultaneously in resonance with both the unmagnetised ions (ω=Vik and magnetised electrons (ω=Vek||. In this paper, Cluster observations of the electric field are used to study the occurrence of lower hybrid waves in the front of the terrestrial bow shock. It is shown that the lower hybrid waves exist as isolated wave packets. However, the very low level of the observed lower hybrid turbulence is too small to impart significant energisation to the electron population.

  15. Shock Wave Energy Dissipation by Metal-Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Miao, Yurun; Banlusan, Kiettipong; Shaw, William; Strachan, Alejandro; Suslick, Kenneth; Dlott, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Metal-organic framework (MOF) such as ZIF-8 and UiO-66 show promising shock energy dissipation abilities through mechano-chemical reactions including bond breaking and pore collapse. In this work, we performed quantitative measurements on the shock wave energy attenuated by MOF films using a laser-driven flyer-plate apparatus. Aluminum flyer plates of 75-um thick were accelerated to speeds up to 2.0 km/s by a flat-top pulsed laser to impact the MOF film. The MOF layer was coated on a 200-nm thick gold mirror, which was deposited previously on glass substrate. Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) was used to track the motions of the gold mirror, which can be converted to the energy flux and fluence of the shock wave that transmitted through the MOF layer. We deduced the shock energy that was attenuated by the MOF film by comparing the transmitted energy flux/fluence obtained with and without the presence of the MOF layer. A two-wave-shaped flux-time curve was obtained with the MOF layer because of its nanoporous structure. Studies on the shock wave energy attenuation by ZIF-8 and UiO-66 were carried out under various flyer speeds and sample thicknesses. We used in situ emission spectroscopy to verify that pore collapse was accompanied by chemical bond breakage. Corresponding author:dlott@illinois.edu.

  16. ShockWave science and technology reference library

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This book is the first of several volumes on solids in the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library. These volumes are primarily concerned with high-pressure shock waves in solid media, including detonation, high-velocity impact, and penetration. Of the eight chapters in this volume three chapters survey recent, exciting experimental advances in - ultra-short shock dynamics at the atomic and molecular scale (D.S. More, S.D. Mcgrane, and D.J. Funk), - Z accelerator for ICE and Shock compression (M.D. Knudson), and - failure waves in glass and ceramics (S.J. Bless and N.S. Brar). The subsequent four chapters are foundational, and cover the subjects of - equation of state (R. Menikoff), - elastic-plastic shock waves (R. Menikoff), - continuum plasticity (R. M. Brannon), and - numerical methods (D. J. Benson). The last chapter, but not the least, describes a tour de force illustration of today’s computing power in - modeling heterogeneous reactive solids at the grain scale (M.R. Baer). All chapters a...

  17. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on hydrodynamic numerical simulations and diffusive shock acceleration model, we calculated the ratio of cosmic ray (CR) to thermal energy. We found that the CR fraction can be less than ∼ 0.1 in the intracluster medium, while it would be of order unity in the warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  18. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  19. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  20. Shock wave fractionated noble gases in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2001-08-01

    Many processes in the active star-forming regions are accompanied by strong shock waves, in acceleration by which the nuclear-active particles form the power-law energy spectrum of high rigidity: F(> E0) ˜ Eγ , with the spectral index γ ≤ 1.5-2. It must affect the production rates of spallogenic components of the isotopes, whose excitation functions depend on the shape of the energy spectrum of radiation. Thus, the isotopic signatures formed in the conditions of the strong shock wave propagation must be different from those formed in the calm environment. The early solar system incorporated all the presumed processes of the starforming stage, so that its matter had to conserve such isotopic anomalies. In previous works [1] the shock wave effects in generation of extinct radionu-clides and light elements Li, Be and B were considered. In the report some results for their evidence in the noble gas signatures are presented. Modelling the Kr isotope generation in spallation of Rb, Sr, Y and Zr with the nuclear-active particles, the energy spectrum of which was variable in the range of γ= 1.1-6.0, shows the different pace of growth of abundances of the dif-ferent Kr isotopes with decreasing . It leads to the quite diverse behaviour of the various Kr isotope ratios: the 78,80 Kr/83 Kr ratios increase, and the 82,84,86 Kr/83 Kr ratios decrease for the smaller γ. According to such criteria, for instance, the isotopically heavier SEP-Kr in the lunar ilmenites was pro-duced with the accelerated particles of the more rigid energy spectrum (γ ˜ 2) in comparison with the SW-Kr. Another important feature of the shock wave acceleration of particles is the enrichment of their specrtum with heavier ions in proportion to A/Z. Clearly, the shock wave fractionation of the noble gases, favouring the heavier isotopes, had to be inevitable. Such a fractionation depends on timing episodes of shock wave acceleration: after the n-th act of the ion acceleration their fractionation is

  1. Shock wave interaction with laser-generated single bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankin, G N; Simmons, W N; Zhu, S L; Zhong, P

    2005-07-15

    The interaction of a lithotripter shock wave (LSW) with laser-generated single vapor bubbles in water is investigated using high-speed photography and pressure measurement via a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. The interaction leads to nonspherical collapse of the bubble with secondary shock wave emission and microjet formation along the LSW propagation direction. The maximum pressure amplification is produced during the collapse phase of the bubble oscillation when the compressive pulse duration of the LSW matches with the forced collapse time of the bubble.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic waves within the medium separated by the plane shock wave or rotational discontinuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lubchich

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of small amplitude plane waves within the medium separated by the plane discontinuity into two half spaces are analysed. The approximation of the ideal one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD is used. The discontinuities with the nonzero mass flux across them are mainly examined. These are fast or slow shock waves and rotational discontinuities. The dispersion equation for MHD waves within each of half space is obtained in the reference frame connected with the discontinuity surface. The solution of this equation permits one to determine the wave vectors versus the parameter cp, which is the phase velocity of surface discontinuity oscillations. This value of cp is common for all MHD waves and determined by an incident wave or by spontaneous oscillations of the discontinuity surface. The main purpose of the study is a detailed analysis of the dispersion equation solution. This analysis let us draw the following conclusions. (I For a given cp, ahead or behind a discontinuity at most, one diverging wave can transform to a surface wave damping when moving away from the discontinuity. The surface wave can be a fast one or, in rare cases, a slow, magnetoacoustic one. The entropy and Alfvén waves always remain in a usual homogeneous mode. (II For certain values of cp and parameters of the discontinuity behind the front of the fast shock wave, there can be four slow magnetoacoustic waves, satisfying the dispersion equation, and none of the fast magnetoacoustic waves. In this case, one of the four slow magnetoacoustic waves is incident on the fast shock wave from the side of a compressed medium. It is shown that its existence does not contradict the conditions of the evolutionarity of MHD shock waves. The four slow magnetoacoustic waves, satisfying the dispersion equation, can also exist from either side of a slow shock wave or rotational discontinuity. (III The

  3. Stochastic particle acceleration at parallel astrophysical shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Campeanu, A.; Lerche, L.

    1993-09-01

    We present exact analytical solutions to the full cosmic ray transport equation describing the diffusive acceleration of cosmic ray protons at parallel nonrelativistic shock waves including momentum diffusion in the downstream region of the shock. The downstream region is of finite extent to avoid the unphysical situation of background waves acting as an infinite source of energy. The spatial diffusion coefficient of particles is assumed to be independent of particle energy. The solutions allow for (i) any momentum dependence of the particle injection at the shock, (ii) any spatial dependence of the upstream spatial diffusion coefficient, and (iii) any spatial dependence of the downstream spatial diffusion coefficient. We assume that the incoming waves upstream are right- and left-handed circularly polarised backward moving Alfvén waves, as suggested by the streaming instability of the upstream precursor cosmic ray distribution. Interaction of these waves with the fast super-Alfvénic adiabatic shock makes momentum diffusion in the downstream region unavoidable. The downstream solution is an infinite sum of power laws whose spectral indices follow from a transcendental eigenvalue equation. Each individual power law component is weighted by expansion coefficients that depend on the actual downstream position. Quite generally the shape of the downstream distribution function is concavely curved, but approaches a single power law at large momenta. In the formal limit of vanishing momentum diffusion and infinite extent of the downstream region our general solution approaches the classical result of Axford et al. (1977), Krymsky (1977), Bell (1978), and Blandford & Ostriker (1978). For efficient momentum diffusion of particles in the downstream region of the shock, the particle spectra become flatter than in the original treatment of diffusive shock acceleration, thereby removing some of the noted discrepancies of the original theory with the explanation of fiat

  4. OPTIMIZATION OF HEMISPHERICAL RESONATOR GYROSCOPE STANDING WAVE PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sergeevna Khalyutina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the problem of autonomous navigation is solved by dead reckoning navigation flight parameters (NFP of the aircraft (AC. With increasing requirements to accuracy of definition NFP improved the sensors of the prima- ry navigation information: gyroscopes and accelerometers. the gyroscopes of a new type, the so-called solid-state wave gyroscopes (SSVG are currently developed and put into practice. The work deals with the problem of increasing the accu- racy of measurements of angular velocity of the hemispherical resonator gyroscope (HRG. The reduction in the accuracy characteristics of HRG is caused by the presence of defects in the distribution of mass in the volume of its design. The syn- thesis of control system for optimal damping of the distortion parameters of the standing wave due to the influence of the mass defect resonator is adapted. The research challenge was: to examine and analytically offset the impact of the standing wave (amplitude and frequency parameters defect. Research was performed by mathematical modeling in the environment of SolidWorks Simulation for the case when the characteristics of the sensitive element of the HRG met the technological drawings of a particular type of resonator. The method of the inverse dynamics was chosen for synthesis. The research re- sults are presented in graphs the amplitude-frequency characteristics (AFC of the resonator output signal. Simulation was performed for the cases: the perfect distribution of weight; the presence of the mass defect; the presence of the mass defects are shown using the synthesized control action. Evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithm is deter- mined by the results of the resonator output signal simulation provided the perfect constructive and its performance in the presence of a mass defect in it. It is assumed that the excitation signals are standing waves in the two cases are identical in both amplitude and frequency. In this

  5. Shock-wave induced synthesis of few layer graphene nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pengwan; Yin, Hao; Xu, Chunxiao; Gao, Xin; Zhou, Qiang; Qu, Liangti

    2017-06-01

    Shock wave action combining shock-induced chemical reaction will cause a series of changes of material physical and chemical properties, which is supposed to be a new method for material synthesis and modification. Using solid CO2 (dry ice) as the carbon source, few layer graphene nanosheets were successful synthesized by reduction of CO2 with calcium hydride under detonation-driven flyer impact loading in this study. Furthermore, by adding ammonium nitrate to the reaction system, nitrogen-doped graphene materials were formed in this one-step shock-wave treatment. Similarly, few layer graphene and nitrogen-doped graphene materials were also prepared through the reaction of calcium carbonate and magnesium induced by shock wave. The shock synthesis of graphene nanosheets requires a balance between the growth rate of graphene materials and the formation rate of carbon atoms. Meanwhile, the pressure and temperature are two important factors affecting the synthesis of few layer graphene nanosheets. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11521062 and 11172043.

  6. Response of ocean bottom dwellers exposed to underwater shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. H. R.; Kaiho, Kunio; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports results of experiments to estimate the mortality of ocean bottom dwellers, ostracoda, against underwater shock wave exposures. This study is motivated to verify the possible survival of ocean bottom dwellers, foraminifera, from the devastating underwater shock waves induced mass extinction of marine creatures which took place at giant asteroid impact events. Ocean bottom dwellers under study were ostracoda, the replacement of foraminifera, we readily sampled from ocean bottoms. An analogue experiment was performed on a laboratory scale to estimate the domain and boundary of over-pressures at which marine creatures' mortality occurs. Ostracods were exposed to underwater shock waves generated by the explosion of 100mg PETN pellets in a chamber at shock over-pressures ranging up to 44MPa. Pressure histories were measured simultaneously on 113 samples. We found that bottom dwellers were distinctively killed against overpressures of 12MPa and this value is much higher than the usual shock over-pressure threshold value for marine-creatures having lungs and balloons.

  7. Lithotripter shock wave interaction with a bubble near various biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, S. W.; Klaseboer, E.; Szeri, A. J.; Khoo, B. C.

    2016-10-01

    Following previous work on the dynamics of an oscillating bubble near a bio-material (Ohl et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6313-36) and the interaction of a bubble with a shockwave (Klaseboer et al 2007 J. Fluid Mech. 593 33-56), the present work concerns the interaction of a gas bubble with a traveling shock wave (such as from a lithotripter) in the vicinity of bio-materials such as fat, skin, muscle, cornea, cartilage, and bone. The bubble is situated in water (to represent a water-like biofluid). The bubble collapses are not spherically symmetric, but tend to feature a high speed jet. A few simulations are performed and compared with available experimental observations from Sankin and Zhong (2006 Phys. Rev. E 74 046304). The collapses of cavitation bubbles (created by laser in the experiment) near an elastic membrane when hit by a lithotripter shock wave are correctly captured by the simulation. This is followed by a more systematic study of the effects involved concerning shockwave bubble biomaterial interactions. If a subsequent rarefaction wave hits the collapsed bubble, it will re-expand to a very large size straining the bio-materials nearby before collapsing once again. It is noted that, for hard bio-material like bone, reflection of the shock wave at the bone—water interface can affect the bubble dynamics. Also the initial size of the bubble has a significant effect. Large bubbles (˜1 mm) will split into smaller bubbles, while small bubbles collapse with a high speed jet in the travel direction of the shock wave. The numerical model offers a computationally efficient way of understanding the complex phenomena involving the interplay of a bubble, a shock wave, and a nearby bio-material.

  8. Blast effects physical properties of shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book compiles a variety of experimental data on blast waves. The book begins with an introductory chapter and proceeds to the topic of blast wave phenomenology, with a discussion Rankine-Hugoniot equations and the Friedlander equation, used to describe the pressure-time history of a blast wave. Additional topics include arrival time measurement, the initiation of detonation by exploding wires, a discussion of TNT equivalency, and small scale experiments. Gaseous and high explosive detonations are covered as well. The topics and experiments covered were chosen based on the comparison of used scale sizes, from small to large. Each characteristic parameter of blast waves is analyzed and expressed versus scaled distance in terms of energy and mass. Finally, the appendix compiles a number of polynomial laws that will prove indispensable for engineers and researchers.

  9. Mechanism of the Shock Wave Generation and Energy Efficiency by Underwater Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Higa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We are developing the rice powder manufacturing system using an underwater shock wave. The purpose of this study is to research a mechanism of the shock wave generation and energy efficiency by underwater discharge in order to increase energy of the underwater shock wave. We observed the shock wave generation using the visualization device with a high speed camera, and measured voltage current characteristics at the same time. As a result, it was clarified that countless underwater shock waves were generated at the time of water plasma expansion by discharge. But, the shock wave was not confirmed at the time of after a second peak of the damping oscillation. It was clarified that one part of charging energy was used to generation of the shock wave. Therefore, it was clarified that to release energy by the critical oscillation is desirable for efficient generation of the shock wave.

  10. Transient granular shock waves and upstream motion on a staircase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weele, J.P.; Kanellopoulos, Giorgos; Tsiavos, Christos; van der Meer, Roger M.

    2009-01-01

    A granular cluster, placed on a staircase setup, is brought into motion by vertical shaking. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the system goes through three phases. After a rapid initial breakdown of the cluster, the particle stream organizes itself in the form of a shock wave moving down the

  11. Success of electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter as monotherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K.S. Meitei

    Abstract. Objectives: To evaluate the success of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) as monotherapy for solitary renal stones larger than 2 cm without ureteral stenting. Hence, if our study result demonstrates acceptable success and safety, we can recommend ESWL as a treatment option for patients with large renal calculi.

  12. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  13. Changing the Window of Shock Wave Application. How it improves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this work is to study the impact of using multiple windows of shock wave application on the results of ESWL therapy for renal calculi. Patients and Methods: Between January 1996 and October 2002, 676 patients with single pelvic stones ≤ 2.5 cm and either no or mild back pressure changes were ...

  14. Maximum intensity of rarefaction shock waves for dense gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guardone, A.; Zamfirescu, C.; Colonna, P.

    2009-01-01

    Modern thermodynamic models indicate that fluids consisting of complex molecules may display non-classical gasdynamic phenomena such as rarefaction shock waves (RSWs) in the vapour phase. Since the thermodynamic region in which non-classical phenomena are physically admissible is finite in terms of

  15. Cavitation cluster dynamics in shock-wave lithotripsy: Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, M.; Junge, L.; Junge, L.; Ohl, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of cavitation bubble growth and collapse in shock-wave lithotripsy in a free field was studied experimentally. The lithotripter was equipped with two independently triggerable layers of piezoceramics. The front and back layers generated positive pressure amplitudes of 30

  16. Shock wave therapy for spastic plantar flexor muscles in hemiplegic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CP). Spastic equines foot is the most frequent deformity in ambulated children with CP. Shock wave therapy on spastic muscles of the upper limb in stroke patients provided a significant reduction in muscle tone. Aim: The present study aimed to ...

  17. paediatric ureteric calculi: in-situ extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To evaluate prospectively the efficacy of in-situ extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) in the treatment of ureteric calculi in the paediatric age group. Patients and Methods Twenty children (aged 2.2 16 years) with 22 ureteric stones were evaluated and treated with in-situ ESWL using the Dornier S lithotripter ...

  18. Admissibility region for rarefaction shock waves in dense gases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Guardone, A.; Colonna, P.

    2008-01-01

    In the vapour phase and close to the liquid–vapour saturation curve, fluids made of complex molecules are expected to exhibit a thermodynamic region in which the fundamental derivative of gasdynamic ? is negative. In this region, non-classical gasdynamic phenomena such as rarefaction shock waves are

  19. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  20. CONNECTION BETWEEN THE SHOCK WAVE SPEED AND II TYPE RADIO BURSTS DRIFT VELOCITY

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Isaeva; Kravetz, R. O.

    2016-01-01

    The substantial arguments of strong connection between shock wave speed and drift velocity of II type radio bursts in 25-180 MHz range are presented. The studied sample has included 112 proton events that were accompanied with coronal shock waves. To evaluate drift velocity and shock wave speed there was used original records of dynamic spectra from radio spectrograph in 25- 180 MHz range. The velocities of shock waves were evaluated with the power mode model of solar corona density falloff.

  1. Comparative Study between Slow Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Fast Shock Wave Lithotripsy in the Management of Renal Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Zamanul Islam Bhuiyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal calculi are frequent causes of ureteric colic. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the most common treatment of these stones. It uses focused sound waves to break up stones externally. Objective: To compare the efficiency of slow and fast delivery rate of shock waves on stone fragmentation and treatment outcome in patients with renal calculi. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was done in the department of Urology, National Institute of Kidney diseases and Urology, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka from July 2006 to June 2007. Total 90 patients were treated using the Storz Medical Modulith ® SLX lithotripter. Patients were divided into Group A, Group B and Group C – each group having 30 subjects. Group A was selected for extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL by 60 shock waves per minute, Group B by 90 shock waves per minute and Group C by 120 shock waves per minute. Results: Complete clearance of stone was observed in 24 patients in Group A and 13 patients in both Group B and Group C in first session. In Group A only 3 patients needed second session but in Group B and Group C, 12 and 8 patients needed second session. In Group A only one patient needed third session but third session was required for 3 patients in Group B and 5 patients in Group C for complete clearance of stone. In Group A, subsequent sessions were performed under spinal anesthesia and in Group B under sedation and analgesia (p>0.001. Mean number of sessions for full clearance of stones in group A was 1.37 ± 0.85, in Group B was 1.8 ± 0.887 and in Group C was 2.0 ± 1.083. Significant difference was observed in term of sessions among groups (p>0.05. In first follow-up, complete clearance of stones was seen in 24 patients in Group A and 13 in both Group B and Group C. In second follow-up, 3 patients in Group A, 12 in Group B and 8 in Group C showed complete clearance of stones. It was observed that rate of stone clearance was higher in Group A

  2. Efficient excitation and detection of standing spin wave in Permalloy film: Demonstration of spin wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseki, K.; Yakata, S.; Kimura, T.

    2012-11-01

    A magnetic resonator consisting of periodical nonmagnetic electrodes on a ferromagnetic metallic film has been fabricated. We demonstrated that the resonator efficiently excites the standing magneto-static surface spin wave with the specific wavelength, which can be controlled by the interval of the periodical electrode. The operation frequency over 5 GHz was confirmed at the interval of 4 μm under a small bias magnetic field less than 100 Oe. The optimization of the electrode pattern for the efficient detection of the standing spin wave was also demonstrated.

  3. STANDING WAVE PROBES FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY OF LOW DENSITY FOAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seugling, R M; Woody, S C; Bauza, M B

    2010-03-23

    Typically, parts and geometries of interest to LLNL are made from a combination of complex geometries and a wide array of different materials ranging from metals and ceramics to low density foams and plastic foils. These parts are combined to develop physics experiments for studying material properties, equation of state (EOS) and radiation transport. Understanding the dimensional uncertainty of the parts contained within an experiment is critical to the physical understanding of the phenomena being observed and represents the motivation for developing probe metrology capability that can address LLNL's unique problems. Standing wave probes were developed for measuring high aspect ratio, micrometer scaled features with nanometer resolution. Originally conceived of for the use in the automotive industry for characterizing fuel injector bores and similar geometries, this concept was investigated and improved for use on geometries and materials important to LLNL needs within target fabrication. As part of the original project, detailed understanding of the probe dynamics and interactions with the surface of the sample was investigated. In addition, the upgraded system was utilized for measuring fuel injector bores and micro-lenses as a means of demonstrating capability. This report discusses the use of the standing wave probe for measuring features in low density foams, 55 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} and 982 mg/cc (%6 relative density) copper foam respectively. These two foam materials represent a difficult metrology challenge because of their material properties and surface topography. Traditional non-contact metrology systems such as normal incident interferometry and/or confocal microscopy have difficulty obtaining a signal from the relatively absorptive characteristics of these materials. In addition to the foam samples, a solid copper and plastic (Rexolite{trademark}) sample of similar geometry was measured with the standing wave probe as a reference for both conductive

  4. Diffraction of an atomic beam by standing-wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P. E.; Gould, P. L.; Atlas, S. R.; Pritchard, D. E.

    1983-08-01

    Preliminary experimental results are reported for the deflection of Na atoms in an atomic beam by a transverse standing-wave laser field whose frequency is tuned between the two ground-state hyperfine components of the D2 line. In contrast to the two experiments done previously, a splitting of the beam into two symmetric peaks whose separation increases with the electric-field is seen here. In addition, the data show evidence for atomic diffraction: a tendency for scattered atoms to acquire momentum in multiples of 2h(bar)k.

  5. Deflection of atoms by standing-wave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P. E.; Gould, P. L.; Pritchard, D. E.

    1985-11-01

    Momentum transfer from a standing-wave light field to an atomic beam has been observed. The atomic beam is split symmetrically into two peaks whose separation increases with field strength. The short interaction time ensures that this deflection is due to induced forces; these are described using a semiclassical dressed-atom treatment, which gives good agreement with the data. In addition to the splitting, diffraction of the atomic beam due to the exchange of even numbers of photons with the field has been observed.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Shock Wave Refraction at Inclined Gas Contact Discontinuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    When a shock wave interacts with a contact discontinuity, there may appear a reflected rarefaction wave, a deflected contact discontinuity and a refracted supersonic shock. The numerical simulation of shock wave refraction at a plane contact discontinuity separating gases with different densities is performed. Euler equations describing inviscid…

  7. Experimental research on dust lifting by propagating shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żydak, P.; Oleszczak, P.; Klemens, R.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the presented work was to study the dust lifting process from a layer of dust behind a propagating shock wave. The experiments were conducted with the use of a shock tube and a specially constructed, five-channel laser optical device enabling measurements at five positions located in one vertical plane along the height of the tube. The system enabled measurements of the delay in lifting up of the dust from the layer, and the vertical velocity of the dust cloud was calculated from the dust concentration measurements. The research was carried out for various initial conditions and for three fractions of black coal dust. In the presented tests, three shock wave velocities: 450, 490 and 518 m/s and three dust layer thicknesses, equal to 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mm, were taken into consideration. On the grounds of the obtained experimental results, it was assumed that the vertical component of the lifted dust velocity is a function of the dust particle diameter, the velocity of the air flow in the channel, the layer thickness and the dust bulk density. It appeared, however, that lifting up of the dust from the thick layers, thicker than 1 mm, is a more complex process than that from thin layers and still requires further research. A possible explanation is that the shock wave action upon the thick layer results in its aggregation in the first stage of the dispersing process, which suppresses the dust lifting process.

  8. Applications of Shock Wave Research to Developments of Therapeutic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2007-06-01

    Underwater shock wave research applied to medicine started in 1980 by exploding micro lead azide pellets in water. Collaboration with urologists in the School of Medicine, Tohoku University at the same time was directed to disintegration of kidney stones by controlling shock waves. We initially proposed a miniature truncated ellipsoidal cavity for generating high-pressures enough to disintegrate the stone but gave up the idea, when encountering the Dornie Systems' invention of an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL). Then we confirmed its effectiveness by using 10 mg silver azide pellets and constructed our own lithotripter, which was officially approved for a clinical use in 1987. Tissue damage during ESWL was attributable to bubble collapse and we convinced it could be done in a controlled fashion. In 1996, we used 160 mJ pulsed Ho:YAG laser beam focusing inside a catheter for shock generation and applied it to the revascularization of cerebral embolism, which is recently expanded to the treatment of pulmonary infarction. Micro water jets discharged in air were so effective to dissect soft tissues preserving small blood vessels. Animal experiments are successfully performed with high frequency water jets driven by an actuator-assisted micro-pump. A metal foil is deformed at high speed by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam loading. We used this technique to project micro-particles or dry drugs attached on its reverse side and extended it to a laser ablation assisted dry drug delivery or DNA introductory system.

  9. Biological effects of spark-generated shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Edwin L.

    1992-08-01

    Shock waves, whether generated by sparks or laser bursts, are capable of producing a wide range of biological effects. Thresholds for hemorrhage of kidney and lung, the killing of fruit fly larvae, developmental defects in embryos and changes in function of excitable tissues such as the heart fall in the range from 1 to 10 MPa. In endoscopic applications, the bubble that is created has the potential to act directly upon the surrounding tissues producing effects by mechanisms that are qualitatively different than the shock fields themselves.

  10. Efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave treatment in calcaneal enthesophytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cosentino, R.; Falsetti, P; Manca, S; Stefano, R.; Frati, E; Frediani, B; Baldi, F; Selvi, E; Marcolongo, R

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) in calcaneal enthesophytosis.
METHODS—60 patients (43 women, 17 men) were examined who had talalgia associated with heel spur. A single blind randomised study was performed in which 30 patients underwent a regular treatment (group 1) and 30 a simulated one (shocks of 0 mJ/mm2 energy were applied) (group 2). Variations in symptoms were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS). Variations in the dimension of enthes...

  11. Shock Tube Simulation of Low Mach Number Blast Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R. G.; Gildfind, D. E.

    The underground mining environment has always been high risk due to the presence of solid and gaseous flammables, and the potential for the creation of detonablemixtures. Following explosions in confined spaces, shock waves are generated and may propagate through the tunnel system, causing injuries and possibly initiating further combusting or detonating events. The ability to generate the conditions which exist post shock is a useful experimental tool for the study of such processes, and for the evaluation of techniques to control and limit propagation.

  12. Thin film characterization by resonantly excited internal standing waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fonzio, S. [SINCROTRONE TRIESTE, Trieste (Italy)

    1996-09-01

    This contribution describes how a standing wave excited in a thin film can be used for the characterization of the properties of the film. By means of grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry one can deduce the total film thickness. On the other hand in making use of a strong resonance effect in the electric field intensity distribution inside a thin film on a bulk substrate one can learn more about the internal structure of the film. The profile of the internal standing wave is proven by diffraction experiments. The most appropriate non-destructive technique for the subsequent thin film characterization is angularly dependent X-ray fluorescence analysis. The existence of the resonance makes it a powerful tool for the detection of impurities and of ultra-thin maker layers, for which the position can be determined with very high precision (about 1% of the total film thickness). This latter aspect will be discussed here on samples which had a thin Ti marker layer at different positions in a carbon film. Due to the resonance enhancement it was still possible to perform these experiments with a standard laboratory x-ray tube and with standard laboratory tool for marker or impurity detection in thin films.

  13. Thoracic shock wave injury causes behavioral abnormalities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hiromi; Miyawaki, Hiroki; Satoh, Yasushi; Saiki, Takami; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Saitoh, Daizoh

    2015-12-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is caused by complex mechanisms of systemic, local and cerebral responses to blast exposure. However, the molecular mechanisms of cognitive impairment after exposure to blast waves are not clearly known. We tested the hypothesis that thoracic injury induced functional and morphological impairment in the brain, leading to behavioral abnormalities. Mice were exposed to laser-induced shock waves (LISWs) impacting the thorax and assessed for behavioral outcome at 7 and 28 days post injury. Hippocampus and lung were collected for histopathological analysis and gene expression profiling after injury. Thoracic injury transiently decreased the heart rate, blood pressure, peripheral oxyhemoglobin saturation and cerebral blood flow immediately after LISW exposure. Although LISWs exposure caused pulmonary contusions, hemorrhage was not apparent in the brain. At 7 and 28 days after, the injured mice exhibited impaired short-term memory and depression-like behavior compared with controls. Histological assessments showed an increase in neuronal cell death after shock wave exposure, especially in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Moreover, shock wave exposure altered the expression of functionally relevant genes in the hippocampus at 1 h and 1 day post injury. Our findings indicate that the LISW-induced thoracic injury with no direct impact on the brain affected the hippocampal gene expression and led to morphological alterations, resulting in behavioral abnormalities. Therefore, body protection may be extremely important in the effective prevention against blast-induced alterations in brain function.

  14. Theoretical investigation of shock stand-off distance for non-equilibrium flows over spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Hua

    2018-02-20

    We derived a theoretical solution of the shock stand-off distance for a non-equilibrium flow over spheres based on Wen and Hornung’s solution and Olivier’s solution. Compared with previous approaches, the main advantage of the present approach is allowing an analytic solution without involving any semi-empirical parameter for the whole non-equilibrium flow regimes. The effects of some important physical quantities therefore can be fully revealed via the analytic solution. By combining the current solution with Ideal Dissociating Gas (IDG) model, we investigate the effects of free stream kinetic energy and free stream dissociation level (which can be very different between different facilities) on the shock stand-off distance.

  15. Shock-wave processing of C60 in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biennier, L.; Jayaram, V.; Suas-David, N.; Georges, R.; Singh, M. Kiran; Arunan, E.; Kassi, S.; Dartois, E.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Interstellar carbonaceous particles and molecules are subject to intense shocks in astrophysical environments. Shocks induce a rapid raise in temperature and density which strongly affects the chemical and physical properties of both the gas and solid phases of the interstellar matter. Aims: The shock-induced thermal processing of C60 particles in hydrogen has been investigated in the laboratory under controlled conditions up to 3900 K with the help of a material shock-tube. Methods: The solid residues generated by the exposure of a C60/H2 mixture to a millisecond shock wave were collected and analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman micro-spectroscopy, and infrared micro-spectroscopy. The gaseous products were analyzed by Gas Chromatography and Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy. Results: Volatile end-products appear above reflected shock gas temperatures of 2540 K and reveal the substantial presence of small molecules with one or two C atoms. These observations confirm the role played by the C2 radical as a major product of C60 fragmentation and less expectedly highlight the existence of a single C atom loss channel. Molecules with more than two carbon atoms are not observed in the post-shock gas. The analysis of the solid component shows that C60 particles are rapidly converted into amorphous carbon with a number of aliphatic bridges. Conclusions: The absence of aromatic CH stretches on the IR spectra indicates that H atoms do not link directly to aromatic cycles. The fast thermal processing of C60 in H2 over the 800-3400 K temperature range leads to amorphous carbon. The analysis hints at a collapse of the cage with the formation of a few aliphatic connections. A low amount of hydrogen is incorporated into the carbon material. This work extends the range of applications of shock tubes to studies of astrophysical interest.

  16. Exploring nonlocal observables in shock wave collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Christian; Grumiller, Daniel; Stanzer, Philipp; Stricker, Stefan A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Technische Universität Wien,Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Schee, Wilke van der [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-09

    We study the time evolution of 2-point functions and entanglement entropy in strongly anisotropic, inhomogeneous and time-dependent N=4 super Yang-Mills theory in the large N and large ’t Hooft coupling limit using AdS/CFT. On the gravity side this amounts to calculating the length of geodesics and area of extremal surfaces in the dynamical background of two colliding gravitational shockwaves, which we do numerically. We discriminate between three classes of initial conditions corresponding to wide, intermediate and narrow shocks, and show that they exhibit different phenomenology with respect to the nonlocal observables that we determine. Our results permit to use (holographic) entanglement entropy as an order parameter to distinguish between the two phases of the cross-over from the transparency to the full-stopping scenario in dynamical Yang-Mills plasma formation, which is frequently used as a toy model for heavy ion collisions. The time evolution of entanglement entropy allows to discern four regimes: highly efficient initial growth of entanglement, linear growth, (post) collisional drama and late time (polynomial) fall off. Surprisingly, we found that 2-point functions can be sensitive to the geometry inside the black hole apparent horizon, while we did not find such cases for the entanglement entropy.

  17. Second sound shock waves and critical velocities in liquid helium 2. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Large amplitude second-sound shock waves were generated and the experimental results compared to the theory of nonlinear second-sound. The structure and thickness of second-sound shock fronts are calculated and compared to experimental data. Theoretically it is shown that at T = 1.88 K, where the nonlinear wave steepening vanishes, the thickness of a very weak shock must diverge. In a region near this temperature, a finite-amplitude shock pulse evolves into an unusual double-shock configuration consisting of a front steepened, temperature raising shock followed by a temperature lowering shock. Double-shocks are experimentally verified. It is experimentally shown that very large second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium 2, which is dramatically displayed as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. The value of the maximum shock-induced relative velocity represents a significant lower bound to the intrinsic critical velocity of helium 2.

  18. Researching of the reduction of shock waves intensivity in the “pseudo boiling” layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G. I.; Telyashov, D. A.; Kochergin, A. V.; Nakoryakov, P. V.; Sukhovaya, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    This article applies to the field of acoustics and deals with noise reduction of pulsating combustion chambers, in particular the reduction of the shock waves’ intensity with the help of pseudo boiling layer. In the course of work on a test stand that included a pulsator, a compressor with the receiver and a high pressure fan was simulated gas jet flowing from the chamber pulsating combustion and studied the effect of different types of fluidization on effect of reducing the sound pressure levels. Were obtained the experimental dependence of the sound pressure levels from parameters such as: height of the layer of granules; diameter of the used granules; amplitude of the pressure pulsations in the gas stream at the entrance to the camera; frequency of pressure pulsations. Based on the results of the study, it was concluded that the using of a pseudo boiling layer is promising for reducing shock wave noise.

  19. Laser-induced versus shock wave induced transformation of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    OpenAIRE

    Pezeril, T.; Bulou, A.; Veysset, David Georges; Kooi, Steven E.; Nelson, Keith Adam

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that in-plane 2D propagation and focusing of a laser-induced shock wave result in enhanced nano-crystallization of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite. Throughout the 2D shock focusing technique, which enables to clearly distinguish between the laser-induced and the shock-induced transformation/transition, our findings establish the role of the shock wave during the transformation/transition process. This configuration could open the way to an alternative path for laser shock fab...

  20. Modeling Mitigation Effects of Watershield on Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S. Shin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this analysis is to investigate mitigation effects of watershield on air blast waves. To examine the water mitigation concept, features of the free-field detonation process are studied from a series of one-dimensional simulations using a multimaterial Eulerian finite element technique. Five different shock Hugoniots for water are compared, and the most accurate data are suggested. To verify the numerical procedure, results are compared with available experimental data for UNDEX problem and analytical predictions for air shocks. For the case of contact watershield, the magnitude of peak pressure generally decreases and the shock arrival time increases with increasing thickness of watershield. The total pressure impulse is reduced significantly at near field. Non-contact watershield was also examined, and was found to provide a better design criterion based on the further decay of peak pressure.

  1. Influence of mass imperfections on the evolution of standing waves in slowly rotating spherical bodies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Standing waves can exist as stable vibrating patterns in perfect structures such as spherical bodies, and inertial rotation of the body causes precession (Bryan’seffect). However, an imperfection such as light mass anisotropy destroys the standing...

  2. Time fractional effect on ion acoustic shock waves in ion-pair plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahed, H. G.; El-Shewy, E. K.; Mahmoud, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The nonlinear properties of ion acoustic shock waves are studied. The Burgers equation is derived and converted into the time fractional Burgers equation by Agrawal's method. Using the Adomian decomposition method, shock wave solutions of the time fractional Burgers equation are constructed. The effect of the time fractional parameter on the shock wave properties in ion-pair plasma is investigated. The results obtained may be important in investigating the broadband electrostatic shock noise in D- and F-regions of Earth's ionosphere.

  3. Interferometric analysis of laser-driven cylindrically focusing shock waves in a thin liquid layer

    OpenAIRE

    David Veysset; Alexei A. Мaznev; Thomas Pezeril; Steven Kooi; Nelson, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Shock waves in condensed matter are of great importance for many areas of science and technology ranging from inertially confined fusion to planetary science and medicine. In laboratory studies of shock waves, there is a need in developing diagnostic techniques capable of measuring parameters of materials under shock with high spatial resolution. Here, time-resolved interferometric imaging is used to study laser-driven focusing shock waves in a thin liquid layer in an all-optical experiment. ...

