WorldWideScience

Sample records for standard antidepressant drugs

  1. Drug evaluation and the permissive principle: continuities and contradictions between standards and practices in antidepressant regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, John; Davis, Courtney

    2009-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals are not permitted on to the market unless they are granted regulatory approval. The regulatory process is, therefore, crucial in whether or not a drug is widely prescribed. Regulatory agencies have developed standards of performance that pharmaceuticals are supposed to meet before entering the market. Regulation of technologies is often discussed by reference to the precautionary principle. In contrast, this paper develops the concept of the 'permissive principle' as a way of understanding the departure of regulators' practices from standards of drug efficacy to which regulatory agencies themselves subscribe. By taking a case study of antidepressant regulation in the UK and the USA, the mechanisms of permissive regulatory practices are examined. An STS methodology of both spatial (international) and temporal comparisons of regulatory practices with regulatory standards is employed to identify the nature and extent of the permissive regulation. It is found that the permissive principle was adopted by drug regulators in the UK and the USA, but more so by the former than the latter. Evidently, permissive regulation, which favours the commercial interests of the drug manufacturer, but is contrary to the interests of patients, may penetrate to the heart of regulatory science. On the other hand, permissive regulation of specific drugs should not be regarded as an inevitable result of marketing strategies and concomitant networks deployed by powerful pharmaceutical companies, because the extent of permissive regulation may vary according to the intra-institutional normative commitments of regulators to uphold their technical standards against the commercial interests of the manufacturer. Likely sociological factors that can account for such permissive regulatory practices are 'corporate bias', secrecy and excessive regulatory trust in the pharmaceutical industry in the UK, political expediency and ideological capture in the USA, combined in both countries

  2. Risk of drug interaction: combination of antidepressants and other drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyasaka Lincoln Sakiara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency of combination of antidepressants with other drugs and risk of drug interactions in the setting public hospital units in Brazil. METHODS: Prescriptions of all patients admitted to a public hospital from November 1996 to February 1997 were surveyed from the hospital's data processing center in São Paulo, Brazil. A manual search of case notes of all patients admitted to the psychiatric unit from January 1993 to December 1995 and all patients registered in the affective disorders outpatient clinic in December 1996 was carried out. Patients taking any antidepressant were identified and concomitant use of drugs was checked. By means of a software program (Micromedex® drug interactions were identified. RESULTS: Out of 6,844 patients admitted to the hospital, 63 (0.9% used antidepressants and 16 (25.3% were at risk of drug interaction. Out of 311 patients in the psychiatric unit, 63 (20.2% used antidepressants and 13 of them (20.6% were at risk. Out of 87 patients in the affective disorders outpatient clinic, 43 (49.4% took antidepressants and 7 (16.2% were at risk. In general, the use of antidepressants was recorded in 169 patients and 36 (21.3% were at risk of drug interactions. Twenty different forms of combinations at risk of drug interactions were identified: four were classified as mild, 15 moderate and one severe interaction. CONCLUSION: In the hospital general units the number of drug interactions per patient was higher than in the psychiatric unit; and prescription for depression was lower than expected.

  3. Drug-drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yvette; Setia, Sajita; Lima, Graca

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions.

  4. Thermodynamic properties of amphiphilic antidepressant drug citalopram HBr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, M.; Khan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Association characteristics of antidepressant during Citalopram hydrobromide in water Have been examined and its thermodynamic parameters have been calculated using tensiometery and conductometry. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) was determined by surface tension measurement at 30 deg. C and Surface activity was studied by measuring surface parameters i.e. surface pressure, JI, surface excess concentration, area per molecule of drug and standard Gibbs free energy of adsorption, delta G. The electrical conductivity was measured as a function of concentration at various temperatures and cmc was calculated in the temperature range 20-50 deg. C. Thermodynamic parameters i.e. standard free energy of micellization, delta G standard enthalpy of micellization, delta H/sub m/ and standard entropy of micellization, delta S/sub m/ were calculated from cmc value using closed association model. (author)

  5. Racial and ethnic disparities in antidepressant drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Rizzo, John A

    2008-12-01

    Little is known about racial and ethnic disparities in health care utilization, expenditures and drug choice in the antidepressant market. This study investigates factors associated with the racial and ethnic disparities in antidepressant drug use. We seek to determine the extent to which disparities reflect differences in observable population characteristics versus heterogeneity across racial and ethnic groups. Among the population characteristics, we are interested in identifying which factors are most important in accounting for racial and ethnic disparities in antidepressant drug use. Using Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) data from 1996-2003, we have an available sample of 10,416 Caucasian, 1,089 African American and 1,539 Hispanic antidepressant drug users aged 18 to 64 years. We estimate individual out-of-pocket payments, total prescription drug expenditures, drug utilization, the probability of taking generic versus brand name antidepressants, and the share of drugs that are older types of antidepressants (e.g., TCAs and MAOIs) for these individuals during a calendar year. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition techniques are employed to determine the extent to which disparities reflect differences in observable population characteristics versus unobserved heterogeneity across racial and ethnic groups. Caucasians have the highest antidepressant drug expenditures and utilization. African-Americans have the lowest drug expenditures and Hispanics have the lowest drug utilization. Relative to Caucasians and Hispanics, African-Americans are more likely to purchase generics and use a higher share of older drugs (e.g., TCAs and MAOIs). Differences in observable characteristics explain most of the racial/ethnic differences in these outcomes, with the exception of drug utilization. Differences in health insurance and education levels are particularly important factors in explaining disparities. In contrast, differences in drug utilization largely reflect unobserved

  6. Testing antidepressant compounds in a neuropsychological model of drug action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerit, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    Although much research effort has been put into the development of new antidepressant drugs, the process of developing a drug often fails at the stage of large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which an initially promising compound appears to lack efficacy after all. Several experimental

  7. Effects of antidepressant drugs on different receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, H.; Oegren, S.-O.

    1981-01-01

    Radioligand receptor binding techniques were used to characterize the effects of different structural types of antidepressant drugs on neurotransmitter receptors. The tricyclic antidepressants more or less potently inhibited the binding to rat brain preparations of several different radiolabelled ligands ([ 3 H]WB4101, [ 3 H]QNB, [ 3 H]d-LSD, [ 3 H]mepyramine). The potency of the nontricyclic antidepressants varied greatly. Mianserin, potently displaced [ 3 H]mepyramine, [ 3 H]d-LSD and [ 3 H]WB4101 while it was very weak on [ 3 H]QNB-binding. Nomifensine and the specific 5-HT uptake inhibitors zimelidine and alaproclate had very low affinity for these receptors. All the antidepressants tested were practically devoid of activity on [ 3 H]DHA binding, [ 3 H]spiroperidol binding, [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding, [ 3 H]muscimol binding and [ 3 H]naloxone binding. The implications of these findings for biogenic amine theories of affective disorders are discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Acute antidepressant drug administration and autobiographical memory recall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Williams, J Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Antidepressants affect memory and neural responses to emotionally valenced stimuli in healthy volunteers. However, it is unclear whether this extends to autobiographical memory for personally experienced events. The current study investigated the effects of acute administration of the antidepress...... of reboxetine on emotional memory extends to recall of personally experienced events. Such effects may be relevant to the cognitive improvements found with recovery from depression and with the mechanism of action of contemporary antidepressant drugs.......Antidepressants affect memory and neural responses to emotionally valenced stimuli in healthy volunteers. However, it is unclear whether this extends to autobiographical memory for personally experienced events. The current study investigated the effects of acute administration...... in the processing of positive versus negative memories was reduced following reboxetine compared with placebo in the left frontal lobe (extending into the insula) and the right superior temporal gyrus. This was paired with increased memory speed in volunteers given reboxetine versus placebo. The effect...

  9. Antidepressants, antimicrobials or both? Gut microbiota dysbiosis in depression and possible implications of the antimicrobial effects of antidepressant drugs for antidepressant effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Danielle; Filho, Adriano José Maia Chaves; Soares de Sousa, Caren Nádia; Quevedo, João; Barichello, Tatiana; Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano Nobre; Freitas de Lucena, David

    2017-01-15

    The first drug repurposed for the treatment of depression was the tuberculostatic iproniazid. At present, drugs belonging to new classes of antidepressants still have antimicrobial effects. Dysbiosis of gut microbiota was implicated in the development or exacerbation of mental disorders, such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Based on the current interest in the gut-brain axis, the focus of this narrative review is to compile the available studies regarding the influences of gut microbiota in behavior and depression and to show the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs. A discussion regarding the possible contribution of the antimicrobial effect of antidepressant drugs to its effectiveness/resistance is included. The search included relevant articles from PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge. MDD is associated with changes in gut permeability and microbiota composition. In this respect, antidepressant drugs present antimicrobial effects that could also be related to the effectiveness of these drugs for MDD treatment. Conversely, some antimicrobials present antidepressant effects. Both antidepressants and antimicrobials present neuroprotective/antidepressant and antimicrobial effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the participation of antimicrobial mechanisms of antidepressants in MDD treatment as well as to determine the contribution of this effect to antidepressant resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Warfarin: pharmacological profile and drug interactions with antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Souto Teles

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral anticoagulants are among the drugs with the greatest numberof drug interactions. The concomitant use of several medications isa common practice in patients with cardiovascular problems, whooften also present with depression; therefore, the probability of aninteraction occurring between warfarin and the antidepressants ishigh, and may result in increased or decreased anticoagulant activity.Since the possible interactions between these two classes of drugshave been poorly explored in literature, with a risk to the patients who use them, we reviewed the pharmacology of warfarin and its possible interactions with antidepressants. Of the antidepressants analyzed, those that showed relevant effects on the interaction with warfarin were, in decreasing order: paroxetine, venlafaxine, fluoxetine, and duloxetine.

  11. Occurrence of Antidepressant Drugs in the Environment - A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ismael Laurindo Costa Junior; Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná; Adelmo L. Pletsch; Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná; Yohandra R. Torres; Universidade Estadual do Centro Oeste

    2014-01-01

    Lately, the identification of emerging pollutants in environmental matrices has become frequent. Among these pollutants, the presence of drugs is highly relevant, because these categories of contaminants comprised thousands of active substances highly consumed worldwide. In the last decades, there has been a significant increase in the prescription and consumption of neuroactive drugs, such as antidepressants, and due to their direct action on the nervous system, neuroactive drugs are cited a...

  12. Progress and prospects in pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Chiara; Crisafulli, Concetta; Calabrò, Marco; Spina, Edoardo; Serretti, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Depression is responsible for the most part of the personal and socio-economic burden due to psychiatric disorders. Since antidepressant response clusters in families, pharmacogenetics represents a meaningful tool to provide tailored treatments and improve the prognosis of depression. This review aims to summarize and discuss the pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs in major depressive disorder, with a focus on the most replicated genes, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), but also on the findings provided by new and promising analysis methods. In particular, multimarker tests such as pathway analysis and polygenic risk scores increase the power of detecting associations compared to the analysis of individual polymorphisms. Since genetic variants are not necessarily associated with a change in protein level, gene expression studies may provide complementary information to genetic studies. Finally, the pharmacogenetic tests that have been investigated for clinical application are discussed. Despite the lack of widespread clinical applications, preliminary results suggest that pharmacogenetics may be useful to guide antidepressant treatment. The US Food and Drug Administration included pharmacogenetic indications in the labeling of several antidepressants. This represented an important official recognition of the clinical relevance of genetic polymorphisms in antidepressant treatment.

  13. Drug–drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Low Y

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Yvette Low,1 Sajita Setia,2 Graca Lima3 1Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Pte. Ltd., Singapore; 3Global Medical Affairs, Asia-Pacific Region, Pfizer, Hong Kong Abstract: Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions. Keywords: desvenlafaxine, polypharmacy, comorbidities, depression, pharmacokinetics

  14. Drug–drug interactions involving antidepressants: focus on desvenlafaxine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Yvette; Setia, Sajita; Lima, Graca

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric and physical conditions often coexist, and there is robust evidence that associates the frequency of depression with single and multiple physical conditions. More than half of patients with depression may have at least one chronic physical condition. Therefore, antidepressants are often used in cotherapy with other medications for the management of both psychiatric and chronic physical illnesses. The risk of drug–drug interactions (DDIs) is augmented by complex polypharmacy regimens and extended periods of treatment required, of which possible outcomes range from tolerability issues to lack of efficacy and serious adverse events. Optimal patient outcomes may be achieved through drug selection with minimal potential for DDIs. Desvenlafaxine is a serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor approved for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Pharmacokinetic studies of desvenlafaxine have shown a simple metabolic profile unique among antidepressants. This review examines the DDI profiles of antidepressants, particularly desvenlafaxine, in relation to drugs of different therapeutic areas. The summary and comparison of information available is meant to help clinicians in making informed decisions when using desvenlafaxine in patients with depression and comorbid chronic conditions. PMID:29497300

  15. The effects of drugs on human models of emotional processing: an account of antidepressant drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Abbie; Harmer, Catherine J

    2015-12-01

    Human models of emotional processing suggest that the direct effect of successful antidepressant drug treatment may be to modify biases in the processing of emotional information. Negative biases in emotional processing are documented in depression, and single or short-term dosing with conventional antidepressant drugs reverses these biases in depressed patients prior to any subjective change in mood. Antidepressant drug treatments also modulate emotional processing in healthy volunteers, which allows the consideration of the psychological effects of these drugs without the confound of changes in mood. As such, human models of emotional processing may prove to be useful for testing the efficacy of novel treatments and for matching treatments to individual patients or subgroups of patients.

  16. Profitable failure: antidepressant drugs and the triumph of flawed experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoey, Linsey

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on an analysis of Irving Kirsch and colleagues' controversial 2008 article in "PLoS [Public Library of Science] Magazine" on the efficacy of SSRI antidepressant drugs such as Prozac, I examine flaws within the methodologies of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that have made it difficult for regulators, clinicians and patients to determine the therapeutic value of this class of drug. I then argue, drawing analogies to work by Pierre Bourdieu and Michael Power, that it is the very limitations of RCTs -- their inadequacies in producing reliable evidence of clinical effects -- that help to strengthen assumptions of their superiority as methodological tools. Finally, I suggest that the case of RCTs helps to explore the question of why failure is often useful in consolidating the authority of those who have presided over that failure, and why systems widely recognized to be ineffective tend to assume greater authority at the very moment when people speak of their malfunction.

  17. Antidepressant, antioxidant and neurotrophic properties of the standardized extract of Cocos nucifera husk fiber in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eliane Brito Cortez; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Vasconcelos, Germana Silva; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; E Silva Pereira, Yuri Freitas; Ximenes, Naiara Coelho; Santos Júnior, Manuel Alves; Matos, Natália Castelo Branco; Brito, Rayanne; Miron, Diogo; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Macêdo, Danielle; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2016-07-01

    The plant Cocos nucifera and its derivatives have shown antidepressant-like effects, although its hydroalcoholic extract has not been studied with this end in mind. Therefore, we decided to determine the antidepressant-like effects of the standardized hydroalcoholic extract of Cocos nucifera husk fiber (HECN) as well as oxidative alterations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HC) and striatum (ST), and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the HC of mice. The extract was characterized based on the content of total polyphenols as well as two phenol compounds-catechin and chlorogenic acid-by HPLC-PDA. Male animals were treated per os (p.o.) for 7 days with distilled water or HECN (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg), or intraperitoneally with vitamin E (Vit E 400 mg/kg). One hour after the last drug administration, the animals were submitted to the open field test, forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST) and, immediately after the behavioral tests, had their brain removed for neurochemical determinations. The results showed that HECN100 decreased the immobility time in the FST and TST presenting, thus demonstrating an antidepressant-like effect. The administration of HECN decreased malondialdehyde levels in all doses and brain areas studied with the exception of HECN50 in the HC. The administration of HECN also decreased nitrite levels in all doses and brain regions studied. HECN100 also increased the levels of BDNF in HC of mice. In conclusion, we demonstrated that HECN has antidepressant-like properties, probably based on its antioxidant and neurotrophic effects, and is thus relevant for the treatment of depression.

  18. Differential Risk of Peptic Ulcer Among Users of Antidepressants Combined With Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ju-Young; Song, Inmyung; Lee, Jin-Ho; Yoon, Jong Lull; Kwon, Jun Soo; Park, Byung-Joo

    2017-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been reported to have an increased risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, and the risk may be further increased by combined use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, little has been known about the risk of peptic ulcer associated with other classes of antidepressants or individual antidepressants combined with NSAIDs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to define the risk of peptic ulcer associated with combined use of antidepressants and NSAIDs, as compared with use of antidepressants alone. Using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database, we identified a total of 1,127,622 patients who began receiving antidepressants between 2009 and 2012. Propensity-based matching and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare the risk of peptic ulcer between antidepressant users with NSAIDs and those without NSAIDs matched in a 1:1 ratio, for a total of 768,850 patients. The risk of peptic ulcer did not increase with combined use of overall antidepressants and NSAIDs, as compared with antidepressant use alone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.06). A slightly increased risk was observed for combined use of NSAIDs with tricyclic antidepressants (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.09-1.21) and with SSRIs (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16). We found that although concomitant use of NSAIDs and antidepressants was not associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer for antidepressants in general, it was so for some specific classes including tricyclic antidepressants and SSRIs. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that the increased risk was solely due to NSAID use.

  19. The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor as a Target for Antidepressant Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah S. Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An important new area of antidepressant drug development involves targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR. This receptor, which is distributed widely in regions of the brain associated with depression, is also implicated in other important processes that are relevant to depression, such as stress and inflammation. The two classes of drugs that target nAChRs can be broadly divided into mecamylamine- and cytisine-based compounds. These drugs probably exert their effects via antagonism at α4β2 nAChRs, and strong preclinical data support the antidepressant efficacy of both classes when used in conjunction with other primary antidepressants (e.g., monoamine reuptake inhibitors. Although clinical data remain limited, preliminary results in this area constitute a compelling argument for further evaluation of the nAChR as a target for future antidepressant drug development.

  20. Potentially inappropriate medication: Association between the use of antidepressant drugs and the subsequent risk for dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heser, Kathrin; Luck, Tobias; Röhr, Susanne; Wiese, Birgitt; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Oey, Anke; Bickel, Horst; Mösch, Edelgard; Weyerer, Siegfried; Werle, Jochen; Brettschneider, Christian; König, Hans-Helmut; Fuchs, Angela; Pentzek, Michael; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Scherer, Martin; Maier, Wolfgang; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Wagner, Michael

    2018-01-15

    Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) is associated with an increased risk for detrimental health outcomes in elderly patients. Some antidepressant drugs are considered as PIM, but previous research on the association between antidepressants and subsequent dementia has been inconclusive. Therefore, we investigated whether the intake of antidepressants, particularly of those considered as PIM according to the Priscus list, would predict incident dementia. We used data of a prospective cohort study of non-demented primary care patients (n = 3239, mean age = 79.62) to compute Cox proportional hazards models. The risk for subsequent dementia was estimated over eight follow-ups up to 12 years depending on antidepressant intake and covariates. The intake of antidepressants was associated with an increased risk for subsequent dementia (HR = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.16-2.02, p = .003; age-, sex-, education-adjusted). PIM antidepressants (HR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.06-2.10, p = .021), but not other antidepressants (HR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.66-1.66, p = .863), were associated with an increased risk for subsequent dementia (in age-, sex-, education-, and depressive symptoms adjusted models). Significant associations disappeared after global cognition at baseline was controlled for. Methodological limitations such as selection biases and self-reported drug assessments might have influenced the results. Only antidepressants considered as PIM were associated with an increased subsequent dementia risk. Anticholinergic effects might explain this relationship. The association disappeared after the statistical control for global cognition at baseline. Nonetheless, physicians should avoid the prescription of PIM antidepressants in elderly patients whenever possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressant drugs specifically inhibiting noradrenaline reuptake enhance recognition memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltmann, Kristin; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; De Bundel, Dimitri; Lindskog, Maria; Schilström, Björn

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from major depression often experience memory deficits even after the remission of mood symptoms, and many antidepressant drugs do not affect, or impair, memory in animals and humans. However, some antidepressant drugs, after a single dose, enhance cognition in humans (Harmer et al., 2009). To compare different classes of antidepressant drugs for their potential as memory enhancers, we used a version of the novel object recognition task in which rats spontaneously forget objects 24 hr after their presentation. Antidepressant drugs were injected systemically 30 min before or directly after the training phase (Session 1 [S1]). Post-S1 injections were used to test for specific memory-consolidation effects. The noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors reboxetine and atomoxetine, as well as the serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine, injected prior to S1 significantly enhanced recognition memory. In contrast, the serotonin reuptake inhibitors citalopram and paroxetine and the cyclic antidepressant drugs desipramine and mianserin did not enhance recognition memory. Post-S1 injection of either reboxetine or citalopram significantly enhanced recognition memory, indicating an effect on memory consolidation. The fact that citalopram had an effect only when injected after S1 suggests that it may counteract its own consolidation-enhancing effect by interfering with memory acquisition. However, pretreatment with citalopram did not attenuate reboxetine's memory-enhancing effect. The D1/5-receptor antagonist SCH23390 blunted reboxetine's memory-enhancing effect, indicating a role of dopaminergic transmission in reboxetine-induced recognition memory enhancement. Our results suggest that antidepressant drugs specifically inhibiting noradrenaline reuptake enhance cognition and may be beneficial in the treatment of cognitive symptoms of depression. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Cyclodextrins improving the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of antidepressant drugs: a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Tâmara Coimbra; Pinto, Tiago Coimbra Costa; Menezes, Paula Dos Passos; Silva, Juliane Cabral; Teles, Roxana Braga de Andrade; Ximenes, Rosana Christine Cavalcanti; Guimarães, Adriana Gibara; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza; Quintans Júnior, Lucindo José; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2018-01-01

    Depression is a serious mood disorder and is one of the most common mental illnesses. Despite the availability of several classes of antidepressants, a substantial percentage of patients are unresponsive to these drugs, which have a slow onset of action in addition to producing undesirable side effects. Some scientific evidence suggests that cyclodextrins (CDs) can improve the physicochemical and pharmacological profile of antidepressant drugs (ADDs). The purpose of this paper is to disclose current data technology prospects involving antidepressant drugs and cyclodextrins. Areas covered: We conducted a patent review to evaluate the antidepressive activity of the compounds complexed in CDs, and we analyzed whether these complexes improved their physicochemical properties and pharmacological action. The present review used 8 specialized patent databases for patent research, using the term 'cyclodextrin' combined with 'antidepressive agents' and its related terms. We found 608 patents. In the end, considering the inclusion criteria, 27 patents reporting the benefits of complexation of ADDs with CDs were included. Expert opinion: The use of CDs can be considered an important tool for the optimization of physicochemical and pharmacological properties of ADDs, such as stability, solubility and bioavailability.

  3. Treating depression with antidepressants: drug-placebo efficacy debates limit broader considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapko, Michael D

    2013-01-01

    The core issue regarding antidepressants for many clinicians is whether they perform significantly better than placebos. However, this article suggests eight additional concerns beyond drug efficacy alone to consider regarding antidepressants including: (1) formulating only a one-dimensional, biological view of depression; (2) defining the client's role as passive in treatment; (3) economic corruption of the research and reporting; (4) false or misleading consumer advertising; (5) conflicting data that confuse practitioners and consumers alike; (6) over- and under-prescription of medications; (7) drug side-effects; and (8) harm to the environment. The enhanced effects of psychotherapy utilizing hypnosis offer a means of avoiding most, if not all, of the problems associated with the use of antidepressants as a primary form of treatment.

  4. Effect of lipopolysaccharide and antidepressant drugs on glucocorticoid receptor-mediated gene transcription

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Budziszewska, B.; Basta-Kaim, A.; Kubera, M.; Jaworska, L.; Leskiewicz, M.; Tetich, M.; Otczyk, M.; Zajícová, Alena; Holáň, Vladimír; Lasoń, W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2005), s. 540-544 ISSN 1734-1140 Grant - others:State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN)(PL) 6P05A076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : glucocorticoid receptor * antidepressant drugs * interleukin-6 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  5. Geriatric characteristics in randomised controlled trials on antidepressant drugs for older adults: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benraad, Carolien E. M.; Kamerman-Celie, Floor; van Munster, Barbara C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Spijker, Jan; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Meta-analyses of antidepressant drug treatment trials have found that increasing age is associated with a less favourable outcome. Because the prevalence of geriatric characteristics, like disability, medical co-morbidity, malnutrition, cognitive (dys) function and frailty increase with

  6. Geriatric characteristics in randomised controlled trials on antidepressant drugs for older adults : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benraad, Carolien E. M.; Kamerman-Celie, Floor; van Munster, Barbara C.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.; Spijker, Jan; Rikkert, Marcel G. M. Olde

    Objective: Meta-analyses of antidepressant drug treatment trials have found that increasing age is associated with a less favourable outcome. Because the prevalence of geriatric characteristics, like disability, medical co-morbidity, malnutrition, cognitive (dys) function and frailty increase with

  7. [Prevalence of Avoidable Potential Interactions Between Antidepressants and Other Drugs in Colombian Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Alba, Jorge E; Morales-Plaza, Cristhian David

    2013-06-01

    To determine the possible drugs interactions with antidepressive agents in data bases of patients in the Health Insurance System of Colombia. From data bases of about 4 million users in Colombia, a systematic review of drugs dispensation statistics was made to identify drug interactions between antidepressive agents, cholinergic antagonists and tramadol in 2010. We identified 114,465 monthly users of antidepressive agents. Of these, 5776 (5.0%) received two, and 178 (0.2%) received three antidepressive agents simultaneously. The most frequent combination was fluoxetine+trazodone (n=3235; 56.9% of cases). About 1127 (1.0%) patients were prescribed a cholinergic antagonist simultaneously; 2523 (2.1%) users were dispensed tramadol at the same time, while raising the risk of serotonin syndrome. Drug interactions represent a potential risk that is often underestimated by physicians. Pharmacovigilance is a useful tool to optimize resources and prevent negative outcomes associated with medication. It is recommended that systematic search is made to enhance surveillance programs for the rational use of medicines in this country. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Antidepressant Drugs for Chronic Urological Pelvic Pain: An Evidence-Based Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Papandreou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of antidepressant drugs for the management of chronic pelvic pain has been supported in the past. This study aimed to evaluate the available evidence for the efficacy and acceptability of antidepressant drugs in the management of urological chronic pelvic pain. Studies were selected through a comprehensive literature search. We included all types of study designs due to the limited evidence. Studies were classified into levels of evidence according to their design. Ten studies were included with a total of 360 patients. Amitriptyline, sertraline, duloxetine, nortriptyline, and citalopram are the antidepressants that have been reported in the literature. Only four randomized controlled trials (RCTs were identified (two for amitriptyline and two for sertraline with mixed results. We conclude that the use of antidepressants for the management of chronic urological pelvic pain is not adequately supported by methodologically sound RCTs. From the existing studies amitriptyline may be effective in interstitial cystitis but publication bias should be considered as an alternative explanation. All drugs were generally well tolerated with no serious events reported.

  9. Antidepressant drugs and the risk of suicide in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacsson, Göran; Rich, Charles L

    2014-04-01

    Government agencies have issued warnings about the use of antidepressant medications in children, adolescents, and young adults since 2003. The statements warn that such medications may cause de novo 'suicidality' in some people. This review explores the data on the treatment of depression that led to these warnings and subsequent data that are relevant to the warnings. It also addresses the effectiveness of antidepressant treatment in general and the relationship of suicide rates to antidepressant treatment. It concludes that the decisions for the 'black box' warnings were based on biased data and invalid assumptions. Furthermore, the decisions were unsupported by the observational data regarding suicide in young people that existed in 2003. The following recommendations would seem to follow from these observations. First, drug authorities should re-evaluate the basis for their imposed warnings on antidepressant medicines, and analyze the actual public health consequences the warnings have had. In the absence of substantial evidence supporting the warnings, they should be removed. Second, physicians and other providers with prescription privileges should continue to be educated regarding the importance of aggressively treating depression in young people, using antidepressants when indicated. Third, physicians and other professionals who treat depressed young people must always be aware of the risk of suicide (albeit quite low) and observe them closely for any signs of increased risk of suicide. This is necessary regardless of the type of treatment being provided.

  10. Antidepressant Drug Treatment in Association with Multiple Sclerosis Disease-Modifying Therapy: Using Explorys in the MS Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Matthew M; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Rae-Grant, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Explorys Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) database contains de-identified clinical data for 50 million patients. Multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), specifically interferon beta (IFNβ) treatments, may potentiate depression. Conflicting data have emerged, and a large-scale claims-based study by Patten et al. did not support such an association. This study compares the results of Patten et al. with those using the EPM database. Methods: "Power searches" were built to test the relationship between antidepressant drug use and DMT in the MS population. Searches were built to produce a cohort of individuals diagnosed as having MS in the past 3 years taking a specific DMT who were then given any antidepressant drug. The antidepressant drug therapy prevalence was tested in the MS population on the following DMTs: IFNβ-1a, IFNβ-1b, combined IFNβ, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, fingolimod, and dimethyl fumarate. Results: In patients with MS, the rate of antidepressant drug use in those receiving DMTs was 40.60% to 44.57%. The rate of antidepressant drug use for combined IFNβ DMTs was 41.61% (males: 31.25%-39.62%; females: 43.10%-47.33%). Antidepressant drug use peaked in the group aged 45 to 54 years for five of six DMTs. Conclusions: We found no association between IFNβ treatment and antidepressant drug use in the MS population compared with other DMTs. The EPM database has been validated against the Patten et al. data for future use in the MS population.

  11. An HDAC-dependent epigenetic mechanism that enhances the efficacy of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmauss, C.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a prevalent and debilitating psychiatric illnesses. However, currently prescribed antidepressant drugs are only efficacious in a limited group of patients. Studies on Balb/c mice suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition may enhance the efficacy of the widely-prescribed antidepressant drug fluoxetine. This study shows that reducing HDAC activity in fluoxetine-treated Balb/c mice leads to robust antidepressant and anxiolytic effects. While reducing the activity of class I HDACs 1 and 3 led to antidepressant effects, additional class II HDAC inhibition was necessary to exert anxiolytic effects. In fluoxetine-treated mice, HDAC inhibitors increased enrichment of acetylated histone H4 protein and RNA polymerase II at promotor 3 of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) gene and increased Bdnf transcription from this promotor. Reducing Bdnf-stimulated tropomyosin kinase B receptor activation in fluoxetine-treated mice with low HDAC activity abolished the behavioral effects of fluoxetine, suggesting that the HDAC-triggered epigenetic stimulation of Bdnf expression is critical for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25639887

  12. Ten years after the FDA black box warning for antidepressant drugs: a critical narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA has warned about the increased suicidality risk associated with the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI and venlafaxine in children and adolescents. Objectives To critically appraise the available evidence supporting the FDA Black box warning concerning to the use of antidepressants in child and adolescents. Methods A critical review of articles in Medline/PubMed and SciELO databases regarding the FDA Black box warning for antidepressants, and the impact of FDA warnings on antidepressant prescriptions and suicide rates. Results The warning was based on surveys that did not report either cases of suicide nor a significant difference supporting an increased suicidality rate. The concept was defined in an ambiguous way and there is currently more available evidence to support such definition. The use of SSRI and venlafaxine has been associated to lower suicidality rates, but the prescription fall due to the warning increased suicide rates. Discussion Suicidality is an inherent feature of depressive disorders so it would be desirable to consider how much of the phenomenon may be attributed to antidepressants per se. It would be appropriate to consider that suicide rates might increase also as a consequence of the warning.

  13. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant drugs: State of the art and clinical implementation - recommendations from the French National Network of Pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Sylvie; Dupouey, Julien; Colle, Romain; Verstuyft, Céline

    2017-04-01

    Tailoring antidepressant drug therapy to each individual patient is a complex process because these drugs have adverse effects leading to discontinuation. Pharmacogenetics may provide useful information in routine practice for optimizing antidepressant treatment by helping limit toxic effects while maintaining efficacy. This review presents the usefulness of pharmacogenetic tests for P450 cytochromes CYP2C19 and CYP2D6 in psychiatric patients taking antidepressants. Depending on the level of evidence, the French National Network of Pharmacogenetics (RNPGx) has issued recommendations stating that pharmacogenetic tests for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes are potentially useful in psychiatric patients treated with antidepressant drugs. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of ifenprodil on the activity of antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wośko, Sylwia; Serefko, Anna; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Kasperek, Regina; Dudka, Jarosław; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Wlaź, Piotr

    2014-12-01

    According to reports in the literature, more than 30% of depressive patients fail to achieve remission. Therapy with the conventional antidepressant drugs may induce the serious adverse reactions. Moreover, its benefits may be seen at least 2-4 weeks after the first dose. Therefore, the alternative strategies for prevention and treatment of depression are sought. The main aim of our study was to assess the effects of ifenprodil given at a non-active dose (10mg/kg) on the activity of antidepressant agents from diverse pharmacological groups. The antidepressant-like effect was assessed by the forced swim test in mice. Ifenprodil potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine (15mg/kg) and fluoxetine (5mg/kg) while did not reduce the immobility time of animals which simultaneously received reboxetine (2.5mg/kg) or tianeptine (15mg/kg). The concomitant administration of certain commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs that affect the serotonergic neurotransmission (i.e., typical tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) with a negative modulator selectively binding to the GluN1/N2B subunits of the NMDA receptor complex (i.e., ifenprodil) may induce a more pronounced antidepressant-like effect than monotherapy. However, these findings still need to be confirmed in further experiments. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of self-aggregation on the hydration of an amphiphilic antidepressant drug in different aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, Pablo; Gutierrez-Pichel, Manuel; Mosquera, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Apparent molal volumes and adiabatic compressibilities of aqueous solutions of the amphiphilic antidepressant drug clomipramine hydrochloride have been determined from density and ultrasound velocity measurements in the temperature range 288.15-313.15 K in buffered aqueous solution of pH 3.0 and 5.5. Critical concentrations of aggregation of this drug were obtained from inflections on the plots of the sound velocity against drug concentration. Apparent molal adiabatic compressibilities of the aggregates formed by the drug, calculated by combining the ultrasound velocity and density data, were typical of those for a stacked aggregate. From the temperature dependence of the critical concentration and using the mass action model combined with the Phillips definition of the critical concentration the thermodynamic standard quantities: free Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of aggregate formation were calculated. The critical concentration and energy involved in the aggregation process of this drug have been also evaluated experimentally using isothermal titration calorimetry at 298.15 K. The solvent-drug interactions have been discussed from compressibility and calorimetry data

  16. Treatment with antidepressants and lithium is associated with increased risk of treatment with antiparkinson drugs: a pharmacoepidemiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, Anne Mette; Kvist, Tine Kajsa; Nielsen, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk for persons treated with antidepressants or lithium of subsequent treatment with antiparkinson drugs (APD). METHODS: The Danish national prescription database supplied data on all persons who received antidepressants, lithium, or antidiabetics (first control group......). A second control group was included comprising persons from the general population. Outcome was purchase of APD and the study period was 1995 to 1999. RESULTS: In total, 1 293 789 persons were included. The rate ratio of treatment with APD after treatment with antidepressants was 2.27 (95% CI 2.14 to 2.......42) for men and 1.50 (95% CI 1.43 to 1.58) for women. Figures for lithium were almost identical. CONCLUSION: Persons treated with antidepressants or lithium are at increased risk of subsequently treatment with APD, showing an association between anxiety/affective disorder and Parkinson's disease....

  17. Magnetic micro-solid-phase extraction based on magnetite-MCM-41 with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of antidepressant drugs in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruzaman, Sazlinda; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Yahaya, Noorfatimah; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Endud, Salasiah; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Nazihah

    2017-11-01

    A new facile magnetic micro-solid-phase extraction coupled to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry detection was developed for the extraction and determination of selected antidepressant drugs in biological fluids using magnetite-MCM-41 as adsorbent. The synthesized sorbent was characterized by several spectroscopic techniques. The maximum extraction efficiency for extraction of 500 μg/L antidepressant drugs from aqueous solution was obtained with 15 mg of magnetite-MCM-41 at pH 12. The analyte was desorbed using 100 μL of acetonitrile prior to gas chromatography determination. This method was rapid in which the adsorption procedure was completed in 60 s. Under the optimized conditions using 15 mL of antidepressant drugs sample, the calibration curve showed good linearity in the range of 0.05-500 μg/L (r 2  = 0.996-0.999). Good limits of detection (0.008-0.010 μg/L) were obtained for the analytes with good relative standard deviations of solid-phase extraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is a convenient, fast, and economical method for the extraction and determination of amitriptyline and chlorpromazine in biological samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-01-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors

  19. Skeletal effects of central nervous system active drugs: anxiolytics, sedatives, antidepressants, lithium and neuroleptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Many central nervous system active drugs can alter postural balance, increasing the risk of fractures. Anxiolytics and sedatives include the benzodiazepines, and these have been associated with a limited increase in the risk of fractures, even at low doses, probably from an increased risk of falls. No systematic differences have been shown between benzodiazepines with long and short half-lives. Although the increase in risk of fractures was limited, care must still be taken when prescribing for older fall-prone subjects at risk of osteoporosis. Neuroleptics may be associated with a decrease in bone mineral density and a very limited increase in fracture risk. Antidepressants are associated with a dose-dependent increase in the risk of fractures. The increase in relative risk of fractures seems to be larger with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) than with tricyclic antidepressants. The reason for this is not known but may be linked to serotonin effects on bone cells and the risk of falls. With the wide use of SSRIs, more research is needed. Lithium is associated with a decrease in the risk of fractures. This may be linked to its effects on the Wnt glycoprotein family, which is a specialised signalling system for certain cell types.

  20. Various effects of antidepressant drugs on bone microarchitectecture, mechanical properties and bone remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, N.; Bernard, P.; Beaupied, H; Bizot, J.C.; Trovero, F.; Courteix, D.; Benhamou, C.L.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various drugs which present antidepressant properties: selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, fluoxetine), serotonin and noradrenaline-reuptake inhibitors (Desipramine) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE, rolipram and tofisopam) on bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties. Twelve female mice were studied per group starting at an age of 10 weeks. During 4 weeks, they received subcutaneously either placebo or 20 mg kg -1 day -1 of desipramine, fluoxetine or 10 mg kg -1 day -1 of rolipram or tofisopam. Serum Osteocalcin and CTx were evaluated by ELISA. Bone microarchitecture of the distal femur was characterized by X-ray microCT (Skyscan1072). Mechanical properties were assessed by three-point bending test (Instron 4501) and antidepressant efficacy by forced swimming and open field tests. Fluoxetine displayed lower TbTh (- 6.1%, p -1 , 6431 ± 1182 MPa) than in placebo (101 ± 9 N mm -1 , 8441 ± 1180 MPa). Bone markers indicated a significantly higher bone formation in tofisopam (+ 8.6%) and a lower in fluoxetine (- 56.1%) compared to placebo. These data suggest deleterious effects for SSRIs, both on trabecular and cortical bone and a positive effect of PDE inhibitors on trabecular bone. Furthermore tofisopam anabolic effect in terms of bone markers, suggests a potential therapeutic effect of the PDE inhibitors on bone

  1. In utero exposure to antidepressants and the use of drugs for pulmonary diseases in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, P. G. J.; Bos, H. J.; de Jong-van de Berg, L. T. W.; Wilffert, B.

    Purpose The use of antidepressants during pregnancy is common. Some studies suggest an association between in utero exposure to antidepressants and the occurrence of pulmonary diseases like asthma later in life. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) as well tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are

  2. Development and evaluation of gastroretentive floating tablets of an antidepressant drug by thermoplastic granulation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal Ashok Pawar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken with an aim to formulate, develop and evaluate gastroretentive floating tablets of an antidepressant drug, Venlafaxine HCl (hydrochloride, which release the drug in a sustained manner over a period of 24 h. Three different hydrophobic retardants namely hydrogenated cottonseed oil, carnauba wax, cetyl alcohol and a hydrophilic polymer Methocel® (hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC K15M were used in different combinations at different ratios for the preparation of tablets. The tablets were prepared by Hot Melt or Thermoplastic granulation method and evaluated for tablet thickness, hardness, weight variation, friability, floating lag time and in vitro drug release. Formulation F8 with hydrophilic polymer (Methocel® K15M and hydrophobic retardant (carnauba wax in the ratio 1:2.6 (approx. was considered as an optimized formulation. The optimized formulation showed satisfactory sustained drug release and remained buoyant on the surface of the medium for more than 24 h and its release profile was comparable with the marketed formulation (VENTAB-XL 37.5. It can also be concluded that floating drug delivery system of Venlafaxine HCl can be successfully formulated as an approach to increase gastric residence time and thereby improving its bioavailability.

  3. I-125-labelled iodothyronines: useful tools for studies of effects of an antidepressant drug fluoxetine in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 3 (2010), s. 867-871 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : antidepressant drug * radiometric enzyme assay * thyroid hormone Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  4. Spectrofluorimetric protocol for antidepressant drugs in dosage forms and human plasma through derivatization with dansyl chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Omar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A reliable, sensitive and selective spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of certain antidepressant drugs namely sertraline hydrochloride, fluoxetine hydrochloride, paroxetine hydrochloride, amineptine hydrochloride and bupropion hydrochloride in pure forms, pharmaceutical formulation and human plasma. The method is based on the reaction of investigated drugs with 5-(dimethylamino naphthalene-1-sulfonyl chloride (dansyl chloride in the presence of 0.5 M sodium carbonate to yield highly fluorescent derivatives, measured at 450 nm (excitation at 347 nm. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the reaction products were carefully studied and optimized. The calibration plots were constructed over the range of 0.02–0.14 μg mL−1. The proposed method was successfully applied for analysis of cited drugs in dosage forms. The high sensitivity of the proposed method allows the determination of investigated drugs in spiked and real human plasma. Statistical comparisons of the results with the reference methods show an excellent agreement and indicate no significant difference in accuracy and precision.

  5. Clinical perspectives on the influence of drug formulation on patient tolerability and use of commonly prescribed antidepressants in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Fuller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the formulation options for currently available antidepressants, and discuss examples of the influence that formulation may have on the pharmacologic and clinical profiles of the medications. A review of current literature suggests that differences in drug-delivery technologies can lead to variations in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of generic and branded drugs, despite generic drugs being required to meet bioequivalence standards compared with their branded counterparts. These differences may influence the effectiveness and tolerability of treatment. Recent reports have highlighted the need for individualized treatment regimens and careful assessment of tolerability and efficacy when switching patients from brand to generic formulations. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that differences in formulation can substantially impact drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, which in turn, can affect drug effects. The clinical impact of these differences remains unclear. Further research is needed to clarify the influence of antidepressant formulations on treatment adherence, patient preference, and quality of life, and how this impacts clinical practice with regard to brand versus generic treatment selection.

  6. Optical sensors for therapeutic drug monitoring of antidepressants for a better medication adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Anne K.; Hess, Stefan; Gauglitz, Günter

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring provides the attending physicians with detailed information on a patient's individual serum level especially during long-term medication. Due to the fact that each patient tolerates drugs or their metabolites differently a medication adjustment can reduce the number and intensity of noticeable side-effects. In particular, psychotropic drugs can cause unpleasant side-effects that affect a patient's life almost as much as the mental disease itself. The tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline is commonly used for treatment of depressions and was selected for the development of an immunoassay using the direct optical sensor technique Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS). RIfS is a simple, robust and label-free method for direct monitoring of binding events on glass surfaces. Binding to the surface causes a shift of the interference spectrum by a change of the refractive index or physical thickness. This technique can be used for time-resolved observation of association and dissociation of amitriptyline (antigen) and a specific antibody using the binding inhibition test format. An amitriptyline derivative is immobilized on the sensor surface and a specific amount of antibodies can bind to the surface unless the binding is inhibited by free amitriptyline in a sample. No fluorescent label is needed making the whole assay less expensive than label-based methods. With this recently developed immunoassay amitriptyline concentrations in buffer (PBS) can easily be detected down to 500 ng/L.

  7. Switching antidepressants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antidepressants are widely prescribed for depression in primary care,1 but a lack ... all antidepressants are capable of causing discontinuation .... antidepressant, or maintaining an antidepressant, in elderly, medically compromised (e.g. renal.

  8. Peripheral blood and neuropsychological markers for the onset of action of antidepressant drugs in patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiemke Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, treatment outcomes with currently available strategies are often disappointing. Therefore, it is sensible to develop new strategies to increase remission rates in acutely depressed patients. Many studies reported that true drug response can be observed within 14 days (early improvement of antidepressant treatment. The identical time course of symptom amelioration after early improvement in patients treated with antidepressants of all classes or with placebo strongly suggests a common biological mechanism, which is not specific for a particular antidepressant medication. However, the biology underlying early improvement and final treatment response is not understood and there is no established biological marker as yet, which can predict treatment response for the individual patient before initiation or during the course of antidepressant treatment. Peripheral blood markers and executive functions are particularly promising candidates as markers for the onset of action and thus the prediction of final treatment outcome in MDD. Methods/Design The present paper presents the rationales, objectives and methods of a multi-centre study applying close-meshed repetitive measurements of peripheral blood and neuropsychological parameters in patients with MDD and healthy controls during a study period of eight weeks for the identification of biomarkers for the onset of antidepressants' action in patients with MDD. Peripheral blood parameters and depression severity are assessed in weekly intervals from baseline to week 8, executive performance in bi-weekly intervals. Patients are participating in a randomized controlled multi-level clinical trial, healthy controls are matched according to mean age, sex and general intelligence. Discussion This investigation will help to identify a biomarker or a set of biomarkers with decision-making quality in the treatment of MDD in order to increase the currently

  9. Possible role of more positive social behaviour in the clinical effect of antidepressant drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, Simon N.; Moskowitz, Debbie S.; aan Het Rot, Marije

    Increasing serotonin decreases quarrelsome behaviours and enhances agreeable behaviours in humans. Antidepressants, even those whose primary action is not on serotonin, seem to increase serotonin function. We suggest that antidepressants act in part by effects on social behaviour, which leads to a

  10. SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION INDUCED BY ANTI-PSYCHOTICS AND ANTI-DEPRESSANTS IN DRUG NAIVE PATIENTS – A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohanalakshmi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to determine and compare sexual dysfunction caused by anti-psychotics and anti-depressants in drug naïve patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients diagnosed as drug naïve schizophrenic and depression as per DSM-5 criteria & age between 18-45 years were recruited and allocated into group A (n=30–receiving anti-psychotics & group B (n=30 receiving anti-depressants after informed consent by the patients. Sexual dysfunction was assessed by Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX during the initial 2 months of therapy. RESULTS ASEX mean for patients receiving antipsychotics increased from the baseline of 7.97 to 17.23 and the ASEX mean for patients receiving antidepressants increased from baseline of 7.80 to 18.67 with p value of 0.249 which is not statistically significant. Among the antipsychotics haloperidol ASEX mean increased from 7.87 to 18.00 and risperidone mean increased from 8.07 to 16.47 with the p value of 0.335 which is not significant. More patients on haloperidol showed evidence of sexual dysfunction as assessed by ASEX scoring than risperidone though p value was not significant. Among the two antidepressants ASEX score mean for amitriptyline patients increased from 8.07 to 16.47, and that of fluoxetine from 7.53 to 16.47 with the p value of 0.018* statistically significant at α of 0.05 level. CONCLUSION This study shows presence of sexual dysfunction in patients receiving antipsychotics & antidepressants by 2 nd month of therapy though statistically not significant. Fluoxetine group patients developed statistically significant sexual dysfunction. Implications for future research about sexual dysfunction in all new treatments should be strongly taken into account because this side effect adds to the emotional stress and worsening of mental dysfunction.

  11. Testing the antidepressant properties of the peptide ARA290 in a human neuropsychological model of drug action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerit, Hilâl; Veer, Ilya M; Dahan, Albert; Niesters, Marieke; Harmer, Catherine J; Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Van der Does, Willem

    2015-12-01

    Studies on the neural effects of Erythropoietin (EPO) indicate that EPO may have antidepressant effects. Due to its hematopoietic effects, EPO may cause serious side-effects with repeated administration if patients are not monitored extensively. ARA290 is an EPO-analog peptide without such hematopoietic side-effects but may have neurotrophic and antidepressant effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant effects of ARA290 in a neuropsychological model of drug action. Healthy participants (N=36) received ARA290 (2mg) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group design. Neural and cognitive effects were assessed one week after administration. Primary outcome measures were the neural processing of fearful vs happy faces and the behavioral recognition of emotional facial expressions. ARA290-treated individuals displayed lower neural responses to happy faces in the fusiform gyrus. ARA290 tended to lower the recognition of happy and disgust facial expressions. Although ARA290 was not associated with a better memory for positive words, it was associated with faster categorization of positive vs negative words. Finally, ARA290 increased attention towards positive emotional pictures. No effects were observed on mood and affective symptoms. ARA290 may modulate some aspects of emotional processing, however, the direction and the strength of its effects do not unequivocally support an antidepressant-like profile for ARA290. Future studies may investigate the effects of different timing and dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Dextroamphetamine sulfate provided quick relief of severe post-partum depression that was recalcitrant to standard antidepressants and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Jaffe, A

    2017-01-01

    To determine if dextroamphetamine sulfate could improve symptoms of post-partum depression. A woman with severe post-partum depression that was resistant to standard antidepressant therapy and psychotherapy was treated with dextroamphetamine sulfate extended release capsules 15 mg/day. A quick and complete abrogation of the depression ensued along with improvement of migraine headaches, insomnia, and chronic fatigue. Dextr6amphetamine sulfate should be considered as a treatment modality for post-partum depression.

  13. The effect of anti-depressant and narcoleptic drugs on isopropyl iodoamphetamine biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, J.L.; Holman, B.L.; Delmon, L.; Carmel, A.; Johnson, D.; Moingeon, P.; Blau, M.; Chu, H.

    1985-01-01

    I-123 Nisopropyl p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) is a useful radiotracer for imaging regional cerebral perfursion in a wide variety of neurological and cerebrovascular diseases. The major route of amine metabolism in the lung is the mixed function oxidase (MFO) system. A number of antidepressants and narcoleptic agents have been shown to displace amphetamine from the lung. If these drugs release IMP before it is metabolized to lipophobic products, brain concentration will be affected. The authors investigated the effects of these drugs on IMP distribution in animals with high and low pulmonary concentrations of MFO. When 1 mg/kg imipramine (IM) was injected iv into Wistar rats 30 min before IMP and 50 min before sacrifice, lung activity was depressed (4 + 1% ID vs 12 + 4% ID). Brain activity was depressed only with 4 mg/kg IM (l.5 + .3% ID vs 2.7 + .7% ID). There was no significant difference in IMP brain activity without IM and when IM was given simultaneously with, 5 or 15 min after IMP. In New Zealand rabbits which have a low pulmonary MFO concentration, IM altered lung and brain uptake during simultaneous injection and as late as 15 min after IMP. Lung uptake was reduced 51% and brain uptake was increased 25%, 20%, and 19% when IM was injected 0, 5 and 15 min after IMP. The MAO inhibitors, phenelzine and L deprenyl, did not alter the brain, lung or liver IMP activity in rats at a dose of 5 mg/kg. These data are consistent with a model in which IMP is trapped and metabolized in the lung by the MFO system. Assuming an active MFO system in the human (unlike the rabbit), brain activity of IMP will not be altered by either IM or MAO inhibitors

  14. Antidepressant-like drug effects in juvenile and adolescent mice in the tail suspension test: Relationship with hippocampal serotonin and norepinephrine transporter expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Mitchell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a major health problem for which most patients are not effectively treated. This problem is further compounded in children and adolescents where only two antidepressants [both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs] are currently approved for clinical use. Mouse models provide tools to identify mechanisms that might account for poor treatment response to antidepressants. However, there are few studies in adolescent mice and none in juvenile mice. The tail suspension test (TST is commonly used to assay for antidepressant-like effects of drugs in adult mice. Here we show that the TST can also be used to assay antidepressant-like effects of drugs in C57Bl/6 mice aged 21 (juvenile and 28 (adolescent days post-partum (P. We found that the magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the SSRI escitalopram was less in P21 mice than in P28 or adult mice. The smaller antidepressant response of juveniles was not related to either maximal binding (Bmax or affinity (Kd for [3H]citalopram binding to the serotonin transporter (SERT in hippocampus, which did not vary significantly among ages. Magnitude of antidepressant-like response to the tricyclic desipramine was similar among ages, as were Bmax and Kd values for [3H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter (NET in hippocampus. Together, these findings suggest that juvenile mice are less responsive to the antidepressant-like effects of escitalopram than adults, but that this effect is not due to delayed maturation of SERT in hippocampus. Showing that the TST is a relevant behavioral assay of antidepressant-like activity in juvenile and adolescent mice sets the stage for future studies of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response in these young populations.

  15. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in major depression in a multi-neurotransmitter system: a focus on antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, R

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and the corresponding subreceptors involved in major depression. Neuronal circuits in the brainstem, hippocampus and hypothalamus are developed, since they can be used to derive a multimodal pharmacotherapy. In this sense, serotonin hypoactivity could occur through a strong presynaptic inhibition of glutaminergic neurons via the subtype 5 of metabotropic glutaminergic receptors, and noradrenaline hypoactivity could be due to an enhanced presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic neurons via GABAB receptors. In the hippocampus, dopamine hypoactivity leads to a decreased positive effect. In clinical trials, the antidepressant effect of drugs interfering with the mentioned subreceptors, for example the triple reuptake inhibitor amitifadine, is being investigated. Moreover, the alterations of neuropeptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y and galanin are pointed out. The additional antidepressant effect of analogs, agonists and antagonists of the mentioned neuropeptides should be examined.

  16. A simple dried blood spot method for therapeutic drug monitoring of the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, and their active metabolites using LC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E. J. J.; Paardekooper, J.; Brummel-Mulder, E.; Hak, E.; Wilffert, B.; Maring, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TOM) of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) is considered useful in patients with major depressive disorder, since these drugs display large individual differences in clearance, and the therapeutic windows of these drugs are relatively small. We developed an assay for

  17. The Utility of Impulsive Bias and Altered Decision Making as Predictors of Drug Efficacy and Target Selection: Rethinking Behavioral Screening for Antidepressant Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Gerard J; Day, Mark; Hudzik, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction may be a core feature of major depressive disorder, including affective processing bias, abnormal response to negative feedback, changes in decision making, and increased impulsivity. Accordingly, a translational medicine paradigm predicts clinical action of novel antidepressants by examining drug-induced changes in affective processing bias. With some exceptions, these concepts have not been systematically applied to preclinical models to test new chemical entities. The purpose of this review is to examine whether an empirically derived behavioral screen for antidepressant drugs may screen for compounds, at least in part, by modulating an impulsive biasing of responding and altered decision making. The differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) 72-second schedule is an operant schedule with a documented fidelity for discriminating antidepressant drugs from nonantidepressant drugs. However, a theoretical basis for this empirical relationship has been lacking. Therefore, this review will discuss whether response bias toward impulsive behavior may be a critical screening characteristic of DRL behavior requiring long inter-response times to obtain rewards. This review will compare and contrast DRL behavior with the five-choice serial reaction time task, a test specifically designed for assessing motoric impulsivity, with respect to psychopharmacological testing and the neural basis of distributed macrocircuits underlying these tasks. This comparison suggests that the existing empirical basis for the DRL 72-second schedule as a pharmacological screen for antidepressant drugs is complemented by a novel hypothesis that altering impulsive response bias for rodents trained on this operant schedule is a previously unrecognized theoretical cornerstone for this screening paradigm. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4 as a target for the development of antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), one of eleven PDE enzyme families, specifically catalyzes hydrolysis of cyclic AMP (cAMP); it has four subtypes (PDE4A-D) with at least 25 splice variants. PDE4 plays a critical role in the control of intracellular cAMP concentrations. PDE4 inhibitors produce antidepressant actions in both animals and humans via enhancement of cAMP signaling in the brain. However, their clinical utility has been hampered by side effects, in particular nausea and emesis. While there is still a long way to go before PDE4 inhibitors with high therapeutic indices are available for treatment of depressive disorders, important advances have been made in the development of PDE4 inhibitors as antidepressants. First, limited, but significant studies point to PDE4D as the major PDE4 subtype responsible for antidepressant-like effects of PDE4 inhibitors, although the role of PDE4A cannot be excluded. Second, PDE4D may contribute to emesis, the major side effect of PDE4 inhibitors. For this reason, identification of roles of PDE4D splice variants in mediating antidepressant activity is particularly important. Recent studies using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have demonstrated the feasibility to identify cellular functions of individual PDE4 variants. Third, mixed inhibitors of PDE4 and PDE7 or PDE4 and serotonin reuptake have been developed and may be potential antidepressants with minimized side effects. Finally, relatively selective inhibitors of one or two PDE4 subtypes have been synthesized using structure- and scaffold-based design. This review also discusses the relationship between PDE4 and antidepressant activity based on structures, brain distributions, and pharmacological properties of PDE4 and its isoforms.

  19. Hollow fiber-based liquid phase microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography for extraction and determination of some antidepressant drugs in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esrafili, Ali; Yamini, Yadollah; Shariati, Shahab

    2007-12-05

    The applicability of hollow fiber-based liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) was evaluated for the extraction and preconcentration of three antidepressant drugs (amitriptyline, imipramine and sertraline) prior to their determination by HPLC-UV. The target drugs were extracted from 11.0 mL of aqueous solution with pH 12.0 (source phase) into an organic extracting solvent (n-dodecane) impregnated in the pores of a hollow fiber and finally back extracted into 24 microL of aqueous solution located inside the lumen of the hollow fiber and adjusted to pH 2.1 using 0.1M of H3PO4 (receiving phase). The extraction was performed due to pH gradient between the inside and outside of the hollow fiber membrane. In order to obtain high extraction efficiency, the parameters affecting the HF-LPME including pH of the source and receiving phases, the type of organic phase, ionic strength and volume of the source phase, stirring rate and extraction time were studied and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, enrichment factors up to 300 were achieved and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method was in the range of 2-12%. The calibration curves were obtained in the range of 5-500 microg L(-1) with reasonable linearity (R2>0.998) and the limits of detection (LODs) ranged between 0.5 and 0.7 microg L(-1) (based on S/N=3). Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by extraction and determination of the drugs in urine, plasma and tap water samples. The results indicated that hollow fiber microextraction method has excellent clean-up and high-preconcentration factor and can be served as a simple and sensitive method for monitoring of antidepressant drugs in the biological samples.

  20. Ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination of antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs in neonatal meconium and maternal hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichini, Simona; Cortes, Laura; Marchei, Emilia; Solimini, Renata; Pacifici, Roberta; Gomez-Roig, Mª Dolores; García-Algar, Oscar

    2016-01-25

    A procedure based on ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry has been developed for the determination of 22 antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs ad metabolites in the three consecutive maternal hair segments representing the pregnancy trimesters and paired neonatal meconium samples. After hair washing with methyl alcohol and diethyl ether and subsequent addition of internal standards, hair samples were treated with 500 μl VMA-T M3 reagent for 1h at 100 °C. After cooling, 100 μl M3 extract were diluted with 400 μl water and a volume of 10 μl was injected into chromatographic system. Meconium samples were firstly treated with 1 ml methyl alcohol and the organic layer back-extracted twice with 1.5 ml of a mixture of ethylacetate:hexane (80:20, v/v). Chromatographic separation was achieved at ambient temperature using a reverse-phase column and a linear gradient elution with two solvents: 0.3% formic acid in acetonitrile and 5mM ammonium formate pH 3. The mass spectrometer was operated in positive ion mode, using multiple reaction monitoring via positive electrospray ionization. The method was linear from the limit of quantification (0.05-1 ng/mg hair and 5-25 ng/g meconium depending on analyte under investigation;) to 10 ng/mg hair and 1000 ng/g meconium, with an intra- and inter-assay imprecision and inaccuracy always less than 20% and an analytical recovery between 66.6% and 95.3%, depending on the considered analyte and biological matrix. Using the validated method, 7 mothers were found positive to one or more hair segments and 5 meconium samples were found positive to one or more antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs, assessing prenatal exposure to these drugs following maternal consumption in one or more pregnancy trimesters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraros, John; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Patten, Scott B; Mousseau, Darrell D

    2017-03-01

    To determine if antidepressant drug usage is associated with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD). We conducted a systematic search of Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. An initial screen by abstracts and titles was performed, and relevant full articles were then reviewed and assessed for their methodologic quality. Crude effect estimates were extracted from the included articles and a pooled estimate was obtained using a random effects model. Five articles were selected from an initial pool of 4,123 articles. Use of antidepressant drugs was associated with a significant twofold increase in the odds of some form of cognitive impairment or dementia (OR = 2.17). Age was identified as a likely modifier of the association between antidepressant use and some form of cognitive impairment or AD/dementia. Studies that included participants with an average age equal to or greater than 65 years showed an increased odds of some form of cognitive impairment with antidepressant drug usage (OR = 1.65), whereas those with participants less than age 65 revealed an even stronger association (OR = 3.25). Antidepressant drug usage is associated with AD/dementia and this is particularly evident if usage begins before age 65. This association may arise due to confounding by depression or depression severity. However, biological mechanisms potentially linking antidepressant exposure to dementia have been described, so an etiological effect of antidepressants is possible. With this confirmation that an association exists, clarification of underlying etiologic pathways requires urgent attention. © 2016 The Authors. Depression and Anxiety published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The association of antidepressant drug usage with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease: A systematic review and meta‐analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraros, John; Nwankwo, Chijioke; Patten, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    1 Objective To determine if antidepressant drug usage is associated with cognitive impairment or dementia, including Alzheimer disease (AD). 2 Method We conducted a systematic search of Medline, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library. An initial screen by abstracts and titles was performed, and relevant full articles were then reviewed and assessed for their methodologic quality. Crude effect estimates were extracted from the included articles and a pooled estimate was obtained using a random effects model. 3 Results Five articles were selected from an initial pool of 4,123 articles. Use of antidepressant drugs was associated with a significant twofold increase in the odds of some form of cognitive impairment or dementia (OR = 2.17). Age was identified as a likely modifier of the association between antidepressant use and some form of cognitive impairment or AD/dementia. Studies that included participants with an average age equal to or greater than 65 years showed an increased odds of some form of cognitive impairment with antidepressant drug usage (OR = 1.65), whereas those with participants less than age 65 revealed an even stronger association (OR = 3.25). 4 Conclusions Antidepressant drug usage is associated with AD/dementia and this is particularly evident if usage begins before age 65. This association may arise due to confounding by depression or depression severity. However, biological mechanisms potentially linking antidepressant exposure to dementia have been described, so an etiological effect of antidepressants is possible. With this confirmation that an association exists, clarification of underlying etiologic pathways requires urgent attention. PMID:28029715

  3. Antidepressants for Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et al. Antidepressant drugs and the risk of suicide in children and adolescents. Pediatric Drugs. 2014;16:115. Gibbons RD, et al. Antidepressant treatment and suicide attempts and self-inflicted injury in children and adolescents. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. 2015;24: ...

