WorldWideScience

Sample records for stages large dense

  1. Single sided tomography of extremely large dense objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoe, R.S.

    1993-03-24

    One can envision many circumstances where radiography could be valuable but is frustrated by the geometry of the object to be radiographed. For example, extremely large objects, the separation of rocket propellants from the skin of solid fuel rocket motor, the structural integrity of an underground tank or hull of a ship, the location of buried objects, inspection of large castings etc. The author has been investigating ways to do this type of radiography and as a result has developed a technique which can be used to obtain three dimensional radiographs using Compton scattered radiation from a monochromatic source and a high efficiency, high resolution germanium spectrometer. This paper gives specific details of the reconstruction technique and presents the results of numerous numerical simulations and compares these simulations to spectra obtained in the laboratory. In addition the author presents the results of calculations made for the development of an alternative single sided radiography technique which will permit inspection of the interior of large objects. As a benchmark the author seeks to obtain three dimensional images with a resolution of about one cubic centimeter in a concrete cube 30 centimeters on a side. Such a device must use photons of very high energy. For example 30 cm of concrete represents about 15 mean free paths for photons of 100 keV, whereas at 1 MeV the attenuation is down to about five mean free paths. At these higher energies Compton scattering becomes much more probable. Although this would appear to be advantageous for single sided imaging techniques, such techniques are hampered by two side effects. In this paper the results are given of numerous Monte Carlo calculations detailing the extent of the multiple scattering and the feasibility of a variety of imaging schemes is explored.

  2. Enabling High Performance Large Scale Dense Problems through KBLAS

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelfattah, Ahmad

    2014-05-04

    KBLAS (KAUST BLAS) is a small library that provides highly optimized BLAS routines on systems accelerated with GPUs. KBLAS is entirely written in CUDA C, and targets NVIDIA GPUs with compute capability 2.0 (Fermi) or higher. The current focus is on level-2 BLAS routines, namely the general matrix vector multiplication (GEMV) kernel, and the symmetric/hermitian matrix vector multiplication (SYMV/HEMV) kernel. KBLAS provides these two kernels in all four precisions (s, d, c, and z), with support to multi-GPU systems. Through advanced optimization techniques that target latency hiding and pushing memory bandwidth to the limit, KBLAS outperforms state-of-the-art kernels by 20-90% improvement. Competitors include CUBLAS-5.5, MAGMABLAS-1.4.0, and CULAR17. The SYMV/HEMV kernel from KBLAS has been adopted by NVIDIA, and should appear in CUBLAS-6.0. KBLAS has been used in large scale simulations of multi-object adaptive optics.

  3. Dense Chern-Simons matter with fermions at large N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geracie, Michael; Goykhman, Mikhail; Son, Dam T.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we investigate properties of Chern-Simons theory coupled to massive fermions in the large N limit. We demonstrate that at low temperatures the system is in a Fermi liquid state whose features can be systematically compared to the standard phenomenological theory of Landau Fermi liquids. This includes matching microscopically derived Landau parameters with thermodynamic predictions of Landau Fermi liquid theory. We also calculate the exact conductivity and viscosity tensors at zero temperature and finite chemical potential. In particular we point out that the Hall conductivity of an interacting system is not entirely accounted for by the Berry flux through the Fermi sphere. Furthermore, investigation of the thermodynamics in the non-relativistic limit reveals novel phenomena at strong coupling. As the 't Hooft coupling λ approaches 1, the system exhibits an extended intermediate temperature regime in which the thermodynamics is described by neither the quantum Fermi liquid theory nor the classical ideal gas law. Instead, it can be interpreted as a weakly coupled quantum Bose gas.

  4. Experiments on the two-stage dense plasma heating on the GOL-3 device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, A. V.; Voropaev, S. G.; Guber, A. F.

    The experimental results on heating of a dense plasma by electron beam (1 MeV, 40 kA, 4 micro-sec) on the GOL-3 device are presented. The relativistic electron beam is injected into a (7-meter long plasma column of a mirror machine). The beam deposits about 20-30% of its energy into 'hot' (1-10 keV) plasma electrons in the homogeneous part of plasma (n - 10(exp 15) cm(exp -3), T approximately = 1 keV). These electrons are slowed down in a 0.5-3 meter long gas cloud of a density of 10(exp 16)-10(exp 17)cm(exp -3) (so-called two-stage heating scheme). The 'hot' electrons ionize the cloud, create a plasma which is heated due to binary collisions. The resulting total energy of the cloud is 2-4 times greater than the instantaneous energy content of the lower density homogeneous plasma. The shock waves were observed in the plasma. Temperature distribution along the plasma cloud was measured and was used to estimate the average energy of 'hot' electrons. The experiment demonstrates a high efficiency of the two-stage scheme of a dense plasma heating.

  5. Human impacts on large benthic foraminifers near a densely populated area of Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Yoko; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Umezawa, Yu; Kayanne, Hajime; Ide, Yoichi; Nagaoka, Tatsutoshi; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Yamano, Hiroya

    2010-08-01

    Human impacts on sand-producing, large benthic foraminifers were investigated on ocean reef flats at the northeast Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, along a human population gradient. The densities of dominant foraminifers Calcarina and Amphistegina declined with distance from densely populated islands. Macrophyte composition on ocean reef flats differed between locations near sparsely or densely populated islands. Nutrient concentrations in reef-flat seawater and groundwater were high near or on densely populated islands. delta(15)N values in macroalgal tissues indicated that macroalgae in nearshore lagoons assimilate wastewater-derived nitrogen, whereas those on nearshore ocean reef flats assimilate nitrogen from other sources. These results suggest that increases in the human population result in high nutrient loading in groundwater and possibly into nearshore waters. High nutrient inputs into ambient seawater may have both direct and indirect negative effects on sand-producing foraminifers through habitat changes and/or the collapse of algal symbiosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Human impacts on large benthic foraminifers near a densely populated area of Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osawa, Yoko; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Umezawa, Yu; Kayanne, Hajime; Ide, Yoichi; Nagaoka, Tatsutoshi; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Yamano, Hiroya

    2010-01-01

    Human impacts on sand-producing, large benthic foraminifers were investigated on ocean reef flats at the northeast Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands, along a human population gradient. The densities of dominant foraminifers Calcarina and Amphistegina declined with distance from densely populated islands. Macrophyte composition on ocean reef flats differed between locations near sparsely or densely populated islands. Nutrient concentrations in reef-flat seawater and groundwater were high near or on densely populated islands. δ 15 N values in macroalgal tissues indicated that macroalgae in nearshore lagoons assimilate wastewater-derived nitrogen, whereas those on nearshore ocean reef flats assimilate nitrogen from other sources. These results suggest that increases in the human population result in high nutrient loading in groundwater and possibly into nearshore waters. High nutrient inputs into ambient seawater may have both direct and indirect negative effects on sand-producing foraminifers through habitat changes and/or the collapse of algal symbiosis.

  7. Fluidized combustion of beds of large, dense particles in reprocessing HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, D.T.

    1977-03-01

    Fluidized bed combustion of graphite fuel elements and carbon external to fuel particles is required in reprocessing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) cores for recovery of uranium. This burning process requires combustion of beds containing both large particles and very dense particles as well as combustion of fine graphite particles which elutriate from the bed. Equipment must be designed for optimum simplicity and reliability as ultimate operation will occur in a limited access ''hot cell'' environment. Results reported in this paper indicate that successful long-term operation of fuel element burning with complete combustion of all graphite fines leading to a fuel particle product containing <1% external carbon can be performed on equipment developed in this program

  8. EARLY STAGES OF CLUSTER FORMATION: FRAGMENTATION OF MASSIVE DENSE CORES DOWN TO {approx}< 1000 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Fuente, Asuncion [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Cesaroni, Riccardo [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Commercon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Boissier, Jeremie [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    In order to study the fragmentation of massive dense cores, which constitute the cluster cradles, we observed the continuum at 1.3 mm and the CO (2-1) emission of four massive cores with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration. We detected dust condensations down to {approx}0.3 M {sub Sun} and separate millimeter sources down to 0.''4 or {approx}< 1000 AU, comparable to the sensitivities and separations reached in optical/infrared studies of clusters. The CO (2-1) high angular resolution images reveal high-velocity knots usually aligned with previously known outflow directions. This, in combination with additional cores from the literature observed at similar mass sensitivity and spatial resolution, allowed us to build a sample of 18 protoclusters with luminosities spanning three orders of magnitude. Among the 18 regions, {approx}30% show no signs of fragmentation, while 50% split up into {approx}> 4 millimeter sources. We compiled a list of properties for the 18 massive dense cores, such as bolometric luminosity, total mass, and mean density, and found no correlation of any of these parameters with the fragmentation level. In order to investigate the combined effects of the magnetic field, radiative feedback, and turbulence in the fragmentation process, we compared our observations to radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations and found that the low-fragmented regions are reproduced well in the magnetized core case, while the highly fragmented regions are consistent with cores where turbulence dominates over the magnetic field. Overall, our study suggests that the fragmentation in massive dense cores could be determined by the initial magnetic field/turbulence balance in each particular core.

  9. Silver intercalation in SPS dense TiS2: staging and thermoelectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Tristan; Lebedev, Oleg I; Roddatis, Vladimir; Bréard, Yohann; Maignan, Antoine; Guilmeau, Emmanuel

    2015-05-07

    Polycrystalline samples in the series AgxTiS2 with x varying from 0 to 0.2 were prepared using solid-liquid-vapor reaction and spark plasma sintering. Depending on the x content, it is found that different stages can occur with intercalation, from the so-called 1T-TiS2 (stage 1) to ordered Ag1/6TiS2 (stage 2). Randomly intercalated Ag cations in the van der Waals gap of stage 1 and stage 2 based TiS2 structures induce a strong decrease of lattice thermal conductivity through structural disorder. A decrease in electrical resistivity and the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient with increasing Ag content supports also the charge transfer to the Ti 3d conduction band, enhancing the power factor in the specific temperature range. Thus, the combined effects of Ag intercalation are beneficial to the improvement in ZT, reaching around 0.45 at 700 K in Ag intercalated compounds.

  10. Cell type-specific sorting of neuropeptides : a mechanism to modulate peptide composition of large dense core vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Spijker, S.; Minnen, J. van; Sharp-Baker, H.; Smit, A.B.; Geraerts, W.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    The CNS of Lymnaea stagnalis contains two populations of egg-laying hormone (ELH)-producing neurons that differ in size and topology. In type I neurons, all peptides located C-terminally from the cleavage site Arg-Ser-Arg-Arg180-183 are sorted into secretory large dense-core vesicles (LDCV), whereas

  11. Design study for a staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Limon et al.

    2001-06-26

    Advancing accelerator designs and technology to achieve the highest energies has enabled remarkable discoveries in particle physics. This report presents the results of a design study for a new collider at Fermilab that will create exceptional opportunities for particle physics--a two-stage very large hadron collider. In its first stage, the machine provides a facility for energy-frontier particle physics research, at an affordable cost and on a reasonable time scale. In a second-stage upgrade in the same tunnel, the VLHC offers the possibility of reaching 100 times the collision energy of the Tevatron. The existing Fermilab accelerator complex serves as the injector, and the collision halls are on the Fermilab site. The Stage-1 VLHC reaches a collision energy of 40 TeV and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC, using robust superferric magnets of elegant simplicity housed in a large-circumference tunnel. The Stage-2 VLHC, constructed after the scientific potential of the first stage has been fully realized, reaches a collision energy of at least 175 TeV with the installation of high-field magnets in the same tunnel. It makes optimal use of the infrastructure developed for the Stage-1 machine, using the Stage-1 accelerator itself as the injector. The goals of this study, commissioned by the Fermilab Director in November 2000, are: to create reasonable designs for the Stage-1 and Stage-2 VLHC in the same tunnel; to discover the technical challenges and potential impediments to building such a facility at Fermilab; to determine the approximate costs of the major elements of the Stage-1 VLHC; and to identify areas requiring significant R and D to establish the basis for the design.

  12. A Low Collision and High Throughput Data Collection Mechanism for Large-Scale Super Dense Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyang Lei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Super dense wireless sensor networks (WSNs have become popular with the development of Internet of Things (IoT, Machine-to-Machine (M2M communications and Vehicular-to-Vehicular (V2V networks. While highly-dense wireless networks provide efficient and sustainable solutions to collect precise environmental information, a new channel access scheme is needed to solve the channel collision problem caused by the large number of competing nodes accessing the channel simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a space-time random access method based on a directional data transmission strategy, by which collisions in the wireless channel are significantly decreased and channel utility efficiency is greatly enhanced. Simulation results show that our proposed method can decrease the packet loss rate to less than 2 % in large scale WSNs and in comparison with other channel access schemes for WSNs, the average network throughput can be doubled.

  13. HID-1 controls formation of large dense core vesicles by influencing cargo sorting andtrans-Golgi network acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Blake H; de Leeuw, Noah F; Burns, Christian; Chen, Lan; Joens, Matthew S; Hosford, Bethany; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Asensio, Cedric S

    2017-12-15

    Large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) mediate the regulated release of neuropeptides and peptide hormones. They form at the trans -Golgi network (TGN), where their soluble content aggregates to form a dense core, but the mechanisms controlling biogenesis are still not completely understood. Recent studies have implicated the peripheral membrane protein HID-1 in neuropeptide sorting and insulin secretion. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we generated HID-1 KO rat neuroendocrine cells, and we show that the absence of HID-1 results in specific defects in peptide hormone and monoamine storage and regulated secretion. Loss of HID-1 causes a reduction in the number of LDCVs and affects their morphology and biochemical properties, due to impaired cargo sorting and dense core formation. HID-1 KO cells also exhibit defects in TGN acidification together with mislocalization of the Golgi-enriched vacuolar H + -ATPase subunit isoform a2. We propose that HID-1 influences early steps in LDCV formation by controlling dense core formation at the TGN. © 2017 Hummer et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Large Area, High Resolution N2H+ studies of dense gas in the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee

    2014-07-01

    Star formation in molecular clouds occurs over a wide range of spatial scales and physical densities. Understanding the origin of dense cores thus requires linking the structure and kinematics of gas and dust from cloud to core scales. The CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy) is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged five diverse regions of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds in N2H+ (J=1-0), totaling over 800 square arcminutes. The observations have 7’’ angular resolution (~0.01 pc spatial resolution) to probe dense gas down to core scales, and use combined interferometric and single-dish data to fully recover line emission up to parsec scales. CLASSy observations are complete, and this talk will focus on three science results. First, the dense gas in regions with existing star formation has complex hierarchical structure. We present a non-binary dendrogram analysis for all regions and show that dense gas hierarchy correlates with star formation activity. Second, well-resolved velocity information for each dendrogram-identified structure allows a new way of looking at linewidth-size relations in clouds. Specifically, we find that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with structure size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity increases strongly with structure size. We argue that the typical line-of-sight depth of a cloud can be estimated from these relations, and that our regions have depths that are several times less than their extent on the plane of the sky. This finding is consistent with numerical simulations of molecular cloud turbulence that show that high-density sheets are a generic result. Third, N2H+ is a good tracer of cold, dense gas in filaments; we resolve multiple beams across many filaments, some of which are narrower than 0.1 pc. The centroid velocity fields of several filaments show gradients perpendicular to their major axis, which is a common feature in filaments formed from numerical

  15. Homogenization of sample absorption for the imaging of large and dense fossils with synchrotron microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Sophie; Fernandez, Vincent; Pierce, Stephanie E; Tafforeau, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Propagation phase-contrast synchrotron radiation microtomography (PPC-SRμCT) has proved to be very successful for examining fossils. Because fossils range widely in taphonomic preservation, size, shape and density, X-ray computed tomography protocols are constantly being developed and refined. Here we present a 1-h procedure that combines a filtered high-energy polychromatic beam with long-distance PPC-SRμCT (sample to detector: 4-16 m) and an attenuation protocol normalizing the absorption profile (tested on 13-cm-thick and 5.242 g cm(-3) locally dense samples but applicable to 20-cm-thick samples). This approach provides high-quality imaging results, which show marked improvement relative to results from images obtained without the attenuation protocol in apparent transmission, contrast and signal-to-noise ratio. The attenuation protocol involves immersing samples in a tube filled with aluminum or glass balls in association with a U-shaped aluminum profiler. This technique therefore provides access to a larger dynamic range of the detector used for tomographic reconstruction. This protocol homogenizes beam-hardening artifacts, thereby rendering it effective for use with conventional μCT scanners.

  16. Two-stage surgical removal of large complex odontoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Jaeger, Filipe; Freire-Maia, Belini

    2010-12-01

    The surgical treatment of a large complex odontoma in the mandibular angle is reported. Four possible surgical approaches to remove a benign tumor in the mandibular angle are discussed. A two-stage surgical treatment was chosen; first, removing most part of the lesion and preserving the second molar, decreasing the risk of a pathological mandibular fracture. A maxillo-mandibular fixation for a period of 4 weeks was used. The patient was oriented to maintain a soft diet. The second surgical stage occurred 3 months after the first one due to the significant bone consolidation observed, reducing the possibility of a mandibular fracture. The remaining lesion and the second molar were then completely removed. This case demonstrates the value of the tridimensional computed tomography in treatment planning prior to any definitive surgery. A computed tomography should be made in every case of intraosseous lesion in order to establish the intraosseous extent of the tumor, cortical perforation, and soft tissue involvement for precise guidance for the surgical planning. It is recommended that the surgeon considers excision by an intraoral, lingual approach when indicated, and in two stages, when an extremely thin mandibular base is present.

  17. From gas to stars in energetic environments: dense gas clumps in the 30 Doradus region within the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Crystal N.; Meier, David S.; Ott, Jürgen; Hughes, Annie; Wong, Tony; Looney, Leslie; Henkel, Christian; Chen, Rosie; Indebetouw, Remy; Muller, Erik; Pineda, Jorge L.; Seale, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    We present parsec-scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO + (1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO + emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H 2 O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properties (masses, linewidths, and sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, and N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar masses but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO + (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30 Doradus region.

  18. One-stage reconstruction technique for large congenital eyelid coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashish, Aiman; Awara, Amr Mahmoud

    2011-08-01

    To determine the functional and cosmetic outcome of using skin graft from prepuce (after circumcision) to reconstruct eyelids in congenital lid coloboma. Four male infants with large eyelid coloboma and marked exposure keratopathy were included. All the patients were selected from the outpatient clinic of Tanta University Eye Hospital, Egypt from March 2006 till August 2009. One-stage reconstruction was used to repair the defect. For upper eyelid coloboma, sliding tarsoconjunctival flap with a free skin graft from of skin of prepuce (after circumcision) was done.For lower lid coloboma, conjunctival dissection with reflection over the cornea with use of a free skin graft from prepuce. All infants had large unilateral defect, 3 upper lids and 1 lower lid. The cosmetic and functional outcome of using skin of the prepuce was satisfactory with good color match in all cases. Also functional and cosmetic results of tarsoconjunctival sliding flap was excellent. All the cases were followed up for a period ranged from 7 to 36 months. Tarsoconjunctival rotational flap and the use of skin of prepuce are very helpful and seems to be an adequate method of reconstruction of large eyelid defect in male patients when the usual donor sites for skin grafts are not available as in infants.

  19. GPS buoys for stage monitoring of large rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, H.; Hung, N. G.; Thoss, H.; Schöne, T.