  4. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome. PMID:25024562

  5. Renal pelvic stones: choosing shock wave lithotripsy or percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Marcovich

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of minimally invasive techniques has revolutionized the surgical management of renal calculi. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy are now both well-established procedures. Each modality has advantages and disadvantages, and the application of each should be based on well-defined factors. These variables include stone factors such as number, size, and composition; factors related to the stone's environment, including the stone's location, spatial anatomy of the renal collecting system, presence of hydronephrosis, and other anatomic variables, such as the presence of calyceal diverticula and renal anomalies; and clinical or patient factors like morbid obesity, the presence of a solitary kidney, and renal insufficiency. The morbidity of each procedure in relation to its efficacy should be taken in to account. This article will review current knowledge and suggest an algorithm for the rational management of renal calculi with shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah Venkatesh Prabhuji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  7. Pediatric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Predicting successful outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Sean; Shukla, Aseem R

    2010-10-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is currently a first-line procedure of most upper urinary tract stones ionizing radiation, perhaps utilizing advancements in ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. This report provides a review of the current literature evaluating the patient attributes and stone factors that may be predictive of successful ESWL outcomes along with reviewing the role of pre-operative imaging and considerations for patient safety.

  8. Remote effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on cutaneous microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisch, Tobias; Sorg, Heiko; Forstmeier, Vinzent; Knobloch, Karsten; Liodaki, Eirini; Stang, Felix; Mailänder, Peter; Krämer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) has proven its clinical benefits in different fields of medicine. Tissue regeneration and healing is improved after shock wave treatment. Even in the case of burn wounds angiogenesis and re-epithelialization is accelerated, but ESWT in extensive burn wounds is impracticable. High energy ESWT influences cutaneous microcirculation at body regions remote from application site. Eighteen Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups and received either high energy ESWT (Group A: total 1000 impulses, 10 J) or placebo shock wave treatment (Group B: 0 impulses, 0 J), applied to the dorsal lower leg of the hind limb. Ten minutes later microcirculatory effects were assessed at the contralateral lower leg of the hind limb (remote body region) by combined Laser-Doppler-Imaging and Photospectrometry. In Group A cutaneous capillary blood velocity was significantly increased by 152.8% vs. placebo ESWT at the remote body location (p = 0.01). Postcapillary venous filling pressure remained statistically unchanged (p > 0.05), while cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation increased by 12.7% in Group A (p = 0.220). High energy ESWT affects cutaneous hemodynamics in body regions remote from application site in a standard rat model. The results of this preliminary study indicate that ESWT might be beneficial even in disseminated and extensive burn wounds by remote shock wave effects and should therefore be subject to further scientific evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Jet formation of SF6 bubble induced by incident and reflected shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuejin; Yu, Lei; Pan, Jianfeng; Pan, Zhenhua; Zhang, Penggang

    2017-12-01

    The computational results of two different cases on the evolution of the shock-SF6 heavy bubble interaction are presented. The shock focusing processes and jet formation mechanisms are analyzed by using the high resolution of computation schemes, and the influence of reflected shock waves is also investigated. It is concluded that there are two steps in the shock focusing process behind the incident shock wave, and the density and pressure values increase distinctly when the shock focusing process is completed. The local high pressure and vorticities in the vicinity of the downstream pole can propel the formation of the jet behind the incident shock wave. In addition, the gas is with the rightward velocity before the reflected shock wave impinges on the bubble; therefore, the evolutions of the waves and the bubble are more complicated when the reflected shock wave impinges on the SF6 bubble. Furthermore, the different end wall distances would affect the deformation degree of the bubble before the interaction of the reflected shock wave; therefore, the different left jet formation processes are found after the impingement of reflected shock waves when L = 27 mm. The local high pressure zones in the vicinity of the left bubble interface and the impingement of different shock waves can induce the local gas to shift the rightward velocity to the leftward velocity, which can further promote the formation of jets.

  10. On the propagation of sound waves in a stellar wind traversed by periodic strong shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Pijpers, F. P.

    1994-01-01

    It has been claimed that in stellar winds traversed by strong shocks the mechanism for driving the wind by sound wave pressure cannot operate because sound waves cannot propagate past the shocks. It is shown here that sound waves can propagate through shocks in one direction and that this is a sufficient condition for the sound wave pressure mechanism to work. A strong shock amplifies a sound wave passing through it and can drag the sound wave away from the star. It is immaterial for the soun...

  11. Examination of the forces controlling dust dispersion by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, O. J.; Houim, R. W.; Oran, E. S.

    2017-07-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and a thin layer of inert dust is studied by solving unsteady, multidimensional Navier-Stokes equations representing the interactions between a compressible gas and incompressible particles. The system studied consists of a layer of densely packed limestone dust containing particles of uniform diameter (40 μ m ) that interact with a shock of strength Ms=1.4 . Particle dispersion is investigated by comparing vertical particle accelerations due to Archimedes, gravitational, intergranular, and aerodynamic drag and lift forces. The simulations show that the shock produces two dust regions: a compacted layer and a dispersed region. The layer compaction, which increases the intergranular particle stress, is produced by drag and Archimedes forces. The dispersed dust is produced by forces that change in time as the shock passes. Initially, the dispersion is caused by intergranular forces. Later it is driven by a tradeoff between lift and drag forces. Eventually, drag forces dominate. Comparisons of the computations to experimental shock-tube data reproduced the observed initial growth of the dispersed dust and later leveled off. Particle agglomeration in the experiments made it difficult to determine a true particle size experimentally, although the computations for 40-μ m particles explain the experimental data.

  12. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Velikovich, A L; Taylor, B D; Giuliani, J L; Zalesak, S T; Iwamoto, Y

    2016-01-01

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Y. Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [H. Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); M. Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic...

  13. A heuristic model of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan B; Zhong, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A heuristic model is presented to describe the overall progression of stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), accounting for the effects of shock wave dose and the average peak pressure, P+(avg), incident on the stone during the treatment. The model is developed through adaptation of the Weibull theory for brittle fracture, incorporating threshold values in dose and P+(avg) that are required to initiate fragmentation. The model is validated against experimental data of stone comminution from two stone types (hard and soft BegoStone) obtained at various positions in lithotripter fields produced by two shock wave sources of different beam width and pulse profile both in water and in 1,3-butanediol (which suppresses cavitation). Subsequently, the model is used to assess the performance of a newly developed acoustic lens for electromagnetic lithotripters in comparison with its original counterpart both under static and simulated respiratory motion. The results have demonstrated the predictive value of this heuristic model in elucidating the physical basis for improved performance of the new lens. The model also provides a rationale for the selection of SWL treatment protocols to achieve effective stone comminution without elevating the risk of tissue injury.

  14. Stability of stagnation via an expanding accretion shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Murakami, M. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Taylor, B. D. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zalesak, S. T. [Berkeley Research Associates, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States); Iwamoto, Y. [Ehime University, Matsuyama, Ehime Pref. 790-8577 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    Stagnation of a cold plasma streaming to the center or axis of symmetry via an expanding accretion shock wave is ubiquitous in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density plasma physics, the examples ranging from plasma flows in x-ray-generating Z pinches [Maron et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 035001 (2013)] to the experiments in support of the recently suggested concept of impact ignition in ICF [Azechi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 235002 (2009); Murakami et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 054007 (2014)]. Some experimental evidence indicates that stagnation via an expanding shock wave is stable, but its stability has never been studied theoretically. We present such analysis for the stagnation that does not involve a rarefaction wave behind the expanding shock front and is described by the classic ideal-gas Noh solution in spherical and cylindrical geometry. In either case, the stagnated flow has been demonstrated to be stable, initial perturbations exhibiting a power-law, oscillatory or monotonic, decay with time for all the eigenmodes. This conclusion has been supported by our simulations done both on a Cartesian grid and on a curvilinear grid in spherical coordinates. Dispersion equation determining the eigenvalues of the problem and explicit formulas for the eigenfunction profiles corresponding to these eigenvalues are presented, making it possible to use the theory for hydrocode verification in two and three dimensions.

  15. Slot-coupled CW standing wave accelerating cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoheng; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2017-05-16

    A slot-coupled CW standing wave multi-cell accelerating cavity. To achieve high efficiency graded beta acceleration, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include different cell lengths. Alternatively, to achieve high efficiency with acceleration for particles with beta equal to 1, each cell in the multi-cell cavity may include the same cell design. Coupling between the cells is achieved with a plurality of axially aligned kidney-shaped slots on the wall between cells. The slot-coupling method makes the design very compact. The shape of the cell, including the slots and the cone, are optimized to maximize the power efficiency and minimize the peak power density on the surface. The slots are non-resonant, thereby enabling shorter slots and less power loss.

  16. The electric field standing wave effect in infrared transflection spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G.; Popp, Jürgen

    2018-02-01

    We show that an electric field standing wave effect is responsible for the oscillations and the non-linear dependence of the absorbance on the layer thickness in thin layers on a reflective surface. This effect is connected to the occurrence of interference inside these layers. Consequently, the absorptance undergoes a maximum electric field intensity enhancement at spectral positions close to those where corresponding non-absorbing layers on a metal show minima in the reflectance. The effect leads to changes of peak maxima ratios with layer thickness and shows the same periodicity as oscillations in the peak positions. These peculiarities are fully based on and described by Maxwell's equations but cannot be understood and described if the strongly simplifying model centered on reflectance absorbance is employed.

  17. Impact of Acoustic Standing Waves on Structural Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaini, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    For several decades large reverberant chambers and most recently direct field acoustic testing have been used in the aerospace industry to test larger structures with low surface densities such as solar arrays and reflectors to qualify them and to detect faults in the design and fabrication. It has been reported that in reverberant chamber and direct acoustic testing, standing acoustic modes may strongly couple with the fundamental structural modes of the test hardware (Reference 1). In this paper results from a recent reverberant chamber acoustic test of a composite reflector are discussed. These results provide further convincing evidence of the acoustic standing wave and structural modes coupling phenomenon. The purpose of this paper is to alert test organizations to this phenomenon so that they can account for the potential increase in structural responses and ensure that flight hardware undergoes safe testing. An understanding of the coupling phenomenon may also help minimize the over and/or under testing that could pose un-anticipated structural and flight qualification issues.

  18. Some recent advances of shock wave physics research at the Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jing Fu Qian

    2002-01-01

    Progress made in recent years on three topics that have been investigated at the Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research are presented in this report. (1) A new equation of state (EOS) has been derived which can be used from a standard state to predict state variable change along an isobaric path. Good agreements between calculations for some representative metals using this new EOS and experiments have been found, covering a wide range from hundreds of MPa to hundreds of GPa and from ambient temperature to tens of thousands of GPa. (2) An empirical relation of Y/G = constant (Y is yield strength, G is shear modulus) at HT-HP has been reinvestigated and confirmed by shock wave experiment. 93W alloy was chosen as a model material. The advantage of this relation is that it is beneficial to formulate a kind of simplified constitutive equation for metallic solids under shock loading, and thus to faithfully describe the behaviours of shocked solids through hydrodynamic simulations. (3) An attempt...

  19. [Current status of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in urinary lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Arias, Jose Gregorio; Gamarra-Quintanilla, Mikel; Urdaneta-Salegui, Luis Felipe; Mora-Christian, Jorge Alberto; Sánchez-Vazquez, Andrea; Astobieta-Odriozola, Ander; Ibarluzea-González, Gaspar

    2017-03-01

    Over the last decade, urinary lithiasis' prevalence has dramatically increased due to diet and lifestyle changes, growing 10.6% and 7.1% in men and women respectively. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has lost relevance in current practice due to endoscopic device development and unpredictability of results. Instrument miniaturization is leading to an increase of the percutaneous approach of increasingly smaller stones, while most flexible ureteroscopes durability and digitalization has allowed urologists to address larger stones. So that, decision algorithm is now impossible to define, but what is clear is that ESWL has declined worldwide. Can it disappear as a urinary lithiasis treatment modality? If we don't improve appropriate candidate selection and optimize disintegration efficiency, guidelines are going to replace the more "boring" ESWL by popular and more attractive endoscopes. Shock wave technology has evolved in the last two decades, however lithotripsy fundamental principle has not changed. ESWL has passed the test of time and centers dedicated to stone treatment should have a lithotripter in order to offer an appropriate balance in different options for different clinical situations. New developments will be focused on improvements in location (in-line navigation systems; Vision track system) and automatic ultrasound location on a robotic arm; monitoring and stone fixation, implementation of different focal sizes with new acoustic lenses, multitask working stations that allow endourological approach, coupling control (avoiding microbubbles) and low cost devices for different applications. On the other hand, optimizing outcomes by: slower pulse rates, ramping strategies and patient selection with soft stones, short stone-skin distance, low BMI and favorable collecting system anatomy, allow us to achieve better outcomes in shock wave treatments. SWL still represents a unique non invasive method of stone disease treatment with no anesthesia and low

  20. Application of shock waves as a treatment modality in the vicinity of the brain and skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Kusaka, Yasuko; Hirano, Takayuki; Saito, Tsutomu; Shirane, Reizo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    2003-07-01

    Shock waves have not previously been used as a treatment modality for lesions in the brain and skull because of the lack of a suitable shock wave source and concerns about safety. Therefore, the authors have performed experiments aimed at developing both a new, compact shock wave generator with a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser and a safe method for exposing the surface of the brain to these shock waves. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. In 10 rats, a single shock wave was delivered directly to the brain, whereas the protective effect of inserting a 0.7-mm-thick expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) dural substitute between the dura mater and skull before applying the shock wave was investigated in the other 10 rats. Visualizations on shadowgraphy along with pressure measurements were obtained to confirm that the shock wave generator was capable of conveying waves in a limited volume without harmful effects to the target. The attenuation rates of shock waves administered through a 0.7-mm-thick ePTFE dural substitute and a surgical cottonoid were measured to determine which of these materials was suitable for avoiding propagation of the shock wave beyond the target. Using the shock wave generator with the Ho:YAG laser, a localized shock wave (with a maximum overpressure of 50 bar) can be generated from a small device (external diameter 15 mm, weight 20 g). The placement of a 0.7-mm-thick ePTFE dural substitute over the dura mater reduces the overpressure of the shock wave by 96% and eliminates damage to surrounding tissue in the rat brain. These findings indicate possibilities for applying shock waves in various neurosurgical treatments such as cranioplasty, local drug delivery, embolysis, and pain management.

  1. Interaction of a shock wave with an array of particles and effect of particles on the shock wave weakening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, P. V.; Ilyina, T. E.; Volkov, K. N.; Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.

    2017-06-01

    Two-phase systems that involve gas-particle or gas-droplet flows are widely used in aerospace and power engineering. The problems of weakening and suppression of detonation during saturation of a gas or liquid flow with the array of solid particles are considered. The tasks, associated with the formation of particles arrays, dust lifting behind a travelling shock wave, ignition of particles in high-speed and high-temperature gas flows are adjoined to safety of space flight. The mathematical models of shock wave interaction with the array of solid particles are discussed, and numerical methods are briefly described. The numerical simulations of interaction between sub- and supersonic flows and an array of particles being in motionless state at the initial time are performed. Calculations are carried out taking into account the influence that the particles cause on the flow of carrier gas. The results obtained show that inert particles significantly weaken the shock waves up to their suppression, which can be used to enhance the explosion safety of spacecrafts.

  2. Temporal evolution of the solar wind and the formation of a standing shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1984-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the solar wind from one steady state to another is explored when momentum deposition produces multiple critical points in the flow. It is shown that the wind always evolves in time to a new steady state compatible with the solution of the steady state equation of motion. However, for the same initial state and identical asymptotic momentum deposition rate, the temporal evolution pattern of the wind depends on the detailed time history of momentum addition and is therefore not unique. This feature plays an important role in the particular case when multiple (three in this study) steady states exist for identical boundary conditions; each one of these solutions is thus shown to be physically accessible. The details of the temporal evolution pattern of the wind reveal the formation of a shock discontinuity whenever the flow becomes supersonic at a critical point upstream from the initial critical point. If the flow remains supersonic at that inner critical point, the shock can become a standing one, depending on the strength and the temporal history of momentum addition. The results of this study indicate that the time scale required for the solar wind to evolve between steady states is of the order of 30-60 hours. Furthermore, the results also reveal the interesting and novel phenomenon that a standing shock is likely to develop in the inner solar wind flow within this time frame, in particular, in coronal hole regions with rapidly diverging geometries.

  3. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  4. Laser-generated shock wave attenuation aimed at microscale pyrotechnic device design

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Hyeonju; Yoh, Jack J

    2016-01-01

    ...m, the laser-generated shock wave in water confinement is adopted. The shock properties are obtained from the free surface velocity by making use of a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR...

  5. Reflection of a converging cylindrical shock wave segment by a straight wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, B.; Skews, B.

    2017-07-01

    As a converging cylindrical shock wave propagates over a wedge, the shock wave accelerates and the angle between the shock wave and the wedge decreases. This causes the conditions at the reflection point to move from what would be the irregular reflection domain for a straight shock wave into the regular reflection domain. This paper covers a largely qualitative study of the reflection of converging shock wave segments with Mach numbers between 1.2 and 2.1 by wedges inclined at angles between 15° and 60° from experimental and numerical results. The sonic condition conventionally used for predicting the type of reflection of straight shock waves was found to also be suitable for predicting the initial reflection of a curved shock wave. Initially regular reflections persisted until the shock was completely reflected by the wedge, whereas the triple point of initially irregular reflections was observed to return to the wedge surface, forming transitioned regular reflection. After the incident shock wave was completely reflected by the wedge, a shock wave focusing mechanism was observed to amplify the pressure on the surface of the wedge by a factor of up to 100 for low wedge angles.

  6. The preplasma effect on the properties of the shock wave driven by a fast electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [University Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Gus' kov, S. Yu. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI,” Moscow115409 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    Strong shock wave generation by a mono-energetic fast electron beam in a plasma with an increasing density profile is studied theoretically. The proposed analytical model describes the shock wave characteristics for a homogeneous plasma preceded by a low density precursor. The shock pressure and the time of shock formation depend on the ratio of the electron stopping length to the preplasma areal density and on the initial energy of injected electrons. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations.

  7. Formation of standing shocks in stellar winds and related astrophysical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinganos, K.; Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    Stellar winds and other analogous astrophysical flows can be described, to lowest order, by the familiar one dimensional hydrodynamic equations which, being nonlinear, admit in some instances discontinuous as well as continuous transonic solutions for identical inner boundary conditions. The characteristics of the time dependent differential equations of motion are described to show how a perturbation changes profile in time and, under well defined conditions, develops into a stationary shock discontinuity. The formation of standing shocks in wind type astrophysical flows depends on the fulfillment of appropriate necessary conditions, which are determined by the conservation of mass, momentum and energy across the discontinuity, and certain sufficient conditions, which are determined by the flow's history.

  8. Linear shock wave therapy in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo-Nieto, M; Linden-Castro, E; Alias-Melgar, A; Espinosa-Pérez Grovas, D; Carreño-de la Rosa, F; Bertrand-Noriega, F; Cortez-Betancourt, R

    2015-09-01

    Linear Shock Wave Therapy (LSWT) is a new noninvasive therapy that uses low-intensity shock waves to induce local angiogenesis promising modality in the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). To evaluate the effectiveness of LSWT in men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (ED), in a Tertiary Care Center. Included 15 men aged 45-70 years, sexually active with mild and moderate vascular ED evaluated with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). The study was conducted in three stage: screening, treatment and results. Treatment stage: 4 weekly sessions LSWT (RENOVA ®) 5000 waves (.09mJ/mm(2)). Erectile function was assessed with IIEFF-EF, SEP (Sexual Encounter Profile) and GAQ (Global Assessment Questions) at one and six months after treatment. The rate of success was 80% (12/15). Patients with mild ED (6/15) 40% and moderate ED (9/15) 60%. We found a positive association between IIEF-Basal (average 14.23 pts) and IIEF at one month and six months after therapy (19.69 pts) a difference of 5.46 pts. (P<.013). The feasibility and tolerability of this treatment, and rehabilitation potential features, make it this an attractive new treatment option for patients with ED. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential applications of low-energy shock waves in functional urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hung-Jen; Cheng, Jai-Hong; Chuang, Yao-Chi

    2017-08-01

    A shock wave, which carries energy and can propagate through a medium, is a type of continuous transmitted sonic wave with a frequency of 16 Hz-20 MHz. It is accompanied by processes involving rapid energy transformations. The energy associated with shock waves has been harnessed and used for various applications in medical science. High-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy is the most successful application of shock waves, and has been used to disintegrate urolithiasis for 30 years. At lower energy levels, however, shock waves have enhanced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, chemoattractant factors and recruitment of progenitor cells; shock waves have also improved tissue regeneration. Low-energy shock wave therapy has been used clinically with musculoskeletal disorders, ischemic cardiovascular disorders and erectile dysfunction, through the mechanisms of neovascularization, anti-inflammation and tissue regeneration. Furthermore, low-energy shock waves have been proposed to temporarily increase tissue permeability and facilitate intravesical drug delivery. The present review article provides information on the basics of shock wave physics, mechanisms of action on the biological system and potential applications in functional urology. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Material response mechanisms are needed to obtain highly accurate experimental shock wave data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Jerry W.

    2017-01-01

    The field of shock wave compression of matter has provided a simple set of equations relating thermodynamic and kinematic parameters that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and energy across a steady plane shock wave with one-dimensional flow. Well-known condensed matter shock wave experimental results will be reviewed to see whether the assumptions required for deriving these simple R-H equations are satisfied. Note that the material compression model is not required for deriving the 1-D conservation flow equations across a steady plane shock front. However, this statement is misleading from a practical experimental viewpoint since obtaining small systematic errors in shock wave measured parameters requires the material compression and release mechanisms to be known. A review will be presented on errors in shock wave data from common experimental techniques for elastic-plastic solids. Issues related to time scales of experiments, steady waves with long rise times and detonations will also be discussed

  11. Influence of Shock-Wave Profile Shape (``Taylor-Wave'' versus Square-Topped) on the Shock-Hardening and Spallation Response of 316L Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, G. T.; Bourne, N. K.; Millett, J. C. F.; Lopez, M. F.

    2004-07-01

    While much has been learned over the past five decades concerning shock hardening and the spallation response of materials shock-loaded using "square-topped" shock profiles, achieved via flyer plate loading, considerably less quantitative information is known concerning direct in-contact HE-driven or triangular-wave loading profile shock prestraining on metals and alloys. In this paper the influence of shock-wave profile, using both "square-topped" and triangular-wave pulses, on the shock hardening and spallation response of 316L stainless steel is presented. The shock hardening in 316L SS, using a triangular-shaped pulse and square-topped pulse (pulse duration of 0.75 μsec) to a peak shock pressure of 6.6 GPa was found to be reasonably similar. Square-wave loading at 6.6 GPa is observed to result in incipient spallation in 316L SS while triangular-wave loading to an equivalent peak stress is quantified to exhibit no wave-profile "pull-back" nor damage evolution.

  12. Comparative shock wave analysis during corneal ablation with an excimer laser, picosecond laser, and femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Ronald R.; Juhasz, Tibor

    1995-05-01

    With the event of topographic steep central islands following excimer laser surgery and the potential damage to the corneal endothelium, shock waves are playing an increasingly important role in laser refractive surgery. With this in mind, we performed a comparative shock wave analysis in corneal tissue using an excimer laser, picosecond laser, and femtosecond laser. We used a Lambda Physik excimer laser at 308 nm wavelength, a Nd:YLF picosecond laser at 1053 nm wavelength and a synchronously pumped linear cavity femtosecond laser at 630 nm wavelength. The pulse widths of the corresponding lasers were 8 ns, 18 ps, 150 fs, respectively. The energy density of irradiation was 2.5 to 8 times the threshold level being 2 J/cm2 (excimer laser), 86 J/cm2 (picosecond laser) and 10.3 J/cm2 (femtosecond laser). Shock wave dynamics were analyzed using time-resolved photography on a nanosecond time scale using the picosecond laser in corneal tissue, water and air. Shock wave dynamics using the femtosecond laser were studied in water only while the excimer laser induced shock wave during corneal ablation was studied in air only. We found the dynamics of shock waves to be similar in water and corneal tissue indicating that water is a good model to investigate shock wave effects in the cornea. The magnitude of the shock wave velocity and pressure decays over time to that of a sound wave. The distance over which it decays is 3 mm in air with the excimer laser and 600 - 700 micrometers in air with the picosecond laser. In water, the picosecond laser shock wave decays over a distance of 150 micrometers compared to the femtosecond laser shock wave which decays over a distance of 30 micrometers . Overall the excimer laser shock wave propagates 5 times further than that of the picosecond laser and the picosecond laser shock wave propagates 5 times further than that of the femtosecond laser. In this preliminary comparison, the time and distance for shock wave decay appears to be directly

  13. Wave Propagation and Dynamic Fracture in Laser Shock-Loaded Solid Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Rességuier, Thibaut de; Cuq-Lelandais, Jean-Paul; Boustie, Michel; LESCOUTE, Emilien; Berthe, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fracture in shock-loaded materials is governed by the propagation, reflection and interactions of stress waves. Post-shock analyses of the residual damage observed in samples recovered from laser shock experiments, less destructive than more conventional techniques, can provide valuable insight into key aspects of wave propagation prior to fracture, such as the effects of structural anisotropy, the role of lateral waves associated to edge effects, or the influence of polymorphic phase...

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SHOCK WAVE REFRACTION ON INCLINED CONTACT DISCONTINUITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider numerical simulation of shock wave refraction on plane contact discontinuity, separating two gases with different density. Discretization of Euler equations is based on finite volume method and WENO finite difference schemes, implemented on unstructured meshes. Integration over time is performed with the use of the third-order Runge–Kutta stepping procedure. The procedure of identification and classification of gas dynamic discontinuities based on conditions of dynamic consistency and image processing methods is applied to visualize and interpret the results of numerical calculations. The flow structure and its quantitative characteristics are defined. The results of numerical and experimental visualization (shadowgraphs, schlieren images, and interferograms are compared.

  15. Observation of the traveling component of an x-ray standing wave field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, B.; Yun, W.B.; Chrzas, J.; Viccaro, P.J.

    1994-03-01

    We present the first systematic experimental study of the traveling component of a standing wave field, formed by interference of an incident beam with its specularly reflected part from a plane interface. The traveling component of the standing wave field propagates parallel to the interface and its existence manifests the dynamical aspect of the standing wave field. In our experiment, a multilayer structure was used to aid in the observation of the traveling wave component. The data measured are explained using a finite thickness diffraction grating model.

  16. No Regularity Singularities Exist at Points of General Relativistic Shock Wave Interaction between Shocks from Different Characteristic Families

    CERN Document Server

    Reintjes, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    We give a constructive proof that coordinate transformations exist which raise the regularity of the gravitational metric tensor from $C^{0,1}$ to $C^{1,1}$ in a neighborhood of points of shock wave collision in General Relativity. The proof applies to collisions between shock waves coming from different characteristic families, in spherically symmetric spacetimes. Our result here implies that spacetime is locally inertial and corrects an error in our earlier RSPA-publication, which led us to the false conclusion that such coordinate transformations, which smooth the metric to $C^{1,1}$, cannot exist. Thus, our result implies that regularity singularities, (a type of mild singularity introduced in our RSPA-paper), do not exist at points of interacting shock waves from different families in spherically symmetric spacetimes. Our result generalizes Israel's celebrated 1966 paper to the case of such shock wave interactions but our proof strategy differs fundamentally from that used by Israel and is an extension o...

  17. Three-dimensional shock wave configurations induced by two asymmetrical intersecting wedges in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, G.; Wang, C.; Teng, H.; Jiang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    This study explores the three-dimensional (3D) wave configurations induced by 3D asymmetrical intersecting compression wedges in supersonic and hypersonic inviscid flows. By using the "spatial dimension reduction" approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction is converted to that of the interaction of two moving shock waves in the characteristic two-dimensional (2D) plane. Shock polar theory is used to analyze the shock configurations in asymmetrical situations. The results show that various shock configurations exist in 3D asymmetrical shock wave interactions, including regular interaction, transitioned regular interaction, single Mach interaction, inverse single Mach interaction, transitional double Mach interaction, weak shock interaction, and weak single Mach interaction. All of the above 3D steady shock/shock interactions have their corresponding 2D moving shock/shock interaction configurations. Numerical simulations are performed by solving the 3D inviscid Euler equations with the non-oscillatory, non-free parameters, dissipative (NND) numerical scheme, and good agreement with the theoretical analysis is obtained. Furthermore, the comparison of results show that the concept of the "virtual wall" in shock dynamics theory is helpful for understanding the mechanism of two-dimensional shock/shock interactions.

  18. Controlling femtosecond-laser-driven shock-waves in hot, dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Amitava; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Blackman, David R.; Lad, Amit D.; Chatterjee, Gourab; Pasley, John; Robinson, A. P. L.; Ravindra Kumar, G.

    2017-07-01

    Ultrafast pump-probe reflectometry and Doppler spectrometry of a supercritical density plasma layer excited by 1017-1018 W/cm2 intensity, 30 fs, and 800 nm laser pulses reveal the interplay of laser intensity contrast and inward shock wave strength. The inward shock wave velocity increases with an increase in laser intensity contrast. This trend is supported by simulations as well as by a separate independent experiment employing an external prepulse to control the inward motion of the shock wave. This kind of cost-effective control of shock wave strength using femtosecond pulses could open up new applications in medicine, science, and engineering.

  19. Effect of focusing conditions on laser-induced shock waves at titanium-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Arpita; Khare, Alika

    2011-07-01

    The spatial and temporal evolution of laser-induced shock waves at a titanium-water interface was analyzed using a beam deflection setup. The focusing conditions of the source laser were varied, and its effect onto the dynamics of shock waves was elucidated. For a tightly focused condition, the speed of the shock wave was ~6.4 Km/s, whereas for a defocused condition the velocities reduced to laser is focused a few millimeters above the target, i.e., within the water, the emission of dual shock waves was observed toward the rear side of the focal volume. These shock waves originate from the titanium-water interface as well as from the pure water breakdown region, respectively. The shock wave pressure is estimated from the shock wave velocity using the Newton's second law across a shock wave discontinuity. The shock wave pressure for a tightly focused condition was 18 GPa, whereas under a defocused condition the pressure experienced was ≤1 GPa in the proximity of target.

  20. Localization of rf breakdowns in a standing wave cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faya Wang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available At SLAC, a five-cell, normal-conducting, L-band (1.3 GHz, standing-wave (SW cavity was built as a prototype positron capture accelerator for the ILC. The structure met the ILC gradient goal but required extensive rf processing. When rf breakdowns occurred, a large variation was observed in the decay rate of the stored energy in the cavity after the input power was shut off. It appeared that the breakdowns were isolating sections of the cavity, and that the trapped energy in those sections was then partitioned among its natural modes, producing a distinct beating pattern during the decay. To explore this phenomenon further, an equivalent circuit model of cavity was created that reproduces well its normal operating characteristics. The model was then used to compute the spectra of trapped energy for different numbers of isolated cells. The resulting modal patterns agree well with those of the breakdown data, and thus such a comparison appears to provide a means of identifying the irises on which the breakdowns occurred.

  1. Supersonic flow. Pt. 5 Shock waves; Fondamenti fisici dei fasci molecolari supersonici. Pt 5 Onde di Shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, G.; Tomassetti, G. [L`Aquila Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1998-02-01

    The discontinuities in the flow fields (both tangential and shocks) are considered and the equations for the quantities conserved across them are written. The post-shock flow variables are expressed by the Mach number of the incident supersonic flow and its deflection angle operated by rigid wall. Normal and oblique shocks are considered and graphs and polar diagrams are introduced. Then the reflections of a shock wave operated by a rigid wall and by the boundary between a jet and a stagnating gas are analyzed. Finally, the interactions between two distinct shock waves are considered. [Italiano] Vengono considerate le discontinuita` (tangenziali e shocks) nei campi di flusso e sono scritte le equazioni per le quantita` che si conservano attraverso di esse. Le variabili del flusso oltre lo shock sono espresse in funzione del numero di Mach del flusso supersonico incidente e dell`angolo di deflessione di questo operato da una parete rigida. I casi di shock normale, obliquo e distaccato sono considerati e sono introdotti grafici vari e rappresentazioni polari. Sono quindi considerate le riflessioni di un fronte di shock da una parete rigida e dalla frontiera tra un gas in moto ed uno stagnante. Sono infine considerate le diverse interazioni tra due shock distinti.

  2. Coherent Thz Frequency Radiation from Shock Waves: a New Ultrafast Strain Wave Detection Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Evan J.; Armstrong, Michael R.; Kim, Ki-Yong; Glownia, James H.

    2007-12-01

    We discover that strain waves of THz frequencies can coherently generate radiation when they propagate past an interface between materials with different piezoelectric coefficients. By considering AlN/GaN heterostructures, we show that the radiation is of detectable amplitude and contains sufficient information to determine the time-dependence of the strain wave with potentially unprecedented nearly atomic time and space resolution. We demonstrate this phenomenon within the context of high amplitude THz frequency strain waves that spontaneously form at the front of shock waves in GaN crystals. We have performed proof of principle experiments that demonstrate THz signals that correlate with strain wave propagation times across Al thin films.

  3. Factors affecting urinary calculi treatment by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarawneh Emad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL is still the treatment of choice for most renal and upper ureteric stones; however the outcome depends on multiple factors. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of stone density, as measured by Hounsfield Units (H.U by non-contrast Computerized Tomography (CT, stone size and stone location on ESWL treatment outcome of urinary calculi in Jordanian patients. 65 patients underwent clinical, biochemical and radiological assessments followed by ESWL treatment. Statistical analyses including chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA, correlation, regression were performed for statistical significance between ESWL treatment, stone fragmentation and stone density, size and location in the renal pelvis. ESWL success rate was high (94% for low density stones (< 500 Hounsfield units. In general CT densities of 750 Hounsfield units or less were almost always successfully treated by ESWL. An inverse association between ESWL treatment outcome and stone size was also documented. CT stone density and stone size combined account for nearly 73% of the variation in the number of shock waves required to attain fragmentation. Stones located in lower calyceal area had less success rates. In conclusion, stones with higher density, large size and lower location may better be managed by percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  4. Factors affecting urinary calculi treatment by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Emad; Awad, Zeyad; Hani, Audy; Haroun, Azmi Amin; Hadidy, Azmi; Mahafza, Waleed; Samarah, Osama

    2010-07-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) is still the treatment of choice for most renal and upper ureteric stones; however the outcome depends on multiple factors. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of stone density, as measured by Hounsfield Units (H.U) by non-contrast Computerized Tomography (CT), stone size and stone location on ESWL treatment outcome of urinary calculi in Jordanian patients. 65 patients underwent clinical, biochemical and radiological assessments followed by ESWL treatment. Statistical analyses including chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, regression were performed for statistical significance between ESWL treatment, stone fragmentation and stone density, size and location in the renal pelvis. ESWL success rate was high (94%) for low density stones (< 500 Hounsfield units). In general CT densities of 750 Hounsfield units or less were almost always successfully treated by ESWL. An inverse association between ESWL treatment outcome and stone size was also documented. CT stone density and stone size combined account for nearly 73% of the variation in the number of shock waves required to attain fragmentation. Stones located in lower calyceal area had less success rates. In conclusion, stones with higher density, large size and lower location may better be managed by percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  5. High-efficiency shock-wave generator for extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyer, P; Cathignol, D; Theillère, Y; Mestas, J L

    1996-09-01

    In extracorporeal lithotripsy, the electro-acoustic efficiency of electrohydraulic generators is limited by the inductance of the electrical discharge circuit. A new shock-wave generator is described that uses a coaxial discharge line enabling electro-acoustic efficiency to be greatly increased. The line is built using a para-electric ceramic with a relative dielectric constant of 1700, manufactured for use in high-voltage impulse mode. A coaxial spark gap, with minimal inductance, has been developed to obtain the triggered breakdown of the discharge line. Shock waves are created with a coaxial electrode plugged directly into the spark gap and immersed in an electrolyte of degassed saline. Electrode gap and electrolyte resistivity are adjusted to match the resistivity of the electrolyte volume between the underwater electrodes to the characteristic impedance of the line. The discharge line generates in the medium a rectangular current pulse with an amplitude of about 6000 A and a rise time of 50 ns. Compared with conventional generators, measurements of the expansive peak pressure pulse show an increase of 105% at 10 kV, 86.5% at 12 kV and 34.5% at 14 kV charging voltage. Electro-acoustic efficiency is found to be 11% instead of 5.5% for a conventional discharge circuit.

  6. Radiating dispersive shock waves in non-local optical media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El, Gennady A; Smyth, Noel F

    2016-03-01

    We consider the step Riemann problem for the system of equations describing the propagation of a coherent light beam in nematic liquid crystals, which is a general system describing nonlinear wave propagation in a number of different physical applications. While the equation governing the light beam is of defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation type, the dispersive shock wave (DSW) generated from this initial condition has major differences from the standard DSW solution of the defocusing NLS equation. In particular, it is found that the DSW has positive polarity and generates resonant radiation which propagates ahead of it. Remarkably, the velocity of the lead soliton of the DSW is determined by the classical shock velocity. The solution for the radiative wavetrain is obtained using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. It is shown that for sufficiently small initial jumps the nematic DSW is asymptotically governed by a Korteweg-de Vries equation with the fifth-order dispersion, which explicitly shows the resonance generating the radiation ahead of the DSW. The constructed asymptotic theory is shown to be in good agreement with the results of direct numerical simulations.