  4. Recent advances in the understanding of the interaction of antidepressant drugs with serotonin and norepinephrine transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Kristensen, Anders Skov; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2009-01-01

    The biogenic monoamine transporters are integral membrane proteins that perform active transport of extracellular dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine into cells. These transporters are targets for therapeutic agents such as antidepressants, as well as addictive substances such as cocaine...... and amphetamine. Seminal advances in the understanding of the structure and function of this transporter family have recently been accomplished by structural studies of a bacterial transporter, as well as medicinal chemistry and pharmacological studies of mammalian transporters. This feature article focuses...

  5. Liquid-phase microextraction for simultaneous chromatographic analysis of three antidepressant drugs in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Dobrovolskni Porto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method using Liquid Phase Microextraction for simultaneous detection of citalopram (CIT, paroxetine (PAR and fluoxetine (FLU, using venlafaxine as internal standard, in plasma by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was developed. The linearity was evaluated between 5.0 and 500 ng mL-1 (r > 0.99 and the limit of quantification was 2.0, 3.0 and 5.0 ng mL-1 for CIT, PAR and FLU, respectively. Therefore, it can be applied to therapeutic drug monitoring, pharmacokinetics or bioavailability studies and its advantages are that it necessary relatively inexpensive equipment and sample preparation techniques.

  6. Atypical Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health-medications/index.shtml. Accessed May 16, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Atypical antidepressants: Pharmacology, admininstration, and ... www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 23, 2016. Hirsch M, et al. Discontinuing antidepressant medications in adults. ...

  7. Genetically encoded photocrosslinkers locate the high-affinity binding site of antidepressant drugs in the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rannversson, Hafsteinn; Andersen, Jacob; Hall, Lena Sørensen

    2016-01-01

    with p-azido-L-phenylalanine (azF) at selected positions in hSERT to map the binding site of imipramine, a prototypical tricyclic antidepressant, and vortioxetine, a novel multimodal antidepressant. We find that the two antidepressants crosslink with azF incorporated at different positions within...

  8. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-02

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed.

  9. Emergency Department Visits for Drug-Related Suicide Attempts Involving Antidepressants by Adolescents and Young Adults: 2004 to 2008. The DAWN Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, adolescents made 23,124 visits to the emergency department (ED) for drug-related suicide attempts, and young adults made 38,036 such visits; of these visits, 23.0 percent (5,312 visits) among adolescents and 17.6 percent (6,700 visits) among young adults involved antidepressants. Among ED visits for suicide attempts involving…

  10. Erythropoietin reduces neural and cognitive processing of fear in human models of antidepressant drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla; O'Sullivan, Ursula; Harmer, Catherine J

    2007-01-01

    with reduced attention to fear. Erythropoietin additionally reduced recognition of fearful facial expressions without affecting recognition of other emotional expressions. These actions occurred in the absence of changes in hematological parameters. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that Epo directly......) versus saline on the neural processing of happy and fearful faces in 23 healthy volunteers. Facial expression recognition was assessed outside the scanner. RESULTS: One week after administration, Epo reduced neural response to fearful versus neutral faces in the occipito-parietal cortex consistent...... study aimed to explore the effects of Epo on neural and behavioral measures of emotional processing relevant for depression and the effects of conventional antidepressant medication. METHODS: In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore the effects of Epo (40,000 IU...

  11. Ketamine decreases resting state functional network connectivity in healthy subjects: implications for antidepressant drug action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Scheidegger

    Full Text Available Increasing preclinical and clinical evidence underscores the strong and rapid antidepressant properties of the glutamate-modulating NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. Targeting the glutamatergic system might thus provide a novel molecular strategy for antidepressant treatment. Since glutamate is the most abundant and major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, pathophysiological changes in glutamatergic signaling are likely to affect neurobehavioral plasticity, information processing and large-scale changes in functional brain connectivity underlying certain symptoms of major depressive disorder. Using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI, the "dorsal nexus "(DN was recently identified as a bilateral dorsal medial prefrontal cortex region showing dramatically increased depression-associated functional connectivity with large portions of a cognitive control network (CCN, the default mode network (DMN, and a rostral affective network (AN. Hence, Sheline and colleagues (2010 proposed that reducing increased connectivity of the DN might play a critical role in reducing depression symptomatology and thus represent a potential therapy target for affective disorders. Here, using a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover rsfMRI challenge in healthy subjects we demonstrate that ketamine decreases functional connectivity of the DMN to the DN and to the pregenual anterior cingulate (PACC and medioprefrontal cortex (MPFC via its representative hub, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC. These findings in healthy subjects may serve as a model to elucidate potential biomechanisms that are addressed by successful treatment of major depression. This notion is further supported by the temporal overlap of our observation of subacute functional network modulation after 24 hours with the peak of efficacy following an intravenous ketamine administration in treatment-resistant depression.

  12. Divergence and convergence of commercial and scientific priorities in drug development: The case of Zelmid, the first SSRI antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulinari, Shai

    2015-08-01

    Based on a realist conceptualization of interests, this paper explores how commercial and scientific priorities appear to have converged and diverged during the development of the antidepressant Zelmid. The drug represents the first of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to reach the market. Zelmid was synthesized in 1971 and launched by the Swedish firm Astra in 1982, but subsequently withdrawn the next year because of adverse neurological effects. This paper draws on in-depth interviews with scientists representing both industry and academia who had high-level involvement in various phases of the project (experimental, pre-clinical and clinical), as well as on textual sources such as scientific articles and memoirs. Zelmid was a product of mechanism-based or "rational" drug discovery from the early 1960s and the associated intermingling of science and commerce. It is argued that both scientists and the pharmaceutical company shared an interest in embracing mechanism-based drug discovery because it simultaneously promised medico-scientific advances and profits. However, the intermingling of science and commerce also strained the relationship between scientific and commercial priorities further along the trajectory of the drug; for example, concerning issues such as dosage strategy and drug use in primary care, where corporate management allegedly took decisions contrary to the recommendations of both academic and company scientists. On such occasions the asymmetry in power became apparent in scientists' narratives: commercial considerations trumped those of science since, ultimately, decisions rest with management, not with scientists. In addition, temporality appears to be associated with the divergence of commercial and scientific priorities. While rare during experimental and pre-clinical phases, divergence was concentrated downstream to the clinical testing and post-marketing phases. It is hypothesized that a similar pattern of convergence and

  13. Involvement of monoaminergic systems in anxiolytic and antidepressive activities of the standardized extract of Cocos nucifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eliane Brito Cortez; de Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Meneses, Lucas Nascimento; E Silva Pereira, Yuri Freitas; Matos, Natália Castelo Branco; de Freitas, Rayanne Brito; Lima, Nycole Brito Cortez; Patrocínio, Manoel Cláudio Azevedo; Leal, Luzia Kalyne Almeida Moreira; Viana, Glauce Socorro Barros; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Extracts from the husk fiber of Cocos nucifera are used in folk medicine, but their actions on the central nervous system have not been studied. Here, the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of the standardized hydroalcoholic extract of C. nucifera husk fiber (HECN) were evaluated. Male Swiss mice were treated with HECN (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg) 60 min before experiments involving the plus maze test, hole-board test, tail suspension test, and forced swimming test (FST). HECN was administered orally (p.o.) in acute and repeated-dose treatments. The forced swimming test was performed with dopaminergic and noradrenergic antagonists, as well as a serotonin release inhibitor. Administration of HECN in the FST after intraperitoneal (i.p.) pretreatment of mice with sulpiride (50 mg/kg), prazosin (1 mg/kg), or p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 100 mg/kg) caused the actions of these three agents to be reversed. However, this effect was not observed after pretreating the animals with SCH23390 (15 µg/kg, i.p.) or yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) The dose chosen for HECN was 100 mg/kg, p.o., which increased the number of entries as well as the permanence in the open arms of the maze after acute and repeated doses. In both the forced swimming and the tail suspension tests, the same dose decreased the time spent immobile but did not disturb locomotor activity in an open-field test. The anxiolytic effect of HECN appears to be related to the GABAergic system, while its antidepressant effect depends upon its interaction with the serotoninergic, noradrenergic (α1 receptors), and dopaminergic (D2 dopamine receptors) systems.

  14. Traxoprodil, a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, potentiates the antidepressant-like effects of certain antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszak, Ewa; Stasiuk, Weronika; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Oniszczuk, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Świąder, Katarzyna; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    One of the newest substances, whose antidepressant activity was shown is traxoprodil, which is a selective antagonist of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of traxoprodil on animals' behavior using the forced swim test (FST), as well as the effect of traxoprodil (10 mg/kg) on the activity of antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg) and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Serotonergic lesion and experiment using the selective agonists of serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 was conducted to evaluate the role of the serotonergic system in the antidepressant action of traxoprodil. Brain concentrations of tested agents were determined using HPLC. The results showed that traxoprodil at a dose of 20 and 40 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST and it was not related to changes in animals' locomotor activity. Co-administration of traxoprodil with imipramine, fluoxetine or escitalopram, each in subtherapeutic doses, significantly affected the animals' behavior in the FST and, what is important, these changes were not due to the severity of locomotor activity. The observed effect of traxoprodil is only partially associated with serotonergic system and is independent of the effect on the 5-HT1A and 5-HT2 serotonin receptors. The results of an attempt to assess the nature of the interaction between traxoprodil and the tested drugs show that in the case of joint administration of traxoprodil and fluoxetine, imipramine or escitalopram, there were interactions in the pharmacokinetic phase.

  15. Sertraline: a new antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auster, R

    1993-08-01

    Sertraline is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that has been approved for use in the treatment of depression. Its side-effect profile is similar to that of fluoxetine, a drug of the same class. The side effects of these drugs most often affect the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors are nonsedating and free of cardiac effects; they do not cause hypotension, urinary retention or blurred vision. Sertraline, like fluoxetine, appears to be safer than tricyclic antidepressants in overdose. However, no clinical studies comparing sertraline and fluoxetine have been published. The wholesale cost of a month's supply of sertraline is about $50, compared with about $5 for a generic tricyclic antidepressant. Despite their cost, serotonin uptake inhibitors may be the initial drugs of choice in depressed elderly patients, because these patients are at increased risk for suicide and have a low tolerance for the side effects of tricyclic antidepressants.

  16. Standardization Study of Antifertility Drug - Pippalyadiyoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaila

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the standardization study of pippalyadiyoga powder. It is used as a long acting contraceptive. The standardization of compound drug has been achieved by physico-chemical analysis and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprint studies. Quantitative evaluation of borax in pippalyadiyoga showed 19.08% as sodium borate. RP-HPLC was performed using methanol and water as mobile phase. The detection and quantification was performed at a wavelength of 345 nm. Linearity of detector response for piperine was between the concentrations 0.005% to 0.1%. The correlation coefficient obtained for the linearity was 0.998. The recovery value of standard piperine was 99.4%. Low value of standard deviation and coefficient of variation are indicative of high precision of the method. Quantitative evaluation of piperine in pippalyadiyoga was found to be 0.339%.

  17. Escitalopram versus other antidepressive agents for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Santilli, Claudio; Furukawa, Toshi A; Signoretti, Alessandra; Nakagawa, Atsuo; McGuire, Hugh; Churchill, Rachel; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment in primary and secondary care settings. During the last 20 years, antidepressant prescribing has risen dramatically in western countries, mainly because of the increasing consumption of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and newer antidepressants, which have progressively become the most commonly prescribed antidepressants. Escitalopram is the pure S-enantiomer of the racemic citalopram. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of escitalopram in comparison with tricyclics, other SSRIs, heterocyclics and newer agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods Electronic databases were searched up to July 2008. Trial databases of drug-approving agencies were hand-searched for published, unpublished and ongoing controlled trials. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials comparing escitalopram against any other antidepressant (including non-conventional agents such as hypericum) for patients with major depressive disorder (regardless of the diagnostic criteria used). Data collection and analysis Data were entered by two review authors (double data entry). Responders and remitters to treatment were calculated on an intention-to-treat basis. For dichotomous data, odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Continuous data were analysed using standardised mean differences (with 95% CI) using the random effects model. Main results Fourteen trials compared escitalopram with another SSRI and eight compared escitalopram with a newer antidepressive agent (venlafaxine, bupropion and duloxetine). Escitalopram was shown to be significantly more effective than citalopram in achieving acute response (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.87). Escitalopram was also more effective than citalopram in terms of remission (OR

  18. What can we learn from consumer reports on psychiatric adverse drug reactions with antidepressant medication? Experiences from reports to a consumer association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna; Carlsten, Anders

    2011-10-25

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the cost of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in the general population is high and under-reporting by health professionals is a well-recognized problem. Another way to increase ADR reporting is to let the consumers themselves report directly to the authorities. In Sweden it is mandatory for prescribers to report serious ADRs to the Medical Products Agency (MPA), but there are no such regulations for consumers. The non-profit and independent organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health, KILEN has launched the possibility for consumers to report their perceptions and experiences from their use of medicines in order to strengthen consumer rights within the health care sector. This study aimed to analyze these consumer reports. All reports submitted from January 2002 to April 2009 to an open web site in Sweden where anyone could report their experience with the use of pharmaceuticals were analyzed with focus on common psychiatric side effects related to antidepressant usage. More than one ADR for a specific drug could be reported. In total 665 reports were made during the period. 442 reports concerned antidepressant medications and the individual antidepressant reports represented 2392 ADRs and 878 (37%) of these were psychiatric ADRs. 75% of the individual reports concerned serotonin-reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and the rest serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI). Women reported more antidepressant psychiatric ADRs (71%) compared to men (24%). More potentially serious psychiatric ADRs were frequently reported to KILEN and withdrawal symptoms during discontinuation were also reported as a common issue. The present study indicates that consumer reports may contribute with important information regarding more serious psychiatric ADRs following antidepressant treatment. Consumer reporting may be considered a complement to traditional ADR reporting.

  19. The role of dopamine and norepinephrine in depression and antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2006-01-01

    Most antidepressants in use today are descendants of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor iproniazid and the tricyclic agent imipramine. These agents were both originally developed for other indications but then were serendipitously determined to have antidepressant effects. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action of these first antidepressants, along with those of reserpine and amphetamine, led to the monoamine theories of depression. Through the past several decades, approaches undertaken to clarify the roles of the neurotransmitters norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in depression have included animal studies, human biological and postmortem studies, inferences drawn from antidepressant drug actions, and challenge or depletion studies; most recently, brain imaging studies have proved to be especially informative. This research has identified novel potential targets, with the goal of developing new antidepressant drugs with better efficacy and faster onset of action than current "gold-standard" treatments.

  20. Seasonal changes in antibiotics, antidepressants/psychiatric drugs, antihistamines and lipid regulators in a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovko, Oksana; Kumar, Vimal; Fedorova, Ganna; Randak, Tomas; Grabic, Roman

    2014-09-01

    Seasonal changes in the concentration of 21 pharmaceuticals in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in České Budějovice were investigated over 12months. The target compounds were 10 antibiotics, 4 antidepressants, 3 psychiatric drugs, 2 antihistamines and 2 lipid regulators. 272 Wastewater samples (136 influents and 136 effluents) were collected from March 2011 to February 2012 and analyzed using two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. All studied pharmaceuticals were frequently detected in both the influent and the effluent wastewater samples, except for meclozine, which was only found in the influent. The mean concentration of pharmaceuticals varied from 0.006μgL(-1) to 1.48μgL(-1) in the influent and from 0.003μgL(-1) to 0.93μgL(-1) in the effluent. The concentration of most pharmaceuticals was higher during winter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Antidepressive-drug-induced bodyweight gain is associated with polymorphisms in genes coding for COMT and TPH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Bukh, Jens; Bock, Camilla

    2009-01-01

    of a single depressive episode and who were under antidepressive treatment. Weight gainers were identified based on rating with the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale. Polymorphisms in catechol-O-methyltransferase, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH1), serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C...... and sex. These new findings may aid the understanding of susceptibility to side effects such as weight gain during clinical antidepressive treatment....

  2. Iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome with inhaled steroid plus antidepressant drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Ozlem

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current guidelines recommend the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS for suppression of airway inflammation in patients with asthma. Although it is well known that ICS cause dose-related adrenocortical suppression, it is less known that they can lead to iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome (CS. Fluticasone propionate (FP is an ICS more potent than beclomethasone and budesonide. FP is metabolized as mediated by cytochrome P450 3A4 in the liver and the gut. Systemic bioactivity of FP can increase with the use of drugs that affect the cytochrome P450. Herein, we report the rapid development of iatrogenic CS in a patient receiving paroxetine and mirtazepine for 12 weeks in addition to inhaled FP.

  3. 125I-labelled iodothyronines. Useful tools for studies of effects of an antidepressant drug fluoxetine in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislav Pavelka; Masaryk University, Brno

    2010-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are supposed to control the activity of some neurotransmitters (e.g., serotonin), which are hypothetically involved in the pathogenesis of depressive illness. A new group of non-tricyclic antidepressant drugs includes selective serotonine re-uptake inhibitors. The most frequently used representative of this group is fluoxetine (Fluox). We followed in the present paper the effects of Fluox, administered subchronicaly (for 25 days) to Wistar rats by itself, or in combination with 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T 3 ). In studies of the interaction of Fluox with the metabolism of TH, we applied adapted radiometric enzyme assays for iodothyronine sulfotransferases (ST) and uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronyltransferase (UDP-GT), as well as our newly developed radiometric assays for iodothyronine deiodinases (IDs) of types 1, 2 and 3 (D1, D2 and D3), using 125 I-labelled iodothyronines of high specific radioactivity as substrates. We found about two-fold higher UDP-GT enzyme activities in samples of liver microsomes of rats treated with Fluox, in comparison with control rats. In contrast, the radiometric determination of ST activities in liver and kidney cytosolic fractions did not demonstrate any significant effects of the administration of Fluox, alone or together with T 3 , on the induction of these enzymes. However, profound changes in enzyme activities were determined in case of IDs, especially in the pituitary and cerebellum of treated rats. The adapted and newly elaborated radiometric enzyme assays proved to be very sensitive and rapid and, at the same time, reliable and robust. (author)

  4. The US Food and Drug Administration's perspective on the new antidepressant vortioxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Mathis, Mitchell V; Sellers, Jenn W; Kordzakhia, George; Jackson, Andre J; Dow, Antonia; Yang, Peiling; Fossom, Linda; Zhu, Hao; Patel, Hiren; Unger, Ellis F; Temple, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) review of the New Drug Application for vortioxetine, especially the clinical efficacy and safety data. It emphasizes the issues that were important to the FDA's approval decision, particularly the difference in the effective dose in domestic and foreign studies, and notes several new labeling features, specifically, description of time course of treatment response and detailed sexual dysfunction evaluation. The data sources were the original raw data sets for all clinical trials included in the development program for vortioxetine, as well as the sponsor's original analyses of these data. Data were available from 51 human trials involving vortioxetine, and included a total of 7,666 healthy volunteers and patients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) or generalized anxiety disorder who were exposed to at least 1 dose of vortioxetine for a total of 2,743 patient-years. Vortioxetine was effective in treating MDD in the United States at a dose of 20 mg/d. The recommended starting dose is 10 mg once daily without regard to food, with increase to 20 mg/d if the 10 mg/d dose is tolerated. For patients who do not tolerate 20 mg/d, 10 mg/d can be used and 5-mg/d dose can be considered. Vortioxetine can be discontinued abruptly, but it is recommended that doses of 15 mg/d or 20 mg/d be reduced to 10 mg/d for 1 week prior to full discontinuation to avoid potential withdrawal symptoms. Although the non-US maintenance study showed that maintenance doses of 5 to 10 mg/d were effective, a clinical judgment needs to be made to decide the maintenance dose in the United States. The applicant has agreed to conduct a US maintenance dose-response study covering the US-approved dose range. Vortioxetine's adverse event profile is similar to that of other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Nausea is the most common adverse event and is dose dependent. No dose adjustment is needed based on

  5. Deuterium labelling of the antidepressant drug doxepin for disposition studies in human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Chandra; Saleh, Samir; Wilkinson, G.R.; Blair, I.A.; Taber, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Two methods have been developed for the introduction of deuterium into the doxepin molecule. The key intermediate (6,11-dihydro-1,2,3,4- 2 H 4 -dibenz[b,e]oxepin-11-one) was prepared by condensation of ethyl 2-bromomethylbenzoate with [ 2 H 6 ]-phenol, saponification of the resulting ester, and dehydration with trifluoroacetic anhydride. Using this key intermediate, E-(1,2,3,4)- 2 H 4 -doxepin was prepared for administration to human subjects. (1,2,3,4)- 2 H 4 -N-desmethyldoxepin, (1,2,3,4,1',2',2')- 2 H 7 -doxepin, (1,2,3,4)- 2 H 4 -(H 2 H 3 ) 2 -doxepin ( 2 H 10 -doxepin) and (1,2,3,4,1',2',2')- 2 H 7 -N-desmethyldoxepin were also prepared for use as internal standards in GC/MS assays. The deuterated compounds contained less than 0.5% protium impurity. (author)

  6. Spadin, a sortilin-derived peptide, targeting rodent TREK-1 channels: a new concept in the antidepressant drug design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Mazella

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Current antidepressant treatments are inadequate for many individuals, and when they are effective, they require several weeks of administration before a therapeutic effect can be observed. Improving the treatment of depression is challenging. Recently, the two-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 has been identified as a new target in depression, and its antagonists might become effective antidepressants. In mice, deletion of the TREK-1 gene results in a depression-resistant phenotype that mimics antidepressant treatments. Here, we validate in mice the antidepressant effects of spadin, a secreted peptide derived from the propeptide generated by the maturation of the neurotensin receptor 3 (NTSR3/Sortilin and acting through TREK-1 inhibition. NTSR3/Sortilin interacted with the TREK-1 channel, as shown by immunoprecipitation of TREK-1 and NTSR3/Sortilin from COS-7 cells and cortical neurons co-expressing both proteins. TREK-1 and NTSR3/Sortilin were colocalized in mouse cortical neurons. Spadin bound specifically to TREK-1 with an affinity of 10 nM. Electrophysiological studies showed that spadin efficiently blocked the TREK-1 activity in COS-7 cells, cultured hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and CA3 hippocampal neurons in brain slices. Spadin also induced in vivo an increase of the 5-HT neuron firing rate in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus. In five behavioral tests predicting an antidepressant response, spadin-treated mice showed a resistance to depression as found in TREK-1 deficient mice. More importantly, an intravenous 4-d treatment with spadin not only induced a strong antidepressant effect but also enhanced hippocampal phosphorylation of CREB protein and neurogenesis, considered to be key markers of antidepressant action after chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. This work also shows the development of a reliable method for dosing the propeptide in serum of mice by using AlphaScreen technology. These findings point out

  7. The Modulatory Properties of Chronic Antidepressant Drugs Treatment on the Brain Chemokine – Chemokine Receptor Network: A Molecular Study in an Animal Model of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Trojan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies indicate that the chemokine system may be the third major communication system of the brain. Therefore, the role of the chemokine system in the development of brain disorders, including depression, has been recently proposed. However, little is known about the impact of the administration of various antidepressant drugs on the brain chemokine – chemokine receptor axis. In the present study, we used an animal model of depression based on the prenatal stress procedure. We determined whether chronic treatment with tianeptine, venlafaxine, or fluoxetine influenced the evoked by prenatal stress procedure changes in the mRNA and protein levels of the homeostatic chemokines, CXCL12 (SDF-1α, CX3CL1 (fractalkine and their receptors, in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. Moreover, the impact of mentioned antidepressants on the TGF-β, a molecular pathway related to fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1, was explored. We found that prenatal stress caused anxiety and depressive-like disturbances in adult offspring rats, which were normalized by chronic antidepressant treatment. Furthermore, we showed the stress-evoked CXCL12 upregulation while CXCR4 downregulation in hippocampus and frontal cortex. CXCR7 expression was enhanced in frontal cortex but not hippocampus. Furthermore, the levels of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 were diminished by prenatal stress in the both examined brain areas. The mentioned changes were normalized with various potency by chronic administration of tested antidepressants. All drugs in hippocampus, while tianeptine and venlafaxine in frontal cortex normalized the CXCL12 level in prenatally stressed offspring. Moreover, in hippocampus only fluoxetine enhanced CXCR4 level, while fluoxetine and tianeptine diminished CXCR7 level in frontal cortex. Additionally, the diminished by prenatal stress levels of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the both examined brain areas were normalized by chronic tianeptine and partially fluoxetine

  8. Erythropoietin modulates neural and cognitive processing of emotional information in biomarker models of antidepressant drug action in depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Favaron, Elisa; Hafizi, Sepehr

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects, and may be a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We have demonstrated antidepressant-like effects of Epo on the neural and cognitive processing of facial expressions in healthy volunteers. The curren...... study investigates the effects of Epo on the neural and cognitive response to emotional facial expressions in depressed patients.......Erythropoietin (Epo) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects, and may be a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We have demonstrated antidepressant-like effects of Epo on the neural and cognitive processing of facial expressions in healthy volunteers. The current...

  9. Inhibition of the CRF1 receptor influences the activity of antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Andrzej; Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Rojek, Karol; Poleszak, Ewa; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Dudka, Jarosław

    2017-08-01

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and impairment of the central corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system are factors in the pathogenesis of depression. Though several antagonists of the CRF 1 receptor were effective in the recognized behavioral tests for antidepressant activity, there is still little information on the potential interactions between CRF 1 receptor inhibitors and conventional antidepressant therapy. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of SN003, a CRF 1 receptor blocker, on the activity of imipramine and fluoxetine in the forced swim test (FST) in rats which presented some signs of depression. The experiments were carried out on female Wistar rats subjected to 14-day subcutaneous corticosterone (CORT) administration (20 mg/kg/day). The antidepressant-like effect was determined by the FST and the CRF levels in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and peripheral blood were measured by a high-sensitivity immunoenzymatic test. SN003 (0.5 mg/kg) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine (15 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (7.5 mg/kg). Moreover, the co-administration of the tested agents abolished CORT-induced increase in CRF levels in the examined biological material more profoundly than monotherapy. Our present findings give further evidence that the blockage of CRF action may be useful in the treatment of mood disorders. The concurrent use of well-known antidepressants with CRF 1 receptor antagonists could be beneficial in terms of safety, since it requires lower doses of the applied agents.

  10. Adherence to antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abimbola Farinde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available While major depression is considered a frequent mental illness there are ongoing reports of high non-adherence to antidepressant medications which places suffers at high risk for relapse, recurrence, or greater impairment,. The World Health Organization (WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a person′s behavior (e.g. taking medications can align with the agreed recommendations of a health care provider. Unfortunately while patient may recognize the importance of adherence to antidepressant medications the majority of patients do not adhere to their prescribed antidepressants. Some of the factors that may contribute to or lead to non-adherence include knowingly or unknowingly missing doses, taking extra doses, delaying administration times, or taking drug holidays. Pharmacists have the unique ability to deter non-adherence through the performance of continuous assessment and monitoring of adherence in this population given these accessibility. Additionally, pharmacists are able to develop therapeutic alliances with patients that can help to increase the likelihood of achieving positive patient outcomes. Antidepressant non-adherence can be viewed as a significant public health concern so it is important for patients to be educated about the importance of adherence, and health care professionals should be aware of factors or patient characteristics that can serve as barriers to non-adherence.

  11. Nanomaterials potentiating standard chemotherapy drugs' effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, S. O.; Korovin, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    Application of antitumor chemotherapeutic drugs is hindered by a number of barriers, multidrug resistance that makes effective drug deposition inside cancer cells difficult is among them. Recent research shows that potential efficiency of anticancer drugs can be increased with nanoparticles. This review is devoted to the application of nanoparticles for cancer treatment. Various types of nanoparticles currently used in medicine are reviewed. The nanoparticles that have been used for cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery to damaged sites of organism are described. Also, the possibility of nanoparticles application for cancer diagnosis that could help early detection of tumors is discussed. Our investigations of antitumor activity of low-dimensional nanostructures based on aluminum oxides and hydroxides are briefly reviewed.

  12. Sexual side effects of serotonergic antidepressants: mediated by inhibition of serotonin on central dopamine release?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijlsma, Elisabeth Y; Chan, Johnny S W; Olivier, Berend; Veening, Jan G; Millan, Mark J; Waldinger, Marcel D; Oosting, Ronald S

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction adversely affects the quality of life of antidepressant users and reduces compliance with treatment. Animal models provide an instructive approach for examining potential sexual side effects of novel drugs. This review discusses the stability and reproducibility of our standardized test procedure that assesses the acute, subchronic and chronic effects of psychoactive compounds in a 30 minute mating test. In addition, we present an overview of the effects of several different (putative) antidepressants on male rat sexual behavior, as tested in our standardized test procedure. By comparing the effects of these mechanistically distinct antidepressants (paroxetine, venlafaxine, bupropion, buspirone, DOV 216,303 and S32006), this review discusses the putative mechanism underlying sexual side effects of antidepressants and their normalization. This review shows that sexual behavior is mainly inhibited by antidepressants that increase serotonin neurotransmission via blockade of serotonin transporters, while those that mainly increase the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline are devoid of sexual side effects. Those sexual disturbances cannot be normalized by simultaneously increasing noradrenaline neurotransmission, but are normalized by increasing both noradrenaline and dopamine neurotransmission. Therefore, it is hypothesized that the sexual side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be mediated by their inhibitory effects on dopamine signaling in sex brain circuits. Clinical development of novel antidepressants should therefore focus on compounds that simultaneously increase both serotonin and dopamine signaling. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Experiences from consumer reports on psychiatric adverse drug reactions with antidepressant medication: a qualitative study of reports to a consumer association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna; Carlsten, Anders

    2012-12-23

    The new European pharmacovigilance legislation has been suggested as marking the beginning of a new chapter in drug safety, making patients an important part of pharmacovigilance. In Sweden since 2008 it has been possible for consumers to report adverse drug reactions (ADRs) to the Medical Products Agency (MPA), and these reports are now understood as an increasingly valuable contribution in the monitoring of safety aspects in medicines. Already in 2002 it was possible to report experiences with medicines to the non-profit and independent organization Consumer Association for Medicines and Health (KILEN) through a web-based report form with an opportunity to describe ADR experiences in free text comments. The aim of this study was to qualitatively analyze the free text comments appended to consumer reports on antidepressant medication. All reports of suspected adverse reactions regarding antidepressant medications submitted from January 2002 to April 2009 to KILEN's Internet-based reporting system in Sweden were analyzed according to reported narrative experience(s). Content analysis was used to interpret the content of 181 reports with free text comments. Three main categories emerged from the analyzed data material: (1) Experiences of drug treatment with subcategories (a) Severe psychiatric adverse reactions, and (b) Discontinuation symptoms; (2) Lack of communication and (3) Trust and distrust. A majority of the reports to KILEN were from patients experiencing symptoms of mental disturbances (sometimes severe) affecting them in many different ways, especially during discontinuation. Several report included narratives of patients not receiving information of potential ADRs from their doctor, but also that there were no follow-ups of the treatment. Trust was highlighted as especially important and some patients reported losing confidence in their doctor when they were not believed about the suspected ADRs they experienced, making them attempt to discontinue their

  14. Milnacipran: a unique antidepressant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Kasper

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Siegfried Kasper, Gerald PailDepartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, AustriaAbstract: Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs are among the most effective antidepressants available, although their poor tolerance at usual recommended doses and toxicity in ­overdose make them difficult to use. While selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are ­better tolerated than TCAs, they have their own specific problems, such as the aggravation of sexual dysfunction, interaction with coadministered drugs, and for many, a discontinuation syndrome. In addition, some of them appear to be less effective than TCAs in more severely depressed patients. Increasing evidence of the importance of norepinephrine in the etiology of depression has led to the development of a new generation of antidepressants, the serotonin and ­norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs. Milnacipran, one of the pioneer SNRIs, was designed from theoretic considerations to be more effective than SSRIs and better tolerated than TCAs, and with a simple pharmacokinetic profile. Milnacipran has the most balanced potency ratio for reuptake inhibition of the two neurotransmitters compared with other SNRIs (1:1.6 for milnacipran, 1:10 for duloxetine, and 1:30 for venlafaxine, and in some studies milnacipran has been shown to inhibit norepinephrine uptake with greater potency than serotonin (2.2:1. Clinical studies have shown that milnacipran has efficacy comparable with the TCAs and is superior to SSRIs in severe depression. In addition, milnacipran is well tolerated, with a low potential for pharmacokinetic drug–drug interactions. Milnacipran is a first-line therapy suitable for most depressed patients. It is frequently successful when other treatments fail for reasons of efficacy or tolerability.Keywords: milnacipran, SNRI, antidepressant efficacy, tolerability

  15. 75 FR 15440 - Guidance for Industry on Standards for Securing the Drug Supply Chain-Standardized Numerical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Standards for Securing the Drug Supply Chain--Standardized Numerical... industry entitled ``Standards for Securing the Drug Supply Chain-Standardized Numerical Identification for... the Drug Supply Chain-Standardized Numerical Identification for Prescription Drug Packages.'' In the...

  16. Testing the antidepressant properties of the peptide ARA290 in a human neuropsychological model of drug action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerit, Hilâl; Veer, Ilya M; Dahan, Albert

    2015-01-01

    , parallel-group design. Neural and cognitive effects were assessed one week after administration. Primary outcome measures were the neural processing of fearful vs happy faces and the behavioral recognition of emotional facial expressions. ARA290-treated individuals displayed lower neural responses to happy...... faces in the fusiform gyrus. ARA290 tended to lower the recognition of happy and disgust facial expressions. Although ARA290 was not associated with a better memory for positive words, it was associated with faster categorization of positive vs negative words. Finally, ARA290 increased attention towards...... positive emotional pictures. No effects were observed on mood and affective symptoms. ARA290 may modulate some aspects of emotional processing, however, the direction and the strength of its effects do not unequivocally support an antidepressant-like profile for ARA290. Future studies may investigate...

  17. Erythropoietin modulates neural and cognitive processing of emotional information in biomarker models of antidepressant drug action in depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Favaron, Elisa; Hafizi, Sepehr

    2010-01-01

    . The current study investigates the effects of Epo on the neural and cognitive response to emotional facial expressions in depressed patients. METHOD: Nineteen acutely depressed patients were randomized to receive Epo (40,000 IU) or saline intravenously in a double-blind, parallel-group design. On day 3, we......OBJECTIVE: Erythropoietin (Epo) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects, and may be a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. We have demonstrated antidepressant-like effects of Epo on the neural and cognitive processing of facial expressions in healthy volunteers...... assessed neuronal responses to fearful and happy faces using functional magnetic resonance imaging and measured facial expression recognition after the scan. RESULTS: Epo reduced neural response to fearful vs. happy faces in the amygdala and hippocampus, and to fearful faces vs. baseline in superior...

  18. [The costs of new drugs compared to current standard treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujeyl, Mariam; Schlegel, Claudia; Gundert-Remy, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Until AMNOG came into effect Germany had free pricing of new drugs. Our exemplary work investigates the costs of new drugs that were licensed in the two years prior to AMNOG, and compares them to the costs of standard treatment that has been used in pivotal trials. Also, the important components of pharmaceutical prices will be illustrated. We retrospectively analysed the European Public Assessment Reports of proprietary medicinal products that the European Medicinal Agency initially approved in 2009 and 2010 and that were tested against an active control in at least one pivotal trial. If the standard treatment was a generic, the average pharmacy retail price of new drugs was 7.4 times (median 7.1) higher than that of standard treatment. If the standard treatment was an originator drug the average price was 1.4 times (median 1.2) higher than that of the new drug. There was no clear correlation of an increase in costs for new drugs and their "grade of innovation" as rated according to the criteria of Fricke. Our study shows that prices of new drugs must be linked to the evidence of comparative benefit; since German drug pricing is complex, cost saving effects obtained thereby will depend on a range of other rules and decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Variation in adverse drug reactions listed in product information for antidepressants and anticonvulsants, between the USA and Europe: a comparison review of paired regulatory documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Victoria R; Liu, Kun; Peacock, Janet; Sauzet, Odile

    2016-03-20

    To compare consistency of adverse drug reaction (ADR) data in publicly available product information documents for brand drugs, between the USA and Europe. To assess the usefulness of information for prescribers and patients. A comparison review of product information documents for antidepressants and anticonvulsants concurrently marketed by the same pharmaceutical company in the USA and Europe. For each drug, data were extracted from the US Product Inserts and the European Summary of Product Characteristics documents between 09/2013 and 01/2015. Individuals contributing ADR information to product information documents. All ADRs reported in product information sections 5 and 6 (USA), and 4·4 and 4·8 (Europe). Twelve brand drugs--24 paired documents--were included. On average, there were 77 more ADRs reported in the USA compared with in the European product information document, with a median number of 201 ADRs (range: 65-425) and 114 (range: 56-265), respectively. More product information documents in the USA reported information on the source of evidence (10 vs 5) and risk (9 vs 5) for greater than 80% of ADRs included in the document. There was negligible information included regarding duration, severity, reversibility or recurrence of ADRs. On average, only 29% of ADR terms were reported in both paired documents. Product information documents contained a large number of ADRs, but lacked contextual data and information important to patients and prescribers, such as duration, severity and reversibility. The ADR profile was found to be inconsistently reported between the USA and Europe, for the same drug. Identifying, selecting, summarising and presenting multidimensional harm data should be underpinned by practical evidence-based guidelines. In order for prescribers to provide considered risk-benefit advice across competing drug therapies to patients, they need access to comprehensible and reliable ADR information. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited

  20. Antidepressant prescribing in five European countries: application of common methods to assess the variation in prevalence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V.; Huerta, C.; Souverein, P.C.; Abajo, F. de; Leufkens, H.G.M.; Slattery, J.; Alvarez, Y.; Montserrat, M.; Gill, M.; Hesse, U.; Requena, G.; Vries, F. de; Rottenkolber, M.; Schmiedl, S.; Reynolds, R.; Schlinger, R.; Groot, M. de; Klungel, O.H.; Staa, T.P. van; Dijk, L. van; Egberts, A.C.G.; Gardarsdottir, H.; Bruin, M.L. de

    2013-01-01

    Background: Drug utilization studies have applied different methods on various data types to describe medication use which may hamper comparisons across populations. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the variation in the prevalence of antidepressant prescribing, applying standard

  1. The antidepressant debate and the balanced placebo trial design: an ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Duff R

    2008-12-01

    There is ongoing debate about whether randomized, placebo-controlled trials under a double-blind have reliably established the pharmacological efficacy of antidepressants. Numerous meta-analyses of antidepressant efficacy trials, e.g., Kirsch et al. [Kirsch, I., Moore, T. J., Scoboria, A., & Nicholls, S. (2002). The emperor's new drugs: An analysis of antidepressant medication data submitted to the U.S. food and drug administration. Prevention and Treatment, 5, Article 23. (Retrieved July 19, 2007 from http://journals.apa.org/prevention/volume5)], have shown a modest drug-placebo difference but methodological problems with standard trial design preclude a definitive conclusion that this difference results from specific biological effects of antidepressants or the nonspecific factors that have not been adequately excluded. Standard trial design assumes the additivity thesis of pharmacological efficacy, being the assumption that the specific or "true" magnitude of the pharmacological effect is limited to the difference between the drug and placebo responses in a standard trial. If the drug effects are as small as these meta-analyses suggest, then their clinical effectiveness is questionable. If the drug effects are actually larger but masked by placebo effects, then the additivity thesis is not valid and we risk false negative results with standard trial design. Kirsch et al. propose an alternative, four arm balanced placebo trial design (BPTD) that can accurately test the additivity thesis. The BPTD uses antidepressants, active placebos and the intentional deception of research subjects. My focal question is whether the BPTD is ethically defensible. I will explore two objections that can be raised against it: 1) lying to BPTD research subjects violates their autonomy and exploits their illness and 2) the BPTD may not enable us to test the additivity thesis with accuracy, i.e., it may contribute to the masking of drug effects that it aims to avoid. I argue that these

  2. Montmorillonite/Poly (L-Lactide microcomposite spheres as reservoirs of antidepressant drugs and their controlled release property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Rajkumar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates intercalation of Nortriptyline (NT and Venlafaxine (VFX in an interlayer gallery of Na+-MMT (Montmorillonite, which was further compounded with Poly (L-Lactide (PLLA to form microcomposite spheres (MPs for oral controlled drug delivery. The XRD patterns, thermal and spectroscopic analyses indicated intercalation of drugs into the MMT interlayer that was stabilized by electrostatic interaction. No significant changes in structural and functional properties of drugs were found in the MMT layers. In vitro drug release studies showed controlled release pattern.

  3. Self-aggregation of bio-surfactants within ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide: A comparative study and potential application in antidepressants drug aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjare, Manoj Kumar; Behera, Kamalakanta; Kurrey, Ramsingh; Banjare, Ramesh Kumar; Satnami, Manmohan L.; Pandey, Siddharth; Ghosh, Kallol K.

    2018-06-01

    Aggregation behavior of bio-surfactants (BS) sodium cholate (NaC) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) within aqueous solution of ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide [Emim][Br] has been investigated using surface tension, conductivity, steady state fluorescence, FT-IR and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. Various interfacial and thermodynamic parameters are determined in the presence of different wt% of IL [Emim][Br]. Information regarding the local microenvironment and size of the aggregates is obtained from fluorescence and DLS, respectively. FT-IR spectral response is used to reveal the interactions taking place within aqueous NaC/NaDC micellar solutions. It is noteworthy to mention that increasing wt% of [Emim][Br] results in an increase in the spontaneity of micelle formation and the hydrophilic IL shows more affinity for NaC as compared to NaDC. Further, the micellar solutions of BS-[Emim][Br] are utilized for studying the aggregation of antidepressants drug promazine hydrochloride (pH). UV-vis spectroscopic investigation reveals interesting outcomes and the results show changes in spectral absorbance of PH drug on the addition of micellar solution (BS-[Emim][Br]). Highest binding affinity and most promising activity are shown for NaC as compared to NaDC.

  4. Volumetric and ultrasonic studies of an antidepressant drug in aqueous and alcoholic medium over temperature range 298.15-313.15 k

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamal, M.A.; Khosa, M.K.; Muneer, M.; Shahzad, K.

    2013-01-01

    Escitalopram oxalate is an amphiphilic serotonin specific reuptake inhibitor-antidepressant drug. Ultrasonic velocity (u) and density (d) measurements were carried out for Escitalopram oxalate in aqueous and alcoholic systems as a function of concentration in a range of molality, m (0.0075-0.04) mol Kg-1 at 298.15-313.15 K using an Anton Paar density sound analyzer (DSA 5000M). Using these experimental values, the acoustical parameters such as apparent molar adiabatic compressibility and partial molar volume (V phi) was apparent molar volume (V phi (K computed for all the systems. The Partial molar expansivity (E/sup 0/) and second derivative values, (partial drive V/sup 0/partial drive T/sup 2/), have also been estimated. The critical micelle concentrations of this drug were obtained from ultrasound velocity measurement by using recently developed least square fitting algorithm. The results are interpreted in the light of structure-making or structure-breaking effects of escitalopram oxalate in the mixtures. (author)

  5. Antidepressant medications and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y; Abrahamsen, B; Adachi, J D; Brandi, M L; Bruyère, O; Compston, J; Ducy, P; Ferrari, S; Harvey, N C; Kanis, J A; Karsenty, G; Laslop, A; Rabenda, V; Vestergaard, P

    2012-09-01

    Use of antidepressant medications that act on the serotonin system has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), and to osteoporosis. This article reviews current evidence for such effects, and identifies themes for future research. Serotonin receptors are found in all major types of bone cell (osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts), indicating an important role of the neuroendocrine system in bone. Observational studies indicate a complex relationship between depression, antidepressants, and fracture. First, the presence of depression itself increases fracture risk, in relation with decreased BMD and an increase in falls. A range of aspects of depression may operate, including behavioral factors (e.g., smoking and nutrition), biological changes, and confounders (e.g., comorbidities and concomitant medications). A substantial proportion of depressed patients receive antidepressants, mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Some of these have been linked to decreased BMD (SSRIs) and increased fracture risk (SSRIs and tricyclic agents). Current use of SSRIs and tricyclics increases fracture risk by as much as twofold versus nonusers, even after adjustment for potential confounders. While there is a dose-response relationship for SSRIs, the effect does not appear to be homogeneous across the whole class of drugs and may be linked to affinity for the serotonin transporter system. The increase in risk is the greatest in the early stages of treatment, with a dramatic increase after initiation, reaching a peak within 1 month for tricyclics and 8 months for SSRIs. Treatment-associated increased risk diminishes towards baseline in the year following discontinuation. The body of evidence suggests that SSRIs should be considered in the list of medications that are risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Beneficial Impact of Antidepressant Drugs on Prenatal Stress-Evoked Malfunction of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Protein Family in the Olfactory Bulbs of Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojan, Ewa; Głombik, Katarzyna; Ślusarczyk, Joanna; Budziszewska, Bogusława; Kubera, Marta; Roman, Adam; Lasoń, Władysław; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) promotes the growth, differentiation, and survival of both neurons and glial cells, and it is believed to exert antidepressant-like activity. Thus, disturbances in the IGF-1 system could be responsible for the course of depression. To date, there have been no papers showing the impact of chronic antidepressant treatment on the IGF-1 network in the olfactory bulb (OB) in an animal model of depression. Prenatal stress was used as model of depression. Twenty-four 3-month-old male offspring of control and stressed mothers were subjected to behavioral testing (forced swim test). The mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and the protein level of IGF-1 and its phosphorylation, as well as the concentrations of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-2, -4, -3, and -6), were measured in OBs before and after chronic imipramine, fluoxetine, or tianeptine administration. Adult rats exposed prenatally to stressful stimuli displayed not only depression-like behavior but also decreased IGF-1 expression, dysregulation in the IGFBP network, and diminished mRNA expression, as well as IGF-1R phosphorylation, in the OB. The administration of antidepressants normalized most of the changes in the IGF-1 system of the OB evoked by prenatal stress. These results suggested a beneficial effect of chronic antidepressant drug treatment in the alleviation of IGF-1 family malfunction in OBs in an animal model of depression.

  7. Antidepressant-selective gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R; Podolsky, Dina; Greenman, Danielle; Madraswala, Rehman

    2013-01-01

    To describe what we believe is the first reported case of synergistic gynecomastia during treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders when sertraline was added to a stable medication regimen including duloxetine, rosuvastatin, and amlodipine. A 67-year-old male with major depression, dysthymia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety, hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia presented with new-onset gynecomastia and breast tenderness. Mammography revealed bilateral gynecomastia (fibroglandular tissue posterior to the nipples bilaterally) without suspicious mass, calcification, or other abnormalities. These new symptoms developed after sertraline was added to his stable medication regimen (duloxetine, alprazolam, rosuvastatin, metoprolol, amlodipine, hydrochlorothiazide/triamterene, metformin, and sitagliptin). These symptoms were dose-dependent, with gynecomastia and breast tenderness more severe as sertraline was titrated from 25 mg/day to 50 mg/day and then to 75 mg/day. When sertraline was discontinued, gynecomastia and breast tenderness rapidly resolved. Mammoplasia and gynecomastia are associated with altered dopamine neurotransmission and/or perturbations in sexual hormones. These adverse effects may be medication induced. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (sertraline), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (duloxetine), rosuvastatin, and amlodipine have been reported to cause these adverse effects. This case was unique, since the patient had been on both sertraline and duloxetine previously as independent psychotropics without the development of gynecomastia. In the context of an additive drug adverse effect, the probability of sertraline as the precipitant drug was determined by both the Naranjo probability scale and the Horn drug interaction probability scale as probable. Gynecomastia is associated with antidepressants and other medications but is rarely addressed. Gynecomastia may be antidepressant selective or may be the result of

  8. Pharmacognostic standardization of Homoeopathic drug: Juniperus virginiana L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Padma Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Juniperus virginiana L., commonly known as ′red cedar′ in English is a well-known evergreen tree belonging to the family Cupressaceae. The leaves and young aerial shoots are used for preparation of medicine in Homoeopathy. Objective: Standardization is the quintessential aspect which ensures purity and quality of drugs. Hence, the pharmacognostic and physico-chemical studies are carried out to facilitate the use of authentic and correct species of raw drug plant material with established parametric standards for manufacturing the drug. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic studies on leaves and young aerial parts of authentic samples of J. virginiana L. have been carried out; physico-chemical parameters of raw drug viz., extractive values, ash values, formulation, besides weight per mL, total solids, alcohol content along with High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC and ultraviolet visible studies have been worked out for mother tincture. Results: The leaves are needles, narrow and sharp at tips; stems are round with greyish white to brown bark possessing small lenticels and covered by imbricate leaves. Epidermal cells in the surface have polygonal linear sides with pitted walls containing crystals and starch. Stomata exclusively occur on the adaxial surface in linear rows. Hypodermis of leaf in T.S. is marked with 1-2 layered lignified sclerenchyma. 2-4 secretory canals are present with one conspicuously beneath midvein bundle. The young terminal axis is sheathed by two closely surrounding leaves while the mature stem possess four leaf bases attached. Vascular tissue of stem possesses predominant xylem surrounded by phloem containing sphaeraphides, prismatic crystals and starch grains. Uniseriate rays occur in the xylem. Mature stem possess shrivelled cork, followed by the cortex. Physicochemical properties and HPTLC values of the drug are standardized and presented. Conclusion: The powder microscopic features and

  9. The effects of antidepressants on gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Latif Güneş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In their daily practice, psychiatrists often experience gastriccomplaints in patients beside psychiatric disorders.Peptic ulcer is one of the diseases, which accompanyto psychiatric disorders including mainly depression. Itis shown that antidepressants can inflame the bleedingsincluding gastrointestinal (GI bleedings, while they havepositive effect on ulcer healing. In this review, studies,which conducted about the positive or negative effects ofantidepressant drugs on ulcer treatment were examined.Accordingly; it was found that opipramol, amitriptyline,imipramine that of tricyclic antidepressants was found tobe helpful in healing of the ulcer. It was stated that SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors generally inflamedulcers, exceptionally fluvoxamine and fluoxetine reducedulcer; moclobemide that of monoamine-oxidase inhibitorand tianeptine and mirtazapine that of atypical antidepressantshad positive effect in ulcer healing. To be carefulin choosing the appropriate antidepressant in psychiatricpatients with gastric ulcer is important in the prognosisof both ulcer and depression.Key words: peptic ulcer; depression; antidepressant drugs

  10. Antidepressants and dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Søndergård, Lars; Forman, Julie Lyng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that antidepressants may have neuroprotective abilities but it has newer been investigated lately whether treatment with antidepressants reduces the risk of dementia. METHOD: Linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and diagnoses of dementia...... in Denmark during a period from 1995 to 2005. RESULTS: Persons who purchased antidepressants once (N=687,552) had an increased rate of dementia compared to persons unexposed to antidepressants (N=779,831). Nevertheless, the rate of dementia changed over time; thus during the initial prescription periods...... the rate increased with the number of prescriptions but continued long-term antidepressants treatment was associated with a reduction in the rate of dementia, however, not to the same level as the rate for the general population. This pattern was found for all classes of antidepressants (SSRIs, newer non...

  11. Parallel-group placebo-controlled trial of testosterone gel in men with major depressive disorder displaying an incomplete response to standard antidepressant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Harrison G; Amiaz, Revital; Brennan, Brian P; Orr, Guy; Weiser, Mark; Kelly, John F; Kanayama, Gen; Siegel, Arthur; Hudson, James I; Seidman, Stuart N

    2010-04-01

    Exogenous testosterone therapy has psychotropic effects and has been proposed as an antidepressant augmentation strategy for depressed men. We sought to assess the antidepressant effects of testosterone augmentation of a serotonergic antidepressant in depressed, hypogonadal men. For this study, we recruited 100 medically healthy adult men with major depressive disorder showing partial response or no response to an adequate serotonergic antidepressant trial during the current episode and a screening total testosterone level of 350 ng/dL or lower. We randomized these men to receive testosterone gel or placebo gel in addition to their existing antidepressant regimen. The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score. Secondary measures included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impression Scale, and the Quality of Life Scale. Our primary analysis, using a mixed effects linear regression model to compare rate of change of scores between groups on the outcome measures, failed to show a significant difference between groups (mean [95% confidence interval] 6-week change in HDRS for testosterone vs placebo, -0.4 [-2.6 to 1.8]). However, in one exploratory analysis of treatment responders, we found a possible trend in favor of testosterone on the HDRS. Our findings, combined with the conflicting data from earlier smaller studies, suggest that testosterone is not generally effective for depressed men. The possibility remains that testosterone might benefit a particular subgroup of depressed men, but if so, the characteristics of this subgroup would still need to be established.

  12. Pharmacognostic and physicochemical standardization of homoeopathic drug: Rumex crispus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Palani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rumex crispus L., commonly called as "yellow dock" in English, "patience frisee" in French, and "Ampfer" in German, and ′aceda de culebra′ in Spanish is a well-known herb belonging to Polygonaceae. Roots of the herb are used as medicine in homoeopathy. Objective: The pharmacognostic and physicochemical studies on roots have been carried out to enable the use of correct species and standardize the raw material. Materials and Methods: Pharmacognostic studies on roots of authentic raw drug have been carried out; physicochemical parameters, namely, extractive value, ash values, formulation besides weight per mL, total solids, alcohol content along with high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC and ultraviolet studies for mother tincture have been worked out. Results: Roots are blackish-brown, wiry, rounded with irregular striations, tortuous; internally, it is softwood, light-yellow, and fracture fibrous. Phellem is 8-10 layered, discontinuous, and tanniniferous. Phellogen is two-layered and contains inulin crystals in few. Outer phelloderm is 12-16 layered often containing spherocrystals and associated with stone cells. Secondary phloem is up to 25 layered. Xylem is in the form of strips. The physicochemical properties and HPTLC values of the drug are standardized and presented. Conclusion: The powder microscopic features and organoleptic characters along with anatomical and physicochemical studies are diagnostic to establish standards for the drug.

  13. Potentials of Curcumin as an Antidepressant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Kulkarni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depression, a debilitating psychiatric disorder, is predicted to be the second most prevalent human illness by the year 2020. Various antidepressants, ranging from monoamine oxidase inhibitors to recently developed dual reuptake inhibitors, are prescribed for alleviating the symptoms of depression. Despite the availability of these blockbuster molecules, approximately 30% of depressed patients do not respond to the existing drug therapies and the remaining 70% fails to achieve complete remission. Moreover, antidepressants are associated with a plethora of side effects and drug-drug/drug-food interactions. In this context, novel approaches are being tried to find more efficacious and safer drugs for the treatment of major depression. Curcumin is one such molecule that has shown promising efficacy in various animal models of major depression. Although the mechanism of the antidepressant effect of curcumin is not fully understood, it is hypothesized to act through inhibiting the monoamine oxidase enzyme and modulating the release of serotonin and dopamine. Moreover, evidences have shown that curcumin enhances neurogenesis, notably in the frontal cortex and hippocampal regions of the brain. The use of curcumin in clinics for the treatment of major depression is limited due to its poor gastrointestinal absorption. The present review attempts to discuss the pharmacological profile along with molecular mechanisms of the antidepressant effect of curcumin in animal models of depression. A need for clinical trials in order to explore the antidepressant efficacy and safety profile of curcumin is emphasized.

  14. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  15. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar E-mail: jogeshwar_mukherjee@ketthealth.com; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-10-01

    We have developed {sup 18}F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 {mu}M) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine.

  16. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, 18F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-01-01

    We have developed 18 F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of 18 F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 μM) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of 18 F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of 18 F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine

  17. The VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine affects effort-related decision making in a progressive ratio/chow feeding choice task: reversal with antidepressant drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A Randall

    Full Text Available Behavioral activation is a fundamental feature of motivation, and organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon evaluations of reinforcement value and response costs. Furthermore, people with major depression and other disorders often show anergia, psychomotor retardation, fatigue, and alterations in effort-related decision making. Tasks measuring effort-based decision making can be used as animal models of the motivational symptoms of depression, and the present studies characterized the effort-related effects of the vesicular monoamine transport (VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine. Tetrabenazine induces depressive symptoms in humans, and also preferentially depletes dopamine (DA. Rats were assessed using a concurrent progressive ratio (PROG/chow feeding task, in which they can either lever press on a PROG schedule for preferred high-carbohydrate food, or approach and consume a less-preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. Previous work has shown that the DA antagonist haloperidol reduced PROG work output on this task, but did not reduce chow intake, effects that differed substantially from those of reinforcer devaluation or appetite suppressant drugs. The present work demonstrated that tetrabenazine produced an effort-related shift in responding on the PROG/chow procedure, reducing lever presses, highest ratio achieved and time spent responding, but not reducing chow intake. Similar effects were produced by administration of the subtype selective DA antagonists ecopipam (D1 and eticlopride (D2, but not by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor neutral antagonist and putative appetite suppressant AM 4413, which suppressed both lever pressing and chow intake. The adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3, the antidepressant and catecholamine uptake inhibitor bupropion, and the MAO-B inhibitor deprenyl, all reversed the impairments induced by tetrabenazine. This work demonstrates the potential utility of the PROG/chow procedure as a

  18. Evaluation of Antidepressant-like Effect of Citrus Maxima Leaves in Animal Models of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Vikram H; Kibile, Swati J

    2011-09-01

    This study planned to assess antidepressant like activity of aqueous extract from leaves of Citrus maxima Merr. (Rutaceae). Boiling was used for aqueous extraction. Acute toxicity study was performed in mice. Antidepressant activity was studied using locomotor activity test, modified forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Three doses 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg of aqueous extract of leaves were selected for testing. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) and imipramine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) were used as the standard drugs. Aqueous extract of Citrus maxima leaves significantly reduced immobility time in both TST and FST. In locomotor activity testing it showed psychostimulant effect. Extract increased the climbing behavior in FST, which is similar to effect observed with imipramine. The results of this study suggest that antidepressant like effect of Citrus maxima seems to be mediated by an increase in norepinephrine level in synapses.

  19. 49 CFR 219.701 - Standards for drug and alcohol testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for drug and alcohol testing. 219.701... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CONTROL OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG USE Drug and Alcohol Testing Procedures § 219.701 Standards for drug and alcohol testing. (a) Drug testing required or authorized by subparts B...

  20. New generation of antidepressants in pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Kashani

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy was once thought to protect against psychiatric disorders, gravid and non gravid women have similar risks for major depression, at 10% to 15%. Both depression and antidepressant treatment during pregnancy have been associated with risks. Few medications have been proved unequivocally safe during pregnancy. Although certain antidepressants have not been linked with an increased risk of birth defects or impaired development including bupropion, citalopram, escitalopram and venlafaxine, the latest studies aren't necessarily reassuring. As researchers continue to learn more about antidepressants, the risks and benefits of taking the drugs during pregnancy must be weighed carefully on a case-by-case basis. This review discusses about the use of new generation of antidepressants in pregnancy

  1. IC Treatment: Antidepressants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Federal Campaign ICA Resources for Donors Corporate Contributions Social Media ... depression. Did you know that antidepressants are also effective in treating symptoms of people with interstitial cystitis ( ...

  2. Chirality of Modern Antidepressants: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Budău

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The majority of modern antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have one or two centers of asymmetry in their structure; resulting in the formation of enantiomers which may exhibit different pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. Recent developments in drug stereochemistry has led to understanding the role of chirality in modern therapy correlated with increased knowledge regarding the molecular structure of specific drug targets and towards the possible advantages of using pure enantiomers instead of racemic mixtures. The current review deals with chiral antidepressant drugs; presenting examples of stereoselectivity in the pharmacological actions of certain antidepressants and their metabolites and emphasizing the differences between pharmacological actions of the racemates and pure enantiomers.

  3. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Ann Browne

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine’s effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse

  4. Antidepressants during pregnancy, risks for mother and child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ververs, F.F.T.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antidepressant drugs during pregnancy is increasing without firm evidence on safety or efficacy. When managing depression and anxiety with antidepressants, the expected benefits must outweigh the risks. For health care processionals it is difficult to balance the benefits against the

  5. Sexual dysfunction, depression, and the impact of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Sidney H; Rizvi, Sakina

    2009-04-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common symptom of depression. Although decreased libido is most often reported, difficulties with arousal, resulting in vaginal dryness in women and erectile dysfunction in men, and absent or delayed orgasm are also prevalent. Sexual dysfunction is also a frequent adverse effect of treatment with most antidepressants and is one of the predominant reasons for premature drug discontinuation. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the most widely prescribed antidepressants and have significant effects on arousal and orgasm compared with antidepressants that target norepinephrine, dopamine, and melatonin systems. The availability of an antidepressant that does not cause or exacerbate sexual dysfunction represents an advance in pharmacotherapy for mood disorders and should reduce treatment noncompliance and decrease the need for switching antidepressants or adding antidotes. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on the prevalence, psychobiology, and relative adverse effect burden of sexual dysfunction associated with different antidepressants.