    2012-01-01

    SummaryMonitoring of river stages is one of the basic observations required for understanding catchment hydrology and hydraulic systems. There are numerous measurement techniques available for this purpose, but in case of large rivers technical as well as financial problems often restrict the use of traditional techniques, e.g. pressure probes or float gauges. We explored the potential of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) based water level measurements for stage monitoring by developing small and easy to handle buoys equipped with high-quality geodetic GNSS receivers. The design of the buoys was particularly suited to the requirements of application in rivers, distinguishing them from typical wave rider buoys used in marine offshore applications. The advantages of buoys include the freedom of positioning and their quick and easy deployment. The developed buoys were tested in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam, at two different locations: on the Mekong river under high currents, and the second in a small nearby lake with hydraulic connections to a major channel with negligible currents. For this study, only data of the Global Positioning System (GPS) was collected and processed. Processing was undertaken in baseline mode using a nearby reference station and validated against standard pressure gauge data. The recorded stages proved to be of high quality (i.e. mean absolute error position changes of the buoy and thus water movement. In the presented case study alternating currents caused by ocean tides could be detected, thus providing additional information about the hydraulic system. We conclude that the developed buoys add well to the existing hydrological monitoring pool and are a good option for the monitoring in rivers where traditional methods are technically difficult to deploy or too costly.

  20. Design Study for a Staged Very Large Hadron Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex W.

    2002-02-27

    Particle physics makes its greatest advances with experiments at the highest energy. The only sure way to advance to a higher-energy regime is through hadron colliders--the Tevatron, the LHC, and then, beyond that, a Very Large Hadron Collider. At Snowmass-1996 [1], investigators explored the best way to build a VLHC, which they defined as a 100 TeV collider. The goals in this study are different. The current study seeks to identify the best and cheapest way to arrive at frontier-energy physics, while simultaneously starting down a path that will eventually lead to the highest-energy collisions technologically possible in any accelerator using presently conceivable technology. This study takes the first steps toward understanding the accelerator physics issues, the technological possibilities and the approximate cost of a particular model of the VLHC. It describes a staged approach that offers exciting physics at each stage for the least cost, and finally reaches an energy one-hundred times the highest energy currently achievable.

  1. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, PO Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Kauffmann, Jens [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69 D-53121, Bonn Germany (Germany); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Volgenau, N. H. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tassis, Konstantinos, E-mail: ijlee9@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), and HCN (J = 1 → 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ∼7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ∼0.2 pc and widths of ∼0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  2. Short elements with charged amino acids form clusters to sort protachykinin into large dense-core vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Bin; Wang, Hai-Bo; Wang, Qiong; Bao, Lan

    2008-12-01

    The sorting of neuropeptide tachykinins into large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) is a key step in their regulated secretion from neurons. However, the sorting mechanism for protachykinin has not yet to be clearly resolved. In this study, we report that the clustered short elements with charged amino acids regulate the efficiency of protachykinin sorting into LDCVs. A truncation experiment showed that the propeptide and the mature peptide-containing sequence of protachykinin were sorted into LDCVs. These two regions exhibit a polarized distribution of charged amino acids. The LDCV localization of the propeptide was gradually decreased with an increasing number of neutral amino acids. Furthermore, the short element with four to five amino acids containing two charged residues was found to be a basic unit for LDCV sorting that enables regulated secretion. In the native propeptide sequence, these charged short elements were clustered to enhance the intermolecular aggregation by electrostatic interaction and produce a gradual and additive effect on LDCV sorting. The optimal conditions for intermolecular aggregation of protachykinin were at millimolar Ca(2+) concentrations and pH 5.5-6.0. These results demonstrate that the charged short elements are clustered such that they serve as aggregative signals and regulate the efficiency of protachykinin sorting into LDCVs. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for the sorting of neuropeptides into a regulated secretory pathway.

  3. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: project overview with analysis of dense gas structure and kinematics in Barnard 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Gong, Hao [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Volgenau, Nikolaus H. [Owens Valley Radio Observatory, MC 105-24 OVRO, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Isella, Andrea, E-mail: sstorm@astro.umd.edu [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN (J = 1 → 0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7'' and spectral resolution near 0.16 km s{sup –1}. We imaged ∼150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO{sup +} and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity dispersions ranging from ∼0.05 to 0.50 km s{sup –1} across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new, non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} position-position-velocity (PPV) cube. The projected sizes of dendrogram-identified structures range from about 0.01 to 0.34 pc. Size-linewidth relations using those structures show that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with projected size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity rises steeply with projected size. Comparing these relations, we propose that all dense gas structures in Barnard 1 have comparable depths into the sky, around 0.1-0.2 pc; this suggests that overdense, parsec-scale regions within molecular clouds are better described as flattened structures rather than spherical collections of gas. Science-ready PPV cubes for Barnard 1 molecular emission are available for download.

  4. Efficient parallel iterative solvers for the solution of large dense linear systems arising from the boundary element method in electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleon, G.; Carpentieri, B.; Du, I.S.; Giraud, L.; Langou, J.; Martin, E.

    2003-01-01

    The boundary element method has become a popular tool for the solution of Maxwell's equations in electromagnetism. It discretizes only the surface of the radiating object and gives rise to linear systems that are smaller in size compared to those arising from finite element or finite difference discretizations. However, these systems are prohibitively demanding in terms of memory for direct methods and challenging to solve by iterative methods. In this paper we address the iterative solution via preconditioned Krylov methods of electromagnetic scattering problems expressed in an integral formulation, with main focus on the design of the pre-conditioner. We consider an approximate inverse method based on the Frobenius-norm minimization with a pattern prescribed in advance. The pre-conditioner is constructed from a sparse approximation of the dense coefficient matrix, and the patterns both for the pre-conditioner and for the coefficient matrix are computed a priori using geometric information from the mesh. We describe the implementation of the approximate inverse in an out-of-core parallel code that uses multipole techniques for the matrix-vector products, and show results on the numerical scalability of our method on systems of size up to one million unknowns. We propose an embedded iterative scheme based on the GMRES method and combined with multipole techniques, aimed at improving the robustness of the approximate inverse for large problems. We prove by numerical experiments that the proposed scheme enables the solution of very large and difficult problems efficiently at reduced computational and memory cost. Finally we perform a preliminary study on a spectral two-level pre-conditioner to enhance the robustness of our method. This numerical technique exploits spectral information of the preconditioned systems to build a low rank-update of the pre-conditioner. (authors)

  5. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Ikjun; Kim, Beom Joon; Ryu, Sook Won; Cho, Jeong Ho; Cho, Jinhan

    2014-12-19

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-Au(NPs)) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-Au(NP))(n) films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO2 gate dielectric layer. For a single AuNP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-Au(NP))1) with a number density of 1.82 × 10(12) cm(-2), the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four Au(NP) layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔV(th)) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 10(6)) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate.

  6. Transistor memory devices with large memory windows, using multi-stacking of densely packed, hydrophobic charge trapping metal nanoparticle array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Ikjun; Cho, Jinhan; Kim, Beom Joon; Cho, Jeong Ho; Ryu, Sook Won

    2014-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistor (OFET) memories have rapidly evolved from low-cost and flexible electronics with relatively low-memory capacities to memory devices that require high-capacity memory such as smart memory cards or solid-state hard drives. Here, we report the high-capacity OFET memories based on the multilayer stacking of densely packed hydrophobic metal NP layers in place of the traditional transistor memory systems based on a single charge trapping layer. We demonstrated that the memory performances of devices could be significantly enhanced by controlling the adsorption isotherm behavior, multilayer stacking structure and hydrophobicity of the metal NPs. For this study, tetraoctylammonium (TOA)-stabilized Au nanoparticles (TOA-Au NPs ) were consecutively layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled with an amine-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (PAD). The formed (PAD/TOA-Au NP ) n films were used as a multilayer stacked charge trapping layer at the interface between the tunneling dielectric layer and the SiO 2 gate dielectric layer. For a single Au NP layer (i.e. PAD/TOA-Au NP ) 1 ) with a number density of 1.82 × 10 12 cm −2 , the memory window of the OFET memory device was measured to be approximately 97 V. The multilayer stacked OFET memory devices prepared with four Au NP layers exhibited excellent programmable memory properties (i.e. a large memory window (ΔV th ) exceeding 145 V, a fast switching speed (1 μs), a high program/erase (P/E) current ratio (greater than 10 6 ) and good electrical reliability) during writing and erasing over a relatively short time scale under an operation voltage of 100 V applied at the gate. (paper)

  7. Very large polycystic kidneys presenting with end stage renal failure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited cause of renal impairment and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Apart from cysts in the kidneys and other organs such as the liver, pancreas and other organs, patients also develop abdominal hernia thought to be as a result of ...

  8. Stocks and dynamics of particulate and dissolved organic matter in a large, shallow eutrophic lake (Taihu, China) with dense cyanobacterial blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Limei; Huang, Yaxin; Lu, Yaping; Chen, Feizhou; Zhang, Min; Yu, Yang; Kong, Fanxiang

    2017-08-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms occur in eutrophic lakes worldwide, and greatly impair these ecosystems. To explore influences of cyanobacterial blooms on dynamics of both particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM), which are at the base of the food chain, an investigation was conducted from December 2014 to November 2015 that included various stages of the seasonal cyanobacterial blooms (dominated by Microcystis) in a large-shallow eutrophic Chinese lake (Taihu Lake). Data from eight sites of the lake are compiled into a representative seasonal cycle to assess general patterns of POM and DOM dynamics. Compared to December, 5-fold and 3.5-fold increases were observed in July for particulate organic carbon (POC, 3.05-15.37 mg/L) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, 5.48-19.25 mg/L), respectively, with chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations varying from 8.2 to 97.7 μg/L. Approximately 40% to 76% of total organic carbon was partitioned into DOC. All C, N, and P in POM and DOC were significantly correlated with Chl a. POC:Chl a ratios were low, whereas proportions of the estimated phytoplankton-derived organic matter in total POM were high during bloom seasons. These results suggested that contributions of cyanobacterial blooms to POM and DOC varied seasonally. Seasonal average C:P ratios in POM and DOM varied from 79 to 187 and 299 to 2 175, respectively. Both peaked in July and then sharply decreased. Redundancy analysis revealed that Chl a explained most of the variations of C:N:P ratios in POM, whereas temperature was the most explanatory factor for DOM. These findings suggest that dense cyanobacterial blooms caused both C-rich POM and DOM, thereby providing clues for understanding their influence on ecosystems.

  9. Exploring proximity effects and large depth of field in helium ion beam lithography: large-area dense patterns and tilted surface exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatabø, Ranveig; Agarwal, Akshay; Hobbs, Richard; Greve, Martin Møeller; Holst, Bodil; Berggren, Karl K

    2018-04-13

    Helium ion beam lithography (HIL) is an emerging nanofabrication technique. It benefits from a reduced interaction volume compared to that of an electron beam of similar energy, and hence reduced long-range scattering (proximity effect), higher resist sensitivity and potentially higher resolution. Furthermore, the small angular spread of the helium ion beam gives rise to a large depth of field. This should enable patterning on tilted and curved surfaces without the need of any additional adjustments, such as laser-auto focus. So far, most work on helium ion beam lithography has been focused on exploiting the reduced proximity effect to reach single-digit nanometer resolution, and has thus been concentrated on single-pixel exposures over small areas. Here we explore two new areas of application. Firstly, we investigate the proximity effect in large area exposures and demonstrate HIL's capabilities in fabricating precise high-density gratings on large planar surfaces (100 µm × 100 µm, with pitch down to 35 nm). Secondly, we exploit the large depth of field by making the first HIL patterns on tilted surfaces (sample stage tilted 45◦). We demonstrate a depth of field greater than 100 µm for a resolution of about 20 nm. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. COPD, stage and treatment in a large outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claire Præst; Holm, Jakob; Nørgaard, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Some COPD patients suffer from frequent exacerbations despite triple inhalation treatment. These frequent exacerbators should be identified, as exacerbations often lead to decreasing lung function and increasing mortality. Roflumilast reduces exacerbations in patients with a previous history...... of exacerbations. Our aim was to describe COPD patient characteristics and compare roflumilast treatment eligible to non-eligible patients. An observational cross-section study was conducted. Patients were included from a large COPD outpatient clinic. Information regarding COPD patient characteristics...... status and medication use between patients receiving roflumilast and not treated eligible patients. Our study documents low use of roflumilast treatment. In view of the established effect of roflumilast we think that this treatment should be considered more consistently as an option among COPD patients...

  11. WARM EXTENDED DENSE GAS AT THE HEART OF A COLD COLLAPSING DENSE CORE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate when and how the birth of a protostellar core occurs, we made survey observations of four well-studied dense cores in the Taurus molecular cloud using CO transitions in submillimeter bands. We report here the detection of unexpectedly warm (∼30-70 K), extended (radius of ∼2400 AU), dense (a few times 10 5 cm -3 ) gas at the heart of one of the dense cores, L1521F (MC27), within the cold dynamically collapsing components. We argue that the detected warm, extended, dense gas may originate from shock regions caused by collisions between the dynamically collapsing components and outflowing/rotating components within the dense core. We propose a new stage of star formation, 'warm-in-cold core stage (WICCS)', i.e., the cold collapsing envelope encases the warm extended dense gas at the center due to the formation of a protostellar core. WICCS would constitute a missing link in evolution between a cold quiescent starless core and a young protostar in class 0 stage that has a large-scale bipolar outflow.

  12. Dense Breasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may lose breast density as a result of hormonal changes experienced during menopause. However, some younger women may have fatty breasts while some elderly women have dense breasts. Much of what determines a woman's ... and hormonal factors also affect a woman's breast density. About ...

  13. Large-scale volumetric flow measurement in a pure thermal plume by dense tracking of helium-filled soap bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, Florian; Schanz, Daniel; Gesemann, Sebastian; Dierksheide, Uwe; van de Meerendonk, Remco; Schröder, Andreas

    2017-09-01

    We present a spatially and temporally highly resolved flow measurement covering a large volume ( 0.6 m3) in a pure thermal plume in air. The thermal plume develops above an extended heat source and is characterized by moderate velocities ( U 0.35 m/s) with a Reynolds number of Re ˜ 500 and a Rayleigh number of {Ra}˜ 106. We demonstrate the requirements and capabilities of the measurement equipment and the particle tracking approach to be able to probe measurement volumes up to and beyond one cubic meter. The use of large tracer particles (300 μm), helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSBs), is crucial and yields high particle image quality over large-volume depths when illuminated with arrays of pulsed high-power LEDs. The experimental limitations of the HFSBs—their limited lifetime and their intensity loss over time—are quantified. The HFSBs' uniform particle images allows an accurate reconstruction of the flow using Shake-The-Box particle tracking with high particle concentrations up to 0.1 particles per pixel. This enables tracking of up to 275,000 HFSBs simultaneously. After interpolating the scattered data onto a regular grid with a Navier-Stokes regularization, the velocity field of the thermal plume reveals a multitude of vortices with a smooth temporal evolution and a remarkable coherence in time (see animation, supplementary data). Acceleration fields are also derived from interpolated particle tracks and complement the flow measurement. Additionally, the flow map, the basis of a large class of Lagrangian coherent structures, is computed directly from observed particle tracks. We show entrainment regions and coherent vortices of the thermal plume in the flow map and compute fields of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent.

  14. Multicomponent isotope separation in matched abundance ratio cascades composed of stages with large separation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Halle, E.

    1987-06-01

    The concept of the matched abundance ratio cascade and the system of equations for performing multicomponent productivity calculations upon them has proven extremely useful for analyzing the behavior of gaseous diffusion plants in which the stage separation factors are very nearly equal to unity. Recent interest in the gas centrifuge process, in which the separation factor of a single centrifuge can be relatively large, makes desirable the extension of the theory of the matched abundance ratio cascade to cascades composed of stages with large separation factors. Equations permit the calculation of the productivity for simple cascades composed of stages with large separation factors. The concentration gradient of each of the isotopic species present can be calculated and the cascade description can be determined. An illustrative example dealing with the separation of the isotopes of tungsten in a cascade composed of gas centrifuges is included

  15. FIRST DETECTION OF AMMONIA IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: THE KINETIC TEMPERATURE OF DENSE MOLECULAR CORES IN N 159 W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, Juergen; Henkel, Christian; Weiss, Axel; Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2010-01-01

    The first detection of ammonia (NH 3 ) is reported from the Magellanic Clouds. Using the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we present a targeted search for the (J, K) = (1,1) and (2,2) inversion lines toward seven prominent star-forming regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Both lines are detected in the massive star-forming region N 159 W, which is located in the peculiar molecular ridge south of 30 Doradus, a site of extreme star formation strongly influenced by an interaction with the Milky Way halo. Using the ammonia lines, we derive a kinetic temperature of ∼16 K, which is 2-3 times below the previously derived dust temperature. The ammonia column density, averaged over ∼17'', is ∼6 x 10 12 cm -2 ( 13 cm -2 over 9'' in the other six sources) and we derive an ammonia abundance of ∼4 x 10 -10 with respect to molecular hydrogen. This fractional abundance is 1.5-5 orders of magnitude below those observed in Galactic star-forming regions. The nitrogen abundance in the LMC (∼10% solar) and the high UV flux, which can photo-dissociate the particularly fragile NH 3 molecule, both must contribute to the low fractional NH 3 abundance, and we likely only see the molecule in an ensemble of the densest, best shielded cores of the LMC.

  16. Two-stage nonnegative sparse representation for large-scale face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ran; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Hu, Bao-Gang; Kong, Xiang-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel nonnegative sparse representation approach, called two-stage sparse representation (TSR), for robust face recognition on a large-scale database. Based on the divide and conquer strategy, TSR decomposes the procedure of robust face recognition into outlier detection stage and recognition stage. In the first stage, we propose a general multisubspace framework to learn a robust metric in which noise and outliers in image pixels are detected. Potential loss functions, including L1 , L2,1, and correntropy are studied. In the second stage, based on the learned metric and collaborative representation, we propose an efficient nonnegative sparse representation algorithm to find an approximation solution of sparse representation. According to the L1 ball theory in sparse representation, the approximated solution is unique and can be optimized efficiently. Then a filtering strategy is developed to avoid the computation of the sparse representation on the whole large-scale dataset. Moreover, theoretical analysis also gives the necessary condition for nonnegative least squares technique to find a sparse solution. Extensive experiments on several public databases have demonstrated that the proposed TSR approach, in general, achieves better classification accuracy than the state-of-the-art sparse representation methods. More importantly, a significant reduction of computational costs is reached in comparison with sparse representation classifier; this enables the TSR to be more suitable for robust face recognition on a large-scale dataset.

  17. Successful three stage repair of a large congenital abdominal region defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidehi Agrawal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present two infants born with large, right upper quadrant defects which cannot be categorized as either a gastroschisis or omphalocele. We successfully managed one infant with a three stage repair using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE patch, porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM and delayed surgical closure. The second infant passed away due to parental consent care withdrawal.

  18. A large-stroke 3DOF stage with integrated feedback in MEMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, B.; Swinkels, Koen R.; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Abelmann, Leon; Herder, Justus Laurens

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we design, fabricate, and validate a large-stroke 3-degree-of-freedom (DOF) positioning stage with integrated displacement sensors for feedback control in a single-mask microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication process. Three equal shuttles exactly define the position of the

  19. MR mammography in the pre-operative staging of breast cancer in patients with dense breast tissue: comparison with mammography and ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Goethem, M.; Schelfout, K.; Verslegers, I.; Biltjes, I.; De Schepper, A.; Dijckmans, L.; Van Der Auwera, J.C.; Weyler, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pre-operative MR mammography could predict the extent of breast cancer in patients with dense breasts or whether dense parenchyma will lead to false-positive or inconclusive examinations. Sixty-seven patients with dense breasts with a malignant breast tumor planned for conservative surgery were reviewed. Detection rates of mammography, ultrasound, and MR mammography were studied, and the diameters of the lesions were measured and compared with pathological examination. Pathology revealed breast cancer in 65 patients. Sensitivity for detection of index lesions was 83% for mammography, 70.8% for ultrasound, and 98% for MR mammography. Mammography underestimated tumor extent in 37%, ultrasound in 40%, and MR in 12.5%. Of the 20 patients (31%) with multifocal or multicentric carcinoma, mammography detected the lesions in 35%, ultrasound in 30%, and MR in 100%, with a false-positive rate of 12.5, 14, and 23%. The MR mammography is more accurate in assessing tumor extent and multifocality in patients with dense breasts, but benign changes may lead to false-positive examinations. (orig.)