  7. Influence of shock waves on laser-driven proton acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, O; Lindau, F; Persson, A; Wahlström, C-G; McKenna, P; Batani, D

    2007-08-01

    The influence of shock waves, driven by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), on laser-accelerated proton beams is investigated. A local deformation, produced by a cold shock wave launched by the ablation pressure of the ASE pedestal, can under oblique laser irradiation significantly direct the proton beam toward the laser axis. This can be understood in the frame of target normal sheath acceleration as proton emission from an area of the target where the local target normal is shifted toward the laser axis. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that there exists a window in laser and target parameter space where the target can be significantly deformed and yet facilitate efficient proton acceleration. The dependence of the magnitude of the deflection on target material, foil thickness, and ASE pedestal intensity and duration is experimentally investigated. The deflection angle is found to increase with increasing ASE intensity and duration and decrease with increasing target thickness. In a comparison between aluminum and copper target foils, aluminum is found to yield a larger proton beam deflection. An analytic model is successfully used to predict the proton emission direction.

  8. Analysis on Non-Resonance Standing Waves and Vibration Tracks of Strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tian-Shen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental technique to observe the vibration tracks of string standing waves. From the vibration tracks, we can analyse the vibration directions of harmonic waves. For the harmonic wave vibrations of strings, when the driving frequency f[subscript s] = Nf[subscript n] (N = 1, 2, 3, 4,...), both resonance and non-resonance…

  9. Reduced clot debris size using standing waves formed via high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shifang; Du, Xuan; Wang, Xin; Lu, Shukuan; Shi, Aiwei; Xu, Shanshan; Bouakaz, Ayache; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-09-01

    The feasibility of utilizing high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to induce thrombolysis has been demonstrated previously. However, clinical concerns still remain related to the clot debris produced via fragmentation of the original clot potentially being too large and hence occluding downstream vessels, causing hazardous emboli. This study investigates the use of standing wave fields formed via HIFU to disintegrate the thrombus while achieving a reduced clot debris size in vitro. The results showed that the average diameter of the clot debris calculated by volume percentage was smaller in the standing wave mode than in the travelling wave mode at identical ultrasound thrombolysis settings. Furthermore, the inertial cavitation dose was shown to be lower in the standing wave mode, while the estimated cavitation bubble size distribution was similar in both modes. These results show that a reduction of the clot debris size with standing waves may be attributed to the particle trapping of the acoustic potential well which contributed to particle fragmentation.

  10. Scaling-up ultrasound standing wave enhanced sedimentation filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prest, Jeff E; Treves Brown, Bernard J; Fielden, Peter R; Wilkinson, Stephen J; Hawkes, Jeremy J

    2015-02-01

    Particle concentration and filtration is a key stage in a wide range of processing industries and also one that can be present challenges for high throughput, continuous operation. Here we demonstrate some features which increase the efficiency of ultrasound enhanced sedimentation and could enable the technology the potential to be scaled up. In this work, 20 mm piezoelectric plates were used to drive 100 mm high chambers formed from single structural elements. The coherent structural resonances were able to drive particles (yeast cells) in the water to nodes throughout the chamber. Ultrasound enhanced sedimentation was used to demonstrate the efficiency of the system (>99% particle clearance). Sub-wavelength pin protrusions were used for the contacts between the resonant chamber and other elements. The pins provided support and transferred power, replacing glue which is inefficient for power transfer. Filtration energies of ∼4 J/ml of suspension were measured. A calculation of thermal convection indicates that the circulation could disrupt cell alignment in ducts >35 mm high when a 1K temperature gradient is present; we predict higher efficiencies when this maximum height is observed. For the acoustic design, although modelling was minimal before construction, the very simple construction allowed us to form 3D models of the nodal patterns in the fluid and the duct structure. The models were compared with visual observations of particle movement, Chladni figures and scanning laser vibrometer mapping. This demonstrates that nodal planes in the fluid can be controlled by the position of clamping points and that the contacts could be positioned to increase the efficiency and reliability of particle manipulations in standing waves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Particle dynamics and pair production in tightly focused standing wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirka, M.; Klimo, O.; Vranić, M.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2017-05-01

    With the advent of 10 PW laser facilities, new regimes of laser-matter interaction are opening since effects of quantum electrodynamics, such as electron-positron pair production and cascade development, start to be important. The dynamics of light charged particles, such as electrons and positrons, is affected by the radiation reaction force. This effect can strongly influence the interaction of intense laser pulses with matter since it lowers the energy of emitting particles and transforms their energy to the gamma radiation. Consequently, electron-positron pairs can be generated via Breit-Wheeler process. To study this new regime of interaction, numerical simulations are required. With their help it is possible to predict and study quantum effects which may occur in future experiments at modern laser facilities. In this work we present results of electron interaction with an intense standing wave formed by two colliding laser pulses. Due to the necessity to achieve ultra intense laser field, the laser beam has to be focused to a μm-diameter spot. Since the paraxial approximation is not valid for tight focusing, the appropriate model describing the tightly focused laser beam has to be employed. In tightly focused laser beam the longitudinal component of the electromagnetic field becomes significant and together with the ponderomotive force they affect the dynamics of interacting electrons and also newly generated Breit-Wheeler electron-positron pairs. Using the Particle-In-Cell code we study electron dynamics, gamma radiation and pair production in such a configuration for linear polarization and different types of targets.

  12. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a ˜60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 μs. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (˜0.03 μm) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial

  13. Experimental Generation of Riemann Waves in Optics: A Route to Shock Wave Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Benjamin; Bongiovanni, Domenico; Kues, Michael; Hu, Yi; Chen, Zhigang; Trillo, Stefano; Dudley, John M; Wabnitz, Stefano; Morandotti, Roberto

    2016-08-12

    We report the first observation of Riemann (simple) waves, which play a crucial role for understanding the dynamics of any shock-bearing system. This was achieved by properly tailoring the phase of an ultrashort light pulse injected into a highly nonlinear fiber. Optical Riemann waves are found to evolve in excellent quantitative agreement with the remarkably simple inviscid Burgers equation, whose applicability in physical systems is often challenged by viscous or dissipative effects. Our method allows us to further demonstrate a viable novel route to efficiently control the shock formation by the proper shaping of a laser pulse phase. Our results pave the way towards the experimental study, in a convenient benchtop setup, of complex physical phenomena otherwise difficult to access.

  14. Acceleration dynamics of ions in shocks and solitary waves driven by intense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min-Qing; Dong, Quan-Li; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Weng, Su-Ming; Chen, Min; Wu, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jie

    2007-09-01

    The acceleration of ions in collisionless electrostatic shocks and solitary waves, driven by ultrashort intense laser pulses in a thin solid target under different conditions, is investigated theoretically. When a shock is formed, ions with certain initial velocities inside the target can be accelerated by the electrostatic field at the shock front to twice the shock speed. When a solitary wave is formed, only ions located at the rear surface of the target can be accelerated by the solitary wave together with the sheath field formed there.

  15. Shock-wave studies of ice under uniaxial strain conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Shock-wave studies have been conducted at stress levels up to 3.6 GPa. A light-gas gun accelerated the flat-faced projectile used to impact the ice-containing targets. The ice samples were initially at ambient pressure and at temperatures of -10 +/- 2 C. The recorded time histories of particle velocity show a precursor wave with an average wave velocity of 3.7 km/s and an average particle velocity amplitude of 0.06 km/s. The particle velocity data were converted to stresses and volumes using Lagrangian gage analysis and the assumption of a simple non-steady wave. This conversion provides a complete compression cycle (which includes both loading and unloading paths) for comparison with static measurements. All experiments show the onset of melting at 0.15 to 0.2 GPa. Experiments with maximum stress states between 0.2 and 0.5 GPa yield results which suggest that a mixed phase of ice I and liquid water exists at these conditions. For maximum loading stresses between 0.6 and 1.7 GPa the results suggest that the final state is predominantly ice VI. In these experiments the specific volume upon compression is changed from 1.09 m/sup 3//Mg to approximately 0.76 m/sup 3//Mg, which represents compaction of approximately 30%. The unloading paths determined from these experiments indicate that the ice VI remains in a frozen or metastable state during most of the unloading process. This hysteresis in the compression cycle gives rise to a large loss of shock-wave energy to the transformation process. At stress levels above 2.2 GPa, ice VII should be the stable form for water according to static compression measurements. Data at 2.4 and 3.6 GPa suggest that ice VII may be formed but these results indicate a mixed phase of ice VI and ice VII rather than complete transformation to ice VII. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  16. Numerical Simulation and Experiment for Underwater Shock Wave in Newly Designed Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shibuta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern eating habits depend in large part on the development of food processing technology. Thermal treatments are often performed in the conventional food processing, but it can cause discoloration and loss of nutrients of the food by thermal processing or treatment. On the other hand, food processing using an underwater shock wave has little influence of heat and its processing time is very short, preventing the loss of nutrients. In this research optical observation experiment and the numerical simulation were performed, in order to understand and control the behavior of the underwater shock wave in the development of the processing container using an underwater shock wave for the factory and home. In this experiment a rectangular container was used to observe the behavior of the underwater shock wave. In the experiment, the shock wave was generated by using explosive on the shock wave generation side. The shock wave, which passed through the phosphor bronze and propagated from the aluminum sidewall, was observed on the processing container side. Numerical simulation of an analogous experimental model was investigated, where LS-DYNA software was used for the numerical simulation. The comparative study of the experiment and the numerical simulation was investigated. The behavior of a precursor shock wave from the device wall was able to be clarified. This result is used for development of the device in numerical simulation.

  17. Development of fiber optic sensors at TNO for explosion and shock wave measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.K.; Smorenburg, C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Bouma, R.H.B.; Meer, B.J. van der; Prinse, W.C.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    2000-01-01

    Fiber Optic sensors are found to be very suitable for explosion and shock wave measurements because they are immune to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI). In the past few years, TNO has developed a number of sensor systems for explosion and shock wave measurements in which the optical fiber is a

  18. In vivo effects of focused shock waves on tumor tissue visualized by fluorescence staining techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukes, Petr; Zeman, Jan; Horak, Vratislav; Hoffer, Petr; Pouckova, Pavla; Holubova, Monika; Hosseini, S Hamid R; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sunka, Pavel; Benes, Jiri

    2015-06-01

    Shock waves can cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells and tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, understanding the mechanisms of shock wave interaction with tissues is limited. We have studied in vivo effects of focused shock waves induced in the syngeneic sarcoma tumor model using the TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical detection of caspase-3 and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Shock waves were produced by a multichannel pulsed-electrohydraulic discharge generator with a cylindrical ceramic-coated electrode. In tumors treated with shock waves, a large area of damaged tissue was detected which was clearly differentiated from intact tissue. Localization and a cone-shaped region of tissue damage visualized by TUNEL reaction apparently correlated with the conical shape and direction of shock wave propagation determined by high-speed shadowgraphy. A strong TUNEL reaction of nuclei and nucleus fragments in tissue exposed to shock waves suggested apoptosis in this destroyed tumor area. However, specificity of the TUNEL technique to apoptotic cells is ambiguous and other apoptotic markers (caspase-3) that we used in our study did not confirmed this observation. Thus, the generated fragments of nuclei gave rise to a false TUNEL reaction not associated with apoptosis. Mechanical stress from high overpressure shock wave was likely the dominant pathway of tumor damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiev, O; Antoun, T

    2009-12-11

    This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both isotropic and anisotropic joint representations. For an isotropically jointed geologic medium, the results show that the properties of the joints can be combined with the properties of the intact rock to develop an equivalent continuum model suitable for analyzing wave propagation through the jointed medium. For an anisotropically jointed geologic medium, they found it difficult to develop an equivalent continuum (EC) model that matches the response derived from mesoscopic simulation. They also performed simulations of wave propagation through jointed media. Two appraoches are suggested for modeling the rock mass. In one approach, jointed are modeled explicitly in a Lagrangian framework with appropriate contact algorithms used to track motion along the interfaces. In the other approach, the effect of joints is taken into account using a constitutive model derived from mesoscopic simulations.

  20. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Joseph T; Taylor, Larissa F; Collis, Jon M

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear progressive wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long-range shock propagation using a wave-following computational domain. Current models are capable of treating smoothly spatially varying medium properties, and fluid-fluid interfaces that align horizontally with a computational grid that can be handled by enforcing appropriate interface conditions. However, sloping interfaces that do not align with a horizontal grid present a computational challenge as application of interface conditions to vertical contacts is non-trivial. In this work, range-dependent environments, characterized by sloping bathymetry, are treated using a rotated coordinate system approach where the irregular interface is aligned with the coordinate axes. The coordinate rotation does not change the governing equation due to the narrow-angle assumption adopted in its derivation, but care is taken with applying initial, interface, and boundary conditions. Additionally, sound pressure level influences on nonlinear steepening for range-independent and range-dependent domains are used to quantify the pressures for which linear acoustic models suffice. A study is also performed to investigate the effects of thin sediment layers on the propagation of blast waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line.

  1. Nanobubbles, cavitation, shock waves and traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Upendra; Goliaei, Ardeshir; Berkowitz, Max L

    2016-12-07

    Collapse of bubbles, microscopic or nanoscopic, due to their interaction with the impinging pressure wave produces a jet of particles moving in the direction of the wave. If there is a surface nearby, the high-speed jet particles hit it, and as a result damage to the surface is produced. This cavitation effect is well known and intensely studied in case of microscopic sized bubbles. It can be quite damaging to materials, including biological tissues, but it can also be beneficial when controlled, like in case of sonoporation of biological membranes for the purpose of drug delivery. Here we consider recent simulation work performed to study collapse of nanobubbles exposed to shock waves, in order to understand the detailed mechanism of the cavitation induced damage to soft materials, such as biological membranes. We also discuss the connection of the cavitation effect with the traumatic brain injury caused by blasts. Specifically, we consider possible damage to model membranes containing lipid bilayers, bilayers with embedded ion channel proteins like the ones found in neural cells and also protein assemblies found in the tight junction of the blood brain barrier.

  2. TRENDS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DETONATION ENGINES FOR HIGH-SPEED AEROSPACE AIRCRAFTS AND THE PROBLEM OF TRIPLE CONFIGURATIONS OF SHOCK WAVES. Part II - Research of counterpropagating shock waves and triple shock wave configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with current issues of the interference theory development of gas-dynamic discontinuities as applied to a problem of propulsion refinement for the air-spacecrafts, designed for hypersonic flight speeds. In the first part of the review we have presented the history of detonation study and different concepts of detonation engines, as well as air intakes designed for hypersonic flight speeds. The second part provides an overview of works on the interference theory development for gas-dynamic discontinuities. We report about classification of the gas-dynamic discontinuities, shock wave propagation, shock-wave structures and triple configurations of shock waves. We have shown that many of these processes are accompanied by a hysteresis phenomenon, there are areas of ambiguity; therefore, in the design of engines and air intakes optimal shock-wave structures should be provided and their sustainability should be ensured. Much attention has recently been given to the use of the air intakes in the shock-wave structures with the rereflection of shock waves and the interference of shock waves in the opposite directions. This review provides increased focus on it, contains references to landmark works, the last calculated and experimental results. Unfortunately, foreign surveys missed many landmark works of the Soviet and Russian researchers, as they were not published in English. At the same time, it was the Soviet school of gas dynamics that has formulated the interference theory of gas-dynamic discontinuities in its present form. To fill this gap is one of this review scopes. The review may be recommended for professionals, engineers and scientists working in the field of aerospace engineering.

  3. Studies on Shock Attenuation in Plastic Materials and Applications in Detonation Wave Shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Ritu; Gautam, P. C.; Rai, Rajwant; Kumar, Anil; Sharma, A. C.; Singh, Manjit, Dr

    2012-07-01

    Pressure in plastic materials attenuates due to change of impedance, phase change in the medium and plastic deformation. A lot of theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted to the attenuation of shock wave produced by the impact of explosive driven flyer plate. However comparatively less work has been done on the attenuation of shock waves due to contact explosive detonation. Present studies deal with the attenuation of explosive driven shock waves in various plastic materials and its applications in design of Hybrid Detonation Wave Generator In present work shock attenuating properties of different polymers such as Perspex, Teflon, nylon, polypropylene and viton has been studied experimentally using rotating mirror streak camera and electrical position pins. High explosive RDX/TNT and OCTOL of diameter 75-100mm and thickness 20 to 50mm were detonated to induce shock wave in the test specimens. From experimental determined shock velocity at different locations the attenuation in shock pressure was calculated. The attenuation of shock velocity with thickness in the material indicates exponential decay according to relation US = UOexp(-ax). In few of the experiments manganin gauge of resistance 50 ohms was used to record stress time profile across shock wave. The shock attenuation data of Viton has successfully been used in the design of hybrid detonation wave generator using Octol as high explosive. While selecting a material it was ensured that the attenuated shock remains strong enough to initiate an acceptor explosive. Theoretical calculation were supported by Autodyne 2D hydro-code simulation which were validated with the experiments conducted using high speed streak photography and electrical shock arrival pins. Shock attenuation data of Perspex was used to establishing card gap test and wedge test in which test items is subjected to known pressure pulse by selecting the thickness of the plastic material.

  4. Finite element modelling of radial shock wave therapy for chronic plantar fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhamaali, Zaied K; Crocombe, Andrew D; Solan, Matthew C; Cirovic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of high-amplitude pressure waves, or shock wave therapy (SWT), is emerging as a popular method for treating musculoskeletal disorders. However, the mechanism(s) through which this technique promotes healing are unclear. Finite element models of a shock wave source and the foot were constructed to gain a better understanding of the mechanical stimuli that SWT produces in the context of plantar fasciitis treatment. The model of the shock wave source was based on the geometry of an actual radial shock wave device, in which pressure waves are generated through the collision of two metallic objects: a projectile and an applicator. The foot model was based on the geometry reconstructed from magnetic resonance images of a volunteer and it comprised bones, cartilage, soft tissue, plantar fascia, and Achilles tendon. Dynamic simulations were conducted of a single and of two successive shock wave pulses administered to the foot. The collision between the projectile and the applicator resulted in a stress wave in the applicator. This wave was transmitted into the soft tissue in the form of compression-rarefaction pressure waves with an amplitude of the order of several MPa. The negative pressure at the plantar fascia reached values of over 1.5 MPa, which could be sufficient to generate cavitation in the tissue. The results also show that multiple shock wave pulses may have a cumulative effect in terms of strain energy accumulation in the foot.

  5. Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Nadar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of tendinopathy and other orthopedic diseases. Patients and methods: 35 patients received shock wave therapy using Econolith 2000 lithotripter 19 patients had isolated lateral epicondylitis, 12 medical epicondylitis and 4 plantar fascitis. A total of 120 shock waves were given in the first sitting. Each patient received a total of three sittings with a gap of one week between each of them. Results: Based on the patients′ self-assessment, about 75% pain relief was observed in 60% of the patients. Fur-ther, in patients having isolated tendinopathies, the pain relief was better. Conclusion: The study indicated that the application of shock waves is not restricted to the fragmentation of urinary calculi. The shock waves can be effectively used for the pain relief in the common orthopedic diseases. Thus, the urologists can widen the application of lithotripters, in a cost-effective manner, to the other medical speciali-ties.

  6. Relationship between plasmid size and shock wave-mediated bacterial transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Guillén, Juan; Fernández, Francisco; Pastrana, Xóchitl; Loske, Achim M

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial transformation is a fundamental tool in molecular biology; nevertheless, there is still a lack of efficient methods for gene delivery. The use of shock waves has been proposed as an alternative. Recently, our group demonstrated that shock wave-induced transfer of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into bacteria can be increased by enhancing acoustic cavitation; however, so far, little information exists about the effects of shock waves on DNA. The objective of this study was to identify the size regimes of plasmids (DNA molecules that are separate from the chromosomal DNA), which promote shock wave-induced transformation. The transformation efficiency of shock waves and the integrity of DNA were studied for six different plasmid sizes, using the parameters that led to the best results in our previous study. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Observation of dust acoustic shock wave in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sumita K., E-mail: sumita-sharma82@yahoo.com; Boruah, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Bailung, H., E-mail: hbailung@yahoo.com [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati 781035 (India)

    2016-05-15

    Dust acoustic shock wave is observed in a strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasma. A supersonic flow of charged microparticles is allowed to perturb a stationary dust fluid to excite dust acoustic shock wave. The evolution process beginning with steepening of initial wave front and then formation of a stable shock structure is similar to the numerical results of the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers equation. The measured Mach number of the observed shock wave agrees with the theoretical results. Reduction of shock amplitude at large distances is also observed due to the dust neutral collision and viscosity effects. The dispersion relation and the spatial damping of a linear dust acoustic wave are also measured and compared with the relevant theory.

  8. [Therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shock wave combined with orthopaedic insole on plantar fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenguang; Sun, Shaodan; Li, Xuhong

    2014-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of extracorporeal shock wave combined with orthopaedic insole on plantar fasciitis. A total of 153 plantar with plantar fasciitis were randomly divided into a combined group (n=51), an extracorporeal shock wave group (n=53) and an orthopaedic group (n=49). The combined group received treatment of both extracorporeal shock wave and orthopaedic insole while the extracorporeal shock wave or the orthopaedic group only received the treatment of extracorporeal shock wave or orthopaedic insole. The therapeutic parameters such as visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, continued walking time and thickness of the plantar fascia were monitored before and aft er the treatment for 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months, respectively. The VAS scores in the 3 groups were all reduced after the treatment compared with the corresponding scores before the therapy (Pplantar fascia was improved after the treatment (Pplantar fasciitis. It is recommended to spread in clinic.

  9. The global coherence initiative: creating a coherent planetary standing wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCraty, Rollin; Deyhle, Annette; Childre, Doc

    2012-03-01

    via biological, electromagnetic, and nonlocal fields, it stands to reason that humans can work together in a co-creative relationship to consciously increase the coherence in the global field environment, which in turn distributes this information to all living systems within the field. GCI was established to help facilitate the shift in global consciousness from instability and discord to balance, cooperation, and enduring peace. A primary goal of GCI is to test the hypothesis that large numbers of people when in a heart-coherent state and holding a shared intention can encode information on the earth's energetic and geomagnetic fields, which act as carrier waves of this physiologically patterned and relevant information. In order to conduct this research, a global network of 12 to 14 ultrasensitive magnetic field detectors specifically designed to measure the earth's magnetic resonances is being installed strategically around the planet. More important is GCI's primary goal to motivate as many people as possible to work together in a more coherent and collaborative manner to increase the collective human consciousness. If we are persuaded that not only external fields of solar and cosmic origins but also human attention and emotion can directly affect the physical world and the mental and emotional states of others (consciousness), it broadens our view of what interconnectedness means and how it can be intentionally utilized to shape the future of the world we live in. It implies that our attitudes, emotions, and intentions matter and that coherent, cooperative intent can have positive effects. GCI hypothesizes that when enough individuals and social groups increase their coherence baseline and utilize that increased coherence to intentionally create a more coherent standing reference wave in the global field, it will help increase global consciousness. This can be achieved when an increasing number of people move towards more balanced and self-regulated emotions

  10. Shock wave deformation of a nonspherical gas bubble in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Itoh, H.

    The deformation of a nonspherical gas bubble caused by the incidence of a shock wave is analysed, taking account of both the nonspherical initial shape and the suddenly induced liquid flow, and then compared with the experimental results given in a previous work. The variational calculation of the governing equations shows: (1) The double disc- and triple disc-type instabilities observed in the water experiments result from an ellipsoidal initial shape. (2) The jet formation occurs in the downstream direction, as observed in the glycerin experiments. (3) The instability is more easily excited in a prolate bubble. (4) The larger the size of a prolate bubble, and the higher the flow velocity, the more that induced deformation becomes flat-topped in the case of glycerin.

  11. Stenting and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M; Matzen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early observational studies of endoscopic treatment and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) reported considerable or complete relief of pain in 50%-80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. There is no consensus on the measurement of pain, making comparison of observational...... studies difficult, and little attention has been paid to the type and amount of analgesics used by patients before and after decompressive treatment. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of all patients with chronic pancreatitis and large-duct disease and receiving decompressing treatment between 1...... November 1994 and 31 July 1999. Primary parameters were type and amount of analgesics used. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients with chronic pancreatitis and large-duct disease received stenting of the pancreatic duct (28 patients), ESWL (6 patients) or both (15 patients). After a median follow-up of 21 months...

  12. Approach to Residual Kidney Stone Fragments After Shock Wave Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumay Ižpekci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For kidney stones up to 2 cm in diameter shock wave therapy (SDT is safely applied and kidney stones smaller than 5mm remaining in the kidney after treatment are regarded as clinically insignificant. Management of this condition is still controversial among clinicians. These stones in the kidney may continue to persist without any clinical symptoms or begin to cause clinical signs. In the event that the clinical symptoms are present, it requires detailed urological examination and treatment. The aim in the surgical treatment of urinary tract stones is completely stone clearance but in stones that are not infected, not causing urinary tract obstruction and without clinical symptoms medical treatment is also beneficial fort he prevention of growth and recurrence. In addition, surgical intervention is also possible for the residual stone fragments which become symptomatic during follow-up.

  13. Fuel droplet combustion. [ignition via shock wave shattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, C. W.; Wierzba, A. S.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical model is developed that demonstrates the behavior of fuel drop ignition, and experimental results are presented that describe the effect of aerodynamic shattering on the process of fuel drop ignition. It is shown that the explosive ignition of a fuel drop which interacts with a shock wave in an oxidizing atmosphere depends upon the production of a fuel-oxidizer mixture in the wake of the original drop. The creation of this mixture is dependent on the formation of fine spray as a result of the aerodynamic shattering of the original fuel drop, the evaporation of the fine spray, and the mixing of the fuel vapor with the surrounding hot oxidizer. Only then does the explosive ignition occur as a result of the chemical reaction between the gaseous fuel and oxidizer.

  14. Shock Wave Propagation in Functionally Graded Mineralized Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelms, Matthew; Hodo, Wayne; Livi, Ken; Browning, Alyssa; Crawford, Bryan; Rajendran, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    In this investigation, the effects of shock wave propagation in bone-like biomineralized tissue was investigated. The Alligator gar (Atractosteus spatula) exoskeleton is comprised of many disparate scales that provide a biological analog for potential design of flexible protective material systems. The gar scale is identified as a two-phase, (1) hydroxyapatite mineral and (2) collagen protein, biological composite with two distinct layers where a stiff, ceramic-like ganoine overlays a soft, highly ductile ganoid bone. Previous experimentations has shown significant softening under compressive loading and an asymmetrical stress-strain response for analogous mineralized tissues. The structural features, porosity, and elastic modulus were determined from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, 3D micro-tomography, and dynamic nanoindentation experiments to develop an idealized computational model for FE simulations. The numerical analysis employed Gurson's yield criterion to determine the influence of porosity and pressure on material strength. Functional gradation of elastic moduli and certain structural features, such as the sawtooth interface, are explicitly modeled to study the plate impact shock profile for a full 3-D analysis using ABAQUS finite element software.

  15. Efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave treatment in calcaneal enthesophytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, R; Falsetti, P; Manca, S; De Stefano, R; Frati, E; Frediani, B; Baldi, F; Selvi, E; Marcolongo, R

    2001-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave treatment (ESWT) in calcaneal enthesophytosis. 60 patients (43 women, 17 men) were examined who had talalgia associated with heel spur. A single blind randomised study was performed in which 30 patients underwent a regular treatment (group 1) and 30 a simulated one (shocks of 0 mJ/mm(2) energy were applied) (group 2). Variations in symptoms were evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS). Variations in the dimension of enthesophytosis were evaluated by x ray examination. Variations in the grade of enthesitis were evaluated by sonography. A significant decrease of VAS was seen in group 1. Examination by x ray showed morphological modifications (reduction of the larger diameter >1 mm) of the enthesophytosis in nine (30%) patients. Sonography did not show significant changes in the grade of enthesitis just after the end of the treatment, but a significant reduction was seen after one month. In the control group no significant decrease of VAS was seen. No modification was observed by x ray examination or sonography. ESWT is safe and improves the symptoms of most patients with a painful heel, it can also structurally modify enthesophytosis, and reduce inflammatory oedema.

  16. Initiation structure of oblique detonation waves behind conical shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengfei; Ng, Hoi Dick; Teng, Honghui; Jiang, Zonglin

    2017-08-01

    The understanding of oblique detonation dynamics has both inherent basic research value for high-speed compressible reacting flow and propulsion application in hypersonic aerospace systems. In this study, the oblique detonation structures formed by semi-infinite cones are investigated numerically by solving the unsteady, two-dimensional axisymmetric Euler equations with a one-step irreversible Arrhenius reaction model. The present simulation results show that a novel wave structure, featured by two distinct points where there is close-coupling between the shock and combustion front, is depicted when either the cone angle or incident Mach number is reduced. This structure is analyzed by examining the variation of the reaction length scale and comparing the flow field with that of planar, wedge-induced oblique detonations. Further simulations are performed to study the effects of chemical length scale and activation energy, which are both found to influence the formation of this novel structure. The initiation mechanism behind the conical shock is discussed to investigate the interplay between the effect of the Taylor-Maccoll flow, front curvature, and energy releases from the chemical reaction in conical oblique detonations. The observed flow fields are interpreted by means of the energetic limit as in the critical regime for initiation of detonation.

  17. Quantitative calibration of sound pressure in ultrasonic standing waves using the Schlieren method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheng; Chen, Hao; Yan, Xu; Qian, Menglu; Cheng, Qian

    2017-08-21

    We investigated the use of the Schlieren method to calibrate the sound pressure in an ultrasonic standing-wave field. Specifically, we derived an equation to calculate the light intensity of the diffraction fringe induced by the standing-wave field. The results indicated that the sound pressure in the standing-wave field relates to the light intensity of the diffraction fringe. Simulations and experiments were conducted to verify the theoretical calculation. We demonstrated that the ratio of the light intensity of different diffraction orders relates to the sound pressure amplitude, allowing the pressure amplitude to be calibrated with the Schlieren method. Therefore, this work presents a non-intrusive calibration method that is particularly suitable for calibrating high-frequency ultrasonic standing-wave fields.

  18. Trapping of particles by the leakage of a standing wave ultrasonic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanyan; Hu, Junhui

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a method of trapping particles by the acoustic leakage from a low frequency standing wave ultrasonic field. The standing wave ultrasonic field is generated in a triangular air gap between two vibrating V-shaped metal strips. Particles are trapped to the lower outlet of the standing wave ultrasonic field. The acoustic radiation force acting on the particles in this method is opposite to the direction of the acoustic leakage. Particles such as medicine pills with a weight up to 256 mg per particle can be trapped. A physical model is developed to analyze the trapping phenomena. The effects of the vibration displacement amplitude at the tip of the V-shaped metal strip, particle's shape and weight, and size of standing wave ultrasonic field on the trapping capability are investigated theoretically and experimentally.

  19. Shock Wave Therapy Promotes Cardiomyocyte Autophagy and Survival during Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Du

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autophagy plays an important role in cardiovascular disease. Controversy still exists regarding the effect of autophagy on ischemic/hypoxic myocardium. Cardiac shock wave therapy (CSWT is an effective alternative treatment for refractory ischemic heart disease. Whether CSWT can regulate cardiomyocyte autophagy under hypoxic conditions is not clear. We established a myocardial hypoxia model using the H9c2 cell line and performed shock waves (SWs treatment to evaluate the effect of SW on autophagy. Methods: The H9c2 cells were incubated under hypoxic conditions, and SW treatment was then performed at energies of 0.02, 0.05, or 0.10 mJ/mm2. The cell viability and intracellular ATP level were examined. Western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of LC3B, AMPK, mTOR, Beclin-1, Sirt1, and HIF-1α. Autophagic vacuoles were visualized by monodansylcadaverine staining. Results: After the 24-hour hypoxic period, cardiomyocyte viability and ATP levels were decreased and autophagy was significantly increased in H9c2 cells. SW treatment with an energy of 0.05 mJ/mm2 significantly increased the cellular viability, ATP level, LC3B-II/I, and number of autophagic vacuoles. In addition, phosphorylated AMPK and Sirt1 were increased and phosphorylated mTOR and HIF-1α were decreased after SW treatment. Conclusion: SW treatment can potentially promote cardiomyocyte autophagy during hypoxia and protect cardiomyocyte function by regulating the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  20. Image processing in standing-wave fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthi, Vijaykumar

    Fluorescence microscopes are valuable tools in determining the structure of the objects they image, typically, fixed and living cells and their components. However, the axial resolution of such microscopes is much worse than their transverse resolution. In addition, due to the finite aperture of the lenses used in all microscopes, not all the light emitted from the object is collected by the microscope. Every microscope acts like a low-pass filter and is therefore characterized by a transfer function, known as the optical transfer function (OTF). The bandpass region of OTF that determines which frequency components of the object will be transmitted has a characteristic shape with a cone shaped region in the middle in addition to bandlimits. Any object frequency components that fall in this cone shaped region, or outside the bandlimits are lost during imaging. The standing-wave fluorescence microscope (SWIM) uses interference of two beams, resulting in a non-uniform, planar excitation pattern in the specimen. The optical transfer function of this microscope (SWOTF) has three distinct bands, a central band that is identical to the optical transfer function (OTF) in a conventional fluorescence microscope, and two additional sidebands that are offset from the central band. Therefore, the SWOTF has gaps between the central band and the sidebands, and information about the object that falls in the gaps or outside the three bands is lost when imaging. The principal questions answered by this thesis are: (1) Do the data in the sidebands of the SWOTF contribute additional information about the object? (2) Can the information about the object lost in the gaps in the SWOTF be recovered using computational means? In SWFM, three images per plane of focus are required to capture all the information about the object. In the case of multiple plane data sets, there are three stacks of such triplets. In order to answer the questions posed above, the three SWFM images (or stacks

  1. Shock wave evolution and discontinuity propagation for relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics with spontaneous symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sun, E-mail: szhang@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology (J-CPNPC), PMO-NJU, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-02-05

    In this Letter, we have studied the shock wave and discontinuity propagation for relativistic superfluid with spontaneous U(1) symmetry breaking in the framework of hydrodynamics. General features of shock waves are provided, the propagation of discontinuity and the sound modes of shock waves are also presented. The first sound and the second sound are identified as the propagation of discontinuity, and the results are in agreement with earlier theoretical studies. Moreover, a differential equation, called the growth equation, is obtained to describe the decay and growth of the discontinuity propagating along its normal trajectory. The solution is in an integral form and special cases of diverging waves are also discussed.

  2. Does the shock wave in a highly ionized non-isothermal plasma really exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhadze, A. A.; Sadykova, S. P.; Samkharadze, T. G.

    2015-09-01

    Here, we study the structure of a highly ionizing shock wave in a gas of high atmospheric pressure. We take into account the gas ionization when the gas temperature reaches few orders above ionization potential. It is shown that after gasdynamic temperature-raising shock and formation of a highly-ionized nonisothermal collisionless plasma Te≫Ti , only the solitary ion-sound wave (soliton) can propagate in this plasma. In such a wave, the charge separation occurs: electrons and ions form the double electric layer with the electric field. The shock wave form, its amplitude, and front width are derived.

  3. Formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets in the field of two standing light waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, MA; Petropavlovsky, SV; Fedorov, MV; Schleich, WP; Yakovlev, VP

    The formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets produced in the interaction of a beam of two-level atoms with two standing light waves polarised in the same plane is considered. The mechanism providing a dispersionless particle dynamics is the balance of two processes: a rapid

  4. No regularity singularities exist at points of general relativistic shock wave interaction between shocks from different characteristic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reintjes, Moritz; Temple, Blake

    2015-05-08

    We give a constructive proof that coordinate transformations exist which raise the regularity of the gravitational metric tensor from C0,1 to C1,1 in a neighbourhood of points of shock wave collision in general relativity. The proof applies to collisions between shock waves coming from different characteristic families, in spherically symmetric spacetimes. Our result here implies that spacetime is locally inertial and corrects an error in our earlier Proc. R. Soc. A publication, which led us to the false conclusion that such coordinate transformations, which smooth the metric to C1,1, cannot exist. Thus, our result implies that regularity singularities (a type of mild singularity introduced in our Proc. R. Soc. A paper) do not exist at points of interacting shock waves from different families in spherically symmetric spacetimes. Our result generalizes Israel's celebrated 1966 paper to the case of such shock wave interactions but our proof strategy differs fundamentally from that used by Israel and is an extension of the strategy outlined in our original Proc. R. Soc. A publication. Whether regularity singularities exist in more complicated shock wave solutions of the Einstein-Euler equations remains open.

  5. The relationship between elastic constants and structure of shock waves in a zinc single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivosheina, M. N.; Kobenko, S. V.; Tuch, E. V.

    2017-12-01

    The paper provides a 3D finite element simulation of shock-loaded anisotropic single crystals on the example of a Zn plate under impact using a mathematical model, which allows for anisotropy in hydrostatic stress and wave velocities in elastic and plastic ranges. The simulation results agree with experimental data, showing the absence of shock wave splitting into an elastic precursor and a plastic wave in Zn single crystals impacted in the [0001] direction. It is assumed that the absence of an elastic precursor under impact loading of a zinc single crystal along the [0001] direction is determined by the anomalously large ratio of the c/a-axes and close values of the propagation velocities of longitudinal and bulk elastic waves. It is shown that an increase in only one elastic constant along the [0001] direction results in shock wave splitting into an elastic precursor and a shock wave of "plastic" compression.