  6. Lack of cross-reactivity of Ambien (zolpidem) with drugs in standard urine drug screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piergies, A A; Sainati, S; Roth-Schechter, B

    1997-04-01

    To determine in healthy volunteers (men and women; 18 to 40 years old) the potential cross-reactivity of Ambien (zolpidem) and/or its metabolites with drugs that are screened by the Syva EMIT II and the Abbott ADx urine drug screens assays. Open-label, fixed-treatment sequence of 1 night each of treatment with zolpidem (10 mg) and temazepam (15 mg). Clinical Pharmacology Unit within a teaching hospital. Over a 24-hour period, presence or absence of positive results on the Syva EMIT II or the Abbott ADx urine drug assay system, each performed at two different laboratory assay sites. Following ingestion of zolpidem, no subject had any positive response in either laboratory to the Syva EMIT II or the Abbott ADx urine drug screen assays at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 hours postdose. During the same time period, all subjects had measurable zolpidem plasma concentrations at 1.5 and 8 hours postdose, with mean concentrations of 115.2 ng/mL and 30.1 ng/mL, respectively (in agreement with its half-life of 2.5 hours). The positive response rate at 10 hours after ingestion of Restoril (temazepam) among the four laboratory/assay combinations ranged from 36.8% to 73.7%, a range that is within the reported response rates for these tests. These data indicate that zolpidem will not cross-react in standard urine drug screens with benzodiazepines, opiates, barbiturates, cocaine, cannabinoids, or amphetamines.

  7. Antidepressant activity of standardised extract of Marsilea minuta Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattamisra, Subrat Kumar; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Agrawal, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Paras Nath; Singh, Sushil Kumar

    2008-04-17

    Marsilea minuta Linn. (Marsileaceae) has been referred in Indian traditional medicine system (Ayurveda) for the treatment of insomnia and other mental disorders. Marsiline isolated from Marsilea minuta was reported to have sedative and anticonvulsant property. The ethanol extract of Marsilea minuta was standardised for marsiline (1.15%, w/w) and studied for its antidepressant activity. Antidepressant activity was studied using forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), learned helplessness test (LHT) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) induced head twitches response in rodents. Standardised extract of Marsilea minuta in doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg/day were administered orally for three consecutive days and evaluated on day 3, 1h after the last dose treatment. Imipramine (15 mg/kg/day, i.p.) was used as the standard drug. Neurochemical mechanism of antidepressant activity was elucidated by using radioligand receptor binding assays for 5-HT2A and benzodiazepine receptors in rat frontal cortex. Immobility time in FST and TST was significantly (P<0.05) reduced by ethanol extract of Marsilea minuta treated animals. A decrease in number of escape failures in LHT was also observed in Marsilea minuta treated rats. Head twitch response induced by 5-HTP was significantly attenuated by Marsilea minuta (400 mg/kg, p.o.) and imipramine showing the involvement of serotonergic system. This effect was corroborated with radioligand receptor binding study where Marsilea minuta (400 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (P<0.05) down regulated 5-HT2A receptor in frontal cortex, whereas, no marked effect was observed for benzodiazepine receptor. The antidepressant effect exhibited by Marsilea minuta extract may be due to its effect on 5-HT2A density in rat frontal cortex.

  8. SSRI antidepressants: altered psychomotor development following exposure in utero?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) are sometimes prescribed to pregnant women. The potential consequences for the unborn child are gradually becoming clearer. In a case-control study of 298 children with autism and 1507 controls, 6.7% of mothers of autistic children had been prescribed an antidepressant during the year before delivery, compared to 3.3% of control mothers. The antidepressant was usually an SSRI. A dozen other small epidemiological studies of neurological development in children exposed to antidepressants in utero have provided mixed results. Two of these studies suggested a risk of psychomotor retardation. In practice, SSRI antidepressants should only be considered for pregnant women when non-drug measures fail and when symptoms are sufficiently serious to warrant drug therapy.

  9. Chronic oral nicotine increases brain [3H]epibatidine binding and responsiveness to antidepressant drugs, but not nicotine, in the mouse forced swim test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen T., Jesper; Nielsen, Elsebet O; Redrobe, John P

    2009-01-01

    Smoking rates among depressed individuals is higher than among healthy subjects, and nicotine alleviates depressive symptoms. Nicotine increases serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal activity and facilitates serotonin and noradrenaline release. In mice, acute nicotine administration enhances...... the activity of antidepressants in the mouse forced swim (mFST) and tail suspension tests. Here, we investigated if this action of nicotine is also reflected in a chronic treatment regimen....

  10. Mind your state: Insights into antidepressant nonadherence

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a severe and debilitating condition1 that occurs in ... that long-term emotional learning processes may play a key role in ... contribute to antidepressants not being highly effective. ... positive outcome with continuous drug treatment.23, 26 Moreover, ... psychological and biological domains.

  11. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015;37:46. Blumenthal SR, et al. An electronic health records study of long-term weight gain following antidepressant ... your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy ...

  12. Antidepressants for depression in adults with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshun-Wilson, Ingrid; Siegfried, Nandi; Akena, Dickens H; Stein, Dan J; Obuku, Ekwaro A; Joska, John A

    2018-01-22

    Rates of major depression among people living with HIV (PLWH) are substantially higher than those seen in the general population and this may adversely affect antiretroviral treatment outcomes. Several unique clinical and psychosocial factors may contribute to the development and persistence of depression in PLWH. Given these influences, it is unclear if antidepressant therapy is as effective for PLWH as the general population. To assess the efficacy of antidepressant therapy for treatment of depression in PLWH. We searched The Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Group's specialised register (CCMD-CTR), the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase and ran a cited reference search on the Web of Science for reports of all included studies. We conducted additional searches of the international trial registers including; ClinicalTrials.gov, World Health Organization Trials Portal (ICTRP), and the HIV and AIDS - Clinical trials register. We searched grey literature and reference lists to identify additional studies and contacted authors to obtain missing data. We applied no restrictions on date, language or publication status to the searches, which included studies conducted between 1 January 1980 and 18 April 2017. We included randomized controlled trials of antidepressant drug therapy compared to placebo or another antidepressant drug class. Participants eligible for inclusion had to be aged 18 years and older, from any setting, and have both HIV and depression. Depression was defined according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or International Statistical Classification of Diseases criteria. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria and extracted data. We presented categorical outcomes as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Continuous outcomes were presented mean (MD) or standardized mean differences (SMD) with standard deviations (SD). We assessed quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 10 studies

  13. Poisoining with Tricyclic Antidepressants and Current Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Gulen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality compared to all the antidepressants. Main toxic effects are on the cardiovascular system and central nervous system and manifests itself as anticholinergic symptoms. There is no antidote known to be used in the treatment. But sodium bicarbonate treatment is effective in preventing ventricular arrhythmias and hypotension, and resolving metabolic acidosis. There are some treatments that has been used for relief of symptoms and some of them still are in research stage. The drugs that are used can be customized according to the patients symptoms. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(4.000: 608-621

  14. Potentiation of omega-3 fatty acid antidepressant-like effects with low non-antidepressant doses of fluoxetine and mirtazapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laino, Carlos Horacio; Fonseca, Cristina; Sterin-Speziale, Norma; Slobodianik, Nora; Reinés, Analía

    2010-12-01

    Despite the advances in psychopharmacology, the treatment of depressive disorders is still not satisfactory. Side effects and resistance to antidepressant drugs are the greatest complications during treatment. Based on recent evidence, omega-3 fatty acids may influence vulnerability and outcome in depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to further characterize the omega-3 antidepressant-like effect in rats in terms of its behavioral features in the depression model forced swimming test either alone or in combination with antidepressants fluoxetine or mirtazapine. Ultimately, we prompted to determine the lowest dose at which omega-3 fatty acids and antidepressant drugs may still represent a pharmacological advantage when employed in combined treatments. Chronic diet supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids produced concentration-dependent antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test displaying a behavioral profile similar to fluoxetine but different from mirtazapine. Fluoxetine or mirtazapine at antidepressant doses (10 and 20 mg/kg/day, respectively) rendered additive effects in combination with omega-3 fatty acid supplementation (720 mg/kg/day). Beneficial effects of combined treatment were also observed at sub-effective doses (1 mg/kg/day) of fluoxetine or mirtazapine, since in combination with omega-3 fatty acids (720 mg/kg/day), antidepressants potentiated omega-3 antidepressant-like effects. The antidepressant-like effects occurred in the absence of changes in brain phospholipid classes. The therapeutic approach of combining omega-3 fatty acids with low ineffective doses of antidepressants might represent benefits in the treatment of depression, especially in patients with depression resistant to conventional treatments and even may contribute to patient compliance by decreasing the magnitude of some antidepressant dose-dependent side effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hippocampal Neurogenesis, Depressive Disorders, and Antidepressant Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Paizanis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that neural stem cells reside in the adult central nervous system where neurogenesis occurs throughout lifespan. Neurogenesis concerns mainly two areas in the brain: the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus and the subventricular zone, where it is controlled by several trophic factors and neuroactive molecules. Neurogenesis is involved in processes such as learning and memory and accumulating evidence implicates hippocampal neurogenesis in the physiopathology of depression. We herein review experimental and clinical data demonstrating that stress and antidepressant treatments affect neurogenesis in opposite direction in rodents. In particular, the stimulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by all types of antidepressant drugs supports the view that neuroplastic phenomena are involved in the physiopathology of depression and underlie—at least partly—antidepressant therapy.

  16. Depression, Antidepressants, and Neurogenesis: A Critical Reappraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Nicola D; Owens, Michael J; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2011-01-01

    The neurogenesis hypothesis of depression posits (1) that neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus is regulated negatively by stressful experiences and positively by treatment with antidepressant drugs and (2) that alterations in the rate of neurogenesis play a fundamental role in the pathology and treatment of major depression. This hypothesis is supported by important experimental observations, but is challenged by equally compelling contradictory reports. This review summarizes the phenomenon of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the initial and continued evidence leading to the development of the neurogenesis hypothesis of depression, and the recent studies that have disputed and/or qualified those findings, to conclude that it can be affected by stress and antidepressants under certain conditions, but that these effects do not appear in all cases of psychological stress, depression, and antidepressant treatment. PMID:21937982

  17. 33 CFR 95.020 - Standard for under the influence of alcohol or a dangerous drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of alcohol or a dangerous drug. 95.020 Section 95.020 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... ALCOHOL OR A DANGEROUS DRUG § 95.020 Standard for under the influence of alcohol or a dangerous drug. An individual is under the influence of alcohol or a dangerous drug when: (a) The individual is operating a...

  18. Chemometrics: A new scenario in herbal drug standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Bansal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromatography and spectroscopy techniques are the most commonly used methods in standardization of herbal medicines but the herbal system is not easy to analyze because of their complexity of chemical composition. Many cutting-edge analytical technologies have been introduced to evaluate the quality of medicinal plants and significant amount of measurement data has been produced. Chemometric techniques provide a good opportunity for mining more useful chemical information from the original data. Then, the application of chemometrics in the field of medicinal plants is spontaneous and necessary. Comprehensive methods and hyphenated techniques associated with chemometrics used for extracting useful information and supplying various methods of data processing are now more and more widely used in medicinal plants, among which chemometrics resolution methods and principal component analysis (PCA are most commonly used techniques. This review focuses on the recent various important analytical techniques, important chemometrics tools and interpretation of results by PCA, and applications of chemometrics in quality evaluation of medicinal plants in the authenticity, efficacy and consistency. Key words: Chemometrics, HELP, Herbal drugs, PCA, OPA

  19. Antidepressant-like effects of methanol extract of Hibiscus tiliaceus flowers in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hibiscus tiliaceus L. (Malvaceae) is used in postpartum disorders. Our purpose was to examine the antidepressant, anxiolytic and sedative actions of the methanol extract of H. tiliaceus flowers using animal models. Methods Adult male Swiss albino mice were treated with saline, standard drugs or methanol extract of H. tiliaceus and then subjected to behavioral tests. The forced swimming and tail suspension tests were used as predictive animal models of antidepressant activity, where the time of immobility was considered. The animals were submitted to the elevated plus-maze and ketamine-induced sleeping time to assess anxiolytic and sedative activities, respectively. Results Methanol extract of H. tiliaceus significantly decreased the duration of immobility in both animal models of antidepressant activity, forced swimming and tail suspension tests. This extract did not potentiate the effect of ketamine-induced hypnosis, as determined by the time to onset and duration of sleeping time. Conclusion Our results indicate an antidepressant-like profile of action for the extract of Hibiscus tiliaceus without sedative side effect. PMID:22494845

  20. Antidepressant-like effects of methanol extract of Hibiscus tiliaceus flowers in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanzella Cláudia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hibiscus tiliaceus L. (Malvaceae is used in postpartum disorders. Our purpose was to examine the antidepressant, anxiolytic and sedative actions of the methanol extract of H. tiliaceus flowers using animal models. Methods Adult male Swiss albino mice were treated with saline, standard drugs or methanol extract of H. tiliaceus and then subjected to behavioral tests. The forced swimming and tail suspension tests were used as predictive animal models of antidepressant activity, where the time of immobility was considered. The animals were submitted to the elevated plus-maze and ketamine-induced sleeping time to assess anxiolytic and sedative activities, respectively. Results Methanol extract of H. tiliaceus significantly decreased the duration of immobility in both animal models of antidepressant activity, forced swimming and tail suspension tests. This extract did not potentiate the effect of ketamine-induced hypnosis, as determined by the time to onset and duration of sleeping time. Conclusion Our results indicate an antidepressant-like profile of action for the extract of Hibiscus tiliaceus without sedative side effect.

  1. Antidepressant Potentials of Components from Trichilia monadelpha (Thonn. J.J. de Wilde in Murine Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Kwami Edem Kukuia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichilia monadelpha is a common medicinal plant used traditionally in treating central nervous system conditions such as epilepsy, depression, pain, and psychosis. In this study, the antidepressant-like effect of crude extracts of the stem bark of T. monadelpha was investigated using two classical murine models, forced swimming test (FST and tail suspension test (TST. The extracts, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, and hydroethanolic extracts (30–300 mg/kg, p.o., standard drug (imipramine; fluoxetine, 3–30 mg/kg, p.o., and saline (vehicle were given to mice one hour prior to the acute study. In a separate experiment the components (flavonoids, saponins, alkaloids, tannins, and terpenoids; 30–300 mg/kg, p.o. from the most efficacious extract fraction were screened to ascertain which components possessed the antidepressant effect. All the extracts and components significantly induced a decline in immobility in the FST and TST, indicative of an antidepressant-like activity. The extracts and some components showed increase in swimming and climbing in the FST as well as a significant enhancement in swinging and/or curling scores in the TST, suggesting a possible involvement of monoaminergic and/or opioidergic activity. This study reveals the antidepressant-like potential of the stem bark extracts and components of T. monadelpha.

  2. Ketamine: A New Antidepressant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Karacaer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Standart antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder. However they do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent studies show that subanesthetic dose of ketamine is efficacy and safety for the treatment of depression. Antidepressant effects of ketamine have been found to be short-lived and its psychotomimetic properties may limit the use of ketamine to depressive patients. Future research studies should focus on identifying predictors of response (pharmalogical and clinical , investigating application of different doses and routes of administration and maintaining antidepressant effect. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 30-40

  3. Mechanisms of action of antidepressants: from neurotransmitter systems to signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Chirisse; Fricker, Ashwana D.; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Gomes, Ivone

    2005-01-01

    Antidepressants are commonly used in the treatment of anxiety and depression, medical conditions that affect ~17–20% of the population. The clinical effects of antidepressants take several weeks to manifest, suggesting that these drugs induce adaptive changes in brain structures affected by anxiety and depression. In order to develop shorter-acting and more effective drugs for the treatment of anxiety and depression, it is important to understand how antidepressants bring about their benefici...

  4. Antidepressants: Can They Lose Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t seem to be having the same effect. Can antidepressants lose effectiveness? Answers from Daniel K. Hall- ... some people and not in others. There also can be other reasons an antidepressant is no longer ...

  5. Antidepressant medications and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzoli, R; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y

    2012-01-01

    Use of antidepressant medications that act on the serotonin system has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density (BMD), and to osteoporosis. This article reviews current evidence for such effects, and identifies themes for future research. Serotonin receptors are found in all major...

  6. Adherence to antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2007-01-01

    Depression is a common disorder with painful symptoms and, frequently, social impairment and decreased quality of life. The disorder has a tendency to be long lasting, often with frequent recurrence of symptoms. The risk of relapse and the severity of the symptoms may be reduced by correct...... of dependence of antidepressant medicine, have a great influence on adherence to treatment....

  7. Factors influencing the choice of antidepressants: A study of antidepressant prescribing practice at University psychiatric clinic in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nađa P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Antidepressants are a widely used class of drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate different aspects of antidepressant prescribing practice at University Psychiatric Clinic in Belgrade. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out by retrospective analysis of the patient's medical charts. The study included all patients with antidepressant prescribed at discharge during 2009 (n = 296. The evaluation was focused on patient- related factors (socio-demographic and illness related, psychiatrist-related factors (sex and duration of working experience and drug related factors (type of antidepressant, dose, polypharmacy and reimbursement by national health insurance. Results. Antidepressants were prescribed for unipolar depression (F32-34, ICD X either without comorbidity (46.2% or with comorbidity (24.7%, mostly as a monotherapy (91% had one antidepressant, to the patients who were 65% female, aged 50.1 ± 8.9, most of them with 12 years of education (52.6%, married (69.3% and employed (55.9%. The majority of patients had a history of two hospitalizations (Med 2; 25th-75th perc. 1-4 during nine years (Med 9; 25th-75th perc. 2-15 after the first episode of depression. Among them, 19% were found to be suicidal in a lifetime. The single most prescribed antidepressant was sertraline (20.4%, followed by fluoxetine (13.3% and maprotiline (11.7%. Utilization of antidepressants was positively correlated with the rate of reimbursement (p < 0.01. The most prescribed antidepressant group was selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI (47.8%, followed by tricyclic antidepresants (TCA (25.3% and new antidepressants - venlafaxine, tianeptine, mirtazapine, bupropion, trazodone (15.1%. Most of the drugs were prescribed in doses which are at the lower end of the recommended dose-range. Regarding severity of the actual depressive episode, TCA were prescribed for severe depression with psychotic features, while SSRI were choice for

  8. Use of antidepressants and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina S; Dehlendorff, Christian; Baandrup, Louise

    2017-01-01

    antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, other antidepressants, and potential confounder drugs), medical and reproductive history and socioeconomic parameters, were obtained from nationwide registries. We used conditional logistic regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and two.......80 (95% CI, 0.60-1.08). Among postmenopausal women, the inverse association was restricted to users of menopausal hormone therapy. In conclusion, use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was associated with a decreased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer; thereby implying potential chemopreventive...

  9. Effectiveness of antidepressants: an evidence myth constructed from a thousand randomized trials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannidis John PA

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Antidepressants, in particular newer agents, are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide with annual sales of billions of dollars. The introduction of these agents in the market has passed through seemingly strict regulatory control. Over a thousand randomized trials have been conducted with antidepressants. Statistically significant benefits have been repeatedly demonstrated and the medical literature is flooded with several hundreds of "positive" trials (both pre-approval and post-approval. However, two recent meta-analyses question this picture. The first meta-analysis used data that were submitted to FDA for the approval of 12 antidepressant drugs. While only half of these trials had formally significant effectiveness, published reports almost ubiquitously claimed significant results. "Negative" trials were either left unpublished or were distorted to present "positive" results. The average benefit of these drugs based on the FDA data was of small magnitude, while the published literature suggested larger benefits. A second meta-analysis using also FDA-submitted data examined the relationship between treatment effect and baseline severity of depression. Drug-placebo differences increased with increasing baseline severity and the difference became large enough to be clinically important only in the very small minority of patient populations with severe major depression. In severe major depression, antidepressants did not become more effective, simply placebo lost effectiveness. These data suggest that antidepressants may be less effective than their wide marketing suggests. Short-term benefits are small and long-term balance of benefits and harms is understudied. I discuss how the use of many small randomized trials with clinically non-relevant outcomes, improper interpretation of statistical significance, manipulated study design, biased selection of study populations, short follow-up, and selective and distorted

  10. Increased use of antidepressants in Wuhan, China: a retrospective study from 2006 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ping; Zhang, Huanian; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Chengliang; Liu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the trend of antidepressant use and analyze the daily cost of antidepressants in Wuhan, China. The data on the expenditure of antidepressants in Wuhan from 2006 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed based on the defined daily dose (DDD) method recommended by the World Health Organization. In addition, the daily cost of antidepressants was calculated for the pharmacoeconomic evaluation. The overall sales of antidepressants increased by 566.7% over the 7-year period. The utilization of antidepressants increased annually from 1.067 DDDs per 1000 inhabitants per day in 2006 to 4.144 in 2012. This upward trend was mainly driven by an increase in the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which accounted for about 60% of antidepressant use. Notably, the use of traditional Chinese patent medicines (TCMs) approved to treat depression in China in 2010 increased from 0.158 DDDs per 1000 inhabitants per day in 2010 to 0.305 in 2012. The daily drug cost analysis indicated that selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and other new antidepressants were more expensive while tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants (TCAs) had a low-cost advantage. Antidepressants were increasingly used over the study period. Among them, SSRIs followed by SNRIs were the most commonly used. After the approval for the treatment of depression, TCMs were generally accepted by physicians and patients. The low-cost advantage allowed TCAs to be used in the antidepressant therapy.

  11. Synthesis and anti-depressant evaluation of novel pyrazolone derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Merugumolu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diazotization of substituted anilines with NaNO2 and concentrated hydrochloric acid at 0ºC gave the diazonium chlorides. Coupling of substituted aryl diazonium chlorides with ethyl acetoacetate in methanol gave ethyl-2-aryl-hydrazono-3-oxobutyrates (2a-h. Reaction of (2a-h with naphthoic carbohydrazide (3 gave the title compounds pyrazolone derivatives (4a-h. The newly synthesized compounds were screened for their in vivo anti-depressant activity by tail suspension test and forced swimming test. Some of the tested compounds 4f, 4g showed very good activity when compared to the standard drug imipramine. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by physical parameters and the structures were elucidated by spectral data.

  12. Antidepressant Use and Risk of Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weeke, P; Jensen, Aksel Karl Georg; Folke, F

    2012-01-01

    being the most frequently used type of antidepressant (50.8%). Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs; odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, confidence interval (CI): 1.14-2.50) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; OR = 1.21, CI: 1.00-1.47) were both associated with comparable increases in risk of OHCA.......17-12.2). An association between cardiac arrest and antidepressant use could be documented in both the SSRI and TCA classes of drugs....

  13. Antidepressants and Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Hsiao, Fei-Yuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Wang, Chi-Chuan; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Empirical evidence regarding the association between antidepressants and valvular heart disease (VHD) is scarce. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research database, this nested case-control study assessed the association between antidepressants and VHD in a Chinese population. Among a cohort of patients who used at least 3 prescription antidepressants, 874 cases with VHD and 3496 matched controls (1:4 ratio) were identified. Conditional logistic regression models were used to examine the timing, duration, dose and type of antidepressants use, and the risk of VHD. Current use of antidepressants was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in the risk of VHD (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–1.77). Among current users, a dose–response association was observed in terms of the cumulative duration and the cumulative antidepressant dose. Significantly higher risks of VHD were observed among the current users of tricyclic antidepressants (aOR 1.40 [1.05–1.87]). We found that the use of antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of VHD and that the risks varied according to different antidepressants. PMID:27057841

  14. Neurogenesis and The Effect of Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence that neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS suggests that the CNS has the potential for self-repair. Beside this potential, the function of newly generated neuronal cells in the adult brain remains the focus of intense research. The hippocampus of patients with depression show signs of atrophy and neuronal loss. This suggests that adult neurogenesis may contribute to the biology of depression. The observations that antidepressants, like fluoxetine, increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG and neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effect of antidepressants, lead to a new theory for depression and the design of new strategies and drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in the etiology of depression remains the source of controversies and debates.

  15. Neurogenesis and the Effect of Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Taupin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent evidence that neurogenesis occurs throughout adulthood and neural stem cells (NSCs reside in the adult central nervous system (CNS suggests that the CNS has the potential for self-repair. Beside this potential, the function of newly generated neuronal cells in the adult brain remains the focus of intense research. The hippocampus of patients with depression show signs of atrophy and neuronal loss. This suggests that adult neurogenesis may contribute to the biology of depression. The observations that antidepressants, like fluoxetine, increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG and neurogenesis is required for the behavioral effect of antidepressants, lead to a new theory for depression and the design of new strategies and drugs for the treatment of depression. However, the role of adult neurogenesis in the etiology of depression remains the source of controversies and debates.

  16. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exposure to antidepressants during pregnancy--prevalences and outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez-Solem, Espen

    2014-01-01

    conflicting. The main challenge is how to discern between the effects of the drug and the effect of the depression itself. We approached this dire problem conducting a nation-wide register based study analyzing the relation between use of antidepressants during pregnancy and the risk of congenital...... that the apparent risk associated with use of SSRIs during pregnancy is not related to the drug exposure, but to unknown characteristics associated with mothers redeeming a prescription for an antidepressant. We found no increased risk of stillbirths or neonatal mortality among off-spring exposed in utero...

  18. Impact of varying control moment selection in a case-crossover (CCO) study on antidepressant drug (AD) use and hip/femur fracture (HFF) in protect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Mark C.H.; Belitser, Svetlana V.; Souverein, Patrick C.; Groenwold, Rolf H.H.; Candore, Gianmario; Alvarez, Yolanda; Schlienger, Raymond G.; Reynolds, Robert; Klungel, Olaf H.; Gardarsdottir, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Background: The CCO design is appealing because it eliminates time-invariant person related confounding. A prerequisite is that exposure in real life drug use is sufficiently transient to allow for independence of exposure states. The impact of variation in time of control moment selection is

  19. Antidepressant therapy in epilepsy: can treating the comorbidities affect the underlying disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardamone, L; Salzberg, MR; O'Brien, TJ; Jones, NC

    2013-01-01

    There is a high incidence of psychiatric comorbidity in people with epilepsy (PWE), particularly depression. The manifold adverse consequences of comorbid depression have been more clearly mapped in recent years. Accordingly, considerable efforts have been made to improve detection and diagnosis, with the result that many PWE are treated with antidepressant drugs, medications with the potential to influence both epilepsy and depression. Exposure to older generations of antidepressants (notably tricyclic antidepressants and bupropion) can increase seizure frequency. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that newer (‘second generation’) antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, have markedly less effect on excitability and may lead to improvements in epilepsy severity. Although a great deal is known about how antidepressants affect excitability on short time scales in experimental models, little is known about the effects of chronic antidepressant exposure on the underlying processes subsumed under the term ‘epileptogenesis’: the progressive neurobiological processes by which the non-epileptic brain changes so that it generates spontaneous, recurrent seizures. This paper reviews the literature concerning the influences of antidepressants in PWE and in animal models. The second section describes neurobiological mechanisms implicated in both antidepressant actions and in epileptogenesis, highlighting potential substrates that may mediate any effects of antidepressants on the development and progression of epilepsy. Although much indirect evidence suggests the overall clinical effects of antidepressants on epilepsy itself are beneficial, there are reasons for caution and the need for further research, discussed in the concluding section. PMID:23146067

  20. Increase in antidepressant medication in the US adult population between 1990 and 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojtabai, Ramin

    2008-01-01

    The rate of antidepressant treatment in the US has significantly increased in the past decade. There are, however, concerns about undertreatment among traditionally underserved groups and overtreatment in less severely ill individuals. This study examines trends in the prevalence of antidepressant drug treatment in two US general population surveys. The prevalence of antidepressant treatment within a 12-month period was compared in the US National Comorbidity Survey (1990-1992) and the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (2001-2003). Variations in trends across groups were examined using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models. The rate of antidepressant drug treatment increased more than four times between early 1990s and early 2000s. The trend was similar across sociodemographic groups. Younger adults, men and racial/ethnic minorities continued to receive antidepressant treatment at a lower rate compared to middle-aged adults, women and non-Hispanic whites, respectively. The rate of antidepressant treatment increased more in the group of less severely ill individuals than in those with more severe psychopathology. Sociodemographic disparities in antidepressant treatment persisted over the last decade in the US, lending support to concerns about undertreatment among traditionally underserved groups, whereas the greater increase in the rate of antidepressant treatment in the less severely ill group lends support to concerns about antidepressant overtreatment in this population.

  1. Antidepressants and advertising: psychopharmaceuticals in crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslit, Nathan P; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2012-03-01

    As the efficacy and science of psychopharmaceuticals has become increasingly uncertain, marketing of these drugs to both physicians and consumers continues to a central part of a multi-billion dollar per year industry in the United States. We explore how such drug marketing portrays idealized scientific relationships between psychopharmaceuticals and depression; how multiple stakeholders, including scientists, regulatory agencies, and patient advocacy groups, negotiate neurobiological explanations of mental illness; and how the placebo effect has become a critical issue in these debates, including the possible role of drug advertising to influence the placebo effect directly. We argue that if and how antidepressants "work" is not a straightforward objective question, but rather a larger social contest involving scientific debate, the political history of the pharmaceutical industry, cultural discourses surrounding the role of drugs in society, and the interpretive flexibility of personal experience.

  2. Involvement of AMPA receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of dextromethorphan in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Linda; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2015-12-15

    Dextromethorphan (DM) is an antitussive with rapid acting antidepressant potential based on pharmacodynamic similarities to ketamine. Building upon our previous finding that DM produces antidepressant-like effects in the mouse forced swim test (FST), the present study aimed to establish the antidepressant-like actions of DM in the tail suspension test (TST), another well-established model predictive of antidepressant efficacy. Additionally, using the TST and FST, we investigated the role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in the antidepressant-like properties of DM because accumulating evidence suggests that AMPA receptors play an important role in the pathophysiology of depression and may contribute to the efficacy of antidepressant medications, including that of ketamine. We found that DM displays antidepressant-like effects in the TST similar to the conventional and fast acting antidepressants characterized by imipramine and ketamine, respectively. Moreover, decreasing the first-pass metabolism of DM by concomitant administration of quinidine (CYP2D6 inhibitor) potentiated antidepressant-like actions, implying DM itself has antidepressant efficacy. Finally, in both the TST and FST, pretreatment with the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide) significantly attenuated the antidepressant-like behavior elicited by DM. Together, the data show that DM exerts antidepressant-like actions through AMPA receptors, further suggesting DM may act as a safe and effective fast acting antidepressant drug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jens Peter; Munch-Hansen, T.; Wieclaw, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription...... alone. None of the measured psychosocial work environment factors were consistently related to prescription of antidepressant drugs during the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The study does not indicate that a poor psychosocial work environment among public service employees is related to prescription...... of antidepressant medication. METHODS: Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD) purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was obtained for a cohort of 21,129 Danish public service workers that participated in work climate surveys carried out during the period 2002-2005. Individual self...

  4. Effects of central nervous system drugs on driving: speed variability versus standard deviation of lateral position as outcome measure of the on-the-road driving test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verster, Joris C; Roth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The on-the-road driving test in normal traffic is used to examine the impact of drugs on driving performance. This paper compares the sensitivity of standard deviation of lateral position (SDLP) and SD speed in detecting driving impairment. A literature search was conducted to identify studies applying the on-the-road driving test, examining the effects of anxiolytics, antidepressants, antihistamines, and hypnotics. The proportion of comparisons (treatment versus placebo) where a significant impairment was detected with SDLP and SD speed was compared. About 40% of 53 relevant papers did not report data on SD speed and/or SDLP. After placebo administration, the correlation between SDLP and SD speed was significant but did not explain much variance (r = 0.253, p = 0.0001). A significant correlation was found between ΔSDLP and ΔSD speed (treatment-placebo), explaining 48% of variance. When using SDLP as outcome measure, 67 significant treatment-placebo comparisons were found. Only 17 (25.4%) were significant when SD speed was used as outcome measure. Alternatively, for five treatment-placebo comparisons, a significant difference was found for SD speed but not for SDLP. Standard deviation of lateral position is a more sensitive outcome measure to detect driving impairment than speed variability.

  5. Systematic derivation of an Australian standard for Tall Man lettering to distinguish similar drug names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerton, Lynne; Rizk, Mariam F S; Bedford, Graham; Lalor, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Confusion between similar drug names can cause harmful medication errors. Similar drug names can be visually differentiated using a typographical technique known as Tall Man lettering. While international conventions exist to derive Tall Man representation for drug names, there has been no national standard developed in Australia. This paper describes the derivation of a risk-based, standardized approach for use of Tall Man lettering in Australia, and known as National Tall Man Lettering. A three-stage approach was applied. An Australian list of similar drug names was systematically compiled from the literature and clinical error reports. Secondly, drug name pairs were prioritized using a risk matrix based on the likelihood of name confusion (a four-component score) vs. consensus ratings of the potential severity of the confusion by 31 expert reviewers. The mid-type Tall Man convention was then applied to derive the typography for the highest priority drug pair names. Of 250 pairs of confusable Australian drug names, comprising 341 discrete names, 35 pairs were identified by the matrix as an 'extreme' risk if confused. The mid-type Tall Man convention was successfully applied to the majority of the prioritized drugs; some adaption of the convention was required. This systematic process for identification of confusable drug names and associated risk, followed by application of a convention for Tall Man lettering, has produced a standard now endorsed for use in clinical settings in Australia. Periodic updating is recommended to accommodate new drug names and error reports. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. What can we learn from consumer reports on psychiatric adverse drug reactions with antidepressant medication? Experiences from reports to a consumer association

    OpenAIRE

    Vilhelmsson, Andreas; Svensson, Tommy; Meeuwisse, Anna; Carlsten, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organization (WHO) the cost of adverse drug reactions   (ADRs) in the general population is high and under-reporting by health professionals   is a well-recognized problem. Another way to increase ADR reporting is to let the   consumers themselves report directly to the authorities. In Sweden it is mandatory   for prescribers to report serious ADRs to the Medical Products Agency (MPA), but there   are no such regulations for consumers. The non-profit a...

  7. Computational Model of Antidepressant Response Heterogeneity as Multi-pathway Neuroadaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam B. Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Current hypotheses cannot fully explain the clinically observed heterogeneity in antidepressant response. The therapeutic latency of antidepressants suggests that therapeutic outcomes are achieved not by the acute effects of the drugs, but rather by the homeostatic changes that occur as the brain adapts to their chronic administration. We present a computational model that represents the known interactions between the monoaminergic neurotransmitter-producing brain regions and associated non-monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems, and use the model to explore the possible ways in which the brain can homeostatically adjust to chronic antidepressant administration. The model also represents the neuron-specific neurotransmitter receptors that are known to adjust their strengths (expressions or sensitivities in response to chronic antidepressant administration, and neuroadaptation in the model occurs through sequential adjustments in these receptor strengths. The main result is that the model can reach similar levels of adaptation to chronic administration of the same antidepressant drug or combination along many different pathways, arriving correspondingly at many different receptor strength configurations, but not all of those adapted configurations are also associated with therapeutic elevations in monoamine levels. When expressed as the percentage of adapted configurations that are also associated with elevations in one or more of the monoamines, our modeling results largely agree with the percentage efficacy rates of antidepressants and antidepressant combinations observed in clinical trials. Our neuroadaptation model provides an explanation for the clinical reports of heterogeneous outcomes among patients chronically administered the same antidepressant drug regimen.

  8. Use of antidepressants in dentistry: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, P A; Martins, C C; Miranda, Gfpc; de Souza E Silva, M E; de Abreu, Mhng

    2017-08-24

    Previous research has suggested that antidepressants can be used in oral health care. The aim of this systematic review was to search for scientific evidence of the efficacy of the use of antidepressants in dentistry. The clinical question was as follows (PICO question): dentistry patients (Patients); antidepressants (Intervention); no use or placebo or other drug (Comparison); and efficacy in oral health problems (Outcome). An electronic search was conducted in seven databases, as well as a manual search without restriction regarding language and date of publication. Two independent reviewers selected studies based on eligibility criteria, extracted data and assessed methodological quality based on the PEDro scale. The PROSPERO record is number CRD42016037442. A total of 15 randomized controlled trials were associated with the use of antidepressants to control chronic or acute pain in dentistry, among other conditions such as bruxism and burning mouth syndrome. The most commonly used drug in clinical trials was amitriptyline (more than 50% of studies). Antidepressants may be effective in dentistry for acute and chronic pain, but there is a large amount of methodological heterogeneity among the evaluated studies. In summary, there is rationality for the indication of this class of medicine in dentistry in specific clinical situations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor ...

  10. 78 FR 42084 - Electronic Study Data Submission; Data Standard Support; Availability of the Center for Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0812... so that safe and effective products can get to market sooner. It is aligned with the objectives of... as captured in the FDA Safety and Innovation Act. The CDER Data Standards Strategy supersedes version...

  11. Polypyrrole/magnetic nanoparticles composite as an efficient sorbent for dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction of antidepressant drugs from biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar; Karami, Sara; Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira; Shekari, Nafiseh; Jalilian, Niloofar

    2015-10-15

    In this study, polypyrrole/magnetic nanoparticles composites in the presence of two different dopants were synthesized with the aid of chemical oxidative polymerization process for dispersive-μ-solid phase extraction (D-μ-SPE). The synthesized magnetic sorbents were characterized by various techniques. The results exhibited that the nanocomposite modified by polypyrrole with sodium perchlorate as a dopant demonstrated higher extraction efficiency for citalopram (CIT) and sertraline (STR) as the model compounds. This nanosorbent in combination with high performance liquid chromatography-UV detection was applied for extraction, preconcentration and determination of CIT and STR in urine and plasma samples. The effect of various parameters on the extraction efficiency including: sample pH, amount of sorbent, sorption time, eluent and its volume, salt content, and elution time were investigated and optimized. The opted conditions were: sample pH, 9.0; sorbent dosage, 10mg; sorption time, 7 min; elution solvent and its volume, 0.06 mol L(-1) HCl in methanol, 120 μL; elution time, 2 min and without addition of salt to the sample. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 1-800 μg L(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) were obtained in the range of 0.2-1.0 μg L(-1) for CIT and 0.3-0.7 μg L(-1) for STR, respectively. The percent of extraction recoveries and relative standard deviations (n=5) were in the range of 93.4-99, 4.8-8.4 for CIT and 94-98.4, 4.3-9.2 for STR, respectively. Finally, the applicability of the method was successfully confirmed by the extraction and determination of CIT and STR in human urine and plasma samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ADEpedia: a scalable and standardized knowledge base of Adverse Drug Events using semantic web technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoqian; Solbrig, Harold R; Chute, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    A source of semantically coded Adverse Drug Event (ADE) data can be useful for identifying common phenotypes related to ADEs. We proposed a comprehensive framework for building a standardized ADE knowledge base (called ADEpedia) through combining ontology-based approach with semantic web technology. The framework comprises four primary modules: 1) an XML2RDF transformation module; 2) a data normalization module based on NCBO Open Biomedical Annotator; 3) a RDF store based persistence module; and 4) a front-end module based on a Semantic Wiki for the review and curation. A prototype is successfully implemented to demonstrate the capability of the system to integrate multiple drug data and ontology resources and open web services for the ADE data standardization. A preliminary evaluation is performed to demonstrate the usefulness of the system, including the performance of the NCBO annotator. In conclusion, the semantic web technology provides a highly scalable framework for ADE data source integration and standard query service.

  13. Determination of the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline, imipramine, desipramine, clomipramine and desmethylclomipramine in dried blood spots using LC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E.J.J.; Paardekooper, J.; Brummel-Mulder, E.; Hak, E.; Wilffert, B.; Maring, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of Tricyclic Antidepressants (TADs) is considered useful in patients with major depressive disorders, since these drugs display large individual differences in clearance and therapeutic windows of these drugs are relatively small. We developed an assay

  14. Antidepressant- and Anxiolytic-Like Effects of New Dual 5-HT₁A and 5-HT₇ Antagonists in Animal Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Pytka

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to further characterize pharmacological properties of two phenylpiperazine derivatives: 1-{2-[2-(2,6-dimethlphenoxyethoxy]ethyl}-4-(2-methoxyphenylpiperazynine hydrochloride (HBK-14 and 2-[2-(2-chloro-6-methylphenoxyethoxy]ethyl-4-(2- methoxyphenylpiperazynine dihydrochloride (HBK-15 in radioligand binding and functional in vitro assays as well as in vivo models. Antidepressant-like properties were investigated in the forced swim test (FST in mice and rats. Anxiolytic-like activity was evaluated in the four-plate test in mice and elevated plus maze test (EPM in rats. Imipramine and escitalopram were used as reference drugs in the FST, and diazepam was used as a standard anxiolytic drug in animal models of anxiety. Our results indicate that HBK-14 and HBK-15 possess high or moderate affinity for serotonergic 5-HT2, adrenergic α1, and dopaminergic D2 receptors as well as being full 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor antagonists. We also present their potent antidepressant-like activity (HBK-14-FST mice: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 5 mg/kg and (HBK-15-FST mice: 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; FST rats: 1.25 and 2.5 mg/kg. We show that HBK-14 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 2.5 mg/kg and HBK-15 (four-plate test: 2.5 and 5 mg/kg; EPM: 5 mg/kg possess anxiolytic-like properties. Among the two, HBK-15 has stronger antidepressant-like properties, and HBK-14 displays greater anxiolytic-like activity. Lastly, we demonstrate the involvement of serotonergic system, particularly 5-HT1A receptor, in the antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions of investigated compounds.

  15. Body weight as a predictor of antidepressant efficacy in the GENDEP project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uher, Rudolf; Mors, Ole; Hauser, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Background: Being overweight or obese may be associated with poor response to antidepressants. The present report explores the moderation of antidepressant response by body weight to establish the specificity to antidepressant mode of action, type of depressive symptoms and gender. Methods: Height....... The relationship between body weight and change in neurovegetative symptoms was moderated by gender with obese men responding less to nortriptyline and obese women having poorer response to both antidepressants. Limitations: As no placebo arm was included, the specificity of findings to antidepressants is relative...... and weight were measured in 797 men and women with major depression treated with escitalopram or nortriptyline for twelve weeks as part of the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project. Body mass index (BMI) and obesity (BMI > 30) were tested as predictors of change in depressive...

  16. Accuracy and completeness of drug information in Wikipedia: a comparison with standard textbooks of pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jona Kräenbring

    Full Text Available The online resource Wikipedia is increasingly used by students for knowledge acquisition and learning. However, the lack of a formal editorial review and the heterogeneous expertise of contributors often results in skepticism by educators whether Wikipedia should be recommended to students as an information source. In this study we systematically analyzed the accuracy and completeness of drug information in the German and English language versions of Wikipedia in comparison to standard textbooks of pharmacology. In addition, references, revision history and readability were evaluated. Analysis of readability was performed using the Amstad readability index and the Erste Wiener Sachtextformel. The data on indication, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and contraindications for 100 curricular drugs were retrieved from standard German textbooks of general pharmacology and compared with the corresponding articles in the German language version of Wikipedia. Quantitative analysis revealed that accuracy of drug information in Wikipedia was 99.7% ± 0.2% when compared to the textbook data. The overall completeness of drug information in Wikipedia was 83.8 ± 1.5% (p < 0.001. Completeness varied in-between categories, and was lowest in the category "pharmacokinetics" (68.0% ± 4.2%; p < 0.001 and highest in the category "indication" (91.3% ± 2.0% when compared to the textbook data overlap. Similar results were obtained for the English language version of Wikipedia. Of the drug information missing in Wikipedia, 62.5% was rated as didactically non-relevant in a qualitative re-evaluation study. Drug articles in Wikipedia had an average of 14.6 ± 1.6 references and 262.8 ± 37.4 edits performed by 142.7 ± 17.6 editors. Both Wikipedia and textbooks samples had comparable, low readability. Our study suggests that Wikipedia is an accurate and comprehensive source of drug-related information for undergraduate medical education.

  17. Accuracy and Completeness of Drug Information in Wikipedia: A Comparison with Standard Textbooks of Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Joanna; Muehlich, Susanne; Zolk, Oliver; Wojnowski, Leszek; Maas, Renke; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The online resource Wikipedia is increasingly used by students for knowledge acquisition and learning. However, the lack of a formal editorial review and the heterogeneous expertise of contributors often results in skepticism by educators whether Wikipedia should be recommended to students as an information source. In this study we systematically analyzed the accuracy and completeness of drug information in the German and English language versions of Wikipedia in comparison to standard textbooks of pharmacology. In addition, references, revision history and readability were evaluated. Analysis of readability was performed using the Amstad readability index and the Erste Wiener Sachtextformel. The data on indication, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and contraindications for 100 curricular drugs were retrieved from standard German textbooks of general pharmacology and compared with the corresponding articles in the German language version of Wikipedia. Quantitative analysis revealed that accuracy of drug information in Wikipedia was 99.7%±0.2% when compared to the textbook data. The overall completeness of drug information in Wikipedia was 83.8±1.5% (ptextbook data overlap. Similar results were obtained for the English language version of Wikipedia. Of the drug information missing in Wikipedia, 62.5% was rated as didactically non-relevant in a qualitative re-evaluation study. Drug articles in Wikipedia had an average of 14.6±1.6 references and 262.8±37.4 edits performed by 142.7±17.6 editors. Both Wikipedia and textbooks samples had comparable, low readability. Our study suggests that Wikipedia is an accurate and comprehensive source of drug-related information for undergraduate medical education. PMID:25250889

  18. Accuracy and completeness of drug information in Wikipedia: a comparison with standard textbooks of pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräenbring, Jona; Monzon Penza, Tika; Gutmann, Joanna; Muehlich, Susanne; Zolk, Oliver; Wojnowski, Leszek; Maas, Renke; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The online resource Wikipedia is increasingly used by students for knowledge acquisition and learning. However, the lack of a formal editorial review and the heterogeneous expertise of contributors often results in skepticism by educators whether Wikipedia should be recommended to students as an information source. In this study we systematically analyzed the accuracy and completeness of drug information in the German and English language versions of Wikipedia in comparison to standard textbooks of pharmacology. In addition, references, revision history and readability were evaluated. Analysis of readability was performed using the Amstad readability index and the Erste Wiener Sachtextformel. The data on indication, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, adverse effects and contraindications for 100 curricular drugs were retrieved from standard German textbooks of general pharmacology and compared with the corresponding articles in the German language version of Wikipedia. Quantitative analysis revealed that accuracy of drug information in Wikipedia was 99.7% ± 0.2% when compared to the textbook data. The overall completeness of drug information in Wikipedia was 83.8 ± 1.5% (p < 0.001). Completeness varied in-between categories, and was lowest in the category "pharmacokinetics" (68.0% ± 4.2%; p < 0.001) and highest in the category "indication" (91.3% ± 2.0%) when compared to the textbook data overlap. Similar results were obtained for the English language version of Wikipedia. Of the drug information missing in Wikipedia, 62.5% was rated as didactically non-relevant in a qualitative re-evaluation study. Drug articles in Wikipedia had an average of 14.6 ± 1.6 references and 262.8 ± 37.4 edits performed by 142.7 ± 17.6 editors. Both Wikipedia and textbooks samples had comparable, low readability. Our study suggests that Wikipedia is an accurate and comprehensive source of drug-related information for undergraduate medical education.

  19. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  20. Effects of Calcium Channel Blockers on Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam and Imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is effective as an anxiolytic and in the adjunct treatment of depression. In this study, the effects of calcium channel antagonists on the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine were investigated. A forced swimming maze was used to study behavioral despair in albino mice. Mice were divided into nine groups (n = 7 per group. One group received a single dose of 1% Tween 80; two groups each received a single dose of the antidepressant alone (alprazolam or imipramine; two groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker (nifedipine or verapamil; four groups each received a single dose of the calcium channel blocker followed by a single dose of the antidepressant (with same doses used for either in the previous four groups. Drug administration was performed concurrently on the nine groups. Our data confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Both nifedipine and verapamil produced a significant antidepressant effect (delay the onset of immobility when administered separately. Verapamil augmented the antidepressant effects of alprazolam and imipramine (additive antidepressant effect. This may be due to the possibility that verapamil might have antidepressant-like effect through different mechanism. Nifedipine and imipramine combined led to a delay in the onset of immobility greater than their single use but less than the sum of their independent administration. This may be due to the fact that nifedipine on its own might act as an antidepressant but blocks one imipramine mechanism that depends on L-type calcium channel activation. Combining nifedipine with alprazolam produced additional antidepressant effects, which indicates that they exert antidepressant effects through different mechanisms.

  1. Detection of systemic hypersensitivity to drugs using standard guinea pig assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, James L; Staten, David; Swann, Joslyn; Armstrong, George; Bates, Melissa; Hastings, Kenneth L

    2003-12-01

    The most commonly used assays designed to detect either skin or systemic immune-based hypersensitivity reactions are those using guinea pigs (GP). We obtained data from various FDA records to evaluate the correlation between GP assay results and reported post-marketing systemic hypersensitivity reactions. We examined the new drug application (NDA) reviews of approved drugs for the results of GP assays. Post-marketing human data were extracted from the FDA adverse event reporting system (AERS). Drug usage data were obtained from a commercial database maintained by IMS Health Inc. We found 83 (21%) of 396 drugs approved between 1978 and 1998 had reported GP test results. Among these 83 drugs, 14 (17%) were found to have positive results in at least one GP assay. Simple reporting index (RI) values for systemic hypersensitivity reactions were calculated from AERS data and usage to produce the index of adverse event reports per million shipping units of drug. A variety of definitions of positive human response were examined. A statistically significant association was seen for rash between post-marketing and clinical trials adverse event reports. No statistically significant associations between human data and GP test results were observed. These data suggest that standard GP assays have limited ability to predict human systemic hypersensitivity potential for pharmaceuticals.

  2. Evaluation of antidepressant like property of amisulpride per se and its comparison with fluoxetine and olanzapine using forced swimming test in albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Ganesh R; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Phadnis, Pradeep; Paliwal, Abhay; Vyas, Savita; Solanki, Pooja

    2009-01-01

    Amisulpride, an atypical antipsychotic was evaluated for antidepressant like activity in forced swimming test in Swiss albino mice. The effect of amisulpride was compared with that of fluoxetine, the standard antidepressant and olanzapine, another atypical antipsychotic claimed to have antidepressant like activity. Both acute and chronic studies were carried out. In both the studies, animals were divided into four groups (n = 8 each) and subjected to oral drug interventions as follows -- Group 1- control (distilled water, 1 mL/kg); Group 2- fluoxetine in a dose of 10 mg/kg 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test; Group 3-amisulpride in a dose of 70 mg/kg 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test; Group 4- olanzapine in a dose of 2 mg/kg 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the study. In the chronic study, the treatment was given daily for 28 days with last dose being given 2 h prior to the test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. Results of both the studies indicated that animals given amisulpride displayed significant improvement in swimming behavior (p Fluoxetine also showed significant difference in activity as compared to amisulpride and olanzapine (p swimming phases in albino mice (p > 0.05). We conclude that amisulpride per se has an antidepressant like activity comparable to that of olanzapine though the activity was significantly less than that of fluoxetine.

  3. Antidepressant, anxiolytic and anti-nociceptive activities of ethanol extract of Steudnera colocasiifolia K. Koch leaves in mice model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shah Hafez Kabir

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the antidepressant, anxiolytic and antinociceptive activities of ethanol extract of Steudnera colocasiifolia K. Koch (S. colocasiifolia leaves. Methods: Swiss albino mice treated with 1% Tween solution, standard drugs and ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia, respectively, were subjected to the neurological and antinociceptive investigations. The tail suspension test and forced swimming test were used for testing antidepressant activity, where the parameter is the measurement of immobility time. Anxiolytic activity was evaluated by hole board model. Anti-nociceptive potential of the extract was also screened for centrally acting analgesic activity by using formalin induced licking response model and acetic acid induced writhing test was used for testing peripheral analgesic action. Results: Ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia significantly decreased the period of immobility in both tested models (tail suspension and forced swimming models of antidepressant activity. In the hole board model, there was a dose dependant (at 100 and 200 mg/kg and a significant increase in the number of head dipping by comparing with control (1% Tween solution (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001. In formalin induced licking model, a significant inhibition of pain compared to standard diclofenac sodium was observed (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001. In acetic acid induced test, there was a significant reduction of writhing response and pain in mice treated with leaves extract of S. colocasiifolia at 200 mg/kg body weight (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001. Conclusions: The results proofed the prospective antidepressant, anxiolytic and antinociceptive activities of ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia leaves.

  4. Spanish Compliance With Guidelines for Prescribing Four Drugs in the Intensive Phase of Standard Tuberculosis Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, José-María; Rodrigo, Teresa; Casals, Martí; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Pascual-Pascual, Teresa; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-05-01

    International and Spanish guidelines recommend a 4-drug regimen in the intensive treatment of tuberculosis (TB). The aim of our study was to determine if these recommendations are followed in Spain, and the factors associated with the use of 3 drugs (standard regimen without ethambutol). Observational, multicenter, retrospective analysis of data from patients diagnosed with TB in practically all Spanish Autonomous Communities between 2007 and 2102. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were analyzed using logistic regression, and odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A total of 3,189 patients were included, 1,413 (44.3%) of whom received 3 drugs. The percentage of 3-drug users among patients with positive sputum smear was 41.2%; among patients with resistance to at least 1 drug, 36.1%; among HIV-infected patients, 31.4%; and among immigrants, 24.8%. Factors associated with the use of 3 drugs were: female sex (OR=1.18; CI: 1.00-1.39); native Spanish (OR=3.09; CI: 2.58-3.70); retired (OR=1.42; CI: 1.14-1.77); homeless (OR=3.10; CI: 1.52-6.43); living alone (OR=1.62; CI: 1.11-2.36); living in a family (OR=1.97; CI: 1.48-2.65); seen by specialists in the region (OR=1.37; CI: 1.10;1.70); no HIV infection (OR=1.63; CI: 1.09-2.48); and negative sputum smear with positive culture (OR=1.59; CI: 1.25-2.02). A large proportion of TB patients receive intensive treatment with 3 drugs. TB treatment recommendations should be followed, both in routine clinical practice and by the National Plan for Prevention and Control of Tuberculosis in Spain. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Economic impact of antidepressant treatment duration in naturalistic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournier, M; Crott, R; Gaudron, Y; Verdoux, H

    2013-05-01

    To assess the economic impact of the duration of antidepressant drug treatment in a real-life setting. A historical fixed cohort study included 27 917 patients aged 18 and over with a new antidepressant treatment registered in the national insurance database. The economic impact concerned healthcare expenditure in the first 3 months after treatment discontinuation. Generalized linear models were used to compare two groups of treatment duration: adjustment for care costs before and during treatment episode, gender, age, chronic diseases, welfare and prescriber specialty, total healthcare costs (in log) [-0.06 (-0.14;0.01) P = 0.11] and psychiatric care costs (in square root) [-0.08 (-0.41;0.25) P = 0.6] were similar in both groups. Non-psychiatric care costs were significantly lower in the 'long treatment duration' group compared with the 'short treatment duration' group [-11.4 (-15.8; -7.0) P costs over the antidepressant treatment episode were larger in the 'long treatment duration' group compared with the 'short treatment duration' group. With regard to healthcare costs and global health, antidepressant drug treatments of short duration appear less effective than treatment of recommended duration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Clinical Use of Mood Stabilizers With Antidepressants in Asia: Report From the Research on Asian Psychotropic Prescription Patterns for Antidepressants (REAP-AD) Projects in 2004 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaratnam, Kamini; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Tripathi, Adarsh; Chiu, Helen F K; Si, Tian-Mei; Chee, Kok-Yoon; Avasthi, Ajit; Grover, Sandeep; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Kuga, Hironori; Kanba, Shigenobu; He, Yan-Ling; Lee, Min-Soo; Yang, Shu-Yu; Udomratn, Pichet; Kallivayalil, Roy A; Tanra, Andi J; Maramis, Margarita M; Shen, Winston W; Sartorius, Norman; Kua, Ee-Heok; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Mahendran, Rathi; Shinfuku, Naotaka; Sum, Min Yi; Baldessarini, Ross J; Sim, Kang

    2017-04-01

    As most reports concerning treatment with combinations of mood stabilizer (MS) with antidepressant (AD) drugs are based in the West, we surveyed characteristics of such cotreatment in 42 sites caring for the mentally ill in 10 Asian countries. This cross-sectional, pharmacoepidemiologic study used 2004 and 2013 data from the REAP-AD (Research Study on Asian Psychotropic Prescription Patterns for Antidepressants) to evaluate the rates and doses of MSs given with ADs and associated factors in 4164 psychiatric patients, using standard bivariate methods followed by multivariable logistic regression modeling. Use of MS + AD increased by 104% (5.5% to 11.2%) between 2004 and 2013 and was much more associated with diagnosis of bipolar disorder than major depression or anxiety disorder, as well as with hospitalization > outpatient care, psychiatric > general-medical programs, and young age (all P contemporary use of MSs with ADs in Asia, support predictions that such treatment increased in recent years, and was associated with diagnosis of bipolar disorder, treatment in inpatient and psychiatric settings, and younger age.

  7. Antidepressants: Selecting One That's Right for You

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antidepressants: Selecting one that's right for you Confused by the choice in antidepressants? With persistence, you and your doctor should find one that works so ... Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved.

  8. Migraine Medications and Antidepressants: A Risky Mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What are the health risks associated with taking migraine medications and antidepressants at the same time? Answers ... W. Swanson, M.D. Reports suggest that combining migraine medications called triptans with certain antidepressants — including selective ...

  9. Strategies of bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Freed, Anita; Lavrich, David; Raghavachari, Ramesh; Huynh-Ba, Kim; Shah, Ketan; Alasandro, Mark

    2015-08-01

    In the past decade, many guidance documents have been issued through collaboration of global organizations and regulatory authorities. Most of these are applicable to new products, but there is a risk that currently marketed products will not meet the new compliance standards during audits and inspections while companies continue to make changes through the product life cycle for continuous improvement or market demands. This discussion presents different strategies to bringing drug product marketing applications to meet current and emerging standards. It also discusses stability and method designs to meet process validation and global development efforts.

  10. Depression, antidepressants and driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Linda L; Lauzon, Vanessa L; Winbrock, Elise L; Li, Guohua; Chihuri, Stanford; Lee, Kelly C

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to review to review the reported associations of depression and antidepressants with motor vehicle crashes. A literature search for material published in the English language between January, 1995, and October, 2015, in bibliographic databases was combined with a search for other relevant material referenced in the retrieved articles. Retrieved articles were systematically reviewed for inclusion criteria: 19 epidemiological studies (17 case-control and 2 cohort studies) fulfilled the inclusion criteria by estimating the crash risk associated with depression and/or psychotropic medications in naturalistic settings. The estimates of the odds ratio (OR) of crash involvement associated with depression ranged from 1.78 to 3.99. All classes of antidepressants were reported to have side effects with the potential to affect driving safety. The majority of studies of antidepressant effects on driving reported an elevated crash risk, and ORs ranged from 1.19 to 2.03 for all crashes, and 3.19 for fatal crashes. In meta-analysis, depression was associated with approximately 2-fold increased crash risk (summary OR = 1.90; 95% CI, 1.06 to 3.39), and antidepressants were associated with approximately 40% increased crash risk (summary OR = 1.40; 95%CI, 1.18 to 1.66). Based on the findings of the studies reviewed, depression, antidepressants or the combination of depression and antidepressants may pose a potential hazard to driving safety. More research is needed to understand the individual contributions of depression and the medications used to treat depression.

  11. Determine equilibrium dissociation constant of drug-membrane receptor affinity using the cell membrane chromatography relative standard method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weina; Yang, Liu; Lv, Yanni; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yanmin; He, Langchong

    2017-06-23

    The equilibrium dissociation constant (K D ) of drug-membrane receptor affinity is the basic parameter that reflects the strength of interaction. The cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method is an effective technique to study the characteristics of drug-membrane receptor affinity. In this study, the K D value of CMC relative standard method for the determination of drug-membrane receptor affinity was established to analyze the relative K D values of drugs binding to the membrane receptors (Epidermal growth factor receptor and angiotensin II receptor). The K D values obtained by the CMC relative standard method had a strong correlation with those obtained by the frontal analysis method. Additionally, the K D values obtained by CMC relative standard method correlated with pharmacological activity of the drug being evaluated. The CMC relative standard method is a convenient and effective method to evaluate drug-membrane receptor affinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Methodological Study to Develop Standard Operational Protocol on Oral Drug Administration for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijarania, Sunil Kumar; Saini, Sushma Kumari; Verma, Sanjay; Kaur, Sukhwinder

    2017-05-01

    To develop standard operational protocol (SOP) on oral drug administration and checklist to assess the implementation of the developed SOP. In this prospective methodological study, SOPs were developed in five phases. In the first phase, the preliminary draft of SOPs and checklists were prepared based on literature review, assessment of current practices and focus group discussion (FGD) with bedside working nurses. In the second phase, content validity was checked with the help of Delphi technique (12 experts). Total four drafts were prepared in stages and necessary modifications were made as per suggestions after each Delphi round. Fourth Delphi round was performed after conducting a pilot study. In the fourth phase, all bedside nurses were trained as per SOPs and asked to practice accordingly and observation of thirty oral drug administrations in children was done to check reliability of checklists for implementation of SOPs. In Phase-V, 7 FGDs were conducted with bedside nurses to assess the effectiveness of SOPs. The Content Validity Index (CVI) of SOP and checklists was 99.77%. Overall standardized Cronbach's alpha was calculated as 0.94. All the nurses felt that the SOP is useful. Valid and feasible SOP for drug administration to children through oral route along with valid and reliable checklist were developed. It is recommended to use this document for drug administration to children.

  13. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Modeling in Pediatric Drug Development, and the Importance of Standardized Scaling of Clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germovsek, Eva; Barker, Charlotte I S; Sharland, Mike; Standing, Joseph F

    2018-04-19

    Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modeling is important in the design and conduct of clinical pharmacology research in children. During drug development, PKPD modeling and simulation should underpin rational trial design and facilitate extrapolation to investigate efficacy and safety. The application of PKPD modeling to optimize dosing recommendations and therapeutic drug monitoring is also increasing, and PKPD model-based dose individualization will become a core feature of personalized medicine. Following extensive progress on pediatric PK modeling, a greater emphasis now needs to be placed on PD modeling to understand age-related changes in drug effects. This paper discusses the principles of PKPD modeling in the context of pediatric drug development, summarizing how important PK parameters, such as clearance (CL), are scaled with size and age, and highlights a standardized method for CL scaling in children. One standard scaling method would facilitate comparison of PK parameters across multiple studies, thus increasing the utility of existing PK models and facilitating optimal design of new studies.