  20. Heat stress increase under climate change twice as large in cities as in rural areas: A study for a densely populated midlatitude maritime region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Hendrik; De Ridder, Koen; Poelmans, Lien; Willems, Patrick; Brouwers, Johan; Hosseinzadehtalaei, Parisa; Tabari, Hossein; Vanden Broucke, Sam; van Lipzig, Nicole P. M.; Demuzere, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Urban areas are usually warmer than their surrounding natural areas, an effect known as the urban heat island effect. As such, they are particularly vulnerable to global warming and associated increases in extreme temperatures. Yet ensemble climate-model projections are generally performed on a scale that is too coarse to represent the evolution of temperatures in cities. Here, for the first time, we combine unprecedented long-term (35 years) urban climate model integrations at the convection-permitting scale (2.8 km resolution) with information from an ensemble of general circulation models to assess temperature-based heat stress for Belgium, a densely populated midlatitude maritime region. We discover that the heat stress increase toward the mid-21st century is twice as large in cities compared to their surrounding rural areas. The exacerbation is driven by the urban heat island itself, its concurrence with heat waves, and urban expansion. Cities experience a heat stress multiplication by a factor 1.4 and 15 depending on the scenario. Remarkably, the future heat stress surpasses everywhere the urban hot spots of today. Our results demonstrate the need to combine information from climate models, acting on different scales, for climate change risk assessment in heterogeneous regions. Moreover, these results highlight the necessity for adaptation to increasing heat stress, especially in urban areas.

  1. Three-Dimensional Interaction of a Large Number of Dense DEP Particles on a Plane Perpendicular to an AC Electrical Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchuan Xie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of dielectrophoresis (DEP particles in an electric field has been observed in many experiments, known as the “particle chains phenomenon”. However, the study in 3D models (spherical particles is rarely reported due to its complexity and significant computational cost. In this paper, we employed the iterative dipole moment (IDM method to study the 3D interaction of a large number of dense DEP particles randomly distributed on a plane perpendicular to a uniform alternating current (AC electric field in a bounded or unbounded space. The numerical results indicated that the particles cannot move out of the initial plane. The similar particles (either all positive or all negative DEP particles always repelled each other, and did not form a chain. The dissimilar particles (a mixture of positive and negative DEP particles always attracted each other, and formed particle chains consisting of alternately arranged positive and negative DEP particles. The particle chain patterns can be randomly multitudinous depending on the initial particle distribution, the electric properties of particles/fluid, the particle sizes and the number of particles. It is also found that the particle chain patterns can be effectively manipulated via tuning the frequency of the AC field and an almost uniform distribution of particles in a bounded plane chip can be achieved when all of the particles are similar, which may have potential applications in the particle manipulation of microfluidics.

  2. Satellite and ground detection of very dense smoke clouds produced on the islands of the Paraná river delta that affected a large region in Central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipiña, A.; Salum, G. M.; Crinó, E.; Piacentini, R. D.

    2012-03-01

    Intense fires were produced on the Paraná river delta islands, Argentina, during most part of 2008, by a combination of an exceptionally dry period and the farmers' use of a fire land-cleaning technique. In April 2008, those fires significantly affected the nearby regions and their inhabitants, from Rosario city to Buenos Aires mega-city. In this work we present satellite as well as ground Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 550 nm data obtained during the propagation of pollution clouds to the central zone of Argentina. The highest value (1.18) was registered at Buenos Aires by atmospheric remote sensing, using the satellite instrument MODIS/Terra on April 18th 2008 at 10:35 local time (= UT - 3 h). On the same day, ground air quality detectors also measured in this city the highest Total Suspended Particle (TSP) value of the month, 2.02 mg/m3. The AOD(550) daily variation at Rosario Astronomical Observatory, which is located near the Paraná riverside, was derived by combining solar ultraviolet erythemal irradiance data (measured with a YES biometre) with model calculations. On April 25th 2008, from 12:00 to 15:30 local time, a rather high and constant AOD(550) value was registered, with a mean value of (0.90 ± 0.21). Cities located on the side of the Rosario-Buenos Aires highway (San Nicolás, Baradero and San Pedro) were also affected, showing a mean AOD(550) between the Rosario and Buenos Aires values. The particulate matter was collected with gridded samplers placed on the Paraná river islands as well as at the Rosario Observatory. They were analysed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and mainly showed a biological origin. Even if normally large particles travel small distances from the source, organic aerosol in the range of 40-100 μm and complex asymmetric structures were registered several kilometres away from the aerosol sources on the islands. Another event of intense UV index attenuation (98.6%) occurred on September 18th 2008, due to very dense

  3. Large spinose microfossils in Ediacaran rocks as resting stages of early animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Phoebe A; Knoll, Andrew H; Kodner, Robin B

    2009-04-21

    Large (>100 microm), profusely ornamented microfossils comprise a distinctive paleontological component of sedimentary rocks deposited during the Ediacaran Period (635-542 million years ago). Smaller spinose fossils in Paleozoic rocks have commonly been interpreted as algal cysts or phycomata, but the Ediacaran populations differ from modern algal analogs in size, shape, ultrastructure, and internal contents. In contrast, cysts formed during the diapause egg-resting stages of many metazoans share features of size, ornamentation, and internal contents with large ornamented Ediacaran microfossils (LOEMs). Moreover, transmission electron microscopic observations of animal-resting cysts reveal a 3-layer wall ultrastructure comparable to that of LOEM taxa. Interpretation of these distinctive Ediacaran microfossils as resting stages in early metazoan life cycles offers additional perspectives on their functional morphology and stratigraphic distribution. Based on comparisons with modern marine invertebrates, the recalcitrant life stage represented by LOEMs is interpreted as an evolutionary response to prolonged episodes of bottom water anoxia in Ediacaran shelf and platform environments. As predicted by this hypothesis, the later Ediacaran disappearance of LOEM taxa coincides with geochemical evidence for a marked decline in the extent of oxygen-depleted waters impinging on continental shelves and platforms. Thus, the form, diversity, and stratigraphic range of LOEMs illuminate life cycle evolution in early animals as influenced by the evolving redox state of the oceans.

  4. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  5. Cyclic Plane Strain Compression Tests on Dense Granular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Junichi; Karimi, Job Munene; Tsutsumi, Yukika; Maqbool, Sajjad; Sato, Takeshi

    A series of cyclic plane strain compression tests are performed under drained condition on dense Toyoura sand and compacted Chiba gravel, by using small-scale and large-scale apparatuses, respectively. Comparisons are made with results from monotonic loading tests. Local strain distributions are calculated by conducting image analyses of digital photographs taken at different stages of loading during each test. Based on these results, strain localization properties of dense granular materials are discussed, in particular focusing on possible effects of cyclic loading history.

  6. Surgical staging identified false HPV-negative cases in a large series of invasive cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Karl Ulrich; Liebrich, Clemens; Luyten, Alexander; Zander, Martina; Iftner, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    We examined a large series of biopsy-proven invasive cervical cancers with surgical staging and HPV re-testing to estimate the relevance of HPV-negative cervical cancers in a Caucasian population. We prospectively collected smears from 371 patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of cervical cancer for HC2 testing of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). In HC2-negative cases, smears and paraffin embedded tissue blocks underwent additional HPV genotyping. HC2 tests showed 31/371 cases (8.8%) had negative findings. Surgical staging showed that 21/31 HC2-negative cases (68%) were not cervical cancer. Overall, 340/350 cases of primary cervical cancer confirmed by surgical staging tested HC2 positive (97.2%). Non-high-risk HPV subtypes were detected in five cases (one HPV-53, one HPV-70, and three HPV-73) and high-risk subtypes in four patients with HC2-negative cervical cancer (two HPV 16 and two HPV-18). The remaining case, a primary undifferentiated carcinoma of the uterine cervix, tested negative for HPV-DNA with all tests. The main explanation for HPV-negative cervical cancer was a false diagnosis, followed by cancers associated with non-HR-HPV types, and false-negative HR-HPV results. Truly HPV negative seem to be very rare in Caucasian populations. Retrospective analyses without surgical staging may overestimate the proportion of HPV negative cervical cancers. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A nutrient-dense, high fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-week trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary intake modulates disease risk, but little is known as to how components within food mixtures affect pathophysiology. Here, a low-calorie, high-fiber, fruit-based nutrient-dense bar of defined composition (e.g., vitamins/minerals, fruit polyphenolics, B-glucan, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) app...

  8. NICOTINAMIDE IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF LARGE-PLAQUE PARAPSORIASIS AND EARLY STAGES OF MALIGNANT T-CELL SKIN LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Khamaganova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess clinical efficacy of nicotinamide in 2 the treatment of patients with early stages of malignant T-cell skin lymphomas and large-plaque parapsoriasis. Materials and methods: 12 patients with erythematous stage of mycosis fungoides and 14 patients with large-plaque parapsoriasis were treated by nicotinamide 15 mg twice daily during 2 weeks. Treatment cycles were repeated 4–5 times per year; topical therapy was also administrated. Results: Nicotinamide demonstrated high therapeutic effect and good tolerability in patients with early stage of mycosis fungoides and large-plaque parapsoriasis. Stable remission was achieved in 1  woman with malignant T-cell lymphoma and 12  patients with large-plaque parapsoriasis; significant clinical improvement was shown in 8 and 12 patients, respectively. Conclusion: Thus, nicotinamide is recommended for comprehensive treatment of large-plaque parapsoriasis and early stages of mycosis fungoides.

  9. Electrochemical lysis at the stage of endoresection for large posterior intraocular tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Belyy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to design the new combined technique of endoresection with intraoperative intraocular electrochemical lysis at the tumor destruction stage for large posterior intraocular tumors.Methods: 3 patients (3 eyes with large choroidal melanomas t3N0M0 (tumor thickness — 8-10 mm, base diameter — 13-15 mm, juxtapapillary localization. Mean age was 55.4 years old. Endoresection with intraoperational intraocular electrochemical lysis of the tumor was performed. Electrochemical lysis was performed with use of the technical unit ECU 300 (Soering, Germany and the original method of combined intratumoral positioning of two platinum electrodes: anode and cathode.Results: the tumor was removal completely in all 3 cases. the anatomical retinal reattachment was reached in all patients. Sclera was safe in all 3 cases. Visual acuity was not changed (NLP. At the place of the removal tumor a surgical choroidal coloboma without pigmentation all over scleral bed and periphery was shown in all cases in distant postoperative period (from 1.5 to 3 years. No local recurrences or metastasis were revealed in all patients.Conclusion: Further investigations in clinical group are necessarily to determinate the real possibilities of the combined method and the indications for endoresection with intraoperative intraocular electrochemical lysis for large intraocular tumors. 

  10. Two-Stage Surgery for a Large Cervical Dumbbell Tumour in Neurofibromatosis 1: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Ariff S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal neurofibromas occur sporadically and typically occur in association with neurofibromatosis 1. Patients afflicted with neurofibromatosis 1 usually present with involvement of several nerve roots. This report describes the case of a 14- year-old child with a large intraspinal, but extradural tumour with paraspinal extension, dumbbell neurofibroma of the cervical region extending from the C2 to C4 vertebrae. The lesions were readily detected by MR imaging and were successfully resected in a two-stage surgery. The time interval between the first and second surgery was one month. We provide a brief review of the literature regarding various surgical approaches, emphasising the utility of anterior and posterior approaches.

  11. Cooperative Hierarchical PSO With Two Stage Variable Interaction Reconstruction for Large Scale Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongwei; Sun, Liang; Tan, Guozhen; Chen, Zheng; Chen, C L Philip

    2017-09-01

    Large scale optimization problems arise in diverse fields. Decomposing the large scale problem into small scale subproblems regarding the variable interactions and optimizing them cooperatively are critical steps in an optimization algorithm. To explore the variable interactions and perform the problem decomposition tasks, we develop a two stage variable interaction reconstruction algorithm. A learning model is proposed to explore part of the variable interactions as prior knowledge. A marginalized denoising model is proposed to construct the overall variable interactions using the prior knowledge, with which the problem is decomposed into small scale modules. To optimize the subproblems and relieve premature convergence, we propose a cooperative hierarchical particle swarm optimization framework, where the operators of contingency leadership, interactional cognition, and self-directed exploitation are designed. Finally, we conduct theoretical analysis for further understanding of the proposed algorithm. The analysis shows that the proposed algorithm can guarantee converging to the global optimal solutions if the problems are correctly decomposed. Experiments are conducted on the CEC2008 and CEC2010 benchmarks. The results demonstrate the effectiveness, convergence, and usefulness of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based model...... of the mapping table, along with associated construction, query processing, and pruning techniques. The DLT-Index supports very efficient aggregate point queries, interval queries, and dense location queries. A comprehensive experimental study with real data shows that the proposed techniques can efficiently...... find dense locations in large amounts of indoor tracking data....

  13. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays based on Neospora caninum dense granule protein 7 and profilin for estimating the stage of neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiasa, Jun; Nishimura, Maki; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Xuan, Xuenan; Inokuma, Hisashi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2012-03-01

    Neospora caninum is an intracellular protozoan parasite that causes bovine and canine neosporosis, characterized by fetal abortion and neonatal mortality and by neuromuscular paralysis, respectively. Although many diagnostic methods to detect parasite-specific antibodies or parasite DNA have been reported, to date no effective serodiagnostic techniques for estimating pathological status have been described. Our study aimed to elucidate the relationship between the parasite-specific antibody response, parasite activation, and neurological symptoms caused by N. caninum infection by using a recombinant antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Among experimentally infected mice, anti-N. caninum profilin (NcPF) antibody was only detected in neurologically symptomatic animals. Parasite numbers within the brains of the symptomatic mice were significantly higher than those in asymptomatic animals. In addition, anti-NcPF and anti-NcGRA7 antibodies were mainly detected at the acute stage in experimentally infected dogs, while anti-NcSAG1 antibody was produced during both acute and chronic stages. Furthermore, among anti-NcSAG1 antibody-positive clinical dogs, the positive rates of anti-NcGRA7 and anti-NcPF antibodies in the neurologically symptomatic dogs were significantly higher than those in the non-neurologically symptomatic animals. Our results suggested that the levels of anti-NcGRA7 and anti-NcPF antibodies reflect parasite activation and neurological symptoms in dogs. In conclusion, antibodies against NcGRA7 and NcPF may have potential as suitable indicators for estimating the pathological status of neosporosis.

  14. Structured reporting adds clinical value in primary CT staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppe, Franziska; Sommer, Wieland H; Nörenberg, Dominik; Verbeek, Mareike; Bogner, Christian; Westphalen, C Benedikt; Dreyling, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J; Fingerle, Alexander A

    2018-03-29

    To evaluate whether template-based structured reports (SRs) add clinical value to primary CT staging in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) compared to free-text reports (FTRs). In this two-centre study SRs and FTRs were acquired for 16 CT examinations. Thirty-two reports were independently scored by four haematologists using a questionnaire addressing completeness of information, structure, guidance for patient management and overall quality. The questionnaire included yes-no, 10-point Likert scale and 5-point scale questions. Altogether 128 completed questionnaires were evaluated. Non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test and McNemar's test were used for statistical analysis. SRs contained information on affected organs more often than FTRs (95 % vs. 66 %). More SRs commented on extranodal involvement (91 % vs. 62 %). Sufficient information for Ann-Arbor classification was included in more SRs (89 % vs. 64 %). Information extraction was quicker from SRs (median rating on 10-point Likert scale=9 vs. 6; 7-10 vs. 4-8 interquartile range). SRs had better comprehensibility (9 vs. 7; 8-10 vs. 5-8). Contribution of SRs to clinical decision-making was higher (9 vs. 6; 6-10 vs. 3-8). SRs were of higher quality (p < 0.001). All haematologists preferred SRs over FTRs. Structured reporting of CT examinations for primary staging in patients with DLBCL adds clinical value compared to FTRs by increasing completeness of reports, facilitating information extraction and improving patient management. • Structured reporting in CT helps clinicians to assess patients with lymphoma. • This two-centre study showed that structured reporting improves information content and extraction. • Patient management may be improved by structured reporting. • Clinicians preferred structured reports over free-text reports.

  15. Unsteady Aero Computation of a 1 1/2 Stage Large Scale Rotating Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wai-Ming

    2012-01-01

    This report is the documentation of the work performed for the Subsonic Rotary Wing Project under the NASA s Fundamental Aeronautics Program. It was funded through Task Number NNC10E420T under GESS-2 Contract NNC06BA07B in the period of 10/1/2010 to 8/31/2011. The objective of the task is to provide support for the development of variable speed power turbine technology through application of computational fluid dynamics analyses. This includes work elements in mesh generation, multistage URANS simulations, and post-processing of the simulation results for comparison with the experimental data. The unsteady CFD calculations were performed with the TURBO code running in multistage single passage (phase lag) mode. Meshes for the blade rows were generated with the NASA developed TCGRID code. The CFD performance is assessed and improvements are recommended for future research in this area. For that, the United Technologies Research Center's 1 1/2 stage Large Scale Rotating Turbine was selected to be the candidate engine configuration for this computational effort because of the completeness and availability of the data.

  16. Two Stage Enucleation and Deflation of a Large Unicystic Ameloblastoma with Mural Invasion in Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Ando, Tomohiro; Akizuki, Tanetaka

    2014-01-01

    A treatment for strategy of unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) should be decided by its pathology type including luminal or mural type. Luminal type of UA can be treated only by enucleation alone, but UA with mural invasion should be treated aggressively like conventional ameloblastomas. However, it is difficult to diagnose the subtype of UA by an initial biopsy. There is a possibility that the lesion is an ordinary cyst or keratocystic odontogenic tumor, leading to a possible overtreatment. Therefore, this study performed the enucleation of the cyst wall and deflation at first, and the pathological finding confirmed mural invasion into the cystic wall, leading to the second surgery. The second surgery enucleated scar tissue, bone curettage, and deflation, and was able to contribute to the reduction of the recurrence rate by removing tumor nest in scar tissue or new bone, enhancing new bone formation, and shrinking the mandibular expanding by fenestration. In this study, a large UA with mural invasion including condyle was treated by “two-stage enucleation and deflation” in a 20-year-old patient. PMID:25050148

  17. Large animal model of functional tricuspid regurgitation in pacing induced end-stage heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Marcin; Proudfoot, Alistair G; Langholz, David; Eberhart, Lenora; Brown, Michael; Schubert, Hans; Wodarek, Jeremy; Timek, Tomasz A

    2017-06-01

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is common in patients with advanced heart failure and frequently complicates left ventricular assist device implantation yet remains poorly understood. We set out to establish large animal model of FTR that could serve as a research platform to investigate the pathogenesis of FTR associated with end-stage heart failure. : Through right thoracotomy, ten adult sheep underwent implantation of pacemaker with epicardial LV lead, five sonomicrometry crystals on the right ventricle, and left and right ventricular telemetry pressure sensors during a beating heart off-pump procedure. After 5 ± 1 days of recovery, baseline haemodynamic, echocardiographic and sonomicrometry data were collected. Animals were paced thereafter at a rate of 220-240 beats/min until the development of heart failure and concomitant tricuspid regurgitation. : Three animals died during early recovery period and one during the pacing phase. Six surviving animals were paced for a mean of 14 ± 5 days. Cardiac function was significantly depressed compared to baseline, with LV ejection fraction falling from 69 ± 2% to 22 ± 4% ( P  heart failure patients presenting for mechanical support. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  18. Two stage enucleation and deflation of a large unicystic ameloblastoma with mural invasion in mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Ando, Tomohiro; Akizuki, Tanetaka

    2014-06-01

    A treatment for strategy of unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) should be decided by its pathology type including luminal or mural type. Luminal type of UA can be treated only by enucleation alone, but UA with mural invasion should be treated aggressively like conventional ameloblastomas. However, it is difficult to diagnose the subtype of UA by an initial biopsy. There is a possibility that the lesion is an ordinary cyst or keratocystic odontogenic tumor, leading to a possible overtreatment. Therefore, this study performed the enucleation of the cyst wall and deflation at first, and the pathological finding confirmed mural invasion into the cystic wall, leading to the second surgery. The second surgery enucleated scar tissue, bone curettage, and deflation, and was able to contribute to the reduction of the recurrence rate by removing tumor nest in scar tissue or new bone, enhancing new bone formation, and shrinking the mandibular expanding by fenestration. In this study, a large UA with mural invasion including condyle was treated by "two-stage enucleation and deflation" in a 20-year-old patient.