  6. Plume emission, shock wave and surface wave formation during excimer laser ablation of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Z; Hopp, B; Rácz, B; Szabó, G; Ratkay, I; Süveges, I; Füst, A; Mohay, J

    1993-01-01

    Excimer lasers are now used for corneal surgery; however, the physical processes occurring during photoablation of the cornea are incompletely understood. High speed laser-based photographic arrangement was constructed. The temporal resolution was better than 1 ns. The setup could work as a Schlieren arrangement, which is sensitive to the refractive index change caused by the shock wave propagating in the air above the eye. With minor changes the setup was converted into a shadowgraph, which could detect the ablation plume and the waves propagating on the surface of the eye. Due to the impact of the excimer laser pulse onto the surface of the cornea, a shock wave was generated in the air. The shadowgraph clearly showed the ejection of the ablated cornea. The ejection velocity of the plume was found to be over 600 m/s. It was shown for the first time that the recoil forces of the plume are generating a wave on the surface of the eye. The laser-based high speed photographic arrangement is a powerful arrangement in the study of physical effects occurring during photoablation of the cornea.

  7. On the overtaking interaction of typical shock waves in the solar wind flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grib, S. A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of traveling fast solar shock waves with other fast shock waves generated previously is considered in terms of magnetohydrodynamics for various solar wind parameters. The shocks are not piston ones and move freely in the flow. The magnetic structure in the interplanetary magnetic field emerging after the shock interaction is shown to correspond to the well-known magnetic configuration commonly observed on spacecraft or the classical Hundhausen R model. A head-on collision of solar shock waves with the boundary of a magnetic cloud is considered. It is pointed out that a slow shockwave refracted into the magnetic cloud can appear at an oblique collision of the shock with the cloud boundary. The results clarify our understanding of the available spacecraft data.

  8. Temperature measurement using ultraviolet laser absorption of carbon dioxide behind shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B

    2005-11-01

    A diagnostic for microsecond time-resolved temperature measurements behind shock waves, using ultraviolet laser absorption of vibrationally hot carbon dioxide, is demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser radiation at 244 and 266 nm was employed to probe the spectrally smooth CO2 ultraviolet absorption, and an absorbance ratio technique was used to determine temperature. Measurements behind shock waves in both nonreacting and reacting (ignition) systems were made, and comparisons with isentropic and constant-volume calculations are reported.

  9. Interferometric analysis of laser-driven cylindrically focusing shock waves in a thin liquid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysset, David; Мaznev, Alexei A; Pezeril, Thomas; Kooi, Steven; Nelson, Keith A

    2016-12-23

    Shock waves in condensed matter are of great importance for many areas of science and technology ranging from inertially confined fusion to planetary science and medicine. In laboratory studies of shock waves, there is a need in developing diagnostic techniques capable of measuring parameters of materials under shock with high spatial resolution. Here, time-resolved interferometric imaging is used to study laser-driven focusing shock waves in a thin liquid layer in an all-optical experiment. Shock waves are generated in a 10 µm-thick layer of water by focusing intense picosecond laser pulses into a ring of 95 µm radius. Using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and time-delayed femtosecond laser pulses, we obtain a series of images tracing the shock wave as it converges at the center of the ring before reemerging as a diverging shock, resulting in the formation of a cavitation bubble. Through quantitative analysis of the interferograms, density profiles of shocked samples are extracted. The experimental geometry used in our study opens prospects for spatially resolved spectroscopic studies of materials under shock compression.

  10. Tailoring the Blast Exposure Conditions in the Shock Tube for Generating Pure, Primary Shock Waves: The End Plate Facilitates Elimination of Secondary Loading of the Specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Matthew; Skotak, Maciej; Misistia, Anthony; Kahali, Sudeepto; Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    The end plate mounted at the mouth of the shock tube is a versatile and effective implement to control and mitigate the end effects. We have performed a series of measurements of incident shock wave velocities and overpressures followed by quantification of impulse values (integral of pressure in time domain) for four different end plate configurations (0.625, 2, 4 inches, and an open end). Shock wave characteristics were monitored by high response rate pressure sensors allocated in six positions along the length of 6 meters long 229 mm square cross section shock tube. Tests were performed at three shock wave intensities, which was controlled by varying the Mylar membrane thickness (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06 inch). The end reflector plate installed at the exit of the shock tube allows precise control over the intensity of reflected waves penetrating into the shock tube. At the optimized distance of the tube to end plate gap the secondary waves were entirely eliminated from the test section, which was confirmed by pressure sensor at T4 location. This is pronounced finding for implementation of pure primary blast wave animal model. These data also suggest only deep in the shock tube experimental conditions allow exposure to a single shock wave free of artifacts. Our results provide detailed insight into spatiotemporal dynamics of shock waves with Friedlander waveform generated using helium as a driver gas and propagating in the air inside medium sized tube. Diffusion of driver gas (helium) inside the shock tube was responsible for velocity increase of reflected shock waves. Numerical simulations combined with experimental data suggest the shock wave attenuation mechanism is simply the expansion of the internal pressure. In the absence of any other postulated shock wave decay mechanisms, which were not implemented in the model the agreement between theory and experimental data is excellent.

  11. Effect of target-fixture geometry on shock-wave compacted copper powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooyeol; Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Yoon, Jae Ik; Park, Lee Ju; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2018-01-01

    In shock compaction with a single gas gun system, a target fixture is used to safely recover a powder compact processed by shock-wave dynamic impact. However, no standard fixture geometry exists, and its effect on the processed compact is not well studied. In this study, two types of fixture are used for the dynamic compaction of hydrogen-reduced copper powders, and the mechanical properties and microstructures are investigated using the Vickers microhardness test and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. With the assistance of finite element method simulations, we analyze several shock parameters that are experimentally hard to control. The results of the simulations indicate that the target geometry clearly affects the characteristics of incident and reflected shock waves. The hardness distribution and the microstructure of the compacts also show their dependence on the geometry. With the results of the simulations and the experiment, it is concluded that the target geometry affects the shock wave propagation and wave interaction in the specimen.

  12. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Amy C; Andrusiv, Lubov P; Courtney, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  13. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Amy C.; Andrusiv, Lubov P.; Courtney, Michael W.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of modular, oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes. Such tools are needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. The pressure-time profiles measured at 1 MHz using high-speed piezoelectric pressure sensors have relevant durations and show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of free-field blast waves. Descriptions are included for shock tube diameters of 27-79 mm. A range of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 1187 kPa (with 0.5-5.6% standard error of the mean) were produced by selection of the driver section diameter and distance from the shock tube opening. The peak pressures varied predictably with distance from the shock tube opening while maintaining both a true blast wave profile and relevant pulse duration for distances up to about one diameter from the shock tube opening. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current compression-driven shock tubes, and it does not have a large jet effect. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven shock tubes, which reduces operating costs and effort and permits greater throughput and accessibility. It is expected to be useful in assessing the response of various sensors to shock wave loading; assessing the reflection, transmission, and absorption properties of candidate armor materials; assessing material properties at high rates of loading; assessing the response of biological materials to shock wave exposure; and providing a means to validate numerical models of the interaction of shock waves with structures. All of these activities have been difficult to pursue in a laboratory setting due in part to lack of appropriate means to produce a realistic blast loading profile.

  14. Possibility of rarefaction shock wave under short pulse laser ablation of solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgakova, N M

    1999-10-01

    Attention is drawn to a phenomenon that may give a radically different explanation for the recent observations of the system of dark rings above a solid surface vaporized by a short laser pulse. If a substance is heated to near-critical temperature, the existence of the compression shock wave becomes impossible, whereas the rarefaction wave takes a form of shock. The rarefaction shock can be considered as an interface in the expanding near-critical substance to form Newton rings in time-resolved optical microscopy experiments. The qualitative picture of the laser-ablated material expansion in vacuum with the generation of the rarefaction shock is discussed.

  15. The Dose-Related Effects of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Knee Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Ja-Young; Choi, Cheol-Min; Lee, June-Kyung; Kee, Hoi-Sung; Jung, Kwang-Ik; Yoon, Seo-Ra

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dose-related effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for knee osteoarthritis. Methods Seventy-five subjects were recruited, 60 of which met the inclusion criteria. The patients were randomly classified into two groups: group L, which was a low-energy group (n=30; 1,000 shocks/session; energy flux density [EFD], 0.040 mJ/mm2) and group M, which was a medium-energy group (n=30; 1,000 shocks/session; EFD, 0.093 mJ/mm2). For each group, 1,000 shock waves w...

  16. Laser-driven shock waves studied by x-ray radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, L; Atzeni, S; Schiavi, A; Baton, S D; Brambrink, E; Koenig, M; Rousseaux, C; Richetta, M; Batani, D; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Le Bel, E; Maheut, Y; Nguyen-Bui, T; Ribeyre, X; Trela, J

    2017-06-01

    Multimegabar laser-driven shock waves are unique tools for studying matter under extreme conditions. Accurate characterization of shocked matter is for instance necessary for measurements of equation of state data or opacities. This paper reports experiments performed at the LULI facility on the diagnosis of shock waves, using x-ray-absorption radiography. Radiographs are analyzed using standard Abel inversion. In addition, synthetic radiographs, which also take into account the finite size of the x-ray source, are generated using density maps produced by hydrodynamic simulations. Reported data refer to both plane cylindrical targets and hemispherical targets. Evolution and deformation of the shock front could be followed using hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Nonlinear interactions in superfluid dynamics: Nonstationary heat transfer due to second sound shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepmann, H. W.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound techniques were used to study superfluid helium. Second sound shock waves produced relative velocities in the bulk fluid. Maximum counterflow velocities produced in this way are found to follow the Langer-Fischer prediction for the fundamental critical velocity in its functional dependence on temperature and pressure. Comparison of successive shock and rotating experiments provides strong evidence that breakdown results in vorticity production in the flow behind the shock. Schlieren pictures have verified the planar nature of second sound shocks even after multiple reflections. The nonlinear theory of second sound was repeatedly verified in its prediction of double shocks and other nonlinear phenomena.

  18. Numerical simulation of shock wave propagation in water droplet impact on a rough surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Kei

    2017-11-01

    In this work shock wave propagation in water droplet impact on a rough surface is numerically studied. The numerical simulation is carried out utilizing two phase full Eulerian approach based on high resolution finite volume method, which allows for shock wave propagation in multiphase flow. To study the shock wave propagation in water droplet impact on a rough surface, an immersed boundary method is used as wall boundary treatment. The maximum impact pressure is computed as a function of surface roughness, and show that the maximum impact pressure increases with increasing relative roughness.

  19. Strain-rate dependence of the effective viscosity under steady-wave shock compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.

    1981-05-15

    Relationships among Hugoniot pressure, effective viscosity, and strain rate under conditions of steady-wave shock compression are predicted based on the assumption of invariance of a shock property equal to the product of the energy dissipated in shock compression and the rise time of the steady wave. Effective viscosity is found to decrease as happrox.e/sup -1/2/, while strain rate increases as eapprox.p/sup 4//sub h/ with Hugoniot pressure. These results are consistent with steady-wave profile measurements on aluminum.

  20. Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma

    OpenAIRE

    P. Fischer; Gauthereau, C.; Godiot, J.; G. Matthieussent

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic wave ( f = 9 GHz, Pi = 150 kW, τ = 1.5 μs) is launched into a subcritical argon plasma (n e ≃1011 cm-3, P0 ≃ 5 × 10-4 Torr), resulting in a standing wave. The associated ponderomotive force generates an ion acoustic wave with a wave vector equal to twice the electromagnetic one and with a frequency satisfying the usual dispersion relation (fA ≃ 150 kHz). The main features of the ion acoustic wave, as measured in this 3D experiment, agree with a simple theory. However, varyi...

  1. Interaction of a weak shock wave with a discontinuous heavy-gas cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiansheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang [High Speed Aerodynamics Institute, China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang 621000 (China); Luo, Xisheng, E-mail: xluo@ustc.edu.cn [Advanced Propulsion Laboratory, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The interaction between a cylindrical inhomogeneity and a weak planar shock wave is investigated experimentally and numerically, and special attention is given to the wave patterns and vortex dynamics in this scenario. A soap-film technique is realized to generate a well-controlled discontinuous cylinder (SF{sub 6} surrounded by air) with no supports or wires in the shock-tube experiment. The symmetric evolving interfaces and few disturbance waves are observed in a high-speed schlieren photography. Numerical simulations are also carried out for a detailed analysis. The refracted shock wave inside the cylinder is perturbed by the diffracted shock waves and divided into three branches. When these shock branches collide, the shock focusing occurs. A nonlinear model is then proposed to elucidate effects of the wave patterns on the evolution of the cylinder. A distinct vortex pair is gradually developing during the shock-cylinder interaction. The numerical results show that a low pressure region appears at the vortex core. Subsequently, the ambient fluid is entrained into the vortices which are expanding at the same time. Based on the relation between the vortex motion and the circulation, several theoretical models of circulation in the literature are then checked by the experimental and numerical results. Most of these theoretical circulation models provide a reasonably good prediction of the vortex motion in the present configuration.

  2. Interaction of a weak shock wave with a discontinuous heavy-gas cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiansheng; Yang, Dangguo; Wu, Junqiang; Luo, Xisheng

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between a cylindrical inhomogeneity and a weak planar shock wave is investigated experimentally and numerically, and special attention is given to the wave patterns and vortex dynamics in this scenario. A soap-film technique is realized to generate a well-controlled discontinuous cylinder (SF6 surrounded by air) with no supports or wires in the shock-tube experiment. The symmetric evolving interfaces and few disturbance waves are observed in a high-speed schlieren photography. Numerical simulations are also carried out for a detailed analysis. The refracted shock wave inside the cylinder is perturbed by the diffracted shock waves and divided into three branches. When these shock branches collide, the shock focusing occurs. A nonlinear model is then proposed to elucidate effects of the wave patterns on the evolution of the cylinder. A distinct vortex pair is gradually developing during the shock-cylinder interaction. The numerical results show that a low pressure region appears at the vortex core. Subsequently, the ambient fluid is entrained into the vortices which are expanding at the same time. Based on the relation between the vortex motion and the circulation, several theoretical models of circulation in the literature are then checked by the experimental and numerical results. Most of these theoretical circulation models provide a reasonably good prediction of the vortex motion in the present configuration.

  3. Targeting Taxanes to Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells by Nanobubbles and Extracorporeal Shock Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Francesca; Rinella, Letizia; Argenziano, Monica; Cavalli, Roberta; Sassi, Francesca; D'Amelio, Patrizia; Battaglia, Antonino; Gontero, Paolo; Bosco, Ornella; Peluso, Rossella; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Frairia, Roberto; Catalano, Maria Graziella

    2016-01-01

    To target taxanes to castration-resistant prostate cancer cells, glycol-chitosan nanobubbles loaded with paclitaxel and docetaxel were constructed. The loaded nanobubbles were then combined with Extracorporeal Shock Waves, acoustic waves widely used in urology and orthopedics, with no side effects. Nanobubbles, with an average diameter of 353.3 ± 15.5 nm, entered two different castration-resistant prostate cancer cells (PC3 and DU145) as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. The shock waves applied increased the amount of intracellular nanobubbles. Loading nanobubbles with paclitaxel and docetaxel and combining them with shock waves generated the highest cytotoxic effects, resulting in a paclitaxel GI50 reduction of about 55% and in a docetaxel GI50 reduction of about 45% respectively. Combined treatment also affected cell migration. Paclitaxel-loaded nanobubbles and shock waves reduced cell migration by more than 85% with respect to paclitaxel alone; whereas docetaxel-loaded nanobubbles and shock waves reduced cell migration by more than 82% with respect to docetaxel alone. The present data suggest that nanobubbles can act as a stable taxane reservoir in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells and shock waves can further increase drug release from nanobubbles leading to higher cytotoxic and anti-migration effect.

  4. Pediatric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: multi-institutional results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Berat Cem; Irkilata, Lokman; Ekici, Musa; Hoşcan, Mustafa Burak; Sarici, Haşmet; Yücetürk, Cem Nedim; Karakan, Tolga; Atilla, Mustafa Kemal; Hasçiçek, Ahmet Metin; Eroglu, Muzaffer

    2016-05-24

    To evaluate the efficacy, auxiliary procedures and complications of pediatric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) performed with electrohydraulic lithotripters. Children with urolithiasis, aged between 0 and 15, were retrospectively evaluated. ESWL was performed by using two different electrohydraulic lithotripters, Elmed Multimed Classic (Elmed Medical Systems, Ankara, Turkey) and E-1000 (EMD Medical Systems, Ankara, Turkey), between January 2008 and December 2012 in four different referral centers in Turkey. 85.5% of patients were stone-free at 3 months. Further ESWL treatment was needed in 33.7% of the cases (one session, n = 55; two sessions, n = 15; three sessions, n = 13). Steinstrasse occurred in 10 patients but 8 of them cleared completely during the follow-up period. Urinary tract infection was detected in 3 (3.9%), fever in 3 (3.9%) and a small subcapsular hematoma in one (1.3%) patient, respectively. When the stones were divided into two groups as those with diameters <10 mm and ≥10 mm, it was found that the stone-free rate was associated with stone diameter, and that the smaller diameters had higher but statistically insignificant stone-free rates (P = 0.196). ESWL yields favorable results with low rates of complication and auxiliary procedures in selected pediatric patients.

  5. Clinical application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, F; Rompe, J D; Furia, J P; Cacchio, A

    2014-04-01

    Currently the application of shock wave therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects are still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge.

  6. EXTRACORPOREAL SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPSY IN TREATMENT OF PEDIATRIC UROLITHIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilija Golubovic

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experiences in the treatment of urinary tract calculosis in 114 children aged 6 months to 14 years by means of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL.The treatment was performed at the Institute of Radiology and the Clinic for Pediatric Surgery and Orthopedics in Nis, in the period 1988-2000 on Siemens Litostar lithotriptor. The children were treated after clinical, laboratory and radiological preparation, provided that the stone was not greater than 3 cm (measured in native urinary tract graph and that it was not located in the pelvic part of the ureter. In the present study, the success in application of ESWL for treating pediatric patients was 88%. The total clearance of fragments was found in 57% of patients, whereas retention of fragments smaller than 4 mm three months after the last treatment was present in 31% of patients. ESWL treatment failed in 12% of patients since they had retained fragments greater than 4 mm.The authors recommend this method as a method of choice in the treatment of renal and urethral calculi in children.

  7. Pediatric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Predicting successful outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean McAdams

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL is currently a first-line procedure of most upper urinary tract stones <2 cm of size because of established success rates, its minimal invasiveness and long-term safety with minimal complications. Given that alternative surgical and endourological options exist for the management of stone disease and that ESWL failure often results in the need for repeat ESWL or secondary procedures, it is highly desirable to identify variables predicting successful outcomes of ESWL in the pediatric population. Despite numerous reports and growing experience, few prospective studies and guidelines for pediatric ESWL have been completed. Variation in the methods by which study parameters are measured and reported can make it difficult to compare individual studies or make definitive recommendations. There is ongoing work and a need for continuing improvement of imaging protocols in children with renal colic, with a current focus on minimizing exposure to ionizing radiation, perhaps utilizing advancements in ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. This report provides a review of the current literature evaluating the patient attributes and stone factors that may be predictive of successful ESWL outcomes along with reviewing the role of pre-operative imaging and considerations for patient safety.

  8. Patient controlled analgesia for extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelling, G; Mendl, G; Weber, W; Pauletzki, J; Sackmann, M; Pöppel, E; Peter, K

    1992-03-01

    Sixty patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy of gallbladder stones (ESWL) were randomly assigned to receive alfentanil either by infusion controlled by the attending anesthesiologist (standard treatment group, n = 31) or by analgesia controlled by the patient (PCA group, n = 29). Patients using PCA were allowed to self-administer 0.25 mg of alfentanil i.v. every minute as required. Data collected during treatment included the total dose of drug required, transcutaneous pCO2 values, verbal pain and sedation scores, visual analogue scale (VAS) patient satisfaction scores, and the incidence of nausea or vomiting. PCA patients used less alfentanil than the standard treatment group (PCA group: 12.8 micrograms/kg; standard treatment group: 44.3 micrograms/kg; mean values, P = 0.0001), tolerated significantly higher pain intensities and self-administered the narcotic only to moderate levels of pain but not to pronounced analgesia. Standard treatment patients reported lower levels of pain, were more sedated (P less than 0.05) and showed significantly higher transcutaneous pCO2 values. There was a trend towards a lower incidence of nausea or vomiting in PCA patients without reaching statistical significance. No significant difference with regard to patient satisfaction with pain relief could be demonstrated. Self-administered alfentanil during ESWL of gallbladder stones provided adequate analgesia with minimal side effects and high patient satisfaction. ESWL may represent a new and useful indication for PCA.

  9. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: An opinion on its future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Rassweiler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of miniaturized nephroscopes which allow one-stage stone clearance with minimal morbidity has brought the role of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL in stone management into question. Design innovations in SWL machines over the last decade have attempted to address this problem. We reviewed the recent literature on SWL using a MEDLINE/PUBMED research. For commenting on the future of SWL, we took the subjective opinion of two senior urologists, one mid-level expert, and an upcoming junior fellow. There have been a number of recent changes in lithotripter design and techniques. This includes the use of multiple focus machines and improved coupling designs. Additional changes involve better localization real-time monitoring. The main goal of stone treatment today seems to be to get rid of the stone in one session rather than being treated multiple times non-invasively. Stone treatment in the future will be individualized by genetic screening of stone formers, using improved SWL devices for small stones only. However, there is still no consensus about the design of the ideal lithotripter. Innovative concepts such as emergency SWL for ureteric stones may be implemented in clinical routine.

  10. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: An opinion on its future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassweiler, Jens; Rassweiler, Marie-Claire; Frede, Thomas; Alken, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The development of miniaturized nephroscopes which allow one-stage stone clearance with minimal morbidity has brought the role of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) in stone management into question. Design innovations in SWL machines over the last decade have attempted to address this problem. We reviewed the recent literature on SWL using a MEDLINE/PUBMED research. For commenting on the future of SWL, we took the subjective opinion of two senior urologists, one mid-level expert, and an upcoming junior fellow. There have been a number of recent changes in lithotripter design and techniques. This includes the use of multiple focus machines and improved coupling designs. Additional changes involve better localization real-time monitoring. The main goal of stone treatment today seems to be to get rid of the stone in one session rather than being treated multiple times non-invasively. Stone treatment in the future will be individualized by genetic screening of stone formers, using improved SWL devices for small stones only. However, there is still no consensus about the design of the ideal lithotripter. Innovative concepts such as emergency SWL for ureteric stones may be implemented in clinical routine.

  11. Vapor condensation behind the shock wave in vapor-liquid two-phase media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syoji, Chiharu; Oshiro, Naoto

    Laser extinction, schlieren photography, and in situ pressure measurements are used to characterize vapor condensation behind a shock wave in a diaphragm shock tube with a low-pressure chamber filled with ethanol, water, or freon-11 vapor. The experimental setup is briefly described, and the results are presented graphically and discussed in detail. Condensation, lasting a few hundred microsec before reevaporation sets in, is found to decrease the intensity of the shock front and lower the pressure behind it.

  12. Spacetime is Locally Inertial at Points of General Relativistic Shock Wave Interaction between Shocks from Different Characteristic Families

    CERN Document Server

    Reintjes, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    We prove that spacetime is locally inertial at points of shock wave collision in General Relativity. The result applies for collisions between shock waves coming from different characteristic families, in spherically symmetric spacetimes. We give a constructive proof that there exist coordinate transformations which raise the regularity of the gravitational metric tensor from $C^{0,1}$ to $C^{1,1}$ in a neighborhood of such points of shock wave interaction, and a $C^{1,1}$ metric regularity suffices for locally inertial frames to exist. This result corrects an error in our earlier RSPA-publication, which led us to the wrong conclusion that such coordinate transformations, which smooth the metric to $C^{1,1}$, cannot exist. Our result here proves that regularity singularities, (a type of mild singularity introduced in our RSPA-publication), do \\emph{not exist} at points of interacting shock waves from different families in spherically symmetric spacetimes, and this generalizes Israel's famous 1966 result to th...

  13. Rock magnetic effects induced in terrestrial basalt and diabase by >20 GPa experimental spherical shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezaeva, N. S.; Swanson-Hysell, N.; Tikoo, S. M.; Badyukov, D. D.; Kars, M. A. C.; Egli, R.; Chareev, D. A.; Fairchild, L. M.; Khakhalova, E.; Strauss, B. E.; Lindquist, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how shock waves generated during hypervelocity impacts affect the magnetic properties of rocks is key for interpreting the paleomagnetic records of lunar rocks, meteorites, and cratered planetary surfaces. Following ref. [1], we conducted spherical shock experiments at the RFNC-VNIIFT (Snezhinsk, Russia) on (titano)magnetite-bearing basaltic lava flow and diabase dike samples from the Osler Volcanic Group of the 1.1 Ga North American Midcontinent Rift [2]. The experimental setup allows for rock magnetic and petrographic changes to be assessed for a range of shock pressures 20 GPa and above. Consistent with prior spherical shock experiments on the Saratov ordinary chondrite [1], both shocked samples exhibited concentric zonation: a central void space was surrounded by an inner layer of impact melt (Zone I, most shocked), a middle partially melted layer (Zone II), and an outer layer of unmelted rock with solid-state shock features (Zones III and IV, least shocked). These zones are petrographically different. Like Zone IV, Zone III is characterized by an intact texture, but the plagioclase grains have been transformed into diaplectic glass. Zones I-III acquired thermoremanent magnetization from shock heating. Zone IV may have undergone shock demagnetization of the pre-shock magnetization without substantial remagnetization. Shocked samples had higher coercivities than unshocked samples of the same rocks. Magnetic force and electron microscopy reveal fracturing of the Fe-Ti oxides, which likely contributes to the observed increase in coercivity in the shocked samples. Our spherical shock experiments build on prior work to show that shock at pressures greater than 20 GPa results in coercivity increase, shock demagnetization and thermal remagnetization. This work can guide future interpretations of the remanent magnetization and bulk magnetic properties of highly shocked materials from planetary surfaces. References: [1] Bezaeva N.S. et al. 2010. MAPS 45

  14. Turbulence Models: Data from Other Experiments: Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Shock Wave / Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows at High Mach Numbers. This web page provides data from experiments that may be useful for the validation of turbulence...

  15. Holography and Colliding gravitational shock waves in asymptotically AdS5 spacetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M; Yaffe, Laurence G

    2011-01-14

    Using holography, we study the collision of planar shock waves in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. This requires the numerical solution of a dual gravitational initial value problem in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime.

  16. Holography and Colliding Gravitational Shock Waves in Asymptotically AdS5 Spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2011-01-01

    Using holography, we study the collision of planar shock waves in strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. This requires the numerical solution of a dual gravitational initial value problem in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime.

  17. Effect of shock wave reapplication on urinary n-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in canine kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A.Q.R. Fortes

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Renal tubular damage can be assessed with the aid of urinary dosing of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG and it is possible to demonstrate a significant correlation between shock wave and damage to renal parenchyma. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of shock wave reapplication over urinary NAG in canine kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors submitted 10 crossbred dogs to 2 applications of 2000 shock waves in a 24-hour interval in order to assess urinary NAG values after 12, 24, 36 and 48 hours. RESULTS: Twelve hours following the first shockwave application there was an increase in NAG of 6.47 ± 5.44 u/g creatinine (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: Shock wave reapplication with a 24-hour interval did not cause any increase in urinary NAG.

  18. Elimination of spiral waves in cardiac tissue by multiple electrical shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panfilov, A.V.; Müller, Stefan C.; Zykov, Vladimir S.; Keener, James P.

    1999-01-01

    We study numerically the elimination of a spiral wave in cardiac tissue by application of multiple shocks of external current. To account for the effect of shocks we apply a recently developed theory for the interaction of the external current with cardiac tissue. We compare two possible feedback

  19. Dust acoustic shock wave generation due to dust charge variation in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for star formation. The DA shock transition to its far downstream amplitude is oscillatory in nature due to dust charge fluctuations, the oscillation amplitude and shock width depending on ... forming to the frame of the wave with velocity λ ... five, ∆Nd is found to exhibit oscillatory increase while |Qd|continues to decrease and so.

  20. Reversing cooling flows with AGN jets: shock waves, rarefaction waves and trailing outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fulai; Duan, Xiaodong; Yuan, Ye-Fei

    2018-01-01

    The cooling flow problem is one of the central problems in galaxy clusters, and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback is considered to play a key role in offsetting cooling. However, how AGN jets heat and suppress cooling flows remains highly debated. Using an idealized simulation of a cool-core cluster, we study the development of central cooling catastrophe and how a subsequent powerful AGN jet event averts cooling flows, with a focus on complex gasdynamical processes involved. We find that the jet drives a bow shock, which reverses cooling inflows and overheats inner cool-core regions. The shocked gas moves outward in a rarefaction wave, which rarefies the dense core and adiabatically transports a significant fraction of heated energy to outer regions. As the rarefaction wave propagates away, inflows resume in the cluster core, but a trailing outflow is uplifted by the AGN bubble, preventing gas accumulation and catastrophic cooling in central regions. Inflows and trailing outflows constitute meridional circulations in the cluster core. At later times, trailing outflows fall back to the cluster centre, triggering central cooling catastrophe and potentially a new generation of AGN feedback. We thus envisage a picture of cool cluster cores going through cycles of cooling-induced contraction and AGN-induced expansion. This picture naturally predicts an anti-correlation between the gas fraction (or X-ray luminosity) of cool cores and the central gas entropy, which may be tested by X-ray observations.

  1. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation in a superthermal dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinejad, H., E-mail: alinejad@nit.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences (RIFS), University of Tabriz, 51664, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tribeche, M. [Plasma Physics Group, Faculty of Sciences – Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar (Algeria); Mohammadi, M.A. [Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences (RIFS), University of Tabriz, 51664, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-14

    The nonlinear propagation of dust ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves is studied in a charge varying dusty plasma with electrons having kappa velocity distribution. We use hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a fast superthermal electron charging current derived from orbit limited motion (OLM) theory. It is found that the presence of superthermal electrons does not only significantly modify the basic properties of shock waves, but also causes the existence of shock profile with only positive potential in such plasma with parameter ranges corresponding to Saturn's rings. It is also shown that the strength and steepness of the shock waves decrease with increase of the size of dust grains and ion temperature. -- Highlights: ► The presence of superthermal electrons causes the existence of shock waves with only positive potential. ► The strength and steepness of the shock waves decrease with increase of the size of dust grains and ion temperature. ► As the electrons evolve toward their thermodynamic equilibrium, the shock structures are found with smaller amplitude.

  2. Rubber-induced uniform laser shock wave pressure for thin metal sheets microforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Zongbao, E-mail: szb@ujs.edu.cn; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Yayuan; Wang, Cuntang

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • The rubber is introduced to smooth laser shock wave pressure. • The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect is proposed. • Smoothing effect is mainly due to the radial expansion of plasma cloud on rubber. • The good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading. - Abstract: Laser shock microforming of thin metal sheets is a new high velocity forming technique, which employs laser shock wave to deform the thin metal sheets. The spatial distribution of forming pressure is mainly dependent on the laser beam. A new type of laser shock loading method is introduced which gives a uniform pressure distribution. A low density rubber is inserted between the laser beam and the thin metal sheets. The mechanism of rubber-induced smoothing effect on confined laser shock wave is proposed. Plasticine is used to perform the smoothing effect experiments due to its excellent material flow ability. The influence of rubber on the uniformity of laser shock wave pressure is studied by measuring the surface micro topography of the deformed plasticine. And the four holes forming experiment is used to verify the rubber-induced uniform pressure on thin metal sheets surface. The research results show the possibility of smoothing laser shock wave pressure using rubber. And the good surface quality can be obtained under rubber dynamic loading.

  3. Renovascular acute renal failure precipitated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for pancreatic stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Nicolas; Goffette, Pierre; Deprez, Pierre; Jadoul, Michel; Morelle, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) for pancreatic stones is considered a safe and efficient method to facilitate fragmentation and stone removal. We describe the case of a 73-year-old woman with a solitary functioning kidney who presented an acute-onset anuria and renovascular renal failure the day after ESWL. We speculate that vascular calcifications in the area targeted by shock waves played a critical role in renal artery obstruction in the present case. PMID:26251710

  4. A Numerical Method for Blast Shock Wave Analysis of Missile Launch from Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heimbs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient empirical approach was developed to accurately represent the blast shock wave loading resulting from the launch of a missile from a military aircraft to be used in numerical analyses. Based on experimental test series of missile launches in laboratory environment and from a helicopter, equations were derived to predict the time- and position-dependent overpressure. The method was finally applied and validated in a structural analysis of a helicopter tail boom under missile launch shock wave loading.

  5. Generation of shock waves in dense plasmas by high-intensity laser pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasley John

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When intense short-pulse laser beams (I > 1022 W/m2, τ < 20 ps interact with high density plasmas, strong shock waves are launched. These shock waves may be generated by a range of processes, and the relative significance of the various mechanisms driving the formation of these shock waves is not well understood. It is challenging to obtain experimental data on shock waves near the focus of such intense laser–plasma interactions. The hydrodynamics of such interactions is, however, of great importance to fast ignition based inertial confinement fusion schemes as it places limits upon the time available for depositing energy in the compressed fuel, and thereby directly affects the laser requirements. In this manuscript we present the results of magnetohydrodynamic simulations showing the formation of shock waves under such conditions, driven by the j × B force and the thermal pressure gradient (where j is the current density and B the magnetic field strength. The time it takes for shock waves to form is evaluated over a wide range of material and current densities. It is shown that the formation of intense relativistic electron current driven shock waves and other related hydrodynamic phenomena may be expected over time scales of relevance to intense laser–plasma experiments and the fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion. A newly emerging technique for studying such interactions is also discussed. This approach is based upon Doppler spectroscopy and offers promise for investigating early time shock wave hydrodynamics launched by intense laser pulses.

  6. Knee joint angle of intracerebral hemorrhage-induced rats after extracorporeal shock wave therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on rat knee joints of extracorporeal shock wave therapy after experimentally induced intracerebral hemorrhage. [Subjects and Methods] Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into an experimental group that received extracorporeal shock wave therapy after central nervous system injury (n=10) and a control group that did not receive any therapeutic intervention after central nervous system injury (n=10). The Dartfish program was us...

  7. Can cellulite be treated with low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo; Kuhn, Christoph; Voss, Axel

    2007-01-01

    Fiorenzo Angehrn1, Christoph Kuhn1, Axel Voss21Klinik Piano, Gottstattstrasse 24, Biel, Switzerland; 2SwiTech Medical AG, Kreuzlingen, SwitzerlandAbstract: The present study investigates the effects of low-energy defocused extracorporeal generated shock waves on collagen structure of cellulite afflicted skin. Cellulite measurement using high-resolution ultrasound technology was performed before and after low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in 21 female subjects. ESWT...

  8. Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Final Technical Report ONR Grant N00014-14-1-0827 Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary...Layer Interactions 30 November 2015 Doyle Knight Dept Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 98 Brett...30 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of CFD Modeling Capability for Hypersonic Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interactions 5a. CONTRACT

  9. Shock Tube Design for High Intensity Blast Waves for Laboratory Testing of Armor and Combat Materiel

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes create simulated blast waves which can be directed and measured to study blast wave effects under laboratory conditions. It is desirable to increase available peak pressure from ~1 MPa to ~5 MPa to simulate closer blast sources and facilitate development and testing of personal and vehicle armors. Three methods were investigated to increase peak simulated blast pressure produced by an oxy-acetylene driven shock tube while maintaining suitability for laboratory studies. The first m...

  10. Damage Detection on Thin-walled Structures Utilizing Laser Scanning and Standing Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Hyeok; Jeon, Jun Young; Kim, Du Hwan; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Nat’l Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, To; Han, Soon Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    This paper describes wavenumber filtering for damage detection using single-frequency standing wave excitation and laser scanning sensing. An embedded piezoelectric sensor generates ultrasonic standing waves, and the responses are measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer and mirror tilting device. After scanning, newly developed damage detection techniques based on wavenumber filtering are applied to the full standing wave field. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed techniques, several experiments were performed on composite plates with delamination and aluminum plates with corrosion damage. The results demonstrated that the developed techniques could be applied to various structures to localize the damage, with the potential to improve the damage detection capability at a high interrogation speed.