  14. Antidepressant efficacy and side-effect burden: a quick guide for clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Santarsieri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Prescribing of antidepressant treatment (ADT for major depressive disorder (MDD has increased in quantity and popularity over the last two decades. This is likely due to the approval of safer medications, better education of clinicians and their patients, direct-to-consumer marketing practices, and less stigma associated with those taking ADT. This trend has also been met with some controversy, however, as the ongoing safety and effectiveness of these treatments have at times been called into question. This paper discusses the differing levels of evidence that support the use of ADT based on (A Food and Drug Administration approvals, (B data from randomized controlled trials or meta-analyses and, where these are not available, the authors discuss and apply, (C theoretical pharmacodynamic principles to justify antidepressant choice in the treatment of MDD patients. The final section discusses standard psychopharmacology guideline approaches to better alert the reader as to which practices are commonplace compared with those which are more outside of the standard of care.

  15. Antidepressant therapy with milnacipran and venlafaxine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilla Mansuy

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Lucilla MansuyPierre Fabre Médicament, Toulouse, FranceAbstract: Specific serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs have been described as “better tolerated tricyclic antidepressants” or as “boosted” selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. Venlafaxine has become a therapeutic reference treatment for major depression. Although less widely studied, indirect comparisons with another SNRI, milnacipran, suggest an equivalent efficacy. This paper discusses these indirect comparisons and the recently published first double-blind, head-to-head comparison. Venlafaxine has potency at serotonin transporters which is about 30-fold greater than that at norepinephrine transporters while milnacipran has a similar potency at each transporter. Thus, at low doses, venlafaxine acts essentially as a SSRI, with significant noradrenergic activity only occurring at higher doses. To overcome the problem of the differing profile of venlafaxine at increasing doses, the first head-to-head study compared the therapeutic effects and tolerability of the two antidepressants when flexibly titrated to the high dose of 200 mg/day. The study showed that the two SNRIs have similar efficacy and safety profiles. Both drugs produced about 42% remissions at the end of the 20-week study. The most frequent adverse events in both groups were nausea, dizziness, headache, and sweating. Certain specific differences in tolerability are discussed.Keywords: milnacipran, venlafaxine, antidepressant efficacy, tolerability, dose-titration

  16. Antidepressant-Resistant Depression and Antidepressant-Associated Suicidal Behaviour: The Role of Underlying Bipolarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Rihmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex relationship between the use of antidepressants and suicidal behaviour is one of the hottest topics of our contemporary psychiatry. Based on the literature, this paper summarizes the author's view on antidepressant-resistant depression and antidepressant-associated suicidal behaviour. Antidepressant-resistance, antidepressant-induced worsening of depression, antidepressant-associated (hypomanic switches, mixed depressive episode, and antidepressant-associated suicidality among depressed patients are relatively most frequent in bipolar/bipolar spectrum depression and in children and adolescents. As early age at onset of major depressive episode and mixed depression are powerful clinical markers of bipolarity and the manic component of bipolar disorder (and possible its biological background shows a declining tendency with age antidepressant-resistance/worsening, antidepressant-induced (hypomanic switches and “suicide-inducing” potential of antidepressants seem to be related to the underlying bipolarity.

  17. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  18. Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories are crucial to national veterinary drug residue monitoring programmes. However, one of the main challenges laboratories encounter is obtaining access to relevant methods of analysis. Thus, in addition to training, providing technical advice and transferring technology, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture has resolved to develop clear and practical manuals to support Member State laboratories. The Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Development of Radiometric and Allied Analytical Methods to Strengthen Residue Control Programs for Antibiotic and Anthelmintic Veterinary Drug Residues has developed a number of analytical methods as standard operating procedures (SOPs), which are now compiled here. This publication contains SOPs on chromatographic and spectrometric techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay and associated screening techniques, for various anthelmintic and antimicrobial veterinary drug residue analysis. Some analytical method validation protocols are also included. The publication is primarily aimed at food and environmental safety laboratories involved in testing veterinary drug residues, including under organized national residue monitoring programmes. It is expected to enhance laboratory capacity building and competence through the use of radiometric and complementary tools and techniques. The publication is also relevant for applied research on residues of veterinary drugs in food and environmental samples

  19. Using time-series intervention analysis to understand U.S. Medicaid expenditures on antidepressant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrand, Yann; Kelton, Christina M L; Guo, Jeff J; Levy, Martin S; Yu, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Medicaid programs' spending on antidepressants increased from $159 million in 1991 to $2 billion in 2005. The National Institute for Health Care Management attributed this expenditure growth to increases in drug utilization, entry of newer higher-priced antidepressants, and greater prescription drug insurance coverage. Rising enrollment in Medicaid has also contributed to this expenditure growth. This research examines the impact of specific events, including branded-drug and generic entry, a black box warning, direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA), and new indication approval, on Medicaid spending on antidepressants. Using quarterly expenditure data for 1991-2005 from the national Medicaid pharmacy claims database maintained by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a time-series autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) intervention analysis was performed on 6 specific antidepressant drugs and on overall antidepressant spending. Twenty-nine potentially relevant interventions and their dates of occurrence were identified from the literature. Each was tested for an impact on the time series. Forecasts from the models were compared with a holdout sample of actual expenditure data. Interventions with significant impacts on Medicaid expenditures included the patent expiration of Prozac® (P0.05), implying that the expanding market for antidepressants overwhelmed the effect of generic competition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Do the recommended standards for in vitro biopharmaceutic classification of drug permeability meet the "passive transport" criterion for biowaivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žakelj, Simon; Berginc, Katja; Roškar, Robert; Kraljič, Bor; Kristl, Albin

    2013-01-01

    BCS based biowaivers are recognized by major regulatory agencies. An application for a biowaiver can be supported by or even based on "in vitro" measurements of drug permeability. However, guidelines limit the application of biowaivers to drug substances that are transported only by passive mechanisms. Regarding published permeability data as well as measurements obtained in our institution, one can rarely observe drug substances that conform to this very strict criterion. Therefore, we measured the apparent permeability coefficients of 13 drugs recommended by FDA's Guidance to be used as standards for "in vitro" permeability classification. The asymmetry of permeability data determined for both directions (mucosal-to-serosal and serosalto- mucosal) through the rat small intestine revealed significant active transport for four out of the nine high-permeability standards and for all four low-permeability standard drugs. As could be expected, this asymmetry was abolished at 4°C on rat intestine. The permeability of all nine high-permeability, but none of the low permeability standards, was also much lower when measured with intestinal tissue, Caco-2 cell monolayers or artificial membranes at 4°C compared to standard conditions (37°C). Additionally, concurrent testing of several standard drugs revealed that membrane transport can be affected by the use of internal permeability standards. The implications of the results are discussed regarding the regulatory aspects of biopharmaceutical classification, good practice in drug permeability evaluation and regarding the general relevance of transport proteins with broad specificity in drug absorption.

  1. Cardiotoxicity of tricyclic antidepressant treated by 2650 mEq sodium bicarbonate: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hassan; Zamani, Nasim; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hossein; Shadnia, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is an important cause of drug-related self-poisoning in the developed world and a very common cause of poisoning and mortality in developing countries. Electrocardiographic manifestations of most tricyclic antidepressant-poisoned patients resolve by the administration of 1-2 mEq/kg of sodium bicarbonate. Some rare cases have been reported who have been resistant to the long-term or high doses of bicarbonate administration. We present a case of acute tricyclic antidepressant toxicity referring with status epilepticus, hypotension, and refractory QRS complex widening that resolved after the intravenous administration of 2650 mEq sodium bicarbonate.

  2. Cardiotoxicity of tricyclic antidepressant treated by 2650 mEq sodium bicarbonate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Amiri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning with tricyclic antidepressants is an important cause of drug-related self-poisoning in the developed world and a very common cause of poisoning and mortality in developing countries. Electrocardiographic manifestations of most tricyclic antidepressant-poisoned patients resolve by the administration of 1–2 mEq/kg of sodium bicarbonate. Some rare cases have been reported who have been resistant to the long-term or high doses of bicarbonate administration. We present a case of acute tricyclic antidepressant toxicity referring with status epilepticus, hypotension, and refractory QRS complex widening that resolved after the intravenous administration of 2650 mEq sodium bicarbonate.

  3. Development of a standardized, citywide process for managing smart-pump drug libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walroth, Todd A; Smallwood, Shannon; Arthur, Karen; Vance, Betsy; Washington, Alana; Staublin, Therese; Haslar, Tammy; Reddan, Jennifer G; Fuller, James

    2018-06-15

    Development and implementation of an interprofessional consensus-driven process for review and optimization of smart-pump drug libraries and dosing limits are described. The Indianapolis Coalition for Patient Safety (ICPS), which represents 6 Indianapolis-area health systems, identified an opportunity to reduce clinically insignificant alerts that smart infusion pumps present to end users. Through a consensus-driven process, ICPS aimed to identify best practices to implement at individual hospitals in order to establish specific action items for smart-pump drug library optimization. A work group of pharmacists, nurses, and industrial engineers met to evaluate variability within and lack of scrutiny of smart-pump drug libraries. The work group used Lean Six Sigma methodologies to generate a list of key needs and barriers to be addressed in process standardization. The group reviewed targets for smart-pump drug library optimization, including dosing limits, types of alerts reviewed, policies, and safety best practices. The work group also analyzed existing processes at each site to develop a final consensus statement outlining a model process for reviewing alerts and managing smart-pump data. Analysis of the total number of alerts per device across ICPS-affiliated health systems over a 4-year period indicated a 50% decrease (from 7.2 to 3.6 alerts per device per month) after implementation of the model by ICPS member organizations. Through implementation of a standardized, consensus-driven process for smart-pump drug library optimization, ICPS member health systems reduced clinically insignificant smart-pump alerts. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Tricyclic antidepressant therapy in headache].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Máté; Csépány, Éva; Gyüre, Tamás; Bozsik, György; Bereczki, Dániel; Ertsey, Csaba

    2015-12-01

    The two most important representatives of the primary headaches are migraine and tension-type headache. More than 10% of the population suffer from migraine and even a greater part, approximately 30-40% from tension-type headache. These two headache types have a great effect both on the individual and on the society. There are two types of therapeutic approaches to headaches: the abortive and the prophylactic therapy. Prophylactic treatment is used for frequent and/or difficult-to-treat headache attacks. Although both migraine and tension-type headache are often associated with depression, for their treatment - in contrast to the widespread medical opinion - not all antidepressants were found to be effective. Amitriptyline, which is a tricyclic antidepressant, is used as a prophylactic therapy for headache since 1968. Its efficacy has been demonstrated in several double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Although the newer types of antidepressant, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, have a more favorable side-effect profile than tricyclic antidepressants, their headache prophylactic effect has not been proven yet.

  5. Antidepressant activity of curcumin: involvement of serotonin and dopamine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas K; Bhutani, Mohit Kumar; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2008-12-01

    Curcumin is a major active principle of Curcuma longa, one of the widely used preparations in the Indian system of medicine. It is known for its diverse biological actions. The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of monoaminergic system(s) in the antidepressant activity of curcumin and the effect of piperine, a bioavailability enhancer, on the bioavailability and biological effects of curcumin. Behavioral (forced swim test), biochemical (monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme inhibitory activity), and neurochemical (neurotransmitter levels estimation) tests were carried out. Curcumin (10-80 mg/kg, i.p.) dose dependently inhibited the immobility period, increased serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) as well as dopamine levels (at higher doses), and inhibited the monoamine oxidase enzymes (both MAO-A and MAO-B, higher doses) in mice. Curcumin (20 mg/kg, i.p.) enhanced the anti-immobility effect of subthreshold doses of various antidepressant drugs like fluoxetine, venlafaxine, or bupropion. However, no significant change in the anti-immobility effect of imipramine and desipramine was observed. Furthermore, combination of subthreshold dose of curcumin and various antidepressant drugs resulted in synergistic increase in serotonin (5-HT) levels as compared to their effect per se. There was no change in the norepinephrine levels. The coadministration of piperine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a bioavailability enhancing agent, with curcumin (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in potentiation of pharmacological, biochemical, and neurochemical activities. The study provides evidences for mechanism-based antidepressant actions of curcumin. The coadministration of curcumin along with piperine may prove to be a useful and potent natural antidepressant approach in the management of depression.

  6. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors: A new strategy for developing fast acting antidepressants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Rebeca; Castro, Elena; Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Pascual-Brazo, Jesús; Díaz, Alvaro; Rojo, María Luisa; Linge, Raquel; Martín, Alicia; Valdizán, Elsa M; Pazos, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of the activity of brain monoaminergic systems has been the focus of attention of many studies since the first antidepressant drug emerged 50 years ago. The search for novel antidepressants is deeply linked to the search for fast-acting strategies, taking into account that 2-4 weeks of treatment with classical antidepressant are required before clinical remission of the symptoms becomes evident. In the recent years several hypotheses have been proposed on the basis of the existence of alterations in brain synaptic plasticity in major depression. Recent evidences support a role for 5-HT4 receptors in the pathogenesis of depression as well as in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. In fact, chronic treatment with antidepressant drugs appears to modulate, at different levels, the signaling pathway associated to 5-HT4 receptors, as well as their levels of expression in the brain. Moreover, several experimental studies have identified this receptor subtype as a promising new target for fast-acting antidepressant strategy: the administration of partial agonists of this receptor induces a number of responses similar to those observed after chronic treatment with classical antidepressants, but with a rapid onset of action. They include efficacy in behavioral models of depression, rapid desensitization of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and modifications in the expression of several molecular markers of brain neuroplasticity. Although much work remains to be done in order to clarify the real therapeutic potential of these drugs, the evidences reviewed below support the hypothesis that 5-HT4 receptor partial agonists could behave as rapid and effective antidepressants.

  7. Tramadol: seizures, serotonin syndrome, and coadministered antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

    2009-04-01

    This ongoing column is dedicated to the challenging clinical interface between psychiatry and primary care-two fields that are inexorably linked.Tramadol (Ultram(®)) is a commonly prescribed analgesic because of its relatively lower risk of addiction and better safety profile in comparison with other opiates. However, two significant adverse reactions are known to potentially occur with tramadol-seizures and serotonin syndrome. These two adverse reactions may develop during tramadol monotherapy, but appear much more likely to emerge during misuse/overdose as well as with the coadministration of other drugs, particularly antidepressants. In this article, we review the data relating to tramadol, seizures, and serotonin syndrome. This pharmacologic intersection is of clear relevance to both psychiatrists and primary care clinicians.

  8. A review on the status of quality control and standardization of herbal drugs in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the herbal medicines in the world originate from the developing countries. There are ample opportunities for these countries to expand their global export. The world market for botanical medicines including drug products and raw materials has been estimated to have an annual growth rate between 5% and 15%. Total global botanical drug market is estimated at US$62 billion and is expected to grow to the tune of US$5 trillion by the year 2050. In the USA alone, the usage of botanicals has been increased by 380% between the years 1990 and 1997. Materials and Methods: Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine, is one of the ancient, yet living traditions that face a typical Western bias. Widespread and growing use of botanicals has created public health challenges globally in terms of quality, safety, and efficacy. Results and Discussion: The development of parameters for standardization and quality control of botanicals is a challenging task. Various regulatory authorities, research organizations, and botanical drug manufacturers have contributed in developing guiding principles and addressing issues related to the quality, safety, and efficacy. Conclusions: The present review describes the regulatory aspects of herbal drugs in India and various other countries.

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhwani, Lalit; Tongia, Sudheer K; Pal, Veerendra S; Agrawal, Rajendra P; Nyati, Prem; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2007-01-01

    Forced swimming test is used to induce a characteristic behavior of immobility in rats, which resembles depression in humans to some extent. We evaluated the effect of omega-3 fatty acids alone as well as compared it with the standard antidepressant therapy with fluoxetine in both acute and chronic studies. In both the studies, rats were divided into 4 groups and subjected to the following drug interventions - Group 1- control: Group 2- fluoxetine in dose of 10 mg/kg subcutaneously 23.5, 5 and 1 h before the test: Group 3- omega-3 fatty acids in dose of 500 mg/kg orally; Group 4- fluoxetine plus omega-3 fatty acids both. In acute study, omega-3 fatty acids were given in single dose 2 h prior to the test while in chronic study omega-3 fatty acids were given daily for a period of 28 days. All animals were subjected to a 15-min pretest followed 24 h later by a 5-min test. A time sampling method was used to score the behavioral activity in each group. The results revealed that in acute study, omega-3 fatty acids do not have any significant effect in forced swimming test. However, in chronic study, omega-3 fatty acids affect the immobility and swimming behavior significantly when compared with control (p fluoxetine is significantly more than that of fluoxetine alone in changing the behavioral activity of rats in forced swimming test. It leads to the conclusion that omega-3 fatty acids have antidepressant activity per se, and the combination of fluoxetine and omega-3 fatty acids has more antidepressant efficacy than fluoxetine alone in forced swimming test in Wistar rats.

  10. Approaches to Increasing Ethical Compliance in China with Drug Trial Standards of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    . With recent reports of scientific misconduct from China, there is an urgent need to find approaches to compel researchers to adhere to ethical research practices. This problem does not call for a simple solution, but if forces are joined with governmental regulations, education in ethics issues for medical......Zeng et al.'s Ethics Review highlights some of the challenges associated with clinical research in China. They found that only a minority of published clinical trials of anti-dementia drugs reported that they fulfilled the basic ethical principles as outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki...... researchers, and strong reinforcement by Chinese journal editors not to publish studies with these flaws, then research ethics and publication standards will probably improve. Other solutions to foster ethical practice of drug trials are discussed including Chinese initiatives directed at managing conflict...

  11. Triple Reuptake Inhibitors: The Next Generation of Antidepressants

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, David M; Pae, Chi-Un; Patkar, Ashwin A

    2008-01-01

    Depression has been associated with impaired neurotransmission of serotonergic, norepinephrinergic, and dopaminergic pathways, although most pharmacologic treatment strategies for depression enhance only serotonin and norepinephrine neurotransmission. Current drug development efforts are aimed at a new class of antidepressants which inhibit the reuptake of all three neurotransmitters in the hope of creating medications with broader efficacy and/or quicker onset of action. The current review e...

  12. Prevalence and Prescription of Antidepressants in Depression with Somatic Comorbidity in Asia: The Research on East Asian Psychotropic Prescription Patterns Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Chen; Tian-Mei Si; Yu-Tao Xiang; Gabor S Ungvari; Chuan-Yue Wang; Yan-Ling He; Ee-Heok Kua

    2015-01-01

    Background:Depression is often comorbid with chronic somatic diseases.Few previous studies have investigated the prevalence of somatic diseases in depression or the prescription pattern of antidepressants in comorbidly depressed patients in Asia.This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of somatic comorbidity (SC) in depression and compared the prescriptions of antidepressants in depressed patients with and without SC.Methods:A total of 2320 patients treated with antidepressants in 8 Asian countries were examined,and a diagnosis was based on the International Classification of Disease,10th revision.We listed 17 common chronic somatic diseases.Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and psychotropic drug prescriptions were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure.Results:Of the patients examined,1240 were diagnosed with depression and 30% of them (n =375) had SC.The most common comorbid condition was diabetes (23.7%).The patients with SC were more likely to seek help at a general hospital (74.7% vs.47.2%),and had a higher incidence of symptoms involving sadness,disturbed sleep,and poor appetite.Noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant was prescribed more for patients with SC than for those without SC (30.4% vs.22.9%).Conclusions:SC is common in depressed Asian patients.It is important to strengthen the recognition of depression,especially in general hospitals and when patients report some somatic discomfort.It is also a matter of urgency to establish evidence-based guidelines for the use of new antidepressants in depressed patients with SC.

  13. Progression-free survival: gaining on overall survival as a gold standard and accelerating drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebwohl, David; Kay, Andrea; Berg, William; Baladi, Jean Francois; Zheng, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In clinical trials of oncology drugs, overall survival (OS) is a direct measure of clinical efficacy and is considered the gold standard primary efficacy end point. The purpose of this study was to discuss the difficulties in using OS as a primary efficacy end point in the setting of evolving cancer therapies. We suggest that progression-free survival is an appropriate efficacy end point in many types of cancer, specifically those for which OS is expected to be prolonged and for which subsequent treatments are expected to affect OS.

  14. Antidepressant-Like Activity of Ethanol Extract of Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslam Muhammad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum, known as “Lingzhi” in China, is one among greatly regarded fungi around the world. In old Chinese encyclopedias of medical “Shen Nong’s Ben Cao Jing” and “Ben Cao Gang Mu”, it is rated as extraordinarily precious fungus. In this study, antidepressant activity of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum has been assessed. The extract was given orally by gavage at the dose of 20 mg/kg, 75 mg/kg, and 130 mg/kg body weight. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg p.o. was used as the standard drug. The results of our study show that Ganoderma lucidum significantly decreased immobility time in forced swim test and tail suspension test. Open field test was used to assess locomotor activity of the mice to exclude the false positive results. In open field test, Ganoderma lucidum didn’t affect the total movement and ambulatory movement at the same doses that significantly reduced immobility time in the forced swim test and tail suspension test. Thus, it is concluded that ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum has antidepressant activity in mice.

  15. [Influence of interleukin-1 beta gene polymorphism and childhood maltreatment on antidepressant treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Zhijun; Xu, Zhi; Pu, Mengjia; Geng, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    To explore the influence of interleukin-1 beta (IL1B) gene polymorphism and childhood maltreatment on antidepressant treatment. Two hundred and four patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have received treatment with single antidepressant drugs and were followed up for 8 weeks. Hamilton depression scale-17 (HAMD-17) was used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms and therapeutic effect. Childhood maltreatment was assessed using Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, a 28-item Short Form (CTQ-SF). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the IL1B gene was determined using a SNaPshot method. Correlation of rs16944 gene polymorphism with response to treatment was analyzed using Unphased 3.0.13 software. The main and interactive effects of SNP and childhood maltreatment on the antidepressant treatment were analyzed using Logistic regression analysis. No significant difference of gender, age, year of education, family history, episode time, and antidepressant agents was detected between the remitters and non-remitters. Association analysis has found that the SNP rs16944 in the IL1B AA genotype carriers antidepressant response was poorer (χ2=3.931, P=0.047). No significant difference was detected in the CTQ scores between the two groups. Genetic and environmental interaction analysis has demonstrated a significant correlation between rs16944 AA genotype and childhood maltreatment and poorer response to antidepressant treatment. The SNP rs16944 in the IL1B gene and its interaction with childhood maltreatment may influence the effect of antidepressant treatment for patients with MDD.

  16. Depression, antidepressants and driving safety

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Linda L.; Lauzon, Vanessa L.; Winbrock, Elise L.; Li, Guohua; Chihuri, Stanford; Lee, Kelly C.

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to review the reported associations of depression and antidepressants with motor vehicle crashes. Purpose A literature search for material published in the English language between January, 1995, and October, 2015, in bibliographic databases was combined with a search for other relevant material referenced in the retrieved articles. Methods Retrieved articles were systematically reviewed for inclusion criteria: 19 epidemiological studies (17 case-contr...

  17. Integrity, standards, and QC-related issues with big data in pre-clinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, John F; Ung, Matthew; Escalante-Chong, Renan; Ross, Jermaine; Zhang, Jenny; Cha, Yoonjeong; Lysaght, Andrew; Funt, Jason; Kusko, Rebecca

    2018-06-01

    The tremendous expansion of data analytics and public and private big datasets presents an important opportunity for pre-clinical drug discovery and development. In the field of life sciences, the growth of genetic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data is partly driven by a rapid decline in experimental costs as biotechnology improves throughput, scalability, and speed. Yet far too many researchers tend to underestimate the challenges and consequences involving data integrity and quality standards. Given the effect of data integrity on scientific interpretation, these issues have significant implications during preclinical drug development. We describe standardized approaches for maximizing the utility of publicly available or privately generated biological data and address some of the common pitfalls. We also discuss the increasing interest to integrate and interpret cross-platform data. Principles outlined here should serve as a useful broad guide for existing analytical practices and pipelines and as a tool for developing additional insights into therapeutics using big data. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antidepressant- like effects of BCEF0083 in the chronic unpredictable stress models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LanlanZhou; LiangMING; ChuangengMa; YanCheng; QinJiang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Depression is a complicated disease, There are no satisfactory drugs to therapy depression so far. BCEF is a new type of bioactive compounds from entomogenous fungi. Depression animal models are effective to evaluate the antidepressant property of drugs. Several animal models of depression have been inn'oduced, however, only a few have been

  19. Risk of dementia in German patients treated with antidepressants in general or psychiatric practices
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Louis; Bohlken, Jens; Kostev, Karel

    2017-04-01

    To study the impact of the use of antidepressants on dementia in German patients with depression treated in general (GPs) or psychiatric practices (PPs). Patients with a first-time documentation of depression with known severity level between 2010 and 2013 (index date) were identified by 1,126 general practitioners and 176 psychiatrists in the IMS Disease Analyzer database. We included patients between the ages of 60 and 80 years who had not previously received prescriptions for antidepressant drugs and had not been diagnosed with all-cause dementia prior to or on the index date. The main outcome of the study was the risk of dementia depending on antidepressant therapy. Cox proportional hazards models (dependent variable: incident dementia) were used to adjust for confounders and to estimate the effect of antidepressant therapy. A total of 22,838 patients treated in GPs and 33,112 patients treated in PPs were included in this study. Of those, 9,570, 30,321, and 16,059 individuals suffered from mild, moderate, and severe depression, respectively. Antidepressant drug use was associated with a decreased risk of dementia in patients affected by moderate (HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.77 - 0.95) or severe depression (HR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.73 - 0.94). The use of antidepressants decreased dementia risk in patients with moderate or severe depression.
.

  20. Reduced Treatment-Emergent Sexual Dysfunction as a Potential Target in the Development of New Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Baldwin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleasurable sexual activity is an essential component of many human relationships, providing a sense of physical, psychological, and social well-being. Epidemiological and clinical studies show that depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and satisfaction, both in untreated and treated patients. The findings of randomized placebo-controlled trials demonstrate that most of the currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with the development or worsening of sexual dysfunction, in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts but can endure over long periods and may reduce self-esteem and affect mood and relationships adversely. Sexual dysfunction during antidepressant treatment is typically associated with many possible causes, but the risk and type of dysfunction vary with differing compounds and should be considered when making decisions about the relative merits and drawbacks of differing antidepressants. A range of interventions can be considered when managing patients with sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants, including the prescription of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, but none of these approaches can be considered “ideal.” As treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction is less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in their pharmacological properties, and because current management approaches are less than ideal, a reduced burden of treatment-emergent sexual dysfunction represents a tolerability target in the development of novel antidepressants.

  1. Effort-reward imbalance at work and the risk of antidepressant treatment in the Danish workforce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Maj Britt D.; Madsen, Ida E. H.; Aust, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that high effort-reward imbalance (ERI) at work is a risk factor for the onset of self-reported depressive symptoms. In this study, we examined whether ERI predicts risk of treatment with antidepressant medication in a representative sample of the Danish...... workforce. Methods: We linked survey data on ERI and covariates of 4541 participants from the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study 2000 with the Danish National Prescription Registry that includes all legally purchased prescription drugs at pharmacies in Denmark since 1995. Participants with a history....... Results: A total of 309 (6.8%) participants started antidepressant treatment during follow-up. Exposure to ERI at baseline was not related to risk of antidepressant treatment (hazard ratio: 0.91, 95% CI=0.81–1.03 after adjustment for potential confounders). Limitations: The use of antidepressant treatment...

  2. Antiepileptic and Antidepressive Polypharmacy in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Anton Giæver Beiske

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS are often suffering from neuropathic pain. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs are commonly used and are susceptible to be involved in drug interactions. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prevalence of use of antiepileptic and antidepressive drugs in MS patients and to discuss the theoretical potential for interactions. Methods. Review of the medical records from all patients treated at a dedicated MS rehabilitation centre in Norway between 2009 and 2012. Results. In total 1090 patients attended a rehabilitation stay during the study period. Of these, 342 (31%; 249 females with mean age of 53 (±10 years and EDSS 4.8 (±1.7 used at least one AED (gabapentin 12.7%, pregabalin 7.7%, clonazepam 7.8%, and carbamazepine 2.6% or amitriptyline (9.7%. Polypharmacy was widespread (mean 5.4 drugs with 60% using additional CNS-active drugs with a propensity to be involved in interactions. Age, gender, and EDSS scores did not differ significantly between those using and not using AED/amitriptyline. Conclusion. One-third of MS patients attending a rehabilitation stay receive AED/amitriptyline treatment. The high prevalence of polypharmacy and use of CNS-active drugs calls for awareness of especially pharmacodynamic interactions and possible excessive adverse effects.

  3. Synthesis and Antidepressant Activity Profile of Some Novel Benzothiazole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümide Demir Özkay

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the scope of our new antidepressant drug development efforts, in this study, we synthesized eight novel benzothiazole derivatives 3a–3h. The chemical structures of the synthesized compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Test compounds were administered orally at a dose of 40 mg/kg to mice 24, 5 and 1 h before performing tail suspension, modified forced swimming, and activity cage tests. The obtained results showed that compounds 3c, 3d, 3f–3h reduced the immobility time of mice as assessed in the tail suspension test. Moreover, in the modified forced swimming tests, the same compounds significantly decreased the immobility, but increased the swimming frequencies of mice, without any alteration in the climbing frequencies. These results, similar to the results induced by the reference drug fluoxetine (20 mg/kg, po, indicated the antidepressant-like activities of the compounds 3c, 3d, 3f–3h. Owing to the fact that test compounds did not induce any significant alteration in the total number of spontaneous locomotor activities, the antidepressant-like effects of these derivatives seemed to be specific. In order to predict ADME parameters of the synthesized compounds 3a–3h, some physicochemical parameters were calculated. The ADME prediction study revealed that all synthesized compounds may possess good pharmacokinetic profiles.

  4. A review on antidepressant effect of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rabiei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a life-threatening, debilitating, and common disease affecting different segments of community. Chemical and synthetic drugs available to treat this disease cause many adverse effects and may lead to complete recovery in only 50% of patients. At the same time, medicinal plants have been reported to exert optimal pharmacological effects in treating depression in different models. In this review, the relevant articles indexed in the reliable databases PubMed, PubMed central, Scopus and Web of Science were review-ed. The review indicated that most medicinal plants exerted antidepressant effects through synaptic regulation of serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine, regulating activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, reinfor-cing anti-oxidant defense system, and decreasing inflammatory mediators. The medicinal plants and their active compounds can relieve depression through different pathways and hence are considered a new source to produce antidepressants.

  5. Increased risk of antidepressant use in childhood cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Lasse Wegener; Winther, J.F.; Cederkvist, L

    2015-01-01

    to the National Prescription Drug Database, which worldwide is the oldest nationwide registry of prescription medication. Hazard ratios (HRs) for antidepressant use were estimated in a Cox proportional hazards model stratified on sex, with population comparisons as referents. RESULTS: Overall, childhood cancer......AIM: Childhood cancer survivors are at risk of both somatic and mental late effects, but large population-based studies of depression are lacking. METHODS: Risk of antidepressant use was evaluated in a population-based cohort of 5452 Danish children treated for cancer in 1975-2009 by linkage....... Increased HRs of 30-50% were seen for survivors of cancers of all main groups (haematological malignancies, central nervous system (CNS) and solid tumors); the highest risk was among children treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1). Our data suggested that the risk...

  6. The effects of depression and use of antidepressive medicines during pregnancy on the methylation status of the IGF2 imprinted control regions in the offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubry A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In utero exposures to environmental factors may result in persistent epigenetic modifications affecting normal development and susceptibility to chronic diseases in later life. We explored the relationship between exposure of the growing fetus to maternal depression or antidepressants and DNA methylation at two differentially methylated regions (DMRs of the imprinted Insulin-like Growth Factor 2 (IGF2 gene. Aberrant DNA methylation at the IGF2 and neighboring H19 DMRs has been associated with deregulated IGF2 expression, childhood cancers and several chronic diseases during adulthood. Our study population is comprised of pregnant mothers and their newborns (n = 436, as part of the Newborn Epigenetics Study (NEST. A standardized questionnaire was completed and medical record data were abstracted to ascertain maternal depression and antidepressive drug use. DMR methylation levels in umbilical cord blood leukocytes were quantified using pyrosequencing. From the 436 newborns, laboratory data were obtained for 356 individuals at the IGF2 DMRs, and for 411 individuals at the H19 DMRs; about half of each group was African American or Caucasian. While overall no association between depression and methylation profiles was found, we observed a significant hypermethylation of the H19 DMRs in newborns of African American (n = 177 but not Caucasian (n = 168 mothers who reported the use of antidepressive drugs during pregnancy (β = +6.89, p = 0.01. Of note, our data reveal a race-independent association between smoking during pregnancy and methylation at the IGF2 DMR (+3.05%, p = 0.01. In conclusion, our findings suggest a race-dependent response related to maternal use of antidepressants at one of the IGF2 DMRs in the offspring.

  7. Columbia Classification Algorithm of Suicide Assessment (C-CASA): classification of suicidal events in the FDA's pediatric suicidal risk analysis of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Kelly; Oquendo, Maria A; Gould, Madelyn; Stanley, Barbara; Davies, Mark

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the link between antidepressants and suicidal behavior and ideation (suicidality) in youth, adverse events from pediatric clinical trials were classified in order to identify suicidal events. The authors describe the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment (C-CASA), a standardized suicidal rating system that provided data for the pediatric suicidal risk analysis of antidepressants conducted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Adverse events (N=427) from 25 pediatric antidepressant clinical trials were systematically identified by pharmaceutical companies. Randomly assigned adverse events were evaluated by three of nine independent expert suicidologists using the Columbia classification algorithm. Reliability of the C-CASA ratings and agreement with pharmaceutical company classification were estimated. Twenty-six new, possibly suicidal events (behavior and ideation) that were not originally identified by pharmaceutical companies were identified in the C-CASA, and 12 events originally labeled as suicidal by pharmaceutical companies were eliminated, which resulted in a total of 38 discrepant ratings. For the specific label of "suicide attempt," a relatively low level of agreement was observed between the C-CASA and pharmaceutical company ratings, with the C-CASA reporting a 50% reduction in ratings. Thus, although the C-CASA resulted in the identification of more suicidal events overall, fewer events were classified as suicide attempts. Additionally, the C-CASA ratings were highly reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.89). Utilizing a methodical, anchored approach to categorizing suicidality provides an accurate and comprehensive identification of suicidal events. The FDA's audit of the C-CASA demonstrated excellent transportability of this approach. The Columbia algorithm was used to classify suicidal adverse events in the recent FDA adult antidepressant safety analyses and has also been mandated to be applied to all

  8. Antidepressants for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Tess E; Heathcote, Lauren C; Clinch, Jacqui; Gold, Jeffrey I; Howard, Richard; Lord, Susan M; Schechter, Neil; Wood, Chantal; Wiffen, Philip J

    2017-08-05

    Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left untreated, views on children's pain have changed over time and relief of pain is now seen as important.We designed a suite of seven reviews on chronic non-cancer pain and cancer pain (looking at antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and paracetamol) in order to review the evidence for children's pain utilising pharmacological interventions.As the leading cause of morbidity in the world today, chronic disease (and its associated pain) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Antidepressants have been used in adults for pain relief and pain management since the 1970s. The clinical impression from extended use over many years is that antidepressants are useful for some neuropathic pain symptoms, and that effects on pain relief are divorced and different from effects on depression; for example, the effects of tricyclic antidepressants on pain may occur at different, and often lower, doses than those on depression. Amitriptyline is one of the most commonly used drugs for treating neuropathic pain in the UK. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of antidepressants used to treat chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents aged between birth and 17 years, in any setting. We searched the

  9. Duloxetine versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Koesters, Markus; Furukawa, Toshi A; Nosè, Michela; Purgato, Marianna; Omori, Ichiro M; Trespidi, Carlotta; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Although pharmacological and psychological interventions are both effective for major depression, in primary and secondary care settings antidepressant drugs remain the mainstay of treatment. Amongst antidepressants many different agents are available. Duloxetine hydrochloride is a dual reuptake inhibitor of serotonin and norepinephrine and has been licensed by the Food and Drug Administration in the US for major depressive disorder (MDD), generalised anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of duloxetine in comparison with all other antidepressant agents in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods MEDLINE (1966 to 2012), EMBASE (1974 to 2012), the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to March 2012. No language restriction was applied. Reference lists of relevant papers and previous systematic reviews were hand-searched. Pharmaceutical company marketing duloxetine and experts in this field were contacted for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to duloxetine versus any other antidepressive agent. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and a double-entry procedure was employed. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy, acceptability and tolerability. Main results A total of 16 randomised controlled trials (overall 5735 participants) were included in this systematic review. Of these, three trials were unpublished. We found 11 studies (overall 3304 participants) comparing duloxetine with one selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) (six studies versus paroxetine, three studies

  10. Antidepressants and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general Dutch adult population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, B.; Tielemans, M.M.; Aaldering, B.R.; Eikendal, T.; Jaspers Focks, J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Rossum, L.G.M. van; Oijen, M.G.H. van

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal symptoms are frequently reported adverse effects of antidepressants, but antidepressants are also a treatment modality in functional gastrointestinal disorders. We aimed to assess the association between antidepressant use and gastrointestinal symptoms in the general

  11. Citalopram versus other anti-depressive agents for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Purgato, Marianna; Furukawa, Toshi A; Trespidi, Carlotta; Imperadore, Giuseppe; Signoretti, Alessandra; Churchill, Rachel; Watanabe, Norio; Barbui, Corrado

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent US and UK clinical practice guidelines recommend that second-generation antidepressants should be considered amongst the best first-line options when drug therapy is indicated for a depressive episode. Systematic reviews have already highlighted some differences in efficacy between second-generation antidepressants. Citalopram, one of the first selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) introduced in the market, is one of these antidepressant drugs that clinicians use for routine depression care. Objectives To assess the evidence for the efficacy, acceptability and tolerability of citalopram in comparison with tricyclics, heterocyclics, other SSRIs and other conventional and non-conventional antidepressants in the acute-phase treatment of major depression. Search methods We searched The Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Register and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to February 2012. No language restriction was applied. We contacted pharmaceutical companies and experts in this field for supplemental data. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials allocating patients with major depression to citalopram versus any other antidepressants. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data. Information extracted included study characteristics, participant characteristics, intervention details and outcome measures in terms of efficacy (the number of patients who responded or remitted), patient acceptability (the number of patients who failed to complete the study) and tolerability (side-effects). Main results Thirty-seven trials compared citalopram with other antidepressants (such as tricyclics, heterocyclics, SSRIs and other antidepressants, either conventional ones, such as mirtazapine, venlafaxine and reboxetine, or non-conventional, like hypericum). Citalopram was shown to be significantly less effective than escitalopram in achieving acute response (odds

  12. 78 FR 36711 - Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Title VII-Drug Supply Chain; Standards for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... inspections, and drive safety and quality throughout the supply chain. Implementation of these authorities... authorities granted to FDA under Title VII and their importance in ensuring drug safety, effectiveness, and.... FDA-2013-N-0683, FDA-2013-N-0684, and FDA-2013-N-0685] Food and Drug Administration Safety and...

  13. Psychosocial work environment and antidepressant medication: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westergaard-Nielsen Niels

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse psychosocial work environments may lead to impaired mental health, but it is still a matter of conjecture if demonstrated associations are causal or biased. We aimed at verifying whether poor psychosocial working climate is related to increase of redeemed subscription of antidepressant medication. Methods Information on all antidepressant drugs (AD purchased at pharmacies from 1995 through 2006 was obtained for a cohort of 21,129 Danish public service workers that participated in work climate surveys carried out during the period 2002–2005. Individual self-reports of psychosocial factors at work including satisfaction with the work climate and dimensions of the job strain model were obtained by self-administered questionnaires (response rate 77,2%. Each employee was assigned the average score value for all employees at his/her managerial work unit [1094 units with an average of 18 employees (range 3–120]. The risk of first-time AD prescription during follow-up was examined according to level of satisfaction and psychosocial strain by Cox regression with adjustment for gender, age, marital status, occupational status and calendar year of the survey. Results The proportion of employees that received at least one prescription of ADs from 1995 through 2006 was 11.9% and prescriptions rose steadily from 1.50% in 1996 to the highest level 6.47% in 2006. ADs were prescribed more frequent among women, middle aged, employees with low occupational status and those living alone. None of the measured psychosocial work environment factors were consistently related to prescription of antidepressant drugs during the follow-up period. Conclusion The study does not indicate that a poor psychosocial work environment among public service employees is related to prescription of antidepressant pharmaceuticals. These findings need cautious interpretation because of lacking individual exposure assessments.

  14. Antipsychotic dose equivalents and dose-years: a standardized method for comparing exposure to different drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Nancy C; Pressler, Marcus; Nopoulos, Peg; Miller, Del; Ho, Beng-Choon

    2010-02-01

    A standardized quantitative method for comparing dosages of different drugs is a useful tool for designing clinical trials and for examining the effects of long-term medication side effects such as tardive dyskinesia. Such a method requires establishing dose equivalents. An expert consensus group has published charts of equivalent doses for various antipsychotic medications for first- and second-generation medications. These charts were used in this study. Regression was used to compare each drug in the experts' charts to chlorpromazine and haloperidol and to create formulas for each relationship. The formulas were solved for chlorpromazine 100 mg and haloperidol 2 mg to derive new chlorpromazine and haloperidol equivalents. The formulas were incorporated into our definition of dose-years such that 100 mg/day of chlorpromazine equivalent or 2 mg/day of haloperidol equivalent taken for 1 year is equal to one dose-year. All comparisons to chlorpromazine and haloperidol were highly linear with R(2) values greater than .9. A power transformation further improved linearity. By deriving a unique formula that converts doses to chlorpromazine or haloperidol equivalents, we can compare otherwise dissimilar drugs. These equivalents can be multiplied by the time an individual has been on a given dose to derive a cumulative value measured in dose-years in the form of (chlorpromazine equivalent in mg) x (time on dose measured in years). After each dose has been converted to dose-years, the results can be summed to provide a cumulative quantitative measure of lifetime exposure. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Escitalopram plasma levels and antidepressant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Vincenzo; Porcelli, Stefano; Saria, Alois; Serretti, Alessandro; Conca, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    Major Depression Disorder (MDD) has a highly variable treatment response due to the large inter-individual variation in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug treatments. In detail the correlation between plasma level and efficacy has been much debated. Among first-line drugs for MDD, one of the most used is escitalopram. In the present study we investigated the association between serum concentration of escitalopram (SCE) and antidepressant response (AR). 70 MDD patients treated with escitalopram monotherapy were recruited and followed for three months. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale - 21 (HAMD-21) was administrated at baseline, month 1, and month 3 to assess AR. SCE was measured at steady state. Linear regression analysis and nonlinear least-squares regression were used to estimate association between SCE and AR. We found an association between SCE and AR both at month 1 (pescitalopram the association between SCE and AR likely follows a nearly-asymptotic function, with poor AR at sub-therapeutic SCE and stable AR response at therapeutic SCE. Thus, when a patient reaches the therapeutic SCE range, further increase of escitalopram dosage seems to be useless, although further studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficacy and feasibility of antidepressants for the prevention of migraine in adults: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X-M; Yang, C; Liu, Y; Dong, M-X; Zou, D-Z; Wei, Y-D

    2017-08-01

    Migraine has greatly impacted the quality of life for migraineurs and was ranked as the seventh highest specific cause of disability worldwide in 2012. Because of the role of serotonin in migraine mechanisms, antidepressants have been used in the prevention of migraine. However, the role of antidepressants for migraine prophylaxis in adults has not been completely established. Our aim was systematically to assess the efficacy and feasibility of antidepressants for the prevention of migraine in adults based on currently available literature. A comprehensive search of databases was conducted including the Cochrane, PubMed, Web of Science and Embase databases from inception to July 2016. Randomized controlled trials that assigned adults with a clinical diagnosis of migraine to antidepressant or placebo treatment were included. The primary outcome was the reduction of migraine frequency or index. Overall, 16 randomized controlled trials including 1082 participants were identified. Antidepressants had a significant advantage over placebo in reducing the migraine frequency or index of adults with a standardized mean difference of -0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI) -1.13 to -0.45, P < 0.00001]. Patients receiving antidepressant therapy were more likely to experience an at least 50% reduction of headache burden than those receiving placebo (28.9% vs. 20.2%; risk ratio 1.40; 95% CI 0.97-2.02; P = 0.07). However, antidepressants were less well tolerated than placebo because of some adverse events (risk ratio 1.74, 95% CI 1.05-2.89, P = 0.03). Antidepressants are effective in the prophylaxis of migraine in adults, but the level of evidence for antidepressants except for amitriptyline seems to be quite shaky. © 2017 EAN.

  17. Efficacy of antidepressants for dysthymia: a meta-analysis of placebo-controlled randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkovitz, Yeciel; Tedeschini, Enrico; Papakostas, George I

    2011-04-01

    The authors sought to determine the efficacy of antidepressants in dysthymic disorder and to compare antidepressant and placebo response rates between major depressive disorder (MDD) and dysthymic disorder. PubMed/MEDLINE databases were searched for double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of antidepressants used as monotherapy for treatment of MDD or dysthymic disorder. We defined antidepressants as those with a letter of approval by the US, Canadian, or European Union drug regulatory agencies for treatment of MDD or dysthymic disorder, which included the following: amitriptyline, nortriptyline, imipramine, desipramine, clomipramine, trimipramine, protriptyline, dothiepin, doxepin, lofepramine, amoxapine, maprotiline, amineptine, nomifensine, bupropion, phenelzine, tranylcypromine, isocarboxazid, moclobemide, brofaromine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, zimelidine, tianeptine, ritanserin, trazodone, nefazodone, agomelatine, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, duloxetine, milnacipran, reboxetine, mirtazapine, and mianserin. Eligible studies were identified by cross-referencing the search term placebo with each of the above-mentioned agents. The search was limited to articles published between January 1, 1980, and November 20, 2009 (inclusive). To expand our database, we also reviewed the reference lists of the identified studies. We selected randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of antidepressants for either MDD or dysthymic disorder according to preset criteria relating to comorbidities, patient age, drug formulation, study duration, diagnostic criteria, choice of assessment scales, and whether or not the study reported original data. Final selection of articles was determined by consensus among the authors. A total of 194 studies were found that were eligible for inclusion in our analysis. Of these, 177 focused on the treatment of MDD and 17 on the treatment of dysthymic disorder. We found that

  18. Effects of BDNF polymorphisms on antidepressant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hong, Chen-Jee; Liou, Ying-Jay

    2010-12-01

    Evidence suggests that the down-regulation of the signaling pathway involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a molecular element known to regulate neuronal plasticity and survival, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of major depression. The restoration of BDNF activity induced by antidepressant treatment has been implicated in the antidepressant therapeutic mechanism. Because there is variability among patients with major depressive disorder in terms of response to antidepressant treatment and since genetic factors may contribute to this inter-individual variability in antidepressant response, pharmacogenetic studies have tested the associations between genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes related to antidepressant therapeutic action. In human BDNF gene, there is a common functional polymorphism (Val66Met) in the pro-region of BDNF, which affects the intracellular trafficking of proBDNF. Because of the potentially important role of BDNF in the antidepressant mechanism, many pharmacogenetic studies have tested the association between this polymorphism and the antidepressant therapeutic response, but they have produced inconsistent results. A recent meta-analysis of eight studies, which included data from 1,115 subjects, suggested that the Val/Met carriers have increased antidepressant response in comparison to Val/Val homozygotes, particularly in the Asian population. The positive molecular heterosis effect (subjects heterozygous for a specific genetic polymorphism show a significantly greater effect) is compatible with animal studies showing that, although BDNF exerts an antidepressant effect, too much BDNF may have a detrimental effect on mood. Several recommendations are proposed for future antidepressant pharmacogenetic studies of BDNF, including the consideration of multiple polymorphisms and a haplotype approach, gene-gene interaction, a single antidepressant regimen, controlling for age and gender interactions, and pharmacogenetic

  19. The effect of anti-depressant Amitriptyline on the immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukan J

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the effect of amitriptyline, a tricyclic anti-depressant drug on several immune parameters of the Balb/c mice in order to evaluate its immunomodulatory effects. Results showed that amitriptyline will potentiates all of the immunocytes functions except for the production of PGE2 by LPS stimulated monocytes. We have also showed that amitriptyline can normalize the immunosuppressive effect of dexamethasone on mice (experimental stress. These results suggest that one of the mechanisms of action of the tricyclic anti-depressant drugs might be through the modulation of the immune system which has been suppressed by stress or distress

  20. A standardized procedure for using human corpus cavernosum strips to evaluate drug activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirone, V; Sorrentino, R; di Villa Bianca, R; Imbimbo, C; Palmieri, A; Fusco, F; Tajana, G; Cirino, G

    2000-01-01

    The main problem of using human corpus cavernosum (HCC) tissue to perform bioassay is linked to its limited availability further complicated by the heterogeneous source of the tissues used. Here, we show that gender reassignment is a reliable source of human tissue without major ethical problems. Indeed, the entire corpus cavernosum is obtained from the surgery procedure, which allows creating a standardized procedure to prepare HCC strip. In addition, human tissue, if kept in the fridge in the condition described, does not loose its ability to contract to phenylephrine (PE; alpha agonist), angiotensin II (AG II) and KCl up to 4 days. Furthermore, once contracted with PE, HCC relaxes to acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent mechanism); sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent mechanism); cromakalim (CRK), a K(ATP) channel opener; or alprostadil, a synthetic PGE2 (ALPR). In conclusion, we have standardized a procedure that allows the use of HCC strips to evaluate drug activity and/or to study pathophysiological mechanisms with an intact functional human tissue up to 4 days from the surgery procedure.

  1. Interplay between the key proteins of serotonin system in SSRI antidepressants efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Alexander V; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Kalueff, Allan V; Naumenko, Vladimir S; Popova, Nina K

    2018-04-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most effective and most used antidepressant drugs. Acting by inhibiting serotonin (5-HT) transporter, SSRIs display a typical 3-4-week delay in their therapeutic effects, with nearly 40% of depressed patients remaining treatment-resistant. Recent evidence suggests complex interplay between 5-HT receptors and key proteins of 5-HT metabolism in molecular mechanisms of such delay and resistance to SSRIs. Area covered: This paper concentrates on the interplay between 5-HT receptors in the delay of therapeutic effect of SSRIs, and the interaction between tryptophan hydroxylase 2 and 5-HT transporter in the SSRI resistance. Specifically, it discusses: (1) the data on the association between antidepressant drug efficacy and genetically defined characteristics of key proteins in the 5-HT signaling (TPH2, MAOA, SERT and 5-HT 1A receptor), (2) the effect of dimerization of 5-HT 7 and 5-HT 1A receptors on the internalization and functioning of 5-HT 1A presynaptic receptors, (3) the role of Tph2 deficiency in the resistance to SSRIs treatment. We shift the emphasis from individual proteins to their interactions in explaining antidepressant action of SSRI. Expert opinion: These interactions should be considered when developing more effective antidepressant drugs as well as for predicting and improving the efficacy of antidepressant therapies.

  2. Placebo and antidepressant treatment for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is generally considered the primary treatment for major depressive disorders (MDD), but antidepressant treatment has recently approached a crisis with shrinking specific effects and growing placebo responses in current trials. The aim of the paper is to review the placebo...

  3. Generic penetration in the retail antidepressant market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Jeffrey; Kalali, Amir H

    2010-06-01

    In this article, we explore the accelerated penetration of generic antidepressants in the United States market following the availability of generic citalopram and sertraline. Analysis suggests that overall, generic penetration into the antidepressant market has grown from approximately 41 percent in January 2004 to over 73 percent in January 2010. Similar trends are uncovered when branded and generic prescriptions are analyzed by specialty.

  4. Antidepressants in the treatment of neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, Søren H.; Otto, Marit; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is due to lesion or dysfunction of the peripheral or central nervous system. Tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants have long been the mainstay of treatment of this type of pain. Tricyclic antidepressants may relieve neuropathic pain by their unique ability to inhibit...... presynaptic reuptake of the biogenic amines serotonin and noradrenaline, but other mechanisms such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and ion channel blockade probably also play a role in their pain-relieving effect. The effect of tricyclic antidepressants in neuropathic pain in man has been demonstrated...... in numerous randomised, controlled trials, and a few trials have shown that serotonin noradrenaline and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants also relieve neuropathic pain although with lower efficacy. Tricyclic antidepressants will relieve one in every 2-3 patients with peripheral...

  5. Use of Sedatives, Antidepressants and Antipsychotic Medicine among Seventh-day Adventists and Baptists in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Johansen, Christoffer; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Kørup, Alex Kappel; Søndergaard, Jens; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2017-10-01

    Earlier it has been found that female Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) and Baptists have an increased incidence of psychiatric affective disorders, in contrast to findings that religious practice is associated with better health. In this study, we examined whether the increase in incidence is due to less use of prescribed antidepressants, sedatives and antipsychotics by members of these religious societies than by the general population. In a cohort study, we examined records of all drugs redeemed by 3121 SDA and 2888 Baptists and 29,817 age- and gender-matched members of the general population between 1995 and 2010 in the Danish Prescription Register and compared the prevalence and incidence of use of antidepressants, sedatives and antipsychotics. The prevalence of antidepressant use by women was lower in 1998 but no different from that in controls in 2003 and 2008; the prevalence of antidepressant use by men was higher in both 1998 and 2008 than in the Danish population. The incidence of antidepressant use was lower for female members in 1996-2000, but no difference was observed in the other periods. The prevalence and incidence of use of sedatives and antipsychotics did not consistently differ from those of the general population. The prevalence and incidence of use of antidepressants, sedatives and antipsychotics by female SDA and Baptists were not consistently lower than in the general Danish population. Our findings hence do not explain the increased incidence of psychiatric disorders among female members of these Danish religious societies.

  6. Interactive effects of N-acetylcysteine and antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Campos, Luciane; Herrmann, Ana P; Pilz, Luísa K; Michels, Marcus; Noetzold, Guilherme; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2013-07-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a glutathione precursor and glutamate modulator, has been shown to possess various clinically relevant psychopharmacological properties. Considering the role of glutamate and oxidative stress in depressive states, the poor effectiveness of antidepressant drugs (ADs) and the benefits of drug combination for treating depression, the aim of this study was to explore the possible benefit of NAC as an add on drug to treat major depression. For that matter we investigated the combination of subeffective and effective doses of NAC with subeffective and effective doses of several ADs in the mice tail suspension test. The key finding of this study is that a subeffective dose of NAC reduced the minimum effective doses of imipramine and escitalopram, but not those of desipramine and bupropion. Moreover, the same subeffective dose of NAC increased the minimum effective dose of fluoxetine in the same model. In view of the advantages associated with using the lowest effective dose of antidepressant, the results of this study suggest the potential of a clinically useful interaction of NAC with imipramine and escitalopram. Further studies are necessary to better characterize the molecular basis of such interactions, as well as to typify the particular drug combinations that would optimize NAC as an alternative for treating depression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Using standardized methods for research on HIV and injecting drug use in developing/transitional countries: case study from the WHO Drug Injection Study Phase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stimson Gerry V

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful cross-national research requires methods that are both standardized across sites and adaptable to local conditions. We report on the development and implementation of the methodology underlying the survey component of the WHO Drug Injection Study Phase II – a multi-site study of risk behavior and HIV seroprevalence among Injecting Drug Users (IDUs. Methods Standardized operational guidelines were developed by the Survey Coordinating Center in collaboration with the WHO Project Officer and participating site Investigators. Throughout the duration of the study, survey implementation at the local level was monitored by the Coordinating Center. Surveys were conducted in 12 different cities. Prior rapid assessment conducted in 10 cities provided insight into local context and guided survey implementation. Where possible, subjects were recruited both from drug abuse treatment centers and via street outreach. While emphasis was on IDUs, non-injectors were also recruited in cities with substantial non-injecting use of injectable drugs. A structured interview and HIV counseling/testing were administered. Results Over 5,000 subjects were recruited. Subjects were recruited from both drug treatment and street outreach in 10 cities. Non-injectors were recruited in nine cities. Prior rapid assessment identified suitable recruitment areas, reduced drug users' distrust of survey staff, and revealed site-specific risk behaviors. Centralized survey coordination facilitated local questionnaire modification within a core structure, standardized data collection protocols, uniform database structure, and cross-site analyses. Major site-specific problems included: questionnaire translation difficulties; locating affordable HIV-testing facilities; recruitment from drug treatment due to limited/selective treatment infrastructure; access to specific sub-groups of drug users in the community, particularly females or higher income groups

  8. The Effect of Antidepressants on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Jeffrey S; Bermeo, Sandra; Skarratt, Kristen K; Fuller, Stephen J; Duque, Gustavo

    2018-02-01

    Use of antidepressant medications has been linked to detrimental impacts on bone mineral density and osteoporosis; however, the cellular basis behind these observations remains poorly understood. The effect does not appear to be homogeneous across the whole class of drugs and may be linked to affinity for the serotonin transporter system. In this study, we hypothesized that antidepressants have a class- and dose-dependent effect on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation, which may affect bone metabolism. Human MSCs (hMSCs) were committed to differentiate when either adipogenic or osteogenic media was added, supplemented with five increasing concentrations of amitriptyline (0.001-10 µM), venlafaxine (0.01-25 µM), or fluoxetine (0.001-10 µM). Alizarin red staining (mineralization), alkaline phosphatase (osteoblastogenesis), and oil red O (adipogenesis) assays were performed at timed intervals. In addition, cell viability was assessed using a MTT. We found that fluoxetine had a significant inhibitory effect on mineralization. Furthermore, adipogenic differentiation of hMSC was affected by the addition of amitriptyline, venlafaxine, and fluoxetine to the media. Finally, none of the tested medications significantly affected cell survival. This study showed a divergent effect of three antidepressants on hMSC differentiation, which appears to be independent of class and dose. As fluoxetine and amitriptyline, but not venlafaxine, affected both osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis, this inhibitory effect could be associated to the high affinity of fluoxetine to the serotonin transporter system.

  9. Oxidative/nitrosative stress and antidepressants: targets for novel antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Lee, Soo-Jung; Han, Changsu; Patkar, Ashwin A; Masand, Prakash S; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-10-01

    The brain is an organ predisposed to oxidative/nitrosative stress. This is especially true in the case of aging as well as several neurodegenerative diseases. Under such circumstances, a decline in the normal antioxidant defense mechanisms leads to an increase in the vulnerability of the brain to the deleterious effects of oxidative damage. Highly reactive oxygen/nitrogen species damage lipids, proteins, and mitochondrial and neuronal genes. Unless antioxidant defenses react appropriately to damage inflicted by radicals, neurons may experience microalteration, microdysfunction, and degeneration. We reviewed how oxidative and nitrosative stresses contribute to the pathogenesis of depressive disorders and reviewed the clinical implications of various antioxidants as future targets for antidepressant treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antidepressant effect of Melissa officinalis in the forced swimming test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Emamghoreishi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: In Iranian and other traditional medicines, an antidepressant effect has been indicated for Melissa officinalis (Lamiaceae. However, studies showing its antidepressant effect is lacking. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine whether the aqueous extract and essential oil from leaves of Melissa officinalis have an antidepressant-like activity in mice.  Materials and Methods: The effect of subchronic administration of different doses of the aqueous extract (25, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg or water; n=9-10 and the essential oil (10, 25, 75, 150, 300 mg/kg or almond oil; n=9-10 on immobility, climbing, and swimming behaviors were evaluated in the forced swimming test. Fluoxetine (20mg/kg and imipramine (15 mg/kg were used as reference drugs. Additionally, the effect of both plant preparations on spontaneous activity was examined. Results: All doses of the aqueous extract, used in this study, produced a significant reduction in immobility along with an increase in climbing behavior which is similar to those which have been observed with imipramine. Essential oil caused a dose-dependent reduction in immobility and an increase in climbing at all studied doses, compared to control group. Only the highest dose (300mg/kg of essential oil showed a significant increase in swimming behavior. The aqueous extract, but not the essential oil, decreased spontaneous activity in a dose dependent manner. Conclusion: The results of this study suggests that the Melissa officinalis possess an antidepressant-like activity similar to imipramine which may have a potential clinical value for treatment of depression.

  11. The Effect of Sympathetic Antagonists on the Antidepressant Action of Alprazolam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorash ZM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alprazolam is an anti-anxiety drug shown to be effective in the treatment of depression. In this study, the effect of sympathetic receptor antagonists on alprazolam–induced antidepressant action was studied using a mouse model of forced swimming behavioral despair. The interaction of three sympathetic receptor antagonists with benzodiazepines, which may impact the clinical use of alprazolam, was also studied. Behavioral despair was examined in six groups of albino mice. Drugs were administered intraperitoneally. The control group received only a single dose of 1% Tween 80. The second group received a single dose of alprazolam, and the third group received an antagonist followed by alprazolam. The fourth group was treated with imipramine, and the fifth group received an antagonist followed by imipramine. The sixth group was treated with a single dose of an antagonist alone (atenolol, a β1-selective adrenoceptor antagonist; propranolol, a non selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist; and prazocin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Results confirmed the antidepressant action of alprazolam and imipramine. Prazocin treatment alone produced depression, but it significantly potentiated the antidepressant actions of imipramine and alprazolam. Atenolol alone produced an antidepressant effect and potentiated the antidepressant action of alprazolam. Propranolol treatment alone produced depression, and antagonized the effects of alprazolam and imipramine, even producing depression in combined treatments. In conclusion, our results reveal that alprazolam may produce antidepressant effects through the release of noradrenaline, which stimulates β2 receptors to produce an antidepressant action. Imipramine may act by activating β2 receptors by blocking or down-regulating β1 receptors.