  19. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  20. Using collaborative two-stage examinations to address test anxiety in a large enrollment gateway course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Kimberly A; Couret, Jannelle; Ramsay, Jason B; Caulkins, Joshua L

    2017-09-01

    Large enrollment foundational courses are perceived as "high stakes" because of their potential to act as barriers for progression to the next course or admittance to a program. The nature of gateway courses makes them ideal settings to explore the relationship between anxiety, pedagogical interventions, and student performance. Here, two-stage collaborative examinations were implemented to improve test-taking skills and address widespread test anxiety in an introductory human anatomy course. Test anxiety data were collected (using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire) before the first examination and last examination. Most students experienced decreased test anxiety over the course of the semester; however, some students may have experienced performance limiting conditions due to test anxiety at the end of the semester based on academic ability in the course (in "C" students when compared to "A" students: P < 0.00006 and "B" students: P < 0.05), overall academic ability (in academically weaker students: P < 0.025), and demographic factors (in women: P < 0.025). The strongest performances on examinations were primarily observed in already academically strong students (mean individual performance: P < 0.000, mean group performance: P < 0.000). Furthermore, changes in test anxiety were not significantly associated with the group portion of the examinations. Patterns of changes in test anxiety over the course of the semester underscore a complex interaction between test anxiety, student background, and student performance. Results suggest that pathways for test anxiety in "high stakes" courses may be separate from the mechanisms responsible for the benefits of collaborative testing. Anat Sci Educ 10: 409-422. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. Dense detector for baryon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, H.; Heller, K.; Marshak, M.L.; Peterson, E.A.; Ruddick, K.; Shupe, M.

    1981-01-01

    Our studies indicate that the dense detector represents a potentially powerful means to search for baryon decay and to study this process, if it occurs. The detector has good angular resolution and particle identification properties for both showering and non-showering events. Its energy resolution is particularly good for muons, but pion, electron and photon energies can also be measured with resolutions of at least 25 percent (standard deviation). The dense detector has strong logistical advantages over other proposed schemes. These advantages imply not only a lower cost but also faster construction and higher reliability. A particular advantage is that the dense detector can be prototyped in order to optimize its characteristics prior to the construction of a large module. Subsequent modules can also be added easily, while the initial detector continues operation

  2. Combined effects of multiple large-scale hydraulic engineering on water stages in the middle Yangtze River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jianqiao; Sun, Zhaohua; Li, Yitian; Yang, Yunping

    2017-12-01

    influence was observed at Hankou owing to its remote location and the short impoundment time of the TGD. (4) Potentially detrimental decreases in low-flow stages and increases in flood stages should be monitored and managed in the future. Our results are of practical significance for river management and the evaluation of the influences of large-scale anthropogenic activities on the hydrological regimes of large rivers.

  3. Dense module enumeration in biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Koji; Georgii, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of large networks is a central topic in various research fields including biology, sociology, and web mining. Detection of dense modules (a.k.a. clusters) is an important step to analyze the networks. Though numerous methods have been proposed to this aim, they often lack mathematical rigorousness. Namely, there is no guarantee that all dense modules are detected. Here, we present a novel reverse-search-based method for enumerating all dense modules. Furthermore, constraints from additional data sources such as gene expression profiles or customer profiles can be integrated, so that we can systematically detect dense modules with interesting profiles. We report successful applications in human protein interaction network analyses.

  4. Gene expression profiling reveals large regulatory switches between succeeding stipe stages in Volvariella volvacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Tao

    Full Text Available The edible mushroom Volvariella volvacea is an important crop in Southeast Asia and is predominantly harvested in the egg stage. One of the main factors that negatively affect its yield and value is the rapid transition from the egg to the elongation stage, which has a decreased commodity value and shelf life. To improve our understanding of the changes during stipe development and the transition from egg to elongation stage in particular, we analyzed gene transcription in stipe tissue of V. volvacea using 3'-tag based digital expression profiling. Stipe development turned out to be fairly complex with high numbers of expressed genes, and regulation of stage differences is mediated mainly by changes in expression levels of genes, rather than on/off modulation. Most explicit is the strong up-regulation of cell division from button to egg, and the very strong down-regulation hereof from egg to elongation, that continues in the maturation stage. Button and egg share cell division as means of growth, followed by a major developmental shift towards rapid stipe elongation based on cell extension as demonstrated by inactivation of cell division throughout elongation and maturation. Examination of regulatory genes up-regulated from egg to elongation identified three potential high upstream regulators for this switch. The new insights in stipe dynamics, together with a series of new target genes, will provide a sound base for further studies on the developmental mechanisms of mushroom stipes and the switch from egg to elongation in V. volvacea in particular.

  5. Transarterial chemoembolization with gelatin sponge microparticles for barcelona clinic liver cancer Stage C and large hepatocellular carcinoma: Initial clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: From our preliminary clinical experience, GSMs-TACE in the treatment of BCLC Stage C and large HCC appears to offer favorable survival and tumor response with low morbidity. However, further prospective studies are required to assess its safety and efficacy.

  6. Staged Soft Tissue Reconstruction Following Sarcoma Excision with Anticipated Large Cutaneous Defects: An Oncologically Safe Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Geoffrey W; Kuzon, William M.; Hasen, Jill M; Biermann, J. Sybil

    2016-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that select patients undergoing planned soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision with anticipated skin and soft tissue deficits could be treated with a two stage surgical procedure which would allow some flexibility in coverage options while not significantly increasing local recurrence rate or wound complication rate. Methods A retrospective review was undertaken in a series of consecutive patients with a minimum 2-year follow-up treated by a single orthopedic oncologist and a single reconstructive plastic surgeon who were managed with a staged approach STS excision and reconstruction. Results There were 73 patients identified over a ten-year period that underwent staged STS excision and soft tissue reconstruction. There were 12 (16%) initial positive margins resected to negative final margins, and a variety of coverage procedures performed. Wound complication rate was 21%. Local recurrence rate was 11%. Conclusion Staged STS excision and reconstruction is an acceptable tool in the armamentarium of the orthopedic oncologist for managing major soft tissue deficits without an increase in local recurrence rates. PMID:27528845

  7. Large Cancer Drug Trial Helps Move Precision Medicine Toward the Mainstream | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    A landmark cancer drug trial is helping set the stage for moving precision medicine into the mainstream of clinical practice, according to a new study. The study, reported in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, validates a procedure used in the dru

  8. A large-stroke planar MEMS-based stage with integrated feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are all around us nowadays, especially in sensor technology. MEMS-based positioning stages can become favorable in applications where the available volume is small, the response needs to be fast, and the fabrication costs low. This thesis describes the

  9. The structure of protostellar dense cores: a millimeter continuum study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motte, Frederique

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical scenario explains low-mass star formation and describes the gravitational collapse of an isolated 'ideal' dense core. The major aim of this thesis is to check the standard model predictions on the structure of protostellar dense cores (or envelopes). The earliest stages of star formation remain poorly known because the protostars are still deeply embedded in massive, opaque circumstellar cocoons. On the one hand, sensitive bolometer arrays very recently allow us to measure the millimeter continuum emission arising from dense cores. Such observations are a powerful tool to constrain the density structure of proto-stellar dense cores (on large length scale). In particular, we studied the structure of isolated proto-stellar envelopes in Taurus and protostars in the ρ Ophiuchi cluster. In order to accurately derive their envelope density power law, we simulated the observation of several envelope models. Then we show that most of the Taurus protostars present a density structure consistent with the standard model predictions. In contrast, dense cores in ρ Ophiuchi main cloud are highly fragmented and protostellar envelope have finite size. Moreover fragmentation appears to be essential in determining the final stellar mass of ρ Oph forming stars. In clusters, fragmentation may thus be at the origin of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). On the other hand, our interferometric millimeter continuum observations are tracing (with higher angular resolution) the inner part of protostellar envelopes. Our study show that disks during protostellar stages are not yet massive and thus do not perturb the analysis of envelope density structure. (author) [fr

  10. Dense plasma. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, P.P.

    1977-01-01

    The known data on dense plasma investigation are summarized and systemized. The dense plasma is created by joint effect of high temperatures, resulting in thermal substance ionization, and high densities, resulting in ionization by pressure. The state of investigations of plasma properties has been analysed and a contribution of static and kinetic theories to equilibrium plasma investigation has been shown

  11. Atoms in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  12. Atoms in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs

  13. Th1/2 Immune Response Signature Predicts Outcome after Dose-Dense Immunochemotherapy in Patients with High Risk Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma – Results from Nordic Lymphoma Group Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M, Autio; Jørgensen, Judit Meszaros; SK, Leivonen

    treatment-specific roles in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. For the high risk DLBCL patients treated with dose-dense immunochemotherapy, high expression of type 1/2 immune response signature genes predicts a poor outcome. A detailed characterization of immune cell composition in the tumor microenvironment......Introduction: Despite better therapeutic options and improved survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 30-40% of the patients still relapse and have dismal prognosis. Recently, the impact of genomic aberrations, allowing lymphoma cells to escape immune recognition on DLBCL pathogenesis...... has been recognized. However, whether immune related signatures could be used as determinants for treatment outcome has not been rigorously evaluated. Here, our aim was to elucidate the immunologic characteristics of the tumor microenvironment, and associate the findings with outcome in patients...

  14. Suprathermal viscosity of dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Schwenzer, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of unstable modes of compact stars that eventually grow large, we study the bulk viscosity of dense matter, taking into account non-linear effects arising in the large amplitude regime, where the deviation μ Δ of the chemical potentials from chemical equilibrium fulfills μ Δ > or approx. T. We find that this supra-thermal bulk viscosity can provide a potential mechanism for saturating unstable modes in compact stars since the viscosity is strongly enhanced. Our study confirms previous results on strange quark matter and shows that the suprathermal enhancement is even stronger in the case of hadronic matter. We also comment on the competition of different weak channels and the presence of suprathermal effects in various color superconducting phases of dense quark matter.

  15. Small larvae in large rivers: observations on downstream movement of European grayling Thymallus thymallus during early life stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Leeuwen, C H A; Dokk, T; Haugen, T O; Kiffney, P M; Museth, J

    2017-06-01

    Behaviour of early life stages of the salmonid European grayling Thymallus thymallus was investigated by assessing the timing of larval downstream movement from spawning areas, the depth at which larvae moved and the distribution of juvenile fish during summer in two large connected river systems in Norway. Trapping of larvae moving downstream and electrofishing surveys revealed that T. thymallus larvae emerging from the spawning gravel moved downstream predominantly during the night, despite light levels sufficient for orientation in the high-latitude study area. Larvae moved in the water mostly at the bottom layer close to the substratum, while drifting debris was caught in all layers of the water column. Few young-of-the-year still resided close to the spawning areas in autumn, suggesting large-scale movement (several km). Together, these observations show that there may be a deliberate, active component to downstream movement of T. thymallus during early life stages. This research signifies the importance of longitudinal connectivity for T. thymallus in Nordic large river systems. Human alterations of flow regimes and the construction of reservoirs for hydropower may not only affect the movement of adult fish, but may already interfere with active movement behaviour of fish during early life stages. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  16. Oxidative stress contributes to large elastic arterial stiffening across the stages of the menopausal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Kerry L; Kohrt, Wendy M; Moreau, Kerrie L

    2014-06-01

    It is unclear how changes in ovarian hormones during the menopausal transition contribute to age-associated arterial stiffening. We sought to evaluate differences in arterial stiffness and the role of oxidative stress across the stages of the menopausal transition in healthy women. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance and ultrasound) was measured during immediate infusions of saline (control) and ascorbic acid (experimental model to immediately decrease oxidative stress) in 97 healthy women (22-70 y) classified as premenopausal (n = 24; mean [SD] age, 33 [7] y), early perimenopausal (n = 21; 49 [3] y) or late perimenopausal (n = 21; 50 [4] y), or postmenopausal (n = 31; 57 [5] y). Basal carotid artery compliance was different among the groups (P menopausal transition in healthy women. This seems to be mediated, in part, by oxidative stress, particularly during the late perimenopausal and postmenopausal periods. It remains uncertain whether this is specifically caused by loss of ovarian function or aging.

  17. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu; Sørensen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    to reach the highest possible combination of pressure and temperature, and adapted to Tier III by introducing two alternative superheaters. The system design is optimized and found capable of producing from 400 to 1900 kW, with a weighted average power of 958 kW. The consumption profile is found...... of recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculating a part of the exhaust gas through the engine combustion chamber to reduce emissions. WHRS combined...... with EGR is a potential way to improve system efficiency while reducing emissions. This paper investigates the feasibility of combining the two systems. EGR dilutes the fuel, lowering the combustion temperature and thereby the formation of NOx, to reach Tier III limitation. A double stage WHRS is set up...

  18. A large-scale RNA interference screen identifies genes that regulate autophagy at different stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Sujuan; Pridham, Kevin J; Virbasius, Ching-Man

    2018-01-01

    a large-scale RNA interference screen in K562 human chronic myeloid leukemia cells using monodansylcadaverine staining, an autophagy-detecting approach equivalent to immunoblotting of the autophagy marker LC3B or fluorescence microscopy of GFP-LC3B. By coupling monodansylcadaverine staining...

  19. Learning at large conferences: from the 'sage on the stage' to contemporary models of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Dario; Manca, Annalisa; Durning, Steven; Janczukowicz, Janusz; Taylor, David; Cleland, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    To explore and evaluate the affordances of a flipped classroom model applied to a research paper session within the professional development opportunity of a large conference setting. Authors were invited to present their research papers in a flipped classroom presentation format at two large, multi-national conferences. Before the session, authors and moderators met online to clarify features of the session, and preparation of the material. The research material was then posted online before the conference, to allow access by meeting attendees. During the sessions, moderators encouraged the audience to actively participate. An evaluation form was collected from the audience at the end of each session. Participants found the session valuable, and appreciated the opportunity to engage in a meaningful dialogue with colleagues. However, the majority of the audience did not access the materials in advance. Lack of time, or technology-related issues were mentioned as potential challenges to such format. In the context of a large conference, a 'flipped session' format can facilitate active learning and a participatory culture of inquiry. However, to change the nature of how individuals learn collaboratively at large conferences means a change in the culture of continuous professional learning.

  20. Dense MCA Sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 77-year-old female presented to the emergency department after being found down at home, last seen normal 7 ½ hours prior to arrival. Patient had a history of hypertension, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation and breast cancer status post chemotherapy/radiation and lumpectomy. Physical exam showed right gaze preference, left facial droop and tongue deviation and flaccid left hemiplegia. Significant findings: A non-contrast computed tomography (CT scan showed a hyperdensity along the right middle cerebral artery (MCA consistent with acute thrombus. The red arrow highlights the hyperdensity in the annotated image. Discussion: The dense MCA sign can serve as an important tool in the diagnosis of acute stroke. It typically appears before other signs of infarct are apparent on CT imaging, and identifies an intracranial large artery occlusion and corresponding infarct, in the correct clinical setting.1 Calcifications in the same area of the brain could be mistaken for an MCA sign, but this sign carries a high specificity (95% and lower sensitivity (52% for arterial obstruction in ischemic stroke.2 Early identification allows for a wider array of treatment options for a patient with an ischemic stroke, including intra-venous or intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. This patient was subsequently taken for mechanical thrombectomy. Mechanical thrombectomy was chosen for this patient because the resources were available, and recent clinical trials have shown that newer types of mechanical thrombectomy have a positive functional outcome in patients with an ischemic stroke from an intracranial large artery occlusion, as compared to intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPa alone.3,4,5,6 In facilities lacking the capability for mechanical thrombectomy, treatment considerations include rapid transfer to a facility with capability, or proceeding with intravenous tPa. After intervention, this

  1. Large-scale multi-stage constructed wetlands for secondary effluents treatment in northern China: Carbon dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiming; Fan, Jinlin; Zhang, Jian; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan

    2018-02-01

    Multi-stage constructed wetlands (CWs) have been proved to be a cost-effective alternative in the treatment of various wastewaters for improving the treatment performance as compared with the conventional single-stage CWs. However, few long-term full-scale multi-stage CWs have been performed and evaluated for polishing effluents from domestic wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). This study investigated the seasonal and spatial dynamics of carbon and the effects of the key factors (input loading and temperature) in the large-scale seven-stage Wu River CW polishing domestic WWTP effluents in northern China. The results indicated a significant improvement in water quality. Significant seasonal and spatial variations of organics removal were observed in the Wu River CW with a higher COD removal efficiency of 64-66% in summer and fall. Obvious seasonal and spatial variations of CH 4 and CO 2 emissions were also found with the average CH 4 and CO 2 emission rates of 3.78-35.54 mg m -2 d -1 and 610.78-8992.71 mg m -2 d -1 , respectively, while the higher CH 4 and CO 2 emission flux was obtained in spring and summer. Seasonal air temperatures and inflow COD loading rates significantly affected organics removal and CH 4 emission, but they appeared to have a weak influence on CO 2 emission. Overall, this study suggested that large-scale Wu River CW might be a potential source of GHG, but considering the sustainability of the multi-stage CW, the inflow COD loading rate of 1.8-2.0 g m -2 d -1 and temperature of 15-20 °C may be the suitable condition for achieving the higher organics removal efficiency and lower greenhouse gases (GHG) emission in polishing the domestic WWTP effluent. The obtained knowledge of the carbon dynamics in large-scale Wu River CW will be helpful for understanding the carbon cycles, but also can provide useful field experience for the design, operation and management of multi-stage CW treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. The Large Hadron Collider and the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN as Tools to Generate Warm Dense Matter and Non–Ideal Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Lomonosov, I V; Gryaznov, V; Piriz, A R; Deutsch, C; Fortov, V E

    2011-01-01

    The largest accelerator in the world, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, has entered into commission- ing phase. It is expected that when this impressive machine will become fully operational, it will generate two counter rotating 7 TeV/c proton beams that will be made to collide, leading to an unprecedented luminosity of 1034 cm−2s−1. Total energy stored in each LHC beam is about 362 MJ, sufficient to melt 500 kg copper. Safety of operation is a very critical issue when working with such extremely powerful beams. It is important to know the consequences of an accidental release of the beam energy in order to design protection system for the equipment. For this purpose we have carried out extensive numerical simulations of the interaction of one full LHC beam with copper and graphite targets which are materials of practical importance. Our calculations have shown that the LHC protons will penetrate up to about 35 m in solid copper and 10 m in solid graphite. A very interesting outcome of this work i...