  11. Epicardial shock-wave therapy improves ventricular function in a porcine model of ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfeld, Johannes; Zimpfer, Daniel; Albrecht-Schgoer, Karin; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Paulus, Patrick; Dumfarth, Julia; Thomas, Anita; Lobenwein, Daniela; Tepeköylü, Can; Rosenhek, Raphael; Schaden, Wolfgang; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Grimm, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Previously we have shown that epicardial shock-wave therapy improves left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in a rat model of myocardial infarction. In the present experiments we aimed to address the safety and efficacy of epicardial shock-wave therapy in a preclinical large animal model and to further evaluate mechanisms of action of this novel therapy. Four weeks after left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation in pigs, the animals underwent re-thoracotomy with (shock-wave group, n = 6) or without (control group, n = 5) epicardial shock waves (300 impulses at 0.38 mJ/mm2 ) applied to the infarcted anterior wall. Efficacy endpoints were improvement of LVEF and induction of angiogenesis 6 weeks after shock-wave therapy. Safety endpoints were haemodynamic stability during treatment and myocardial damage. Four weeks after LAD ligation, LVEF decreased in both the shock-wave (43 ± 3%, p heart failure exerted a positive effect on LVEF improvement and did not show any adverse effects. Angiogenesis was induced by stimulation of VEGF receptors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Effects of improving current characteristics of spark discharge on underwater shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Higa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have been developing a food-processing device that uses underwater shock waves generated by spark discharges at an underwater spark gap. Underwater shock waves can be used in food processing for softening, fracturing and sterilization. These technologies are attracting attention because the food is not heated during processing, so it does not change flavour. In this study, we develop a rice-powder manufacturing system using the fracturing effect provided by underwater shock waves. Because rice grains are very hard, the process must be applied repeatedly using a momentary high pressure to fracture the grains. The fast repeated generation of shock waves should provide high pressures from low energies. Therefore, we aim to achieve higher pressures from low energies expended by the underwater gap discharge. We increase the pulse compression rate by decreasing the circuit impedance of the device and increasing the charging voltage. Using optical observations and a pressure sensor, we measure the high pressure developed by the underwater shock wave and the rise time of the discharge current. We find that we can decrease the rise time of the discharge current by 17% while maintaining the peak current, and simultaneously increase the high pressure of the underwater shock wave by 135%.

  13. Delivery by shock waves of active principle embedded in gelatin-based capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstedt, Cedric; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique; Chesnais, Sabrina; El Bahri, Zineb; Massard, Christophe; Taverdet, Jean-Louis; Lafon, Cyril

    2008-07-01

    Delivering a drug close to the targeted cells improves its benefit versus risk ratio. A possible method for local drug delivery is to encapsulate the drug into solid microscopic carriers and to release it by ultrasound. The objective of this work was to use shock waves for delivering a molecule loaded in polymeric microcapsules. Ethyl benzoate (EBZ) was encapsulated in spherical gelatin shells by complex coacervation. A piezocomposite shock wave generator (120 mm in diameter, focused at 97 mm, pulse length 1.4 micros) was used for sonicating the capsules and delivering the molecule. Shock parameters (acoustic pressure, number of shocks and shock repetition frequency) were varied in order to measure their influence on EBZ release. A cavitation-inhibitor liquid (Ablasonic) was then used to evaluate the role of cavitation in the capsule disruption. The measurements showed that the mean quantity of released EBZ was proportional to the acoustic pressure of the shock wave (r2 > 0.99), and increased with the number of applied shocks. Up to 88% of encapsulated EBZ could be released within 4 min only (240 shocks, 1 Hz). However, the quantity of released EBZ dropped at high shock rates (above 2Hz). Ultrasound imaging sequences showed that cavitation clouds might form, at high shock rates, along the acoustic axis making the exposure inefficient. Measurements done in Ablasonic showed that cavitation plays a major role in microcapsules disruption. In this study, we designed polymeric capsules that can be disrupted by shock waves. This type of microcapsule is theoretically a suitable vehicle for carrying hydrophobic drugs. Following these positive results, encapsulation of drugs is considered for further medical applications.

  14. Comparison of Hydrocode Simulations with Measured Shock Wave Velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hixson, R. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States); Veeser, L. R. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2014-11-30

    We have conducted detailed 1- and 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly made to understand various shock processes in a sample and to design shock experiments. We began with relatively simple shock experiments, where we examined the effects of the equation of state and the viscoplastic strength models. Eventually we included spallation in copper and iron and a solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations.

  15. Diffusive Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at Shock Waves of Arbitrary Speed with Magnetostatic Turbulence. I. General Theory and Correct Nonrelativistic Speed Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R.; Oppotsch, J.

    2017-12-01

    The analytical theory of diffusive acceleration of cosmic rays at parallel stationary shock waves of arbitrary speed with magnetostatic turbulence is developed from first principles. The theory is based on the diffusion approximation to the gyrotropic cosmic-ray particle phase-space distribution functions in the respective rest frames of the up- and downstream medium. We derive the correct cosmic-ray jump conditions for the cosmic-ray current and density, and match the up- and downstream distribution functions at the position of the shock. It is essential to account for the different particle momentum coordinates in the up- and downstream media. Analytical expressions for the momentum spectra of shock-accelerated cosmic rays are calculated. These are valid for arbitrary shock speeds including relativistic shocks. The correctly taken limit for nonrelativistic shock speeds leads to a universal broken power-law momentum spectrum of accelerated particles with velocities well above the injection velocity threshold, where the universal power-law spectral index q≃ 2-{γ }1-4 is independent of the flow compression ratio r. For nonrelativistic shock speeds, we calculate for the first time the injection velocity threshold, settling the long-standing injection problem for nonrelativistic shock acceleration.

  16. Kapitza-Dirac scattering of electrons from a bichromatic standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Dellweg, Matthias M

    2015-01-01

    Coherent scattering of an electron beam by the Kapitza-Dirac effect from a standing laser wave which comprises two frequency components is studied. To this end, the Schr\\"odinger equation is solved numerically with a suitable ponderomotive potential. Besides, an analytical solution for electron diffraction in the asymptotic domain of large field amplitudes is obtained and a mathematical model in reduced dimensionality for the scattering amplitude in the Bragg regime is presented. We demonstrate distinct interference signatures and relative phase effects when the standing wave contains a fundamental frequency and its second harmonic. The influence of the relative field intensities on the Rabi oscillation dynamics is also discussed.

  17. Standing-wave excited soft x-ray photoemission microscopy: application to Co microdot magnetic arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alexander; Kronast, Florian; Papp, Christian; Yang, See-Hun; Cramm, Stefan; Krug, Ingo P.; Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Hilken, Dawn L.; Anderson, Erik H.; Fischer, Peter; Durr, Hermann A.; Schneider, Claus M.; Fadley, Charles S.

    2010-10-29

    We demonstrate the addition of depth resolution to the usual two-dimensional images in photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM), with application to a square array of circular magnetic Co microdots. The method is based on excitation with soft x-ray standing-waves generated by Bragg reflection from a multilayer mirror substrate. Standing wave is moved vertically through sample simply by varying the photon energy around the Bragg condition. Depth-resolved PEEM images were obtained for all of the observed elements. Photoemission intensities as functions of photon energy were compared to x-ray optical calculations in order to quantitatively derive the depth-resolved film structure of the sample.

  18. Ultrathin multi-band planar metamaterial absorber based on standing wave resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Bing; Lai, Shumin; Zhang, Dao Hua; Teng, Jing-Hua

    2012-12-03

    We present a planar waveguide model and a mechanism based on standing wave resonances to interpret the unity absorptions of ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers. The analytical model predicts that the available absorption peaks of the absorber are corresponding to the fundamental mode and only its odd harmonic modes of the standing wave. The model is in good agreement with numerical simulation and can explain the main features observed in typical ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers. Based on this model, ultrathin planar metamaterial absorbers with multi-band absorptions at desired frequencies can be easily designed.

  19. Geometric optics with atomic beams scattered by a detuned standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V; Konkov, L E

    2012-01-01

    We report on theoretical and numerical study of propagation of atomic beams crossing a detuned standing-wave laser beam in the geometric oprics limit. The interplay between external and internal atomic degrees of freedom is used to manipulate the atomic motion along the optical axis by light. By adjusting the atom-laser detuning, we demonstrate how to focus, split and scatter atomic beams in a real experiment. The novel effect of chaotic scattering of atoms at a regular near-resonant standing wave is found numerically and explained qualitatively. Some applications of the effects found are discussed.

  20. Laser driven shock wave experiments for equation of state studies at megabar pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, H C; Senecha, V K; Bandyopadhyay, S; Rai, V N; Khare, P; Bhat, R K; Gupta, N K; Godwal, B K

    2002-01-01

    We present the results from laser driven shock wave experiments for equation of state (EOS) studies of gold metal. An Nd:YAG laser chain (2 J, 1.06 mu m wavelength, 200 ps pulse FWHM) is used to generate shocks in planar Al foils and Al + Au layered targets. The EOS of gold in the pressure range of 9-13 Mbar is obtained using the impedance matching technique. The numerical simulations performed using the one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code support the experimental results. The present experimental data show remarkable agreement with the existing standard EOS models and with other experimental data obtained independently using laser driven shock wave experiments.

  1. Ignition of partially shattered liquid fuel drops in a reflected shock wave environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzba, A. S.; Kauffman, C. W.; Nicholls, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the ignition of individual fuel drops after their interaction with an incident and a reflected shock wave near the end wall of a shock tube has been carried out. The influence of the aerodynamic shattering of the fuel drop by the convective flow on the ignition characteristics has been examined by varying the drop-end wall separation distance. Data are presented which show the ignition delay times to be a function of the various experimental conditions encountered in this study. A comparison is made with previous investigations concerning the ignition of a liquid fuel drop due only to the interaction with an incident shock wave.

  2. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranch, Geoffrey A; Lunsford, Robert; Grün, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-10

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry-Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry-Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. The peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  3. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Jutta [Bethanien Krankenhaus, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Luboldt, Wolfgang; Schwarz, Wolfram; Jacobi, Volkmar; Herzog, Christopher; Vogl, Thomas J. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    To investigate clinical (pain, mobility) and radiological (resolution of calcium deposits) efficacy of different energy levels of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. There were 90 study subjects with radiographically verified calcific tendinitis of one shoulder, mean age 52{+-}6 years (range 29 - 65 years; females:males=55:35), all of whom had had symptoms for at least 6 months and substantial restriction of shoulder mobility and pain that required taking anti-inflammatory drugs. Calcium deposits were of type I or type II (clearly circumscribed and dense) and ranged from 1 cm to 3 cm in diameter. Subjects were divided into three groups to receive ESWT at one of two energy levels (E{sub 1}=0.15 mJ/mm{sup 2}, E{sub 2}=0.44 mJ/mm{sup 2}) or sham treatment. Treatment was given at 6 weekly intervals until symptoms resolved, five treatments had been given or the subject dropped out of the programme. All subjects in groups E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} completed the programme. Those in group E{sub 1} had significantly less pain during treatment but more treatments than those in group E{sub 2}, and at 6 month follow-up had residual calcification and recurrence of pain (87%). Subjects in group E{sub 2} had no residual calcification or recurrence of pain. Sham treatment had no effect. There were no side effects except a small number of haematomas (2 in E{sub 1}, 6 in E{sub 2}; maximum size 2 cm). ESWT in calcific tendinitis of the shoulder is very effective. It does not have significant side effects at an energy level of E=0.44 mJ/mm{sup 2}, which can therefore be recommended. (orig.)

  4. Standing torsional waves in a fully saturated, porous, circular cylinder

    CERN Document Server

    Solorza, S; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2004.02198.x

    2004-01-01

    For dynamic measurement of the elastic moduli of a porous material saturated with viscous fluid using the resonance-bar technique, one also observes attenuation. In this article we have carried out the solution of the boundary-value problem associated with standing torsional oscillations of a finite, poroelastic, circular cylinder cast in the framework of volume-averaged theory of poroelasticity. Analysing this solution by eigenvalue perturbation approach we are able to develop expressions for torsional resonance and temporal attenuation frequencies in which the dependence upon the material properties are transparent. It shows how the attenuation is controlled by the permeability and the fluid properties, and how the resonance frequency drops over its value for the dry solid-frame due to the drag effect of fluid mass. Based upon this work we have a firm basis to determine solid-frame shear modulus, permeability, and tortuosity factor from torsional oscillation experiments.

  5. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid (4)He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-28

    Intense shock waves in superfluid (4)He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 10(4) m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  6. Ultrafast shock wave propagation at high ambient pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Zaug, Joseph; Howard, William

    2008-03-01

    The measurement and characterization of acoustic phenomena at high pressure is critical to the modeling of planetary dynamics, seismic events, and chemistry in extreme environments. Here we present the results of experiments using ultrafast laser excitation and detection of shock waves starting from high precompression (10s GPa) in a standard diamond anvil cell (DAC) with transient single shot shock pressures > 10 GPa. Using ultrafast interferometry, we directly detect surface motion with ˜nm spatial resolution and ˜ps time resolution. Such experiments enable examination of shock waves with significant strain starting at high ambient pressure using a convenient and relatively inexpensive apparatus. Ultrafast time resolution enables the observation of shock-induced chemistry on the scale of a picosecond shock rise. Furthermore, standard DACs can reach 100s GPa precompression, enabling the examination of phase transitions and chemical reactions starting from a wide range of thermodynamic initial conditions.

  7. Shock formation in small-data solutions to 3D quasilinear wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Speck, Jared

    2016-01-01

    In 1848 James Challis showed that smooth solutions to the compressible Euler equations can become multivalued, thus signifying the onset of a shock singularity. Today it is known that, for many hyperbolic systems, such singularities often develop. However, most shock-formation results have been proved only in one spatial dimension. Serge Alinhac's groundbreaking work on wave equations in the late 1990s was the first to treat more than one spatial dimension. In 2007, for the compressible Euler equations in vorticity-free regions, Demetrios Christodoulou remarkably sharpened Alinhac's results and gave a complete description of shock formation. In this monograph, Christodoulou's framework is extended to two classes of wave equations in three spatial dimensions. It is shown that if the nonlinear terms fail to satisfy the null condition, then for small data, shocks are the only possible singularities that can develop. Moreover, the author exhibits an open set of small data whose solutions form a shock, and he prov...

  8. Metallurgical applications of shock wave and high strain rate phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murr, L.E.; Staudhammer, K.P.; Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the impact testing of metals. Topics considered at the conference included dynamic consolidation, the analysis of dislocation kinetics across shocks, high-strain-rate deformation, adiabatic shear band phenomena, dynamic fracture, explosive metal working, shock synthesis and the property modification of materials, and novel concepts and applications of high pressure.

  9. Discrete Element Simulation of Elastoplastic Shock Wave Propagation in Spherical Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shoaib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastoplastic shock wave propagation in a one-dimensional assembly of spherical metal particles is presented by extending well-established quasistatic compaction models. The compaction process is modeled by a discrete element method while using elastic and plastic loading, elastic unloading, and adhesion at contacts with typical dynamic loading parameters. Of particular interest is to study the development of the elastoplastic shock wave, its propagation, and reflection during entire loading process. Simulation results yield information on contact behavior, velocity, and deformation of particles during dynamic loading. Effects of shock wave propagation on loading parameters are also discussed. The elastoplastic shock propagation in granular material has many practical applications including the high-velocity compaction of particulate material.

  10. Imaging Shock Waves in Diamond with Both High Temporal and Spatial Resolution at an XFEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schropp, Andreas; Hoppe, Robert; Meier, Vivienne; Patommel, Jens; Seiboth, Frank; Ping, Yuan; Hicks, Damien G; Beckwith, Martha A; Collins, Gilbert W; Higginbotham, Andrew; Wark, Justin S; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric C; Arnold, Brice; Zastrau, Ulf; Hastings, Jerome B; Schroer, Christian G

    2015-06-18

    The advent of hard x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) has opened up a variety of scientific opportunities in areas as diverse as atomic physics, plasma physics, nonlinear optics in the x-ray range, and protein crystallography. In this article, we access a new field of science by measuring quantitatively the local bulk properties and dynamics of matter under extreme conditions, in this case by using the short XFEL pulse to image an elastic compression wave in diamond. The elastic wave was initiated by an intense optical laser pulse and was imaged at different delay times after the optical pump pulse using magnified x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The temporal evolution of the shock wave can be monitored, yielding detailed information on shock dynamics, such as the shock velocity, the shock front width, and the local compression of the material. The method provides a quantitative perspective on the state of matter in extreme conditions.

  11. Wave propagation and shock formation in the most general scalar-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Norihiro; Ohashi, Seiju

    2017-11-01

    This work studies wave propagation in the most general covariant scalar-tensor theories with second-order field equations, particularly focusing on the causal structure realized in these theories and also the shock formation process induced by nonlinear effects. For these studies we use the Horndeski theory and its generalization to the two scalar field case. We show that propagation speeds of the gravitational wave and scalar field wave in these theories may differ from the light speed depending on background field configuration, and find that a Killing horizon becomes a boundary of causal domain if the scalar fields share the symmetry of the background spacetime. With regard to the shock formation, we focus on transport of discontinuity in second derivatives of the metric and scalar field in the shift-symmetric Horndeski theory. We find that amplitude of the discontinuity generically diverges within finite time, which corresponds to shock formation. It turns out that the canonical scalar field and the scalar DBI model, among other theories described by the Horndeski theory, are free from such shock formation even when the background geometry and scalar field configuration are nontrivial. We also observe that the gravitational wave is protected against shock formation when the background has some symmetries at least. This fact may indicate that the gravitational wave in this theory is more well-behaved compared to the scalar field, which typically suffers from shock formation.

  12. Effect of a transverse plasma jet on a shock wave induced by a ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu WANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted experiments in a wind tunnel with Mach number 2 to explore the evolution of a transverse plasma jet and its modification effect on a shock wave induced by a ramp with an angle of 24°. The transverse plasma jet was created by arc discharge in a small cylindrical cavity with a 2 mm diameter orifice. Three group tests with different actuator arrangements in the spanwise or streamwise direction upstream from the ramp were respectively studied to compare their disturbances to the shock wave. As shown by a time-resolved schlieren system, an unsteady motion of the shock wave by actuation was found: the shock wave was significantly modified by the plasma jet with an upstream motion and a reduced angle. Compared to spanwise actuation, a more intensive impact was obtained with two or three streamwise actuators working together. From shock wave structures, the control effect of the plasma jet on the shock motion based on a thermal effect, a potential cause of shock modification, was discussed. Furthermore, we performed a numerical simulation by using the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES method to simulate the evolution of the transverse plasma jet plume produced by two streamwise actuators. The results show that flow structures are similar to those identified in schlieren images. Two streamwise vortices were recognized, which indicates that the higher jet plume is the result of the overlap of two streamwise jets. Keywords: Flow control, Improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method, Plasma synthetic jet, Shock wave/boundary layer interaction, Time resolved schlieren system

  13. [Research on Energy Distribution During Osteoarthritis Treatment Using Shock Wave Lithotripsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shinian; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave treatment is capable of providing a non-surgical and effective treatment modality for patients suffering from osteoarthritis. The major objective of current works is to investigate how the shock wave (SW) field would change if a bony structure exists in the path of the acoustic wave. Firstly, a model of finite element method (FEM) was developed based on Comsol software in the present study. Then, high-speed photography experiments were performed to record cavitation bubbles with the presence of mimic bone. On the basis of comparing experimental with simulated results, the effectiveness of FEM model could be verified. Finally, the energy distribution during extracorporeal shock wave treatment was predicted. The results showed that the shock wave field was deflected with the presence of bony structure and varying deflection angles could be observed as the bone shifted up in the z-direction relative to shock wave geometric focus. Combining MRI/CT scans to FEM modeling is helpful for better standardizing the treatment dosage and optimizing treatment protocols in the clinic.

  14. Standing Waves in an Elastic Spring: A Systematic Study by Video Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Daniel Rodrigues; de Carvalho, Paulo Simeão; Dias, Marco Adriano

    2017-04-01

    The word "wave" is part of the daily language of every student. However, the physical understanding of the concept demands a high level of abstract thought. In physics, waves are oscillating variations of a physical quantity that involve the transfer of energy from one point to another, without displacement of matter. A wave can be formed by an elastic deformation, a variation of pressure, changes in the intensity of electric or magnetic fields, a propagation of a temperature variation, or other disturbances. Moreover, a wave can be categorized as pulsed or periodic. Most importantly, conditions can be set such that waves interfere with one another, resulting in standing waves. These have many applications in technology, although they are not always readily identified and/or understood by all students. In this work, we use a simple setup including a low-cost constant spring, such as a Slinky, and the free software Tracker for video analysis. We show they can be very useful for the teaching of mechanical wave propagation and the analysis of harmonics in standing waves.

  15. Slow vs rapid delivery rate shock wave lithotripsy for pediatric renal urolithiasis: a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Hosni Khairy; Fathy, Hesham; Elfayoumy, Hanny; Aly, Hussein; Ghonium, Ahmed; Mohsen, Mostafa A; Hegazy, Abd El Rahim

    2014-05-01

    We compared slow vs fast shock wave frequency rates in disintegration of pediatric renal stones less than 20 mm. Our study included 60 children with solitary 10 to 20 mm radiopaque renal stones treated with shock wave lithotripsy. Patients were prospectively randomized into 2 groups, ie those undergoing lithotripsy at a rate of 80 shock waves per minute (group 1, 30 patients) and those undergoing lithotripsy at a rate of 120 shock waves per minute (group 2, 30 patients). The 2 groups were compared in terms of treatment success, anesthesia time, secondary procedures and efficiency quotient. Stone clearance rate was significantly higher in group 1 (90%) than in group 2 (73.3%, p = 0.025). A total of 18 patients in group 1 (60%) were rendered stone-free after 1 session, 8 required 2 sessions and 1 needed 3 sessions, while shock wave lithotripsy failed in 3 patients. By comparison, 8 patients (26.6%) in group 2 were rendered stone-free after 1 session, 10 (33.3%) required 2 sessions and 4 (13.3%) needed 3 sessions to become stone-free. Mean general anesthesia time was significantly longer in group 1 (p = 0.041). Postoperatively 2 patients in group 1 and 4 in group 2 suffered low grade fever (Clavien grade II). Significantly more secondary procedures (percutaneous nephrolithotomy, repeat shock wave lithotripsy) were required in group 2 (p = 0.005). The predominant stone analysis was calcium oxalate dihydrate in both groups. Efficiency quotient was 0.5869 and 0.3437 for group 1 and group 2, respectively (p = 0.0247). In children with renal stones slow delivery rates of shock wave lithotripsy have better results regarding stone clearance than fast delivery rates. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Steepening of kinetic magnetosonic waves into shocklets - Simulations and consequences for planetary shocks and comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, N.; Winske, D.

    1990-01-01

    The generation and the nonlinear evolution of oblique low-frequency electromagnetic (kinetic magnetosonic) waves which were observed upstream of planetary bow shocks and at the Giacobini-Zinner comet, and referred to as shocklets, were investigated using an electromagnetic hybrid code. The observations show that the waves, which have a sinusoidal form when their amplitude is small, become steepened and linearly polarized as they grow in amplitude. The results of simulations show the original small-amplitude elliptically polarized wave grows and steepens, so that its polarization changes and becomes somewhat linear. The steepening process is associated with the coherent generation of a broad spectrum of waves on the magnetosonic whistler branch, which propagate at various phase and group velocities. It is shown that the presence of shocklets upstream of a planetary bow shock can modify its local structure by changing the solar wind Mach number and temperature, or by colliding with the shock.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Rockburst Effect of Shock Wave on Underground Roadway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Ping Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using UDEC discrete element numerical simulation software and a cosine wave as vibration source, the whole process of rockburst failure and the propagation and attenuation characteristics of shock wave in coal-rock medium were investigated in detail based on the geological and mining conditions of 1111(1 working face at Zhuji coal mine. Simultaneously, by changing the thickness and strength of immediate roof overlying the mining coal seam, the whole process of rockburst failure of roadway and the attenuation properties of shock wave were understood clearly. The presented conclusions can provide some important references to prevent and control rockburst hazards triggered by shock wave interferences in deep coal mines.

  18. From coherent shocklets to giant collective incoherent shock waves in nonlocal turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Vocke, D.; Faccio, D.; Garnier, J.; Roger, T.; Trillo, S.; Picozzi, A.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding turbulent flows arising from random dispersive waves that interact strongly through nonlinearities is a challenging issue in physics. Here we report the observation of a characteristic transition: strengthening the nonlocal character of the nonlinear response drives the system from a fully turbulent regime, featuring a sea of coherent small-scale dispersive shock waves (shocklets) towards the unexpected emergence of a giant collective incoherent shock wave. The front of such global incoherent shock carries most of the stochastic fluctuations and is responsible for a peculiar folding of the local spectrum. Nonlinear optics experiments performed in a solution of graphene nano-flakes clearly highlight this remarkable transition. Our observations shed new light on the role of long-range interactions in strongly nonlinear wave systems operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium, which reveals analogies with, for example, gravitational systems, and establishes a new scenario that can be common to many turbulent flows in photonic quantum fluids, hydrodynamics and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  19. First-principle simulation of the acoustic radiation force on microparticles in ultrasonic standing waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Jakob Herring; Bruus, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The recent development in the field of microparticle acoutophoresis in microsystems has led to an increased need for more accurate theoretical predections for the acoustic radiation force on a single microparticle in an ultrasonic standing wave. Increasingly detailed analytical solutions of this ...

  20. Nanolithography with metastable helium atoms in a high-power standing-wave light field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petra, S.J.H.; Feenstra, L.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2004-01-01

    We have created periodic nanoscale structures in a gold substrate with a lithography process using metastable triplet helium atoms that damage a hydrophobic resist layer on top of the substrate. A beam of metastable helium atoms is transversely collimated and guided through an intense standing-wave

  1. Acoustic evaluation of wood quality in standing trees. Part I, Acoustic wave behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Peter Carter

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic wave velocities in standing trees or live softwood species were measured by the time-of-flight (TOF) method. Tree velocities were compared with acoustic velocities measured in corresponding butt logs through a resonance acoustic method. The experimental data showed a skewed relationship between tree and log acoustic measurements. For most trees tested,...

  2. Visualization of the cavitation bubbles produced by a clinical shock wave field using a micropulse LED light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gwansuk; Huh, Jung Sik; Choi, Min Joo

    2017-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy employs intense shock waves that produce cavitation bubbles understood to play an important role in therapeutic effects. This study considers shock-wave-induced cavitation bubbles, expected to be closely associated with treated therapeutic regions. A simple optical method was devised to visualize the cavitation bubbles under micropulse LED light illumination and to capture an afterimage of the bubbles for their entire lifetime from formation to collapse. The optical images of the cavitation bubbles produced by a clinical shock wave therapeutic device were shown to preserve the characteristics of the focusing shock wave field. The similarity of the characteristics may enable the cavitation cloud image to provide the intensity and location of shock wave irradiation for the clinical quality assurance of therapeutic devices. Further research that includes the dynamic effects in the static images of cavitation bubbles is suggested.

  3. Turbulence generation by a shock wave interacting with a random density inhomogeneity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete Ruiz de Lira, C.

    2010-12-01

    When a planar shock wave interacts with a random pattern of pre-shock density non-uniformities, it generates an anisotropic turbulent velocity/vorticity field. This turbulence plays an important role in the early stages of the mixing process in a compressed fluid. This situation emerges naturally in a shock interaction with weakly inhomogeneous deuterium-wicked foam targets in inertial confinement fusion and with density clumps/clouds in astrophysics. We present an exact small-amplitude linear theory describing such an interaction. It is based on the exact theory of time and space evolution of the perturbed quantities behind a corrugated shock front for a single-mode pre-shock non-uniformity. Appropriate mode averaging in two dimensions results in closed analytical expressions for the turbulent kinetic energy, degree of anisotropy of velocity and vorticity fields in the shocked fluid, shock amplification of the density non-uniformity and sonic energy flux radiated downstream. These explicit formulae are further simplified in the important asymptotic limits of weak/strong shocks and highly compressible fluids. A comparison with the related problem of a shock interacting with a pre-shock isotropic vorticity field is also presented.

  4. Effect of Pressure Gradients on the Initiation of PBX-9502 via Irregular (Mach) Reflection of Low Pressure Curved Shock Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence Mark [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Phillip Isaac [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moro, Erik Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    In the instance of multiple fragment impact on cased explosive, isolated curved shocks are generated in the explosive. These curved shocks propagate and may interact and form irregular or Mach reflections along the interaction loci, thereby producing a single shock that may be sufficient to initiate PBX-9501. However, the incident shocks are divergent and their intensity generally decreases as they expand, and the regions behind the Mach stem interaction loci are generally unsupported and allow release waves to rapidly affect the flow. The effects of release waves and divergent shocks may be considered theoretically through a “Shock Change Equation”.

  5. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953...

  6. Numerical study of heterogeneous mean temperature and shock wave in a resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Takeru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-10-28

    When a frequency of gas oscillation in an acoustic resonator is sufficiently close to one of resonant frequencies of the resonator, the amplitude of gas oscillation becomes large and hence the nonlinear effect manifests itself. Then, if the dissipation effects due to viscosity and thermal conductivity of the gas are sufficiently small, the gas oscillation may evolve into the acoustic shock wave, in the so-called consonant resonators. At the shock front, the kinetic energy of gas oscillation is converted into heat by the dissipation process inside the shock layer, and therefore the temperature of the gas in the resonator rises. Since the acoustic shock wave travels in the resonator repeatedly over and over again, the temperature rise becomes noticeable in due course of time even if the shock wave is weak. We numerically study the gas oscillation with shock wave in a resonator of square cross section by solving the initial and boundary value problem of the system of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with a finite difference method. In this case, the heat conduction across the boundary layer on the wall of resonator causes a spatially heterogeneous distribution of mean (time-averaged) gas temperature.

  7. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, SeokJoo; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Kwansub

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a conservative physical therapy group (n=10) and an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (n=10). Both groups received general conservative physical therapy, and the extracorporeal shock wave therapy was additionally treated with ext...

  8. Generation of spherical and cylindrical shock acoustic waves from optical breakdown in water, stimulated with femtosecond pulse

    OpenAIRE

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.; Podshivalov, A. A.; Gordienko, V. M.

    2014-01-01

    Using shadow photography technique we have observed shock acoustic wave from optical breakdown, excited in water by tightly focused Cr:Forsterite femtosecond laser beam, and have found two different regimes of shock wave generation by varying only the energy of laser pulse. At low energies a single spherical shock wave is generated from laser beam waist, and its radius tends to saturation with energy increasing. At higher energies long laser filament in water is fired, that leads to the cylin...

  9. C324 Study of micro-underwater shock waves induced by Q-switched Ho : YAG laser focusing

    OpenAIRE

    S. H. R., Hosseini; T., Hirano; K., Takayama; Department of Neurosurgery. School of Medicine. Tohoku University; Shock Wave Research Center. Institute of Fluid Science. Tohoku University

    2002-01-01

    Paper reports a quantitative study of underwater shock waves and cavity bubbles induced by direct irradiation of pulse laser beam. Energy source was a Q-switched Ho : YAG laser. The laser beam was focused and transmitted through an optical fiber. Double exposure holographic interferometry was used for flow visualization. The whole sequences of underwater shock waves generation and propagation were observed. The laser interaction produced micro plasma. which drove spherical shock wave in water...

  10. Dispersion of low frequency plasma waves upstream of the quasi-perpendicular terrestrial bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimmock

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency waves in the foot of a supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock front have been observed since the very early in situ observations of the terrestrial bow shock (Guha et al., 1972. The great attention that has been devoted to these type of waves since the first observations is explained by the key role attributed to them in the processes of energy redistribution in the shock front by various theoretical models. In some models, these waves play the role of the intermediator between the ions and electrons. It is assumed that they are generated by plasma instability that exist due to the counter-streaming flows of incident and reflected ions. In the second type of models, these waves result from the evolution of the shock front itself in the quasi-periodic process of steepening and overturning of the magnetic ramp. However, the range of the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame are not enough to distinguish the origin of the observed waves. It also requires the determination of the wave vectors and the plasma frame frequencies. Multipoint measurements within the wave coherence length are needed for an ambiguous determination of the wave vectors. In the main multi-point missions such as ISEE, AMPTE, Cluster and THEMIS, the spacecraft separation is too large for such a wave vector determination and therefore only very few case studies are published (mainly for AMPTE UKS AMPTE IRM pair. Here we present the observations of upstream low frequency waves by the Cluster spacecraft which took place on 19 February 2002. The spacecraft separation during the crossing of the bow shock was small enough to determine the wave vectors and allowed the identification of the plasma wave dispersion relation for the observed waves. Presented results are compared with whistler wave dispersion and it is shown that contrary to previous studies based on the AMPTE data, the phase velocity in the shock frame is directed downstream. The consequences of this

  11. Illustrations and Supporting Texts for Sound Standing Waves of Air Columns in Pipes in Introductory Physics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liang; Smith, Chris; Poelzer, G. Herold; Rodriguez, Jennifer; Corpuz, Edgar; Yanev, George

    2014-01-01

    In our pilot studies, we found that many introductory physics textbook illustrations with supporting text for sound standing waves of air columns in open-open, open-closed, and closed-closed pipes inhibit student understanding of sound standing wave phenomena due to student misunderstanding of how air molecules move within these pipes. Based on…

  12. Experiment and analysis of shock waves radiated from pulse laser focusing in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental understanding of shock and bubble dynamics in human tissues is essential to laser application for medical purposes. Here, we experimentally study the dynamics of shock waves in viscoelastic media. A nanosecond laser pulse of wavelength at 532 nm and of energy up to 2.66 +/- 0.09 mJ was focused through a microscope objective lens (10 x, NA = 0.30) into a gel of gelatin concentration at 3 and 10 wt%; a shock wave and a bubble can be generated, respectively, by rapid expansion of the laser-induced plasma and local heat deposition after the plasma recombines. The shock propagation and the bubble growth were recorded by a ultra-high-speed camera at 100 Mfps. The shock evolution was determined by image analysis of the recording and the shock pressure in the near field was computed according to the Rankine-Hugoniot relation. The far-field pressure was measured by a hydrophone. In the poster, we will present the decay rate of the shock pressure in the near and far fields and examine viscous effects on the shock dynamics. The Research Grant of Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science & Technology.

  13. On the Effects of Viscosity on the Shock Waves for a Hydrodynamical Case—Part I: Basic Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Cavus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of shock waves with viscosity is one of the central problems in the supersonic regime of compressible fluid flow. In this work, numerical solutions of unmagnetised fluid equations, with the viscous stress tensor, are investigated for a one-dimensional shock wave. In the algorithm developed the viscous stress terms are expressed in terms of the relevant Reynolds number. The algorithm concentrated on the compression rate, the entropy change, pressures, and Mach number ratios across the shock wave. The behaviour of solutions is obtained for the Reynolds and Mach numbers defining the medium and shock wave in the supersonic limits.

  14. In situ wave phenomena in the upstream and downstream regions of interplanetary shocks: Implications for type 2 burst theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Vinas, A. F.

    1997-01-01

    The results are presented of in situ waves observed by the Ulyssess unified radio and plasma wave experiment (URAP) in the upstream and downstream regions of a large number of interplanetary shocks. The Langmuir waves which are the most essential ingredients for the type 2 radio emission are observed only in the upstream regions of a limited number of shocks. On the other hand, the ion-acoustic-like waves (0.5 to 5 kHz) are observed near most of the interplanetary shocks. Implications of observations made for the electron acceleration mechanisms at the collisionless shocks and for type 2 burst theories are presented.

  15. Outcomes of Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Ureteroscopy for Treatment of Pediatric Urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejwani, Rohit; Wang, Hsin-Hsiao S; Wolf, Steven; Wiener, John S; Routh, Jonathan C

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has been commonly used to treat children with renal and ureteral calculi but recently ureteroscopy has been used more frequently. We examined postoperative outcomes from these 2 modalities in children. We reviewed linked inpatient, ambulatory surgery and emergency department data from 2007 to 2010 for 5 states to identify pediatric admissions for renal/ureteral calculi treated with shock wave lithotripsy or ureteroscopy. Unplanned readmissions, additional procedures and emergency room visits were extracted. Multivariate logistic regression using generalized estimating equations to adjust for hospital level clustering was performed. We identified 2,281 admissions (1,087 for shock wave lithotripsy and 1,194 for ureteroscopy). Ages of patients undergoing ureteroscopy and those undergoing shock wave lithotripsy were similar (median 17.0 years for both cohorts, p = 0.001) but patients were more likely to be female (63.4% vs 54.7%, p shock wave lithotripsy for initial pediatric stone intervention. Although repeat treatment rates did not differ between procedures, ureteroscopy patients were more likely to be seen at an emergency room or hospitalized within 30 days of the initial procedure. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in children: Results and short-term complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Lima, João Paulo; Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cristofani, Lílian Maria; Srougi, Miguel

    2007-08-01

    The introduction of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy represented an important evolution in urinary tract lithiasis management. The aim of this study is to describe the results of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for the treatment of urinary tract lithiasis in children, focusing on the index of elimination of the calculi and the complications occurring during the procedure and during the following three months. From September 1991 to July 2002, 135 children between one and 12 years, suffering from urinary tract lithiasis underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. A retrospective analysis of these patients was carried out. One hundred and ninety-five calculi ranging in size from 5.0 mm to 20.0 mm were treated, out of which 147 were found in the kidneys and 48 in the ureter. Urinary tract dilation was presented by 30% of the children at the time of the procedure. After extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy 75.8% of the calculi were eliminated: 64.1% were stone-free and 11.7% had pain. In children, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy proved to be able to eliminate 75.8% of the treated calculi and 83.7% of the patients presented a complete or partial response. Complications were observed in 23.7% of patients, and pain was the most frequent symptom.