  12. Human experimental pain models: A review of standardized methods in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sunil kumar Reddy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human experimental pain models are essential in understanding the pain mechanisms and appear to be ideally suited to test analgesic compounds. The challenge that confronts both the clinician and the scientist is to match specific treatments to different pain-generating mechanisms and hence reach a pain treatment tailored to each individual patient. Experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. Standardized stimuli of different modalities (i.e., mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical can be applied to the skin, muscles, and viscera for a differentiated and comprehensive assessment of various pain pathways and mechanisms. Using a multimodel-multistructure testing, the nociception arising from different body structures can be explored and modulation of specific biomarkers by new and existing analgesic drugs can be profiled. The value of human experimental pain models is to link animal and clinical pain studies, providing new possibilities for designing successful clinical trials. Spontaneous pain, the main compliant of the neuropathic patients, but currently there is no human model available that would mimic chronic pain. Therefore, current human pain models cannot replace patient studies for studying efficacy of analgesic compounds, although being helpful for proof-of-concept studies and dose finding.

  13. Relabeling the Medications We Call Antidepressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Antonuccio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises the question about whether the data on the medications we call antidepressants justify the label of antidepressant. The authors argue that a true antidepressant should be clearly superior to placebo, should offer a risk/benefit balance that exceeds that of alternative treatments, should not increase suicidality, should not increase anxiety and agitation, should not interfere with sexual functioning, and should not increase depression chronicity. Unfortunately, these medications appear to fall short on all of these dimensions. Many of the “side effects” of these medications have larger effect sizes than the antidepressant effect size. To call these medications antidepressants may make sense from a marketing standpoint but may be misleading from a scientific perspective. Consumers deserve a label that more accurately reflects the data on the largest effects and helps them understand the range of effects from these medications. In other words, it may make just as much sense to call these medications antiaphrodisiacs as antidepressants because the negative effects on libido and sexual functioning are so common. It can be argued that a misleading label may interfere with our commitment to informed consent. Therefore, it may be time to stop calling these medications antidepressants.

  14. 78 FR 10107 - Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Modernization Act: Proposed Rules To Establish Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is providing public meeting registration information for two FSMA related... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 1, 16, 106, 110...

  15. New insights into the pharmacogenomics of antidepressant response from the GENDEP and STAR*D studies: rare variant analysis and high-density imputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, C; Tansey, K E; Perlis, R H; Hauser, J; Henigsberg, N; Maier, W; Mors, O; Placentino, A; Rietschel, M; Souery, D; Breen, G; Curtis, C; Sang-Hyuk, L; Newhouse, S; Patel, H; Guipponi, M; Perroud, N; Bondolfi, G; O'Donovan, M; Lewis, G; Biernacka, J M; Weinshilboum, R M; Farmer, A; Aitchison, K J; Craig, I; McGuffin, P; Uher, R; Lewis, C M

    2017-11-21

    Genome-wide association studies have generally failed to identify polymorphisms associated with antidepressant response. Possible reasons include limited coverage of genetic variants that this study tried to address by exome genotyping and dense imputation. A meta-analysis of Genome-Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) and Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) studies was performed at the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), gene and pathway levels. Coverage of genetic variants was increased compared with previous studies by adding exome genotypes to previously available genome-wide data and using the Haplotype Reference Consortium panel for imputation. Standard quality control was applied. Phenotypes were symptom improvement and remission after 12 weeks of antidepressant treatment. Significant findings were investigated in NEWMEDS consortium samples and Pharmacogenomic Research Network Antidepressant Medication Pharmacogenomic Study (PGRN-AMPS) for replication. A total of 7062 950 SNPs were analyzed in GENDEP (n=738) and STAR*D (n=1409). rs116692768 (P=1.80e-08, ITGA9 (integrin α9)) and rs76191705 (P=2.59e-08, NRXN3 (neurexin 3)) were significantly associated with symptom improvement during citalopram/escitalopram treatment. At the gene level, no consistent effect was found. At the pathway level, the Gene Ontology (GO) terms GO: 0005694 (chromosome) and GO: 0044427 (chromosomal part) were associated with improvement (corrected P=0.007 and 0.045, respectively). The association between rs116692768 and symptom improvement was replicated in PGRN-AMPS (P=0.047), whereas rs76191705 was not. The two SNPs did not replicate in NEWMEDS. ITGA9 codes for a membrane receptor for neurotrophins and NRXN3 is a transmembrane neuronal adhesion receptor involved in synaptic differentiation. Despite their meaningful biological rationale for being involved in antidepressant effect, replication was partial. Further studies may help in clarifying

  16. Moderation of antidepressant response by the serotonin transporter gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huezo-Diaz, Patricia; Uher, Rudolf; Smith, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Background: There have been conflicting reports on whether the length polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We hypothesised that the pharmacogenetic effect of 5-HTTLPR...... the serotonin transporter gene were genotyped in 795 adults with moderate-to-severe depression treated with escitalopram or nortriptyline in the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project. Results: The 5-HTTLPR moderated the response to escitalopram, with long-allele carriers improving more...

  17. [Driving under the influence of benzodiazepines and antidepressants: prescription and abuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Daniel; Vieira, Duarte Nuno; Teixeira, Helena M

    2011-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are drugs usually used in anxiety disorders, dyssomnias, convulsions, muscle disorders, alcohol and other drugs detoxification, as well as in preoperative sedation/amnesia. Moreover, antidepressants are mainly indicated in depression and as co-therapeutic drugs in other psychiatric disorders. The use of benzodiazepines and antidepressants is associated with some health and public safety problems. Decreased of attention, concentration, reflexes, visual capacity, motor coordination and reasoning, associated with increased reaction time and lack of awareness of driving impairment among these drug users, contributes to the increased risk on traffic safety linked with these drugs. This risk may further increase with non-compliance of medical prescription, drug abuse or concomitant use of alcohol. The relationship between the use of psychoactive drugs and road traffic safety is, however, an extremely complex subject and has a primordial importance in the clarification of the role of benzodiazepine and antidepressant effects on driving skills. The prevention of driving under the influence of these drugs depends on the awareness, among doctors, of the risks associated with their use. Thus, the consciousness of medical prescription, as well as providing clear information to patients is extremely important.

  18. Use of Sedatives, Antidepressants and Antipsychotic Medicine among Seventh-day Adventists and Baptists in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Johansen, Christoffer; Hvidt, Niels Christian

    2017-01-01

    to less use of prescribed antidepressants, sedatives and antipsychotics by members of these religious societies than by the general population. In a cohort study, we examined records of all drugs redeemed by 3121 SDA and 2888 Baptists and 29,817 age- and gender-matched members of the general population...

  19. Declining efficacy in controlled trials of antidepressants: effects of placebo dropout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalkwijk, S.J.; Undurraga, J.; Tondo, L.; Baldessarini, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-placebo differences (effect-sizes) in controlled trials of antidepressants for major depressive episodes have declined for several decades, in association with selectively increasing clinical improvement associated with placebo-treatment. As these trends require adequate explanation, we tested

  20. Drug: D07623 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 01942 ... Iminobenzyl antipsychotic Chemical group: DG01312 ... Tricyclic antidepressant, Iminodibenzyl derivativ... D07623 Drug Carpipramine (INN) ... C28H38N4O D07623.gif ... Neuropsychiatric agent ... DG

  1. The impact of direct-to-consumer television and magazine advertising on antidepressant use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Rosemary J; Eisenberg, Matthew D; Simon, Kosali I

    2012-09-01

    We examine whether exposure to direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) for antidepressant drugs affects individual use of these medications among those suffering from depression. Prior studies have almost exclusively relied on making connections between national or market-level advertising volume/expenditures and national or individual-level usage of medications. This is the first study to: estimate the impact of individual-level exposure to DTCA on individual-level use of antidepressants; estimate the impact of individual-level exposure to television DTCA on individual-level use in any drug class; consider the relative and interactive impact of DTCA in two different media in any drug class; and, consider the heterogeneity of impact among different populations in an econometric framework in the antidepressant market. There are also important limitations to note. Unlike prior market level studies that use monthly data, we are limited to aggregated annual data. Our measures of potential advertising exposure are constructed assuming that media consumption patterns are stable during the year. We are also not able to study the impact of advertising on use of antidepressants for conditions other than depression, such as anxiety disorders. We find that: DTCA impacts antidepressant use in a statistically and economically significant manner; that these effects are present in both television and magazine advertising exposure but do not appear to have interactive effects; are stronger for women than for men in the magazine medium, but are about equally strong for men and women in the TV medium; and, are somewhat stronger for groups suffering from more severe forms of depression. The overall size of the effect is a 6-10 percentage point increase in antidepressant use from being exposed to television advertising; the corresponding magazine effects are between 3 and 4 percentage points. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antidepressant induced sexual dysfunction Part 1: epidemiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Abstract. Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of treatment with antidepressants, particularly those with a predominantly .... free of serotonergic effects or have highly selective receptor .... received little attention in the current literature.

  3. [Consumption of antidepressants in Chile from 1992 to 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirón, Marcela; Machado, Márcio; Ruiz, Inés

    2008-09-01

    Data from the Ministry of Health show that in Chile in 2004, 17% of the population had some form of depression, and mood disorders are the tenth cause of disability-adjusted life years (DALY) loss. To determine consumption of antidepressants (ADs) in Chile from 1992 to 2004. National sales data were obtained from the company IMS Health Chile and converted into defined daily doses (DDDs) per 1,000 inhabitants per day. Available ADs were classified in four pharmacological groups (i.e., serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, SNRLs; selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRLs; tricyclic antidepressants, TCAs; and others). Total economic burden of ADs utilization and cost per DDDs were also calculated. Trends over time were analyzed using Pearson-R2. Total ADs consumption in Chile measured by DDDs per 1,000 inhabitants per day (DHD) increased linearly (y =0.901x + 1.9129; R2 =0.9296; p economic burden of ADs in Chile (total cost of DDDs consumed) increased from US$65.4 million in 2001 to US$74.6 million in 2004 (14% increase). Average cost per DDD of all AD increased linearly, however not significantly from US$ 0.94 in 2001 to US$ 1.04 in 2004 (y =0.0362x + 0.8784; R2 =0.7382; p =0,262). DDDs per 1,000 inhabitants per day increased linearly over 470% from 1992-2004. SSRLs were the most commonly consumed drugs in Chile. Future research should evaluate the cost-effectiveness of antidepressants in Chile, comparing the results with drug utilization, and determining if unnecessary expenditures have been paid out.

  4. Antidepressant efficacy of sertraline and imipramine for the treatment of major depression in elderly outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestes Vicente Forlenza

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Most double-blind studies of efficacy and tolerability of sertraline as compared to tricyclics in the treatment of late-life major depression have used amitriptyline as a standard, leading to the inevitable conclusion that the former drug is better tolerated than the latter, with both being equally efficacious. OBJECTIVE: To compare the antidepressant efficacy and tolerability of sertraline (50 mg/day and imipramine (150 mg/day in the first 6 weeks of the treatment of major depression in the elderly. DESIGN: A randomized double-blind parallel study with 6 weeks of follow-up. SETTING: The psychogeriatric clinic at the Institute of Psychiatry, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 55 severe and moderately depressed non-demented outpatients aged 60 years or more. INTERVENTION: Patients were assigned to sertraline 50 mg/day or imipramine 150 mg/day. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: CAMDEX interview. Psychiatric diagnosis followed the guidelines for "Major Depressive Episode" according to DSM-IV criteria. Severity of symptoms was evaluated using the "CGI" and "MADRS" scales. Cognitive state was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination. Side effects were assessed using the "Safetee-Up" schedule. RESULTS: Both groups had a significant decrease in depressive symptoms according to the MADRS scores after 6 weeks of treatment (P = 0.01. No significant differences between groups were detected regarding treatment outcome (t = 0.4; P = 0.7. Although the dropout rate was greater in the imipramine group, the overall tolerability among patients who completed the 6-week trial was similar in both test groups. CONCLUSIONS: Both sertraline and imipramine exhibited good efficacy and an acceptable side-effect profile for elderly depressed patients after 6 weeks of antidepressant treatment.

  5. Pharmacogenetics of antidepressant response: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Antonio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The past few decades have witnessed much progress in the field of pharmacogenetics. The identification of the genetic background that regulates the antidepressant response has benefited from these advances. This review focuses on the pharmacogenetics of the antidepressant response through the analysis and discussion of the most compelling evidence in this line of research. Online databases (Medline and PsycINFO have been searched and the most replicated association findings relating to the genetics of the antidepressant response have been reported and discussed. Some replicated findings in the literature have suggested the serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR, serotonin receptor 1A (HTR1A, serotonin receptor 2A (HTR2A, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1 and FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5 as putative regulators of the antidepressant response. A high rate of failure of replication has also been reported. Pharmacogenetics will hopefully provide the basis for personalised antidepressant treatment that is able to maximise the probability of a good response and to minimise side effects; however, this goal is not achievable at the moment. The extent of the validity of the replicated findings and the reasons for the poor results obtained from studies of the pharmacogenetics of the antidepressant response are discussed.

  6. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brand, M W M; Pouwels, S; Samson, M M; van Staa, T P; Thio, B; Cooper, C; Leufkens, H G M; Egberts, A C G; Verhaar, H J J; de Vries, F

    2009-10-01

    Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between the use of anti-depressants and the risk of hip/femur fractures with a special focus on the relation with the degree of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter (5-HTT) inhibition and the duration of use. A case-control study was conducted within the Dutch PHARMO-RLS database. Cases (n = 6,763) were adult patients with a first hip/femur fracture during the study period. For each case, four controls (n = 26341) were matched by age, gender and geographic region. The risk of hip/femur fracture increased with current use of SSRIs (adjusted odds ratio (OR(adj)) 2.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.94-2.84]) and TCAs (ORadj 1.76 [95% CI 1.45-2.15]). The risk of hip/femur fracture declined rapidly after discontinuation of use. The risk of hip/femur fracture increased as the degree of 5-HTT inhibition of all anti-depressants increased from OR(adj) 1.64 [95% CI 1.14-2.35] for drugs with low 5-HTT inhibition to OR(adj) 2.31 [95% CI 1.94-2.76] for those with high 5-HTT inhibiting properties. Current use of both SSRIs and TCAs increase hip/femur fracture risk. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanistic pathways and the relation with the underlying pathophysiology. Until then, the elevated fracture risk should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants.

  7. Beliefs of people taking antidepressants about causes of depression and reasons for increased prescribing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, John; Cartwright, Claire; Gibson, Kerry; Shiels, Christopher; Haslam, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    Public beliefs about the causes of mental health problems are related to desire for distance and pessimism about recovery, and are therefore frequently studied. The beliefs of people receiving treatment are researched less often. An online survey on causal beliefs about depression and experiences with antidepressants was completed by 1829 New Zealand adults prescribed anti-depressants in the preceding five years, 97.4% of whom proceeded to take antidepressants. The most frequently endorsed of 17 causal beliefs were family stress, relationship problems, loss of loved one, financial problems, isolation, and abuse or neglect in childhood. Factor analysis produced three factors: 'bio-genetic', 'adulthood stress' and 'childhood adversity'. The most strongly endorsed explanations for increases in antidepressant prescribing invoked improved identification, reduced stigma and drug company marketing. The least strongly endorsed was 'Anti-depressants are the best treatment'. Regression analyses revealed that self-reported efficacy of the antidepressants was positively associated with bio-genetic causal beliefs, negatively associated with childhood adversity beliefs and unrelated to adulthood stress beliefs. The belief that 'People cannot׳ get better by themselves even if they try' was positively associated with bio-genetic beliefs. The convenience sample may have been biased towards a favourable view of bio-genetic explanations, since 83% reported that the medication reduced their depression. Clinicians׳ should consider exploring patients׳ causal beliefs. The public, even when taking antidepressants, continues to hold a multi-factorial causal model of depression with a primary emphasis on psycho-social causes. A three factor model of those beliefs may lead to more sophisticated understandings of relationships with stigma variables. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antidepressant-like responses in the forced swimming test elicited by glutathione and redox modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Juliana M; Dafre, Alcir Luiz; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-09-15

    Glutathione (GSH) displays a broad range of functions, among them a role as a neuromodulator with some neuroprotective properties. Taking into account that oxidative stress has been associated with depressive disorders, this study investigated the possibility that GSH, a major cell antioxidant, elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice. Thus, GSH was administered by i.c.v. route to mice that were tested in the forced swimming test and in the tail suspension test, two predictive tests for antidepressant drug activity. In addition, GSH metabolism and the redox environment were modulated in order to study the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of GSH in the forced swimming test. The administration of GSH decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test (300-3000nmol/site) and tail suspension test (100-1000nmol/site), consistent with an antidepressant-like effect. GSH depletion elicited by l-buthionine sulfoximine (3.2μmol/site, i.c.v.) did not alter the antidepressant-like effect of GSH, whereas the inhibition of extracellular GSH catabolism by acivicin (100nmol/site, i.c.v.) prevented the antidepressant-like effect of GSH. Moreover, a sub-effective dose (0.01nmol/site, i.c.v.) of the oxidizing agent DTNB (5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)) potentiated the effect of GSH (100nmol/site, i.c.v.), while the pretreatment (25-100mg/kg, i.p.) with the reducing agent DTT (dl-dithiothreitol) prevented the antidepressant-like effect of GSH (300nmol/site, i.c.v.). DTNB (0.1nmol/site, i.c.v.), produced an antidepressant-like effect, per se, which was abolished by DTT (25mg/kg, i.p.). The results show, for the first time, that centrally administered GSH produces an antidepressant-like effect in mice, which can be modulated by the GSH metabolism and the thiol/disulfide reagents. The redox environment may constitute a new venue for future antidepressant-drug development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Purely in silico BCS classification: science based quality standards for the world's drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Kim, Young Hoon; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Crippen, Gordon M; Takagi, Toshihide; Bermejo, Marival; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-11-04

    BCS classification is a vital tool in the development of both generic and innovative drug products. The purpose of this work was to provisionally classify the world's top selling oral drugs according to the BCS, using in silico methods. Three different in silico methods were examined: the well-established group contribution (CLogP) and atom contribution (ALogP) methods, and a new method based solely on the molecular formula and element contribution (KLogP). Metoprolol was used as the benchmark for the low/high permeability class boundary. Solubility was estimated in silico using a thermodynamic equation that relies on the partition coefficient and melting point. The validity of each method was affirmed by comparison to reference data and literature. We then used each method to provisionally classify the orally administered, IR drug products found in the WHO Model list of Essential Medicines, and the top-selling oral drug products in the United States (US), Great Britain (GB), Spain (ES), Israel (IL), Japan (JP), and South Korea (KR). A combined list of 363 drugs was compiled from the various lists, and 257 drugs were classified using the different in silico permeability methods and literature solubility data, as well as BDDCS classification. Lastly, we calculated the solubility values for 185 drugs from the combined set using in silico approach. Permeability classification with the different in silico methods was correct for 69-72.4% of the 29 reference drugs with known human jejunal permeability, and for 84.6-92.9% of the 14 FDA reference drugs in the set. The correlations (r(2)) between experimental log P values of 154 drugs and their CLogP, ALogP and KLogP were 0.97, 0.82 and 0.71, respectively. The different in silico permeability methods produced comparable results: 30-34% of the US, GB, ES and IL top selling drugs were class 1, 27-36.4% were class 2, 22-25.5% were class 3, and 5.46-14% were class 4 drugs, while ∼8% could not be classified. The WHO list

  10. Depression, antidepressants, and bone mineral density in a population-based cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezuk, Briana; Eaton, William W; Golden, Sherita Hill; Wand, Gary; Lee, Hochang Benjamin

    2008-12-01

    It is uncertain whether depression and antidepressant use are associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and whether these relationships differ for men and women. The study used a case-cohort design within the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study, a population-based sample of adults that recently completed its 23-year follow-up. Depression was measured at four time points during the follow-up period by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. Lower spine BMD was measured at the fourth wave by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. The association of BMD with lifetime history of depression and antidepressant medication use was studied using linear regression with bootstrap standard errors. A history of depression was associated with lower spine BMD after controlling for age, sex, race, calcium intake, alcohol use, smoking status, level of physical activity, percent body fat, and antidepressant medication use (-0.140 g/cm(2); p history of depression predicted decreased lumbar spine BMD in men and women, and antidepressant use predicted decreased BMD in women even after controlling for depression. The magnitude of the effect of depression on BMD was approximately equivalent to 1 standard deviation in BMD and was therefore clinically significant. Providers should be aware of the physiologic consequences of depression as well as the possible risks to bone strength associated with antidepressant use in older patients.

  11. Synthesis of Chlorinated Tetracyclic Compounds and Testing for Their Potential Antidepressant Effect in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Karama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the tetracyclic compounds 1-(4,5-dichloro-9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracen-11-yl-N-methylmethanamine (5 and 1-(1,8-dichloro-9,10-dihydro-9,10-ethanoanthracen-11-yl-N-methylmethanamine (6 as a homologue of the anxiolytic and antidepressant drugs benzoctamine and maprotiline were described. The key intermediate aldehydes (3 and (4 were successfully synthesized via a [4 + 2] cycloaddition between acrolein and 1,8-dichloroanthracene. The synthesized compounds were investigated for antidepressant activity using the forced swimming test. Compounds (5, (6 and (3 showed significant reduction in the mice immobility indicating significant antidepressant effects. These compounds significantly reduced the immobility times at a dose 80 mg/kg by 84.0%, 86.7% and 71.1% respectively.

  12. Antidepressant potential of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic moieties: An updated review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Siddiqui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression is currently the fourth leading cause of disease or disability worldwide. Antidepressant is approved for the treatment of major depression (including paediatric depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (in both adult and paediatric populations, bulimia nervosa, panic disorder and premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Antidepressant is a psychiatric medication used to alleviate mood disorders, such as major depression and dysthymia and anxiety disorders such as social anxiety disorder. Many drugs produce an antidepressant effect, but restrictions on their use have caused controversy and off-label prescription a risk, despite claims of superior efficacy. Our current understanding of its pathogenesis is limited and existing treatments are inadequate, providing relief to only a subset of people suffering from depression. Reviews of literature suggest that heterocyclic moieties and their derivatives has proven success in treating depression.

  13. Diverse antidepressants increase CDP-diacylglycerol production and phosphatidylinositide resynthesis in depression-relevant regions of the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Undieh Ashiwel S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a serious mood disorder affecting millions of adults and children worldwide. While the etiopathology of depression remains obscure, antidepressant medications increase synaptic levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in brain regions associated with the disease. Monoamine transmitters activate multiple signaling cascades some of which have been investigated as potential mediators of depression or antidepressant drug action. However, the diacylglycerol arm of phosphoinositide signaling cascades has not been systematically investigated, even though downstream targets of this cascade have been implicated in depression. With the ultimate goal of uncovering the primary postsynaptic actions that may initiate cellular antidepressive signaling, we have examined the antidepressant-induced production of CDP-diacylglycerol which is both a product of diacylglycerol phosphorylation and a precursor for the synthesis of physiologically critical glycerophospholipids such as the phosphatidylinositides. For this, drug effects on [3H]cytidine-labeled CDP-diacylglycerol and [3H]inositol-labeled phosphatidylinositides were measured in response to the tricyclics desipramine and imipramine, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and paroxetine, the atypical antidepressants maprotiline and nomifensine, and several monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Results Multiple compounds from each antidepressant category significantly stimulated [3H]CDP-diacylglycerol accumulation in cerebrocortical, hippocampal, and striatal tissues, and also enhanced the resynthesis of inositol phospholipids. Conversely, various antipsychotics, anxiolytics, and non-antidepressant psychotropic agents failed to significantly induce CDP-diacylglycerol or phosphoinositide synthesis. Drug-induced CDP-diacylglycerol accumulation was independent of lithium and only partially dependent on phosphoinositide hydrolysis, thus indicating that antidepressants

  14. Evaluation of antidepressant activity of vanillin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Ahsan; Chowta, Mukta; Pallempati, Gokul; Rai, Amritha; Singh, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate antidepressant activity of vanillin in mice models of depression. Animals were divided into five groups, consisting six mice in each group. Out of these, three groups served as control (distilled water, imipramine,and fluoxetine) and the remaining two groups received test drug in two different doses (10 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg). All the drugs were administered orally one hour before the test procedure for acute study and daily for ten days for chronic study. Mice were subjected to forced swim (FST) and tail suspension tests (TST). Both the doses of vanillin reduced the immobility duration in TST as well as in FST. In TST, there was a statistically significant decrease in the immobility in all the groups when compared to the control (distilled water) group. But the reduction of immobility in FST did not show statistically significant reduction in immobility in the groups treated with vanillin when compared with control. In the chronic study group that received vanillin at a dose of 100 mg/kg, the immobility reduction was significantly lower when compared to the group receiving fluoxetine. Vanillin at the dosage of 100 mg/kg has demonstrated antidepressant activity in mice, which is comparable with fluoxetine.

  15. Antipsychotic drugs a last resort for these 5 conditions (ADHD, Anxiety, Depression, Insomnia and PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more about antipsychotic drugs, see these additional Best Buy Drugs reports. ■ Use of Antipsychotic Drugs in Children ■ Antipsychotic ... depression with antidepressant medication, see our FREE Best Buy Drugs report here . For more about augmentation therapy with ...

  16. Synthesis of Some Novel Thiadiazole Derivative Compounds and Screening Their Antidepressant-Like Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiz Öncü Can

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Novel thiadiazole derivatives were synthesized through the reaction of acetylated 2-aminothiadiazole and piperazine derivatives. The chemical structures of the compounds were clarified by Infrared Spectroscopy (IR, 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-NMR, 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (13C-NMR and Electronspray Ionisation Mass Spectroscopy (ESI-MS spectroscopic methods. Antidepressant-like activities were evaluated by the tail-suspension (TST and modified forced swimming (MFST methods. Besides, possible influence of the test compounds on motor activities of the animals were examined by activity cage tests. In the TST, administration of the compounds 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 2g and 2h significantly decreased the immobility time of mice regarding the control values. Further, in the MFST, the same compounds reduced the total number of immobility behaviors while increasing swimming performance. However, no change was observed in the total number of climbing behaviors. These data suggested that compounds 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 2g and 2h possess notable antidepressant-like activities. Reference drug fluoxetine (10 mg/kg was also exhibited its antidepressant activity, as expected. No significant difference was seen between the locomotor activity values of the test groups signifying that observed antidepressant-like activities are specific. Theoretical calculation of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME properties for the obtained compounds were performed and obtained data supported the antidepressant-like potential of these novel thiadiazole derivatives.

  17. Reevaluating Antidepressant Selection in Patients With Bruxism and Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Royce; Sun, Ye-Ming

    2017-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is a broad pain disorder that refers to several conditions affecting the temporomandibular joint of the jaw and the muscles of mastication. As with most pain disorders, a high prevalence of depression and anxiety is associated with TMD. Research has shown that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the first-line drug therapy for major depressive disorder, may not be suitable for TMD patients because SSRIs can induce teeth-grinding, otherwise known as bruxism. This is problematic because bruxism is believed to further exacerbate TMD. Therefore, the purpose of this literature review is to better understand the mechanism of SSRI-induced bruxism, as well as discuss alternative antidepressant options for treating depression and anxiety in patients with bruxism and TMD. Alternative classes of antidepressants reviewed include serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, atypical antidepressants, and monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Findings indicate that dopamine agonists and buspirone are currently the most effective medications to treat the side effects of SSRI-induced bruxism, but results regarding the effectiveness of specific antidepressants that avoid bruxism altogether remain inconclusive.

  18. Stopping Antidepressants and Anxiolytics as Major Concerns Reported in Online Health Communities: A Text Mining Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbe, Adeline; Falissard, Bruno

    2017-10-23

    Internet is a particularly dynamic way to quickly capture the perceptions of a population in real time. Complementary to traditional face-to-face communication, online social networks help patients to improve self-esteem and self-help. The aim of this study was to use text mining on material from an online forum exploring patients' concerns about treatment (antidepressants and anxiolytics). Concerns about treatment were collected from discussion titles in patients' online community related to antidepressants and anxiolytics. To examine the content of these titles automatically, we used text mining methods, such as word frequency in a document-term matrix and co-occurrence of words using a network analysis. It was thus possible to identify topics discussed on the forum. The forum included 2415 discussions on antidepressants and anxiolytics over a period of 3 years. After a preprocessing step, the text mining algorithm identified the 99 most frequently occurring words in titles, among which were escitalopram, withdrawal, antidepressant, venlafaxine, paroxetine, and effect. Patients' concerns were related to antidepressant withdrawal, the need to share experience about symptoms, effects, and questions on weight gain with some drugs. Patients' expression on the Internet is a potential additional resource in addressing patients' concerns about treatment. Patient profiles are close to that of patients treated in psychiatry. ©Adeline Abbe, Bruno Falissard. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 23.10.2017.

  19. Modifying 5-HT1A receptor gene expression as a new target for antidepressant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Albert

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depression is the most common form of mental illness, and is treated with antidepressant compounds that increase serotonin (5-HT neurotransmission. Increased 5-HT1A autoreceptor levels in the raphe nuclei act as a “brake” to inhibit the 5-HT system, leading to depression and resistance to antidepressants. Several 5-HT1A receptor agonists (buspirone, flesinoxan, ipsapirone that preferentially desensitize 5-HT1A autoreceptors have been tested for augmentation of antidepressant drugs with mixed results. One explanation could be the presence of the C(-1019G 5-HT1A promoter polymorphism that prevents gene repression of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor. Furthermore, down-regulation of 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression, not simply desensitization of receptor signaling, appears to be required to enhance and accelerate antidepressant action. The current review focuses on the transcriptional regulators of 5-HT1A autoreceptor expression, their roles in permitting response to 5-HT1A-targeted treatments and their potential as targets for new antidepressant compounds for treatment-resistant depression.

  20. Physicochemical and elemental studies of Hydrocotyle javanica Thunb. for standardization as herbal drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manab Mandal

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Hence the present physicochemical and elements studies reveals that the plant Hydrocotyle javanica Thunb. could be a potent source of herbal preparation as well as a safe and novel synthetic antibacterial drug.

  1. Phytochemistry and pharmacology of anti-depressant medicinal plants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Jeanette; S, Brijesh

    2018-05-16

    Stress renders an individual to experience mental pressure and exhaustion which brings about feelings of anxiety, depression, anger and/or other negative emotions. Depression affects a person's state of mind, behaviour, health and is often associated with suicide. The use of anti-depressant drugs as therapeutic agents is associated with symptoms such as, delayed onset of action, side-effects, drug-drug and dietary interactions, sexual dysfunction, cardiac toxicity, etc. Thus, there is need to target these issues and improve current treatment options. Medicinal plants have long been used in discovering novel treatment strategies and compounds with promising roles in treating various disease conditions. There has been an increase, worldwide, in the use of medicinal plants and herbs for developing nutraceuticals for treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders. Medicinal plants in their natural forms are valuable as they are rich in various phytochemical compounds. These phytochemical compounds have pharmacological roles in treating various diseases conditions; apart from being widely available in nature and commercially beneficial. The phytochemical compounds in plants are constantly being explored through various experimental studies to determine the molecular basis of how medicinal plants work in relation to drugs and diseases and to develop neutraceuticals for improving conditions. This review summarizes 110 medicinal plants and their phytochemical constituents that have been shown to possess anti-depressant activity. This review also highlights the various mechanisms of anti-depressant action of some of these plants and their plant parts like roots, stem, leaves, flowers, fruit or whole plant; phytochemical compounds showing anti-depressant activity such flavanoids, steroids, saponins, sugars, lectins, alkaloids, etc.; and various anti-depressant screening models used such as tail suspension test, forced swim test, chronic unpredictable stress test

  2. Fluoxetine, 17-β estradiol or folic acid combined with intra-lateral septal infusions of neuropeptide Y produced antidepressant-like actions in ovariectomized rats forced to swim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Hernández, Miguel; Téllez-Alcántara, N Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Folic acid is antidepressant, either alone or combined with several antidepressant drugs. However, the antidepressant-like actions of folic acid combined with intra-lateral septal (LSN) infusions of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the forced swimming test (FST) have not been tested before. Thus, systemic injections of fluoxetine (20.0mg/kg, Pfluoxetine (15.0 mg/kg, P<0.05; s.c.) combined with subthreshold doses of NPY (2.5 μg/rat, P<0.05; intra-LSN) and these combinations produced antidepressant-like actions; which were canceled by BIBP 3226 (a NPY-Y1 receptor antagonist). It is concluded that folic acid produced antidepressant-like effects probably through the participation of the NPY Y1 receptors found in the lateral septal nuclei. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Methodological Flaws, Conflicts of Interest, and Scientific Fallacies: Implications for the Evaluation of Antidepressants' Efficacy and Harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengartner, Michael P

    2017-01-01

    In current psychiatric practice, antidepressants are widely and with ever-increasing frequency prescribed to patients. However, several scientific biases obfuscate estimates of antidepressants' efficacy and harm, and these are barely recognized in treatment guidelines. The aim of this mini-review is to critically evaluate the efficacy and harm of antidepressants for acute and maintenance treatment with respect to systematic biases related to industry funding and trial methodology. Narrative review based on a comprehensive search of the literature. It is shown that the pooled efficacy of antidepressants is weak and below the threshold of a minimally clinically important change once publication and reporting biases are considered. Moreover, the small mean difference in symptom reductions relative to placebo is possibly attributable to observer effects in unblinded assessors and patient expectancies. With respect to trial dropout rates, a hard outcome not subjected to observer bias, no difference was observed between antidepressants and placebo. The discontinuation trials on the efficacy of antidepressants in maintenance therapy are systematically flawed, because in these studies, spontaneous remitters are excluded, whereas half of all patients who remitted on antidepressants are abruptly switched to placebo. This can cause a severe withdrawal syndrome that is easily misdiagnosed as a relapse when assessed on subjective symptom rating scales. In accordance, the findings of naturalistic long-term studies suggest that maintenance therapy has no clear benefit, and non-drug users do not show increased recurrence rates. Moreover, a growing body of evidence from hundreds of randomized controlled trials suggests that antidepressants cause suicidality, but this risk is underestimated because data from industry-funded trials are systematically flawed. Unselected, population-wide observational studies indicate that depressive patients who use antidepressants are at an increased

  4. Adverse Effects of Antidepressants for Chronic Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Riediger

    2017-07-01

    tolerability of low-dose antidepressants for the treatment of chronic pain and revealed drug specific risk profiles. This encompassing characterization of adverse effect profiles might be useful in defining multimodal treatment regimens for chronic pain which also consider patients’ comorbidities and co-medication.

  5. Segregating the cerebral mechanisms of antidepressants and placebo in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karin B; Petzke, Frank; Carville, Serena; Choy, Ernest; Fransson, Peter; Gracely, Richard H; Vitton, Olivier; Marcus, Hanke; Williams, Steven C R; Ingvar, Martin; Kosek, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Antidepressant drugs are commonly used to treat fibromyalgia, but there is little knowledge about their mechanisms of action. The aim of this study was to compare the cerebral and behavioral response to positive treatment effects of antidepressants or placebo. Ninety-two fibromyalgia patients participated in a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with milnacipran, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Before and after treatment, measures of cerebral pain processing were obtained using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Also, there were stimulus response assessments of pressure pain, measures of weekly pain, and fibromyalgia impact. Following treatment, milnacipran responders exhibited significantly higher activity in the posterior cingulum compared with placebo responders. The mere exposure to milnacipran did not explain our findings because milnacipran responders exhibited increased activity also in comparison to milnacipran nonresponders. Stimulus response assessments revealed specific antihyperalgesic effects in milnacipran responders, which was also correlated with reduced clinical pain and with increased activation of the posterior cingulum. A short history of pain predicted positive treatment response to milnacipran. We report segregated neural mechanisms for positive responses to treatment with milnacipran and placebo, reflected in the posterior cingulum. The increase of pain-evoked activation in the posterior cingulum may reflect a normalization of altered default mode network processing, an alteration implicated in fibromyalgia pathophysiology. This study presents neural and psychophysical correlates to positive treatment responses in patients with fibromyalgia, treated with either milnacipran or placebo. The comparison between placebo responders and milnacipran responders may shed light on the specific mechanisms involved in antidepressant treatment of chronic pain. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by

  6. Standard-based comprehensive detection of adverse drug reaction signals from nursing statements and laboratory results in electronic health records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suehyun; Choi, Jiyeob; Kim, Hun-Sung; Kim, Grace Juyun; Lee, Kye Hwa; Park, Chan Hee; Han, Jongsoo; Yoon, Dukyong; Park, Man Young; Park, Rae Woong; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Ju Han

    2017-07-01

    We propose 2 Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities-enabled pharmacovigilance algorithms, MetaLAB and MetaNurse, powered by a per-year meta-analysis technique and improved subject sampling strategy. This study developed 2 novel algorithms, MetaLAB for laboratory abnormalities and MetaNurse for standard nursing statements, as significantly improved versions of our previous electronic health record (EHR)-based pharmacovigilance method, called CLEAR. Adverse drug reaction (ADR) signals from 117 laboratory abnormalities and 1357 standard nursing statements for all precautionary drugs ( n   = 101) were comprehensively detected and validated against SIDER (Side Effect Resource) by MetaLAB and MetaNurse against 11 817 and 76 457 drug-ADR pairs, respectively. We demonstrate that MetaLAB (area under the curve, AUC = 0.61 ± 0.18) outperformed CLEAR (AUC = 0.55 ± 0.06) when we applied the same 470 drug-event pairs as the gold standard, as in our previous research. Receiver operating characteristic curves for 101 precautionary terms in the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Preferred Terms were obtained for MetaLAB and MetaNurse (0.69 ± 0.11; 0.62 ± 0.07), which complemented each other in terms of ADR signal coverage. Novel ADR signals discovered by MetaLAB and MetaNurse were successfully validated against spontaneous reports in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System database. The present study demonstrates the symbiosis of laboratory test results and nursing statements for ADR signal detection in terms of their system organ class coverage and performance profiles. Systematic discovery and evaluation of the wide spectrum of ADR signals using standard-based observational electronic health record data across many institutions will affect drug development and use, as well as postmarketing surveillance and regulation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American

  7. Addressing brain tumors with targeted gold nanoparticles: a new gold standard for hydrophobic drug delivery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Meyers, Joseph D; Agnes, Richard S; Doane, Tennyson L; Kenney, Malcolm E; Broome, Ann-Marie; Burda, Clemens; Basilion, James P

    2011-08-22

    EGF-modified Au NP-Pc 4 conjugates showed 10-fold improved selectivity to the brain tumor compared to untargeted conjugates. The hydrophobic photodynamic therapy drug Pc 4 can be delivered efficiently into glioma brain tumors by EGF peptide-targeted Au NPs. Compared to the untargeted conjugates, EGF-Au NP-Pc 4 conjugates showed 10-fold improved selectivity to the brain tumor. This delivery system holds promise for future delivery of a wider range of hydrophobic therapeutic drugs for the treatment of hard-to-reach cancers. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Association between bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundgaard, Kristian; Hansen, Steen M; Mortensen, Rikke Nørmark; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Malta; Lippert, Freddy; Gislason, Gunnar; Køber, Lars; Nielsen, Jimmi; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen; Kragholm, Kristian

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to examine rates of redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics, used as markers for cerebral dysfunction in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors, and examine the association between bystander CPR and these psychoactive drugs. We included all 30-day survivors of OHCA in Denmark between 2001 and 2011, who had not redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants or anxiolytics in the last six months prior to OHCA. Main outcome measures were redeemed prescriptions of antidepressants and anxiolytics within one year after OHCA. Among 2,001 30-day survivors, 174 (8.6% died and 12.0% redeemed a first prescription for an antidepressant and 8.2% for an anxiolytic drug within one year after arrest. The corresponding frequencies for redeemed prescribed drugs among age- and sex-matched population controls were 7.5% and 5.2%, respectively. Among survivors who received bystander CPR, prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were redeemed in 11.1% [95% CI 9.2-13.3%] and 6.3% [95% CI 4.9-8.0%] of the cases, respectively, versus 17.2% [95% CI 13.9-21.1%] and 13.4% [95% CI 10.5-17.0%], respectively, among patients who had not received bystander CPR. Adjusted for age, sex, year of arrest, comorbidity, witnessed status and socioeconomic status, bystander CPR was associated with significant reductions in redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants, Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.71 [95% CI 0.52-0.98], P=0.031; and anxiolytics, HR 0.55 [95% CI 0.38-0.81], P=0.002. Relative to no bystander CPR, redeemed prescriptions for antidepressants and anxiolytics were significantly lower among 30-day survivors of OHCA who received bystander CPR, suggesting a cerebral dysfunction-lowering potential of bystander CPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 75 FR 34452 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Data Standards Plan; Availability for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... comments to the Division of Dockets Management (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane... sources. This wealth of data holds great potential to advance CDER's regulatory and scientific work, but... improvements requires careful analysis, advanced planning, project management, expert input, and effective...

  10. Clinical trials information in drug development and regulation : existing systems and standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valkenhoef, Gert van; Tervonen, Tommi; Brock, Bert de; Hillege, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials provide pivotal evidence on drug efficacy and safety. The evidence, information from clinical trials, is currently used by regulatory decision makers in marketing authorization decisions, but only in an implicit manner. For clinical trials information to be used in a transparent and

  11. Antidepressant medication and the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Heijne, Loes F.; Zakiyah, Neily; Bos, Jens H.J.; Hak, Eelko; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased activity of the sympatic nervous system could possibly cause pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). Previous studies have suggested that antidepressants could contribute to this increased activity. Objectives: To examine whether the use of antidepressants during pregnancy

  12. Pain Relief in Depressive Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Stefan; Heinzel-Gutenbrunner, Monika; König, Udo

    2016-12-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with depressive disorders, which, if present, worsens the prognosis. However, there is little empirical knowledge of the therapeutic effects of antidepressants on painful physical symptoms of patients with depressive disorders. Furthermore, tricyclic/tetracyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have not yet been included in existing meta-analyses. A broad, systematic search of PubMed literature on antidepressant drug treatment of patients with depressive disorders with comorbid pain symptoms was carried out. A random-effects meta-analysis has been performed among 3 different groups of drugs for the 2 end points: pain and depression. Fourteen placebo-controlled studies with selective serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SSNRIs) could be included, with 3 of them also investigating selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Three further placebo-controlled SSRI studies were identified, but only 2 placebo-controlled TCA studies.Both SSNRIs and SSRIs, but not TCAs, were significantly superior to placebo as regards their analgesic effects. However, all effects were small. For SSNRIs, there was a strong positive correlation between their effectiveness for pain relief and their positive effect on the mood of the patients. The analgesic effects of SSNRIs and SSRIs in patients with primary depressive disorders can be interpreted as largely equivalent. Because of a lack of placebo-controlled TCA studies, the results for TCAs would be comparable only to those of SSRIs and SSNRIs, if non-placebo-controlled TCA studies were included. The positive correlation found indicates a close relationship of pain relief and antidepressant treatment effects. These results refer merely to patients with primary depressive disorders, not to patients with primary pain disorders. Further studies comparing the effects of different types of antidepressant drugs on pain in depressive patients are warranted.

  13. Low dose of caffeine enhances the efficacy of antidepressants in major depressive disorder and the underlying neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Shan; Deng, Ran; Fan, Yuyan; Li, Keqin; Meng, Fangang; Li, Xueli; Liu, Rui

    2017-08-01

    Caffeine is one of the most frequently used psychoactive substances ingested mainly via beverage or food products. Major depressive disorder is a serious and devastating psychiatric disorder. Emerging evidence indicates that caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in rodents. However, whether joint administration of low dose of caffeine enhances the antidepressant actions in depressed patients remains unclear. A total of 95 male inpatients were assigned to three groups and were asked to take either caffeine (60, 120 mg) or placebo (soymilk powder) daily for 4 wk on the basis of their current antidepressant medications. Results showed that chronic supplementation with low dose of caffeine (60 mg) produced rapid antidepressant action by reduction of depressive scores. Furthermore, low dose of caffeine improved cognitive performance in depressed patients. However, caffeine did not affect sleep as measured by overnight polysomnography. Moreover, chronic caffeine consumption elicited inhibition of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation by normalization of salivary cortisol induced by Trier social stress test. These findings indicated the potential benefits of further implications of supplementary administration of caffeine to reverse the development of depression and enhance the outcome of antidepressants treatment in major depressive disorder. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Antidepressants induce autophagy dependent-NLRP3-inflammasome inhibition in Major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-Gómez, Elísabet; Casas-Barquero, Nieves; Williams, Matthew R; Romero-Guillena, Samuel L; Cañadas-Lozano, Diego; Bullón, Pedro; Sánchez-Alcazar, José Antonio; Navarro-Pando, José M; Cordero, Mario D

    2017-07-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, ICD-10: F-33) is a prevalent illness in which the pathogenic mechanism remains elusive. Recently an important role has been attributed to neuro-inflammation, and specifically the NLRP3-inflammasome complex, in the pathogenesis of MDD. This suggests a key role for immunomodulation as a key pathway in the treatment of this disorder. This study evaluates the involvement of nine common antidepressants in the NLRP3-inflammasome complex (fluoxetine, paroxetine, mianserin, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, amitriptyline, imipramine and agomelatine), both in in vitro THP-1 cells stimulated by ATP, and in a stress-induced depressive animal or MDD patients. Antidepressant treatment induced inflammasome inhibition was observed by decreased serum levels of IL-1β and IL-18 and decrease of NLRP3 and IL-1β (p17) protein expression. This was also observed under stress-induced depressive behaviour and inflammasome activation in C57Bl/6 mice in vivo. Deletion of key autophagy mediator Atg5 in embryonic fibroblasts (MEF cells) showed an autophagy dependent-NLRP3-inflammasome inhibition by antidepressant treatment. These results suggest the NLRP3-inflammasome could be a biomarker for antidepressant treatment response in MDD patients, and therefore the monitoring of NLRP3 expression levels and/or IL-1β/IL-18 release may have clinical value in drug selection. Existing evidence suggests an anti-inflammatory effect of some antidepressants shown by IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Our data have shown that antidepressant-mediated autophagy may have a role in restoration of certain metabolic and immunological pathways in MDD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Overactive Bladder in Male Antidepressant Users: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Solmaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose In this study, we investigated overactive bladder (OAB functions in male patients who used antidepressant drugs (ADs that were previously examined in female patients, based on conflicting data in literature regarding the effects of AD on OAB and the differences between male and female urinary system physiologies (anatomical and hormonal. Methods The study included 202 male patients (a control group of 90 healthy subjects, and an experimental group of 112 patients taking ADs for different disorders. All the patients completed the overactive bladder-validated 8 (OAB-V8 questionnaire, the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDS. Results The OAB-V8, ICIQ-SF, and BDS scores for the antidepressant users were significantly higher than those of the control group. The highest prevalence of OAB symptoms was observed in patients taking venlafaxine (68.2%, and the lowest prevalence was in patients taking sertraline (28.0%. Moreover, the frequency of OAB between the antidepressant groups was statistically significant. The univariate logistic regression analyses showed a significant relationship between the presence of OAB, antidepressant usage, BDS score, and the age of a patient. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, the association between the presence of OAB and antidepressant usage was statistically significant. Conclusions The present study showed that the incidence of OAB and the severity of OAB symptoms increased in males using antidepressants for various disorders. This may have been due to unique pharmacological effects, on a molecular or individual level, of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.

  16. Poor response to antidepressants predicts new suicidal ideas and behavior in depressed outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtet, Philippe; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lopez-Castroman, Jorge; Gorwood, Philip

    2014-10-01

    Only a few studies have investigated the factors associated with suicidal behavior after antidepressant treatment onset in adults. We examined the specific predictors of de novo suicidal ideas or attempts among depressed patients in the community, including subjects potentially at risk of suicidal behaviors, who initiated a new antidepressant treatment. A large set of GPs and psychiatrists throughout France followed-up, for 6 weeks, 4357 outpatients for whom an antidepressant drug was prescribed. Dimensions related with antidepressant-induced suicidal events, such as depression, anxiety or hopelessness, were assessed longitudinally using univariate and multivariate approaches among subjects with treatment-emergent suicide ideation or attempts. New suicidal ideas were observed in 9% of patients with no suicidal ideation at baseline (n=81), while suicidal attempts were reported for 1.7% of the sample during the 6-week observation period (n=75). The onset of suicidal ideas and attempts was associated with the initial features of the patients (baseline level of anxiety, past history of suicide attempts and alcohol misuse) and the non-improvement of depression. Worsening of depressive symptoms during the follow-up increased the onset of new suicidal ideas (OR=5.67, pideas or attempts, the link between antidepressants and suicide risk might be more adequately explained by a poor response to antidepressant treatment rather than by a direct trigger-effect. This naturalistic study is limited by the use of non-structured diagnoses and self-report outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. GPs motivations of prescribing antidepressants and their practical relevance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, A.; Jong, A. de; Braspenning, J.C.C.; Bakker, D. de; Dijk, L. van

    2004-01-01

    Background: Insight in the motivations of prescribing antidepressants may contribute to advance the efficiency of the current, large antidepressant prescription rate. Less is known about why general practitioners (GPs) treat patients with antidepressants or not and choose modern SSRIs instead of the

  18. Neuronal NOS inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-imidazole augment the effects of antidepressants acting via serotonergic system in the forced swimming test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulak, Güner; Mutlu, Oguz; Akar, Füruzan Yildiz; Komsuoğlu, F Ipek; Tanyeri, Pelin; Erden, B Faruk

    2008-10-01

    Treatment-resistant depression has necessitated new therapeutic strategies in augmenting the therapeutic actions of currently existing antidepressant drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of synergistic interaction between 1-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-imidazole (TRIM), a novel neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor and conventional antidepressants of different classes in the forced swimming test (FST) in rats. TRIM decreased the immobility time at 50 mg/kg doses in the FST in rats. Treatment with a behaviourally subeffective dose of TRIM (20 mg/kg) augmented the behavioural effect of tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram and fluoxetine or selective serotonin reuptake enhancer tianeptine but failed to augment the antidepressant effect of reboxetine, a noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, in this test. Therefore inhibition of NOS augments the effects of antidepressants acting on serotonergic system in the FST. Neither TRIM (10-50 mg/kg) nor other drug treatments affected the locomotor activity of animals. These findings are in agreement with the view that antidepressant effects or augmentation of these effects in the FST may be explained with inhibition of NOS activity and this may be a new approach in offering greater therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants acting via serotonergic system.

  19. Antidepressants and changes in concentration of endocannabinoids and N-acylethanolamines in rat brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaga, Irena; Bystrowska, Beata; Gawliński, Dawid; Pomierny, Bartosz; Stankowicz, Piotr; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-08-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has recently been implicated in both the pathogenesis of depression and the action of antidepressants. Here, we investigated the effect of acutely or chronically administering antidepressants [imipramine (IMI) (15 mg/kg), escitalopram (ESC) (10 mg/kg), and tianeptine (10 mg/kg)] on the levels of both eCBs [anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)] and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs) [palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA)] in various rat brain regions. We also examined the ability of the acute and chronic administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) (a mucolytic drug; 100 mg/kg) or URB597 (a fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor; 0.3 mg/kg), which have both elicited antidepressant activity in preclinical studies, to affect eCB and NAE levels. Next, we determined whether the observed effects are stable 10 days after the chronic administration of these drugs was halted. We report that the chronic administration of all investigated drugs increased AEA levels in the hippocampus and also increased both AEA and 2-AG levels in the dorsal striatum. NAE levels in limbic regions also increased after treatment with IMI (PEA/OEA), ESC (PEA), and NAC (PEA/OEA). Removing chronic ESC treatment for 10 days affected eCB and NAE levels in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, dorsal striatum, and cerebellum, while a similar tianeptine-free period enhanced accumbal NAE levels. All other drugs maintained their effects after the 10-day washout period. Therefore, the eCB system appears to play a significant role in the mechanism of action of clinically effective and potential antidepressants and may serve as a target for drug design and discovery.

  20. HYDROXYCARBAMINE: FROM AN OLD DRUG USED IN MALIGNANT HEMOPATHIES TO A CURRENT STANDARD IN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Cannas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While hydroxycarbamine (hydroxyurea, HU has less and less indications in malignant hemopathies, it represents the only widely used drug which modifies sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Clinical experience with HU for patients with sickle cell disease has been accumulated over the past 25 years in Western countries. The review of the literature provides increasing support of safety and efficacy in both children and adults for reducing acute vaso-occlusive events including pain episodes and acute chest syndrome. HU has become the standard-of-care for sickle cell anemia, but remains underused. Barriers to its use should be identified and overcome.

  1. 77 FR 48491 - Regulatory New Drug Review: Solutions for Study Data Exchange Standards; Notice of Meeting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... input from industry, technology vendors, and other members of the public regarding the advantages and disadvantages of current and emerging open, consensus-based standards for the exchange of regulated study data... many years, it is not an extensible modern technology. Moreover, it is not supported and maintained by...

  2. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  3. Antidepressant screening and flavonoids isolation from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eremostachys laciniata (L) Bunge (Lamiaceae), a rich source of flavonoids, has been investigated for chemical constituents and in vivo antidepressant property using forced swim test (FST) model. Five important compounds were isolated, including luteolin (1), apigenin (2), 5,8-dihydroxy-6,7- dimethoxyflavone (3), 5 ...

  4. Tricyclic antidepressant overdose necessitating ICU admission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) overdose necessitating intensive care unit (ICU) admission remains a significant problem in the Western Cape. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the course of life-threatening TCA overdose in our centre to identify potential prognostic indicators. TCA levels >1 000 ng/ml were associated ...

  5. Jieyuanshen decoction exerts antidepressant effects on depressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: JYAS-D had a significant antidepressant-like effect on rat model through regulating serum concentration of CORT, ACTH and CRH, increasing the content of hippocampus GR and regulating the equilibrium of amino acids neurotransmitter. Keywords: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; Glucocorticoid/ ...

  6. Adverse Effects of Antidepressants Reported by 1,431 people from 38 Countries: Emotional Blunting, Suicidality, and Withdrawal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, John; Williams, James

    2018-06-04

    Studies of the adverse effects of antidepressants tend to focus on biological symptoms. The prevalence of suicidality and withdrawal effects are currently a source of controversy. To directly ascertain the experiences of an international sample of antidepressant users. An online survey asked adult antidepressant users whether they had experienced 20 adverse effects 'as a result of taking the antidepressant', and if so, to what degree of severity. 1,431 people from 38 countries responded. 61% of the respondents reported at least ten of the 20 effects, most commonly: 'Feeling emotionally numb' (reported by 71%), 'Feeling foggy or detached' (70%); 'Feeling not like myself' (66%), 'Sexual difficulties' (66%), 'Drowsiness' (63%), and 'Reduction in positive feelings' (60%). 'Suicidality' as a result of the drugs was reported by 50%. Withdrawal effects were reported by 59%, and 'Addiction' by 40%. Rates of adverse effects were higher for those prescribed multiple antidepressants and those who also took antipsychotics. Younger age and longer use of ADs were positively related to total adverse effects. One third did not recall being told about any side effects by the prescriber. Less than 5% were told about suicidality, emotional numbing, withdrawal effects or addiction. Asking people directly reveals far higher rates of adverse responses to antidepressants than previously understood, especially in the emotional, psychological and interpersonal domains. Given recent findings that antidepressants are only marginally more effective than placebo, the findings of the current study imply a cost-benefit analysis that cannot justify the extremely high prescription rates for these drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Agmatine enhances antidepressant potency of MK-801 and conventional antidepressants in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian Binder; Moretti, Morgana; Manosso, Luana Meller; Lopes, Mark W; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2015-03-01

    Agmatine, an endogenous guanidine amine, has been shown to produce antidepressant-like effects in animal studies. This study investigated the effects of the combined administration of agmatine with either conventional monoaminergic antidepressants or the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 in the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. The aim was to evaluate the extent of the antidepressant synergism by examining the ability of a fixed dose of agmatine to shift the antidepressant potency of fluoxetine, imipramine, bupropion and MK-801. A sub-effective dose of agmatine (0.0001 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly increased the potency by which fluoxetine, imipramine, bupropion and MK-801 decreased immobility time in the TST by 2-fold (fluoxetine), 10-fold (imipramine and bupropion) and 100-fold (MK-801). Combined with previous evidence indicating a role of monoaminergic systems in the effect of agmatine, the current data suggest that agmatine may modulate monoaminergic neurotransmission and augment the activity of conventional antidepressants. Moreover, this study found that agmatine substantially augmented the antidepressant-like effect of MK-801, reinforcing the notion that this compound modulates NMDA receptor activation. These preclinical data may stimulate future clinical studies testing the effects of augmentation therapy with agmatine for the management of depressive disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Changes in prescription patterns for peripheral and cerebral vasoactive drugs before and after establishing prescription standards in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuittenez, F; Guignard, E; Comte, S

    1999-01-23

    Assess changes in the number of prescriptions for peripheral and cerebral vasoactive drugs for the treatment of lower limb arteritis and cerebrovascular disease since the promulgation in 1995 of prescription standards for the treatment of lower limb arteritis. Assess compliance to prescription standards with a detailed analysis of patient features, prescriptions written for lower limb arteritis, cerebrovascular disease and concomitant diseases and evaluate changes in treatment costs for lower limb arteritis and cerebrovascular disease as well as cost of the full prescription, including treatments for associated diseases. This study was based on data recorded during the Permanent Study of Medical Prescriptions conducted from March 1994 to February 1995 and from March 1995 to February 1996 by the IMS. Prescription costs were established from the National Description Files of the IMS. Treatment costs were expressed as public price (FF) tax included. Prescriptions meeting the following criteria were selected for each period: prescriptions written by general practitioners for drugs with peripheral and cerebral vasoactivity (excepting calcium antagonists with a cerebral target) belonging to the Anatomic Therapeutic Classes C4A1 of the European Pharmaceutical Marketing Research Association, Bromly 1996; prescriptions for diagnoses 447.6 (arteritis) and 437.9 (cerebrovascular disease) according to the 9th WHO classification. A random sample of 500 prescriptions was selected to calculate costs. Since the advent of the prescription standards in 1995, prescriptions have dropped off by 6.3% for lower limb arteritis and by 14.8% for cerebrovascular disease. There was a 3.7 point decline in the percentage of multiple prescriptions of vasoactive drugs for lower limb arteritis (21.7% prior to March 1995 versus 18% after promulgation of the prescription standards, p > 0.1) and a 1.8 increase in the percentage of multiple prescriptions for cerebrovascular disease (14% prior to March

  9. Antidepressant stimulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthesis does not require monoamine reuptake inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboukhatwa Marwa A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies demonstrate that diverse antidepressant agents increase the cellular production of the nucleolipid CDP-diacylglycerol and its synthetic derivative, phosphatidylinositol, in depression-relevant brain regions. Pharmacological blockade of downstream phosphatidylinositide signaling disrupted the behavioral antidepressant effects in rats. However, the nucleolipid responses were resistant to inhibition by serotonin receptor antagonists, even though antidepressant-facilitated inositol phosphate accumulation was blocked. Could the neurochemical effects be additional to the known effects of the drugs on monoamine transmitter transporters? To examine this question, we tested selected agents in serotonin-depleted brain tissues, in PC12 cells devoid of serotonin transporters, and on the enzymatic activity of brain CDP-diacylglycerol synthase - the enzyme that catalyzes the physiological synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol. Results Imipramine, paroxetine, and maprotiline concentration-dependently increased the levels of CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositides in PC12 cells. Rat forebrain tissues depleted of serotonin by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine showed responses to imipramine or maprotiline that were comparable to respective responses from saline-injected controls. With fluoxetine, nucleolipid responses in the serotonin-depleted cortex or hippocampus were significantly reduced, but not abolished. Each drug significantly increased the enzymatic activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase following incubations with cortical or hippocampal brain tissues. Conclusion Antidepressants probably induce the activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase leading to increased production of CDP-diacylglycerol and facilitation of downstream phosphatidylinositol synthesis. Phosphatidylinositol-dependent signaling cascades exert diverse salutary effects in neural cells, including facilitation of BDNF signaling and neurogenesis. Hence

  10. A Pilot Study: Cardiac Parameters in Children Receiving New-Generation Antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Mai; Spencer, Andrea E; Kenworthy, Tara; Chan, James; Fitzgerald, Maura; Rosales, Ana Maria; Kagan, Elana; Saunders, Alexandra; Biederman, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Because of concerns about potential associations between high doses of citalopram and QTc prolongation in adults, this study examined whether such associations are operant in children. We hypothesized that therapeutic doses of nontricyclic antidepressant medications (non-TCAs) prescribed to children would be cardiovascularly safe. The sample consisted of 49 psychiatrically referred children and adolescents 6 to 17 years old of both sexes treated with a non-TCA (citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, bupropion, duloxetine, venlafaxine, mirtazapine). To standardize the doses of different antidepressants, we converted doses of individual medicines into "citalopram equivalent doses" (CEDs) based on dosing recommendation for individual antidepressants. Correlation analysis was carried out to compare the continuous and weight-based CED to variables of interest. A QTc grouping was defined as normal, borderline, or abnormal, and CED was compared across QTc groupings using linear regression. An antidepressant dosage group was defined as low or high dose, and a t test compared variables of interest across dosage groups. No significant associations were found between total or weight-corrected CEDs of any antidepressant examined and QTc or any other electrocardiogram or blood pressure parameters. In patients taking citalopram or escitalopram, a significant correlation was found between PR interval and total daily dose, which disappeared when weight-based doses were used or when corrected by age. Although limited by a relatively small sample size, these results suggest that therapeutic doses of non-TCA antidepressants when used in children do not seem to be associated with prolonged QTc interval or other adverse cardiovascular effects.