  3. Obtaining high-resolution stage forecasts by coupling large-scale hydrologic models with sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, K. J.; Kerkez, B.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate how "big" quantities of distributed sensor data can be coupled with a large-scale hydrologic model, in particular the National Water Model (NWM), to obtain hyper-resolution forecasts. The recent launch of the NWM provides a great example of how growing computational capacity is enabling a new generation of massive hydrologic models. While the NWM spans an unprecedented spatial extent, there remain many questions about how to improve forecast at the street-level, the resolution at which many stakeholders make critical decisions. Further, the NWM runs on supercomputers, so water managers who may have access to their own high-resolution measurements may not readily be able to assimilate them into the model. To that end, we ask the question: how can the advances of the large-scale NWM be coupled with new local observations to enable hyper-resolution hydrologic forecasts? A methodology is proposed whereby the flow forecasts of the NWM are directly mapped to high-resolution stream levels using Dynamical System Identification. We apply the methodology across a sensor network of 182 gages in Iowa. Of these sites, approximately one third have shown to perform well in high-resolution flood forecasting when coupled with the outputs of the NWM. The quality of these forecasts is characterized using Principal Component Analysis and Random Forests to identify where the NWM may benefit from new sources of local observations. We also discuss how this approach can help municipalities identify where they should place low-cost sensors to most benefit from flood forecasts of the NWM.

  4. Routine use of ancillary investigations in staging diffuse large B-cell lymphoma improves the International Prognostic Index (IPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaulikar, Dipti; Shadbolt, Bruce; Dahlstrom, Jane E; McDonald, Anne

    2009-11-22

    The International Prognostic Index (IPI) is used to determine prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). One of the determinants of IPI is the stage of disease with bone marrow involvement being classified as stage IV. For the IPI, involvement on bone marrow is traditionally defined on the basis of histology with ancillary investigations used only in difficult cases to aid histological diagnosis. This study aimed to determine the effect of the routine use of flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and molecular studies in bone marrow staging upon the IPI. Bone marrow trephines of 156 histologically proven DLBCL cases at initial diagnosis were assessed on routine histology, and immunohistochemistry using two T-cell markers (CD45RO and CD3), two B-cell markers (CD20 and CD79a) and kappa and lambda light chains. Raw flow cytometry data on all samples were reanalysed and reinterpreted blindly. DNA extracted from archived paraffin-embedded trephine biopsy samples was used for immunoglobulin heavy chain and light chain gene rearrangement analysis. Using immunophenotyping (flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry), 30 (19.2%) cases were upstaged to stage IV. A further 8 (5.1%) cases were upstaged using molecular studies. A change in IPI was noted in 18 cases (11.5%) on immunophenotyping alone, and 22 (14.1%) cases on immunophenotyping and molecular testing. Comparison of two revised IPI models, 1) using immunophenotyping alone, and 2) using immunophenotyping with molecular studies, was performed with baseline IPI using a Cox regression model. It showed that the revised IPI model using immunophenotyping provides the best differentiation between the IPI categories. Improved bone marrow staging using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry improves the predictive value of the IPI in patients with DLBCL and should be performed routinely in all cases.

  5. Design and analysis of a 3-DOF planar micromanipulation stage with large rotational displacement for micromanipulation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ding

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Flexure-based mechanisms have been widely used for scanning tunneling microscopy, nanoimprint lithography, fast servo tool system and micro/nano manipulation. In this paper, a novel planar micromanipulation stage with large rotational displacement is proposed. The designed monolithic manipulator has three degrees of freedom (DOF, i.e. two translations along the X and Y axes and one rotation around Z axis. In order to get a large workspace, the lever mechanism is adopted to magnify the stroke of the piezoelectric actuators and also the leaf beam flexure is utilized due to its large rotational scope. Different from conventional pre-tightening mechanism, a modified pre-tightening mechanism, which is less harmful to the stacked actuators, is proposed in this paper. Taking the circular flexure hinges and leaf beam flexures hinges as revolute joints, the forward kinematics and inverse kinematics models of this stage are derived. The workspace of the micromanipulator is finally obtained, which is based on the derived kinematic models.

  6. Non-coplanar beam intensity modulation allows large dose escalation in stage III lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derycke, Sylvie; Van Duyse, Bart; De Gersem, Werner; De Wagter, Carlos; De Neve, Wilfried

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we compared standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar beam arrangements, without (3D) and with beam intensity modulation (3D-BIM). Materials and methods: This study was a planning effort performed on a non-selected group of 10 patients. Starting from a serial CT scan, treatment planning was performed using Sherouse's GRATIS TM 3D planning system. Two target volumes were defined; gross tumor volume (GTV) defined a high-dose target volume that had to receive a dose of at least 80 Gy and GTV plus the lymph node regions with >10% probability of invasion defined an intermediate-dose target volume (GTV+N). It was our intention to irradiate GTV+N up to 56 Gy or more. If the prescribed doses on GTV and GTV+N could not be reached with either the 2D or 3D technique, a 3D-BIM plan was performed. The 3D-BIM plan was a class solution involving identical gantry angles, segment arrangements and relative segment weights for all patients. Dose volume histograms for GTV, GTV+N, lung and spinal cord were calculated. Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20 Gy. Under these constraints, maximal achievable doses to GTV and GTV+N were calculated. Results: In all 2D plans, spinal cord was the limiting factor and the prescribed doses for GTV and GTV+N could not be reached in any patient. The non-coplanar 3D plan resulted in a satisfying solution in 4 out of 10 patients under the same constraints. In comparison with 2D, the minimum dose in GTV+N was increased. Six patients had to be planned with the 3D-BIM technique. The theoretical minimum dose to GTV+N ranged between 56 and 98 Gy. The delivery of 80 Gy or more to GTV was possible in all patients. For a minimal dose of 80 Gy to GTV, the maximal dose to any point of the spinal cord varied between 27 and 46 Gy. The lung volume receiving more than

  7. Modelling dense relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness they are no......Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness...... they are not naturally suited for kernel K-means. We propose a generative Bayesian model for dense matrices which generalize kernel K-means to consider off-diagonal interactions in matrices of interactions, and demonstrate its ability to detect structure on both artificial data and two real data sets....

  8. Large Conization and Laparoendoscopic Single-Port Pelvic Lymphadenectomy in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer for Fertility Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polat Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fertility preservation in early-stage cervical cancer is a hot topic in gynecologic oncology. Although radical vaginal trachelectomy (RVT is suggested as a fertility preserving approach, there are some serious concerns like cervical stenosis, second trimester loss, preterm delivery in survivors, and lack of residual tumor in the majority of the surgical specimens. Therefore, less radical surgical operations have been proposed in early-stage cervical carcinomas. On the other hand, single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS is an evolving endoscopic approach for minimal access surgery. In this report, we present a case with early-stage cervical cancer who wishes to preserve fertility. We successfully performed single-port pelvic lymphadenectomy and large conization to preserve fertility potential of the patient. We think that combination of less radical approach like conization and single-port pelvic lymphadenectomy might be less minimally invasive and is still an effective surgical approach in well-selected cases with cervical carcinomas. Incorporation of single-port laparoscopy into the minimally invasive fertility sparing management of the cervical cancer will improve patients outcome with less complications and better cosmesis. Further studies are needed to reach a clear conclusion.

  9. Large Blooms ofBacillales(Firmicutes) Underlie the Response to Wetting of Cyanobacterial Biocrusts at Various Stages of Maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaoz, Ulas; Couradeau, Estelle; da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Lim, Hsiao-Chien; Northen, Trent; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Brodie, Eoin L

    2018-03-06

    Biological soil crusts (biocrusts) account for a substantial portion of primary production in dryland ecosystems. They successionally mature to deliver a suite of ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration, water retention and nutrient cycling, and climate regulation. Biocrust assemblages are extremely well adapted to survive desiccation and to rapidly take advantage of the periodic precipitation events typical of arid ecosystems. Here we focus on the wetting response of incipient cyanobacterial crusts as they mature from "light" to "dark." We sampled a cyanobacterial biocrust chronosequence before (dry) and temporally following a controlled wetting event and used high-throughput 16S rRNA and rRNA gene sequencing to monitor the dynamics of microbial response. Overall, shorter-term changes in phylogenetic beta diversity attributable to periodic wetting were as large as those attributable to biocrust successional stage. Notably, more mature crusts showed significantly higher resistance to precipitation disturbance. A large bloom of a few taxa within the Firmicutes , primarily in the order Bacillales , emerged 18 h after wetting, while filamentous crust-forming cyanobacteria showed variable responses to wet-up across the successional gradient, with populations collapsing in less-developed light crusts but increasing in later-successional-stage dark crusts. Overall, the consistent Bacillales bloom accompanied by the variable collapse of pioneer cyanobacteria of the Oscillatoriales order across the successional gradient suggests that the strong response of few organisms to a hydration pulse with the mortality of the autotroph might have important implications for carbon (C) balance in semiarid ecosystems. IMPORTANCE Desert biological soil crusts are terrestrial topsoil microbial communities common to arid regions that comprise 40% of Earth's terrestrial surface. They successionally develop over years to decades to deliver a suite of ecosystem services of local

  10. Electro-optic correlator for large-format microwave interferometry: Up-conversion and correlation stages performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, D.; Casas, Francisco J.; Ruiz-Lombera, R.; Mirapeix, J.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a microwave interferometer prototype with a near-infra-red optical correlator is proposed as a solution to get a large-format interferometer with hundreds of receivers for radio astronomy applications. A 10 Gbits/s Lithium Niobate modulator has been tested as part of an electro-optic correlator up-conversion stage that will be integrated in the interferometer prototype. Its internal circuitry consists of a single-drive modulator biased by a SubMiniature version A (SMA) connector allowing to up-convert microwave signals with bandwidths up to 12.5 GHz to the near infrared band. In order to characterize it, a 12 GHz tone and a bias voltage were applied to the SMA input using a polarization tee. Two different experimental techniques to stabilize the modulator operation point in its minimum optical carrier output power are described. The best achieved results showed a rather stable spectrum in amplitude and wavelength at the output of the modulator with an optical carrier level 23 dB lower than the signal of interest. On the other hand, preliminary measurements were made to analyze the correlation stage, using 4f and 6f optical configurations to characterize both the antenna/fiber array configuration and the corresponding point spread function.

  11. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  12. Large birth size does not reduce the negative latent effects of harsh environmental conditions across life stages in two coral species.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, A.C.; Marhaver, K.L.; Chamberland, V.F.; Sandin, S.A.; Vermeij, M.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    When juveniles must tolerate harsh environments early in life, the disproportionate success of certain phenotypes across multiple early life stages will dramatically influence adult community composition and dynamics. In many species, large offspring have a higher tolerance for stressful

  13. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrena, R; Canovas, C; Sánchez, A

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 degrees C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 degrees C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process.

  14. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, R.; Canovas, C.; Sanchez, A.

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 deg. C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 deg. C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process

  15. MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE ISOLATED MASSIVE DENSE CLUMP IRAS 20126+4104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Phillips, Thomas G.; Novak, Giles; Vaillancourt, John E.; Machida, Masahiro N.; Kataoka, Akimasa; Tomisaka, Kohji; Davidson, Jacqueline; Houde, Martin; Dowell, C. Darren; Leeuw, Lerothodi

    2012-01-01

    We measured polarized dust emission at 350 μm toward the high-mass star-forming massive dense clump IRAS 20126+4104 using the SHARC II Polarimeter, SHARP, at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. Most of the observed magnetic field vectors agree well with magnetic field vectors obtained from a numerical simulation for the case when the global magnetic field lines are inclined with respect to the rotation axis of the dense clump. The results of the numerical simulation show that rotation plays an important role on the evolution of the massive dense clump and its magnetic field. The direction of the cold CO 1-0 bipolar outflow is parallel to the observed magnetic field within the dense clump as well as the global magnetic field, as inferred from optical polarimetry data, indicating that the magnetic field also plays a critical role in an early stage of massive star formation. The large-scale Keplerian disk of the massive (proto)star rotates in an almost opposite sense to the clump's envelope. The observed magnetic field morphology and the counterrotating feature of the massive dense clump system provide hints to constrain the role of magnetic fields in the process of high-mass star formation.

  16. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  17. Dense Axion Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-16

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10^{-14}M_{⊙} if the axion mass is 10^{-4}  eV. We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10^{-20}M_{⊙} to about M_{⊙}. If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  18. Prevalence and intensity of third stage Gnathostoma spinigerum larvae in swamp eels sold in three large markets in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksirisampant, Wilai; Nuchprayoon, Surang; Wiwanitkit, Viroj; Kraivichian, Kanyarat; Suwansaksri, Jamsai

    2002-01-01

    Gnathostoma spinigerum is a common human tissue parasite in Thailand. The swamp eel is the major intermediate or paratenic host for this parasite. The high prevalence of the infective third stage larvae (L3) of this parasite in the rainy season has been noted in previous studies. During June 1999 (rainy season), we performed a cross-sectional survey of the prevalence and the intensity of G. spinigerum L3s in the livers of swamp eels that were obtained from three large Bangkok markets (Klong Toey, Pran Nok, and Tevej). Of a total of 785 livers, G. spinigerum L3s were found in 97: an infection rate of 12%. The prevalence rates in Klong Toey, Pran Nok, and Tevej markets were 13%, 10% and 14% respectively. There was no significant difference in the proportion of infected eels between the markets (p > 0.05). The intensity of L3 burden in the livers ranged from 1-17 larvae, with an average of 2.60 +/- 0.24 larvae (mean +/- SE). In this study a high prevalence of G. spinigerum L3s was found; there was no significant difference in the intensity of larvae in swamp eels between markets. These findings emphasize the importance of public health education: people need to be aware of the dangers of consuming raw or undercooked food.

  19. Hyperons in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-28

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V{sub low} {sub k}) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V{sub low} {sub k} potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three

  20. Aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation in an adult patient: a two-stage approach using a large-diameter stent graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosel, Luka; Perkov, Dražen; Dobrota, Savko; Ćorić, Vedran; Štern Padovan, Ranka

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a staged surgical and endovascular management in a 62-year-old woman with aortic coarctation associated with aortic valve stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The patient was admitted for severe aortic valve stenosis and mitral valve incompetence. During hospitalization and preoperative imaging, a previously undiagnosed aortic coarctation was discovered. The patient underwent a 2-stage approach that combined a Bentall procedure and mitral valve replacement in the first stage, followed by correction of the aortic coarctation by percutaneous placement of an Advanta V12 large-diameter stent graft (Atrium, Mijdrecht, The Netherlands) which to our knowledge has not been used in an adult patient with this combination of additional cardiac comorbidities. A staged approach combining surgical treatment first and endovascular placement of an Advanta V12 stent graft in the second stage can be effective and safe in adult patients with coarctation of the aorta and additional cardiac comorbidities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT provides powerful prognostic stratification in the primary staging of large breast cancer when compared with conventional explorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, Alexandre [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Le2i UMR CNRS 6306, Dijon (France); Dygai-Cochet, Inna; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Toubeau, Michel [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Humbert, Olivier; Brunotte, Francois [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dijon Cedex (France); Le2i UMR CNRS 6306, Dijon (France); CHU Dijon, MRI and Spectroscopy Unit, Dijon (France); Guiu, Severine; Coudert, Bruno [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Oncology, Dijon (France); Coutant, Charles; Fumoleau, Pierre [Centre Georges-Francois Leclerc, Department of Surgery, Dijon (France)

    2014-03-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact on management and the prognostic value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT for initial staging of newly diagnosed large breast cancer (BC) when compared with conventional staging. We prospectively included 142 patients with newly diagnosed BC and at least grade T2 tumour. All patients were evaluated with complete conventional imaging (CI) procedures (mammogram and/or breast ultrasound, bone scan, abdominal ultrasound and/or CT, X-rays and/or CT of the chest), followed by FDG PET/CT exploration, prior to treatment. The treatment plan based on CI staging was compared with that based on PET/CT findings. CI and PET/CT findings were confirmed by imaging and clinical follow-up and/or pathology when assessable. Progression-free survival (PFS) was analysed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. According to CI staging, 79 patients (56 %) were stage II, 46 (32 %) stage III and 17 (12 %) stage IV (distant metastases). Of the patients, 30 (21 %) were upstaged by PET/CT, including 12 (8 %) from stage II or III to stage IV. On the other hand, 23 patients (16 %) were downstaged by PET/CT, including 4 (3 %) from stage IV to stage II or III. PET/CT had a high or medium impact on management planning for 18 patients (13 %). Median follow-up was 30 months (range 9-59 months); 37 patients (26 %) experienced recurrence or progression of disease during follow-up and 17 patients (12 %) died. The Cox model indicated that CI staging was significantly associated with PFS (p = 0.01), but PET/CT staging provided stronger prognostic stratification (p < 0.0001). Moreover, Cox regression multivariate analysis showed that only PET/CT staging remained associated with PFS (p < 0.0001). FDG PET/CT provides staging information that more accurately stratifies prognostic risk in newly diagnosed large BC when compared with conventional explorations alone. (orig.)

  2. Large-scale expression analysis reveals distinct microRNA profiles at different stages of human neurodevelopment.

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    Brandon Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs predicted to regulate one third of protein coding genes via mRNA targeting. In conjunction with key transcription factors, such as the repressor REST (RE1 silencing transcription factor, miRNAs play crucial roles in neurogenesis, which requires a highly orchestrated program of gene expression to ensure the appropriate development and function of diverse neural cell types. Whilst previous studies have highlighted select groups of miRNAs during neural development, there remains a need for amenable models in which miRNA expression and function can be analyzed over the duration of neurogenesis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed large-scale expression profiling of miRNAs in human NTera2/D1 (NT2 cells during retinoic acid (RA-induced transition from progenitors to fully differentiated neural phenotypes. Our results revealed dynamic changes of miRNA patterns, resulting in distinct miRNA subsets that could be linked to specific neurodevelopmental stages. Moreover, the cell-type specific miRNA subsets were very similar in NT2-derived differentiated cells and human primary neurons and astrocytes. Further analysis identified miRNAs as putative regulators of REST, as well as candidate miRNAs targeted by REST. Finally, we confirmed the existence of two predicted miRNAs; pred-MIR191 and pred-MIR222 associated with SLAIN1 and FOXP2, respectively, and provided some evidence of their potential co-regulation. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, we demonstrate that regulation of miRNAs occurs in precise patterns indicative of their roles in cell fate commitment, progenitor expansion and differentiation into neurons and glia. Furthermore, the similarity between our NT2 system and primary human cells suggests their roles in molecular pathways critical for human in vivo neurogenesis.

  3. An Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search-based Three-Stage Matheuristic for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jonas Mark; Røpke, Stefan

    The Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW) consist of determining a set of feasible vehicle routes to deliver goods to a set of customers using a hierarchical objective; first minimising the number of vehicles used and, second, the total driving distance. A three-stage method is proposed...... for the VRPTW. The first stage aims at minimising the number of vehicle used, whereas the second and third phase aims at minimising the travel distance. The first stage maintains an ejection pool with temporarily unserved customers, and tries to insert these customer into the existing solution. If a new...... candidate solution for the minimum number of vehicles is found, a route is removed and the customers from the route is placed in the ejection pool. If the heuristic terminates without finding a new candidate solution where all customers are served, the first stage returns the last found candidate solution...