  17. Incidence of infectious complications after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients without associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira Moreno, Alejandra; Montoya Lirola, María Dolores; García Tabar, Pedro José; Galiano Baena, Juan Francisco; Tenza Tenza, José Antonio; Lobato Encinas, Juan José

    2014-11-01

    We determined the incidence of infectious complications (asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection and urosepsis) in patients without associated risk factors treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. We performed an observational, prospective cohort study between October 2010 and June 2013. We included all patients without risk factors who were treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy for kidney or ureteral lithiasis. All patients underwent urine culture 5 days before the procedure. Another urine culture was performed 7 days after lithotripsy. No patient received antibiotics. Initially 366 patients with a mean ± SD age of 53 ± 13 years were enrolled in the study. A total of 64 patients (17.5%) underwent extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy with a previously placed Double-J® stent. After lithotripsy urine culture was positive in 20 patients (5.8%), of whom 4 (1.2%) presented with symptomatic urinary infection and the remaining 4.6% showed no symptoms. Urosepsis did not develop in any case. In our study patient age was an independent risk factor for bacteriuria after lithotripsy. The incidence of infectious complications after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients without risk factors is low. This leads us to conclude that without defined risk factors antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified. Also, elderly patients were more at risk for bacteriuria after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and, thus, for a possible infectious complication. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Modulus of Elasticity in Standing Trees and Sawn Wood in Populous deltoids using Nondestructive Stress Wave Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrab Madhoushi; Soheila Daneshvar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate relationship between dynamic modulus of elasticity (MOEd) in healthy standing trees of Populus deltoides and static modulus of elasticity (MOEs) of sawn lumber from the same standing trees, using nondestructive stress wave testing (NDT). For this purpose, NDT stress wave technique was used. The study was performed on 10 healthy standing trees of Populus deltoides. The diameter of trees at the breast height was selected at two categories, namely 25-30 cm a...

  19. Increased fragmentation efficiency by enhancement of cavitation for extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy; Steigerung der Fragmentationseffizienz durch Verstaerkung von Kavitation zur beruehrungsfreien Nierensteinzertruemmerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loske, A.M.; Fernandez, F. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, UNAM, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Gutierrez, J. [Univ. de Guadalajara, Nuevo Hospital Civil, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The non-invasive disintegration of kidney stones using shock waves, referred to as extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy, has been successful for more than twenty years in treating patients having renal and ureteral stones. Two modified shock wave generators are described in this article. The novel systems produce two similar shock waves (tandem shock waves) generated with a short time delay. The second shock wave arrives during collapse of the bubbles generated in the neighborhood of the stone due to the first shock wave. This may increase cavitation bubble collapse and could enhance cavitation-induced damage to kidney stones during shock wave lithotripsy. In vitro comparison of standard systems with the new designs showed that fragmentation efficiency of artificial kidney stones was significantly enhanced using tandem shock waves. (orig.)

  20. An FDTD-based computer simulation platform for shock wave propagation in electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Bülent; Çiftçi, Emre

    2013-06-01

    Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) is based on disintegration of the kidney stone by delivering high-energy shock waves that are created outside the body and transmitted through the skin and body tissues. Nowadays high-energy shock waves are also used in orthopedic operations and investigated to be used in the treatment of myocardial infarction and cancer. Because of these new application areas novel lithotriptor designs are needed for different kinds of treatment strategies. In this study our aim was to develop a versatile computer simulation environment which would give the device designers working on various medical applications that use shock wave principle a substantial amount of flexibility while testing the effects of new parameters such as reflector size, material properties of the medium, water temperature, and different clinical scenarios. For this purpose, we created a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD)-based computational model in which most of the physical system parameters were defined as an input and/or as a variable in the simulations. We constructed a realistic computational model of a commercial electrohydraulic lithotriptor and optimized our simulation program using the results that were obtained by the manufacturer in an experimental setup. We, then, compared the simulation results with the results from an experimental setup in which oxygen level in water was varied. Finally, we studied the effects of changing the input parameters like ellipsoid size and material, temperature change in the wave propagation media, and shock wave source point misalignment. The simulation results were consistent with the experimental results and expected effects of variation in physical parameters of the system. The results of this study encourage further investigation and provide adequate evidence that the numerical modeling of a shock wave therapy system is feasible and can provide a practical means to test novel ideas in new device design procedures

  1. On mechanism of non-heating sterilization using the underwater shock wave loading and gas formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Takemoto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the field where the thermal sterilization can’t be applied, the establishment of the sterilization technology with non-heating is strongly requested. The sterilization by pressurizing is one of the sterilization technology. Especially, the underwater shock wave causes scarcely heat in pressurizing because the pressurizing time is extremely short. That is, it is thought that the underwater shock wave enables non-heating sterilization that originates only in pressure. Hence, in this research, the underwater shock wave loading caused by explosive was used for non-heating sterilization. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the budding yeast was used for experiments. S. cerevisiae starts fermentation by feeding the glucose, and causes CO2 within its body. There is the great density difference between cells of S. cerevisiae and the gas, hence, the acoustic impedance is different on the underwater shock wave transmission. Therefore, a strong reflected wave is caused on the boundary of the cell and the gas, and a remarkable expansion is caused. Fermented S. cerevisiae are sterilized by this phenomenon, and showed high sterilization rates. The sterilization rate by the underwater shock wave was low for not giving the glucose, that is, S. cerevisiae that had not fermented. The sterilization rate that had been done on three conditions was as follows in the order of higher. 1 Fermenting S. cerevisiae, high pressure. 2 Fermenting S. cerevisiae, low pressure. 3 Non-fermenting S. cerevisiae, high pressure. The detonation fuse was used in this experiment. There was an interesting phenomenon, that is, the sterilization rate was high at the side of detonation beginning, and it was decreased toward the direction. It is thought that this is related to a constant angle of the shock wave caused from the detonation fuse. A corresponding result to the phenomenon was gotten by the numerical analysis between the progress of the detonation and the change of pressure.

  2. Constrained reaction volume approach for studying chemical kinetics behind reflected shock waves

    KAUST Repository

    Hanson, Ronald K.

    2013-09-01

    We report a constrained-reaction-volume strategy for conducting kinetics experiments behind reflected shock waves, achieved in the present work by staged filling in a shock tube. Using hydrogen-oxygen ignition experiments as an example, we demonstrate that this strategy eliminates the possibility of non-localized (remote) ignition in shock tubes. Furthermore, we show that this same strategy can also effectively eliminate or minimize pressure changes due to combustion heat release, thereby enabling quantitative modeling of the kinetics throughout the combustion event using a simple assumption of specified pressure and enthalpy. We measure temperature and OH radical time-histories during ethylene-oxygen combustion behind reflected shock waves in a constrained reaction volume and verify that the results can be accurately modeled using a detailed mechanism and a specified pressure and enthalpy constraint. © 2013 The Combustion Institute.

  3. Elastic precursor shock waves in tantalum at very high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowhurst, Jonathan; Armstrong, Michael; Gates, Sean; Radousky, Harry; Zaug, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    We have obtained data from micron-thick tantalum films using our ultrafast laser shock platform. By measuring free surface velocity time histories at breakout, and shock wave arrival times at different film thicknesses, we have been able to estimate the dependence of particle and shock velocities on propagation distances and strain rates. We will show how elastic precursor shock waves depend on strain rate in the regime up to and above 109 s-1. We find that while elastic amplitudes are very large at very early times decay occurs rapidly as propagation distance increases. Finally we will consider the prospects for using these data to obtain the dynamic strength of tantalum at these very high strain rates. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 with Laboratory directed Research and Development funding (12ERD042).

  4. Database for properties of materials studied in experiments using shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhernokletov, M. V.; Trunin, R. F.; Gudarenko, L. F.; Trushchin, V. D.; Gushchina, O. N.

    1997-07-01

    During nearly 50-year period of development of the dynamic methods for studying material properties Russia accumulated a large amount of experimental data for more than 200 individual materials, compounds, condensed media and gases. Practically all the information is obtained at RFNC-VNIIEF. For the accumulated experimental data systematization and visualization the database being presented was developed. At its development DBMS Paradox for Windows was used. The database is a set of interconnected tables storing: the data for shock compression of continuous materials; the data for shock compression of heated materials; the data for shock compression of porous materials; the data for shock compression of materials by the second shock wave; expansion adiabats of shock-compressed continuous materials; expansion adiabats of shock-compressed porous materials; the data for the rate of scattering of shock-compressed materials to air; the data for sound speed in shock-compressed materials. Currently the database stores the data for the following material types: metals; metal hydrides and nitrides; carbides and oxides; mixtures; solid organic materials; alkali metal halogenides; minerals and rocks; water and saturated water solutions of salts; organic liquids. As the data is (and will be) transferred to the Experimental data base from a great number of various sources (papers and reports), it also stores the complete list of these sources.

  5. Acceleration time scale for the first-order Fermi acceleration in relativistic shock waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bednarz, J.; Ostrowski, M.

    1996-01-01

    The acceleration time scale for the process of first-order Fermi acceleration in relativistic shock waves with oblique magnetic field configurations is investigated by the method of Monte Carlo particle simulations. We demonstrate the presence of correlation between the particle energy gain at interaction with the shock and the respective time elapsed since the previous interaction. Because of that any derivation of the acceleration time scale can not use the distribution of energy gains and ...

  6. The Formation of Massive Molecular Filaments and Massive Stars Triggered by a MHD Shock Wave

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hennebelle, Patrick; Fukui, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Iwasaki, Kazunari; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that intensive molecular cloud collision can trigger massive star/cluster formation. The most important physical process caused by the collision is a shock compression. In this paper, the influence of a shock wave on the evolution of a molecular cloud is studied numerically by using isothermal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with the effect of self-gravity. Adaptive-mesh-refinement and sink particle techniques are used to follow long-time evolution of the sh...

  7. A new mathematical approach for shock-wave solution in a dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, G.C.; Dwivedi, C.B. [Plasma Physics Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Khanapara, Guwahati-781022, Assam (India); Talukdar, M. [Computer Science Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Khanapara, Guwahati-781022, Assam (India); Sarma, J. [Department of Mathematics, R. G. Baruah College, Guwahati-781025, Assam (India)

    1997-12-01

    The problem of nonlinear Burger equation in a plasma contaminated with heavy dust grains has been revisited. As discussed earlier [C. B. Dwivedi and B. P. Pandey, Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 9 (1995)], the Burger equation originates due to dust charge fluctuation dynamics. A new alternate mathematical approach based on a simple traveling wave formalism has been applied to find out the solution of the derived Burger equation, and the method recovers the known shock-wave solution. This technique, although having its own limitation, predicts successfully the salient features of the weak shock-wave structure in a dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation dynamics. It is emphasized that this approach of the traveling wave formalism is being applied for the first time to solve the nonlinear wave equation in plasmas. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Low-frequency shock waves in a magnetized superthermal dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, B. S.; Ghai, Yashika; Saini, N. S.

    2017-09-01

    The characteristics of low-frequency shocks in a magnetized dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust fluid, kappa-distributed electrons and ions have been investigated. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries-Burgers (KdV-B) equation which governs the dynamics of the dust acoustic (DA) shock waves is derived. The characteristics of shock structures are studied under the influence of various plasma parameters, viz. superthermality of ions, magnetic field, electron-to-dust-density ratio, kinematic viscosity, ion-to-electron-temperature ratio and obliqueness. The combined effects of these physical parameters significantly influence the characteristics of DA shock structures. It is observed that only negative potential shocks exist in a plasma environment comprising of dust fluid and superthermal electrons and ions such as that of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  9. Enhanced shock wave detection sensitivity for laser-produced plasmas in low pressure ambient gases using interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, P.; Kelly, T. J.; Fallon, C.; McLoughlin, C.; Hayden, P.; Kennedy, E. T.; Mosnier, J. P.; Harilal, S. S.; Costello, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    We report results from the analysis of the shock wave formed following the creation of a laser-produced plasma in a gaseous atmosphere, using both interferometry and shadowgraphy. A Nomarski polarization interferometer and a focused-type shadowgraphy setup were utilized to track the evolution of the shock wave with high spatial and temporal resolution for a variety of incident laser energies and ambient gas pressures. It was found that the visibility of the shock wave was high for both techniques at high gas pressure (⩾100 mbar) and incident laser energies (⩾400 mJ). The velocity of the shock wave in these regimes was of the order of several km s-1. At lower pressures (≈ 1-10 mbar) and incident laser energies (≈ 100-200 mJ), the visibility of the shock wave decreased dramatically and, in some cases, disappeared completely from the shadowgrams. In contrast, the shock wave remained visible in the interferograms, manifesting itself as a blurring of the fringes. The shock wave visibility was improved further by simply differentiating the interferograms to enhance the fringe boundaries. Shock velocities, exceeding 100 km s-1, were detected at low background gas pressures where the enhanced shock wave visibility was provided by the interferometer.

  10. Fourth American Physical Society Topical Conference on Shock Waves in Condensed Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Shock Waves in Condensed Matter

    1986-01-01

    The Fourth American Physical Society Topical Conference on Shock Waves in Condensed Matter was held in Spokane, Washington, July 22-25, 1985. Two hundred and fifty scientists and engineers representing thirteen countries registered at the conference. The countries represented included the United States of America, Australia, Canada, The People's Repub­ lic of China, France, India, Israel, Japan, Republic of China (Taiwan), United Kingdom, U. S. S. R, Switzerland and West Germany. One hundred and sixty-two technical papers, cov­ ering recent developments in shock wave and high pressure physics, were presented. All of the abstracts have been published in the September 1985 issue of the Bulletin of the American Physical Society. The topical conferences, held every two years since 1979, have become the principal forum for shock wave studies in condensed materials. Both formal and informal technical discussions regarding recent developments conveyed a sense of excitement. Consistent with the past conferences, th...

  11. Development of the rice-powder manufacturing system using underwater shock wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Shimojima

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-sufficiency in food is very low (about 40% in Japan. Therefore, the rice powder is paid to attention because it can be processed to the udon (noodle and bread etc. We has already developed the rice-powder disintegrator using the underwater shock wave by the electrode. But it has not been cleared what is the most suitable pressure vessel. The purpose of this study is to investigate the most suitable configuration of the pressure vessels for manufacturing the rice-powder using the underwater shock wave. Experimental conditions to manufacture the rice-powder (particle size is 100 μm is clarified using this device. Moreover, the manufacturing efficiency of the rice-powder, the relation between the number of the shock wave generation and the grain degree of rice-powder is clarified.

  12. Knee joint angle of intracerebral hemorrhage-induced rats after extracorporeal shock wave therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact on rat knee joints of extracorporeal shock wave therapy after experimentally induced intracerebral hemorrhage. [Subjects and Methods] Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into an experimental group that received extracorporeal shock wave therapy after central nervous system injury (n=10) and a control group that did not receive any therapeutic intervention after central nervous system injury (n=10). The Dartfish program was used to evaluate the SD rats’ locomotion. [Results] There was a significant difference between the control group and the experimental group in the change of knee joint angle during midstance after the intervention. [Conclusion] In conclusion, at extracorporeal shock wave therapy for central nervous system injury was confirmed to be effective at reducing knee joint angle, confirming it is a good physical therapy intervention, based on its efficacy. PMID:27942132

  13. Optodynamic characterization of shock waves after laser-induced breakdown in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkovsek, Rok; Mozina, Janez; Mocnik, Grisa

    2005-05-30

    Plasma and a cavitation bubble develop at the site of laser-induced breakdown in water. Their formation and the propagation of the shock wave were monitored by a beam-deflection probe and an arm-compensated interferometer. The interferometer part of the setup was used to determine the relative position of the laser-induced breakdown. The time-of-flight data from the breakdown site to the probe beam yielded the velocity, and from the velocity the shock-wave pressure amplitudes were calculated. Two regions were found where the pressure decays with different exponents, pointing to a strong attenuation mechanism in the initial phase of the shock-wave propagation.

  14. Compressibility and shock wave interaction effects on free shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimy, M.; Erwin, D. E.; Elliott, G. S.

    1989-01-01

    Two compressible free shear layers with convective Mach numbers of .51 and .86 were studied as baseline configurations to investigate the effects of compressibility on the turbulence characteristics. These shear layers were then disturbed by the placement of an obstruction in the shear layer in an attempt to enhance the shear layer growth rate. These models produced a curved shock in the supersonic side of the shear layer. The results indicate a significant reduction in turbulence levels with increased compressibility. However, there are not any significant changes due to the bow shock interaction with the shear layer.

  15. Redirection of the spherical expanding shock wave on the interface with plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S. [Physics Department, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    We study a strong spherical expanding shock wave interacting with the finite-gradient interface between neutral cold gas and weakly ionized plasma. We want to see how the interaction with the interface can alter the shock structure compared to the case of its free propagation through the media with the exponentially varying density. From our comparative calculations based on the 2D model, we found substantial difference in the shock structure including strong deformation of the shock front followed with its gradual flattening and the redirection in its propagation. There are a number of factors that can be used to control this phenomenon in order to strengthen or lessen the effect. The calculations can be made on any scale, limited with the requirement for the shock wave to be strong. The study points at the possibility in certain applications to avoid the shock wave with its redirection rather than attenuation. The results can be applicable to optimization of the energy deposition into the supersonic flux, the drag reduction in hypersonic flight, in the detonation theory, and combustion through the control of the ignition conditions, and for environmental improvements through sonic boom reduction. Cartesian coordinates were used in order to visualize the phenomenon.

  16. Shock wave emission upon spherical bubble collapse during cavitation-induced megasonic surface cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsier, V; Proost, J

    2008-04-01

    When a gas bubble in a liquid interacts with an acoustic wave near a solid surface, the bubble first expands and then collapses. In this paper, a mathematical framework combining the Gilmore model and the method of characteristics is presented to model the shock wave emitted at the end of the bubble collapse. It allows to describe the liquid velocity at the shock front as a function of the radial distance to the bubble center in the case of spherical bubble collapse. Numerical calculations of the liquid velocity at the shock front have shown that this velocity increases with the acoustic amplitude and goes through a maximum as a function of the initial bubble radius. Calculations for different gas state equations inside the bubble show that the Van der Waals law predicts a slightly higher liquid velocity at the shock front than when considering a perfect gas law. Finally, decreasing the value of the surface tension at the bubble/liquid interface results in an increase of the liquid velocity at the shock front. Our calculations indicate that the strength of the shock waves emitted upon spherical bubble collapse can cause delamination of typical device structures used in microelectronics.

  17. Self-oscillation of standing spin wave in ring resonator with proportional-integral-derivative control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B.; Urazuka, Y.; Chen, H.; Oyabu, S.; Otsuki, H.; Tanaka, T., E-mail: t-tanaka@ed.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Matsuyama, K. [ISEE, Kyushu University, Motooka 744, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We report on numerical analysis on self-oscillation of standing spin wave excited in a nanostructured active ring resonator, consists of a ferromagnetic nanowire with perpendicular anisotropy. The confined resonant modes are along the nanowire length. A positive feedback with proportional-integral-derivative gain control was adopted in the active ring. Stable excitation of the 1st order standing spin wave has been demonstrated with micromagnetic simulations, taking into account the thermal effect with a random field model. The stationary standing spin wave with a pre-determined set variable of precession amplitude was attained within 20 ns by optimizing the proportional-integral-derivative gain control parameters. The result indicates that a monochromatic oscillation frequency f{sub osc} is extracted from the initial thermal fluctuation state and selectively amplified with the positive feedback loop. The obtained f{sub osc} value of 5.22 GHz practically agrees with the theoretical prediction from dispersion relation of the magneto static forward volume wave. It was also confirmed that the f{sub osc} change due to the temperature rise can be compensated with an external perpendicular bias field H{sub b}. The observed quick compensation time with an order of nano second suggests the fast operation speed in the practical device application.

  18. Heat transfer from vapor condensation in the region behind a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasunori; Oshiro, Naoto

    1989-06-01

    A series of experiments were conducted on shock wave propagation in a single-component two-phase(vapor-liquid) medium. A heat transfer mechanism in the flow field associated with vapor condensation behind a shock front was investigated. Measurements of pressure and temperature were made by conventional sensors and the flow field was visualized by schlieren photographs with the aid of high speed drum camera. Refrigerant-11 and benzene were used as a working fluid under a large void fraction of almost 100 percent. A flow field realized behind a shock front revealed significant features of ineffective compressibility and complicated flow patterns, which are largely different from those of pure gases.

  19. EFFECT OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPYVERSUS CORTICOSTEROID INJECTION IN MANAGEMENT OFKNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Elerian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: knee Osteoarthritis is the most common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Shockwaves have been used as an alternative treatment for musculoskeletal disorders; intra-articular injection of steroid is a common treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of Shock wave therapy versus Corticosteroid intra articular injection in case of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients were diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis; they were included in the study. Their ages were 43:65 years with mean age 50 ± 3.5 years. Patients were divided randomly into three equal groups, group (A received shock wave therapy, group (B received two intra-articular injections of corticosteroid at 1-month intervals and group (C received sham shock wave. The outcome measurements were Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC values, knee ROM, and pain severity using the visual analogue scale (VAS were recorded. The patients were evaluated for these parameters before allocated in their groups then after 1, 2, and 6months later. Results: compared to sham group there were significant improvement of VAS and ROM of shock wave group and corticosteroid injection group than sham (placebo group (p<0.000, (p<0.006, and 0.02 respectively. Furthermore there was significant improve of shock wave group than corticosteroid injection group where p was <0.000 for VAS, ROM and (WOMAC. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that shock wave therapy may provide effective modality for relieving pain, increase Range of motion and improve function in knee osteoarthritis patient than intra articular corticosteroid injection.

  20. Molecular modeling of transmembrane delivery of paclitaxel by shock waves with nanobubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue-mei; Yuan, Bing; Zhang, Xian-ren; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    The development of advanced delivery strategies for anticancer drugs that can permeate through cellular membranes is urgently required for biomedical applications. In this work, we investigated the dynamic transmembrane behavior of paclitaxel (PTX), a powerful anticancer drug, under the combined impact of shock waves and nanobubbles, by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations show that the PTX molecule experiences complicated motion modes during the action process with the membrane, as a consequence of its interplay with the lipid bilayer and water, under the joint effect of the shock wave and nanobubble. Moreover, it was found that the transmembrane movement of PTX is closely associated with the conformation changes of PTX, as well as the structural changes of the membrane (e.g., compression and poration in membrane). The nanobubble collapse induced by the shock wave, the proper PTX location with respect to the nanobubble, and a suitable nanobubble size and shock impulse are all necessary for the delivery of PTX into the cell. This work provides a molecular understanding of the interaction mechanism between drug molecules and cell membranes under the influence of shock waves and nanobubbles, and paves the way for exploiting targeted drug delivery systems that combine nanobubbles and ultrasound.

  1. Development of Laser-induced Grating Spectroscopy for Underwater Temperature Measurement in Shock Wave Focusing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gasdynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results may be used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cells which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  2. Increased Risk of New-Onset Hypertension After Shock Wave Lithotripsy in Urolithiasis: A Nationwide Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Wei; Tsai, Chung-You; Wang, Jui; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Chen, Pei-Chun; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2017-10-01

    Although shock wave lithotripsy is minimally invasive, earlier studies argued that it may increase patients' subsequent risk of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This study evaluated the association between shock wave lithotripsy and new-onset hypertension or diabetes mellitus. The Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database was used to identify 20 219 patients aged 18 to 65 years who underwent the first stone surgical treatment (shock wave lithotripsy or ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy) between January 1999 and December 2011. A Cox proportional model was applied to evaluate associations. Time-varying Cox models were applied to evaluate the association between the number of shock wave lithotripsy sessions and the incidence of hypertension or diabetes mellitus. After a median follow-up of 74.9 and 82.6 months, 2028 and 688 patients developed hypertension in the shock wave lithotripsy and ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy groups, respectively. Patients who underwent shock wave lithotripsy had a higher probability of developing hypertension than patients who underwent ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy, with a hazard ratio of 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.31) after adjusting for covariates. The risk increased as the number of shock wave lithotripsy sessions increased. However, the diabetes mellitus risk was similar in the shock wave lithotripsy and ureterorenoscopic lithotripsy groups. Furthermore, the hazard ratio did not increase as the number of shock wave lithotripsy sessions increased. Shock wave lithotripsy consistently increased the incidence of hypertension on long-term follow-up. Therefore, alternatives to urolithiasis treatment (eg, endoscopic surgery or medical expulsion therapy) could avoid the hypertension risk. Furthermore, avoiding multiple sessions of shock wave lithotripsy could also evade the hypertension risk. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Cosmic Rays Accelerated at Cosmological Shock Waves Renyi Ma1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on hydrodynamic numerical simulations and diffusive shock acceleration model, we calculated the ratio of cosmic ray (CR) to thermal energy. We found that the CR fraction can be less than ∼ 0.1 in the intracluster medium, while it would be of order unity in the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Key words.

  4. The distant bow shock and magnetotail of Venus - Magnetic field and plasma wave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Elphic, R. C.; Scarf, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    An examination of the magnetic field and plasma wave data obtained by the Pioneer Venus orbiter in the wake region behind Venus discloses a well developed bow shock whose location is similar to that observed on previous missions in contrast to the dayside bow shock. Venus also has a well developed magnetotail in which the field strenght is enhanced over magnetosheath values and in which the magnetic field is aligned approximately with the solar wind direction. The boundary between magnetosheath and magnetotail is also marked by a change in the plasma wave spectrum.

  5. Can cellulite be treated with low-energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angehrn, Fiorenzo; Kuhn, Christoph; Voss, Axel

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates the effects of low-energy defocused extracorporeal generated shock waves on collagen structure of cellulite afflicted skin. Cellulite measurement using high-resolution ultrasound technology was performed before and after low-energy defocused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in 21 female subjects. ESWT was applied onto the skin at the lateral thigh twice a week for a period of six weeks. Results provide evidence that low-energy defocused ESWT caused remodeling of the collagen within the dermis of the tested region. Improving device-parameters and therapy regimes will be essential for future development of a scientific based approach to cellulite treatment. PMID:18225463

  6. Study of thin-walled structure behavior under shock-wave loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, M. N.; Adishchev, V. V.; Fedorova, N. N.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental and numerical investigation of the deformation process of duraluminium plates under the action of a shock wave formed as a result of the explosion of a condensed explosive. The character of the deformation and destruction of the plate fixed along the perimeter is determined. It is shown that the plate is deformed according to the "envelope" scheme. The residual plastic deformation of the plate is determined. The shock wave load is described by semi-empirical dependences. The results of the calculations coincide with the experimental data.

  7. Formation of shock waves in a discharge plasma in the presence of a magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurbanismailov, V. S., E-mail: vali-60@mail.ru; Omarov, O. A.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.; Abakarova, Kh. M.; Abbas Ali, Ali Rafid [Dagestan State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    The effect of an external magnetic field on the dynamics of shock waves generated in an argon plasma due to both explosive processes on the cathode and expansion of the spark channel has been studied experimentally. It is shown that the expanding plasma of the cathode spot forms a shock wave and that the application of a longitudinal magnetic field decelerates the radial expansion of the cathode plasma. It is found that the intensities of some argon spectral lines increase in the presence of a magnetic field.

  8. Consolidation of Bimetallic Nanosized Particles and Formation of Nanocomposites Depending on Conditions of Shock Wave Compaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorozhtsov, S. A.; Kudryashova, O. B.; Lerner, M. I.; Vorozhtsov, A. B.; Khrustalyov, A. P.; Pervikov, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    The authors consider and evaluate the physical parameters and regularities of the process of consolidation of Fe-Cu, Cu-Nb, Ag-Ni, Fe-Pb nanoparticles when creating composite materials by means of shock wave compaction. As a result of theoretical consideration of explosive compaction process, researchers established and discussed the physical process conditions, established a number of threshold pressure values corresponding to different target indicators of the state of the compact. The time of shock wave impact on powders for powder consolidation was estimated.

  9. Self-similar shock wave solutions of the non-linear Maxwell equations

    CERN Document Server

    Barna, I F

    2013-01-01

    In our study we consider nonlinear, power-law field-dependent electrical permitivity and magnetic permeability and investigate the time-dependent Maxwell equations with the self-similar Ansatz. This is a first-order hyperbolic PDE system which can conserve non-continuous initial conditions describing electromagnetic shock-waves. Besides shock-waves other interesting solutions (e.g. with localized compact support) can be found with delicate physical properties. Such phenomena may happen in complex materials induced by the planned powerful Extreme Light Infrastructure(ELI) laser pulses.

  10. Numerical investigation on the shock wave transition in a three-dimensional scramjet isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Zhen-guo; Pourkashanian, Mohamed; Ma, Lin; Ingham, Derek B.; Luo, Shi-bin; Lei, Jing; Liu, Jun

    2011-06-01

    The scramjet isolator, which is used to prevent the hypersonic inlet from disturbances that arise from the pressure rise in the scramjet combustor due to the intense turbulent combustion, is one of the most critical components in hypersonic airbreathing propulsion systems. Any engineering error that is possible in the design and manufacturing procedure of the experimental model, and the intense heat release in the scramjet combustor, may cause the performance of the isolator to decrease, leading to its lack of capability in supporting the back pressure. The coupled implicit Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and the two-equation standard k- ɛ turbulent model have been employed to numerically simulate the flow fields in a three-dimensional scramjet isolator. The effects of the divergent angle and the back pressure on the shock wave transition and the location of the leading edge of the shock wave train have been estimated and discussed. The obtained results show that the present numerical results are in very good agreement with the available experimental shadow-pictures, and the numerical method is more suitable for capturing the shock wave train and predicting the location of the leading edge of the shock wave train in the scramjet isolator than the present two-dimensional numerical methods. This is due to the small width-to-height ratio of the isolator and the intense three-dimensional flow structures. On increasing the divergent angle of the scramjet isolator, the static pressure along the central symmetrical line of the isolator decreases sharply. This is due to the strong expansion wave generated at the entrance of the isolator, and when the divergent angle of the isolator is sufficiently large, namely 1.5°, a zone of negative pressure is formed just ahead of the leading edge of the shock wave train. At the same time, the shock wave train varies from being oblique to being normal, and then back to oblique. With an increase in the prescribed back

  11. Effect of particle momentum transfer on an oblique-shock-wave/laminar-boundary-layer interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, E.-J.; Johansen, C. T.

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations of solid particles seeded into a supersonic flow containing an oblique shock wave reflection were performed. The momentum transfer mechanism between solid and gas phases in the shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction was studied by varying the particle size and mass loading. It was discovered that solid particles were capable of significant modulation of the flow field, including suppression of flow separation. The particle size controlled the rate of momentum transfer while the particle mass loading controlled the magnitude of momentum transfer. The seeding of micro- and nano-sized particles upstream of a supersonic/hypersonic air-breathing propulsion system is proposed as a flow control concept.

  12. Optoheterodyne Doppler measurements of the ballistic expansion of the products of the shock wave-induced surface destruction: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andriyash, A. V. [All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Astashkin, M. V.; Baranov, V. K.; Golubinskii, A. G.; Irinichev, D. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation); Kondrat’ev, A. N., E-mail: an.kondratev@physics.msu.ru; Kuratov, S. E. [All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Mazanov, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation); Rogozkin, D. B. [All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation); Stepushkin, S. N.; Khatunkin, V. Yu. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF) (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The results of optoheterodyne Doppler measurements of the ballistic expansion of the products of surface destruction under shock-wave loading are presented. The possibility of determining the physical characteristics of a rapidly flying dust cloud, including the microparticle velocities, the microparticle sizes, and the areal density of the dust cloud, is shown. A compact stand for performing experiments on shock-wave loading of metallic samples is described. Shock-wave loading is performed by a 100-µm-thick tantalum flyer plate accelerated to a velocity of 2.8 km/s. As the samples, lead plates having various thicknesses and the same surface roughness are used. At a shock-wave pressure of 31.5 GPa, the destruction products are solid microparticles about 50 µm in size. At a pressure of 42 and 88 GPa, a liquid-drop dust cloud with a particle size of 10–15 µm is formed. To interpret the spectral data on the optoheterodyne Doppler measurements of the expansion of the surface destruction products (spalled fragments, dust microparticles), a transport equation for the function of mutual coherence of a multiply scattered field is used. The Doppler spectra of a backscattered signal are calculated with the model developed for the dust cloud that appears when a shock wave reaches the sample surface at the parameters that are typical of an experimental situation. Qualitative changes are found in the spectra, depending on the optical thickness of the dust cloud. The obtained theoretical results are in agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Photoacoustic shock wave emission and cavitation from structured optical fiber tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Gonzalez Avila, Silvestre Roberto; Wan, Yin Chi; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Fiber optics are used in medicine to deliver laser pulses for microsurgery. Upon absorption of a high-power laser pulse, a thermoelastic wave is emitted from the fiber tip. If a flat cleaved fiber is used, the photoacoustic field comprises a planar compressive shock wave and a tensile diffraction wave from the tip edge. Here we demonstrate that by modifying the geometry of a fiber tip, multiple shock waves can be generated from a single laser pulse. Flat cleaved fibers generate tension only along the fiber axis and with one compression-tension cycle from a laser pulse; however, structured fiber tips cause significant tension both along and off-axis, and generate multiple pressure cycles from a single laser pulse. Fast flash photography reveals that diffraction waves from the edges of the tip structures overlap and generate enough tension to form cavitation clouds. We numerically solve the linear wave equation to model the acoustic transients of structured fiber tips and achieve good agreement with pressure measurements from a fiber optic hydrophone. Multiple shock wave emission from a single laser pulse introduces structured fiber tips as a candidate to deliver histotripsy effects via a surgical catheter for micro-scale ablation of soft tissue.

  14. Measurements of the Poynting vector of standing hydromagnetic waves at geosynchronous orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, W. D.; Deforest, S. E.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The observation is discussed of a train of hydromagnetic waves with a period of about 150 sec seen at synchronous orbit by the ATS 6 spacecraft on June 27, 1974. The critical observation is a phase shift of 90 deg between east-west oscillations of the particle flow and the east-west component of magnetic field oscillations. This phase shift alone suggests a standing rather than a propagating hydromagnetic wave. Careful processing of the particle data makes it possible to determine the drift velocity and hence the electric field of the wave. The wave electric field together with the time-varying magnetic field reveals an oscillating Poynting vector with zero mean component aligned with the ambient magnetic field and nonzero azimuthal (westward) component.

  15. On an efficient shock wave generation mechanism in the quiet solar transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunin-Barkovskaya, O. V.; Somov, B. V.

    2017-08-01

    Two competing fundamental hypotheses are usually postulated in the solar coronal heating problem: heating by nanoflares and heating by waves. In the latter it is assumed that acoustic and magnetohydrodynamic disturbances whose amplitude grows as they propagate in a medium with a decreasing density come from the convection zone. The shock waves forming in the process heat up the corona. In this paper we draw attention to yet another very efficient shock wave generation process that can be realized under certain conditions typical for quiet regions on the Sun. In the approximation of stationary dissipative hydrodynamics we show that a shock wave can be generated in the quiet solar chromosphere-corona transition region by the fall of plasma from the corona into the chromosphere. This shock wave is directed upward, and its dissipation in the corona returns part of the kinetic energy of the falling plasma to the thermal energy of the corona. We discuss the prospects for developing a quantitative nonstationary model of the phenomenon.

  16. Development and performance evaluation of an electromagnetic-type shock wave generator for lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, S M; Chang, M H; Yang, Z Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at the design and development of electromagnetic-type intermittent shock wave generation in a liquid. The shock wave generated is focused at a focal point through an acoustic lens. This hardware device mainly consists of a full-wave bridge rectifier, 6 capacitors, a spark gap, and a flat coil. A metal disk is mounted in a liquid-filled tube and is placed in close proximity to the flat coil. Due to the repulsive force existing between the coil and disk shock waves are generated, while an eddy current is induced in the metal disk. Some components and materials associated with the device are also described. By increasing the capacitance content to enhance electric energy level, a highly focused pressure can be achieved at the focal point through an acoustic lens in order to lyse fat tissue. Focused pressures were measured at the focal point and its vicinity for different operation voltages. The designed shock wave generator with an energy intensity of 0.0016 mJ/mm(2) (at 4 kV) and 2000 firings or higher energy intensities with 1000 firings is found to be able to disrupt pig fat tissue.

  17. SHOCKFIND - an algorithm to identify magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in turbulent clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Andrew; Federrath, Christoph; Wardle, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The formation of stars occurs in the dense molecular cloud phase of the interstellar medium. Observations and numerical simulations of molecular clouds have shown that supersonic magnetized turbulence plays a key role for the formation of stars. Simulations have also shown that a large fraction of the turbulent energy dissipates in shock waves. The three families of MHD shocks - fast, intermediate and slow - distinctly compress and heat up the molecular gas, and so provide an important probe of the physical conditions within a turbulent cloud. Here, we introduce the publicly available algorithm, SHOCKFIND, to extract and characterize the mixture of shock families in MHD turbulence. The algorithm is applied to a three-dimensional simulation of a magnetized turbulent molecular cloud, and we find that both fast and slow MHD shocks are present in the simulation. We give the first prediction of the mixture of turbulence-driven MHD shock families in this molecular cloud, and present their distinct distributions of sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers. Using subgrid one-dimensional models of MHD shocks we estimate that ˜0.03 per cent of the volume of a typical molecular cloud in the Milky Way will be shock heated above 50 K, at any time during the lifetime of the cloud. We discuss the impact of this shock heating on the dynamical evolution of molecular clouds.