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of the xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor allopurinol in rats. A comparison with fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz Özgür, Börte; Aksu, Hatice; Birincioğlu, Mustafa; Dost, Turhan

    2015-11-01

    Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor that is widely used for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, which metabolizes tryptophan (TRP), is decreased by xanthine oxidase inhibitors, causing TRP levels in the body to be increased. Increases in TRP levels in the brain might have antidepressant effects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antidepressant effects of allopurinol compared to those of fluoxetine, which is a proven antidepressant. Thirty-two Wistar albino male rats were divided into four groups (control, 10mg/kg fluoxetine, 50mg/kg allopurinol, 50mg/kg allopurinol+10 mg/kg fluoxetine; n=8 per group), and forced swimming tests were performed before and after 14days of drug administration. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and uric acid levels were measured in blood samples after the final treatment. When allopurinol and fluoxetine were administered separately, a decrease in the duration of immobility and an increased duration of swimming were observed in the forced swimming test. The results showed similar antidepressant efficacies between allopurinol and fluoxetine. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the antidepressant effect of the combined therapy versus single drug therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Placental transfer of antidepressant medications: implications for postnatal adaptation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Grace; Tatarchuk, Yekaterina; Appleby, Dina; Schwartz, Nadav; Kim, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Seven to thirteen percent of women are either prescribed or taking (depending on the study) an antidepressant during pregnancy. Because antidepressants freely cross into the intrauterine environment, we aim to summarize the current findings on placental transfer of antidepressants. Although generally low risk, antidepressants have been associated with postnatal adaptation syndrome (PNAS). Specifically, we explore whether the antidepressants most closely associated with PNAS (paroxetine, fluoxetine, venlafaxine) cross the placenta to a greater extent than other antidepressants. We review research on antidepressants in the context of placental anatomy, placental transport mechanisms, placental metabolism, pharmacokinetics, as well as non-placental maternal and fetal factors. This provides insight into the complexity involved in understanding how placental transfer of antidepressants may relate to adverse perinatal outcomes. Ultimately, from this data there is no pattern in which PNAS is related to placental transfer of antidepressant medications. In general, there is large interindividual variability for each type of antidepressant. To make the most clinically informed decisions about the use of antidepressants in pregnancy, studies that link maternal, placental and fetal genetic polymorphisms, placental transfer rates and infant outcomes are needed.

  13. [Antidepressants do prevent suicide, at least pending something better...].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtet, Philippe; Olié, Émilie

    2014-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health problem worldwide, with about 1.5 million deaths each year France ranks 7th in the EU Patients with depression account for the majority of completed suicides. As most of these individuals are not adequately treated, it is conceivable that better treatment of depression would reduce suicide mortality. However, the last ten years have seen a controversy over a possible suicidogenic effect of antidepressants. Here we summarize data from the different types of studies that have cast a shadow over these drugs which can save lives when used effectively to treat depression. Better knowledge of the pathophysiology of "suicidal behaviour disorder" should identify therapeutic targets for innovative agents capable of preventing suicide.

  14. Presenting a New Standard Drug Model for Turmeric and Its Prized Extract, Curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Cavaleri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Various parts of the turmeric plant have been used as medicinal treatment for various conditions from ulcers and arthritis to cardiovascular disease and neuroinflammation. The rhizome’s curcumin extract is the most studied active constituent, which exhibits an expansive polypharmacology with influence on many key inflammatory markers. Despite the expansive reports of curcucmin’s therapeutic value, clinical reliability and research repeatability with curcumin treatment are still poor. The pharmacology must be better understood and reliably mapped if curcumin is to be accepted and used in modern medical applications. Although the polypharmacology of this extract has been considered, in mainstream medicine, to be a drawback, a perspective change reveals a comprehensive and even synergistic shaping of the NF-kB pathway, including transactivation. Much of the inconsistent research data and unreliable clinical outcomes may be due to a lack of standardization which also pervades research standard samples. The possibility of other well-known curcumin by-products contributing in the polypharmacology is also discussed. A new flowchart of crosstalk in transduction pathways that lead to shaping of nuclear NF-kB transactivation is generated and a new calibration or standardization protocol for the extract is proposed which could lead to more consistent data extraction and improved reliability in therapy.

  15. The Effects of Fall-Risk-Increasing Drugs on Postural Control : A Literature Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Maartje H.; van Campen, Jos P. C. M.; Moek, Marije A.; Tulner, Linda R.; Beijnen, Jos H.; Lamoth, Claudine J. C.

    Meta-analyses showed that psychotropic drugs (antidepressants, neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, antiepileptic drugs) and some cardiac drugs (digoxin, type IA anti-arrhythmics, diuretics) are associated with increased fall risk. Because balance and gait disorders are the most consistent predictors of

  16. Influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants in Wistar rats submitted to repeated forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possamai, Fernanda; dos Santos, Juliano; Walber, Thais; Marcon, Juliana C; dos Santos, Tiago Souza; Lino de Oliveira, Cilene

    2015-04-03

    Repeated forced swimming test (rFST) may detect gradual effects of antidepressants in adult rats. Antidepressants, as enrichment, affected behavior and neurogenesis in rats. However, the influence of enrichment on behavioral and neurogenic effects of antidepressants is unknown. Here, effects of antidepressants on rFST and hippocampal neurogenesis were investigated in rats under enriched conditions. Behaviors of male Wistar rats, housed from weaning in standard (SE) or enriched environment (EE), were registered during rFST. The rFST consisted of 15min of swimming (pretest) followed by 5min of swimming in the first (test), seventh (retest 1) and fourteenth (retest 2) days after pretest. One hour before the test, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of saline (1ml/kg), fluoxetine (2.5mg/kg) or imipramine (2.5 or 5mg/kg). These treatments were performed daily until the day of the retest 2. After retest 2, rats were euthanized for the identification of markers for neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Fluoxetine or imipramine decreased immobility in retests 1 and 2, as compared to saline. EE abolished these differences. In EE, fluoxetine or imipramine (5mg/kg) reduced immobility time in retest 2, as compared to the test. Independent of the housing conditions, fluoxetine and imipramine (5mg/kg) increased the ratio of immature neurons per progenitor cell in the hippocampus. In summary, antidepressants or enrichment counteracted the high immobility in rFST. Enrichment changed the effects of antidepressants in rFST depending on the type, and the dose of a substance but failed to change neurogenesis in control or antidepressant treated-rats. Effects of antidepressants and enrichment on rFST seemed neurogenesis-independent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. What is the role of sedating antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants in the management of insomnia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Catherine; McCall, W Vaughn

    2012-10-01

    Psychiatric medications such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants are commonly prescribed by physicians for the off-label use of improving sleep. Reasons for preferential prescription of these medications over FDA-approved insomnia drugs may include a desire to treat concurrent sleep problems and psychiatric illness with a single medication, and/or an attempt to avoid hypnotic drugs due to their publicized side effects. However, there have been few large studies demonstrating the efficacy and safety of most off-label medications prescribed to treat insomnia. In addition, many of these medications have significant known side effect profiles themselves. Here we review the pertinent research studies published in recent years on antidepressant, antipsychotic, and anticonvulsant medications frequently prescribed for sleep difficulties. Although there have been few large-scale studies for most of these medications, some may be appropriate in the treatment of sleep issues in specific well-defined populations.

  18. Sensitivity to changes during antidepressant treatment: a comparison of unidimensional subscales of the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-C) and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) in patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Isabella; Wagner, Stefanie; Mergl, Roland; Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Hautzinger, Martin; Henkel, Verena; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tadić, André

    2012-06-01

    In the efficacy evaluation of antidepressant treatments, the total score of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) is still regarded as the 'gold standard'. We previously had shown that the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) was more sensitive to detect depressive symptom changes than the HAMD17 (Helmreich et al. 2011). Furthermore, studies suggest that the unidimensional subscales of the HAMD, which capture the core depressive symptoms, outperform the full HAMD regarding the detection of antidepressant treatment effects. The aim of the present study was to compare several unidimensional subscales of the HAMD and the IDS regarding their sensitivity to changes in depression symptoms in a sample of patients with mild major, minor or subsyndromal depression (MIND). Biweekly IDS-C28 and HAMD17 data from 287 patients of a 10-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of sertraline and cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with MIND were converted to subscale scores and analysed during the antidepressant treatment course. We investigated sensitivity to depressive change for all scales from assessment-to-assessment, in relation to depression severity level and placebo-verum differences. The subscales performed similarly during the treatment course, with slight advantages for some subscales in detecting treatment effects depending on the treatment modality and on the items included. Most changes in depressive symptomatology were detected by the IDS short scale, but regarding the effect sizes, it performed worse than most subscales. Unidimensional subscales are a time- and cost-saving option in judging drug therapy outcomes, especially in antidepressant treatment efficacy studies. However, subscales do not cover all facets of depression (e.g. atypical symptoms, sleep disturbances), which might be important for comprehensively understanding the nature of the disease depression. Therefore, the cost-to-benefit ratio must be

  19. HPLC Fingerprinting of Sennosides in Laxative Drugs with Isolation of Standard Substances from Some Senna Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Omur Demirezer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Senna leaves are one of the oldest medicinal herbs and they are used as laxative. Herbal teas which contain senna leaves are most commonly used to promote weight loss. The quality control of slimming teas which contain Senna leaves and also pharmaceutical preparations including Senna extract enriched by sennoside B was achieved by HPLC fingerprinting method. While the presence of sennoside A and B in laxative drugs was proved, it was seen to be devoid of sennosides in slimming teas. Kaempferol 3-O-β-D-gentiobioside (1, aloe-emodine 8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2, rhein 8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3, torachrysone 8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4, isorhamnetine 3-O-β-D-gentiobioside (5 were also isolated from Senna leaves.

  20. Automated identification of drug and food allergies entered using non-standard terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; St Jacques, Paul; Stockin, Michael; Rothman, Brian; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Denny, Joshua C

    2013-01-01

    An accurate computable representation of food and drug allergy is essential for safe healthcare. Our goal was to develop a high-performance, easily maintained algorithm to identify medication and food allergies and sensitivities from unstructured allergy entries in electronic health record (EHR) systems. An algorithm was developed in Transact-SQL to identify ingredients to which patients had allergies in a perioperative information management system. The algorithm used RxNorm and natural language processing techniques developed on a training set of 24 599 entries from 9445 records. Accuracy, specificity, precision, recall, and F-measure were determined for the training dataset and repeated for the testing dataset (24 857 entries from 9430 records). Accuracy, precision, recall, and F-measure for medication allergy matches were all above 98% in the training dataset and above 97% in the testing dataset for all allergy entries. Corresponding values for food allergy matches were above 97% and above 93%, respectively. Specificities of the algorithm were 90.3% and 85.0% for drug matches and 100% and 88.9% for food matches in the training and testing datasets, respectively. The algorithm had high performance for identification of medication and food allergies. Maintenance is practical, as updates are managed through upload of new RxNorm versions and additions to companion database tables. However, direct entry of codified allergy information by providers (through autocompleters or drop lists) is still preferred to post-hoc encoding of the data. Data tables used in the algorithm are available for download. A high performing, easily maintained algorithm can successfully identify medication and food allergies from free text entries in EHR systems.

  1. Thoughtflow: Standards and Tools for Provenance Capture and Workflow Definition to Support Model-Informed Drug Discovery and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, J J; Chan, Pls; Chard, J; Smith, G; Smith, M K; Beer, M; Dunn, A; Flandorfer, C; Franklin, C; Gomeni, R; Harnisch, L; Kaye, R; Moodie, S; Sardu, M L; Wang, E; Watson, E; Wolstencroft, K; Cheung, Sya

    2017-05-01

    Pharmacometric analyses are complex and multifactorial. It is essential to check, track, and document the vast amounts of data and metadata that are generated during these analyses (and the relationships between them) in order to comply with regulations, support quality control, auditing, and reporting. It is, however, challenging, tedious, error-prone, and time-consuming, and diverts pharmacometricians from the more useful business of doing science. Automating this process would save time, reduce transcriptional errors, support the retention and transfer of knowledge, encourage good practice, and help ensure that pharmacometric analyses appropriately impact decisions. The ability to document, communicate, and reconstruct a complete pharmacometric analysis using an open standard would have considerable benefits. In this article, the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) Drug Disease Model Resources (DDMoRe) consortium proposes a set of standards to facilitate the capture, storage, and reporting of knowledge (including assumptions and decisions) in the context of model-informed drug discovery and development (MID3), as well as to support reproducibility: "Thoughtflow." A prototype software implementation is provided. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. Antidepressants Are Effective in Decreasing Neuropathic Pain After SCI: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Swati; Guy, Stacey; Lam, Tracey; Teasell, Robert; Loh, Eldon

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review and assess the effectiveness and safety of antidepressants for neuropathic pain among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). A systematic search was conducted using multiple databases for relevant articles published from 1980 to April 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain with ≥ 3 individuals and ≥ 50% of study population with SCI were included. Two independent reviewers selected studies based on inclusion criteria and then extracted data. Pooled analysis using Cohen's d to calculate standardized mean difference, standard error, and 95% confidence interval for primary (pain) and other secondary outcomes was conducted. Four RCTs met inclusion criteria. Of these, 2 studies assessed amitriptyline, 1 trazadone, and 1 duloxetine among individuals with neuropathic SCI pain. A small effect was seen in the effectiveness of antidepressants in decreasing pain among individuals with SCI (standardized mean difference = 0.34 ± 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.62; P = .02). A number needed to treat of 3.4 for 30% or more pain relief was found by pooling 2 studies. Of these, significantly higher risk of experiencing constipation (risk ratio [RR] = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.09-2.78; P = .02) and dry mouth (RR = 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.85; P = .02) was found amongst individuals receiving antidepressant treatment compared to those in the control group. The current meta-analysis demonstrates that antidepressants are effective in reducing neuropathic SCI pain. However, this should be interpreted with caution due to the limited number of studies. Further evaluation of long-term therapeutic options may be required.

  3. Evidences for the agmatine involvement in antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotagale, Nandkishor R; Tripathi, Sunil J; Aglawe, Manish M; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Taksande, Brijesh G

    2013-06-01

    Although bupropion has been widely used in the treatment of depression, the precise mechanism of its therapeutic actions is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role of agmatine in an antidepressant like effect of bupropion in mouse forced swim test. The antidepressant like effect of bupropion was potentiated by pretreatment with agmatine (10-20mg/kg, ip) and by the drugs known to increase endogenous agmatine levels in brain viz., l-arginine (40 μg/mouse, icv), an agmatine biosynthetic precursor, ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, dl-α-difluoromethyl ornithine hydrochloride, DFMO (12.5 μg/mouse, icv), diamine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine (6.5 μg/mouse, icv) and agmatinase inhibitor, arcaine (50 μg/mouse, icv) as well as imidazoline I1 receptor agonists, moxonidine (0.25mg/kg, ip) and clonidine (0.015 mg/kg, ip) and imidazoline I2 receptor agonist, 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride, 2-BFI (5mg/kg, ip). Conversely, prior administration of I1 receptor antagonist, efaroxan (1mg/kg, ip) and I2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan (0.25mg/kg, ip) blocked the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and its synergistic combination with agmatine. These results demonstrate involvement of agmatine in the antidepressant like effect of bupropion and suggest agmatine and imidazoline receptors as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of depressive disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antidepressant and neurocognitive effects of isoflurane anesthesia versus electroconvulsive therapy in refractory depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard R Weeks

    Full Text Available Many patients have serious depression that is nonresponsive to medications, but refuse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT. Early research suggested that isoflurane anesthesia may be an effective alternative to ECT. Subsequent studies altered drug, dose or number of treatments, and failed to replicate this success, halting research on isoflurane's antidepressant effects for a decade. Our aim was to re-examine whether isoflurane has antidepressant effects comparable to ECT, with less adverse effects on cognition.Patients with medication-refractory depression received an average of 10 treatments of bifrontal ECT (n = 20 or isoflurane (n = 8 over 3 weeks. Depression severity (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-24 and neurocognitive responses (anterograde and retrograde memory, processing speed and verbal fluency were assessed at Pretreatment, Post all treatments and 4-week Follow-up.Both treatments produced significant reductions in depression scores at Post-treatment and 4-week Follow-up; however, ECT had modestly better antidepressant effect at follow-up in severity-matched patients. Immediately Post-treatment, ECT (but not isoflurane patients showed declines in memory, fluency, and processing speed. At Follow-up, only autobiographical memory remained below Pretreatment level for ECT patients, but isoflurane patients had greater test-retest neurocognitive score improvement.Our data reconfirm that isoflurane has an antidepressant effect approaching ECT with less adverse neurocognitive effects, and reinforce the need for a larger clinical trial.

  5. Antidepressant behavioral effects of duloxetine and fluoxetine in the rat forced swimming test

    OpenAIRE

    Ciulla,Leandro; Menezes,Honório Sampaio; Bueno,Bárbara Beatriz Moreira; Schuh,Alexandre; Alves,Rafael José Vargas; Abegg,Milena Pacheco

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the effects of the antidepressant drugs duloxetine and fluoxetine on depressive behaviors in rodents. METHODS: Eighteen male Wistar rats were given systemic injections of duloxetine, fluoxetine, or saline prior to a Forced Swimming Test (FST). Immobility and number of stops were measured. RESULTS: Rats given injections of fluoxetine displayed significantly less immobility (p = 0.02) and fewer stops than the control group (p = 0.003). Duloxetine significanlty reduced the nu...

  6. Metabolic mapping of the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine on the brains of congenitally helpless rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shumake, Jason; Colorado, Rene A.; Barrett, Douglas W.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants require adaptive brain changes before efficacy is achieved, and they may impact the affectively disordered brain differently than the normal brain. We previously demonstrated metabolic disturbances in limbic and cortical regions of the congenitally helpless rat, a model of susceptibility to affective disorder, and we wished to test whether administration of fluoxetine would normalize these metabolic differences. Fluoxetine was chosen because it has become a first-line drug for...

  7. Preparation and characterization of standardized pomegranate extract-phospholipid complex as an effective drug delivery tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amisha Kamlesh Vora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagins, a pair of anomeric ellagitannins, present in Punica granatum (Pomegranates are known to possess excellent antioxidant activity in vitro, but poor oral bioavailability. The reasons cited for poor bioavailability are their large molecular size, poor lipophilicity, and degradation by colonic microflora into less active metabolites. The objective of the present research work was to complex the standardized pomegranate extract (SPE with phospholipid to formulate standardized pomegranate extract-phospholipid complex (SPEPC, characterize it and check its permeability through an ex vivo everted gut sac experiment. SPEPC was prepared by mixing SPE (30% punicalagins and soya phosphatidylcholine (PC in 1:1 v/v mixture of methanol and dioxane and spray-drying the mixture. The complex was characterized by infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. It was evaluated for its octanol solubility, dissolution, and permeability by everted the gut sac technique. The characterization methods confirmed the formation of complex. Increased n-octanol solubility of the complex proved its increased lipophilicity. Dissolution studies revealed that the phospholipid covering may prevent the punicalagins to be released in gastro-intestinal tract, thus preventing their colonic microbial degradation. SPEPC showed better apparent permeability than SPE in an everted gut sac technique. Hence, it could be concluded that phospholipid complex of SPE may be of potential use in increasing the permeability and hence the bioavailability of punicalagins.

  8. The efficacy of primary care chaplaincy compared with antidepressants: a retrospective study comparing chaplaincy with antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Gordon

    2017-07-01

    Aim To determine the effectiveness of primary care chaplaincy (PCC) when used as the sole intervention, with outcomes being compared directly with those of antidepressants. This was to be carried out in a homogenous study population reflective of certain demographics in the United Kingdom. Increasing numbers of patients are living with long-term conditions and 'modern maladies' and are experiencing loss of well-being and depression. There is an increasing move to utilise non-pharmacological interventions such as 'talking therapies' within this context. Chaplaincy is one such 'talking therapy' but within primary care its evidence base is sparse with only one quantitative study to date. There is therefore a need to evaluate PCC excluding those co-prescribed antidepressants, as this is not evidenced in the literature as yet. PCC also needs to be directly compared with the use of antidepressants to justify its use as a valid alternative treatment for loss of well-being and depression. This was a retrospective observational study based on routinely collected data. There were 107 patients in the PCC group and 106 in the antidepressant group. Socio-demographic data were collected. Their pre- and post-intervention (either chaplaincy or antidepressant) well-being was assessed, by the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) which is a validated Likert scale. Findings The majority of both groups were female with both groups showing marked ethnic homogeneity. PCC was associated with a significant and clinically meaningful improvement in well-being at a mean follow-up of 80 days. This treatment effect was maintained after those co-prescribed antidepressants were removed. PCC was associated with an improvement in well-being similar to that of antidepressants with no significant difference between the two groups.

  9. Faster onset of antidepressant effects of citalopram compared with sertraline in drug-naïve first-episode major depressive disorder in a Chinese population: a 6-week double-blind, randomized comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ju-Wei; Su, Tung-Ping; Huang, Chen-Ying; Chen, Ying-Sheue; Chou, Yuan-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    Several previous studies, including a meta-analysis, reported no significant differences between various selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of major depressive disorder. However, because of the different chemical structure of SSRIs and the difference in the frequency of serotonin transporter polymorphisms between ethnic groups, a head-to-head comparative study between SSRIs in different populations may be enlightening. We compared the efficacy and adverse effect profiles of citalopram and sertraline in a double-blinded randomized clinical trial in a Chinese population of drug-naïve patients with first-episode major depressive disorder. Fifty-one patients were randomly assigned to citalopram or sertraline treatment. The Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was used as the primary outcome. Efficacy and adverse effects were analyzed in an intent-to-treat population. Efficacy was analyzed using a last-observation-carried-forward method for early terminators. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics at baseline. No significant differences were found in MADRS scores between citalopram and sertraline at baseline (36.6 ± 5.5 vs 38.2 ± 4.9; P = 0.322) or at the end of treatment (week 6; 10.8 ± 10.0 vs 16.7 ± 11.3; P = 0.082). However, MADRS scores in the citalopram group were significantly lower at week 1 (25.2 ± 8.5 vs 30.4 ± 6.1; P = 0.029) and week 3 (15.9 ± 10.0 vs 22.1 ± 8.7; P = 0.037). Overall, treatment-emergent adverse effects were reported by 14.3% and 28.6% of patients in the citalopram and sertraline groups, respectively. In conclusion, citalopram and sertraline were both efficacious and well tolerated. However, citalopram exhibited a significantly faster onset than sertraline during the early weeks of treatment and tended to have a better efficacy in overall treatment, although the statistic was not significant.

  10. Impact of Antidepressants on Cytokine Production of Depressed Patients in Vitro

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    Alexander Munzer

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between immune and nervous systems plays a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression. In depressive episodes, patients show increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. There is limited information on the effect of antidepressant drugs on cytokines, most studies report on a limited sample of cytokines and none have reported effects on IL-22. We systematically investigated the effect of three antidepressant drugs, citalopram, escitalopram and mirtazapine, on secretion of cytokines IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17, IL-22 and TNF-α in a whole blood assay in vitro, using murine anti-human CD3 monoclonal antibody OKT3, and 5C3 monoclonal antibody against CD40, to stimulate T and B cells respectively. Citalopram increased production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-22. Mirtazapine increased IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-22. Escitalopram decreased IL-17 levels. The influence of antidepressants on IL-2 and IL-4 levels was not significant for all three drugs. Compared to escitalopram, citalopram led to higher levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17 and IL-22; and mirtazapine to higher levels of IL-1β, IL-17, IL-22 and TNF-α. Mirtazapine and citalopram increased IL-22 production. The differing profile of cytokine production may relate to differences in therapeutic effects, risk of relapse and side effects.

  11. The interpersonal adverse effects reported by 1008 users of antidepressants; and the incremental impact of polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, John; Gee, Aimee; Diggle, Jacob; Butler, Helen

    2017-10-01

    Antidepressant drugs are being prescribed at ever increasing rates internationally, despite marginal benefit compared to placebo and a range of adverse effects. Most studies of adverse effects focus on biological phenomena. This article presents the results of an online survey of 1008 self-selected anti-depressant users in Britain, which asked about five adverse effects in the interpersonal domain. The most commonly reported among participants who took only antidepressants were: Sex Life - 43.7%, Work or Study - 27.0% and Social Life - 23.5%. These rates of interpersonal adverse effects were even higher for the 52% of participants who were also taking one or more other psychiatric drugs. Only about a half (48%) felt they had been given enough information about side effects by the prescriber. Those initially prescribed medication by a psychiatrist were more likely to be on several types of drugs and reported more adverse effects than those whose prescriber was a General Practitioner (GP). Researchers and prescribers are encouraged to pay greater attention to interpersonal adverse effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

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    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  13. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

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    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  14. Antidepressant-Like Activity of the Ethanolic Extract from Uncaria lanosa Wallich var. appendiculata Ridsd in the Forced Swimming Test and in the Tail Suspension Test in Mice

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    Lieh-Ching Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the antidepressant activity of ethanolic extract of U. lanosa Wallich var. appendiculata Ridsd (ULEtOH for two-weeks administrations by using FST and TST on mice. In order to understand the probable mechanism of antidepressant-like activity of ULEtOH in FST and TST, the researchers measured the levels of monoamines and monoamine oxidase activities in mice brain, and combined the antidepressant drugs (fluoxetine, imipramine, maprotiline, clorgyline, bupropion and ketanserin. Lastly, the researchers analyzed the content of RHY in the ULEtOH. The results showed that ULEtOH exhibited antidepressant-like activity in FST and TST in mice. ULEtOH increased the levels of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, the levels of NE and MHPG in cortex and hippocampus, the level of NE in striatum, and the level of DOPAC in striatum. Two-week injection of IMI, CLO, FLU and KET enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of ULEtOH. ULEtOH inhibited the activity of MAO-A. The amount of RHY in ULEtOH was 17.12 mg/g extract. Our findings support the view that ULEtOH exerts antidepressant-like activity. The antidepressant-like mechanism of ULEtOH may be related to the increase in monoamines levels in the hippocampus, cortex, striatum, and hypothalamus of mice.

  15. Comparison of alterations in c-fos and Egr-1 (zif268) expression throughout the rat brain following acute administration of different classes of antidepressant compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, David A; Morrow, John A; Hudson, Alan L; Hill, David R; Nutt, David J; Henry, Brian

    2005-07-01

    The majority of immediate-early gene (IEG) studies focus on a few key brain regions associated with the class of psychoactive compound being studied. Recently, using a meta-analysis of the c-fos literature, we demonstrated the utility of c-fos profiling to classify such compounds. The present study examined acute delivery of a range of antidepressant classes; fluoxetine, imipramine, LiCl, and mirtazapine. The dual aims were to study the IEG profiles of these varying classes of antidepressants throughout the rat brain and to compare the utility of c-fos or Egr-1 as IEGs to classify clinically efficacious antidepressants. All antidepressants increased c-fos mRNA in the central amygdala, as previously shown, while c-fos was also increased in the anterior insular cortex and significantly decreased within the septum. Although acute antidepressant administration altered c-fos expression in a number of brain regions, Egr-1 expression was only significantly altered in the central amygdala, suggesting that Egr-1 may not be as useful a marker to investigate acute antidepressant treatment. The fact that these drugs, including the previously unclassified antidepressant mirtazapine, share a number of common loci of activation, which are implicated by human and animal studies in depression, adds further support to the use of IEG mapping to classify psychoactive compounds.

  16. Antidepressant effects of Mentha pulegium in mice

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    Zahra Rabiei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the antidepressant effects of Mentha pulegium essential oil in BALB/c mice. Six experimental groups (7 mice each were used. Forced swim test was performed 30 min after essential oil injection. In the groups receiving M. pulegium essential oil (50, 75 and 100 mg/kg, immobility duration significantly decreased compared to the control group. M. pulegium (50 and 75 mg/kg resulted in significant decrease in nitrate/nitrite content in serum compared to the control group. M. pulegium essential oil antidepressant effect that may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress. The results showed that decrease in nitrate/nitrite content in serum and high anti-oxidant effects of M. pulegium essential oil.

  17. Risco de câncer associado ao uso de antidepressivos Risk of cancer associated with the use of antidepressants

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    Camila Silva Bôaventura

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Alguns estudos sugerem que o uso de antidepressivos poderia aumentar o risco de câncer. Este estudo visa realizar uma revisão sobre o tema. MÉTODO: Foi feita uma busca nas bases de dados MEDLINE e LILACS, utilizando como palavras de busca antidepressant, cancer e nomes das diferentes drogas antidepressivas. RESULTADOS: Onze artigos foram selecionados. Foram encontrados seis artigos sugerindo uma associação positiva fraca entre o uso de antidepressivos e o crescimento tumoral e cinco artigos que não sugeriam a associação. Discussão: Os resultados dos estudos com relação ao risco de câncer associado ao uso de antidepressivos são ainda conflitantes. Na maioria dos estudos, a análise multivariada não mostra associação positiva em uso de antidepressivos e câncer, a não ser em casos específicos, como linfoma de Hodgkin.INTRODUCTION: Some studies suggest that the use of antidepressants could increase the risk of cancer. This study aims at performing a review on this subject. METHOD: A search was performed in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases using the keywords antidepressant, cancer and names of varied antidepressant drugs. RESULTS: Eleven articles were selected. Six articles were found suggesting a positive weak association between use of antidepressants and tumoral growth. In five articles this association was not found. DISCUSSION: The results of studies on increased risk of cancer associated with antidepressants are still conflicting. In most studies the multivariate analysis did not show positive association between use of antidepressants and cancer, unless in specific cases, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. Non-tricyclic and Non-selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Antidepressants and Recurrent Falls in Frail Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Jennifer G; Kotlarczyk, Mary P; Perera, Subashan; Greenspan, Susan L; Hanlon, Joseph T

    2016-12-01

    To determine the risk of recurrent falls associated with antidepressants other than tricyclics (TCAs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) among frail older women. This is a secondary analysis of the Zoledronic acid in frail Elders to STrengthen bone, or ZEST, trial data treated as a longitudinal cohort in 181 frail, osteoporotic women aged ≥65 years in long-term care. The primary exposure was individual non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressants (i.e., serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, mirtazapine, trazodone, and bupropion) at baseline and 6 months. The main outcome was recurrent (at least two) falls within 6 months after antidepressant exposure. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were derived using a generalized estimating equations model. At least 15% of women experienced recurrent falls between 0-6 and 6-12 months. At baseline and 6 months, 18.2% and 6.9% had a non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant, respectively. Adjusting for demographics, health status, and other drugs that increase risk of falls, non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant exposure significantly increased the risk of recurrent falls (AOR: 2.14; 95% CI: 1.01-4.54). Fall risk further increased after removing bupropion from the non-TCA/non-SSRI antidepressant group in sensitivity analyses (AOR: 2.73; 95% CI: 1.24-6.01). Other antidepressant classes may not be safer than TCAs/SSRIs with respect to recurrent falls in frail older women. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suppressive immunoregulatory effects of three antidepressants via inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB activation assessed using primary macrophages of carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Wenhui [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Environmental Science & Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Wu, Minghong; Liu, Shuai [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Chen, Bei [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Pan, Chenyuan [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Yang, Ming, E-mail: mingyang@shu.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Wang, Ke-Jian, E-mail: wkjian@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2017-05-01

    effects on macrophages. • Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was inhibited by drug exposure. • Anti-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was induced by drug exposure. • NF-κB pathway was involved in the effects of antidepressants. • Synergetic effects occurred at environmentally relevant concentration of 10 ng/L.

  20. Suppressive immunoregulatory effects of three antidepressants via inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB activation assessed using primary macrophages of carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Wenhui; Wu, Minghong; Liu, Shuai; Chen, Bei; Pan, Chenyuan; Yang, Ming; Wang, Ke-Jian

    2017-01-01

    effects on macrophages. • Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was inhibited by drug exposure. • Anti-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was induced by drug exposure. • NF-κB pathway was involved in the effects of antidepressants. • Synergetic effects occurred at environmentally relevant concentration of 10 ng/L.

  1. Antidepressant treatment outcomes of psychogenic movement disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Lang, Anthony E

    2005-12-01

    Psychogenic movement disorder (PMD) is a subtype of conversion disorder. We describe the outcomes of a series of PMD patients following antidepressant treatment. Twenty-three outpatients with chronic PMD, diagnosed using Fahn and Williams' criteria, underwent psychiatric assessment. The patients were referred for assessment and management from January 2003 to July 2004. Fifteen agreed to be treated with antidepressants. Patients received citalopram or paroxetine; those who did not respond after 4 weeks of taking an optimal dose were switched to venlafaxine. Concurrently, 3 had supportive psychotherapy, and 1 had family intervention. Assessments included the DSM-IV-based Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and scales measuring depression, anxiety, and motor and global severity. Eighteen patients (78%) had at least 1 Axis I diagnosis in addition to the somatoform diagnosis, and 3 (13%) had somatization disorder. Five (22%) had previous psychiatric contact. Nine (39%) had previously been treated with antidepressants, but only 4 (17%) had adequate trials. No significant differences existed in patient characteristics between treated and untreated groups. Among treated patients, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores improved from baseline (p hypochondriasis, somatization disorder, or probable factitious disorder/malingering, of whom none improved. All of the patients with primary conversion disorder had a current or previous depressive or anxiety disorder compared with 40% (N = 2) of the patients with additional somatoform diagnoses. Our preliminary findings suggest that chronic PMD with primary conversion symptoms and with recent or current depression or anxiety may respond to antidepressants. Further well-designed studies, now under way, are required to confirm these findings.

  2. Antidepressant induced excessive yawning and indifference

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    Bruno Palazzo Nazar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Antidepressant induced excessive yawning has been described as a possible side effect of pharmacotherapy. A syndrome of indifference has also been described as another possible side effect. The frequency of those phenomena and their physiopathology are unknown. They are both considered benign and reversible after antidepressant discontinuation but severe cases with complications as temporomandibular lesions, have been described. Methods We report two unprecedented cases in which excessive yawning and indifference occurred simultaneously as side effects of antidepressant therapy, discussing possible physiopathological mechanisms for this co-occurrence. Case 1: A male patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 80/day and apathy after venlafaxine XR treatment. Symptoms reduced after a switch to escitalopram, with a reduction to 50 yawns/day. Case 2: A female patient presented excessive yawning (approximately 25/day and inability to react to environmental stressors with desvenlafaxine. Conclusion Induction of indifference and excessive yawning may be modulated by serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanisms. One proposal to unify these side effects would be enhancement of serotonin in midbrain, especially paraventricular and raphe nucleus.

  3. Antidepressants and Suicide Risk: A Comprehensive Overview

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    Roberto Tatarelli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The annual worldwide suicide rate currently averages approximately 13 per 100,000 individuals per year (0.013% per year, with higher average rates for men than for women in all but a few countries, very low rates in children, and relatively high rates in elderly men. Suicide rates vary markedly between countries, reflecting in part differences in case-identification and reporting procedures. Rates of attempted suicide in the general population average 20–30 times higher than rates of completed suicide, but are probably under-reported. Research on the relationship between pharmacotherapy and suicidal behavior was rare until a decade ago. Most ecological studies and large clinical studies have found that a general reduction in suicide rates is significantly correlated with higher rates of prescribing modern antidepressants. However, ecological, cohort and case-control studies and data from brief, randomized, controlled trials in patients with acute affective disorders have found increases, particularly in young patients and particularly for the risk of suicide attempts, as well as increases in suicidal ideation in young patients. whether antidepressants are associated with specific aspects of suicidality (e.g., higher rates of completed suicide, attempted suicide and suicidal ideation in younger patients with major affective disorders remains a highly controversial question. In light of this gap this paper analyzes research on the relationship between suicidality and antidepressant treatment.

  4. Inhibition of G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K+ channels by different classes of antidepressants.

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    Toru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Various antidepressants are commonly used for the treatment of depression and several other neuropsychiatric disorders. In addition to their primary effects on serotonergic or noradrenergic neurotransmitter systems, antidepressants have been shown to interact with several receptors and ion channels. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects of antidepressants have not yet been sufficiently clarified. G protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+ (GIRK, Kir3 channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability and heart rate, and GIRK channel modulation has been suggested to have therapeutic potential for several neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac arrhythmias. In the present study, we investigated the effects of various classes of antidepressants on GIRK channels using the Xenopus oocyte expression assay. In oocytes injected with mRNA for GIRK1/GIRK2 or GIRK1/GIRK4 subunits, extracellular application of sertraline, duloxetine, and amoxapine effectively reduced GIRK currents, whereas nefazodone, venlafaxine, mianserin, and mirtazapine weakly inhibited GIRK currents even at toxic levels. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent, with various degrees of potency and effectiveness. Furthermore, the effects of sertraline were voltage-independent and time-independent during each voltage pulse, whereas the effects of duloxetine were voltage-dependent with weaker inhibition with negative membrane potentials and time-dependent with a gradual decrease in each voltage pulse. However, Kir2.1 channels were insensitive to all of the drugs. Moreover, the GIRK currents induced by ethanol were inhibited by sertraline but not by intracellularly applied sertraline. The present results suggest that GIRK channel inhibition may reveal a novel characteristic of the commonly used antidepressants, particularly sertraline, and contributes to some of the therapeutic effects and adverse effects.

  5. Monoamine involvement in the antidepressant-like effect induced by P2 blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Cassiano R A F; Rodrigues, Murilo; Casarotto, Plínio C; Pereira, Vítor S; Crestani, Carlos C; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2017-12-01

    Depression is a common mental disorder that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Available monoaminergic antidepressants are far from ideal since they show delayed onset of action and are ineffective in approximately 40% of patients, thus indicating the need of new and more effective drugs. ATP signaling through P2 receptors seems to play an important role in neuropathological mechanisms involved in depression, since their pharmacological or genetic inactivation induce antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test (FST). However, the mechanisms involved in these effects are not completely understood. The present work investigated monoamine involvement in the antidepressant-like effect induced by non-specific P2 receptor antagonist (PPADS) administration. First, the effects of combining sub-effective doses of PPADS with sub-effective doses of fluoxetine (FLX, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) or reboxetine (RBX, selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor) were investigated in mice submitted to FST. Significant antidepressant-like effect was observed when subeffective doses of PPADS was combined with subeffective doses of either FLX or RBX, with no significant locomotor changes. Next, the effects of depleting serotonin and noradrenaline levels, by means of PCPA (p-Chlorophenylalanine) or DSP-4 (N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride) pretreatment, respectively, was investigated. Both, PCPA and DSP-4 pretreatment partially attenuated PPADS-induced effects in FST, without inducing relevant locomotor changes. Our results suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of PPADS involves modulation of serotonin and noradrenaline levels in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction with sildenafil: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurnberg, H George; Hensley, Paula L; Gelenberg, Alan J; Fava, Maurizio; Lauriello, John; Paine, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common adverse effect of antidepressants that frequently results in treatment noncompliance. To assess the efficacy of sildenafil citrate in men with sexual dysfunction associated with the use of selective and nonselective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressants. Prospective, parallel-group, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted between November 1, 2000, and January 1, 2001, at 3 US university medical centers among 90 male outpatients (mean [SD] age, 45 [8] years) with major depression in remission and sexual dysfunction associated with SRI antidepressant treatment. Patients were randomly assigned to take sildenafil (n = 45) or placebo (n = 45) at a flexible dose starting at 50 mg and adjustable to 100 mg before sexual activity for 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was score on the Clinical Global Impression-Sexual Function (CGI-SF); secondary measures were scores on the International Index of Erectile Function, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, Massachusetts General Hospital-Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Among the 90 randomized patients, 93% (83/89) of patients treated per protocol took at least 1 dose of study drug and 85% (76/89) completed week 6 end-point assessments with last observation carried forward analyses. At a CGI-SF score of 2 or lower, 54.5% (24/44) of sildenafil compared with 4.4% (2/45) of placebo patients were much or very much improved (Psatisfaction domain measures improved significantly in sildenafil compared with placebo patients. Mean depression scores remained consistent with remission (HAM-D score sexual function in men with sexual dysfunction associated with the use of SRI antidepressants. These improvements may allow patients to maintain adherence with effective antidepressant treatment.

  7. Synthesis, potential anticonvulsant and antidepressant effects of 2-(5-methyl-2,3-dioxoindolin-1-ylacetamide derivatives

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    Xinghua Zhen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new series of 2-(5-methyl-2,3-dioxoindolin-1-ylacetamide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anticonvulsive activity in a pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-evoked convulsion model and antidepressant activity in the forced swimming test (FST model. Eleven synthesized compounds were found to be protective against PTZ-induced seizure and showed the anticonvulsant activity. In addition, four of the synthesized compounds (4l, 4m, 4p and 4q showed potent antidepressant-like activity. Among these compounds, compound 4l was found to have the most potent antidepressant-like activity, and significantly reduced the duration of immobility time at 100 mg/kg dose level when compared to the vehicle control, which is similar to the reference drug fluoxetine.

  8. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity, effect on blood pressure & gastric tolerability of antidepressants

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    Preeta Kaur Chugh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Antidepressants are being used as analgesics for various pain related disorders like neuropathic and non neuropathic pain. Although their analgesic activity is well recognized but anti-inflammatory potential of antidepressants is still inconclusive. Since the antidepressants are used for longer duration, it becomes important to elucidate effect of anti-depressants on blood pressure and gastric mucosa. This study was undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of various antidepressant drugs as well as their effect on blood pressure and gastric tolerability on chronic administration in rats. Methods: Rat paw oedema model was used for studying anti-inflammatory activity, single dose of test drug (venlafaxine 20 and 40 mg/kg, amitryptline 25 mg/kg, fluoxetine 20 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally 45 min prior to administration of 0.1 ml of 1 per cent carrageenan in sub-planter region. Oedema induced in test group was compared with normal saline treated control group. For studying effect on blood pressure and gastric tolerability, test drugs were administered for 14 days. Blood pressure was recorded on days 0, 7 and 14 using tail cuff method. On day 14, 4 h after drug administration, rats were sacrificed and stomach mucosa was examined for ulcerations. Results: Pretreatment of rats with venlafaxine (40 mg/kg resulted in a significant decrease in paw oedema as compared to control (2.4 ± 0.15 to 1.1 ± 0.16 ml, P<0.01. Similarly, in the group pretreated with fluoxetine, significant decrease in paw oedema was observed in comparison to control (P<0.05. Significant change in mean blood pressure was seen in rats pretreated with venlafaxine 40 mg/kg (126.7 ± 4.2 to 155.2 ± 9.7, P<0.05 and fluoxetine (143.5 ± 2.6 to 158.3 ± 1.2, P<0.05 on day 7. No significant difference with regard to gastric tolerability was observed among groups. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed significant anti

  9. Preferential reduction of binding of 125I-iodopindolol to beta-1 adrenoceptors in the amygdala of rat after antidepressant treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordway, G.A.; Gambarana, C.; Tejani-Butt, S.M.; Areso, P.; Hauptmann, M.; Frazer, A.

    1991-01-01

    This study utilized quantitative receptor autoradiography to examine the effects of repeated administration of antidepressants to rats on the binding of the beta adrenoceptor antagonist, 125 I-iodopindolol ( 125 I-IPIN) to either beta-1 or beta-2 adrenoceptors in various regions of brain. Antidepressants were selected to represent various chemical and pharmacological classes including tricyclic compounds (desipramine and protriptyline), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (clorgyline, phenelzine and tranylcypromine), atypical antidepressants (mianserin and trazodone) and selective inhibitors of the uptake of serotonin (citalopram and sertraline). Additionally, rats were treated with various psychotropic drugs that lack antidepressant efficacy (cocaine, deprenyl, diazepam and haloperidol). Repeated treatment of rats with desipramine, protriptyline, clorgyline, phenelzine, tranylcypromine or mianserin reduced the binding of 125 I-IPIN to beta-1 adrenoceptors in many brain areas. Only in the basolateral and lateral nuclei of the amygdala did all six of these antidepressants significantly reduce 125 I-IPIN binding to beta-1 adrenoceptors. In these amygdaloid nuclei, the magnitude of the reduction in the binding of 125 I-IPIN caused by each of these drugs was comparable to or greater than the reduction in binding produced in any other region of brain. Reductions of binding of 125 I-IPIN after antidepressant treatments were not consistently observed in the cortex, the area of brain examined most often in homogenate binding studies. Only the monoamine oxidase inhibitors caused reductions in the binding of 125 I-IPIN to beta-2 adrenoceptors, and this effect was generally localized to the amygdala and hypothalamus

  10. Genetic predictors of response to serotonergic and noradrenergic antidepressants in major depressive disorder: a genome-wide analysis of individual-level data and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Tansey

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that outcomes of antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder could be significantly improved if treatment choice is informed by genetic data. This study aims to test the hypothesis that common genetic variants can predict response to antidepressants in a clinically meaningful way.The NEWMEDS consortium, an academia-industry partnership, assembled a database of over 2,000 European-ancestry individuals with major depressive disorder, prospectively measured treatment outcomes with serotonin reuptake inhibiting or noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting antidepressants and available genetic samples from five studies (three randomized controlled trials, one part-randomized controlled trial, and one treatment cohort study. After quality control, a dataset of 1,790 individuals with high-quality genome-wide genotyping provided adequate power to test the hypotheses that antidepressant response or a clinically significant differential response to the two classes of antidepressants could be predicted from a single common genetic polymorphism. None of the more than half million genetic markers significantly predicted response to antidepressants overall, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, or differential response to the two types of antidepressants (genome-wide significance p<5×10(-8. No biological pathways were significantly overrepresented in the results. No significant associations (genome-wide significance p<5×10(-8 were detected in a meta-analysis of NEWMEDS and another large sample (STAR*D, with 2,897 individuals in total. Polygenic scoring found no convergence among multiple associations in NEWMEDS and STAR*D.No single common genetic variant was associated with antidepressant response at a clinically relevant level in a European-ancestry cohort. Effects specific to particular antidepressant drugs could not be investigated in the current study. Please see later in the article for the

  11. Genetic predictors of response to serotonergic and noradrenergic antidepressants in major depressive disorder: a genome-wide analysis of individual-level data and a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Katherine E; Guipponi, Michel; Perroud, Nader; Bondolfi, Guido; Domenici, Enrico; Evans, David; Hall, Stephanie K; Hauser, Joanna; Henigsberg, Neven; Hu, Xiaolan; Jerman, Borut; Maier, Wolfgang; Mors, Ole; O'Donovan, Michael; Peters, Tim J; Placentino, Anna; Rietschel, Marcella; Souery, Daniel; Aitchison, Katherine J; Craig, Ian; Farmer, Anne; Wendland, Jens R; Malafosse, Alain; Holmans, Peter; Lewis, Glyn; Lewis, Cathryn M; Stensbøl, Tine Bryan; Kapur, Shitij; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that outcomes of antidepressant treatment for major depressive disorder could be significantly improved if treatment choice is informed by genetic data. This study aims to test the hypothesis that common genetic variants can predict response to antidepressants in a clinically meaningful way. The NEWMEDS consortium, an academia-industry partnership, assembled a database of over 2,000 European-ancestry individuals with major depressive disorder, prospectively measured treatment outcomes with serotonin reuptake inhibiting or noradrenaline reuptake inhibiting antidepressants and available genetic samples from five studies (three randomized controlled trials, one part-randomized controlled trial, and one treatment cohort study). After quality control, a dataset of 1,790 individuals with high-quality genome-wide genotyping provided adequate power to test the hypotheses that antidepressant response or a clinically significant differential response to the two classes of antidepressants could be predicted from a single common genetic polymorphism. None of the more than half million genetic markers significantly predicted response to antidepressants overall, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, or differential response to the two types of antidepressants (genome-wide significance panalysis of NEWMEDS and another large sample (STAR*D), with 2,897 individuals in total. Polygenic scoring found no convergence among multiple associations in NEWMEDS and STAR*D. No single common genetic variant was associated with antidepressant response at a clinically relevant level in a European-ancestry cohort. Effects specific to particular antidepressant drugs could not be investigated in the current study. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  12. Antidepressants in Parkinson's disease. Recommendations by the movement disorder study group of the Neurological Association of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, E; Mata, M; López-Manzanares, L; Kurtis, M; Eimil, M; Martínez-Castrillo, J C; Navas, I; Posada, I J; Prieto, C; Ruíz-Huete, C; Vela, L; Venegas, B

    2016-03-19

    Although antidepressants are widely used in Parkinson's disease (PD), few well-designed studies to support their efficacy have been conducted. These clinical guidelines are based on a review of the literature and the results of an AMN movement disorder study group survey. Evidence suggests that nortriptyline, venlafaxine, paroxetine, and citalopram may be useful in treating depression in PD, although studies on paroxetine and citalopram yield conflicting results. In clinical practice, however, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are usually considered the treatment of choice. Duloxetine may be an alternative to venlafaxine, although the evidence for this is less, and venlafaxine plus mirtazapine may be useful in drug-resistant cases. Furthermore, citalopram may be indicated for the treatment of anxiety, atomoxetine for hypersomnia, trazodone and mirtazapine for insomnia and psychosis, and bupropion for apathy. In general, antidepressants are well tolerated in PD. However, clinicians should consider the anticholinergic effect of tricyclic antidepressants, the impact of serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on blood pressure, the extrapyramidal effects of antidepressants, and any potential interactions between monoamine oxidase B inhibitors and other antidepressants. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the antidepressant-like effects of acute and sub-acute administration of crocin and crocetin in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Amin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the putative antidepressant effects of crocin and crocetin, two major active ingredients of Crocus sativus L. (saffron using mice in two different regimens of acute and sub-acute administration. Material and Methods: In acute treatment, antidepressant-like activities of crocin and crocetin (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p. were evaluated using forced swim test (FST. In sub-acute study (21 times with 24-h intervals, antidepressant-like effects of oral administration of drugs were examined using FST and tail suspension test (TST. Locomotor activity and motor coordination were studied using open field and rotarod tests, respectively. Results: Acute treatment with crocin (40 mg/kg and crocetin (20 and 40 mg/kg produced antidepressant-like effect in FST without affecting the baseline locomotion in mice. Sub-acute oral administration of crocin significantly decreased immobility time only at the highest dose (100 mg/kg. Crocetin (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg was able to decrease immobility time in FST and TST. Locomotor activity and coordination of mice were not affected by crocin or crocetin. Conclusion: Since higher doses of crocin was required to show antidepressant effects, more efficacy of crocetin may be concluded. This observation provides further support for metabolism of crocin to crocetin following oral administration.

  14. Antidepressant use in children and adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder: what can we learn from published data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    The consequences of major depression disorder (MDD) in youths are likely to be devastating for both the patient and his/her family. Thus, this review analyzes systematically the effectiveness of antidepressant drugs (ADDs) in managing such patients. Medical literature reporting primary data on use of ADDs in children and adolescents was identified through searches (1966-January 2010) of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and The Cochrane Library databases. Additional studies were manually identified from the reference lists of published articles. Search terms (variously combined) were: children, childhood, adolescents, adolescence, MDD, mood/affective disorders, depression, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) SSRIs, Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), noradrenergic/specific serotoninergic antidepressants (NaSSA). A separate search was conducted to complete the profile of effectiveness of each single antidepressant agent. 43 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria. Reviewed information does not definitively support the use of antidepressants in children younger than 10 years old. In contrast, robust information suggests that fluoxetine should be considered as first-line agent in depressed adolescents whose clinical conditions require psychopharmacological approach. Depressed children should be primarily approached with non-pharmacological interventions that should include the evaluation of potential parental psychiatric disorders. In adolescents with MDD, the decision to use fluoxetine should be associated with specific social and health protocols focused to reinforce self-esteem, improve the quality of relationships with parents and peers, facilitate healthy life-style changes, and identify the potential onset/worsening of suicidality.

  15. Hypericum perforatum: a 'modern' herbal antidepressant: pharmacokinetics of active ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurglics, Mario; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort [SJW]) counts among the most favourite herbal drugs, and is the only herbal alternative to classic synthetic antidepressants in the therapy of mild to moderate depression. Several clinical studies have been conducted to verify the effectiveness of ethanolic or methanolic extracts of SJW. Alcoholic SJW extracts are a mixture of substances with widely varying physical and chemical properties and activities. Hyperforin, a phloroglucinol derivative, is the main source of pharmacological effects caused by the consumption of alcoholic extracts of SJW in the therapy of depression. However, several studies indicate that flavone derivatives, e.g. rutin, and also the naphthodianthrones hypericin and pseudohypericin, take part in the antidepressant efficacy. In contrast to the amount of documentation concerning clinical efficacy, oral bioavailability and pharmacokinetic data about the active components are rather scarce. The hyperforin plasma concentration in humans was investigated in a small number of studies. The results of these studies indicate a relevant plasma concentration, comparable with that used in in vitro tests. Furthermore, hyperforin is the only ingredient of H. perforatum that could be determined in the brain of rodents after oral administration of alcoholic extracts. The plasma concentrations of the hypericins were, compared with hyperforin, only one-tenth and, until now, the hypericins could not be found in the brain after oral administration of alcoholic H. perforatum extracts or pure hypericin. Until now, the pharmacokinetic profile of the flavonoids in humans after oral administration of an alcoholic H. perforatum extract has been investigated in only one study. More data are available for rutin and the aglycone quercetin after administration of pure substances or other flavonoid sources.

  16. Combining clinical variables to optimize prediction of antidepressant treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Raquel; Malki, Karim; Maier, Wolfgang; Rietschel, Marcella; Mors, Ole; Hauser, Joanna; Henigsberg, Neven; Dernovsek, Mojca Zvezdana; Souery, Daniel; Stahl, Daniel; Dobson, Richard; Aitchison, Katherine J; Farmer, Anne; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of treatment with antidepressants varies markedly across people with the same diagnosis. A clinically significant prediction of outcomes could spare the frustration of trial and error approach and improve the outcomes of major depressive disorder through individualized treatment selection. It is likely that a combination of multiple predictors is needed to achieve such prediction. We used elastic net regularized regression to optimize prediction of symptom improvement and remission during treatment with escitalopram or nortriptyline and to identify contributing predictors from a range of demographic and clinical variables in 793 adults with major depressive disorder. A combination of demographic and clinical variables, with strong contributions from symptoms of depressed mood, reduced interest, decreased activity, indecisiveness, pessimism and anxiety significantly predicted treatment outcomes, explaining 5-10% of variance in symptom improvement with escitalopram. Similar combinations of variables predicted remission with area under the curve 0.72, explaining approximately 15% of variance (pseudo R(2)) in who achieves remission, with strong contributions from body mass index, appetite, interest-activity symptom dimension and anxious-somatizing depression subtype. Escitalopram-specific outcome prediction was more accurate than generic outcome prediction, and reached effect sizes that were near or above a previously established benchmark for clinical significance. Outcome prediction on the nortriptyline arm did not significantly differ from chance. These results suggest that easily obtained demographic and clinical variables can predict therapeutic response to escitalopram with clinically meaningful accuracy, suggesting a potential for individualized prescription of this antidepressant drug. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Antidepressant Medication Management among Older Patients Receiving Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuhua; Shao, Huibo; Bruce, Martha L.; Press, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Antidepressant management for older patients receiving home health care (HHC) may occur through two pathways: nurse-physician collaboration (without patient visits to the physician) and physician management through office visits. This study examines the relative contribution of the two pathways and how they interplay. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using Medicare claims of 7,389 depressed patients 65 or older who received HHC in 2006–7 and who possessed antidepressants at the start of HHC. A change in antidepressant therapy (vs. discontinuation or refill) was the main study outcome and could take the form of a change in dose, switch to a different antidepressant, or augmentation (addition of a new antidepressant). Logistic regressions were estimated to examine how use of home health nursing care, patient visits to physicians, and their interactions predict a change in antidepressant therapy. Results About 30% of patients experienced a change in antidepressants versus 51% who refilled and 18% who discontinued. Receipt of mental health specialty care was associated with a statistically significant, 10–20 percentage-point increase in the probability of antidepressant change; receipt of primary care was associated with a small and statistically significant increase in the probability of antidepressant change among patients with no mental health specialty care and above-average utilization of nursing care. Increased home health nursing care in absence of physician visits was not associated with increased antidepressant change. Conclusions Active antidepressant management resulting in a change in medication occurred on a limited scale among older patients receiving HHC. Addressing knowledge and practice gaps in antidepressant management by primary care providers and home health nurses and improving nurse-physician collaboration will be promising areas for future interventions. PMID:25158915

  18. Evaluation of the antidepressant, anxiolytic and memory-improving efficacy of aripiprazole and fluoxetine in ethanol-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda-Malarz, Kinga; Kus, Krzysztof; Ratajczak, Piotr; Czubak, Anna; Hardyk, Szymon; Nowakowska, Elżbieta

    2014-07-01

    Some study results indicate a positive effect of aripiprazole (ARI) on impaired cognitive functions caused by brain damage resulting from chronic EtOH abuse. However, other research shows that to manifest itself, an ARI antidepressant effect requires a combined therapy with another selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressant, namely, fluoxetine (FLX). The aim of this article was to assess antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of ARI as well as its effect on spatial memory in ethanol-treated (alcoholized) rats. On the basis of alcohol consumption pattern, groups of (1) ethanol-preferring rats, with mean ethanol intake above 50%, and (2) ethanol-nonpreferring rats (EtNPRs), with mean ethanol intake below 50% of total daily fluid intake, were formed. The group of EtNPRs was used for this study, subdivided further into three groups administered ARI, FLX and a combination of both, respectively. Behavioral tests such as Porsolt's forced swimming test, the Morris water maze test and the two-compartment exploratory test were employed. Behavioral test results demonstrated (1) no antidepressant effect of ARI in EtNPRs in subchronic treatment and (2) no procognitive effect of ARI and FLX in EtNPRs in combined single administration. Combined administration of both drugs led to an anxiogenic effect and spatial memory deterioration in study animals. ARI had no antidepressant effect and failed to improve spatial memory in rats. However, potential antidepressant, anxiolytic and procognitive properties of the drug resulting from its mechanism of action encourage further research aimed at developing a dose of both ARI and FLX that will prove such effects in alcoholized EtNPRs.

  19. Antidepressant use and violent crimes among young people: a longitudinal examination of the Finnish 1987 birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminki, Elina; Merikukka, Marko; Gissler, Mika; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Savolainen, Jukka; Ristikari, Tiina; Aaltonen, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    The use of antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), has been questioned due to poor efficacy and safety. We examined whether young violent offenders were more likely antidepressant users prior to their first violent offence than other young persons. The study is a follow-up of children born in Finland in 1987 (n=59 120), linking national registers to each other using personal identity codes. Data on psychotropic drug use came from a register of reimbursed drugs and data on crimes from a register on court convictions (after the age of 14 years). Participants were followed until the age of 18 years, and for some analyses until the end of the follow-up (mean 21 years). To adjust for differences in background characteristics, regression analyses for antidepressant use were made, using the no-conviction group as the reference. Proportions of young people convicted by the age of 18 years were: 5% of boys (1.7% for violent crimes) and 1% (0.5%) of girls. Antidepressant use (both overall and for SSRIs) prior to violent crime was more common among those convicted than among those without convictions. Among boys with repeated violent crimes, it was also more common than among boys with non-violent crimes. Adjustment for differences in background characteristics decreased the associations between antidepressant use and violent crime, but did not eliminate them. The results add further evidence for caution in prescribing antidepressants among young persons. It also calls for a reanalysis of violence measures in the original trial data. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Antidepressant-like effect of celecoxib piroxicam in rat models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Ronise M; Barbiero, Janaína; Martynhak, Bruno J; Boschen, Suelen L; da Silva, Luisa M; Werner, Maria F P; Da Cunha, Claudio; Andreatini, Roberto; Lima, Marcelo M S; Vital, Maria A B F

    2014-06-01

    Beyond the current hypothesis of depression, several new biological substrates have been proposed for this disorder. The present study investigated whether the anti-inflammatory drugs celecoxib and piroxicam have antidepressant activity in animal models of depression. After acute administration, we observed antidepressant-like effects of celecoxib (10 mg/kg) and piroxicam (10 mg/kg) in the modified forced swim test in rats. Piroxicam increased serotonin and norepinephrine levels in the hippocampus. Prolonged (21-day) treatment with celecoxib (10 mg/kg) and piroxicam (10 mg/kg) rescued sucrose preference in a chronic mild stress model of depression. Additionally, the chronic mild stress-induced reduction of hippocampal glutathione was prevented by treatment with celecoxib and piroxicam. Superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus was increased after chronic mild stress compared with the non-stressed saline group. The non-stressed celecoxib and piroxicam groups and stressed piroxicam group exhibited an increase in hippocampal superoxide dismutase activity compared with the stressed saline group. Lipid hydroperoxide was increased in the stressed group treated with vehicle and non-stressed group treated with imipramine but not in the stressed groups treated with celecoxib and piroxicam. These results suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of anti-inflammatory drugs might be attributable to enhanced antioxidant defenses and attenuated oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

  1. Fair balance in direct-to-consumer antidepressant print and television advertising, 1995-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Rosemary J; Eisenberg, Matthew; Simon, Kosali I

    2012-01-01

    The authors evaluated fair balance in the presentation of risks and benefits in a large sample of direct-to-consumer advertising for prescription antidepressant medications appearing in magazines (1995-2006) and television (1999-2007) to assess how well they meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Using content analysis to capture relevant dimensions of the ads, results indicated that (a) considerably less attention is given to risks relative to benefits and (b) implicit ad content favors communication of drug benefits over risks, but that fair balance in direct-to-consumer ads has improved over time. The authors discuss policy implications and explore future research directions.

  2. Continued antidepressant treatment and suicide in patients with depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergård, Lars; Lopez, Ana Garcia; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2007-01-01

    1995 to 2000, we investigated the relation between continued treatment with antidepressants and suicide in a population of all patients discharged from hospital psychiatry with a diagnosis of depressive disorder. Patients discharged from hospital psychiatry with a diagnosis of depressive disorder had...... of prescriptions. On individualized data from a cohort of patients with a known history of depressive disorder, continued antidepressant treatment was associated with reduced risk of suicide.......Antidepressant use in Denmark, as in many developed countries, has substantially increased during recent years, coinciding with a decreasing suicide rate. In a nationwide observational cohort study with linkage of registers of all prescribed antidepressants and recorded suicides in Denmark from...