  4. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  5. Breaking Dense Structures: Proving Stability of Densely Structured Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Möhlmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstraction and refinement is widely used in software development. Such techniques are valuable since they allow to handle even more complex systems. One key point is the ability to decompose a large system into subsystems, analyze those subsystems and deduce properties of the larger system. As cyber-physical systems tend to become more and more complex, such techniques become more appealing. In 2009, Oehlerking and Theel presented a (de-composition technique for hybrid systems. This technique is graph-based and constructs a Lyapunov function for hybrid systems having a complex discrete state space. The technique consists of (1 decomposing the underlying graph of the hybrid system into subgraphs, (2 computing multiple local Lyapunov functions for the subgraphs, and finally (3 composing the local Lyapunov functions into a piecewise Lyapunov function. A Lyapunov function can serve multiple purposes, e.g., it certifies stability or termination of a system or allows to construct invariant sets, which in turn may be used to certify safety and security. In this paper, we propose an improvement to the decomposing technique, which relaxes the graph structure before applying the decomposition technique. Our relaxation significantly reduces the connectivity of the graph by exploiting super-dense switching. The relaxation makes the decomposition technique more efficient on one hand and on the other allows to decompose a wider range of graph structures.

  6. Attachment site selection of life stages of Ixodes ricinus ticks on a main large host in Europe, the red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysterud, Atle; Hatlegjerde, Idar Lauge; Sørensen, Ole Jakob

    2014-11-13

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases are increasing in many areas of Europe and North America due to climate change, while land use and the increased abundances of large hosts play a more controversial role. The pattern of host selection involves a crucial component for tick abundance. While the larvae and nymphs feed on a wide range of different sized hosts, the adult female ticks require blood meal from a large host (>1 kg), typically a deer, to fulfil the life cycle. Understanding the role of different hosts for abundances of ticks is therefore important, and also the extent to which different life stages attach to large hosts. We studied attachment site selection of life stages of I. ricinus ticks on a main large host in Europe, the red deer (Cervus elaphus). We collected from 33 felled red deer pieces of skin from five body parts: leg, groin, neck, back and ear. We counted the number of larval, nymphal, adult male and adult female ticks. Nymphs (42.2%) and adult (48.7%) ticks dominated over larvae (9.1%). There were more larvae on the legs (40.9%), more nymphs on the ears (83.7%), while adults dominated in the groins (89.2%) and neck (94.9%). Large mammalian hosts are thus a diverse habitat suitable for different life stages of ticks. The attachment site selection reflected the life stages differing ability to move. The spatial separation of life stages may partly limit the role of deer in co-feeding transmission cycles.

  7. L1CAM in Early-Stage Type I Endometrial Cancer: Results of a Large Multicenter Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeimet, A.G.; Reimer, D.; Huszar, M.; Winterhoff, B.; Puistola, U.; Azim, S.A.; Muller-Holzner, E.; Ben-Arie, A.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Petru, E.; Jahn, S.; Geels, Y.P.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Amant, F.; Polterauer, S.; Lappi-Blanco, E.; Bulten, J.; Meuter, A.; Tanouye, S.; Oppelt, P.; Stroh-Weigert, M.; Reinthaller, A.; Mariani, A.; Hackl, W.; Netzer, M.; Schirmer, U.; Vergote, I.; Altevogt, P.; Marth, C.; Fogel, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the excellent prognosis of Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) stage I, type I endometrial cancers, a substantial number of patients experience recurrence and die from this disease. We analyzed the value of immunohistochemical L1CAM determination to

  8. Renal cell carcinoma: stage, grade and histology migration over the last 15 years in a large Australian surgical series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeuk, Norbert; Guo, Ding Y; Haddad, Richard; Lau, Howard; Woo, Henry H; Bariol, Simon; Drummond, Malcolm; Vladica, Philip; Brooks, Andrew; Patel, Manish I

    2011-05-01

    • To verify whether migration towards earlier-stage renal cell carcinoma (RCC), which has been observed in the USA over the last decade, also applies to Australia. • Between January 1993 and December 2007, 547 nephrectomies performed in public and private hospitals in western Sydney were analysed from a retrospectively collected database. • Data were divided into three consecutive time groups. • Tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) stage as well as patient demographics, size, grade and histology of tumours and proportion of benign tumours were also assessed. • In all, 499 nephrectomies were performed for RCC. The median age was 62 years, with a male:female ratio of 1.9 : 1. Similarly sized tumours were identified in each time group [group 1 (1993-1997), 54.8 mm; group 2 (1998-2002), 52.0 mm; group 3 (2003-2007), 52.2 mm, P= 0.6]. • Pathological stage II disease decreased from 18.1 to 11.1%, but stage III disease showed an increase from 13.9 to 21.5% over that time period (P= 0.02). • The proportion of stage I and stage IV disease has remained relatively the same. There has been a statistically significant upward histological migration for the papillary subtype from 1.3 to 10.2% (P= 0.01). • There has also been an increasing representation of Fuhrman grade III tumours over time, from 17.6 to 30.8%, and a decreasing proportion of Fuhrman grade I tumours from 16.2 to 7.1% (P= 0.03). • There was a decrease in the incidence of benign tumours originally thought to be malignant on preoperative investigations, from 10% in group 1 to 4% in group 3 (P= 0.03). • The recent US phenomenon of migration towards earlier-stage, smaller RCCs as well as increased representation of benign tumours was not observed in the present study. The results of the present study, however, show an upward histological migration for papillary RCCs and an increasing representation of more aggressive Fuhrman grade III tumours. © 2010 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2010 BJU

  9. The international staging system improves the IPI risk stratification in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaolei; Hao, Xiaoxiao; Zhou, Lizhi; Wei, Qi; Zhang, Yuankun; Huang, Weimin; Song, Jialin; Feng, Ru; Wei, Yongqiang

    2017-10-19

    The international staging system (ISS), based on serum beta-2 microglobulin and albumin, is used to predict survival in multiple myeloma, but its prognostic significance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains unknown. Herein, we retrospectively analyzed 215 de novo DLBCL patients. According to ISS, there were 90 of 215 (41.9%) patients in stage I, 98 of 215 (45.6%) in stage II and 27 of 215 (12.6%) in stage III group. Patients with ISS stage II/III showed shorter overall survival (OS) and event free survival (EFS) than those with stage I treated with R-CHOP (p = 0.012 and p = 0.043, respectively), but not those treated with CHOP regimen (p > 0.05). Multivariable analysis revealed that ISS, independent of IPI, indicated different survival in both OS (HR, 5.690; 95% CI, 1.270-25.495, p = 0.023) and EFS (HR, 2.116; 95% CI, 1.005-4.455, p = 0.049) in DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP. ISS could identify patients with better outcome in intermediate-high/high IPI risk patients (p IPI risk patients, which may help to avoid intensive therapy.

  10. Stages of Change, Smoking Behaviour and Readiness to Quit in a Large Sample of Indigenous Australians Living in Eight Remote North Queensland Communities

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    Robyn McDermott

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is a major health issue for Indigenous Australians, however there are few interventions with demonstrated efficacy in this population. The Transtheoretical Model may provide a useful framework for describing smoking behaviour and assessing readiness to quit, with the aim of developing better interventions. Interviews were conducted with 593 Indigenous Australians in eight rural and remote communities in north Queensland, to examine stages of change and smoking behaviour. Among current smokers, 39.6% and 43.4% were in Precontemplation and Contemplation stages respectively. A further 13.9% were making preparations to quit (Preparation whilst only 3.2% said they were actively trying to quit (Action. When analysed by stage of change, the pattern of smoking-related behaviours conformed to the results of past research using the model. Importantly however, distribution of individuals across the stages opposes those observed in investigations of smoking behaviour in non-Indigenous Australian populations. The Transtheoretical Model can be used to meaningfully classify Indigenous smokers in remote north Queensland according to stages along the behaviour change continuum. Importantly, in this large sample across eight communities, most Indigenous smokers were not making preparations to change their smoking behaviour. This suggests that interventions should focus on promoting movement toward the Preparation and Action stages of change.

  11. Comparison of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with gallium-67 scintigraphy in the initial clinical staging of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Masatoshi; Toyama, Takaaki; Kikuchi, Taku; Kato, Jun; Shimizu, Takayuki; Koda, Yuya; Karigane, Daiki; Yamane, Yusuke; Abe, Ryohei; Yamazaki, Rie; Nakazato, Tomonori; Nakahara, Tadaki; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Mori, Takehiko

    2018-02-01

    Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been recommended as a complementary tool for the staging of various malignancies, including malignant lymphoma. PET findings often shift patients to higher stages and may affect treatment outcomes. In this study, we retrospectively compared staging and treatment outcomes of newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) assessed by PET (n = 153) or gallium-67 scintigraphy (Ga) (n = 95). In total, Ga upstaged two (2.1%) of 95 patients, whereas PET upstaged 13 (8.5%) of 153 patients. Bone/bone marrow (15 vs. 4%, P = 0.01) and muscle lesion (5 vs. 0%, P = 0.03) were identified more frequently in the PET group than in the Ga group. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survival rates did not differ significantly in the two groups at any stage. However, patients with stage III disease tended to have better progression-free survival in the PET group than in the Ga group [92.3 (95% CI 56.6-98.9%) vs. 58.3% (95% CI 27.0-80.1%), P = 0.086]. These results suggest that PET has a greater potential in detecting musculoskeletal lesions of DLBCL as extranodal lesions than Ga, and may contribute to the optimal staging.

  12. Formation and fragmentation of protostellar dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maury, Anaelle

    2009-01-01

    Stars form in molecular clouds, when they collapse and fragment to produce protostellar dense cores. These dense cores are then likely to contract under their own gravity, and form young protostars, that further evolve while accreting their circumstellar mass, until they reach the main sequence. The main goal of this thesis was to study the formation and fragmentation of protostellar dense cores. To do so, two main studies, described in this manuscript, were carried out. First, we studied the formation of protostellar cores by quantifying the impact of protostellar outflows on clustered star formation. We carried out a study of the protostellar outflows powered by the young stellar objects currently formed in the NGc 2264-C proto-cluster, and we show that protostellar outflows seem to play a crucial role as turbulence progenitors in clustered star forming regions, although they seem unlikely to significantly modify the global infall processes at work on clump scales. Second, we investigated the formation of multiple systems by core fragmentation, by using high - resolution observations that allow to probe the multiplicity of young protostars on small scales. Our results suggest that the multiplicity rate of protostars on small scales increase while they evolve, and thus favor dynamical scenarios for the formation of multiple systems. Moreover, our results favor magnetized scenarios of core collapse to explain the small-scale properties of protostars at the earliest stages. (author) [fr

  13. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for interim response assessment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terasawa, T.; Lau, J.; Bardet, S.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To systematically review the prognostic accuracy of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for interim response assessment of patients with untreated advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE......, SCOPUS, and Biologic Abstracts were searched for relevant studies. Two assessors independently reviewed studies for inclusion and extracted data. Relevant unpublished data were requested from the investigators if unavailable from publications. A meta-analysis of the prognostic accuracy was performed....... RESULTS: Thirteen studies involving 360 advanced-stage HL patients and 311 DLBCL patients met our inclusion criteria. Advanced-stage HL studies included few unfavorable-risk patients. DLBCL studies were heterogeneous. FDG-PET had an overall sensitivity of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72 to 0.89) and a specificity of 0...

  14. Mining connected global and local dense subgraphs for bigdata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Shen, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The problem of discovering connected dense subgraphs of natural graphs is important in data analysis. Discovering dense subgraphs that do not contain denser subgraphs or are not contained in denser subgraphs (called significant dense subgraphs) is also critical for wide-ranging applications. In spite of many works on discovering dense subgraphs, there are no algorithms that can guarantee the connectivity of the returned subgraphs or discover significant dense subgraphs. Hence, in this paper, we define two subgraph discovery problems to discover connected and significant dense subgraphs, propose polynomial-time algorithms and theoretically prove their validity. We also propose an algorithm to further improve the time and space efficiency of our basic algorithm for discovering significant dense subgraphs in big data by taking advantage of the unique features of large natural graphs. In the experiments, we use massive natural graphs to evaluate our algorithms in comparison with previous algorithms. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our algorithms for the two problems and their efficiency. This work is also the first that reveals the physical significance of significant dense subgraphs in natural graphs from different domains.

  15. Prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Validation and ranking of established staging-systems in a large western HCC-cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark op den Winkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HCC is diagnosed in approximately half a million people per year, worldwide. Staging is a more complex issue than in most other cancer entities and, mainly due to unique geographic characteristics of the disease, no universally accepted staging system exists to date. Focusing on survival rates we analyzed demographic, etiological, clinical, laboratory and tumor characteristics of HCC-patients in our institution and applied the common staging systems. Furthermore we aimed at identifying the most suitable of the current staging systems for predicting survival. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overall, 405 patients with HCC were identified from an electronic medical record database. The following seven staging systems were applied and ranked according to their ability to predict survival by using the Akaike information criterion (AIC and the concordance-index (c-index: BCLC, CLIP, GETCH, JIS, Okuda, TNM and Child-Pugh. Separately, every single variable of each staging system was tested for prognostic meaning in uni- and multivariate analysis. Alcoholic cirrhosis (44.4% was the leading etiological factor followed by viral hepatitis C (18.8%. Median survival was 18.1 months (95%-CI: 15.2-22.2. Ascites, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, AFP, number of tumor nodes and the BCLC tumor extension remained independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Overall, all of the tested staging systems showed a reasonable discriminatory ability. CLIP (closely followed by JIS was the top-ranked score in terms of prognostic capability with the best values of the AIC and c-index (AIC 2286, c-index 0.71, surpassing other established staging systems like BCLC (AIC 2343, c-index 0.66. The unidimensional scores TNM (AIC 2342, c-index 0.64 and Child-Pugh (AIC 2369, c-index 0.63 performed in an inferior fashion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared with six other staging systems, the CLIP-score was identified as the most suitable staging system for

  16. A rare case of gastric outlet obstruction due to large intramural duodenal hematoma following endotherapy for bleeding duodenal ulcer in a patient with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Kumar Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a very rare case and probably the first from India of gastric outlet obstruction due to a large intramural duodenal hematoma following combination endotherapy with hemoclipping and injection adrenaline 1:10,000 for actively bleeding duodenal ulcer in an elderly male patient with diabetes, hypertension, and end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis. The patient improved to approximately 6 weeks of conservative treatment with nasojejunal feeding.

  17. INTERNAL MOTIONS IN STARLESS DENSE CORES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Won; Myers, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the statistics of internal motions in starless dense cores and the relation of these motions to core density and evolution. Four spectral lines from three molecular species are analyzed from single-pointing and mapped observations of several tens of starless cores. Blue asymmetric profiles are dominant, indicating that inward motions are prevalent in sufficiently dense starless cores. These blue profiles are found to be more abundant, and their asymmetry is bluer, at core positions with stronger N 2 H + line emission or higher column density. Thirty-three starless cores are classified into four different types according to the blueshift and redshift of the lines in their molecular line maps. Among these cores, contracting motions dominate: 19 are classified as contracting, 3 as oscillating, 3 as expanding, and 8 as static. Contracting cores have inward motions all over the core with those motions predominating near the region of peak density. Cores with the bluest asymmetry tend to have greater column density than other cores and all five cores with peak column density >6 x 10 21 cm -2 are found to be contracting. This suggests that starless cores are likely to have contracting motions if they are sufficiently condensed. Our classification of the starless cores may indicate a sequence of core evolution in the sense that column density increases from static to contracting cores: the static cores in the earliest stage, the expanding and/or the oscillating cores in the next, and the contracting cores in the latest stage.

  18. Simulating natural ventilation in large sports buildings : Prediction of temperature and airflow patterns in the early design stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Aquilio, A.; Šileryte, R.; Yang, D.; Turrin, M.; Attar, Ramtin; Chronis, Angelos; Hanna, Sean; Turrin, Michela

    2016-01-01

    In large sport’s buildings, a big part of energy can be saved by providing natural instead of mechanical ventilation. However, additional challenges arise while controlling airflow and temperatures in different zones. These measures
    highly depend on the shape, construction and ventilation

  19. L1CAM in early-stage type I endometrial cancer: results of a large multicenter evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Huszar, Monica; Winterhoff, Boris; Puistola, Ulla; Azim, Samira Abdel; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Ben-Arie, Alon; van Kempen, Léon C; Petru, Edgar; Jahn, Stephan; Geels, Yvette P; Massuger, Leon F; Amant, Frédéric; Polterauer, Stephan; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Bulten, Johan; Meuter, Alexandra; Tanouye, Staci; Oppelt, Peter; Stroh-Weigert, Monika; Reinthaller, Alexander; Mariani, Andrea; Hackl, Werner; Netzer, Michael; Schirmer, Uwe; Vergote, Ignace; Altevogt, Peter; Marth, Christian; Fogel, Mina

    2013-08-07

    Despite the excellent prognosis of Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique (FIGO) stage I, type I endometrial cancers, a substantial number of patients experience recurrence and die from this disease. We analyzed the value of immunohistochemical L1CAM determination to predict clinical outcome. We conducted a retrospective multicenter cohort study to determine expression of L1CAM by immunohistochemistry in 1021 endometrial cancer specimens. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model were applied for survival and multivariable analyses. A machine-learning approach was used to validate variables for predicting recurrence and death. Of 1021 included cancers, 17.7% were rated L1CAM-positive. Of these L1CAM-positive cancers, 51.4% recurred during follow-up compared with 2.9% L1CAM-negative cancers. Patients bearing L1CAM-positive cancers had poorer disease-free and overall survival (two-sided Log-rank P relevance of these parameters was related strictly to L1CAM positivity. A classification and regression decision tree (CRT)identified L1CAM as the best variable for predicting recurrence (sensitivity = 0.74; specificity = 0.91) and death (sensitivity = 0.77; specificity = 0.89). To our knowledge, L1CAM has been shown to be the best-ever published prognostic factor in FIGO stage I, type I endometrial cancers and shows clear superiority over the standardly used multifactor risk score. L1CAM expression in type I cancers indicates the need for adjuvant treatment. This adhesion molecule might serve as a treatment target for the fully humanized anti-L1CAM antibody currently under development for clinical use.