  18. Shear Wave Elastographic Alterations in the Kidney After Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkay, Rustu; Inci, Ercan; Bas, Derya; Atar, Arda

    2017-10-13

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a method used frequently for the treatment of renal stone disease. Although its safety is proven, there are still concerns about its unwanted effects on kidneys. In this prospective study, we aimed to evaluate renal tissue alterations with shear wave elastography (SWE) after ESWL. We also studied the correlation between SWE and resistive index (RI) changes. The study included 59 patients who underwent ESWL treatment for renal stone disease. We performed SWE and color Doppler ultrasonography to calculate SWE and RI values before, 1 hour after, and 1 week after lithotripsy treatment. A binary comparison was performed by the Bonferroni test. The correlation between SWE and RI values was evaluated by a Pearson correlation analysis. The patients included 26 women (44.1%) and 33 men (55.9%). Their ages ranged from 20 to 65 years (mean ± SD, 45.0 ± 1.1 years). Stone diameters ranged from 7 to 19 mm (mean, 13.0 ± 0.5 mm). There was a significant difference in SWE values before and 1 hour after lithotripsy treatment (P = .001; P  .99; P > .05). Resistive index values increased significantly 1 hour after lithotripsy treatment and returned to prelithotripsy values 1 week after treatment. In the correlation analysis, SWE and RI values were not correlated. Measurements of alterations in SWE values after ESWL can provide useful information about renal tissue injury. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Shock wave interaction with a thermal layer produced by a plasma sheet actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteeva, E.; Znamenskaya, I.; Orlov, D.; Sysoev, N.

    2017-03-01

    This paper explores the phenomena associated with pulsed discharge energy deposition in the near-surface gas layer in front of a shock wave from the flow control perspective. The energy is deposited in 200 ns by a high-current distributed sliding discharge of a ‘plasma sheet’ type. The discharge, covering an area of 100× 30 mm2, is mounted on the top or bottom wall of a shock tube channel. In order to analyse the time scales of the pulsed discharge effect on an unsteady supersonic flow, we consider the propagation of a planar shock wave along the discharge surface area 50-500 μs after the discharge pulse. The processes in the discharge chamber are visualized experimentally using the shadowgraph method and modelled numerically using 2D/3D CFD simulations. The interaction between the planar shock wave and the discharge-induced thermal layer results in the formation of a lambda-shock configuration and the generation of vorticity in the flow behind the shock front. We determine the amount and spatial distribution of the electric energy rapidly transforming into heat by comparing the calculated flow patterns and the experimental shadow images. It is shown that the uniformity of the discharge energy distribution strongly affects the resulting flow dynamics. Regions of turbulent mixing in the near-surface gas are detected when the discharge energy is deposited non-uniformly along the plasma sheet. They account for the increase in the cooling rate of the discharge-induced thermal layer and significantly influence its interaction with an incident shock wave.

  20. Development of a standing wave apparatus for calibrating acoustic vector sensors and hydrophones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Richard D; Sagers, Jason D; Wilson, Preston S

    2016-01-01

    An apparatus was developed to calibrate acoustic hydrophones and vector sensors between 25 and 2000 Hz. A standing wave field is established inside a vertically oriented, water-filled, elastic-walled waveguide by a piston velocity source at the bottom and a pressure-release boundary condition at the air/water interface. A computer-controlled linear positioning system allows a device under test to be precisely located in the water column while the acoustic response is measured. Some of the challenges of calibrating hydrophones and vector sensors in such an apparatus are discussed, including designing the waveguide to mitigate dispersion, understanding the impact of waveguide structural resonances on the acoustic field, and developing algorithms to post-process calibration measurement data performed in a standing wave field. Data from waveguide characterization experiments and calibration measurements are presented and calibration uncertainty is reported.

  1. A standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijiang; Li, Xiaotian; Ci, Penghong; Liu, Guoxi; Dong, Shuxiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel standing wave linear ultrasonic motor operating in in-plane expanding and bending modes was proposed in this study. The stator (or actuator) of the linear motor was made of a simple single Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) ceramic square plate (15 × 15 × 2 mm3) with a circular hole (D = 6.7 mm) in the center. The geometric parameters of the stator were computed with the finite element analysis to produce in-plane bi-mode standing wave vibration. The calculated results predicted that a driving tip attached at midpoint of one edge of the stator can produce two orthogonal, approximate straight-line trajectories, which can be used to move a slider in linear motion via frictional forces in forward or reverse direction. The investigations showed that the proposed linear motor can produce a six times higher power density than that of a previously reported square plate motor.

  2. An experimental study on the coalescence process of binary droplets in oil under ultrasonic standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoming; Cao, Juhang; He, Limin; Wang, Hongping; Yan, Haipeng; Qin, Yahua

    2017-01-01

    The coalescence process of binary droplets in oil under ultrasonic standing waves was investigated with high-speed photography. Three motion models of binary droplets in coalescence process were illustrated: (1) slight translational oscillation; (2) sinusoidal translational oscillation; (3) migration along with acoustic streaming. To reveal the droplets coalescence mechanisms, the influence of main factors (such as acoustic intensity, droplet size, viscosity and interfacial tension, etc) on the motion and coalescence of binary droplets was studied under ultrasonic standing waves. Results indicate that the shortest coalescence time is achieved when binary droplets show sinusoidal translational oscillation. The corresponding acoustic intensity in this case is the optimum acoustic intensity. Under the optimum acoustic intensity, drop size decrease will bring about coalescence time decrease by enhancing the binary droplets oscillation. Moreover, there is an optimum interfacial tension to achieve the shortest coalescence time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. X-ray standing wave investigations of Group III and V metal adsorption on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Y.; Bedzyk, M.J. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.; Lyman, P.F. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Investigations of atomic bonding, surface reconstruction, surface dynamics, and growth kinetics of group III and V metals on Si(001) are important for understanding the initial growth stage of III-V semiconductors on Si(001). Such studies can also provide valuable information for other important issues such as surfactant-mediated epitaxy, surface passivation and delta-doping layers. X-ray standing waves generated by dynamical Bragg diffraction were used as an element-specific structural probe for investigating Ga and Sb adsorption on Si(001). These high-resolution measurements reveal important quantitative structural information regarding the dimerized surface structures, and provide a stringent test for structural models proposed by various theoretical calculations. An overview of the X-ray standing wave technique and its application to surface structure and dynamics is presented.

  4. Counter-rotating standing spin waves: A magneto-optical illusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihab, S.; Thevenard, L.; Lemaître, A.; Gourdon, C.

    2017-04-01

    We excite perpendicular standing spin waves by a laser pulse in a GaMnAsP ferromagnetic layer and detect them using time-resolved magneto-optical effects. Quite counterintuitively, we find the first two excited modes to be of opposite chirality. We show that this can only be explained by taking into account absorption and optical phase shift inside the layer. This optical illusion is particularly strong in weakly absorbing layers. These results provide a correct identification of spin waves modes, enabling a trustworthy estimation of their respective weight as well as an unambiguous determination of the spin stiffness parameter.

  5. Axial acoustic radiation force on rigid oblate and prolate spheroids in Bessel vortex beams of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2017-02-01

    The analysis using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in spherical coordinates is extended to evaluate the acoustic radiation force experienced by rigid oblate and prolate spheroids centered on the axis of wave propagation of high-order Bessel vortex beams composed of progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves, respectively. A coupled system of linear equations is derived after applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface in a non-viscous fluid, and solved numerically by matrix inversion after performing a single numerical integration procedure. The system of linear equations depends on the partial-wave index n and the order of the Bessel vortex beam m using truncated but converging PWSEs in the least-squares sense. Numerical results for the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy density and unit cross-sectional surface, are computed with particular emphasis on the amplitude ratio describing the transition from the progressive to the pure standing waves cases, the aspect ratio (i.e., the ratio of the major axis over the minor axis of the spheroid), the half-cone angle and order of the Bessel vortex beam, as well as the dimensionless size parameter. A generalized expression for the radiation force function is derived for cases encompassing the progressive, standing and quasi-standing waves of Bessel vortex beams. This expression can be reduced to other types of beams/waves such as the zeroth-order Bessel non-vortex beam or the infinite plane wave case by appropriate selection of the beam parameters. The results for progressive waves reveal a tractor beam behavior, characterized by the emergence of an attractive pulling force acting in opposite direction of wave propagation. Moreover, the transition to the quasi-standing and pure standing wave cases shows the acoustical tweezers behavior in dual-beam Bessel vortex beams. Applications in acoustic levitation, particle manipulation and acousto

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Strong Shock Waves Propagating in Dense Deuterium With the Effect of Excited Electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Hao; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Huiling; He, X T

    2016-01-01

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation of shock waves propagating in dense deuterium with the electron force field method [J. T. Su and W. A. Goddard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 185003 (2007)], which explicitly takes the excitation of electrons into consideration. Non-equilibrium features associated with the excitation of electrons are systematically investigated. We show that chemical bonds in D$_2$ molecules lead to a more complicated shock wave structure near the shock front, compared with the results of classical molecular dynamics simulation. Charge separation can bring about accumulation of net charges on the large scale, instead of the formation of a localized dipole layer, which might cause extra energy for the shock wave to propagate. In addition, the simulations also display that molecular dissociation at the shock front is the major factor corresponding to the "bump" structure in the principal Hugoniot. These results could help to build a more realistic picture of shock wave propagation in fuel mater...

  7. Prediction and Measurements of the Influence of Boundary Conditions in a Standing Wave Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Vigran, Tor Erik; Kelders, Luc; Lauriks, Walter; Leclaire, Philippe; Johansen, T.F.

    1997-01-01

    International audience; The paper concerns a comparison between measurement results of the acoustic absorption coefficient and impedance using two different methods, the standing wave tube (Kundt's tube) and a free field method. The mounting of the sample in the Kundt's tube is known to be very important. In this paper, the effect of the constraints at the tube wall on the absorption coefficient of an elastic porous material is analysed. It will be shown that the effect of the friction offere...

  8. Variational Approach to the Orbital Stability of Standing Waves of the Gross-Pitaevskii Equation

    KAUST Repository

    Hadj Selem, Fouad

    2014-08-26

    This paper is concerned with the mathematical analysis of a masssubcritical nonlinear Schrödinger equation arising from fiber optic applications. We show the existence and symmetry of minimizers of the associated constrained variational problem. We also prove the orbital stability of such solutions referred to as standing waves and characterize the associated orbit. In the last section, we illustrate our results with few numerical simulations. © 2014 Springer Basel.

  9. Thin films and buried interfaces characterization with X-ray standing waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, S. [CNR, Rome (Italy). Istituto Elettronica Stato Solido

    1996-09-01

    The X-ray standing wave techniques is a powerful, non destructive method to study interfaces at the atomic level. Its basic features are described here together with the peculiarities of its applications to epitaxial films and buried interfaces. As examples of applications, experiments carried out on Si/silicide interfaces, on GaAs/InAs/GaAs buried interfaces and on Si/Ge superlattices are shown.

  10. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipkens, Bart, E-mail: blipkens@wne.edu [Mechanical Engineering, Western New England University, Springfield, Massachusetts, 01119 (United States); Ilinskii, Yurii A., E-mail: ilinskii@gmail.com; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A., E-mail: zheniazabolotskaya@gmail.com [Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78713–8029 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  11. Shock formation and the ideal shape of ramp compression waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, D C; Kraus, R G; Loomis, E; Hicks, D G; McNaney, J M; Johnson, R P

    2008-05-29

    We derive expressions for shock formation based on the local curvature of the flow characteristics during dynamic compression. Given a specific ramp adiabat, calculated for instance from the equation of state for a substance, the ideal nonlinear shape for an applied ramp loading history can be determined. We discuss the region affected by lateral release, which can be presented in compact form for the ideal loading history. Example calculations are given for representative metals and plastic ablators. Continuum dynamics (hydrocode) simulations were in good agreement with the algebraic forms. Example applications are presented for several classes of laser-loading experiment, identifying conditions where shocks are desired but not formed, and where long duration ramps are desired.

  12. Comparative study of standing wave reduction methods using random modulation for transcranial ultrasonication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhata, Hiroshi; Saito, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    Various transcranial sonotherapeutic technologies have risks related to standing waves in the skull. In this study, we present a comparative study on standing waves using four different activation methods: sinusoidal (SIN), frequency modulation by noise (FMN), periodic selection of random frequency (PSRF), and random switching of both inverse carriers (RSBIC). The standing wave was produced and monitored by the schlieren method using a flat plane and a human skull. The minimum ratio RSW, which is defined by the ratio of the mean of the difference between local maximal value and local minimal value of amplitude to the average value of the amplitude, was 36% for SIN, 24% for FMN, 13% for PSRF, and 4%for RSBIC for the flat reflective plate, and it was 25% for SIN, 11% for FMN, 13% for PSRF, and 5% for RSBIC for the inner surface of the human skull. This study is expected to have a role in the development of safer therapeutic equipment. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulation control over ultrasound-mediated gene delivery: evaluating the importance of standing waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mariame A; Buldakov, Mikhail A; Ogawa, Ryohei; Zhao, Qing-Li; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Kudo, Nobuki; Kondo, Takashi; Riesz, Peter

    2010-01-04

    Low modulation frequencies from 0.5 to 100Hz were shown to alter the characteristics of the ultrasound field producing solution agitation (5Hz; region of standing waves establishment) (Buldakov et al., Ultrason. Sonochem., 2009). In this study, the same conditions were used to depict the changes in exogenous DNA delivery in these regions. The luciferase expression data revealed that lower modulations were more capable of enhancing delivery at the expense of viability. On the contrary, the viability was conserved at higher modulations whereas delivery was found to be null. Cavitational activity and acoustic streaming were the effecters beyond the observed pattern and delivery enhancement was shown to be mediated mainly through sonopermeation. To promote transfection, the addition of calcium ions or an echo contrast agent (Levovist((R))) was proposed. Depending on the mechanism involved in each approach, differential enhancement was observed in both regions and at the interim zone (5Hz). In both cases, enhancement in standing waves field was significant reaching 16.0 and 3.3 folds increase, respectively. Therefore, it is concluded that although the establishment of standing waves is not the only prerequisite for high transfection rates, yet, it is a key element in optimization when other factors such as proximity and cavitation are considered.

  14. Depth-resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy in nanostructures via standing-wave excited photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronast, F.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kaiser, A.; Wiemann, C.; Yang, S.-H.; Locatelli, A.; Burgler, D.E.; Schreiber, R.; Salmassi, F.; Fischer, P.; Durr, H.A.; Schneider, C.M.; Eberhardt, W.; Fadley, C.S.

    2008-11-24

    We present an extension of conventional laterally resolved soft x-ray photoelectron emission microscopy. A depth resolution along the surface normal down to a few {angstrom} can be achieved by setting up standing x-ray wave fields in a multilayer substrate. The sample is an Ag/Co/Au trilayer, whose first layer has a wedge profile, grown on a Si/MoSi2 multilayer mirror. Tuning the incident x-ray to the mirror Bragg angle we set up standing x-ray wave fields. We demonstrate the resulting depth resolution by imaging the standing wave fields as they move through the trilayer wedge structure.

  15. Nonstandard Analysis and Shock Wave Jump Conditions in a One-Dimensional Compressible Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy S. Baty, F. Farassat, John A. Hargreaves

    2007-05-25

    Nonstandard analysis is a relatively new area of mathematics in which infinitesimal numbers can be defined and manipulated rigorously like real numbers. This report presents a fairly comprehensive tutorial on nonstandard analysis for physicists and engineers with many examples applicable to generalized functions. To demonstrate the power of the subject, the problem of shock wave jump conditions is studied for a one-dimensional compressible gas. It is assumed that the shock thickness occurs on an infinitesimal interval and the jump functions in the thermodynamic and fluid dynamic parameters occur smoothly across this interval. To use conservations laws, smooth pre-distributions of the Dirac delta measure are applied whose supports are contained within the shock thickness. Furthermore, smooth pre-distributions of the Heaviside function are applied which vary from zero to one across the shock wave. It is shown that if the equations of motion are expressed in nonconservative form then the relationships between the jump functions for the flow parameters may be found unambiguously. The analysis yields the classical Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for an inviscid shock wave. Moreover, non-monotonic entropy jump conditions are obtained for both inviscid and viscous flows. The report shows that products of generalized functions may be defined consistently using nonstandard analysis; however, physically meaningful products of generalized functions must be determined from the physics of the problem and not the mathematical form of the governing equations.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves using the absorbing boundary condition: A case study of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolesta, Alexey V.; Zheng, Lianqing; Thompson, Donald L.; Sewell, Thomas D.

    2007-12-01

    We report a method that enables long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of shock wave loading. The goal is to mitigate the severe interference effects that arise at interfaces or free boundaries when using standard nonequilibrium MD shock wave approaches. The essence of the method is to capture between two fixed pistons the material state at the precise instant in time when the shock front, initiated by a piston with velocity up at one end of the target sample, traverses the contiguous boundary between the target and a second, stationary piston located at the opposite end of the sample, at which point the second piston is also assigned velocity up and the simulation is continued. Thus, the target material is captured in the energy-volume Hugoniot state resulting from the initial shock wave, and can be propagated forward in time to monitor any subsequent chemistry, plastic deformation, or other time-dependent phenomena compatible with the spatial scale of the simulation. For demonstration purposes, we apply the method to shock-induced chemistry in methane based on the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order force field [S. J. Stuart , J. Chem. Phys. 112, 6472 (2000)].

  17. Emergence of unstable modes for classical shock waves in isothermal ideal MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistühler, Heinrich; Kleber, Felix; Schropp, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    This note studies classical magnetohydrodynamic shock waves in an inviscid fluidic plasma that is assumed to be a perfect conductor of heat as well as of electricity. For this mathematically prototypical material, it identifies, mainly numerically, two critical manifolds in parameter space, across which slow resp. fast MHD shock waves undergo emergence of a complex conjugate pair of unstable transverse modes. For slow shocks, this emergence occurs in a particularly interesting way already in the parallel case, in which it happens at the spectral value λ ˆ ≡ λ / | ω | = 0 and the critical manifold possesses a simple explicit algebraic representation. Results of refined numerical treatment show that within the set of non-parallel slow shocks the unstable mode pair emerges from two generically different spectral values λ ˆ = ± iγ. For fast shocks, the critical manifold does not intersect the parallel regime and the emergence within the set of non-parallel fast shocks again starts from two generically different spectral values.

  18. Carbon, Helium, and Proton Kinetic Temperatures in a Cygnus Loop Shock Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; Edgar, Richard J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Blair, William P.

    2015-06-01

    Observations of SN 1006 have shown that ions and electrons in the plasma behind fast supernova remnant shock waves are far from equilibrium, with the electron temperature much lower than the proton temperature and ion temperatures approximately proportional to ion mass. In the ˜360 km s-1shock waves of the Cygnus Loop, on the other hand, electron and ion temperatures are roughly equal, and there is evidence that the oxygen kinetic temperature is not far from the proton temperature. In this paper, we report observations of the He ii λ1640 line and the C iv λ1550 doublet in a 360 km s-1shock in the Cygnus Loop. While the best-fit kinetic temperatures are somewhat higher than the proton temperature, the temperatures of He and C are consistent with the proton temperature and the upper limits are 0.5 and 0.3 times the mass-proportional temperatures, implying efficient thermal equilibration in this collisionless shock. The equilibration of helium and hydrogen affects the conversion between proton temperatures determined from Hα line profiles and shock speeds, and the efficient equilibration found here reduces the shock speed estimates and the distance estimate to the Cygnus Loop of Medina et al. to about 800 pc.

  19. The effect of wedge position and inlet geometry on shock wave reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R. E.; da Silva, N. P.; Skews, B. W.; Paton, R. T.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments were conducted in a shock tube to determine the effect of planar wedge inlet geometry on the shock wave reflection pattern that occurred on a wedge. High-speed schlieren imaging was used to visualize the experiments conducted in air with a nominal incident shock strength of Mach 1.31. The experimental test pieces consisted of a wedge mounted above the floor of the shock tube where the underside wedge angle was varied. The upper wedge angle was fixed at 30°, resulting in a Mach reflection. The underside wedge angle was either 30° or 90°, corresponding to a conventional and blunt wedge respectively. For the cases presented here, the reflected shock from the initial interaction reflects off of the shock tube floor and diffracts around the wedge apex. A density gradient is formed at the wedge apex due to this process and results in a vortex being shed for the 90° wedge. It was shown by simple measurements that the diffracted wave could reach the triple point of the upper Mach reflection if the wedge were of sufficient length.

  20. Characterizing shock waves in hydrogel using high speed imaging and a fiber-optic probe hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip A.; Betney, M. R.; Doyle, H. W.; Tully, B.; Ventikos, Y.; Hawker, N. A.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2017-05-01

    The impact of a stainless steel disk-shaped projectile launched by a single-stage light gas gun is used to generate planar shock waves with amplitudes on the order of 102MPa in a hydrogel target material. These shock waves are characterized using ultra-high-speed imaging as well as a fiber-optic probe hydrophone. Although the hydrogel equation of state (EOS) is unknown, the combination of these measurements with conservation of mass and momentum allows us to calculate pressure. It is also shown that although the hydrogel behaves similarly to water, the use of a water EOS underpredicts pressure amplitudes in the hydrogel by ˜10 % at the shock front. Further, the water EOS predicts pressures approximately 2% higher than those determined by conservation laws for a given value of the shock velocity. Shot to shot repeatability is controlled to within 10%, with the shock speed and pressure increasing as a function of the velocity of the projectile at impact. Thus the projectile velocity may be used as an adequate predictor of shock conditions in future work with a restricted suite of diagnostics.

  1. Laser-generated shock wave attenuation aimed at microscale pyrotechnic device design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeonju Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To meet the rising demand for miniaturizing the pyrotechnic device that consists of donor/acceptor pair separated by a bulkhead or a thin gap, the shock initiation sensitivity in the microscale gap test configuration is investigated. For understanding the shock attenuation within a gap sample (304 stainless steel thickness of 10∼800 μm, the laser-generated shock wave in water confinement is adopted. The shock properties are obtained from the free surface velocity by making use of a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR. Analytical models for plasma generation in a confined geometry and for evolution and decay of shock waves during the propagation are considered. The shape and amplitude of the laser-driven initial pressure load and its attenuation pattern in the gap are effectively controlled for targeting the microscale propagation distance and subsequent triggering pressure for the acceptor charge. The reported results are important in the precise controlling of the shock strength during the laser initiation of microscale pyrotechnic devices.

  2. Generation of spherical and cylindrical shock acoustic waves from optical breakdown in water, stimulated with femtosecond pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Potemkin, F V; Podshivalov, A A; Gordienko, V M

    2014-01-01

    Using shadow photography technique we have observed shock acoustic wave from optical breakdown, excited in water by tightly focused Cr:Forsterite femtosecond laser beam, and have found two different regimes of shock wave generation by varying only the energy of laser pulse. At low energies a single spherical shock wave is generated from laser beam waist, and its radius tends to saturation with energy increasing. At higher energies long laser filament in water is fired, that leads to the cylindrical shock wave generation, which longitude increases logarithmically with laser pulse energy. From shadow pictures we estimated maximal velocity in front or shock wave of 2300+/-150m/s and pressure of 1.0+/-0.1 GPa

  3. Shock Wave-Stimulated Periosteum for Cartilage Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    an electrohydraulically generated wave, with its higher frequency components, would be more attenuated than pneumatically generated waves. It is...vivo, we used goat marrow-derived MSCs. We implemented cultures of MSCs in suspension and in hydrogels as tissue simulants in an effort to: 1... suspension in a test tube, and the cells subsequently seeded into the hydrogel. bMSC viability in the Gtn-HPA gel containing control and treated

  4. Fourth-power law structure of the shock wave fronts in metals and ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayandin, Yuriy; Naimark, Oleg; Saveleva, Natalia

    2017-06-01

    The plate impact experiments were performed for solids during last fifty years. It was established that the dependence between the strain rate and the shock wave amplitude for metals and ceramics expressed by a fourth-power law. Present study is focused on the theoretical investigation and numerical simulation of plane shock wave propagation in metals and ceramics. Statistically based constitutive model of solid with defects (microcracks and microshears) was developed to provide the relation between damage induced mechanisms of structural relaxation, thermally activated plastic flow and material reactions for extreme loading conditions. Original approach based on the wide range constitutive equations was proposed for the numerical simulation of multiscale damage-failure transition mechanisms and plane shock wave propagation in solids with defects in the range of strain rate 103 -108s-1 . It was shown that mechanisms of plastic relaxation and damage-failure transitions are linked to the multiscale kinetics of defects leading to the self-similar nature of shock wave fronts in metals and ceramics. The work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-19-01173).

  5. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPY IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS: PART I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    The shock wave has been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; therefore we carried out a review on the activity performed by shock waves on the bone-myofascial tissue system. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed- and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65 to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader about the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper, with the help of a literature review, indications and success rates for SWT in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders are outlined, while adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density, etc.) are defined according to the present state of knowledge. Given the abundance of the argument, it seems appropriate to subdivide the review into two parts, the first concerning the evidence of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) on bone disorders, the second concerning findings on tendon and muscle treatment.

  6. TUMOR-GROWTH DELAY BY LASER-GENERATED SHOCK-WAVES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Reijke, T. M.; Schamhart, D. H.; Kurth, K. H.; Löwik, C. W.; Donkers, L. H.; Sterenborg, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    The antiproliferative effect of laser-generated shock waves (L-SW) was investigated on a human renal cell carcinoma, RC-8, grown subcutaneously in the nu/nu mouse. The RC-8 is characterized by the syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM) associated with profound cachexia, increase of

  7. Spallation reactions in shock waves at supernova explosions and related problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinova, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    The isotopic anomalies of some extinct radionuclides testify to the outburst of a nearby supernova just before the collapse of the protosolar nebula, and to the fact that the supernova was Sn Ia, i.e. the carbon-detonation supernova. A key role of spallation reactions in the formation of isotopic anomalies in the primordial matter of the Solar System is revealed. It is conditioned by the diffusive acceleration of particles in the explosive shock waves, which leads to the amplification of rigidity of the energy spectrum of particles and its enrichment with heavier ions. The quantitative calculations of such isotopic anomalies of many elements are presented. It is well-grounded that the anomalous Xe- HL in meteoritic nanodiamonds was formed simultaneously with nanodiamonds themselves during the shock wave propagation at the Sn Ia explosion. The possible effects of shock wave fractionation of noble gases in the atmosphere of planets are considered. The origin of light elements Li, Be and B in spallation reactions, predicted by Fowler in the middle of the last century, is argued. All the investigated isotopic anomalies give the evidence for the extremely high magneto- hydrodynamics (MHD) conditions at the initial stage of free expansion of the explosive shock wave from Sn Ia, which can be essential in solution of the problem of origin of cosmic rays. The specific iron-enriched matter of Sn Ia and its MHD-separation in turbulent processes must be taking into account in the models of origin of the Solar System.

  8. Experimental Study on Peak Pressure of Shock Waves in Quasi-Shallow Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxiong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the similarity laws of the explosion, this research develops similarity requirements of the small-scale experiments of underwater explosions and establishes a regression model for peak pressure of underwater shock waves under experimental condition. Small-scale experiments are carried out with two types of media at the bottom of the water and for different water depths. The peak pressure of underwater shock waves at different measuring points is acquired. A formula consistent with the similarity law of explosions is obtained and an analysis of the regression precision of the formula confirms its accuracy. Significance experiment indicates that the influence of distance between measuring points and charge on peak pressure of underwater shock wave is the greatest and that of water depth is the least within the range of geometric parameters. An analysis of data from experiments with different media at the bottom of the water reveals an influence on the peak pressure, as the peak pressure of a shock wave in a body of water with a bottom soft mud and rocks is about 1.33 times that of the case where the bottom material is only soft mud.

  9. Measurements of shock-induced guided and surface acoustic waves along boreholes in poroelastic materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chao, G.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Van Dongen, M.E.H.

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic experiments on the propagation of guided waves along water-filled boreholes in water-saturated porous materials are reported. The experiments were conducted using a shock tube technique. An acoustic funnel structure was placed inside the tube just above the sample in order to enhance the

  10. Lunar cycle may have an effect on Shock Wave Lithotripsy related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: We tried to investigate the effects of lunar phase on Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL) related pain. In addition, correlation of various clinical parameters with the pain perception during SWL procedure, were also investigated. Methods: A total of 378 patients who underwent first SWL sessions for renal or ureteral ...

  11. Shock Waves Oscillations in the Interaction of Supersonic Flows with the Head of the Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Pavel V.; Volkov, Konstantin N.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we reviewed the shock wave oscillation that occurs when supersonic flows interact with conic, blunt or flat nose of aircraft, taking into account the aerospike attached to it. The main attention was paid to the problem of numerical modeling of such oscillation, flow regime classification, and cases where aerospike attachment can…

  12. Depolarization and Electrical Response of Porous PZT 95/5 Ferroelectric Ceramics under Shock Wave Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Zhu; Jiang, Yi-Xuan; Zhang, Pan; Wang, Xing-Zhe; He, Hong-Liang

    2014-07-01

    The release of bound charges by shock wave loading of poled lead zirconate titanate (PZT 95/5) ferroelectric ceramics can result in a high-power electrical energy output. In this study, a theoretical formulation describing the depolarization and electrical response of porous PZT 95/5 ceramics in the normal mode to shock wave compression loading perpendicular to the polarization direction is developed. The depoling process in porous poled PZT 95/5 ceramics is analyzed by using a parallel circuit consisting of a current source, capacitance, conductance and a circuit load. This modeling takes the effects of porosity on wave velocity and remanent polarization and dielectric constant into account, and the effects of variations in dielectric constant and conductivity in the shocked region are assessed. The output current characteristics of porous PZT 95/5 ceramics under short-circuit and resistive load conditions are analyzed and compared with the experiment, with the results showing that theoretical predictions taking into consideration the porosity of ferroelectric ceramics are in close agreement with the experimentally measured electrical response of porous PZT 95/5 under shock wave compression loading.

  13. Measuring the Deceleration of a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave using High-Precision Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian

    2017-08-01

    We propose a third epoch of HST imaging of the NW filament of the remnant of SN 1006. Proper motions have been measured for this remnant in multiple wavelengths, and are nearly 0.3 per year in the NW filament, the only part of the remnant that is bright at optical wavelengths. A first epoch observation with HST was done in 2006, with a second epoch completed in 2013. We propose for a third epoch, with which we will measure, for the first time, the change in the velocity of the shock wave of a supernova remnant. Doing this will require high-precision astrometry, as we will need to measure the proper motions to an accuracy of a few tenths of a milliarcsecond per year. This is achievable with HST, and members of our group have made measurements even more accurate than this in recent years on other astronomical sources. A direct deceleration measurement would avoid the sources of uncertainty that are encountered by indirect inferences. This measurement would add an additional constraint to hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of SN 1006, as well as serve as a diagnostic on the density of the interstellar medium that the shock wave is sweeping up. Only Hubble has the capabilities of performing a measurement like this, and a measurement of the deceleration of this shock wave would open a new window into SNR evolution for SN 1006 and other remnants with fast shock waves.

  14. Experimental and numerical study of shock wave propagation in water generated by pulsed arc electrohydraulic discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Maurel, Olivier; La Borderie, Christian; Reess, Thierry; De Ferron, Antoine; Matallah, Mohammed; Pijaudier-Cabot, Gilles; Jacques, Antoine; Rey-Bethbeder, Frank

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study is to simulate the propagation of the shock wave in water due to an explosion. The study is part of a global research program on the development of an alternative stimulation technique to conventional hydraulic fracturing in tight gas reservoirs aimed at inducing a distributed state of microcracking of rocks instead of localized fracture. We consider the possibility of increasing the permeability of rocks with dynamic blasts. The blast is a shock wave generated in water by pulsed arc electrohydraulic discharges. The amplitude of these shock waves is prescribed by the electrohydraulic discharges which generate high pressures of several kilobars within microseconds. A simplified method has been used to simulate the injected electrical energy as augmentation of enthalpy in water locally. The finite element code EUROPLEXUS is used to perform fluid fast dynamic computation. The predicted pressure is consistent with the experimental results. In addition, shock wave propagation characteristics predicted with simulation can be valuable reference for design of underwater structural elements and engineering of underwater explosion.

  15. Flow features that arise due to the interaction of a plane shock wave with concave profiles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    MacLucas, David A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the author's thesis was the aerodynamic flow field that develops as a result of the interaction of a moving plane shock wave with concave profiles. In this presentation, he discusses some of the interesting flow phenomena that arise...

  16. Efficacy of shock wave lithotripsy in management of kidney stones in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.M. El Nashar

    Efficacy of shock wave lithotripsy in management of kidney stones in infants. A.M. El Nashara,∗. , A.H. Metwallya, O. Abd El Kadera, E.E. Alib,. M. Abdelbaseerc a Suez Canal University, Egypt b Al Azhar University, Egypt c Assiut University, Egypt. Received 31 July 2013; received in revised form 9 November 2013; accepted ...

  17. Treatment of cutaneous calcinosis in CREST syndrome by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparsa, Agnès; Lesaux, Nicolas; Kessler, Emmanuel; Bonnetblanc, Jean-Marie; Blaise, Sophie; Lebrun-Ly, Valérie; Colombeau, Pierre; Vidal, Elisabeth; Bédane, Christophe

    2005-11-01

    We describe the unusual case of a 78-year-old woman consulting for extensive and painful wound leg ulcerations and calcifications secondary to CREST syndrome that was treated by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. This treatment was considered because of the severity of our patient's symptoms and her failure to respond to various medical and surgical treatment.

  18. Measuring the flexoelectric coefficient of bulk barium titanate from a shock wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Taotao; Deng, Qian; Liang, Xu; Shen, Shengping

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, a phenomenon of polarization introduced by shock waves is experimentally studied. Although this phenomenon has been reported previously in the community of physics, this is the first time to link it to flexoelectricity, the coupling between electric polarization and strain gradients in dielectrics. As the shock waves propagate in a dielectric material, electric polarization is thought to be induced by the strain gradient at the shock front. First, we control the first-order hydrogen gas gun to impact and generate shock waves in unpolarized bulk barium titanate (BT) samples. Then, a high-precision oscilloscope is used to measure the voltage generated by the flexoelectric effect. Based on experimental results, strain elastic wave theory, and flexoelectric theory, a longitudinal flexoelectric coefficient of the bulk BT sample is calculated to be μ 11 = 17.33 × 10 - 6 C/m, which is in accord with the published transverse flexoelectric coefficient. This method effectively suppresses the majority of drawbacks in the quasi-static and low frequency dynamic techniques and provides more reliable results of flexoelectric behaviors.

  19. High temperature science: future needs and anticipated development in high-density shock-wave research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, M.; Ahrens, T.J.; Nellis, W.J.

    1979-03-07

    Shock-wave experiments on condensed matter currently achieve pressures up to 5 Mbar, and temperatures over 20,000/sup 0/K. In this report we survey a number of experimental methods that, in the next decade, may increase the conditions by an order of magnitude. These advanced experiments will allow us to investigate a new range of physics problems.

  20. Dissipative shock waves in all-normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecaplain, C; Soto-Crespo, J M; Grelu, Ph; Conti, C

    2014-01-15

    We propose an interpretation of the pronounced "M" spectral shape that is a recurrent feature in all-normal-dispersion mode-locked fiber laser dynamics. Our interpretation involves shock wave formation regularized by dissipation, modeled by a modified Burgers equation. The large fringes appearing at the edges of the spectrum result from discontinuities in the spectral phase.

  1. CHARADE: A characteristic code for calculating rate-dependent shock-wave response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.N.; Tonks, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    In this report we apply spatially one-dimensional methods and simple shock-tracking techniques to the solution of rate-dependent material response under flat-plate-impact conditions. This method of solution eliminates potential confusion of material dissipation with artificial dissipative effects inherent in finite-difference codes, and thus lends itself to accurate calculation of elastic-plastic deformation, shock-to-detonation transition in solid explosives, and shock-induced structural phase transformation. Equations are presented for rate-dependent thermoelastic-plastic deformation for (100) planar shock-wave propagation in materials of cubic symmetry (or higher). Specific numerical calculations are presented for polycrystalline copper using the mechanical threshold stress model of Follansbee and Kocks with transition to dislocation drag. A listing of the CHARADE (for characteristic rate dependence) code and sample input deck are given. 26 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Theory of the corrugation instability of a piston-driven shock wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J W

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the two-dimensional stability of a shock wave driven by a steadily moving corrugated piston in an inviscid fluid with an arbitrary equation of state. For h≤-1 or h>h(c), where h is the D'yakov parameter and h(c) is the Kontorovich limit, we find that small perturbations on the shock front are unstable and grow--at first quadratically and later linearly--with time. Such instabilities are associated with nonequilibrium fluid states and imply a nonunique solution to the hydrodynamic equations. The above criteria are consistent with instability limits observed in shock-tube experiments involving ionizing and dissociating gases and may have important implications for driven shocks in laser-fusion, astrophysical, and/or detonation studies.

  3. First Imaging Observation of Standing Slow Wave in Coronal Fan Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pant, V.; Tiwari, A.; Banerjee, D. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Yuan, D. [Institute of Space Science and Applied Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518000 (China)

    2017-09-20

    We observe intensity oscillations along coronal fan loops associated with the active region AR 11428. The intensity oscillations were triggered by blast waves that were generated due to X-class flares in the distant active region AR 11429. To characterize the nature of oscillations, we created time–distance maps along the fan loops and noted that the intensity oscillations at two ends of the loops were out of phase. As we move along the fan loop, the amplitude of the oscillations first decreased and then increased. The out-of-phase nature together with the amplitude variation along the loop implies that these oscillations are very likely to be standing waves. The period of the oscillations is estimated to be ∼27 minutes, damping time to be ∼45 minutes, and phase velocity projected in the plane of sky to be ∼65–83 km s{sup −1}. The projected phase speeds were in the range of the acoustic speed of coronal plasma at about 0.6 MK, which further indicates that these are slow waves. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the existence of the standing slow waves in non-flaring fan loops.