  3. Association Between Serotonergic Antidepressant Use During Pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Hilary K; Ray, Joel G; Wilton, Andrew S; Lunsky, Yona; Gomes, Tara; Vigod, Simone N

    2017-04-18

    Previous observations of a higher risk of child autism spectrum disorder with serotonergic antidepressant exposure during pregnancy may have been confounded. To evaluate the association between serotonergic antidepressant exposure during pregnancy and child autism spectrum disorder. Retrospective cohort study. Health administrative data sets were used to study children born to mothers who were receiving public prescription drug coverage during pregnancy in Ontario, Canada, from 2002-2010, reflecting 4.2% of births. Children were followed up until March 31, 2014. Serotonergic antidepressant exposure was defined as 2 or more consecutive maternal prescriptions for a selective serotonin or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor between conception and delivery. Child autism spectrum disorder identified after the age of 2 years. Exposure group differences were addressed by inverse probability of treatment weighting based on derived high-dimensional propensity scores (computerized algorithm used to select a large number of potential confounders) and by comparing exposed children with unexposed siblings. There were 35 906 singleton births at a mean gestational age of 38.7 weeks (50.4% were male, mean maternal age was 26.7 years, and mean duration of follow-up was 4.95 years). In the 2837 pregnancies (7.9%) exposed to antidepressants, 2.0% (95% CI, 1.6%-2.6%) of children were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The incidence of autism spectrum disorder was 4.51 per 1000 person-years among children exposed to antidepressants vs 2.03 per 1000 person-years among unexposed children (between-group difference, 2.48 [95% CI, 2.33-2.62] per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 2.16 [95% CI, 1.64-2.86]; adjusted HR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.17-2.17]). After inverse probability of treatment weighting based on the high-dimensional propensity score, the association was not significant (HR, 1.61 [95% CI, 0.997-2.59]). The association was also not significant when exposed children

  4. Antidepressant action of ketamine via mTOR is mediated by inhibition of nitrergic Rheb degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harraz, M M; Tyagi, R; Cortés, P; Snyder, S H

    2016-03-01

    As traditional antidepressants act only after weeks/months, the discovery that ketamine, an antagonist of glutamate/N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, elicits antidepressant actions in hours has been transformative. Its mechanism of action has been elusive, though enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a major feature. We report a novel signaling pathway wherein NMDA receptor activation stimulates generation of nitric oxide (NO), which S-nitrosylates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Nitrosylated GAPDH complexes with the ubiquitin-E3-ligase Siah1 and Rheb, a small G protein that activates mTOR. Siah1 degrades Rheb leading to reduced mTOR signaling, while ketamine, conversely, stabilizes Rheb that enhances mTOR signaling. Drugs selectively targeting components of this pathway may offer novel approaches to the treatment of depression.

  5. Mortality in major affective disorder: relationship to subtype of depression. The Danish University Antidepressant Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholtz-Hansen, P E; Wang, A G; Kragh-Sørensen, P

    1993-01-01

    A total of 219 inpatients with a DSM-III diagnosis of major depression, 150 women and 69 men, were followed prospectively for 3-10 years and mortality was recorded. The patients were previous participants in psychopharmacological multicenter trials, which were carried out for the purpose...... of comparing the antidepressant effect of newer 5-HT reuptake inhibitors with that of the tricyclic antidepressant drug, clomipramine. The study comprised patients with a total Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of > or = 18 and/or a Hamilton subscale score of > or = 9. Diagnostic classification...... according to the Newcastle I Scale in endogenous and nonendogenous depression was performed. The observed mortality was significantly greater than that expected. The increased mortality was essentially due to suicides and mainly found among women. Patients scored as nonendogenously depressed had...

  6. Depression during pregnancy: views on antidepressant use and information sources of general practitioners and pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schobben Fred

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of antidepressants during pregnancy has increased in recent years. In the Netherlands, almost 2% of all pregnant women are exposed to antidepressants. Although guidelines have been developed on considerations that should be taken into account, prescribing antidepressants during pregnancy is still a subject of debate. Physicians and pharmacists may have opposing views on using medication during pregnancy and may give contradictory advice on whether or not to take medication for depression and anxiety disorders during pregnancy. In this study, we investigated information sources used by general practitioners (GPs and pharmacists and their common practices. Methods A questionnaire on the use of information sources and the general approach when managing depression during pregnancy was sent out to 1400 health care professionals to assess information sources on drug safety during pregnancy and also the factors that influence decision-making. The questionnaires consisted predominantly of closed multiple-choice questions. Results A total of 130 GPs (19% and 144 pharmacists (21% responded. The most popular source of information on the safety of drug use during pregnancy is the Dutch National Health Insurance System Formulary, while a minority of respondents contacts the Dutch national Teratology Information Service (TIS. The majority of GPs contact the pharmacy with questions concerning drug use during pregnancy. There is no clear line with regard to treatment or consensus between GPs on the best therapeutic strategy, nor do practitioners agree upon the drug of first choice. GPs have different views on stopping or continuing antidepressants during pregnancy or applying alternative treatment options. The debate appears to be ongoing as to whether or not specialised care for mother and child is indicated in cases of gestational antidepressant use. Conclusion Primary health care workers are not univocal concerning therapy for

  7. Modulation of attention network activation under antidepressant agents in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Heiko; Abler, Birgit; Hartmann, Antonie; Metzger, Coraline D; Walter, Martin

    2013-07-01

    While antidepressants are supposed to exert similar effects on mood and drive via various mechanisms of action, diverging effects are observed regarding side-effects and accordingly on neural correlates of motivation, emotion, reward and salient stimuli processing as a function of the drugs impact on neurotransmission. In the context of erotic stimulation, a unidirectional modulation of attentional functioning despite opposite effects on sexual arousal has been suggested for the selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine and the selective dopamine and noradrenaline reuptake-inhibitor (SDNRI) bupropion. To further elucidate the effects of antidepressant-related alterations of neural attention networks, we investigated 18 healthy males under subchronic administration (7 d) of paroxetine (20 mg), bupropion (150 mg) and placebo within a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over double-blind functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design during an established preceding attention task. Neuropsychological effects beyond the fMRI-paradigm were assessed by measuring alertness and divided attention. Comparing preceding attention periods of salient vs. neutral pictures, we revealed congruent effects of both drugs vs. placebo within the anterior midcingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, anterior insula and the thalamus. Relatively decreased activation in this network was paralleled by slower reaction times in the divided attention task in both verum conditions compared to placebo. Our results suggest similar effects of antidepressant treatments on behavioural and neural attentional functioning by diverging neurochemical pathways. Concurrent alterations of brain regions within a fronto-parietal and cingulo-opercular attention network for top-down control could point to basic neural mechanisms of antidepressant action irrespective of receptor profiles.

  8. Antidepressant activity of nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor antagonists in the mouse learned helplessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Victor A D; Medeiros, Iris U; Asth, Laila; Guerrini, Remo; Calo', Girolamo; Gavioli, Elaine C

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacological and genetic evidence support antidepressant-like effects elicited by the blockade of the NOP receptor. The learned helplessness (LH) model employs uncontrollable and unpredictable electric footshocks as a stressor stimulus to induce a depressive-like phenotype that can be reversed by classical antidepressants. The present study aimed to evaluate the action of NOP receptor antagonists in helpless mice. Male Swiss mice were subjected to the three steps of the LH paradigm (i.e., (1) induction, (2) screening, and (3) test). Only helpless animals were subjected to the test session. During the test session, animals were placed in the electrified chamber and the latency to escape after the footshock and the frequency of escape failures were recorded. The effect of the following treatments administered before the test session were evaluated: nortriptyline (30 mg/kg, ip, 60 min), fluoxetine (30 mg/kg, ip, four consecutive days of treatment), and NOP antagonists SB-612111 (1-10 mg/kg, ip, 30 min) and UFP-101 (1-10 nmol, icv, 5 min). To rule out possible biases, the effects of treatments on controllable stressful and non stressful situations were assessed. In helpless mice, nortriptyline, fluoxetine, UFP-101 (3-10 nmol), and SB-612111 (3-10 mg/kg) significantly reduced escape latencies and escape failures. No effects of drug treatments were observed in mice subjected to the controllable electric footshocks and non stressful situations. Acute treatment with NOP antagonists reversed helplessness similarly to the classical antidepressants. These findings support the proposal that NOP receptor antagonists are worthy of development as innovative antidepressant drugs.

  9. Metabolic mapping of the effects of the antidepressant fluoxetine on the brains of congenitally helpless rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumake, Jason; Colorado, Rene A; Barrett, Douglas W; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2010-07-09

    Antidepressants require adaptive brain changes before efficacy is achieved, and they may impact the affectively disordered brain differently than the normal brain. We previously demonstrated metabolic disturbances in limbic and cortical regions of the congenitally helpless rat, a model of susceptibility to affective disorder, and we wished to test whether administration of fluoxetine would normalize these metabolic differences. Fluoxetine was chosen because it has become a first-line drug for the treatment of affective disorders. We hypothesized that fluoxetine antidepressant effects may be mediated by decreasing metabolism in the habenula and increasing metabolism in the ventral tegmental area. We measured the effects of fluoxetine on forced swim behavior and regional brain cytochrome oxidase activity in congenitally helpless rats treated for 2 weeks with fluoxetine (5mg/kg, i.p., daily). Fluoxetine reduced immobility in the forced swim test as anticipated, but congenitally helpless rats responded in an atypical manner, i.e., increasing climbing without affecting swimming. As hypothesized, fluoxetine reduced metabolism in the habenula and increased metabolism in the ventral tegmental area. In addition, fluoxetine reduced the metabolism of the hippocampal dentate gyrus and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. This study provided the first detailed mapping of the regional brain effects of an antidepressant drug in congenitally helpless rats. All of the effects were consistent with previous studies that have metabolically mapped the effects of serotonergic antidepressants in the normal rat brain, and were in the predicted direction of metabolic normalization of the congenitally helpless rat for all affected brain regions except the prefrontal cortex. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distinct Neuropsychological Mechanisms May Explain Delayed- Versus Rapid-Onset Antidepressant Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Sarah A; Butler, Paul; Munafò, Marcus R; Nutt, David J; Robinson, Emma SJ

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical targets for antidepressants are relatively well established, but we lack a clear understanding of how actions at these proteins translate to clinical benefits. This study used a novel rodent assay to investigate how different antidepressant drugs act to modify affective biases that have been implicated in depression. In this bowl-digging task, rats encounter two equal value learning experiences on separate days (one during an affective manipulation and the other during control conditions). This induces an affective bias that is quantified using a preference test in which both digging substrates are presented together and the individual rats’ choices recorded. The assay can be used to measure affective biases associated with learning (when the treatment is given at the time of the experience) or examine the modification of previously acquired biases (when the treatment is administered before the preference test). The rapid-onset antidepressant ketamine, but not the delayed-onset antidepressant, venlafaxine, attenuated the previously acquired FG7142-induced negative bias following systemic administration. Venlafaxine but not ketamine induced a positive bias when administered before learning. We then used local drug infusions and excitotoxic lesions to localize the effects of ketamine to the medial prefrontal cortex and venlafaxine to the amygdala. Using a modified protocol we also showed that positive and negative biases amplified further when the numbers of substrate–reinforcer associations are increased. We propose that this pattern of results could explain the delayed onset of action of venlafaxine and the rapid onset of action but lack of long-term efficacy seen with ketamine. PMID:25740288

  11. Risk factors for non-adherence to antidepressant treatment in patients with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Sanz, Emilio J

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antidepressant therapy by patients with depressive disorders is essential not only to achieve a positive patient outcome but also to prevent a relapse. The aim of this study was to identify potential modelling factors influencing adherence to antidepressant treatment by patients with mood disorders in the community mental health care setting A total of 160 consecutive psychiatric outpatients attending two Community Mental Health Centres on Tenerife Island between September 2011 and May 2012 were asked to participate in the study; of these, 145 accepted. The Morisky self-report scale was used to assess adherence. The potential predictors examined included socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic variables. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity and -Improvement scales and the Beck Depression Inventory were used for clinical assessment. Drug treatment side-effects were assessed using the "Self-report Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist." All participants were also asked to complete the "Drug Attitude Inventory" (DAI), "Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire" (BMQ), and "Leeds Attitude towards concordance Scale". Discriminant analyses were performed to predict non-adherence. There was no clear correlation between adherence and the socio-demographic variables examined, but adherence was related to a positive attitude of the patients towards his/her treatment (DAI) and low scores in the BMQ-Harm and -Concern subscales. Non-adherence was also related to an increasing severity of depression and to the presence and severity of side-effects. Among our study cohort, the profiles of adherent patients to antidepressant treatment were more closely associated with each patient's attitudes and beliefs than to objective socio-demographic variables. The severity of depression played a relevant role in adherence, but whether this role is direct or an interaction with several concurrent factors is not yet clear. Side-effects were also closely related to adherence, as

  12. Experiences of antidepressant medication and cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Paul; Holttum, Sue

    2015-09-01

    To develop a preliminary model of the experiences of people undergoing combined treatment with antidepressant medication and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for depression. The study used a qualitative methodology informed by grounded theory. Participants were 12 adults who had received treatment with antidepressant medication and CBT for depression. Participants engaged in a semistructured interview about their experiences. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using components of grounded theory methodology. Medication was often seen as an initial aid to surviving a crisis. Staying on medication longer term resulted in some participants feeling caught in a 'drug loop'. Feeling that medication was unhelpful or actively harmful could contribute to participants seeking CBT. Medics also offered information on CBT and acted as gatekeepers, meaning that negotiation was sometimes necessary. CBT was described as a process of being guided towards skilled self-management. Occasionally, participants felt that medication had facilitated CBT at one or more stages. Conversely, developing skilled self-management through CBT could reduce feelings of dependency on medication and affect several of the other elements maintaining the 'drug loop'. Antidepressant medication and CBT are perceived and experienced differently, with CBT often being seen as an alternative to medication, or even as a means to discontinue medication. Service users' experiences and beliefs about medication may thus affect their engagement and goals in CBT, and it may be important for therapists to consider this. Practitioners who prescribe medication should ensure that they also provide information on the availability and appropriateness of CBT, and engage in an open dialogue about treatment options. CBT practitioners should explore aspects of clients' experiences and beliefs about medication. This would particularly include clients' experiences of the effects of medication, their beliefs about

  13. Consistency of psychotropic drug-drug interactions listed in drug monographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyue; Hatton, Randy C; Zhu, Yanmin; Hincapie-Castillo, Juan M; Bussing, Regina; Barnicoat, Marie; Winterstein, Almut G

    With an increasing prevalence of psychotropic polypharmacy, clinicians depend on drug-drug interaction (DDI) references to ensure safe regimens, but the consistency of such information is frequently questioned. To evaluate the consistency of psychotropic DDIs documented in Clinical Pharmacology (CP), Micromedex (MM), and Lexicomp (LC) and summarize consistent psychotropic DDIs. In May 2016, we extracted severe or major psychotropic DDIs for 102 psychotropic drugs, including central nervous system (CNS) stimulants, antidepressants, an antimanic agent (lithium), antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and anxiolytics-sedatives-hypnotics from CP, MM, and LC. We then summarized the psychotropic DDIs that were included in all 3 references and with evidence quality of "excellent" or "good" based on MM. We identified 1496, 938, and 1006 unique severe or major psychotropic DDIs from CP, MM, and LC, respectively. Common adverse effects related to psychotropic DDIs include increased or decreased effectiveness, CNS depression, neurotoxicity, QT prolongation, serotonin syndrome, and multiple adverse effects. Among these interactions, only 371 psychotropic DDIs were documented in all 3 references, 59 of which had "excellent" or "good" quality of evidence based on MM. The consistency of psychotropic DDI documentation across CP, MM, and LC is poor. DDI documentations need standards that would encourage consistency among drug information references. The list of the 59 DDIs may be useful in the assessment of psychotropic polypharmacy and highlighting DDI alerts in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between CYP2D6 Genotypes and the Risk of Antidepressant Discontinuation, Dosage Modification and the Occurrence of Maternal Depression during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anick Bérard

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Importance: Polymorphic expression of drug metabolizing enzymes affects the metabolism of antidepressants, and thus can contribute to drug response and/or adverse events. Pregnancy itself can affect CYP2D6 activity with profound variations determined by CYP2D6 genotype.Objective: To investigate the association between CYP2D6 genotype and the risk of antidepressant discontinuation, dosage modification, and the occurrence of maternal CYP2D6, Antidepressants, Depression during pregnancy.Setting: Data from the Organization of Teratology Information Specialists (OTIS Antidepressants in Pregnancy Cohort, 2006–2010, were used. Women were eligible if they were within 14 completed weeks of pregnancy at recruitment and exposed to an antidepressant or having any exposures considered non-teratogenic.Main Outcomes and Measures: Gestational antidepressant usage was self-reported and defined as continuous/discontinued use, and non-use; dosage modification was further documented. Maternal depression and anxiety were measured every trimester using the telephone interviewer-administered Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and the Beck Anxiety Inventory, respectively. Saliva samples were collected and used for CYP2D6 genotype analyses. Logistic regression models were used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR with 95% confidence intervals.Results: A total of 246 pregnant women were included in the study. The majority were normal metabolizers (NM, n = 204, 83%; 3.3% (n = 8 were ultrarapid metabolizers (UM, 5.7% (n = 14 poor metabolizers (PM, and 8.1% (n = 20 intermediate metabolizers (IM. Among study subjects, 139 women were treated with antidepressants at the beginning of pregnancy, and 21 antidepressant users (15% discontinued therapy during pregnancy. Adjusting for depressive symptoms, and other potential confounders, the risk of discontinuing antidepressants during pregnancy was nearly four times higher in slow metabolizers (poor or intermediate

  15. Is the antidepressive effect of second-generation antidepressants a myth?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P

    2010-01-01

    Two recent meta-analyses on second-generation antidepressants versus placebo in mild to moderate forms of major depression, based on data on all randomized clinical trials using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) submitted to FDA, have shown an effect size of approximately 0.30 in favour...

  16. Antidepressants and the risk of hyponatremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Møller, Katja Biering; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Torstensson, Maia

    2016-01-01

    for the association with hyponatremia in the first p-sodium measured after initiation of treatment were for citalopram 7.8 (CI 7.42 to 8.20); clomipramine 4.93 (CI 2.72 to 8.94); duloxetine 2.05 (CI 1.44 to 292); venlafaxine 2.90 (CI 2.43 to 3.46); mirtazapine 2.95 (CI 2.71 to 3.21); and mianserin 0.90 (CI 0.71 to 1.......14). CONCLUSIONS: All antidepressants except mianserin are associated with hyponatremia. The association is strongest with citalopram and lowest with duloxetine, venlafaxine and mirtazapine....

  17. Evidence based herbal drug standardization approach in coping with challenges of holistic management of diabetes: a dreadful lifestyle disorder of 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Raman; Thakur, Pallavi; Chowdhry, Ayush; Jaiswal, Sarita; Sharma, Anamika; Goel, Rajeev; Sharma, Jyoti; Priyadarshi, Smruti Sagar; Kumar, Vinod; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Arora, Rajesh

    2013-07-04

    Plants by virtue of its composition of containing multiple constituents developed during its growth under various environmental stresses providing a plethora of chemical families with medicinal utility. Researchers are exploring this wealth and trying to decode its utility for enhancing health standards of human beings. Diabetes is dreadful lifestyle disorder of 21st century caused due to lack of insulin production or insulin physiological unresponsiveness. The chronic impact of untreated diabetes significantly affects vital organs. The allopathic medicines have five classes of drugs, or otherwise insulin in Type I diabetes, targeting insulin secretion, decreasing effect of glucagon, sensitization of receptors for enhanced glucose uptake etc. In addition, diet management, increased food fiber intake, Resistant Starch intake and routine exercise aid in managing such dangerous metabolic disorder. One of the key factors that limit commercial utility of herbal drugs is standardization. Standardization poses numerous challenges related to marker identification, active principle(s), lack of defined regulations, non-availability of universally acceptable technical standards for testing and implementation of quality control/safety standard (toxicological testing). The present study proposed an integrated herbal drug development & standardization model which is an amalgamation of Classical Approach of Ayurvedic Therapeutics, Reverse Pharmacological Approach based on Observational Therapeutics, Technical Standards for complete product cycle, Chemi-informatics, Herbal Qualitative Structure Activity Relationship and Pharmacophore modeling and, Post-Launch Market Analysis. Further studies are warranted to ensure that an effective herbal drug standardization methodology will be developed, backed by a regulatory standard guide the future research endeavors in more focused manner.

  18. Targeted analysis of 116 drugs in hair by UHPLC-MS/MS and its application to forensic cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xin; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose

    2017-01-01

    A multi-target method that can detect a broad range of drugs of abuse in human hair, such as hypnotics, anxiolytics, analgesics, benzodiazepines, antihistamines, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anticonvulsants, was developed based on ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass...... spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The drugs were extracted from 10 mg of washed hair by incubation for 18 h in a 25:25:50 (v/v/v) mixture of methanol/acetonitrile/2 mM ammonium formate (8% acetonitrile, pH 5.3). For 51% of the basic drugs, the lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) were in the range of 0.05-0.5 pg...... studies, the present method is sensitive enough to detect single dose drug exposure for many of the drugs. The accuracy was within 75-125% for the majority of drugs. Good precision was observed (relative standard deviations [RSD%] 

  19. Risks for oral health with the use of antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, FPML; deVries, MW; Vissink, A

    In this article, attention is focused on ornl pathology, particularly dental caries, caused by hyposalivation as a consequence of (long-term) use of antidepressants. Changes in clinical psychiatric practice and increasing numbers of presciptions of antidepressants in primary care and specialty care

  20. nfluence of antidepressants on glucose homeostasis : effects and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijks, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Depression has shown to be a common morbidity in patients with diabetes mellitus and comorbid depression in diabetes mellitus patients is frequently treated with antidepressants. It has been postulated that antidepressants may interfere with glucose homeostasis and that the interference of

  1. Efficacy of antidepressants on orofacial pain: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, W.J.J.M.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a common complaint with multiple diagnoses. There is controversy about the effectiveness of antidepressants for the management of orofacial pain disorders. In order to be able to make a best evidence choice between available antidepressants for the treatment of orofacial pain, a

  2. Antidepressants for non-specific low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urquhart, D. M.; Hoving, J. L.; Assendelft, W. W. J. J.; Roland, M.; van Tulder, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressants are commonly used in the management of low-back pain. However, their use is controversial. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this review was to determine whether antidepressants are more effective than placebo for the treatment of non-specific low-back pain. SEARCH STRATEGY:

  3. The Most Prevalnet Organism in Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Its Drug Sensitivity and Resistance to Different Standard Antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nageen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find the most prevalent organism in diabetic foot ulcers and its drug sensitivity and resistance to different standard antibiotics. Study Design: Adescriptive and cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center, Karachi, from December 2010 to December 2012. Methodology: Ninety-five diabetic patients with infected foot wounds of Wegener grade 2 - 5 who had not received any previous antibiotics were included in the study by consecutive sampling. Pus culture specimen from wounds was taken and the organism isolated was identified. Also the most sensitive group of antibiotics and the most resistant one to that organism was noted. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism constituting 23.16% (n=22) of the organisms isolated; Escherichia coli with 17.89% (n=17) and Klebsiella with 12.63% (n=12) followed. Males presented more with diabetic foot (n=52) out of 95 patients. The most common age group affected was 41 - 60 years (73 patients). The organisms were most sensitive to Meropenem, effective in 90 (95%) patients and most resistant to Cotrimoxazole (80, 84% patients). Out of the 95 patients, 39 (41%) patients were hypertensive, 30 (31.5%) were obese and 14 (15%) were smokers. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent organism overall irrespective to gender, age groups and co-morbidity of the patients. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent organism in diabetic foot ulcers; the most effective antibiotic is Meropenem and least effective is Cotrimoxazole. (author)

  4. Influence of psychotherapist density and antidepressant sales on suicide rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapusta, N D; Niederkrotenthaler, T; Etzersdorfer, E; Voracek, M; Dervic, K; Jandl-Jager, E; Sonneck, G

    2009-03-01

    Antidepressant sales and suicide rates have been shown to be correlated in industrialized countries. The aim was to study the possible effects of psychotherapy utilization on suicide rates. We assessed the impact of antidepressant sales and psychotherapist density on suicide rates between 1991 and 2005. To adjust for serial correlation in time series, three first-order autoregressive models adjusted for per capita alcohol consumption and unemployment rates were employed. Antidepressant sales and the density of psychotherapists in the population were negatively associated with suicide rates. This study provides evidence that decreasing suicide rates were associated with both increasing antidepressant sales and an increasing density of psychotherapists. The decrease of suicide rates could reflect a general improvement in mental health care rather than being caused by antidepressant sales or psychotherapist density alone.

  5. Prescription patterns for psychotropic drugs in cancer patients; a large population study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, N.C.; Boks, M.P.; Smeets, H.M.; Zainal, N.Z.; Wit, N.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychotropic drugs are commonly prescribed for various psychological complaints in cancer patients. We aim to examine the prescription pattern in cancer patients of three common psychotropic drugs: benzodiazepine, antidepressant and antipsychotic. Methods: This is a retrospective

  6. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Depression and Antidepressants Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialou, Vincent; Feng, Jian; Robison, Alfred J.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, which control chromatin structure and function, mediate changes in gene expression that occur in response to diverse stimuli. Recent research has established that environmental events and behavioral experience induce epigenetic changes at particular gene loci that help shape neuronal plasticity and function, and hence behavior, and that some of these changes can be very stable and even persist for a lifetime. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that aberrations in chromatin remodeling and subsequent effects on gene expression within limbic brain regions contribute to the pathogenesis of depression and other stress-related disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and other anxiety syndromes. Likewise, the gradually developing but persistent therapeutic effects of antidepressant medications may be achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms. This review discusses recent advances in understanding epigenetic regulation of stress-related disorders and focuses on three distinct aspects of stress-induced epigenetic pathology: the effects of stress and antidepressant treatment during adulthood, the life-long effects of early life stress on subsequent stress vulnerability, and the possible trans-generational transmission of stress-induced abnormalities. PMID:23020296

  7. GLYX-13, a NMDA receptor glycine-site functional partial agonist, induces antidepressant-like effects without ketamine-like side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Nicholson, Katherine L; Balster, Robert L; Leander, J David; Stanton, Patric K; Gross, Amanda L; Kroes, Roger A; Moskal, Joseph R

    2013-04-01

    Recent human clinical studies with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine have revealed profound and long-lasting antidepressant effects with rapid onset in several clinical trials, but antidepressant effects were preceded by dissociative side effects. Here we show that GLYX-13, a novel NMDAR glycine-site functional partial agonist, produces an antidepressant-like effect in the Porsolt, novelty induced hypophagia, and learned helplessness tests in rats without exhibiting substance abuse-related, gating, and sedative side effects of ketamine in the drug discrimination, conditioned place preference, pre-pulse inhibition and open-field tests. Like ketamine, the GLYX-13-induced antidepressant-like effects required AMPA/kainate receptor activation, as evidenced by the ability of NBQX to abolish the antidepressant-like effect. Both GLYX-13 and ketamine persistently (24 h) enhanced the induction of long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission and the magnitude of NMDAR-NR2B conductance at rat Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in vitro. Cell surface biotinylation studies showed that both GLYX-13 and ketamine led to increases in both NR2B and GluR1 protein levels, as measured by Western analysis, whereas no changes were seen in mRNA expression (microarray and qRT-PCR). GLYX-13, unlike ketamine, produced its antidepressant-like effect when injected directly into the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). These results suggest that GLYX-13 produces an antidepressant-like effect without the side effects seen with ketamine at least in part by directly modulating NR2B-containing NMDARs in the MPFC. Furthermore, the enhancement of 'metaplasticity' by both GLYX-13 and ketamine may help explain the long-lasting antidepressant effects of these NMDAR modulators. GLYX-13 is currently in a Phase II clinical development program for treatment-resistant depression.

  8. Growth Modeling with Non-Ignorable Dropout: Alternative Analyses of the STAR*D Antidepressant Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthén, Bengt; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Hunter, Aimee; Leuchter, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This paper uses a general latent variable framework to study a series of models for non-ignorable missingness due to dropout. Non-ignorable missing data modeling acknowledges that missingness may depend on not only covariates and observed outcomes at previous time points as with the standard missing at random (MAR) assumption, but also on latent variables such as values that would have been observed (missing outcomes), developmental trends (growth factors), and qualitatively different types of development (latent trajectory classes). These alternative predictors of missing data can be explored in a general latent variable framework using the Mplus program. A flexible new model uses an extended pattern-mixture approach where missingness is a function of latent dropout classes in combination with growth mixture modeling using latent trajectory classes. A new selection model allows not only an influence of the outcomes on missingness, but allows this influence to vary across latent trajectory classes. Recommendations are given for choosing models. The missing data models are applied to longitudinal data from STAR*D, the largest antidepressant clinical trial in the U.S. to date. Despite the importance of this trial, STAR*D growth model analyses using non-ignorable missing data techniques have not been explored until now. The STAR*D data are shown to feature distinct trajectory classes, including a low class corresponding to substantial improvement in depression, a minority class with a U-shaped curve corresponding to transient improvement, and a high class corresponding to no improvement. The analyses provide a new way to assess drug efficiency in the presence of dropout. PMID:21381817

  9. White matter tract integrity is associated with antidepressant response to lurasidone in bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Martin J; Rubin-Falcone, Harry; Motiwala, Fatima; Chen, Ying; Stewart, Jonathan W; Hellerstein, David J; Mann, J John; McGrath, Patrick J

    2017-09-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder spend the most time in the depressed phase, and that phase is associated with the most morbidity and mortality. Treatment of bipolar depression lacks a test to determine who will respond to treatment. White matter disruptions have been found in bipolar disorder. Previous reports suggest that white matter disruptions may be associated with resistance to antidepressant medication, but this has never been investigated in a prospective study using a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication. Eighteen subjects with bipolar disorder who were in a major depressive episode and off all medications were recruited. Magnetic resonance imaging was acquired using a 64-direction diffusion tensor imaging sequence on a 3T scanner. Subjects were treated with 8 weeks of open-label lurasidone. The Montgomrey-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was completed weekly. Tract-Based Spatial Statistics were utilized to perform a regression analysis of fractional anisotropy (FA) data with treatment outcome as assessed by percent change in MADRS as a regressor while controlling for age and sex, using a threshold of P (threshold-free cluster enhancement-corrected) bipolar disorder were associated with poorer antidepressant response to lurasidone. The disruptions may potentially indicate treatment with a different antidepressant medication class. These results are limited by the open-label study design, sample size and lack of a healthy control group. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Antidepressant-like Effect of Kaempferol and Quercitirin, Isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Han, Pyung-Lim; Lee, Jin-Koo; Suh, Hong-Won

    2010-06-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten. is widely cultivated in Jeju Island (South Korea) for use in manufacture of health foods. This study described antidepressant effect of two flavonoids (kaempferol and quercitrin) isolated from the Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten. The expression of the hypothalamic POMC mRNA or plasma β-endorphin levels were increased by extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten or its flavoniods administered orally. In addition, antidepressant activity was studied using tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and rota-rod test in chronically restraint immobilization stress group in mice. After restraint stress (2 hrs/day for 14 days), animals were kept in cage for 14 days without any further stress, bet with drugs. Mice were fed with a diet supplemented for 14 days and during the behavioral test period with kaempferol or quercitrin (30 mg/kg/day). POMC mRNA or plasma β-endorphin level was increased by extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten and its flavoniods. In addition, immobility time in TST and FST was significantly reduced by kaempferol or quercitrin. In rota-rod test, the time of permanence was maintained to the semblance of control group in turning at 15 rpm. Our results suggest that two flavonoids (kaempferol and quercitrin) isolated from the Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten. show a potent antidepressant effect.

  11. Antidepressant-like Effect of Kaempferol and Quercitirin, Isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Hyun; Sim, Yun-Beom; Han, Pyung-Lim; Lee, Jin-Koo

    2010-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten. is widely cultivated in Jeju Island (South Korea) for use in manufacture of health foods. This study described antidepressant effect of two flavonoids (kaempferol and quercitrin) isolated from the Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten. The expression of the hypothalamic POMC mRNA or plasma β-endorphin levels were increased by extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten or its flavoniods administered orally. In addition, antidepressant activity was studied using tail suspension test (TST), forced swimming test (FST) and rota-rod test in chronically restraint immobilization stress group in mice. After restraint stress (2 hrs/day for 14 days), animals were kept in cage for 14 days without any further stress, bet with drugs. Mice were fed with a diet supplemented for 14 days and during the behavioral test period with kaempferol or quercitrin (30 mg/kg/day). POMC mRNA or plasma β-endorphin level was increased by extract of Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten and its flavoniods. In addition, immobility time in TST and FST was significantly reduced by kaempferol or quercitrin. In rota-rod test, the time of permanence was maintained to the semblance of control group in turning at 15 rpm. Our results suggest that two flavonoids (kaempferol and quercitrin) isolated from the Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten. show a potent antidepressant effect. PMID:22110339

  12. The anxieties of globalization: antidepressant sales and economic crisis in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, Andrew

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes the role of market research firms in shaping the actions of key players in the pharmaceutical arena. It focuses on strategies for marketing novel antidepressants (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs) to doctors in Buenos Aires during the Argentine financial crisis of 2001, posing the question of whether increased antidepressant sales were due to the social situation or to promotional practices. This case demonstrates how 'pharmaceutical relations' - interactions between doctors and pharmaceutical companies - are structured by a gift economy whose effects are monitored through the sales numbers produced by database firms. It suggests that the use of these numbers takes on special importance given the distinctiveness of both the Argentine context and the antidepressant market. More generally, the case points to the interpretive flexibility of psychotropic medication. In the Argentine setting, doctors' prescription of SSRIs was dependent neither on a diagnosis of depression nor on a biological understanding of mental disorder. These drugs found a different means of entering the professionally mediated marketplace: doctors understood and used SSRIs as a treatment not for a lack of serotonin in the brain, but for the suffering caused by the social situation - the sense of insecurity and vulnerability that the economic and political crisis had wrought.

  13. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Rafael G; Osório, Flávia L; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2016-03-01

    To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline). Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Five hundred and fourteen studies were identified, of which 21 met the established criteria. Studies in animals have shown anxiolytic and antidepressive effects of ayahuasca, harmine, and harmaline, and experimental studies in humans and mental health assessments of experienced ayahuasca consumers also suggest that ayahuasca is associated with reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms. A pilot study reported rapid antidepressive effects of a single ayahuasca dose in six patients with recurrent depression. Considering the need for new drugs that produce fewer adverse effects and are more effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptomatology, the described effects of ayahuasca and its alkaloids should be further investigated.

  14. Radioactive cDNA microarrys for gene expression profiles in antidepressant therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. S.; Han, B. J.; Cha, J. H.; Ryu, Y. M.; Shin, E. K.; Park, J. H.; Park, Y. H.; Kim, M. K.

    2002-01-01

    Using radioactive cDNA microarray, we investigated a pattern of gene regulation under treatment of antidepressant on patients of depressive disoder. Basic microarray technology was performed as previously described in our research. The bioinformatic selection of human cDNAs, which is specifically designed for psychiatry, neurology, and signal transduction, were arrayed on nylon membranes. Using with 33P-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles of our interest including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signalings. Gene expression profiles were also classified into several categories in accordance with the gene-regulation of antidepressant. The gene profiles of our interest were significantly up- (16 genes, >2.0 of Z-ratio) or down- (24 genes, <-2.0 of Z ratio) regulated when compared the good responsed group with the bad-responsed one. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology

  15. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael G. dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline. Methods: Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Results: Five hundred and fourteen studies were identified, of which 21 met the established criteria. Studies in animals have shown anxiolytic and antidepressive effects of ayahuasca, harmine, and harmaline, and experimental studies in humans and mental health assessments of experienced ayahuasca consumers also suggest that ayahuasca is associated with reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms. A pilot study reported rapid antidepressive effects of a single ayahuasca dose in six patients with recurrent depression. Conclusion: Considering the need for new drugs that produce fewer adverse effects and are more effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptomatology, the described effects of ayahuasca and its alkaloids should be further investigated.

  16. The analgesic effect of different antidepressants combined with aspirin on thermally induced pain in Albino mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla S. Elhwuegi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Combination analgesics provide more effective pain relief for a broader spectrum of pain. This research examines the possible potentiation of the analgesic effect of different classes of antidepressants when combined with aspirin in thermal model of pain using Albino mice.Methods:Different groups of six animals each were injected intraperitoneally by different doses of aspirin (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, imipramine (2.5, 7.5, 15 or 30 mg/kg, fluoxetine (1.25, 2.5, 5 or 7.5 mg/kg, mirtazapine (1.25, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg and a combination of a fixed dose of aspirin (100 mg/kg with the different doses of the three antidepressants. One hour later the analgesic effect of these treatments were evaluated against thermally induced pain. All data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired Student's t-test.Results:Aspirin had no analgesic effect in thermally induced pain. The three selected antidepressants produced dose dependent analgesia. The addition of a fixed dose of aspirin to imipramine significantly increased the reaction time (RT of the lowest dose (by 23% and the highest dose (by 20%. The addition of the fixed dose of aspirin to fluoxetine significantly increased RT by 13% of the dose 2.5 mg/Kg. Finally, the addition of the fixed dose of aspirin significantly potentiated the antinociceptive effect of the different doses of mirtazapine (RT was increased by 24, 54 and 38% respectively.Conclusion:Combination of aspirin with an antidepressant might produce better analgesia, increasing the efficacy of pain management and reduces side effects by using smaller doses of each drug.

  17. Antidepressants inhibit P2X4 receptor function: a possible involvement in neuropathic pain relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozaki-Saitoh Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain is characterized by pain hypersensitivity to innocuous stimuli (tactile allodynia that is nearly always resistant to known treatments such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or even opioids. It has been reported that some antidepressants are effective for treating neuropathic pain. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. We have recently demonstrated that blocking P2X4 receptors in the spinal cord reverses tactile allodynia after peripheral nerve injury in rats, implying that P2X4 receptors are a key molecule in neuropathic pain. We investigated a possible role of antidepressants as inhibitors of P2X4 receptors and analysed their analgesic mechanism using an animal model of neuropathic pain. Results Antidepressants strongly inhibited ATP-mediated Ca2+ responses in P2X4 receptor-expressing 1321N1 cells, which are known to have no endogenous ATP receptors. Paroxetine exhibited the most powerful inhibition of calcium influx via rat and human P2X4 receptors, with IC50 values of 2.45 μM and 1.87 μM, respectively. Intrathecal administration of paroxetine produced a striking antiallodynic effect in an animal model of neuropathic pain. Co-administration of WAY100635, ketanserin or ondansetron with paroxetine induced no significant change in the antiallodynic effect of paroxetine. Furthermore, the antiallodynic effect of paroxetine was observed even in rats that had received intrathecal pretreatment with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, which dramatically depletes spinal 5-hydroxytryptamine. Conclusion These results suggest that paroxetine acts as a potent analgesic in the spinal cord via a mechanism independent of its inhibitory effect on serotonin transporters. Powerful inhibition on P2X4 receptors may underlie the analgesic effect of paroxetine, and it is possible that some antidepressants clinically used in patients with neuropathic pain show antiallodynic effects, at least in part

  18. Comparing the quality of antidepressant pharmacotherapy in the Department of Veterans Affairs and the private sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Susan H; Leslie, Douglas L; Rosenheck, Robert A

    2004-12-01

    Comparing quality of care between large health care systems is important for health systems management. This study compared measures of the quality of pharmacotherapy for patients with major depression across a sample of patients from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the private sector. In this observational study, all patients who were given a new prescription for an antidepressant and a diagnosis of major depression in the VA during fiscal year 2000 were identified by using administrative data (N=27,713). In the private sector, a similar sample of patients were identified by using Medstat's MarketScan database (N=4,852). For both groups, measures of the quality of antidepressant pharmacotherapy were constructed. These measures were compared across the two groups by using logistic regression models. Controls for age, gender, comorbid disorders, and initial antidepressant drug prescribed were included in some models. Although the populations had different demographic and clinical characteristics, differences in the quality measures between the two systems were few, with the VA slightly outperforming the private sector in the prescription of antidepressants during the acute phase of treatment, the first 84 days (84.7 compared with 81 percent) and during the maintenance phase of treatment, the first 181 days (53.9 compared with 50.9 percent). Patient characteristics that were associated with quality measures included being older, being female, and having a comorbid diagnosis of substance use disorder, bipolar disorder, or anxiety or adjustment disorder. Both systems had relatively high rates of adherence to pharmacotherapy guidelines. Even though the populations in the two systems were different, adjusting the analyses for clinical characteristics did little to change the measured differences between the two systems.

  19. Evaluation of antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine: an acute and chronic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmukhani, Jayesh; Anovadiya, Ashish; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu B

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of commonly used spice Curuma longa Linn. In the present study, the antidepressant like activity of curcumin and its combination with fluoxetine and imipramine was studied in acute model (three doses 24, 5 and 1 h before test) of forced swimming test (FST) in glass jar and tail suspension test (TST) in mice and in chronic model (14 day study) of FST with water wheel in rats. All the tests were carried out in the following seven groups (n = 6 in each group), drugs being given orally (doses for mice): Group 1 (vehicle), group 2 (curcumin 50 mg/kg), group 3 (curcumin 100 mg/kg), group 4 (fluoxetine 20 mg/kg), group 5 (imipramine 15 mg/kg), group 6 (curcumin 100 mg/kg plus fluoxetine 20 mg/kg) and group 7 (curcumin 100 mg/kg plus imipramine 15 mg/kg). Equivalent doses for rats were used. Both the acute model of FST and TST, and the chronic model of FST with water wheel showed significant antidepressant like activity of curcumin in 100 mg/kg dose as compared to vehicle control (p fluoxetine and imipramine (p > 0.05) but its addition to fluoxetine and imipramine did not improve their antidepressant activity (p > 0.05). Curcumin increased both the swimming and climbing behavior in FST, thus its antidepressant like activity could be due to an increase in serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the brain. Curcumin can be a useful antidepressant especially in cases which respond to drugs having mixed effects on serotonin and catecholamines levels in the brain.

  20. Sex-specific antidepressant effects of dietary creatine with and without sub-acute fluoxetine in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia J.; D'Anci, Kristen E.; Kanarek, Robin B.; Renshaw, Perry F.

    2013-01-01

    The potential role of metabolic impairments in the pathophysiology of depression is motivating researchers to evaluate the treatment efficacy of creatine, a naturally occurring energetic and neuroprotective compound found in brain and muscle tissues. Growing evidence is demonstrating the benefit of oral creatine supplements for reducing depressive symptoms in humans and animals. A novel question is whether dietary creatine, when combined with antidepressant drug therapy, would be more effective than either compound alone. To answer this question, four studies were conducted to investigate the behavioral effects of combined creatine and low-dose fluoxetine treatment using the forced swim test in male and female rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed powdered rodent chow supplemented with 0%, 2% or 4% w/w creatine monohydrate for 5 weeks. Rats were injected with fluoxetine (5.0 or 10.0 mg/kg) or saline according to a sub-acute dosing schedule. Female rats maintained on a 4% creatine diet displayed antidepressant-like effects compared to non-supplemented females prior to fluoxetine treatment. In contrast, creatine did not alter behavior reliably in males. Following drug treatment and a second forced swim trial, the antidepressant-like profile of creatine remained significant only in females co-administered 5.0 mg/kg fluoxetine. Moreover, in females only, supplementation with 4% creatine produced a more robust antidepressant-like behavioral profile compared to either dose of fluoxetine alone. Estrous cycle data indicated that ovarian hormones influenced the antidepressant-like effects of creatine. Addressing the issue of sex differences in response to treatment may affect our understanding of creatine, its relationship with depressive behavior, and may lead to sex-specific therapeutic strategies. PMID:22429992

  1. Antidepressant monotherapy vs sequential pharmacotherapy and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, or placebo, for relapse prophylaxis in recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Zindel V; Bieling, Peter; Young, Trevor; MacQueen, Glenda; Cooke, Robert; Martin, Lawrence; Bloch, Richard; Levitan, Robert D

    2010-12-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a group-based psychosocial intervention designed to enhance self-management of prodromal symptoms associated with depressive relapse. To compare rates of relapse in depressed patients in remission receiving MBCT against maintenance antidepressant pharmacotherapy, the current standard of care. Patients who met remission criteria after 8 months of algorithm-informed antidepressant treatment were randomized to receive maintenance antidepressant medication, MBCT, or placebo and were followed up for 18 months. Outpatient clinics at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and St Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario. One hundred sixty patients aged 18 to 65 years meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder with a minimum of 2 past episodes. Of these, 84 achieved remission (52.5%) and were assigned to 1 of the 3 study conditions. Patients in remission discontinued their antidepressants and attended 8 weekly group sessions of MBCT, continued taking their therapeutic dose of antidepressant medication, or discontinued active medication and were switched to placebo. Relapse was defined as a return, for at least 2 weeks, of symptoms sufficient to meet the criteria for major depression on module A of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Intention-to-treat analyses showed a significant interaction between the quality of acute-phase remission and subsequent prevention of relapse in randomized patients (P = .03). Among unstable remitters (1 or more Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score >7 during remission), patients in both MBCT and maintenance treatment showed a 73% decrease in hazard compared with placebo (P = .03), whereas for stable remitters (all Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores ≤7 during remission) there were no group differences in survival. For depressed patients achieving stable or unstable clinical remission, MBCT offers protection against relapse

  2. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J.; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I.; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J.; Singh, Nagendra S.; Dossou, Katina S.S.; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L.; Wainer, Irving W.; Albuquerque, Edson X.; Thompson, Scott M.; Thomas, Craig J.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Gould, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts ~16 percent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite a number of available monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require many weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine), exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects following a single dose in depressed patients. Here we show that the metabolism of ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant actions in vivo. Notably, we demonstrate that these antidepressant actions are NMDAR inhibition-independent but they involve early and sustained α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor activation. We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side-effects. Our results indicate a novel mechanism underlying ketamine’s unique antidepressant properties, which involves the required activity of a distinct metabolite and is independent of NMDAR inhibition. These findings have relevance for the development of next generation, rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:27144355

  3. Adherence to anti-depressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The study of medicine taking is controversial as it often reveals a discrepancy between healthcare professionals' advice and patients' actual behaviour. Qualitative researchers have examined depressed people's adherence to prescriptions of antidepressants by exploring the meaning they impute...... to the medicine and their use of the medicine in the wider context of their everyday lives. This paper contributes to this area of research by means of a prospective research study focussing on depressed patients' perspectives on taking medicine and how they change through time. The study included consecutive...... semi-structured interviews with 16 people four times during the year following an admission to hospital for depression. Data were collected in 2008-2009 in the Region of Southern Denmark. The study was based on an interactionist conception of social career and data were analysed thematically. Findings...

  4. Extracorporeal treatment for tricyclic antidepressant poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais; Sowinski, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTR) in poisoning. Here, the workgroup presents its results for tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). After an extensive literature search, using a predefined...... methodology, the subgroup responsible for this poison reviewed the articles, extracted the data, summarized findings, and proposed structured voting statements following a predetermined format. A two-round modified Delphi method was chosen to reach a consensus on voting statements and RAND...... yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 108 patients, including 12 fatalities, were abstracted. The workgroup concluded that TCAs are not dialyzable and made the following recommendation: ECTR is not recommended in severe TCA poisoning (1D). The workgroup considers...

  5. Antidepressant utilization after hospitalization with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Thomsen, Louise Thirstrup; Kriegbaum, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant (AD) therapy is recommended for patients 4-12months after remission from depression. The aim was to examine whether immigrants (refugees or family reunited immigrants) from non-Western countries are at greater risk than Danish-born residents of 1) not initiating AD...... therapy after discharge and 2) early AD discontinuation. Methods: A cohort of immigrants from non-Western countries (n=132) and matched Danish-born residents (n=396) discharged after first admission with moderate to severe depression between 1 January 1996 and 31 May 2008 was followed in the Danish...... treatment after hospitalization with depression. This may indicate a need for a better understanding of the circumstances of this vulnerable group....

  6. Antidepressant utilization after hospitalization with depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallach-Kildemoes, Helle; Thomsen, Louise Thirstrup; Kriegbaum, Margit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressant (AD) therapy is recommended for patients 4-12 months after remission from depression. The aim was to examine whether immigrants (refugees or family reunited immigrants) from non-Western countries are at greater risk than Danish-born residents of 1) not initiating AD...... therapy after discharge and 2) early AD discontinuation. METHODS: A cohort of immigrants from non-Western countries (n = 132) and matched Danish-born residents (n = 396) discharged after first admission with moderate to severe depression between 1 January 1996 and 31 May 2008 was followed in the Danish...... only minor impact on these associations. CONCLUSION: Immigrants seem less likely to receive the recommended AD treatment after hospitalization with depression. This may indicate a need for a better understanding of the circumstances of this vulnerable group....

  7. Optimal antidepressant dosing. Practical framework for selection, titration, and duration of therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, J W; Witek, M W; Hurwitz, S

    2000-10-01

    Appropriate antidepressant dosing and trial duration are crucial for successful treatment of depression. Before prescribing an antidepressant, primary care physicians should take into account each patient's history, responses to previous antidepressants, depressive symptoms, coexisting illnesses, and current prescriptions. Physicians must be able to help patients manage side effects and know when to discontinue treatment, switch antidepressants, or refer patients to a psychiatrist.

  8. Antidepressant behavioral effects of duloxetine and fluoxetine in the rat forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulla, Leandro; Menezes, Honório Sampaio; Bueno, Bárbara Beatriz Moreira; Schuh, Alexandre; Alves, Rafael José Vargas; Abegg, Milena Pacheco

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effects of the antidepressant drugs duloxetine and fluoxetine on depressive behaviors in rodents. Eighteen male Wistar rats were given systemic injections of duloxetine, fluoxetine, or saline prior to a Forced Swimming Test (FST). Immobility and number of stops were measured. Rats given injections of fluoxetine displayed significantly less immobility (p = 0.02) and fewer stops than the control group (p = 0.003). Duloxetine significantly reduced the number of stops (p = 0.003), but did not effect immobility (p = 0.48). Duloxetine and fluoxetine reduced depressive behaviors in the Forced FST. However, our findings suggest that fluoxetine is more effective than duloxetine.

  9. The inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 as a novel target for antidepressant action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico

    2010-01-01

    therapy of depression. A recent study from our laboratory reported an antidepressant-like response in the rat forced swim test (FST) following chronic (11 day) co-administration of the phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil and the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonist atropine...... rats were treated with vehicle/drug(s) for 14 days, whereafter immobility, swimming and climbing behaviours were measured in the FST, or time spent in social interaction in the social interaction test. Following decapitation, saturation binding studies were performed for the measurement of m...

  10. Harmane induces anxiolysis and antidepressant-like effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricioglu, Feyza; Altunbas, Hale

    2003-12-01

    A forced swim test (FST) and an elevated plus maze (EPM) were used to determine antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of harmane in rats in comparison with a known antidepressant, imipramine (30 mg/kg i.p.). Harmane (2.5, 5.0, or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), saline, or imipramine were given 30 minutes before the tests. Administration of harmane decreased the time of immobility in the FST dose-dependently and increased the time spent in open arms in the EPM, as compared with the saline group. As an endogenous substance, harmane therefore has anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects.

  11. Involvement of NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin in mouse forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Ameli, Sanaz; Akhlaghipour, Golnoosh; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical studies regarding the beneficial effect of gabapentin in depression, we aimed to evaluate the antidepressant-like properties of gabapentin in mice and also the participation of nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in this effect. The following drugs were used in this study: gabapentin; N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a non-specific NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor; 7-nitroindazole, a specific neuronal NOS inhibitor; aminoguanidine, a specific inducible NOS inhibitor; L-arginine, a NO precursor; and sildenafil, a phosphodiestrase inhibitor. Finally, we studied the behavioral effects through the forced swimming test (FST) and the changes of the hippocampus NO level through nitrite assay. The immobility time was significantly reduced after gabapentin administration. Co-administration of non-effective doses of gabapentin and L-NAME or 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) resulted in antidepressant-like effect in FST, while aminoguanidine did not affect the immobility time of gabapentin-treated mice. Furthermore, the antidepressant-like property of gabapentin was prevented by L-arginine or sildenafil. Also, the hippocampal nitrite level was significantly lower in gabapentin-treated mice relative to saline-injected mice, and co-administration of 7-NI with sub-effective gabapentin caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. Our results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin in the mice FST model is mediated at least in part through nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway.

  12. Possible involvement of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in N-acetylcysteine-mediated antidepressant-like effects

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Samhari, Marwa M; Al-Rasheed, Nouf M; Al-Rejaie, Salim; Al-Rasheed, Nawal M; Hasan, Iman H; Mahmoud, Ayman M; Dzimiri, Nduna

    2015-01-01

    Advances in depression research have targeted inflammation and oxidative stress to develop novel types of treatment. The JAK/STAT signaling pathway plays pivotal roles in immune and inflammatory responses. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of N-acetylcysteine, a putative precursor of the antioxidant glutathione, in an animal model of depression, with an emphasis on the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. Fluoxetine, a classical antidepressant drug was also under investigation....

  13. P-glycoprotein Inhibition Increases the Brain Distribution and Antidepressant-Like Activity of Escitalopram in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Fionn E; O'Connor, Richard M; Clarke, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G; Griffin, Brendan T; Cryan, John F

    2013-01-01

    Despite the clinical prevalence of the antidepressant escitalopram, over 30% of escitalopram-treated patients fail to respond to treatment. Recent gene association studies have highlighted a potential link between the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and response to escitalopram. The present studies investigated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between P-gp and escitalopram. In vitro bidirectional transport studies revealed that escitalopram is a transported subst...

  14. Estimation of the standardized risk difference and ratio in a competing risks framework: application to injection drug use and progression to AIDS after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephen R; Lau, Bryan; Eron, Joseph J; Brookhart, M Alan; Kitahata, Mari M; Martin, Jeffrey N; Mathews, William C; Mugavero, Michael J

    2015-02-15

    There are few published examples of absolute risk estimated from epidemiologic data subject to censoring and competing risks with adjustment for multiple confounders. We present an example estimating the effect of injection drug use on 6-year risk of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) after initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy between 1998 and 2012 in an 8-site US cohort study with death before AIDS as a competing risk. We estimate the risk standardized to the total study sample by combining inverse probability weights with the cumulative incidence function; estimates of precision are obtained by bootstrap. In 7,182 patients (83% male, 33% African American, median age of 38 years), we observed 6-year standardized AIDS risks of 16.75% among 1,143 injection drug users and 12.08% among 6,039 nonusers, yielding a standardized risk difference of 4.68 (95% confidence interval: 1.27, 8.08) and a standardized risk ratio of 1.39 (95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.72). Results may be sensitive to the assumptions of exposure-version irrelevance, no measurement bias, and no unmeasured confounding. These limitations suggest that results be replicated with refined measurements of injection drug use. Nevertheless, estimating the standardized risk difference and ratio is straightforward, and injection drug use appears to increase the risk of AIDS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. NF-κB Mediated Regulation of Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis: Relevance to Mood Disorders and Antidepressant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bortolotto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is a peculiar form of process of neuroplasticity that in recent years has gained great attention for its potential implication in cognition and in emotional behavior in physiological conditions. Moreover, a vast array of experimental studies suggested that adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be altered in various neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depression, where its disregulation may contribute to cognitive impairment and/or emotional aspects associated with those diseases. An intriguing area of interest is the potential influence of drugs on adult neurogenesis. In particular, several psychoactive drugs, including antidepressants, were shown to positively modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Among molecules which could regulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis the NF-κB family of transcription factors has been receiving particular attention from our and other laboratories. Herein we review recent data supporting the involvement of NF-κB signaling pathways in the regulation of adult neurogenesis and in the effects of drugs that are endowed with proneurogenic and antidepressant activity. The potential implications of these findings on our current understanding of the process of adult neurogenesis in physiological and pathological conditions and on the search for novel antidepressants are also discussed.

  16. [Interactions of cytostatic agents with other drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, C

    1991-08-31

    With the degree of polypharmacy currently practiced in the field of oncology, there are undoubtedly many drug interactions. In the present study the influence of "non-cytotoxic" drugs on anticancer drugs is discussed, but not the reverse. Not only is the augmentation (reversal of multidrug resistance) or the reduction of antitumor properties of cytotoxic drugs observed, but also cytostatic activities of "non-cytotoxic" drugs themselves. Examples are calmodulin inhibitors such as phenothiazines and tricyclic antidepressants. Interactions may also increase side effects of cytostatic drugs or even neutralize the antitumoral activity. To ensure that interactions are not overlooked, all medicaments being administered should be listed. It is, however, not feasible yet to determine serum concentrations of all the drugs given to the patient. The antitumor activity of supportive care could be evaluated in randomized studies (e.g. cytostatic drugs +/- antidepressants).

  17. Increased use of antidepressants at the end of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Rosholm, Jens-Ulrik; Gichangi, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    of antidepressants increases steadily over time in all age groups. Among the 65+ year-olds it also increases with age and differs substantially between the youngest and the oldest. Very high prevalences are observed: 26.8% among females 85-89 years old and 17.5% among males 85 years and above in 2004. In all age......BACKGROUND: The new antidepressants are generally effective and safe for older people, but may have serious side-effects. The use has been rapidly increasing, but focus on upper age groups has been limited. The pattern of antidepressant use as death approaches has never been analysed. OBJECTIVE......: To analyse the use of antidepressants among individuals aged 65 years and above with respect to time trends, age and proximity to death. DESIGN: Population-based prescription study. SETTING: The County of Funen, Denmark, 1992-2004 (approximately 470,000 inhabitants). RESULTS: The 1-year prevalence...

  18. Antidepressant sales and regional variations of suicide mortality in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blüml, V; Helbich, M.; Mayr, M; Turnwald, R; Vyssoki, B; Lewitzka, U; Hartung, S; Plener, P; Fegert, J; Kapusta, N

    2017-01-01

    Suicides account for over one million deaths per year worldwide with depression among the most important risk factors. Epidemiological research into the relationship between antidepressant utilization and suicide mortality has shown heterogeneous and contradictory results. Different methodological

  19. Stimulation of entorhinal cortex-dentate gyrus circuitry is antidepressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sanghee; Reynolds, Ryan P; Petrof, Iraklis; White, Alicia; Rivera, Phillip D; Segev, Amir; Gibson, Adam D; Suarez, Maiko; DeSalle, Matthew J; Ito, Naoki; Mukherjee, Shibani; Richardson, Devon R; Kang, Catherine E; Ahrens-Nicklas, Rebecca C; Soler, Ivan; Chetkovich, Dane M; Kourrich, Saïd; Coulter, Douglas A; Eisch, Amelia J

    2018-04-16

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is considered a 'circuitopathy', and brain stimulation therapies hold promise for ameliorating MDD symptoms, including hippocampal dysfunction. It is unknown whether stimulation of upstream hippocampal circuitry, such as the entorhinal cortex (Ent), is antidepressive, although Ent stimulation improves learning and memory in mice and humans. Here we show that molecular targeting (Ent-specific knockdown of a psychosocial stress-induced protein) and chemogenetic stimulation of Ent neurons induce antidepressive-like effects in mice. Mechanistically, we show that Ent-stimulation-induced antidepressive-like behavior relies on the generation of new hippocampal neurons. Thus, controlled stimulation of Ent hippocampal afferents is antidepressive via increased hippocampal neurogenesis. These findings emphasize the power and potential of Ent glutamatergic afferent stimulation-previously well-known for its ability to influence learning and memory-for MDD treatment.

  20. Increase in depression diagnoses and prescribed antidepressants among young girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovlund, Charlotte Wessel; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Mørch, Lina Steinrud

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To analyse trends in depression diagnoses and antidepressant use according to age and gender. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all women and men of 10-49 years living in Denmark during 2000-2013. The Psychiatric Registry and Prescription Registry provided data on depression...... diagnoses and antidepressant medication, respectively. Incidence rates as well as 1-year prevalence rates were calculated. RESULTS: The incidence and 1-year prevalence rates of depression diagnoses increased during 2000-2013. The women/men rates were 2.0 for both 1-year prevalence of depressions diagnoses...... and antidepressant use. For adolescent girls, the absolute increase was 3 per 1000 for depression diagnoses and 8 per 1000 for first use of antidepressants, compared to boys who had an increase of 1.1 and 3 per 1000, respectively. Before puberty, boys and girls had almost the same incidence rates of both depression...

  1. Antidepressant treatment of depression in rural nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Cindy Sullivan; Dyck, Mary J; Culp, Kennith R; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2008-09-01

    Under-diagnosis and under-treatment of depression are major problems in nursing home residents. The purpose of this study was to determine antidepressant use among nursing home residents who were diagnosed with depression using three different methods: (1) the Geriatric Depression Scale, (2) Minimum Data Set, and (3) primary care provider assessments. As one would expect, the odds of being treated with an antidepressant were about eight times higher for those diagnosed as depressed by the primary care provider compared to the Geriatric Depression Scale or the Minimum Data Set. Men were less likely to be diagnosed and treated with antidepressants by their primary care provider than women. Depression detected by nurses through the Minimum Data Set was treated at a lower rate with antidepressants, which generates issues related to interprofessional communication, nursing staff communication, and the need for geropsychiatric role models in nursing homes.

  2. Antidepressant use during pregnancy and asthma in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Olsen, Jørn; Pedersen, Lars Henning

    2015-01-01

    in the offspring. METHODS: A cohort study was performed among all live singletons born in Denmark between 1996 and 2007. Mothers who had a diagnosis of depressive disorder and/or who used antidepressants 1 year before or during the index pregnancy were identified. Using a Cox proportional hazards regression model...... or use of antidepressants 1 year before or during pregnancy). Prenatal maternal depression was associated with childhood asthma (HR: 1.25 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.20–1.30]). Overall, 8895 children were exposed to antidepressants in utero. Compared with children born to mothers with prenatal......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that maternal depression during pregnancy is abstract associated with asthma in the offspring, but the role of medical treatment of depression is not known. Our goal was to examine whether prenatal antidepressant use increases the risk of asthma...