  20. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Joycelin, E-mail: canavanjoycelin@gmail.com [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L. [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  1. Treatment of ruptured complex and large/giant ruptured cerebral aneurysms by acute coiling followed by staged flow diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinjikji, Waleed; Piano, Mariangela; Fang, Shanna; Pero, Guglielmo; Kallmes, David F; Quilici, Luca; Valvassori, Luca; Lozupone, Emilio; Cloft, Harry J; Boccardi, Edoardo; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Flow-diversion treatment has been shown to be associated with high rates of angiographic obliteration; however, the treatment is relatively contraindicated in the acute phase following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) as these patients require periprocedural dual antiplatelet therapy. Acute coiling followed by flow diversion has emerged as an intriguing and feasible treatment option for ruptured complex and giant aneurysms. In this study the authors report outcomes and complications of patients with ruptured aneurysms undergoing coiling in the acute phase followed by planned delayed flow diversion. METHODS This case series includes patients from 2 institutions. All patients underwent standard endovascular coiling in the acute phase after SAH with the intention and plan to proceed with flow diversion at a later date. Outcomes studied included angiographic occlusion, procedure-related complications, and long-term clinical outcome as measured using the modified Rankin Scale. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent coiling in the acute phase with the intention to undergo flow diversion at a later date. The mean aneurysm size was 15.8 ± 7.9 mm. Of the 31 patients undergoing coiling, 4 patients could not undergo further flow-diverter therapy: 3 patients (9.7%) died of complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage and 1 patient had permanent morbidity as a result of perioperative ischemic stroke (3.1%). Twenty-seven patients underwent staged placement of flow diverters after adequate recovery. The median time to treatment was 16 weeks. There was one case of aneurysm rebleeding following coil treatment. There were no cases of permanent morbidity or mortality resulting from flow-diverter treatment. Twenty-four patients underwent imaging follow-up; 18 of these patients had aneurysms that were completely or nearly completely occluded (58.1% on an intent-to-treat basis). At last follow-up (mean 18.3 months), 25 patients had mRS scores ≤ 2 (80.6% on an intent-to-treat basis

  2. Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Chemotherapy for Patients With Early-Stage Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma of Waldeyer Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yong-Gang; Qi, Shu-Nan; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Wang, Wei-Hu; Jin, Jing; Song, Yong-Wen; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); He, Xiao-Hui; Dong, Mei [Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Chen, Bo; Lu, Ning-Ning; Li, Ning; Tang, Yuan; Tang, Yu; Dai, Jian-Rong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Li, Ye-Xiong, E-mail: yexiong12@163.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric benefit, prognosis, and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early-stage, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of Waldeyer ring (WR-DLBCL). Methods and Materials: Sixty-one patients with early-stage WR-DLBCL who received chemotherapy followed by IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Dosimetric parameters for the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated, and survival was calculated. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the effect of the mean dose (D{sub mean}) to the parotid glands on xerostomia. Results: The median conformity index and homogeneity index of the planning target volume (PTV) were 0.83 and 0.90, respectively, demonstrating very good coverage of the target volume. The mean dose to the parotid glands was 24.9 Gy. The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and locoregional control (LRC) were 94.7%, 93.1%, and 98.3%, respectively. Early and late toxicities were mild, and no patient experienced late grade ≥3 toxicities. The D{sub mean} to the parotid glands had a linear correlation with late grade ≥2 xerostomia. Conclusions: IMRT after chemotherapy can provide excellent dose conformity and achieve favorable survival and LRC with mild toxicities in patients with early-stage WR-DLBCL. Dose constraints for the parotid glands should be limited to <24 Gy for early-stage WR-DLBCL.

  3. Significance of tumor size and radiation dose to local control in stage I-III diffuse large cell lymphoma treated with CHOP-Bleo and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Lillian M.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Velasquez, William S.; Allen, Pamela K.; McLaughlin, Peter; Rodriguez, M. Alma; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Swan, Forrest; Cabanillas, Fernando; Palmer, Judy L.; Cox, James D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of adjunctive involved field (IF) radiotherapy on long-term local control for patients with Ann Arbor Stage I-III diffuse large cell lymphoma (DLCL) who achieved a complete remission on a combined modality program which included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and Bleomycin (CHOP-Bleo). Methods and Materials: One hundred and ninety patients with Ann Arbor Stage I-III DLCL were treated with CHOP-Bleo and radiotherapy. Analyses were undertaken to determine (a) response to treatment according to stage, extent of maximum local disease, and irradiation dose either < 40 Gy or ≥ 40 Gy and (b) relapse patterns. Results: A complete remission (CR) was achieved in 162 patients. Among patients who achieved a CR, local control was better for those who received tumor doses of ≥ 40 Gy (97%) than for those who received < 40 Gy (83%) (p = 0.002.) Among those with extensive local disease, the corresponding control rates were 88% and 71%, respectively. A study of distant relapse patterns following a CR showed that the first relapse usually involved an extranodal site. Conclusion: Radiotherapy was an effective adjunctive treatment to CHOP-Bleo for patients with stage I-III DLCL who achieved a CR. Patterns of relapse suggested that total nodal irradiation (TNI) possibly could have benefited a small subset of patients

  4. Stage of disease in hepatitis B virus infection in Zambian adults is associated with large cell change but not well defined using classic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsokolo, Bright; Kanunga, Anne; Sinkala, Edford; Zyambo, Kanekwa; Kumwenda, Dia; Chama, David; Muyinda, Gabriel; Vinikoor, Michael; Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard; Elmdaah, Ali Khalifa A; Jones, Meleri; Chiluba, Clarence; Mudenda, Victor; Goldin, Robert D; Foster, Graham; Kelly, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Hepatocellular malignancy in young adults is a prominent feature of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in southern Africa. Here we report a cross-sectional study of liver pathology correlated with biomarkers in adults with HBV infection in Zambia. We analysed liver biopsies from Zambian patients with persistent HBV infection. We analysed 104 patients with HBV infection and evidence of liver disease. We obtained liver biopsies from 53 adults; of these, 12 (23%) were hepatitis B e antigen seropositive. The genotype was evenly distributed between A and E. One biopsy showed malignancy. Stage was 3 or more in 11 of 52 (21%) biopsies free of malignancy and lobular inflammation was found in 50 (94%). Neither alanine aminotransferase (ALT) nor the γ-glutamyl transferase:platelet ratio (GPR) were correlated with the stage of disease but were correlated with total Ishak score (ρ=0.47, p=0.0004 and ρ=0.33, p=0.02, respectively). Large cell change was observed in 10 of 11 biopsies with fibrosis stage 3 or more and 16 of 41 with early disease (p=0.005). Serum α-fetoprotein was elevated, although still within the normal range, in patients with large cell change (median 3.6 [interquartile range {IQR} 1.6-5.1]) compared with those without (1.7 [IQR 1.0-2.8]; p=0.03). Neither ALT nor GPR predicted large cell change. Large cell change was common in young HBV-infected adults in Zambia. Only serum α-fetoprotein was identified as a biomarker of this phenotype. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Geochemical stratigraphy and correlation within large igneous provinces: The final preserved stages of the Faroe Islands Basalt Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, J. M.; Hole, M. J.; Jolley, D. W.; Passey, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    The Faroe Islands Basalt Group (FIBG) comprises a gross stratigraphic thickness of over 6.5 km of dominantly extrusive basaltic facies erupted during the Late Palaeocene to Early Eocene. In this study we present 140 major and trace element analyses from flow by flow field and borehole sample profiles, through the Enni Formation, which comprises the final phase of volcanism preserved on the Faroe Islands. The sample profiles target geographically spaced and overlapping stratigraphic sequences tied relative to a 3D ArcGIS surface for the regionally extensive volcaniclastic Argir Beds marker unit. From these profiles five geochemical groups including one low TiO2 (Low-Ti 1.5 wt%) groups differentiated by Nb, Zr, Y and V variations are identified in conjunction with previous studies. The spatial and stratigraphic distribution of these groups is mapped across the islands and demonstrates a complex inter-digitated flow field evolution. Within the finer scale variations, broad spatial and temporal development trends are identified demonstrating the potential for correlation within the volcanic succession at the local, tens of kilometers scale. Low-Ti lavas formed in association with lithospheric thinning and developed extensive flow fields between the Faroe Islands and East Greenland contemporaneous to the eruption of High-Ti smaller melt fraction lava flows in both locations. The progression of High-Ti lava groups preserved on either side of the developing rift zone is very similar, but is not, however, chronostratigraphic due to multiple inter-digitations of the chemical types. We tentatively suggest that a previously proposed rift-oblique transfer zone between the Faroe Islands and East Greenland enabled non-uniform lithospheric thinning and the preservation of a near-continuous High-Ti melting region between these areas beyond the onset of Low-Ti eruptions which were initially fed from the west. This study highlights the complex nature of late stage flood basalt

  6. Risk of corneal ulcer in patients with end-stage renal disease: a retrospective large-scale cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Ren-Long; Tai, Ming-Cheng; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chang, Yuh-Shin

    2017-08-30

    To investigate the risk of corneal ulcer in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study included 92 967 patients with ESRD recruited between 2000 and 2009 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The same number of age-matched and sex-matched patients without ESRD were selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database, 2000 as the control group. Data for each patient were collected from the index date until December 2011. Corneal ulcer incidence rate and risk were compared between the groups. A Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the HR for a corneal ulcer after adjustment for potential confounders. The cumulative corneal ulcer incidence rate was calculated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. In total, 660 patients with ESRD and 591 controls showed a corneal ulcer during follow-up; thus, the corneal ulcer incidence rate in patients with ESRD was 1.54 times (95% CI 1.38-1.72) that in the control patients. After adjustment for potential confounders, including diabetes mellitus and HIV disease, patients with ESRD were 1.17 times (95% CI 1.03 to 1.33) more likely to develop a corneal ulcer in the cohort for the total sample. Among patients with diabetes mellitus, the corneal ulcer incidence rate was significantly higher in the ESRD group, and diabetes mellitus significantly increased corneal ulcer risk even after adjustment for other confounders in the cohort. ESRD increases the risk of a corneal ulcer, particularly in patients with ESRD with diabetes mellitus. Regular ocular examinations are suggested for patients with ESRD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for interim response assessment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terasawa, T.; Lau, J.; Bardet, S.

    2009-01-01

    -stage HL, FDG-PET performed after a few cycles of standard chemotherapy seems to be a reliable prognostic test to identify poor responders, warranting prospective studies to assess PET-based treatment strategies. For DLBCL, no reliable conclusions can be drawn due to heterogeneity. Interim PET remains......PURPOSE: To systematically review the prognostic accuracy of fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for interim response assessment of patients with untreated advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE......, SCOPUS, and Biologic Abstracts were searched for relevant studies. Two assessors independently reviewed studies for inclusion and extracted data. Relevant unpublished data were requested from the investigators if unavailable from publications. A meta-analysis of the prognostic accuracy was performed...

  8. Additional Survival Benefit of Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After R-CHOP Chemotherapy in Limited Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jeanny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han, E-mail: ihkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Hyuck [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of involved-lesion radiation therapy (ILRT) after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy in limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by comparing outcomes of R-CHOP therapy alone with R-CHOP followed by ILRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 198 patients treated with R-CHOP (median, 6 cycles) for pathologically confirmed DLBCL of limited stage from July 2004 to December 2012. Clinical characteristics of these patients were 33% with stage I and 66.7% with stage II; 79.8% were in the low or low-intermediate risk group; 13.6% had B symptoms; 29.8% had bulky tumors (≥7 cm); and 75.3% underwent ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP therapy. RT was given to 43 patients (21.7%) using ILRT technique, which included the prechemotherapy tumor volume with a median margin of 2 cm (median RT dose: 36 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 40 months, 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.8% and 88.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP (PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.004) and ILRT (PFS, P=.021; OS, P=.014) were favorable prognosticators of PFS and OS. A bulky tumor (P=.027) and response to R-CHOP (P=.012) were also found to be independent factors of OS. In subgroup analysis, the effect of ILRT was prominent in patients with a bulky tumor (PFS, P=.014; OS, P=.030) or an elevated level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.012). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ILRT after R-CHOP therapy improves PFS and OS in patients with limited stage DLBCL, especially in those with bulky disease or an elevated serum LDH level.

  9. Fabrication of dense panels in lithium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcy, P.; Roger, J.; Pointud, R.

    1958-04-01

    The authors report a study aimed at the fabrication of large and dense lithium fluoride panels. This sintered lithium fluoride is then supposed to be used for the construction of barriers of protection against a flow of thermal neutrons. They briefly present the raw material which is used under the form of chamotte obtained through a pre-sintering process which is also described. Grain size measurements and sample preparation are indicated. Shaping, drying, and thermal treatment are briefly described, and characteristics of the sintered product are indicated

  10. Dense Crowds of Virtual Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stüvel, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel crowd simulation method `Torso Crowds', aimed at the simulation of dense crowds. The method is based on the results of user studies and a motion capture experiment, which are also described in this thesis. Torso Crowds introduces a capsule shape to represent people in

  11. Consecutive Short-Scan CT for Geological Structure Analog Models with Large Size on In-Situ Stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    Full Text Available For the analysis of interior geometry and property changes of a large-sized analog model during a loading or other medium (water or oil injection process with a non-destructive way, a consecutive X-ray computed tomography (XCT short-scan method is developed to realize an in-situ tomography imaging. With this method, the X-ray tube and detector rotate 270° around the center of the guide rail synchronously by switching positive and negative directions alternately on the way of translation until all the needed cross-sectional slices are obtained. Compared with traditional industrial XCTs, this method well solves the winding problems of high voltage cables and oil cooling service pipes during the course of rotation, also promotes the convenience of the installation of high voltage generator and cooling system. Furthermore, hardware costs are also significantly decreased. This kind of scanner has higher spatial resolution and penetrating ability than medical XCTs. To obtain an effective sinogram which matches rotation angles accurately, a structural similarity based method is applied to elimination of invalid projection data which do not contribute to the image reconstruction. Finally, on the basis of geometrical symmetry property of fan-beam CT scanning, a whole sinogram filling a full 360° range is produced and a standard filtered back-projection (FBP algorithm is performed to reconstruct artifacts-free images.

  12. Safety and efficacy of staged retrograde intrarenal surgery for large stone burden of renal stones in selected patients: A single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Feng Lin

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, RIRS for large renal stone manipulation is an effective and safe treatment modality currently. In our study, the single RIRS SFR was superior to PNL or SWL even when the stone burden was between 2.0 cm and 3.0 cm (80.2%. For those patients whose stone burden was over 3.0 cm or for those with comorbidities, staged RIRS resulted in a lower complication rate, reduced hospital stay, and better SFR (76.5%.

  13. Value of Surveillance Studies for Patients With Stage I to II Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma in the Rituximab Era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiniker, Susan M.; Pollom, Erqi L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Khodadoust, Michael S. [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Kozak, Margaret M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Xu, Guofan; Quon, Andrew [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Advani, Ranjana H. [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hoppe, Richard T., E-mail: rhoppe@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Background: The role of surveillance studies in limited-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) in the rituximab era has not been well defined. We sought to evaluate the use of imaging (computed tomography [CT] and positron emission tomography [PET]-CT) scans and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in surveillance of patients with stage I to II DLBCL. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who received definitive treatment between 2000 and 2013. Results: One hundred sixty-two consecutive patients with stage I to II DLBCL were treated with chemotherapy +/− rituximab, radiation, or combined modality therapy. The 5-year rates of overall survival (OS) and freedom from progression (FFP) were 81.2% and 80.8%, respectively. Of the 162 patients, 124 (77%) were followed up with at least 1 surveillance PET scan beyond end-of-treatment scans; of those, 94 of 124 (76%) achieved a complete metabolic response on PET scan after completion of chemotherapy, and this was associated with superior FFP (P=.01, HR=0.3) and OS (P=.01, HR 0.3). Eighteen patients experienced relapse after initial response to therapy. Nine relapses were initially suspected by surveillance imaging studies (8 PET, 1 CT), and 9 were suspected clinically (5 by patient-reported symptoms and 4 by symptoms and physical examination). No relapses were detected by surveillance LDH. The median duration from initiation of treatment to relapse was 14.3 months among patients with relapses suspected by imaging, and 59.8 months among patients with relapses suspected clinically (P=.077). There was no significant difference in OS from date of first therapy or OS after relapse between patients whose relapse was suspected by imaging versus clinically. Thirteen of 18 patients underwent successful salvage therapy after relapse. Conclusions: A complete response on PET scan immediately after initial chemotherapy is associated with superior FFP and OS in stage I to II DLBCL. The use of PET scans as

  14. Evolution of dense spatially modulated electron bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balal, N.; Bratman, V. L.; Friedman, A.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical theory describing the dynamics of relativistic moving 1D electron pulses (layers) with the density modulation affected by a space charge has been revised and generalized for its application to the formation of dense picosecond bunches from linear accelerators with laser-driven photo injectors, and its good agreement with General Particle Tracer simulations has been demonstrated. Evolution of quasi-one-dimensional bunches (disks), for which the derived formulas predict longitudinal expansion, is compared with that for thin and long electron cylinders (threads), for which the excitation of non-linear waves with density spikes was found earlier by Musumeci et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106(18), 184801 (2011)] and Musumeci et al. [Phys. Rev. Spec. Top. -Accel. Beams 16(10), 100701 (2013)]. Both types of bunches can be used for efficiency enhancement of THz sources based on the Doppler frequency up-shifted coherent spontaneous radiation of electrons. Despite the strong Coulomb repulsion, the periodicity of a preliminary modulation in dense 1D layers persists during their expansion in the most interesting case of a relatively small change in particle energy. However, the period of modulation increases and its amplitude decreases in time. In the case of a large change in electron energy, the uniformity of periodicity is broken due to different relativistic changes in longitudinal scales along the bunch: the "period" of modulation decreases and its amplitude increases from the rear to the front boundary. Nevertheless, the use of relatively long electron bunches with a proper preliminary spatial modulation of density can provide a significantly higher power and a narrower spectrum of coherent spontaneous radiation of dense bunches than in the case of initially short single bunches with the same charge.

  15. Managing oral phosphate binder medication expenditures within the Medicare bundled end-stage renal disease prospective payment system: economic implications for large U.S. dialysis organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Haesuk; Rascati, Karen L; Keith, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    From January 2016, payment for oral-only renal medications (including phosphate binders and cinacalcet) was expected to be included in the new Medicare bundled end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS). The implementation of the ESRD PPS has generated concern within the nephrology community because of the potential for inadequate funding and the impact on patient quality of care. To estimate the potential economic impact of the new Medicare bundled ESRD PPS reimbursement from the perspective of a large dialysis organization in the United States. We developed an interactive budget impact model to evaluate the potential economic implications of Medicare payment changes to large dialysis organizations treating patients with ESRD who are receiving phosphate binders. In this analysis, we focused on the budget impact of the intended 2016 integration of oral renal drugs, specifically oral phosphate binders, into the PPS. We also utilized the model to explore the budgetary impact of a variety of potential shifts in phosphate binder market shares under the bundled PPS from 2013 to 2016. The base model predicts that phosphate binder costs will increase to $34.48 per dialysis session in 2016, with estimated U.S. total costs for phosphate binders of over $682 million. Based on these estimates, a projected Medicare PPS $33.44 reimbursement rate for coverage of all oral-only renal medications (i.e., phosphate binders and cinacalcet) would be insufficient to cover these costs. A potential renal drugs and services budget shortfall for large dialysis organizations of almost $346 million was projected. Our findings suggest that large dialysis organizations will be challenged to manage phosphate binder expenditures within the planned Medicare bundled rate structure. As a result, large dialysis organizations may have to make treatment choices in light of potential inadequate funding, which could have important implications for the quality of care for patients

  16. Human herpesvirus 8 is not detectable in lesions of large plaque parapsoriasis, and in early-stage sporadic, familial, and juvenile cases of mycosis fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay-Laish, Iris; Sarid, Ronit; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Kalt, Inna; Masa, Shiri Rivka; David, Michael; Feinmesser, Meora; Hodak, Emmilia

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV) 8, an essential etiologic agent of Kaposi sarcoma, is also associated with several lymphoproliferative disorders. The involvement of HHV 8 in mycosis fungoides (MF) and large plaque parapsoriasis (LPP) is controversial, with contradictory reports from various countries worldwide. We sought to investigate the presence of the HHV 8 genome in skin lesions of LPP and early-stage sporadic, familial, and juvenile MF in patients in Israel. Archival paraffin-embedded and frozen samples from skin biopsies of untreated patients with LPP and early-stage MF performed in 1990 through 2006 were randomly collected from the department of dermatology of a tertiary medical center in central Israel. DNA was extracted, and a TaqMan-based real-time polymerase chain reaction assay specific for the K6 gene region was used to detect the HHV 8 genome. A total of 46 biopsies were sampled from 11 patients with LPP and 35 with early-stage MF (17 adults with sporadic MF, 10 children, and 8 patients with familial MF). In all, 44 samples were negative for HHV 8 DNA; two samples from adults with sporadic MF were positive. The presence of HHV 8 antibodies or virus sequences was not assessed in peripheral blood. The results of this study, conducted in a region relatively endemic for HHV 8, support most earlier studies showing a lack of association of HHV 8 infection with LPP and sporadic adult-type MF. To our knowledge, the lack of association of HHV 8 infection with juvenile and familial MF has not been previously reported. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Using large-scale Granger causality to study changes in brain network properties in the Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) stage of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Chockanathan, Udaysankar; DSouza, Adora M.; Inglese, Matilde; Wismüller, Axel

    2017-03-01

    Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS) is often considered to be the first neurological episode associated with Multiple sclerosis (MS). At an early stage the inflammatory demyelination occurring in the CNS can manifest as a change in neuronal metabolism, with multiple asymptomatic white matter lesions detected in clinical MRI. Such damage may induce topological changes of brain networks, which can be captured by advanced functional MRI (fMRI) analysis techniques. We test this hypothesis by capturing the effective relationships of 90 brain regions, defined in the Automated Anatomic Labeling (AAL) atlas, using a large-scale Granger Causality (lsGC) framework. The resulting networks are then characterized using graph-theoretic measures that quantify various network topology properties at a global as well as at a local level. We study for differences in these properties in network graphs obtained for 18 subjects (10 male and 8 female, 9 with CIS and 9 healthy controls). Global network properties captured trending differences with modularity and clustering coefficient (p<0.1). Additionally, local network properties, such as local efficiency and the strength of connections, captured statistically significant (p<0.01) differences in some regions of the inferior frontal and parietal lobe. We conclude that multivariate analysis of fMRI time-series can reveal interesting information about changes occurring in the brain in early stages of MS.