  4. Simulation studies on the standing and traveling wave thermoacoustic prime movers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaria, Mathew; Rasheed, K. K. Abdul; Shafi, K. A.; Kasthurirengan, S.; Behera, Upendra

    2014-01-01

    Thermoacoustic systems have been a focus of recent research due to its structural simplicity, high reliability due to absence of moving parts, and can be driven by low grade energy such as fuel, gas, solar energy, waste heat etc. There has been extensive research on both standing wave and traveling wave systems. Towards the development of such systems, simulations can be carried out by several methods such as (a) solving the energy equation, (b) enthalpy flow model, (c) DeltaEC, a free software available from LANL, USA (d) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) etc. We present here the simulation studies of standing wave and traveling wave thermoacoustic prime movers using CFD and DeltaEC. The CFD analysis is carried out using Fluent 6.3.26, incorporating the necessary boundary conditions with different working fluids at different operating pressures. The results obtained by CFD are compared with those obtained using DeltaEC. Also, the CFD simulation of the thermoacoustically driven refrigerator is presented.

  5. Refraction of cylindrical converging shock wave at an air/helium gaseous interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhigang; Li, Wei; Si, Ting; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2017-01-01

    Refraction of a cylindrical converging shock wave at an inclined air/helium interface is investigated. Experimentally, based on the shock dynamics theory, a special wall profile is designed to generate a perfectly cylindrical converging shock wave. A soap film technique is developed to form an inclined discontinuous air/helium interface, and high-speed schlieren photography is adopted to capture the flow. Numerical simulations are also performed to compare with the experimental counterparts and to show details of refraction. In this work, two initial incident angles (45° and 60°) are considered. As the incident shock converges inward, the shock intensity increases while the incident angle decreases, causing possible transitions among the wave patterns. For the case of 45°, an irregular refraction of free precursor refraction (FPR) first occurs and gradually transits into regular refraction, while for the case of 60°, various irregular refractions of twin von Neumann refraction (TNR), twin regular refraction (TRR), free precursor von Neumann refraction (FNR), and FPR occur in sequence. The transition sequences do not belong to any groups described in the planar counterpart, indicating that the classification of the refraction phenomenon in the planar case is not exhaustive or cannot be applied to the converging case. It is also the first time to observe the transition from FNR to FPR, providing an experimental evidence for the previous numerical results. It is deemed that the difference between the velocities of the incident and transmitted shocks propagating along the interface is the primary factor that induces the transitions among wave patterns.

  6. Material strength and inelastic deformation of silicon carbide under shock wave compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, R.; Raiser, G. F.; Gupta, Y. M.

    1998-01-01

    In-material, lateral, manganin foil gauge measurements were obtained in dense polycrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) shocked to peak longitudinal stresses ranging from 10-24 GPa. The lateral gauge data were analyzed to determine the lateral stresses in the shocked SiC and the results were checked for self-consistency through dynamic two-dimensional computations. Over the stress range examined, the shocked SiC has an extremely high strength: the maximum shear stress supported by the material in the shocked state increases from 4.5 GPa at the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the material (11.5 GPa) to 7.0 GPa at stresses approximately twice the HEL. The latter value is 3.7% of the shear modulus of the material. The elastic-inelastic transition in the shocked SiC is nearly indistinctive. At stresses beyond twice the HEL, the data suggest a gradual softening with increasing shock compression. The post-HEL material strength evolution resembles neither catastrophic failure due to massive cracking nor classical plasticity response. Stress confinement, inherent in plane shock wave compression, contributes significantly to the observed material response. The results obtained are interpreted qualitatively in terms of an inhomogeneous deformation mechanism involving both in-grain microplasticity and highly confined microfissures.

  7. Material strength and inelastic deformation of silicon carbide under shock wave compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, R.; Raiser, G.F.; Gupta, Y.M. [Shock Dynamics Center and Department of Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2814 (United States)

    1998-01-01

    In-material, lateral, manganin foil gauge measurements were obtained in dense polycrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) shocked to peak longitudinal stresses ranging from 10{endash}24 GPa. The lateral gauge data were analyzed to determine the lateral stresses in the shocked SiC and the results were checked for self-consistency through dynamic two-dimensional computations. Over the stress range examined, the shocked SiC has an extremely high strength: the maximum shear stress supported by the material in the shocked state increases from 4.5 GPa at the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the material (11.5 GPa) to 7.0 GPa at stresses approximately twice the HEL. The latter value is 3.7{percent} of the shear modulus of the material. The elastic{endash}inelastic transition in the shocked SiC is nearly indistinctive. At stresses beyond twice the HEL, the data suggest a gradual softening with increasing shock compression. The post-HEL material strength evolution resembles neither catastrophic failure due to massive cracking nor classical plasticity response. Stress confinement, inherent in plane shock wave compression, contributes significantly to the observed material response. The results obtained are interpreted qualitatively in terms of an inhomogeneous deformation mechanism involving both in-grain microplasticity and highly confined microfissures. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Elastic precursor wave decay in shock-compressed aluminum over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan A.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the dynamic flow behavior of aluminum is considered in the context of precursor wave decay measurements and simulations. In this regard, a dislocation-based model of high-rate metal plasticity is brought into agreement with previous measurements of evolving wave profiles at 300 to 933 K, wherein the amplification of the precursor structure with temperature arises naturally from the dislocation mechanics treatment. The model suggests that the kinetics of inelastic flow and stress relaxation are governed primarily by phonon scattering and radiative damping (sound wave emission from dislocation cores), both of which intensify with temperature. The manifestation of these drag effects is linked to low dislocation density ahead of the precursor wave and the high mobility of dislocations in the face-centered cubic lattice. Simulations performed using other typical models of shock wave plasticity do not reproduce the observed temperature-dependence of elastic/plastic wave structure.

  9. Influence of exothermic chemical reactions on laser-induced shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Jennifer L

    2014-10-21

    Differences in the excitation of non-energetic and energetic residues with a 900 mJ, 6 ns laser pulse (1064 nm) have been investigated. Emission from the laser-induced plasma of energetic materials (e.g. triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], cyclotrimethylene trinitramine [RDX], and hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane [CL-20]) is significantly reduced compared to non-energetic materials (e.g. sugar, melamine, and l-glutamine). Expansion of the resulting laser-induced shock wave into the air above the sample surface was imaged on a microsecond timescale with a high-speed camera recording multiple frames from each laser shot; the excitation of energetic materials produces larger heat-affected zones in the surrounding atmosphere (facilitating deflagration of particles ejected from the sample surface), results in the formation of additional shock fronts, and generates faster external shock front velocities (>750 m s(-1)) compared to non-energetic materials (550-600 m s(-1)). Non-explosive materials that undergo exothermic chemical reactions in air at high temperatures such as ammonium nitrate and magnesium sulfate produce shock velocities which exceed those of the inert materials but are less than those generated by the exothermic reactions of explosive materials (650-700 m s(-1)). The most powerful explosives produced the highest shock velocities. A comparison to several existing shock models demonstrated that no single model describes the shock propagation for both non-energetic and energetic materials. The influence of the exothermic chemical reactions initiated by the pulsed laser on the velocity of the laser-induced shock waves has thus been demonstrated for the first time.

  10. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF SHOCK WAVE DIFFRACTION OVER RIGHT ANGLE ON UNSTRUCTURED MESHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Numerical simulation results and investigation of shock wave diffraction of differentintensity on the flat right angleare presented. Method. The numerical model is based on the solution of unsteadyEuler equations for inviscid compressible gas. The finite volume method and explicit WENO-type difference scheme of the third-order of accuracyare used. Convective fluxesare calculated independently for each direction with the approximate Riemann solver(HLLC method. Time integration is performed with the Runge-Kutta method of the third order. Main Results. Flow structure and flowquantitative characteristicshave beendetermined. To visualize and interpret the results of numerical calculations theprocedure of identification and classification of gas-dynamic discontinuities has beenappliedbased on the use of dynamic compatibility conditions and methods of digital image processing. The results of calculations have beenpresented in the form of numerical shadow pictures, schlieren images and interferograms, and compared with the optical observations. Significantly better agreement with the experimental data has beendemonstrated as compared toconventionalnumerical methods. Application of numerical methods of high order accuracy has yielded a numerical solution which is free from non-physicaloscillations on the shock waves with minimal smearingoverdifference cells. Practical Relevance. The study of shock-wave phenomena is of interest for the solution of problems related to the impact of shock waves on the design elements, the operation of pulsed gas-dynamic devices, the use of shock waves in technological processes. Supersonic flows around angle configurations lead to interference and diffraction phenomena complicated by flow separation. These effects make complexthe calculation of such phenomena using conventional numericalmethods. The problem ofthe results interpretation is not less complicated one,as well, in particular, identification

  11. Longitudinal waves in a perpendicular collisionless plasma shock. III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.

    1971-01-01

    This paper considers electrostatic waves in a Vlasov plasma of unmagnetized ions and magnetized electrons undergoing an E x B drift. The linear dispersion relation is solved numerically for an electron temperature approximately equal to the ion temperature. For a fixed ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal velocity, the growth rates of the E x B electron drift instability are smaller, and the waves are stabilized at much smaller values of k.B than in the case where electron temperature is much larger than the ion temperature.

  12. Comment on ``Enhanced transmission of light through a gold film due to excitation of standing surface-plasmon Bloch waves"

    OpenAIRE

    Weiner, J.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this comment is first to correct a misapprehension of the role played by composite wave diffraction on surface-wave generation at subwavelength structures and second to point out that periodic Bloch structures are unnecessary for the efficient production of the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) guided mode either as traveling or standing waves. Guided surface waves originate from simple slit or groove edges illuminated under normal incidence, and one-dimensional (1-D) surface cav...

  13. Laser Ion Acceleration from Shock Wave Generated Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Kaganovich, Dmitri; Ting, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Efficient acceleration of ions by means of high power laser radiation requires electron plasma densities at or in excess of the critical density. Traditionally, this has been achieved using solid targets. More recently, laser facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the University of California in Los Angeles have achieved acceleration using Terawatt CO2 interacting with gas jets. Gas targets are advantageous in that they are relatively simple and can be operated at high repetition rates; however, they typically operate at densities far below those required for optical wavelengths, where most of the world's terawatt lasers operate. To get around this and other issues, a new type of target, a ``gas foil,'' has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The target is created by igniting an optically driven hydrodynamic shock into the flow of a gas jet in vacuum. Experiments have shown that a laser-ignited shock is capable of producing 4 times ambient. These results have been incorporated into 3D PIC simulations. Results for a relatively compact and inexpensive 20 TW laser yielded protons with energies in excess of 5 MeV. Simulations as well as preliminary experimental results will be discus

  14. Van Allen Probes Observations of Second Harmonic Poloidal Standing Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Oimatsu, Satoshi; Nosé, Masahito; Min, Kyungguk; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Chan, Anthony; Wygant, John; Kim, Hyomin

    2018-01-01

    Long-lasting second-harmonic poloidal standing Alfvén waves (P2 waves) were observed by the twin Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes, or RBSP) spacecraft in the noon sector of the plasmasphere, when the spacecraft were close to the magnetic equator and had a small azimuthal separation. Oscillations of proton fluxes at the wave frequency (˜10 mHz) were also observed in the energy (W) range 50-300 keV. Using the unique RBSP orbital configuration, we determined the phase delay of magnetic field perturbations between the spacecraft with a 2nπ ambiguity. We then used finite gyroradius effects seen in the proton flux oscillations to remove the ambiguity and found that the waves were propagating westward with an azimuthal wave number (m) of ˜-200. The phase of the proton flux oscillations relative to the radial component of the wave magnetic field progresses with W, crossing 0 (northward moving protons) or 180° (southward moving protons) at W ˜ 120 keV. This feature is explained by drift-bounce resonance (mωd ˜ ωb) of ˜120 keV protons with the waves, where ωd and ωb are the proton drift and bounce frequencies. At lower energies, the proton phase space density (FH+) exhibits a bump-on-tail structure with ∂FH+/∂W>0 occurring in the 1-10 keV energy range. This FH+ is unstable and can excite P2 waves through bounce resonance (ω ˜ ωb), where ω is the wave frequency.

  15. Experimental Research about Shock Wave in a 1+1/2 Counter-Rotating Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the internal distribution regularities of shock wave structure in 1+1/2 counter-rotating turbine, numerical simulation and experimental research about the shock wave structure were conducted by using the schlieren apparatus under different working conditions.From the point of the unsteady results, the unsteady effect has few influence on the flow field of high pressure guide vane, but the wake of the high pressure guide leaves periodically sweeps through the front edge of the high pressure blade and there presents strong unsteady effect on flow field of high pressure rotor. Because of periodic influence of external wake and shock wave, the unsteadiness of flow in low pressure rotor is still strong but not that drastic compared to the high pressure rotor. 50% height section of the blade of the three types of blades are extracted respectively to make plane cascades which are conducted blowing experiments in supersonic wind tunnel. The final photograph were analyzed by comparing with the CFD results. Results show that with the increase of expansion ratio, the wave structures in blade channel move toward the exit and the caudal interference between the outer tail wave and is strengthened gradually.

  16. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-06-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  17. Piecewise parabolic method for simulating one-dimensional shear shock wave propagation in tissue-mimicking phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, B. B.; Espíndola, D.; Pinton, G. F.

    2017-11-01

    The recent discovery of shear shock wave generation and propagation in the porcine brain suggests that this new shock phenomenology may be responsible for a broad range of traumatic injuries. Blast-induced head movement can indirectly lead to shear wave generation in the brain, which could be a primary mechanism for injury. Shear shock waves amplify the local acceleration deep in the brain by up to a factor of 8.5, which may tear and damage neurons. Currently, there are numerical methods that can model compressional shock waves, such as comparatively well-studied blast waves, but there are no numerical full-wave solvers that can simulate nonlinear shear shock waves in soft solids. Unlike simplified representations, e.g., retarded time, full-wave representations describe fundamental physical behavior such as reflection and heterogeneities. Here we present a piecewise parabolic method-based solver for one-dimensional linearly polarized nonlinear shear wave in a homogeneous medium and with empirical frequency-dependent attenuation. This method has the advantage of being higher order and more directly extendable to multiple dimensions and heterogeneous media. The proposed numerical scheme is validated analytically and experimentally and compared to other shock capturing methods. A Riemann step-shock problem is used to characterize the numerical dissipation. This dissipation is then tuned to be negligible with respect to the physical attenuation by choosing an appropriate grid spacing. The numerical results are compared to ultrasound-based experiments that measure planar polarized shear shock wave propagation in a tissue-mimicking gelatin phantom. Good agreement is found between numerical results and experiment across a 40 mm propagation distance. We anticipate that the proposed method will be a starting point for the development of a two- and three-dimensional full-wave code for the propagation of nonlinear shear waves in heterogeneous media.

  18. A volleyball player with bilateral knee osteochondritis dissecans treated with extracorporeal shock wave therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Biagio; Notarnicola, Angela; Moretti, Lorenzo; Giordano, Paola; Patella, Vittorio

    2009-05-01

    We present a case report of a 14-year-old Caucasian sport woman affected by bilateral and symmetrical knee osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) addressed to surgery, in which extracorporeal shock wave therapy determined complete healing. Shock wave is a longitudinal acoustic wave traveling with the speed of ultrasound through the water of the body tissue. Recently, this therapy has been used in the treatment of a number of musculoskeletal pathologies on the basis of the effects produced by the induction of angiogenesis, recruitment of progenitor cells and downregulation of cartilage damage. This therapy is useful, because it is non-invasive, safe, without complications or adverse effects and repeatable. Thus, it could be suggested as a useful strategy for the treatment of OCD prior starting surgery.

  19. Numerical simulation for the propagation and action of shock waves during explosive synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelepugin, S. A.; Ivanova, O. V.; Yunoshev, A. S.; Zelepugin, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents numerical and experimental studying the behavior of porous reactive mixtures (Al/S, Al/Tf and Al/Tf/C) under explosive loading using a multicomponent medium model. The initial dispersion of reactive mixtures is varied to evaluate its contribution to the development of chemical reactions. The results have shown that the shock wave, reflected from the bottom of the ampoule in the form of a compression wave, encounters the shock wave propagating in the sample, which leads to a sharp increase in the pressure and the rate of chemical reactions at the bottom of the sample. The high rate of heat release and the sharp increase in pressure lead to the ampoule fracture. It is found that the higher the initial dispersion of the mixture components is, the more intensive the development of chemical reactions and the ampoule fracture are.

  20. Experimental approach to shape field relevant blast wave profiles in compressed gas-driven shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind eSundaramurthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Detonation of a high explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects even at farther distances, which is termed as primary blast injury, which is the theme of this work. The shock-blast profile is characterized with blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs. These parameters in turn are a function of field factors, such as the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (Chandra et al., 2011;Sundaramurthy et al., 2012;Skotak et al., 2013, the profile not only determines the survival of the animal but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, exact replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. 40 experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68 to 1209.68 mm, measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium. The relationships between SAPs and the resulting shock-blast profiles are characterized. Finally, shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared with the profiles obtained

  1. Focused and Radial Shock Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Tennis Elbow: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of radial and focused shock wave therapies applied to treat tennis elbow. Patients with tennis elbow were randomized into two comparative groups: focused shock wave therapy (FSWT; n=25 and radial shock wave therapy (RSWT; n=25. Subjects in the FSWT and RSWT groups were applied with a focused shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 shocks, 4 Hz, 0.2 mJ/mm2 and a radial shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 + 2000 shocks, 8 Hz, 2.5 bar, respectively. The primary study endpoints were pain relief and functional improvement (muscle strength one week after therapy. The secondary endpoint consisted of the results of the follow-up observation (3, 6 and 12 weeks after the study. Successive measurements showed that the amount of pain patients felt decreased in both groups. At the same time grip strength as well as strength of wrist extensors and flexors of the affected extremity improved significantly. Both focused and radial shock wave therapies can comparably and gradually reduce pain in subjects with tennis elbow. This process is accompanied by steadily improved strength of the affected extremity.

  2. Numerical study of shock waves in non-ideal magnetogasdynamics (MHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addepalli Ramu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional unsteady adiabatic flow of strong converging shock waves in cylindrical or spherical symmetry in MHD, which is propagating into plasma, is analyzed. The plasma is assumed to be non-ideal gas whose equation of state is of Mie–Gruneisen type. Suitable transformations reduce the governing equations into ordinary differential equations of Poincare type. In the present work, McQueen and Royce equations of state (EOS have been considered with suitable material constants and the spherical and cylindrical cases are worked out in detail to investigate the behavior and the influence on the shock wave propagation by energy input and β(ρ/ρ0, the measure of shock strength. The similarity solution is valid for adiabatic flow as long as the counter pressure is neglected. The numerical technique applied in this paper provides a global solution to the implosion problem for the flow variables, the similarity exponent α for different Gruneisen parameters. It is shown that increasing β(ρ/ρ0 does not automatically decelerate the shock front but the velocity and pressure behind the shock front increases quickly in the presence of the magnetic field and decreases slowly and become constant. This becomes true whether the piston is accelerated, is moving at constant speed or is decelerated. These results are presented through the illustrative graphs and tables. The magnetic field effects on the flow variables through a medium and total energy under the influence of strong magnetic field are also presented.

  3. Application of CHAD hydrodynamics to shock-wave problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trease, H.E.; O`Rourke, P.J.; Sahota, M.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    CHAD is the latest in a sequence of continually evolving computer codes written to effectively utilize massively parallel computer architectures and the latest grid generators for unstructured meshes. Its applications range from automotive design issues such as in-cylinder and manifold flows of internal combustion engines, vehicle aerodynamics, underhood cooling and passenger compartment heating, ventilation, and air conditioning to shock hydrodynamics and materials modeling. CHAD solves the full unsteady Navier-Stoke equations with the k-epsilon turbulence model in three space dimensions. The code has four major features that distinguish it from the earlier KIVA code, also developed at Los Alamos. First, it is based on a node-centered, finite-volume method in which, like finite element methods, all fluid variables are located at computational nodes. The computational mesh efficiently and accurately handles all element shapes ranging from tetrahedra to hexahedra. Second, it is written in standard Fortran 90 and relies on automatic domain decomposition and a universal communication library written in standard C and MPI for unstructured grids to effectively exploit distributed-memory parallel architectures. Thus the code is fully portable to a variety of computing platforms such as uniprocessor workstations, symmetric multiprocessors, clusters of workstations, and massively parallel platforms. Third, CHAD utilizes a variable explicit/implicit upwind method for convection that improves computational efficiency in flows that have large velocity Courant number variations due to velocity of mesh size variations. Fourth, CHAD is designed to also simulate shock hydrodynamics involving multimaterial anisotropic behavior under high shear. The authors will discuss CHAD capabilities and show several sample calculations showing the strengths and weaknesses of CHAD.

  4. Propagation of acoustic shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries and into shadow zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjouy, C., E-mail: cyril.desjouy@gmail.com; Ollivier, S.; Dragna, D.; Blanc-Benon, P. [Laboratoire de Mécanique des Fluides et d’Acoustique, UMR CNRS 5509, École Centrale de Lyon, Université de Lyon, 69134 Ecully Cedex (France); Marsden, O. [European Center For Medium Range Weather Forecasts, United Kingdom Shinfield (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-28

    The study of acoustic shock propagation in complex environments is of great interest for urban acoustics, but also for source localization, an underlying problematic in military applications. To give a better understanding of the phenomenon taking place during the propagation of acoustic shocks, laboratory-scale experiments and numerical simulations were performed to study the propagation of weak shock waves between parallel rigid boundaries, and into shadow zones created by corners. In particular, this work focuses on the study of the local interactions taking place between incident, reflected, and diffracted waves according to the geometry in both regular or irregular – also called Von Neumann – regimes of reflection. In this latter case, an irregular reflection can lead to the formation of a Mach stem that can modify the spatial distribution of the acoustic pressure. Short duration acoustic shock waves were produced by a 20 kilovolts electric spark source and a schlieren optical method was used to visualize the incident shockfront and the reflection/diffraction patterns. Experimental results are compared to numerical simulations based on the high-order finite difference solution of the two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations.

  5. Simulation studies of shock wave propagation and reflection in semi-crystalline polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Robert M.; Chantawansri, Tanya L.; Sliozberg, Yelena R.; Sirk, Timothy W.; Yeh, In-Chul; O'Connor, Thomas C.; Robbins, Mark O.; Andzelm, Jan W.

    2017-06-01

    Polyethylene (PE) fibers are used in many applications where high-strain-rate impacts occur, so understanding their response to such events is vital. Although PE fibers often have high crystallinity, they also contain defects such as amorphous domains. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we generate compressive shock waves of varying strength in crystalline, amorphous, and semi-crystalline PE models. The differing properties of amorphous and crystalline PE result in an impedance mismatch, which causes partial reflection/refraction of shock waves at interfaces between the phases. We quantify the properties (e.g., pressure) of these waves and the reflection/transmission of energy at interfaces, and we compare with a simple continuum-level theory. The theory and simulations agree that amorphous domains attenuate weak shocks more effectively than strong shocks. However, the simulations unexpectedly show that small amorphous domains reflect less energy than theoretically predicted. We identify nanoscale mechanisms that reduce the impedance mismatch, and thus reflection, at thin amorphous domains, including confinement-induced stiffness, chain ordering, and density. The significance of these results emerges as a design choice, in that processing techniques can be used to tune the size of amorphous inclusions for the requirements of a particular application.

  6. Conditions for Debris-Background Ion Interactions and Collisionless Shock Wave Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10

    We use hybrid simulations and simple theoretical arguments to determine when debris ions streaming relative to background ions in a collisionless, magnetized plasma couple strongly enough to generate a magnetosonic shock wave. We consider three types of configurations: one-dimensional, the two-dimensional extension of the 1-D case, and a more complex 2-D geometry that contains some effects that would be found in a laser-produced, laboratory plasma. We show that the simulation results as well as previous Russian and LLNL results reduce to a simple condition (R{sub m}/{rho}{sub d} = equal mass radius/debris ion gyroradius {ge} 0.7) for the generation of a shock wave. Strong debris interaction with the background is characterized by the formation of a magnetic pulse that steepens and speeds up as it encounters the debris ions deflected by the magnetic field. The pulse further evolves into a shock. As the earlier work has indicated, the process also involves the generation of a transverse electric field perpendicular to the flow and the magnetic field that accelerates the background ions radially outward, which in turn causes the speedup of the pulse. With electric and magnetic field probes, the UCLA laser experiments should be able to detect these signatures of coupling as well as the generation of the shock wave.

  7. Higher order corrections to dust-acoustic shock waves in a strongly coupled cryogenic dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Borie, M. A.; Atteya, A.

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the contribution of higher-order nonlinearity and dissipation to nonlinear ultra-low-frequency dust-acoustic shock waves (DASWs), a reductive perturbation technique is employed in a strongly coupled cryogenic dusty plasma. The model consists of Boltzmann distributed electrons and ions, as well as equations for strongly coupled charged dust grains. A nonlinear Burger equation and a linear inhomogeneous Burger-type equation are derived. The present model admits both compressive and rarefactive dust-acoustic (DA) shocks. Including these higher-order corrections results in creating new shock wave structures called "humped DASWs." It is shown that the effects of kinematic viscosity, the number of electrons residing on the dust grain surface, Zd, and the dust number density via β have important roles in the basic features of the produced DA shocks and the associated electric fields. It has been shown that it is more important to be included. These findings are devoted to explaining the observed waves propagating in the laboratory plasma experiments at cryogenic temperature. This kind of plasma is used for etching nano-patterns without defects, used in nonideal systems, and physics of nucleation to deposit nanosize Si compounds.

  8. Laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation for shock wave loading: validation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, Dennis L; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Greenfield, Scott R; Koskelo, Aaron C

    2008-02-01

    We present validation and some applications of two laser-driven shock wave loading techniques: laser-launched flyer plate and confined laser ablation. We characterize the flyer plate during flight and the dynamically loaded target with temporally and spatially resolved diagnostics. With transient imaging displacement interferometry, we demonstrate that the planarity (bow and tilt) of the loading induced by a spatially shaped laser pulse is within 2-7 mrad (with an average of 4+/-1 mrad), similar to that in conventional techniques including gas gun loading. Plasma heating of target is negligible, in particular, when a plasma shield is adopted. For flyer plate loading, supported shock waves can be achieved. Temporal shaping of the drive pulse in confined laser ablation allows for flexible loading, e.g., quasi-isentropic, Taylor-wave, and off-Hugoniot loading. These techniques can be utilized to investigate such dynamic responses of materials as Hugoniot elastic limit, plasticity, spall, shock roughness, equation of state, phase transition, and metallurgical characteristics of shock-recovered samples.

  9. Application of background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to a laser-induced underwater shock wave

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Shota; Kameda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    We build an ultra-high-speed imaging system based on the background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique in order to capture a laser-induced underwater shock wave. This BOS technique is able to provide two-dimensional density-gradient field of fluid and requires a simple setup. The imaging system consists of an ultra-high speed video camera, a laser stroboscope, and a patterned background. This system takes images every 0.2 $\\mu$s. Furthermore, since the density change of water disturbed by the shock is exceedingly small, the system has high spatial resolution $\\sim$ 10 $\\mu$m/pixel. Using this BOS system, we examine temporal position of a shock wave. The position agrees well with that measured by conventional shadowgraph, which indicates that the high-speed imaging system can successfully capture the instantaneous position of the underwater shock wave that propagates with the speed of about 1500 m/s. The local density gradient can be determined up to $O$(10$^3$ kg/m$^4$), which is confirmed by the gradient est...

  10. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sangyong; Choi, SeokJoo; Choi, Yoon-Hee; Lee, Kwansub

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on the pain and function of patients with degenerative knee arthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty patients with degenerative knee arthritis were divided into a conservative physical therapy group (n=10) and an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (n=10). Both groups received general conservative physical therapy, and the extracorporeal shock wave therapy was additionally treated with extracorporeal shock wave therapy after receiving conservative physical therapy. Both groups were treated three times a week over a four-week period. The visual analogue scale was used to evaluate pain in the knee joints of the subjects, and the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index was used to evaluate the function of the subjects. [Results] The comparison of the visual analogue scale and Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores within each group before and after the treatment showed statistically significant declines in scores in both the conservative physical therapy group and extracorporeal shock wave therapy group. A group comparison after the treatment showed statistically significant differences in these scores in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group and the conservative physical therapy group. [Conclusion] extracorporeal shock wave therapy may be a useful nonsurgical intervention for reducing the pain of patients with degenerative knee arthritis and improving these patients’ function. PMID:28356649

  11. Shock Waves in the Study of Shaped Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    metal which flew out of the fire and penetrated her breast bone. The small particle of metal was from the coned end of a detonator which was apparently...use spin compensated liners, especially when asoolated with spinning warheads. Gun fired projectiles are spun in flight to provide aerodynamic...also used In tapping steel mill furnaces, as a source of earth waves for geophysical prospecting and seismic explotation , mining (surface or

  12. The Coronal Analysis of SHocks and Waves (CASHeW) framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Davey, Alisdair; Kendrick, Alexander; Hammer, Michael; Keith, Celeste

    2017-11-01

    Coronal bright fronts (CBF) are large-scale wavelike disturbances in the solar corona, related to solar eruptions. They are observed (mostly in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light) as transient bright fronts of finite width, propagating away from the eruption source location. Recent studies of individual solar eruptive events have used EUV observations of CBFs and metric radio type II burst observations to show the intimate connection between waves in the low corona and coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks. EUV imaging with the atmospheric imaging assembly instrument on the solar dynamics observatory has proven particularly useful for detecting large-scale short-lived CBFs, which, combined with radio and in situ observations, holds great promise for early CME-driven shock characterization capability. This characterization can further be automated, and related to models of particle acceleration to produce estimates of particle fluxes in the corona and in the near Earth environment early in events. We present a framework for the coronal analysis of shocks and waves (CASHeW). It combines analysis of NASA Heliophysics System Observatory data products and relevant data-driven models, into an automated system for the characterization of off-limb coronal waves and shocks and the evaluation of their capability to accelerate solar energetic particles (SEPs). The system utilizes EUV observations and models written in the interactive data language. In addition, it leverages analysis tools from the SolarSoft package of libraries, as well as third party libraries. We have tested the CASHeW framework on a representative list of coronal bright front events. Here we present its features, as well as initial results. With this framework, we hope to contribute to the overall understanding of coronal shock waves, their importance for energetic particle acceleration, as well as to the better ability to forecast SEP events fluxes.

  13. The Coronal Analysis of SHocks and Waves (CASHeW framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarev Kamen A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal bright fronts (CBF are large-scale wavelike disturbances in the solar corona, related to solar eruptions. They are observed (mostly in extreme ultraviolet (EUV light as transient bright fronts of finite width, propagating away from the eruption source location. Recent studies of individual solar eruptive events have used EUV observations of CBFs and metric radio type II burst observations to show the intimate connection between waves in the low corona and coronal mass ejection (CME-driven shocks. EUV imaging with the atmospheric imaging assembly instrument on the solar dynamics observatory has proven particularly useful for detecting large-scale short-lived CBFs, which, combined with radio and in situ observations, holds great promise for early CME-driven shock characterization capability. This characterization can further be automated, and related to models of particle acceleration to produce estimates of particle fluxes in the corona and in the near Earth environment early in events. We present a framework for the coronal analysis of shocks and waves (CASHeW. It combines analysis of NASA Heliophysics System Observatory data products and relevant data-driven models, into an automated system for the characterization of off-limb coronal waves and shocks and the evaluation of their capability to accelerate solar energetic particles (SEPs. The system utilizes EUV observations and models written in the interactive data language. In addition, it leverages analysis tools from the SolarSoft package of libraries, as well as third party libraries. We have tested the CASHeW framework on a representative list of coronal bright front events. Here we present its features, as well as initial results. With this framework, we hope to contribute to the overall understanding of coronal shock waves, their importance for energetic particle acceleration, as well as to the better ability to forecast SEP events fluxes.

  14. Gyrating ions and large-amplitude monochromatic MHD waves upstream of the earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Rusell, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Episodes of nearly monochromatic, low-frequency (0.03 Hz) hydromagnetic waves are occasionally observed upstream of the earth's bow shock. High time resolution (3 s) measurements of two-dimensional ion distributions during two nearly monochromatic wave events reveal that the ion distributions asociated with these waves are 'gyrating ions.' Such distributions consists of suprathermal ions with parallel and perpendicular velocities confined to a fairly narrow range of (nonzero) values. The ions are also often confined to a fairly narrow range of gyrophase angle ('gyrophase bunched'). In one of the two cases, the observed frequency of the waves agrees quite well with the Doppler shifted resonance frequency of waves in right-hand resonance with the observed gyrating ions. In the second case, the observed frequency is lower than the predicted frequency by a factor of 1.5-2.

  15. Longitudinal waves in a perpendicular collisionless plasma shock. IV - Gradient B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.

    1972-01-01

    The consideration of elastic waves in a Vlasov plasma of unmagnetized ions and magnetized electrons undergoing E x B electron drift and gradient B drift, pursued in the earlier three parts, is brought to conclusion in this last part of the longitudinal wave study in a collisionless plasma shock. Detailed calculations of the effects of the beta sub e dimensionless parameter on the E x B electron drift instability are presented. It is shown that the range of propagation of the elastic waves about the perpendicular remains quite narrow, and that, for oblique propagation, the already narrow angular range of unstable waves is decreased by increases in the value of the beta sub e dimensionless parameter. Also, increases in wave number generally reduce the growth rate and the angular range of propagation.

  16. Shock wave induced phase transition in α -FePO 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K. D.; Suresh, N.; Jyoti, G.; Kulshreshtha, S. K.; Gupta, S. C.; Sikka, S. K.

    Shock wave induced response of the berlinite form of FePO 4 has been investigated up to 8.5 GPa. The X-ray diffraction measurements on the shock recovered samples reveal transition to the mixture of an amorphous phase and an orthorhombic phase around 5 GPa. The proportion of the amorphous material in the recovered sample is found to decrease at higher pressure. The results are interpreted in terms of a three-level free energy diagram for the crystal to amorphous transitions.

  17. Density profile in shock wave fronts of partially ionized xenon plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Reinholz, H; Morozov, I; Mintsev, V; Zaparoghets, Y; Fortov, V; Wierling, A

    2003-01-01

    Results for the reflection coefficient of shock-compressed dense xenon plasmas at pressures of 1.6-20 GPa and temperatures around 30 000 K are interpreted. In addition to former experiments using laser beams with lambda = 1.06 mu m, measurements at lambda = 0.694 mu m have been performed recently. Reflectivities typical for metallic systems are found at high densities. Besides free carriers, the theoretical description also takes into account the influence of the neutral component of the plasma on the reflectivity. A consistent description of the measured reflectivities is achieved only if a finite width of the shock wave front is considered.

  18. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrenberg, C. E.; McGonegle, D.; Bolme, C.; Higginbotham, A.; Lazicki, A.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Rudd, R. E.; Sliwa, M.; Suggit, M.; Swift, D.; Tavella, F.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.; Wark, J. S.

    2017-10-01

    Pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation is challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum—an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common association between twinning

  19. In situ X-ray diffraction measurement of shock-wave-driven twinning and lattice dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrenberg, C E; McGonegle, D; Bolme, C; Higginbotham, A; Lazicki, A; Lee, H J; Nagler, B; Park, H-S; Remington, B A; Rudd, R E; Sliwa, M; Suggit, M; Swift, D; Tavella, F; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Wark, J S

    2017-10-25

    Pressure-driven shock waves in solid materials can cause extreme damage and deformation. Understanding this deformation and the associated defects that are created in the material is crucial in the study of a wide range of phenomena, including planetary formation and asteroid impact sites, the formation of interstellar dust clouds, ballistic penetrators, spacecraft shielding and ductility in high-performance ceramics. At the lattice level, the basic mechanisms of plastic deformation are twinning (whereby crystallites with a mirror-image lattice form) and slip (whereby lattice dislocations are generated and move), but determining which of these mechanisms is active during deformation is challenging. Experiments that characterized lattice defects have typically examined the microstructure of samples after deformation, and so are complicated by post-shock annealing and reverberations. In addition, measurements have been limited to relatively modest pressures (less than 100 gigapascals). In situ X-ray diffraction experiments can provide insights into the dynamic behaviour of materials, but have only recently been applied to plasticity during shock compression and have yet to provide detailed insight into competing deformation mechanisms. Here we present X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond resolution that capture in situ, lattice-level information on the microstructural processes that drive shock-wave-driven deformation. To demonstrate this method we shock-compress the body-centred-cubic material tantalum-an important material for high-energy-density physics owing to its high shock impedance and high X-ray opacity. Tantalum is also a material for which previous shock compression simulations and experiments have provided conflicting information about the dominant deformation mechanism. Our experiments reveal twinning and related lattice rotation occurring on the timescale of tens of picoseconds. In addition, despite the common association between twinning and

  20. Euler-Lagrange Simulations of Shock Wave-Particle Cloud Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Park, Chanyoung; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Numerical experiments of shock interacting with an evolving and fixed cloud of particles are performed. In these simulations we use Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. As validation, we use Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments and particle-resolved simulations. The particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In the simulations evolving the particle cloud, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions. A detailed analysis of the influence of initial conditions on the evolution of the particle cloudis presented. The early time behavior of the models is studied in the fixed bed simulations at varying volume fractions and shock Mach numbers.The mean gas quantities are measured in the context of 1-way and 2-way coupled simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.