  3. Prescribing patterns of medicine classified as 'antidepressants' in South African children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanita R. Burger

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to characterise prescribing patterns of medicine classified as 'antidepressants' (hereafter simply referred to as antidepressants in children and adolescents in the private health care sector of South Africa. A retrospective drug utilisation design was used to identify patients aged 19 years and younger from a South African pharmaceutical benefit management company’s database, whom were issued at least one antidepressant between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2006. Prescribed daily dosages (PDDs were calculated using the Statistical Analysis System® program. A total of 1 013 patients received a mean number of 2.88 (SD 3.04 prescriptions per patient. Females received more prescriptions than their male counterparts, with the highest prevalence in the 15 ≤ 19 years age group. The pharmacological groups most prescribed were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (43.0% and the tricyclics (42.7%, with imipramine (22.04% and amitriptyline (19% as the most commonly prescribed drugs. Approximately 30% (n = 2 300 of all antidepressants in the study population were prescribed off-label. Amitriptyline and clomipramine were prescribed at daily dosages higher than recommended in children and adolescents aged 9 ≤ 15 years. Lithium, trimipramine, trazodone and sulpiride were prescribed at sub-therapeutic dosages in adolescents. This study provided insight in the prescribing patterns of medicine classified as antidepressants in South African children and adolescents. These drugs, however, have many indications. Further research is needed to determine reasons why specific drugs are prescribed in this population. Opsomming Die algemene doelstelling van hierdie studie was om die voorskrifpatrone van middels wat as 'antidepressante' geklassifiseer word (hierna verwys na as slegs antidepressante wat vir kinders en adolessente in die Suid-Afrikaanse private gesondheidsorgsektor voorgeskryf word, te beskryf. 'n

  4. Explanatory models of depression and treatment adherence to antidepressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Johannessen, Helle; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    and medicine were not central. However, taking antidepressant medication was a meaningful part of being admitted to hospital, and the adoption of the rhetoric and practices of biomedicine strengthened patients' sense of control and hope for recovery. If medicine was ineffective, the explanatory models...... legitimised alternative strategies towards recovery, including non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The patients' reasons for adhering to antidepressants included a range of diverse psychosocial issues, and could be regarded as a central part of their common sense illness management....

  5. Achieving a Spiritual Therapy Standard for Drug Dependency in Malaysia, from an Islamic Perspective: Brief Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghatoleslam, Tahereh; Habil, Hussain; Hatim, Ahmad; Rashid, Rusdi; Ardakan, Abolfazl; Esmaeili Motlaq, Farid

    2015-01-01

    Religion is one of the protective factors that facilities positive outcomes by preventing individuals from engaging in addictive substance. A recent study has confirmed that religion inhibits drug addiction. The concept of psychospiritual therapy was to introduce drug addiction. Therefore, of the various methods of psychotherapy, the usage of Taqwa (piety) emerged as an applicable method of Islamic spiritual therapy. This study was conducted in Malaysia as a Muslim country and focuses on Islamic recommendations and its relation to spiritual therapy.

  6. Antidepressant Effects of a Single Dose of Ayahuasca in Patients With Recurrent Depression: A SPECT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, Rafael Faria; de Lima Osório, Flávia; Dos Santos, Rafael G; Macedo, Ligia R H; Maia-de-Oliveira, João Paulo; Wichert-Ana, Lauro; de Araujo, Draulio Barros; Riba, Jordi; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Hallak, Jaime E C

    2016-02-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian botanical hallucinogenic brew which contains dimethyltryptamine, a 5-HT2A receptor agonist, and harmine, a monoamine-oxidase A inhibitor. Our group recently reported that ayahuasca administration was associated with fast-acting antidepressive effects in 6 depressive patients. The objective of the present work was to assess the antidepressive potentials of ayahuasca in a bigger sample and to investigate its effects on regional cerebral blood flow. In an open-label trial conducted in an inpatient psychiatric unit, 17 patients with recurrent depression received an oral dose of ayahuasca (2.2 mL/kg) and were evaluated with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Clinician Administered Dissociative States Scale during acute ayahuasca effects and 1, 7, 14, and 21 days after drug intake. Blood perfusion was assessed eight hours after drug administration by means of single photon emission tomography. Ayahuasca administration was associated with increased psychoactivity (Clinician Administered Dissociative States Scale) and significant score decreases in depression-related scales (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) from 80 minutes to day 21. Increased blood perfusion in the left nucleus accumbens, right insula and left subgenual area, brain regions implicated in the regulation of mood and emotions, were observed after ayahuasca intake. Ayahuasca was well tolerated. Vomiting was the only adverse effect recorded, being reported by 47% of the volunteers. Our results suggest that ayahuasca may have fast-acting and sustained antidepressive properties. These results should be replicated in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials.

  7. Antidepressant Treatment for Acute Bipolar Depression: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Amit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While studies in the past have focused more on treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder (BD, recent findings demonstrate the depressive phase to be at least as debilitating. However, in contrast to unipolar depression, depression in bipolar patients exhibits a varying response to antidepressants, raising questions regarding their efficacy and tolerability. Methods. We conducted a MEDLINE and Cochrane Collaboration Library search for papers published between 2005 and 2011 on the subject of antidepressant treatment of bipolar depression. Sixty-eight articles were included in the present review. Results. While a few studies did advocate the use of antidepressants, most well-controlled studies failed to show a robust effect of antidepressants in bipolar depression, regardless of antidepressant class or bipolar subtype. There was no significant increase in the rate of manic/hypomanic switch, especially with concurrent use of mood stabilizers. Prescribing guidelines published in recent years rely more on atypical antipsychotics, especially quetiapine, as a first-line therapy. Conclusions. Antidepressants probably have no substantial role in acute bipolar depression. However, in light of conflicting results between studies, more well-designed trials are warranted.

  8. In vitro comparison of the activity of various antibiotics and drugs against new Taiwan isolates and standard strains of avian mycoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M Y

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-nine antibiotics or drugs were incorporated individually into mycoplasma agar to evaluate their inhibitory activity against avian mycoplasmas: 100 recent Taiwan isolates of 7 serotypes and 10 standard strains of 7 serotypes were tested. All of the standard strains were very sensitive to erythromycin, chlorotetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline, and tetracycline, but the local isolates were highly resistant to these antibiotics. The drugs or antibiotics that possessed an MIC90 of 50 micrograms/ml or less against the local isolates were tiamulin (less than 0.4 micrograms/ml), lincospectin (2.7), josamycin (2.7), lincomycin (3.0), spectinomycin (4.8), tylosin (6.0), kanamycin (6.0), chloramphenicol (6.0), gentamicin (7.5), apramycin (24.5), doxycycline (27.4), minocycline (29.0), spiramycin (30.0), colistin (44.3), leucomycin (45.0), and streptomycin (50.0). The MIC90 of the other antibiotics or drugs was greater than 50 micrograms/ml. None of the isolates or strains were sensitive to nalidixic acid, ronidazole, penicillin, ampicillin, cephalexin, carbadox, or four sulfa drugs at a concentration about 5 times the therapeutic level.

  9. Learning and memory in the forced swimming test: effects of antidepressants having varying degrees of anticholinergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enginar, Nurhan; Yamantürk-Çelik, Pınar; Nurten, Asiye; Güney, Dilvin Berrak

    2016-07-01

    The antidepressant-induced reduction in immobility time in the forced swimming test may depend on memory impairment due to the drug's anticholinergic efficacy. Therefore, the present study evaluated learning and memory of the immobility response in rats after the pretest and test administrations of antidepressants having potent, comparatively lower, and no anticholinergic activities. Immobility was measured in the test session performed 24 h after the pretest session. Scopolamine and MK-801, which are agents that have memory impairing effects, were used as reference drugs for a better evaluation of the memory processes in the test. The pretest administrations of imipramine (15 and 30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (7.5 and 15 mg/kg), trazodone (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg), and moclobemide (10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective, whereas the pretest administrations of scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg) and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time suggesting impaired "learning to be immobile" in the animals. The test administrations of imipramine (30 mg/kg), amitriptyline (15 mg/kg), moclobemide (10 mg/kg), scopolamine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg), and MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) decreased immobility time, which suggested that the drugs exerted antidepressant activity or the animals did not recall that attempting to escape was futile. The test administrations of trazodone (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (10 and 20 mg/kg) produced no effect on immobility time. Even though the false-negative and positive responses made it somewhat difficult to interpret the findings, this study demonstrated that when given before the pretest antidepressants with or without anticholinergic activity seemed to be devoid of impairing the learning process in the test.

  10. New insight into the antidepressants action: modulation of kynurenine pathway by increasing the kynurenic acid/3-hydroxykynurenine ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocki, Tomasz; Wnuk, Sebastian; Kloc, Renata; Kocki, Janusz; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Urbanska, Ewa M

    2012-02-01

    Altered function of kynurenine pathway has emerged recently as one of the factors contributing to the pathogenesis of depression. Neuroprotective kynurenic acid (KYNA) and neurotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) are two immediate metabolites of L: -kynurenine. Here, we aimed to assess the hypothesis that antidepressant drugs that may change brain KYNA/3-HK ratio. In primary astroglial cultures, fluoxetine, citalopram, amitriptyline and imipramine (1-10 μM) increased de novo production of KYNA and diminished 3-HK synthesis (24 and 48, but not 2 h). RT-PCR studies revealed that Kat1, Kat2 and kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (Kmo) gene expressions were not altered after 2 h. At 24 h, the expression of Kat1 and Kat2 genes was enhanced by all studied drugs, whereas Kmo expression was diminished by citalopram, fluoxetine and amitriptyline, but not imipramine. After 48 h, the expression of Kat1 and Kat2 was further up-regulated, and Kmo expression was down-regulated by all antidepressants. The ratio KYNA/3-HK was increased by fluoxetine, citalopram, amitriptyline and imipramine in a time-dependent manner-the effect was not observed after 2 h, modest after 24 h and robust after 48 h incubation time. Our findings indicate that the action of antidepressants may involve re-establishing of the beneficial ratio between KYNA and 3-HK. Shift in the kynurenine pathway, observed after prolonged exposure to antidepressant drugs, may partly explain their delayed therapeutic effectiveness.

  11. Herb-drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugh-Berman, A

    2000-01-08

    Concurrent use of herbs may mimic, magnify, or oppose the effect of drugs. Plausible cases of herb-drug interactions include: bleeding when warfarin is combined with ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), garlic (Allium sativum), dong quai (Angelica sinensis), or danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza); mild serotonin syndrome in patients who mix St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) with serotonin-reuptake inhibitors; decreased bioavailability of digoxin, theophylline, cyclosporin, and phenprocoumon when these drugs are combined with St John's wort; induction of mania in depressed patients who mix antidepressants and Panax ginseng; exacerbation of extrapyramidal effects with neuroleptic drugs and betel nut (Areca catechu); increased risk of hypertension when tricyclic antidepressants are combined with yohimbine (Pausinystalia yohimbe); potentiation of oral and topical corticosteroids by liquorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra); decreased blood concentrations of prednisolone when taken with the Chinese herbal product xaio chai hu tang (sho-salko-to); and decreased concentrations of phenytoin when combined with the Ayurvedic syrup shankhapushpi. Anthranoid-containing plants (including senna [Cassia senna] and cascara [Rhamnus purshiana]) and soluble fibres (including guar gum and psyllium) can decrease the absorption of drugs. Many reports of herb-drug interactions are sketchy and lack laboratory analysis of suspect preparations. Health-care practitioners should caution patients against mixing herbs and pharmaceutical drugs.

  12. Location of the Antidepressant Binding Site in the Serotonin Transporter IMPORTANCE OF SER-438 IN RECOGNITION OF CITALOPRAM AND TRICYCLIC ANTIDEPRESSANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Taboureau, Olivier; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2009-01-01

    antidepressants, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram and the tricyclic antidepressants imipramine, clomipramine, and amitriptyline. A conservative mutation of Ser-438 to threonine (S438T) selectively increased the K-i values for these antidepressants up to 175-fold. The effects...

  13. A possible participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channels in the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Shyamshree S S; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2012-06-15

    The present study investigated the influence of transient receptor vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel agonist (capsaicin) and antagonist (capsazepine) either alone or in combination with traditional antidepressant drug, fluoxetine; or a serotonin hydroxylase inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine; or a glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist, NMDA on the forced swim test and tail suspension test using male Swiss mice. Results revealed that intracerebroventricular injections of capsaicin (200 and 300 μg/mouse) and capsazepine (100 and 200 μg/mouse) reduced the immobility time, exhibiting antidepressant-like activity that was comparable to the effects of fluoxetine (2.5-10 μg/mouse) in both the tests. However, in the presence of inactive dose (10 μg/mouse) of capsazepine, capsaicin (300 μg/mouse) had no influence on the indices of both tests, signifying that the effects are TRPV1-mediated. Further, the antidepressant-like effects of both the TRPV1 ligands were neutralized in mice-pretreated with NMDA (0.1 μg/mouse), suggestive of the fact that decreased glutamatergic transmission might contribute to the antidepressant-like activity. In addition, co-administration of sub-threshold dose of capsazepine (10 μg/mouse) and fluoxetine (1.75 μg/mouse) produced a synergistic effect in both the tests. In contrast, inactive doses of capsaicin (10 and 100 μg/mouse) partially abolished the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine (10 μg/mouse), while its effect was potentiated by active dose of capsaicin (200 μg/mouse). Moreover, pretreatment of mice with para-chlorophenylalanine (300 mg/kg/day × 3 days, i.p.) attenuated the effects of capsaicin and capsazepine, demonstrating a probable interplay between serotonin and TRPV1, at least in parts. Thus, our data indicate a possible role of TRPV1 in depressive-like symptoms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon [College of Medicine, Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology.

  15. Radioactive cDNA microarray (II): Gene expression profiling of antidepressant treatment by human cDNA microarray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hye; Kang, Rhee Hun; Ham, Byung Joo; Lee, Min Su; Shin, Kyung Ho; Choe, Jae Gol; Kim, Meyoung Kon

    2003-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a prevalent psychiatric disorder in primary care, associated with impaired patient functioning and well-being. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and is a commonly prescribed antidepressant compound. Its action is primarily attributed to selective inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the central nervous system. Objectives ; the aims of this study were two-fold: (1) to determine the usefulness for investigation of the transcription profiles in depression patients, and (2) to assess the differences in gene expression profiles between positive response group and negative response groups by fluoxetine treatment. This study included 53 patients with major depression (26 in positive response group with antidepressant treatment, 27 in negative response group with antidepressant treatment), and 53 healthy controls. To examine the difference of gene expression profile in depression patients, radioactive complementary DNA microarrays were used to evaluate changes in the expression of 1,152 genes in total. Using 33p-labeled probes, this method provided highly sensitive gene expression profiles including brain receptors, drug metabolism, and cellular signaling. Gene transcription profiles were classified into several categories in accordance with the antidepressant gene-regulation. The gene profiles were significantly up-(22 genes) and down-(16 genes) regulated in the positive response group when compared to the control group. Also, in the negative response group, 35 genes were up-regulated and 8 genes were down-regulated when compared to the control group. Consequently, we demonstrated that radioactive human cDNA microarray is highly likely to be an efficient technology for evaluating the gene regulation of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), by using high-throughput biotechnology

  16. Antidepressant-Like Effects of Central BDNF Administration in Mice of Antidepressant Sensitive Catalepsy (ASC) Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonova, Maria; Kulikov, Alexander V

    2012-08-31

    Although numerous data evidence the implication of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression, the potential for BDNF to correct genetically defined depressive-like states is poorly studied. This study was aimed to reveal antidepressant-like effects of BDNF (300 ng, 2×, i.c.v.) on behavior and mRNA expression of genes associated with depression-like state in the brain in mice of antidepressant sensitive catalepsy (ASC) strain characterized by high hereditary predisposition to catalepsy and depressive-like features. Behavioral tests were held on the 7th-16th days after the first (4th-13th after the second) BDNF injection. Results showed that BDNF normalized impaired sexual motivation in the ASC males, and this BDNF effect differed, with advantageous effects, from that of widely used antidepressants. The anticataleptic effect of two BDNF injections was enhanced compared with a single administration. A tendency to decrease the immobility duration in tail-suspension test was observed in BDNF-treated ASC mice. The effects on catalepsy and sexual motivation were specific since BDNF did not alter locomotor and exploratory activity or social interest in the ASC mice. Along with behavioral antidepressant-like effects on the ASC mice, BDNF increased hippocampal mRNA levels of Bdnf and Creb1 (cAMP response element-binding protein gene). BDNF also augmented mRNA levels of Arc gene encoding Arc (Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated) protein involved in BDNF-induced processes of neuronal and synaptic plasticity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. The data suggest that: [1] BDNF is effective in the treatment of some genetically defined behavioral disturbances; [2] BDNF influences sexually-motivated behavior; [3] Arc mRNA levels may serve as a molecular marker of BDNF physiological activity associated with its long-lasting behavioral effects; [4] ASC mouse strain can be used as a suitable model to study mechanisms of BDNF effects on

  17. The antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects following co-treatment with escitalopram and risperidone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, K; Rogoz, Z

    2016-06-01

    Several clinical reports have documented a beneficial effect of the addition of a low dose of risperidone to the ongoing treatment with antidepressants, in particular selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), in the treatment of drug-resistant depression and treatment-resistant anxiety disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effect of treatment with the antidepressant escitalopram (SSRI) given separately or jointly with a low dose of risperidone (an atypical antipsychotic) in the forced swim test and in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. The obtained results showed that escitalopram at doses of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg evoked antidepressant-like effect in the forced swim test. Moreover, risperidone at low doses (0.05 or 0.1 mg/kg) enhanced the antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram (1 mg/kg) in this test by increasing the swimming time and decreasing the immobility time in those animals. WAY 100635 (a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg abolished the antidepressant-like effect induced by co-administration of escitalopram and risperidone. The active behavior in that test did not reflect an increase in general activity, since the combined treatment with escitalopram and risperidone failed to enhance the exploratory activity of rats. In the following experiment, we showed that escitalopram (5 mg/kg) and mirtazapine (5 or 10 mg/kg) or risperidone (0.1 mg/kg) induced an anxiolytic-like effect in the elevated plus-maze test, and the combined treatment with an ineffective dose of risperidone (0.05 mg/kg) enhanced the anxiolytic-like effects of escitalopram (2.5 mg/kg) or mirtazapine (1 and 2.5 mg/kg) in this test. The obtained results suggest that risperidone applied at a low dose enhances the antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram in the forced swim test, and that 5-HT1A receptors may play some role in these effects. Moreover, a low dose of risperidone may also enhance the anxiolytic-like action of the studied

  18. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Tarang; Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors.Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. DATA SOURCES: Clinical...... for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.......93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary...

  19. A new strategy for antidepressant prescription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Lavergne

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available From our research and literature search we propose an understanding of the mechanism of action of antidepressants (ADs that should lead to increase efficacy and tolerance.We understand that ADs promote synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. This promotion is linked with dopamine (DA stimulation. Literature shows that all ADs (chemical, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, sleep deprivation increase at least one neuromodulator (serotonin, noradrenaline or DA; this article focuses on DA release or turn-over in the frontal cortex. DA increase promotes synaptic plasticity with an inverted U shape dose-response curve. Specific interaction between DA and glutamate relies on DA (D1 receptors and Glutamate (NMDA receptors and/or on neurotrophic factors activation. With the understanding that all ADs have a common, final, DArgic stimulation that promotes synaptic plasticity we can predict that:1AD efficiency is related to the compound strength for inducing DArgic stimulation.2AD efficiency presents a therapeutic window that coincides with the inverted U shape DA response curve.3AD delay of action is related to a synaptogenesis and neurogenesis delay of action.4The minimum efficient dose can be found by starting at a low dosage and increasing up to the patient response. 5An increased tolerance requires a concomitant prescription of a few ADs, with different or opposite adverse effects, at a very low dose.6ADs could improve all diseases with cognitive impairments and synaptic depression by increasing synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis.

  20. Antidepressant-like effects of the acute and chronic administration of nicotine in the rat forced swimming test and its interaction with fluoxetine [correction of flouxetine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Palacios, G; Bonilla-Jaime, H; Velázquez-Moctezuma, J

    2004-05-01

    An antidepressant action of nicotine (NIC) has recently been suggested. Flouxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is currently the most widely used antidepressant. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the administration of NIC, fluoxetine (FLX), and the combination of both drugs given acutely, subchronically, and chronically as well as 7 days after chronic administration of these drugs on the forced swim test. Results showed that NIC induced a significant reduction of the time in immobility during the forced swim test (antidepressant effect), with a concomitant increase in swimming activity (serotonergic activation), after acute administration. These effects remain the same after subchronic and chronic administration. FLX failed to induce any effect after acute administration but did induce a significant decrease of immobility and an increase of swimming after subchronic administration. The effect of the chronic administration was significantly larger compared to subchronic administration. The combination of both drugs induced a larger effect than that observed after a single administration but only after subchronic treatment. No effect was observed after the end of the 7-day treatments. Data suggest that NIC has an antidepressant action that is expressed faster than FLX but remains the same later. Thus, cholinergic-serotonergic interactions could play an important role in the treatment of depression.

  1. Personality traits predict treatment outcome with an antidepressant in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanum, L; Malt, U F

    2000-09-01

    We investigated the relationship between personality traits and response to treatment with the tetracyclic antidepressant mianserin or placebo in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGD) without psychopathology. Forty-eight patients completed the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory, Neuroticism Extroversion Openness -Personality Inventory (NEO-PI), and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ), neuroticism + lie subscales, before they were consecutively allocated to a 7-week double-blind treatment study with mianserin or placebo. Treatment response to pain and target symptoms were recorded daily with the Visual Analogue Scale and Clinical Global Improvement Scale at every visit. A low level of neuroticism and little concealed aggressiveness predicted treatment outcome with the antidepressant drug mianserin in non-psychiatric patients with FGD. Inversely, moderate to high neuroticism and marked concealed aggressiveness predicted poor response to treatment. These findings were most prominent in women. Personality traits were better predictors of treatment outcome than serotonergic sensitivity assessed with the fenfluramine test. Assessment of the personality traits negativism, irritability, aggression, and neuroticism may predict response to drug treatment of FGD even when serotonergic sensitivity is controlled for. If confirmed in future studies, the findings point towards a more differential psychopharmacologic treatment of FGD.

  2. Synthesis and Antidepressant Activity of Some New 5-(1H-Indol-3-yl-3-(substituted aryl-4,5-dihydroisoxazoline Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin O. Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study refers to the synthesis of new antidepressant candidates using the indole scaffold. In an attempt to identify potential lead antidepressant agents, a number of indole molecules, incorporating isoxazoline, were synthesized by microwave-assisted synthesis. The antidepressant activity of the synthesized compounds (3a–3n was evaluated by forced swim test in mice and their locomotor activity was assessed using actophotometry. The present paper showed significant antidepressant activity for all compounds of the series and no significant change in locomotor activity of mice. Compounds 3d and 3j were found to be potent molecules of this series, when compared with the reference drugs imipramine and fluoxetine. It clearly demonstrated that replacement of aromatic core by appropriate heterocycles such as pyridine and pyrrole on the 5-(1H-Indol-3-yl-3-(Phenyl-4,5-dihydroisoxazoline (3a would generate more potent derivatives. Thus, these compounds can serve as potential leads for further antidepressant studies.

  3. Antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine may depend on translocator protein activity and pretest session duration in forced swimming test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, Nikita V; Kalinina, Tatiana S; Shimshirt, Alexander A; Korolev, Anton O; Volkova, Anna V; Voronina, Tatiana A

    2018-06-01

    The antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine (20 mg/kg i.p.) has been assessed using the forced swimming test (FST) in IRC (CD-1) mice exposed or not to a pretest session of different duration (5 or 20 min). The influence of the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) activity on the antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine (20 mg/kg i.p.) in the FST was also studied. The antidepressant-like effect of fluoxetine was observed only in mice subjected to a 5-min pretest session 24 h before the FST. The TSPO antagonist PK11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide; 1 or 3 mg/kg i.p.] inhibited the antidepressant activity of fluoxetine in the FST. In the present study, fluoxetine or PK11195 was administered for a short duration. We suppose that the functional activity of TSPO may depend on a pretest session and that using this procedure is necessary to detect antidepressant activity of fluoxetine-like drugs.

  4. Possible involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the antidepressant-like effects of gabapentin in mouse forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Nikoui, Vahid; Zolfaghari, Samira; Chamanara, Mohsen; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-07-01

    Gabapentin as an anticonvulsant drug also has beneficial effects in treatment of depression. Previously, we showed that acute administration of gabapentin produced an antidepressant-like effect in the mouse forced swimming test (FST) by a mechanism that involves the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO). Considering the involvement of NO in adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels (K ATP ), in the present study we investigated the involvement of K ATP channels in antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin. Gabapentin at different doses (5-10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) were administrated by intraperitoneal route, 60 and 30 min, respectively, before the test. To clarify the probable involvement of K ATP channels, mice were pretreated with K ATP channel inhibitor or opener. Gabapentin at dose 10 mg/kg significantly decreased the immobility behavior of mice similar to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg). Co-administration of subeffective dose (1 mg/kg) of glibenclamide (inhibitor of K ATP channels) with gabapentin (3 mg/kg) showed a synergistic antidepressant-like effect. Also, subeffective dose of cromakalim (opener of K ATP channels, 0.1 mg/kg) inhibited the antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin (10 mg/kg). None of the treatments had any impact on the locomotor movement. Our study, for the first time, revealed that antidepressant-like effect of gabapentin in mice is mediated by blocking the K ATP channels.

  5. Age-related changes in the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine and fluoxetine in the rat forced-swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Nazario, Maribel; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2016-02-01

    Some reports suggest that older patients are less responsive to antidepressants than young adults, but this idea has not been fully supported. Here, we investigated the role of aging in the behavioral effects of the antidepressants, desipramine (DMI) (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (FLX) (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) in young adults (3-5 months), middle-aged (MA, 12-15 months), and senescent (SE, 23-25 months) male rats in the forced-swim test. In addition, locomotor activity and motor coordination were assessed as side-effects. DMI and fluoxetine produced an antidepressant-like effect in YA and MA animals, although in the latter group, a shift to the right in the dose-response curve was found for DMI. Importantly, neither drug was effective in SE animals. Motor side-effects were produced mainly by DMI in MA and SE rats. Therefore, a decrease in the antidepressant-like effect is associated strongly with senescence as well as an increased vulnerability to motor side-effects, particularly of tricyclics. This study is significant because SE animals are scarcely studied in pharmacological screening tests, and our findings might be useful for improving antidepressant treatments for the increasing aged population.

  6. The antidepressant-like effects of topiramate alone or combined with 17β-estradiol in ovariectomized Wistar rats submitted to the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Hernández, Miguel; Téllez-Alcántara, N Patricia; Olivera-López, Jorge I; Jaramillo, M Teresa

    2014-09-01

    There is a significant delay in the clinical response of antidepressant drugs, and antidepressant treatments produce side effects. We examined the relationship between 17β-estradiol and topiramate in ovariectomized Wistar rats submitted to the forced swimming test (FST). Topiramate was administered alone or combined with 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized rats submitted to the FST. Topiramate (20 mg/kg, P swimming; these effects were antagonized by finasteride (50 mg/kg). In interaction experiments, topiramate (10 mg/kg) plus 17β-estradiol (5 micrograms per rat; P swimming behavior. Besides, 17β-estradiol (2.5 micrograms per rat) shortened the onset of the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate (P < 0.05). In the open field test, topiramate alone or combined with 17β-estradiol (P < 0.05) reduced locomotion. Topiramate alone or combined with 17β-estradiol produced antidepressant-like actions; and 17β-estradiol shortened the onset of the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate.

  7. Effect of co-administration of memantine and sertraline on the antidepressant-like activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidfar, Meysam; Réus, Gislaine Z; Quevedo, João; Kim, Yong-Ku; Arbabi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    A developing body of data has drawn attention to the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists as potential drugs for the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). We investigated the possibility of synergistic interactions between the antidepressant sertraline with the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine. The present study was aimed to evaluate behavioural and molecular effects of the chronic treatment with memantine and sertraline alone or in combination in rats. To this aim, rats were chronically treated with memantine (2.5 and 5mg/kg) and sertraline (5mg/kg) for 14days once a day, and then exposed to the forced swimming test. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were assessed in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in all groups by ELISA sandwich assay. Sertraline and memantine (2.5mg/kg) alone did not have effect on the immobility time; however, the effect of sertraline was enhanced by both doses of memantine. Combined treatment with memantine and sertraline produced stronger increases in the BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Our results indicate that co-administration of antidepressant memantine with sertraline may induce a more pronounced antidepressant activity than treatment with each antidepressant alone. Antidepressant properties using the combination of memantine and sertraline could be attributed to increased levels of BDNF. This finding may be of particular importance in the case of drug-resistant patients and could suggest a method of obtaining significant antidepressant actions whereas limiting side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway mediates the antidepressant effects of ketamine in rats in the forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Fen; Wang, Nan; Shi, Jin-Yun; Xu, Shi-Xia; Li, Xiao-Min; Ji, Mu-Huo; Zuo, Zhi-Yi; Zhou, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Converging evidence shows that the acute administration of a sub-anaesthetic dose ketamine produces fast-acting and robust antidepressant properties in patients suffering from major depressive disorder. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the role of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway in the antidepressant effects of ketamine in rats performing the forced swimming test (FST). Ketamine (10 mg/kg) significantly decreased immobility times in the FST and the activities of total nitric oxide synthases (T-NOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS) in the rat hippocampus. Interestingly, the plasma activities of T-NOS, iNOS, and eNOS increased after administration of ketamine. Furthermore, the activities of neuronal NOS (nNOS) did not change significantly in either the hippocampus or plasma after ketamine administration. The antidepressant effects of ketamine were prevented by pre-treatment with l-arginine (750 mg/kg). Pre-treatment with the NOS inhibitor L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester at a sub-antidepressant dose of 50 mg/kg and ketamine at a sub-antidepressant dose of 3 mg/kg reduced immobility time in the FST compared to treatment with either drug alone. None of the drugs affected crossing and rearing scores in the open field test. These results suggest that the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway is involved in the antidepressant effects of ketamine observed in rats in the FST and this involvement is characterised by the inhibition of brain T-NOS, iNOS, and eNOS activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Psychological therapies versus antidepressant medication, alone and in combination for depression in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Georgina R; Callahan, Patch; Churchill, Rachel; Hunot, Vivien; Merry, Sally N; Parker, Alexandra G; Hetrick, Sarah E

    2014-11-30

    Depressive disorders are common in children and adolescents and, if left untreated, are likely to recur in adulthood. Depression is highly debilitating, affecting psychosocial, family and academic functioning. To evaluate the effectiveness of psychological therapies and antidepressant medication, alone and in combination, for the treatment of depressive disorder in children and adolescents. We have examined clinical outcomes including remission, clinician and self reported depression measures, and suicide-related outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) to 11 June 2014. The register contains reports of relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1950 to date), EMBASE (1974 to date), and PsycINFO (1967 to date). RCTs were eligible for inclusion if they compared i) any psychological therapy with any antidepressant medication, or ii) a combination of psychological therapy and antidepressant medication with a psychological therapy alone, or an antidepressant medication alone, or iii) a combination of psychological therapy and antidepressant medication with a placebo or'treatment as usual', or (iv) a combination of psychological therapy and antidepressant medication with a psychological therapy or antidepressant medication plus a placebo.We included studies if they involved participants aged between 6 and 18 years, diagnosed by a clinician as having Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) or International Classification of Diseases (ICD) criteria. Two review authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed the quality of the studies. We applied a random-effects meta-analysis, using the odds ratio (OR) to describe dichotomous outcomes, mean difference (MD) to describe continuous outcomes when the same measures were used, and standard mean difference (SMD) when

  10. Stressful life events and social health factors in women using anxiolytics and antidepressants: an Italian observational study in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Incau, Paola; Barbui, Corrado; Tubini, Jacopo; Conforti, Anita

    2011-04-01

    In Italy, as in all of Europe, women differ from men in that they are somewhat more sensitive to the depressogenic effects of stressful life events related to their social networks and emotional sphere. Women are more likely than men to have experienced poverty, gender discrimination, and physical and sexual abuse. The purpose of this study was to expand the knowledge about the occurrence of stressful life events in women exposed and not exposed to anxiolytics and antidepressants in a community pharmacy setting. Women attending 100 community pharmacies in the Italian Veneto region were surveyed by pharmacists with regard to a number of general features of their current pharmacologic treatment. Women independently completed a written self-assessment questionnaire that focused on stressful life events. Unconditional logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between anxiolytics and antidepressants use and potential factors, including stressful life events. The study population comprised 11,357 women. One or more stressful life events occurred in 90% of the women treated with anxiolytics and/or antidepressants (users [n = 3848]) and in 74% of the women not treated with these drugs (nonusers [n = 7509]) (odds ratio = 3.19; 95% CI, 2.83-3.60). On average, the life events occurred during the previous 6 months and the women considered the influence of these events on their well-being to be severe. After the unconditional logistic regression analysis, the association between anxiolytics and/or antidepressants use remained positive for most of the stressful life events studied as well as for other factors: separation/divorce, living alone or with others (family or friends), unemployment, whether currently being seen by a psychologist/psychiatrist, and treatment with drugs for the alimentary tract and metabolism, cardiovascular system, or nervous system. A significant association between stressful life events and anxiolytics and

  11. Evidence of Antidepressive Effects of a Wakan-yaku, Hochuekkito, in Depression Model Mice with Learned-Helplessness Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohda, Michihisa; Mingmalairak, Salin

    2013-01-01

    Wakan-yaku is a type of Japanese and Sino traditional, systematized medical care that has been practiced for hundreds of years. This medicinal system includes many antidepressive prescriptions. One of the candidates is Hochuekkito, although experimental evidence has not yet been established clearly. To obtain evidence, a depression model of learned-helplessness (LH) mice was used. Based on the score of escape failure, an index of the depression degree, mice with a depressive condition were selected to assess Hochuekkito's effects. This selection was significant and effective in the following two points: evaluation of the drug effect under disease conditions and minimization of the number of animals. Treatment with Hochuekkito (1 and 5 g/kg p.o.; estimated galenical amount) for 14 days significantly decreased the depression index, the number of escape failures, and desipramine (10 mg/kg p.o.) suggesting that Hochuekkito has an antidepressive effect. PMID:24454491

  12. Evidence of Antidepressive Effects of a Wakan-yaku, Hochuekkito, in Depression Model Mice with Learned-Helplessness Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihisa Tohda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wakan-yaku is a type of Japanese and Sino traditional, systematized medical care that has been practiced for hundreds of years. This medicinal system includes many antidepressive prescriptions. One of the candidates is Hochuekkito, although experimental evidence has not yet been established clearly. To obtain evidence, a depression model of learned-helplessness (LH mice was used. Based on the score of escape failure, an index of the depression degree, mice with a depressive condition were selected to assess Hochuekkito’s effects. This selection was significant and effective in the following two points: evaluation of the drug effect under disease conditions and minimization of the number of animals. Treatment with Hochuekkito (1 and 5 g/kg p.o.; estimated galenical amount for 14 days significantly decreased the depression index, the number of escape failures, and desipramine (10 mg/kg p.o. suggesting that Hochuekkito has an antidepressive effect.

  13. Development of novel (1-H benzimidazole bearing pyrimidine-trione based MAO-A inhibitors: Synthesis, docking studies and antidepressant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijo Mathew

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of some novel (1-H benzimidazole bearing pyrimidine-trione based MAO-A inhibitors were achieved by the reaction between 2E-1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-3-phenylprop-2-en-1-ones(4a–f and barbituric acid in the presence of a catalytic amount of acetic acid medium. All the final structures were assigned on the basis of IR, 1HNMR and mass spectra analyses. All the synthesized derivatives showed good antidepressant activity when compared to the standard clomipiramine at a dose level of 20 mg/kg. The compound (5d 5-{(2E-1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl-3-[4-(dimethylaminophenyl] prop-2-en-1-ylidene} pyrimidine-2, 4, 6(1H,3H,5H-trione significantly reduced the duration of immobility times at 50 mg/kg−1 dose level when compared to the standard drug. Molecular docking studies revealed the need for an extra hydrophobic interaction in the titled scaffold for acquiring the promising experimental values. It has been concluded that the computational values obtained after the docking calculation are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  14. Decisional conflict among women considering antidepressant medication use in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Georgia D; Ross, Lori E; Stewart, Donna E; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Vigod, Simone

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine decision-making among women considering antidepressant medication use in pregnancy. Decisional conflict was assessed using the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS) among pregnant women considering antidepressant medication treatment (N = 40). Overall DCS and subscale scores were compared between women who were antidepressant users and non-users. Semi-structured interviews (N = 10) explored barriers and facilitators of decision-making. Twenty-one women (52 %) had moderate or high decisional conflict (DCS ≥ 25). Overall DCS scores did not differ between groups, but antidepressant use was associated with feeling more adequately informed (subscale mean 17.5, SD 17.9 vs. 42.1, SD 23.8, p = 0.001) and clear about values (subscale mean 16.7, SD 15.1 vs. 29.8, SD 24.0, p = 0.043). Barriers to decision-making were (1) difficulty weighing maternal versus infant health, (2) lack of high quality information, (3) negative external influences, and (4) emotional reactions to decision-making. Facilitators were (1) interpersonal supports, (2) accessible subspecialty care, and (3) severe depressive symptoms. Many pregnant women facing decisions regarding antidepressant medication use experience decisional conflict. Interventions that provide accurate information, assistance with weighing risks and benefits of treatment, management of problematic external influences, and emotional support may reduce decisional conflict and facilitate the decision-making process.

  15. Peripheral administration of lactate produces antidepressant-like effects

    KAUST Repository

    Carrard, A; Elsayed, M; Margineanu, Michael B.; Boury-Jamot, B; Fragniè re, L; Meylan, E M; Petit, J-M; Fiumelli, Hubert; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Martin, J-L

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role as metabolic substrate that can sustain neuronal function and viability, emerging evidence supports a role for l-lactate as an intercellular signaling molecule involved in synaptic plasticity. Clinical and basic research studies have shown that major depression and chronic stress are associated with alterations in structural and functional plasticity. These findings led us to investigate the role of l-lactate as a potential novel antidepressant. Here we show that peripheral administration of l-lactate produces antidepressant-like effects in different animal models of depression that respond to acute and chronic antidepressant treatment. The antidepressant-like effects of l-lactate are associated with increases in hippocampal lactate levels and with changes in the expression of target genes involved in serotonin receptor trafficking, astrocyte functions, neurogenesis, nitric oxide synthesis and cAMP signaling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of l-lactate may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  16. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response and Treatment Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Rose Levinstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance.

  17. Peripheral administration of lactate produces antidepressant-like effects

    KAUST Repository

    Carrard, A

    2016-10-18

    In addition to its role as metabolic substrate that can sustain neuronal function and viability, emerging evidence supports a role for l-lactate as an intercellular signaling molecule involved in synaptic plasticity. Clinical and basic research studies have shown that major depression and chronic stress are associated with alterations in structural and functional plasticity. These findings led us to investigate the role of l-lactate as a potential novel antidepressant. Here we show that peripheral administration of l-lactate produces antidepressant-like effects in different animal models of depression that respond to acute and chronic antidepressant treatment. The antidepressant-like effects of l-lactate are associated with increases in hippocampal lactate levels and with changes in the expression of target genes involved in serotonin receptor trafficking, astrocyte functions, neurogenesis, nitric oxide synthesis and cAMP signaling. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of l-lactate may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  18. [Prevalence of psychoactive drug consumption in an obese population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdá Esteve, Maria A; Barral Tafalla, Diego; Gudelis, Mindaugas; Goday, Albert; Farre Albaladejo, Magi; Cano, Juan F

    2010-04-01

    To establish the prevalence of psychoactive drug consumption in an obese population. We collected data from the clinical records of obese patients attending the Endocrinology and Nutrition Department and Psychiatry Department of Hospital del Mar between June 2005 and May 2006 (n=259). We recorded anthropometric, epidemiological and toxicological data. We also investigated the prevalence of concomitant diseases in this population. Psychoactive drugs were consumed by 37% of obese patients, mainly antidepressants (27%), anxiolytics, sedatives and hypnotics, and anticonvulsants. Moreover, 15% of all patients received combination treatment with two or more psychoactive drugs, mostly the association of an antidepressant and an antiepileptic drug. The prevalence of psychoactive drug consumption in our sample was higher than prevalence data observed in the general population, with antidepressant consumption being three-fold higher. Copyright 2009 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. The effect of a three-tier formulary on antidepressant utilization and expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Parks Thomas, Cindy; Simoni-Wastila, Linda; Ritter, Grant A; Lee, Sue

    2008-06-01

    Health plans in the United States are struggling to contain rapid growth in their spending on medications. They have responded by implementing multi-tiered formularies, which label certain brand medications 'non-preferred' and require higher patient copayments for those medications. This multi-tier policy relies on patients' willingness to switch medications in response to copayment differentials. The antidepressant class has certain characteristics that may pose problems for implementation of three-tier formularies, such as differences in which medication works for which patient, and high rates of medication discontinuation. To measure the effect of a three-tier formulary on antidepressant utilization and spending, including decomposing spending allocations between patient and plan. We use claims and eligibility files for a large, mature nonprofit managed care organization that started introducing its three-tier formulary on January 1, 2000, with a staggered implementation across employer groups. The sample includes 109,686 individuals who were continuously enrolled members during the study period. We use a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design that includes a comparison group, comprising members whose employer had not adopted three-tier as of March 1, 2000. This permits some control for potentially confounding changes that could have coincided with three-tier implementation. For the antidepressants that became nonpreferred, prescriptions per enrollee decreased 11% in the three-tier group and increased 5% in the comparison group. The own-copay elasticity of demand for nonpreferred drugs can be approximated as -0.11. Difference-in-differences regression finds that the three-tier formulary slowed the growth in the probability of using antidepressants in the post-period, which was 0.3 percentage points lower than it would have been without three-tier. The three-tier formulary also increased out-of-pocket payments while reducing plan payments and total spending

  20. Contribution to the standardization of the chromatographic conditions for the lipophilicity assessment of neutral and basic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaginis, Costas; Theocharis, Stamatios; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna

    2006-01-01

    The chromatographic conditions aiming to a better simulation of n-octanol-water partitioning using a base deactivated silica (BDS) column as stationary phase were investigated for structurally diverse basic and neutral drugs. Extrapolated retention factors log k w , determined using different methanol fractions as organic modifier, were considered as lipophilicity indices. The effect of n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives was examined and the appropriateness of the final retention outcome to reproduce lipophilicity data was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of n-octanol on the linearity of the log k/methanol fraction relationship and on the uniformity of the retention mechanism was investigated. 1:1 correlation between log k w values and the logarithm of the distribution coefficient (log D) was established for basic drugs in presence of both n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives. However, for neutral drugs n-decylamine proved to be a sufficient and more important factor than n-octanol

  1. Contribution to the standardization of the chromatographic conditions for the lipophilicity assessment of neutral and basic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaginis, Costas [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, Athens 15771 (Greece); Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece); Theocharis, Stamatios [Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 Mikras Asias Street, Athens 11527 (Greece); Tsantili-Kakoulidou, Anna [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografou, Athens 15771 (Greece)]. E-mail: tsantili@pharm.uoa.gr

    2006-07-28

    The chromatographic conditions aiming to a better simulation of n-octanol-water partitioning using a base deactivated silica (BDS) column as stationary phase were investigated for structurally diverse basic and neutral drugs. Extrapolated retention factors log k{sub w}, determined using different methanol fractions as organic modifier, were considered as lipophilicity indices. The effect of n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives was examined and the appropriateness of the final retention outcome to reproduce lipophilicity data was evaluated. Moreover, the influence of n-octanol on the linearity of the log k/methanol fraction relationship and on the uniformity of the retention mechanism was investigated. 1:1 correlation between log k{sub w} values and the logarithm of the distribution coefficient (log D) was established for basic drugs in presence of both n-decylamine and n-octanol as mobile phase additives. However, for neutral drugs n-decylamine proved to be a sufficient and more important factor than n-octanol.

  2. NPY intraperitoneal injections produce antidepressant-like effects and downregulate BDNF in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfo, Francesca; Tirassa, Paola; De Bartolo, Paola; Croce, Nicoletta; Bernardini, Sergio; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura; Angelucci, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have documented an involvement of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) in stress-related disorders. Stress-related disorders are also characterized by changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophins implicated in the survival and function of neurons. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate whether an NPY intraperitoneal treatment has antidepressant-like effects in rats subjected to a classical stress paradigm, the Forced Swim Test (FST), in association with changes in local brain neurotrophin production. Rats were intraperitoneally injected with either NPY (60 μg/kg) or a vehicle for three consecutive days between two FST sessions and then tested for time spent (or delay onset) in immobile posture. Moreover, we measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) neurotrophin levels in the hypothalamus and corticosterone levels in plasma. The data showed that NPY induced a significant delay in the onset and a significant reduction in the duration of the immobility posture in FST. We also found that NPY decreased BDNF levels in the hypothalamus and corticosterone levels in plasma. Immobility posture in FST can be reduced by antidepressant drugs. Thus, our data show an antidepressant-like effect of NPY associated with changes in BDNF levels in the hypothalamus and reduced activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. These findings, while confirming the involvement of the NPY system in stress-related disorders, suggest that a less invasive route of administration, such as an intraperitoneal injection, may be instrumental in coping with stressful events in animal models and perhaps in humans. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Acute effect of different antidepressants on glycemia in diabetic and non-diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients have a 20% higher risk of depression than the general population. Treatment with antidepressant drugs can directly interfere with blood glucose levels or may interact with hypoglycemic agents. The treatment of depression in diabetic patients must take into account variations of glycemic levels at different times and a comparison of the available antidepressant agents is important. In the present study we evaluated the interference of antidepressants with blood glucose levels of diabetic and non-diabetic rats. In a first experiment, male adult Wistar rats were fasted for 12 h. Imipramine (5 mg/kg, moclobemide (30 mg/kg, clonazepam (0.25 mg/kg, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg sertraline (30 mg/kg or vehicle was administered. After 30 min, fasting glycemia was measured. An oral glucose overload of 1 ml of a 50% glucose solution was given to rats and blood glucose was determined after 30, 60 and 90 min. Imipramine and clonazepam did not change fasting or overload glycemia. Fluoxetine and moclobemide increased blood glucose at different times after the glucose overload. Sertraline neutralized the increase of glycemia induced by oral glucose overload. In the second experiment, non-diabetic and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were fasted, and the same procedures were followed for estimation of glucose tolerance 30 min after glucose overload. Again, sertraline neutralized the increase in glycemia after glucose overload both in diabetic and non-diabetic rats. These data raise the question of whether sertraline is the best choice for prolonged use for diabetic individuals, because of its antihyperglycemic effects. Clonazepam would be useful in cases with potential risk of hypoglycemia.

  4. [Αnti-Inflammatory medication as adjunctive antidepressive treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufidou, F; Nikolaou, C

    2016-01-01

    Mounting data of evidence that have emerged during the last twenty years, point towards the existence of an inflammatory mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of depressive disorder. These data have inspired a number of clinical studies characterized by the administration of inflammatory response altering medication in addition to conventional medication in depressive disorder patients. The drugs were either Non Steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) or Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFa) inhibitors and were selected among those that are already in use for various diseases related to the immune system. The choice of these specific immunomodulatory agents for the co-administration with conventional antidepressive medication was based on a number of laboratory data and clinical evidence. A total of seven relevant clinical trials have been conducted, all of them with promising results that have been published between 2006 and 2013. However, only four out of them were eligibly designed regarding the homogeneity of the study groups, randomization, double-blinding and placebo controlling. These three studies showed clinical advantages of the adjunctive medication as estimated by significant drops in Hamilton scores. Of interest are the findings of the most recent and largest clinical trial of the TNF-a antagonist infliximab which show that treatment with anti-inflammatory agents may be beneficial only in depressive patients with raised levels of baseline inflammatory markers. A limitation of the studies was that, since no guidelines currently exist for anti-inflammatory agents and depression, adjunctive medication could have been under or overdosed. Other limitations were the follow-up period that was rather small and the number of the participants that was also small. Recently, a lot of progress has been made in identifying therapeutic targets along metabolic pathways in the brain relevant to depression, which could be manipulated by immune mediators. In fact

  5. Test-retest paradigm of the forced swimming test in female mice is not valid for predicting antidepressant-like activity: participation of acetylcholine and sigma-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Hato-Yamada, Noriko; Araki, Hiroaki; Yoshimura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) in mice is widely used to predict the antidepressant activity of a drug, but information describing the immobility of female mice is limited. We investigated whether a prior swimming experience affects the immobility duration in a second FST in female mice and whether the test-retest paradigm is a valid screening tool for antidepressants. Female ICR mice were exposed to the FST using two experimental paradigms: a single FST and a double FST in which mice had experienced FST once 24 h prior to the second trail. The initial FST experience reliably prolonged immobility duration in the second FST. The antidepressants imipramine and paroxetine significantly reduced immobility duration in the single FST, but not in the double FST. Scopolamine and the sigma-1 (σ1) antagonist NE-100 administered before the second trial significantly prevented the prolongation of immobility. Neither a 5-HT1A nor a 5-HT2A receptor agonist affected immobility duration. We suggest that the test-retest paradigm in female mice is not adequate for predicting antidepressant-like activity of a drug; the prolongation of immobility in the double FST is modulated through acetylcholine and σ1 receptors.

  6. Antidepressant exposure during early pregnancy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Henning

    are reassuring, however, an association with heart malformations has been suggested for e.g. paroxetine. A potential biological explanation will be reviewed. The potential teratogenic potential of antidepressants needs to be balanced against the obvious problems associated with under-treated maternal depression......Pharmacological treatment of pregnant women with depression is hampered by concerns for the developing fetus. The presentation will summarize existing knowledge on the potential association between antidepressants and congenital malformations, elaborate on the scientific background, and discuss...... the clinical significance. Most information on malformations in humans is derived from epidemiological studies. The strengths and limitations of the different designs need careful consideration, including issues of confounding by indication, recall bias, and power. For most antidepressants existing data...

  7. Leveling the playing field: bringing development of biomarkers and molecular diagnostics up to the standards for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poste, George; Carbone, David P; Parkinson, David R; Verweij, Jaap; Hewitt, Stephen M; Jessup, J Milburn

    2012-03-15

    Molecular diagnostics are becoming increasingly important in clinical research to stratify or identify molecularly profiled patient cohorts for targeted therapies, to modify the dose of a therapeutic, and to assess early response to therapy or monitor patients. Molecular diagnostics can also be used to identify the pharmacogenetic risk of adverse drug reactions. The articles in this CCR Focus section on molecular diagnosis describe the development and use of markers to guide medical decisions regarding cancer patients. They define sources of preanalytic variability that need to be minimized, as well as the regulatory and financial challenges involved in developing diagnostics and integrating them into clinical practice. They also outline a National Cancer Institute program to assist diagnostic development. Molecular diagnostic clinical tests require rigor in their development and clinical validation, with sensitivity, specificity, and validity comparable to those required for the development of therapeutics. These diagnostics must be offered at a realistic cost that reflects both their clinical value and the costs associated with their development. When genome-sequencing technologies move into the clinic, they must be integrated with and traceable to current technology because they may identify more efficient and accurate approaches to drug development. In addition, regulators may define progressive drug approval for companion diagnostics that requires further evidence regarding efficacy and safety before full approval can be achieved. One way to accomplish this is to emphasize phase IV postmarketing, hypothesis-driven clinical trials with biological characterization that would permit an accurate definition of the association of low-prevalence gene alterations with toxicity or response in large cohorts.

  8. Are studies of psychotherapies for depression more or less generalizable than studies of antidepressants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzo-Luaces, Lorenzo; Zimmerman, Mark; Cuijpers, Pim

    Background: The generalizability of findings from studies exploring the efficacy of psychotherapy and antidepressants has been called into question in part because studies exclude many patients. Despite this, the frequency with which psychotherapy and antidepressant studies use specific inclusion

  9. Antidepressant treatment with tianeptine reduces apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and temporal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Fuchs, E.; Czeh, B.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical and preclinical studies suggest that major depression may be related to impairments of structural plasticity. Consequently, antidepressants may act by restoring altered rates of cell birth or death. Here, we investigated whether the antidepressant tianeptine would affect

  10. Factors associated with the prescription of antidepressive medication to breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Nis P; Deltour, Isabelle; Damkjaer, Lars H

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated factors associated with use of antidepressant medication subsequent to a diagnosis of breast cancer. We also evaluated the effect of participation in a cancer rehabilitation program on use of antidepressants....

  11. Comparison of Metabolite Concentrations in the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Left Frontal White Matter, and the Left Hippocampus in Patients in Stable Schizophrenia Treated with Antipsychotics with or without Antidepressants. 1H-NMR Spectroscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Strzelecki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Managing affective, negative, and cognitive symptoms remains the most difficult therapeutic problem in stable phase of schizophrenia. Efforts include administration of antidepressants. Drugs effects on brain metabolic parameters can be evaluated by means of proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy. We compared spectroscopic parameters in the left prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, the left frontal white matter (WM and the left hippocampus and assessed the relationship between treatment and the spectroscopic parameters in both groups. We recruited 25 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR, with dominant negative symptoms and in stable clinical condition, who were treated with antipsychotic and antidepressive medication for minimum of three months. A group of 25 patients with schizophrenia, who were taking antipsychotic drugs but not antidepressants, was matched. We compared metabolic parameters (N-acetylaspartate (NAA, myo-inositol (mI, glutamatergic parameters (Glx, choline (Cho, and creatine (Cr between the two groups. All patients were also assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS. In patients receiving antidepressants we observed significantly higher NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios within the DLPFC, as well as significantly higher mI/Cr within the frontal WM. Moreover, we noted significantly lower values of parameters associated with the glutamatergic transmission—Glx/Cr and Glx/Cho in the hippocampus. Doses of antipsychotic drugs in the group treated with antidepressants were also significantly lower in the patients showing similar severity of psychopathology.

  12. A cross-sectional study of tuberculosis drug resistance among previously treated patients in a tertiary hospital in Accra, Ghana: public health implications of standardized regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forson, Audrey; Kwara, Awewura; Kudzawu, Samuel; Omari, Michael; Otu, Jacob; Gehre, Florian; de Jong, Bouke; Antonio, Martin

    2018-04-02

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance is a major challenge to the use of standardized regimens for tuberculosis (TB) therapy, especially among previously treated patients. We aimed to investigate the frequency and pattern of drug resistance among previously treated patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital Chest Clinic, Accra. This was a cross-sectional survey of mycobacterial isolates from previously treated patients referred to the Chest Clinic Laboratory between October 2010 and October 2013. The Bactec MGIT 960 system for mycobactrerial culture and drug sensitivity testing (DST) was used for sputum culture of AFB smear-positive patients with relapse, treatment failure, failure of smear conversion, or default. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize patient characteristics, and frequency and patterns of drug resistance. A total of 112 isolates were studied out of 155 from previously treated patients. Twenty contaminated (12.9%) and 23 non-viable isolates (14.8%) were excluded. Of the 112 studied isolates, 53 (47.3%) were pan-sensitive to all first-line drugs tested Any resistance (mono and poly resistance) to isoniazid was found in 44 isolates (39.3%) and any resistance to streptomycin in 43 (38.4%). Thirty-one (27.7%) were MDR-TB. Eleven (35.5%) out of 31 MDR-TB isolates were pre-XDR. MDR-TB isolates were more likely than non-MDR isolates to have streptomycin and ethambutol resistance. The main findings of this study were the high prevalence of MDR-TB and streptomycin resistance among previously treated TB patients, as well as a high prevalence of pre-XDR-TB among the MDR-TB patients, which suggest that first-line and second-line DST is essential to aid the design of effective regimens for these groups of patients in Ghana.

  13. Use of anti-depressants and the risk of fracture of the hip or femur

    OpenAIRE

    van den Brand, M. W. M.; Samson, M. M.; Pouwels, S.; van Staa, T. P.; Thio, B.; Cooper, C.; Leufkens, H. G. M.; Egberts, A. C. G.; Verhaar, H. J. J.; de Vries, F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Anti-depressants are used largely, but have serious side effects. We show that both selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs) increase the risk of hip/femur fracture and that this risk is time related and depends on the degree of serotonin transporter inhibition. This should be considered when prescribing anti-depressants to patients. Introduction Anti-depressants are known to have serious side effects. We examined the association between t...

  14. Factors associated to antidepressant prescription for civil servants of Belo Horizonte, MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Lopes Hurtado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Selecting the most suitable drug for the treatment of depression has clinical and economic implications, since both safety and cost of antidepressants (AD vary among therapeutic subgroups. This study aimed to evaluate the prescription of antidepressants for users of the pharmacy for civil servants of PBH (FARMASERV in 2005. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyzes using logistic regression were performed. Of the total prescriptions analyzed (652, the majority were for women (81.7% and individuals aged between 19 and 59 years (81.7%. The variables independently associated with the selection of AD were gender, age and the specialty of the prescriber. Women and young adults were more likely to be prescribed an SSRI compared to their congeners, with statistically significant differences. Psychiatrists were more likely to prescribe an SSRI than neurologists or general physicians. The determinant factors for selecting antidepressants may aid the planning of interventions aimed at patients and prescribers which can enable rationalization of the use of antidepressants.A seleção adequada do medicamento para o tratamento da depressão tem implicações clínicas e econômicas, visto que a segurança e o custo dos antidepressivos (AD variam entre as subclasses terapêuticas. Esse estudo avaliou prescrições de AD dispensadas em 2005 para usuários da Farmácia da Clínica dos Servidores da PBH (FARMASERV. Foram realizadas análises univariada, bivariada e multivariada dos dados, utilizando-se regressão logística. Do total de prescrições (652, a maioria era para mulheres (81,7% e para indivíduos com idade entre 19 e 59 anos (81,7%. As variáveis independentemente associadas à seleção de AD foram gênero, faixa etária e especialidade do prescritor. Mulheres e adultos jovens têm maior chance de receber prescrição de ISRS, em comparação aos seus congêneres, sendo as diferenças estatisticamente significativas. A chance dos psiquiatras

  15. Agmatine produces antidepressant-like effects by activating AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neis, Vivian Binder; Moretti, Morgana; Bettio, Luis Eduardo B; Ribeiro, Camille M; Rosa, Priscila Batista; Gonçalves, Filipe Marques; Lopes, Mark William; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2016-06-01

    The activation of AMPA receptors and mTOR signaling has been reported as mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of fast-acting agents, specially the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. In the present study, oral administration of agmatine (0.1mg/kg), a neuromodulator that has been reported to modulate NMDA receptors, caused a significant reduction in the immobility time of mice submitted to the tail suspension test (TST), an effect prevented by the administration of DNQX (AMPA receptor antagonist, 2.5μg/site, i.c.v.), BDNF antibody (1μg/site, i.c.v.), K-252a (TrkB receptor antagonist, 1μg/site, i.c.v.), LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor, 10nmol/site, i.c.v.) or rapamycin (selective mTOR inhibitor, 0.2nmol/site, i.c.v.). Moreover, the administration of lithium chloride (non-selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 10mg/kg, p.o.) or AR-A014418 (selective GSK-3β inhibitor, 0.01μg/site, i.c.v.) in combination with a sub-effective dose of agmatine (0.0001mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the immobility time in the TST when compared with either drug alone. Furthermore, increased immunocontents of BDNF, PSD-95 and GluA1 were found in the prefrontal cortex of mice just 1h after agmatine administration. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of agmatine in the TST may be dependent on the activation of AMPA and TrkB receptors, PI3K and mTOR signaling as well as inhibition of GSK-3β, and increase in synaptic proteins. The results contribute to elucidate the complex signaling pathways involved in the antidepressant effect of agmatine and reinforce the pivotal role of these molecular targets for antidepressant responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Not all side effects associated with tricyclic antidepressant therapy are true side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiwan, Syed; Drossman, Douglas A; Morris, Carolyn B; Dalton, Chris; Toner, Brenda B; Diamant, Nicholas E; Hu, J B; Whitehead, William E; Leserman, Jane; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I

    2009-04-01

    Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders treated with tricyclic antidepressants sometimes report nongastrointestinal symptoms; it is unclear whether these are drug side effects or reflect a behavioral tendency to report symptoms. We evaluated whether symptoms reported before treatment with a tricyclic antidepressant (desipramine) increased in number or worsened in severity after 2 weeks of treatment and assessed the baseline factors that predispose patients to report symptoms. Female patients in a multicenter National Institutes of Health trial for functional bowel disorders completed a 15-item symptom questionnaire at baseline (before randomization), 2 weeks after they were given desipramine (n = 81) or placebo (n = 40), and at study completion (12 weeks). Patients were asked about the severity and frequency of 15 symptoms. Results were analyzed from 57 patients given desipramine who completed the questionnaires. Symptoms reported as side effects to have occurred more frequently and also worsened at week 2 in the group given desipramine included dizziness, dry mouth/thirstiness, lightheadedness, jittery feelings/tremors, and flushing. Symptoms that did not change in severity or showed improvement at week 2 in the group given desipramine included morning tiredness, nausea, blurred vision, headaches, appetite reduction, and trouble sleeping. Psychologic distress but not desipramine blood level correlated with symptom reporting. Most symptoms often attributed to side effects of desipramine were present before treatment; only a few, related to anticholinergic effects, worsened 2 weeks after treatment, suggesting that most so-called side effects were not associated specifically with desipramine use. Such symptoms might instead be associated with psychologic distress.

  17. Clinical pharmacology of sibutramine hydrochloride (BTS 54524), a new antidepressant, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, D J; Devaney, N

    1988-01-01

    The cardiovascular, anticholinergic and central effects of single doses of 30, 45 and 60 mg of sibutramine hydrochloride (BTS 54524), a new potential antidepressant, were compared with amitriptyline (50 mg) and placebo given at weekly intervals in a randomised design to six healthy male volunteers. Sibutramine was associated with increases in both supine heart rate and systolic blood pressure at 1, 2 and 6 h after 60 mg (P less than 0.05). Amitriptyline caused a significant 50-60% decrease in salivation compared with placebo at 2 and 6 h but there were no changes with sibutramine. No significant changes in pupil size were detected with either drug. Visual analogue rating scales (VARS) revealed significant drowsiness with amitriptyline but neither sedative nor stimulant effects with sibutramine. Impairments of simple auditory and visual reaction times, visual two-choice reaction time, finger tapping and trail making, measured using an automated test battery, occurred with amitriptyline compared with sibutramine. If sibutramine proves to be an effective antidepressant it should be devoid of anticholinergic or central depressant effects. Chronic dosage studies are indicated to evaluate the clinical significance of its cardiovascular effects. PMID:3207566

  18. Antidepressant-like effects of a cocoa polyphenolic extract in Wistar-Unilever rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoudi, Michaël; Bisson, Jean-François; Nejdi, A