  18. Redesigning Triangular Dense Matrix Computations on GPUs

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali

    2016-08-09

    A new implementation of the triangular matrix-matrix multiplication (TRMM) and the triangular solve (TRSM) kernels are described on GPU hardware accelerators. Although part of the Level 3 BLAS family, these highly computationally intensive kernels fail to achieve the percentage of the theoretical peak performance on GPUs that one would expect when running kernels with similar surface-to-volume ratio on hardware accelerators, i.e., the standard matrix-matrix multiplication (GEMM). The authors propose adopting a recursive formulation, which enriches the TRMM and TRSM inner structures with GEMM calls and, therefore, reduces memory traffic while increasing the level of concurrency. The new implementation enables efficient use of the GPU memory hierarchy and mitigates the latency overhead, to run at the speed of the higher cache levels. Performance comparisons show up to eightfold and twofold speedups for large dense matrix sizes, against the existing state-of-the-art TRMM and TRSM implementations from NVIDIA cuBLAS, respectively, across various GPU generations. Once integrated into high-level Cholesky-based dense linear algebra algorithms, the performance impact on the overall applications demonstrates up to fourfold and twofold speedups, against the equivalent native implementations, linked with cuBLAS TRMM and TRSM kernels, respectively. The new TRMM/TRSM kernel implementations are part of the open-source KBLAS software library (http://ecrc.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Res-kblas.aspx) and are lined up for integration into the NVIDIA cuBLAS library in the upcoming v8.0 release.

  19. Phosphorus in the dense interstellar medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, B.E.; Tsuji, T.; Bally, J.; Guelin, M.; Cernicharo, J.

    1990-01-01

    An observational study was made of interstellar (and circumstellar) phosphorus chemistry by means of (1) a survey of PN in energetic star-forming regions (several new detections); (2) a search for PN in cold cloud cores; and (3) a search for HPO, HCP, and PH3 in interstellar and circumstellar sources. The results are consistent with previously developed ion-molecule models of phosphorus chemistry and imply large depletion factors for P in dense clouds: about 1000 in warm star-forming cores and more than 10,000 in cold cloud cores. Thermochemical equilibrium models have been developed for the P chemistry in C-rich and O-rich environments, and it is found that HCP contains all the phosphorus in the C-rich case. The search for HCP in IRC 10216 yields an upper limit which, taken together with the recent detection of CP, implies significant depletion of HCP onto grains. Depletion factors for first- and second-row elements in diffuse and dense interstellar clouds are summarized, and an overall picture of circumstellar and interstellar grain and gas-phase processes is proposed to explain the depletions of N, O, C, S, Si, P, and in particular the high depletions of Si and P. 101 refs

  20. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Primary Gastric Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Dosimetric Analysis, Clinical Outcome, and Quality of Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xin; Fang, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Hu; Song, Yong-Wen; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; He, Xiao-Hui; Dong, Mei; Ren, Hua; Jin, Jing; Li, Ye-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric superiority, efficacy, toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) data of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PG-DLBCL). Methods and Materials: Forty-six consecutive patients with early-stage PG-DLBCL underwent IMRT after chemotherapy. The majority of patients (61.5%) were subclassified as the non-germinal center B cell–like subtype. Dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were assessed. Survival rates were depicted with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Quality of life was evaluated using the QLQ-C30-STO22 questionnaires at the last follow-up contact. Results: The median PTV mean dose was 41.6 Gy. Only 0.73% of the PTV received <95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent target coverage. The median kidney V20 and liver V30 were 14.1% and 16.1%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and locoregional control rates for all patients were 80.4%, 75.0%, and 93.2%, respectively. Stage, lactate dehydrogenase level, and immunophenotype were significant prognostic factors for OS, and only stage was a significant factor for locoregional control. Consolidation IMRT in patients with complete response after chemotherapy resulted in significantly better OS and progression-free survival than salvage IMRT in patients with non-complete response. Two of 8 patients who had chronic liver disease experienced grade 4 or grade 5 acute hepatic failure after 4 to 5 cycles of rituximab-based chemotherapy and IMRT (40 Gy). No other serious acute or late toxicity was observed. The long-term global and functional QOL scales were excellent, with negligible symptom scales. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy yielded excellent target coverage and critical tissue sparing and achieved favorable outcomes with acceptable toxicity and good long-term QOL in early-stage PG-DLBCL.

  1. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Primary Gastric Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: Dosimetric Analysis, Clinical Outcome, and Quality of Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Fang, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Hu; Song, Yong-Wen; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); He, Xiao-Hui; Dong, Mei [Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Ren, Hua; Jin, Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, Ye-Xiong, E-mail: yexiong@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College and Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric superiority, efficacy, toxicity, and quality of life (QOL) data of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PG-DLBCL). Methods and Materials: Forty-six consecutive patients with early-stage PG-DLBCL underwent IMRT after chemotherapy. The majority of patients (61.5%) were subclassified as the non-germinal center B cell–like subtype. Dosimetric parameters of the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk were assessed. Survival rates were depicted with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Quality of life was evaluated using the QLQ-C30-STO22 questionnaires at the last follow-up contact. Results: The median PTV mean dose was 41.6 Gy. Only 0.73% of the PTV received <95% of the prescribed dose, indicating excellent target coverage. The median kidney V20 and liver V30 were 14.1% and 16.1%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, and locoregional control rates for all patients were 80.4%, 75.0%, and 93.2%, respectively. Stage, lactate dehydrogenase level, and immunophenotype were significant prognostic factors for OS, and only stage was a significant factor for locoregional control. Consolidation IMRT in patients with complete response after chemotherapy resulted in significantly better OS and progression-free survival than salvage IMRT in patients with non-complete response. Two of 8 patients who had chronic liver disease experienced grade 4 or grade 5 acute hepatic failure after 4 to 5 cycles of rituximab-based chemotherapy and IMRT (40 Gy). No other serious acute or late toxicity was observed. The long-term global and functional QOL scales were excellent, with negligible symptom scales. Conclusions: Intensity modulated radiation therapy yielded excellent target coverage and critical tissue sparing and achieved favorable outcomes with acceptable toxicity and good long-term QOL in early-stage PG-DLBCL.

  2. Particle Segregation in Dense Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John Mark Nicholas Timm

    2018-01-01

    Granular materials composed of particles with differing grain sizes, densities, shapes, or surface properties may experience unexpected segregation during flow. This review focuses on kinetic sieving and squeeze expulsion, whose combined effect produces the dominant gravity-driven segregation mechanism in dense sheared flows. Shallow granular avalanches that form at the surface of more complex industrial flows such as heaps, silos, and rotating drums provide ideal conditions for particles to separate, with large particles rising to the surface and small particles percolating down to the base. When this is combined with erosion and deposition, amazing patterns can form in the underlying substrate. Gravity-driven segregation and velocity shear induce differential lateral transport, which may be thought of as a secondary segregation mechanism. This allows larger particles to accumulate at flow fronts, and if they are more frictional than the fine grains, they can feedback on the bulk flow, causing flow fingering, levee formation, and longer runout of geophysical mass flows.

  3. Charmonium propagation through a dense medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeliovich B.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation of a colourless c̄c dipole propagating with a large momentum through a hot medium originates from two sources, Debye screening (melting, and inelastic collisions with surrounding scattering centres (absorption. The former never terminates completely production of a bound charmonium in heavy ion collisions, even at very high temperatures. The latter, is controlled my the magnitude of the dipole cross section, related to the transport coefficient, which is the rate of transverse momentum broadening in the medium. A novel procedure of Lorentz boosting of the Schrödinger equation is developed, which allows to calculate the charmonium survival probability employing the path-integral technique, incorporating both melting and absorption. A novel mechanism of charmonium regeneration in a dense medium is proposed.

  4. Finding dense locations in symbolic indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for many applications such as overloaded area detection, security control, crowd management, indoor navigation, and so on. Indoor tracking data can be enormous and are not immediately ready for finding dense locations. This paper...... presents two graph-based models for constrained and semi-constrained indoor movement, respectively, and then uses the models to map raw tracking records into mapping records that represent object entry and exit times in particular locations. Subsequently, an efficient indexing structure called Hierarchical...

  5. Assessing the initiation and completion of adjuvant chemotherapy in a large nationwide and population-based cohort of elderly patients with stage-III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chung-Yuan; Delclos, George L; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L

    2011-12-01

    Randomized trials conducted in the 1980s have established the effectiveness of 5-fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy in treating stage-III colon cancer. However, the initiation of adjuvant chemotherapy is just the first step for survival improvement. Little is known about the actual completion rate of such a therapy in the community. The objectives of this study were to measure the initiation and completion rate of adjuvant chemotherapy and to identify the associated factors. We studied 12,265 patients aged 65+ diagnosed with stage-III colon cancer between 1991 and 2005 who were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database. Chemotherapy initiation was defined as at least one claim indicating the use of chemotherapy. The first and last claims were used to measure the length of chemotherapy. A complete course of chemotherapy was defined as 8-13 months for 1991-1995 cohort and 5-7 months for 1996-2005 cohort according to clinical guideline. Of the 12,265 patients, 64.4% received adjuvant chemotherapy within 3 months after tumor resection. Among those who had chemotherapy initiated, 62.2% (or 38.0% of 12,265 patients) received a complete course of chemotherapy. Patient's age at diagnosis, marital status, and comorbidity score were the significant predictors for chemotherapy initiation. These variables remained significant in predicting chemotherapy completion after adjusting for year of diagnosis and other factors. In conclusion, initiation and completion of chemotherapy was largely influenced by patient's age, marital status and comorbidity. Further investigation is needed to explore the cause of these differences in adherence to standard treatment that is essential for better quality of cancer care.

  6. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J; Chen, Q F; Gu, Y J; Chen, Z Y

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ∼6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.

  7. A single-institution retrospective analysis of outcomes for stage I-II primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma treated with immunochemotherapy with or without radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Michael S; Hiniker, Susan M; Wu, Sharon; Natkunam, Yasodha; Mittra, Erik S; Advani, Ranjana H; Hoppe, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    As the optimal treatment for primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) remains undefined, we evaluated outcomes of patients treated with standard and dose-intense rituximab-chemotherapy (R-CT) with and without radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively identified 28 patients with stage I-II PMBCL in our lymphoma database, re-reviewed pathology slides and scored interim or post-chemotherapy PET/CTs using the Deauville scale. Fourteen patients received RT (36-45 Gy) preceded by either six cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) or 12 weeks of rituximab, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisone and bleomycin (R-VACOP-B) with median follow-up of 94 months. Fourteen patients received 4-8 cycles of dose-adjusted etoposide, vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide and rituximab (DA-EPOCH-R) with median follow-up of 38 months; one of these received RT (36 Gy) due to post-chemotherapy PET/CT Deauville score 4. Following R-CT and RT or DA-EPOCH-R, 5-year and 3-year FFP and OS were both 100%. Both R-CHOP/R-VACOP-B with RT and DA-EPOCH-R demonstrate excellent outcomes.

  8. Beamforming via large and dense antenna arrays above a clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrabadi, Osama; Tsakalaki, Elpiniki; Huang, Howard

    2013-01-01

    necessitate multi-layering. In the multi-layer BF mode, the RF coverage is divided into a number of directive non-overlapping sector-beams in a deterministic manner within a multi-user multi-input multi-output (MIMO) system. The optimal number of layers that maximizes the user's sum-rate given a constrained...

  9. Dynamical effects on binary X-ray sources in dense stellar clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shull, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    We examine the model in which the globular-cluster X-ray sources are binaries. Collisions of field stars in cores of dense clusters may shrink the orbits of tightly bound (''hard'') binaries, with important consequences for the evolution of X-ray sources if one component is a collapsed star. Exchange capture of field stars enables the binary to recycle its mass supplier and to undergo a number of intermittent stages of X-ray activity. ''Hard'' binaries may be formed by three-body encounters or by two-body tidal capture in clusters with large core densities and low velocity dispersions. Alternatively, as suggested by Hills, such objects may form by neutron-star or black-hole capture in exchange collisions with primordial binaries

  10. Filter-Dense Multicolor Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Kijani

    Full Text Available Immunofluorescence microscopy is a unique method to reveal the spatial location of proteins in tissues and cells. By combining antibodies that are labeled with different fluorochromes, the location of several proteins can simultaneously be visualized in one sample. However, because of the risk of bleed-through signals between fluorochromes, standard multicolor microscopy is restricted to a maximum of four fluorescence channels, including one for nuclei staining. This is not always enough to address common scientific questions. In particular, the use of a rapidly increasing number of marker proteins to classify functionally distinct cell populations and diseased tissues emphasizes the need for more complex multistainings. Hence, multicolor microscopy should ideally offer more channels to meet the current needs in biomedical science. Here we present an enhanced multi-fluorescence setup, which we call Filter-Dense Multicolor Microscopy (FDMM. FDMM is based on condensed filter sets that are more specific for each fluorochrome and allow a more economic use of the light spectrum. FDMM allows at least six independent fluorescence channels and can be applied to any standard fluorescence microscope without changing any operative procedures for the user. In the present study, we demonstrate an FDMM setup of six channels that includes the most commonly used fluorochromes for histology. We show that the FDMM setup is specific and robust, and we apply the technique on typical biological questions that require more than four fluorescence microscope channels.

  11. Dense sheet Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetsu, Miyamoto

    1999-01-01

    The steady state and quasi-steady processes of infinite- and finite-width sheet z-pinches are studied. The relations corresponding to the Bennett relation and Pease-Braginskii current of cylindrical fiber z-pinches depend on a geometrical factor in the sheet z-pinches. The finite-width sheet z-pinch is approximated by a segment of infinite-width sheet z-pinch, if it is wide enough, and corresponds to a number of (width/thickness) times fiber z-pinch plasmas of the diameter that equals the sheet thickness. If the sheet current equals this number times the fiber current, the plasma created in the sheet z-pinches is as dense as in the fiber z-pinches. The total energy of plasma and magnetic field per unit mass is approximately equal in both pinches. Quasi-static transient processes are different in several aspects from the fiber z-pinch. No radiation collapse occurs in the sheet z-pinch. The stability is improved in the sheet z-pinches. The fusion criterions and the experimental arrangements to produce the sheet z-pinches are also discussed. (author)

  12. Parametric dense stereovision implementation on a system-on chip (SoC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Alfredo; Montejo, Pablo; García, Jorge; Bravo, Ignacio; Lázaro, José L

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel hardware implementation of a dense recovery of stereovision 3D measurements. Traditionally 3D stereo systems have imposed the maximum number of stereo correspondences, introducing a large restriction on artificial vision algorithms. The proposed system-on-chip (SoC) provides great performance and efficiency, with a scalable architecture available for many different situations, addressing real time processing of stereo image flow. Using double buffering techniques properly combined with pipelined processing, the use of reconfigurable hardware achieves a parametrisable SoC which gives the designer the opportunity to decide its right dimension and features. The proposed architecture does not need any external memory because the processing is done as image flow arrives. Our SoC provides 3D data directly without the storage of whole stereo images. Our goal is to obtain high processing speed while maintaining the accuracy of 3D data using minimum resources. Configurable parameters may be controlled by later/parallel stages of the vision algorithm executed on an embedded processor. Considering hardware FPGA clock of 100 MHz, image flows up to 50 frames per second (fps) of dense stereo maps of more than 30,000 depth points could be obtained considering 2 Mpix images, with a minimum initial latency. The implementation of computer vision algorithms on reconfigurable hardware, explicitly low level processing, opens up the prospect of its use in autonomous systems, and they can act as a coprocessor to reconstruct 3D images with high density information in real time.

  13. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-07-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  14. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  15. Dense suspensions: force response and jamming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Kann, S.

    2012-01-01

    The response of dense suspensions to an external force was studied using two different experiments. In the first experiment, objects were settled in a deep bath of a dense cornstarch suspension. This is the only suspension to result in two unexpected phenomena: Velocity oscillations in the bulk, and

  16. Dense image correspondences for computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ce

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental building-block of many new computer vision systems: dense and robust correspondence estimation. Dense correspondence estimation techniques are now successfully being used to solve a wide range of computer vision problems, very different from the traditional applications such techniques were originally developed to solve. This book introduces the techniques used for establishing correspondences between challenging image pairs, the novel features used to make these techniques robust, and the many problems dense correspondences are now being used to solve. The book provides information to anyone attempting to utilize dense correspondences in order to solve new or existing computer vision problems. The editors describe how to solve many computer vision problems by using dense correspondence estimation. Finally, it surveys resources, code, and data necessary for expediting the development of effective correspondence-based computer vision systems.   ·         Provides i...

  17. Three body dynamics in dense gravitational systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Kenneth

    galactic black hole binaries as a background source. I also found that the binaries are ejected from the cluster with, for the most part, a velocity just above the escape speed of the cluster which is a few tens of km/sec. These gravitational wave sources are thus constrained in their host galaxies as the galactic escape velocity is some hundreds of km/sec which only a very few binaries achieve in special cases. I studied the effect of the Kozai mechanism on two pulsars, one in the globular cluster M4, and the other J1903+0327. The M4 pulsar pulsar was found to have an unusually large orbital eccentricity, given that it is in a binary with a period of nearly 200 days. This unusual behavior led to the conclusion that a planet-like third body of much less than a solar mass was orbiting the binary. I used my own code to integrate the secular evolution equations with a broad set of initial conditions to determine the first detailed properties of the third body; namely that the mass of the planet is about that of Jupiter. The second pulsar J1903+0327 consists of a 2.15ms pulsar and a near solar mass companion in an e = 0.44 orbit. A preliminary study of this pulsar showed that the high eccentricity can be reproduced by my models, and there are three candidate clusters from which this pulsar could have originated. My third project was a study of the effect of a planet at 50 AU on the inner solar system. The origin of this planet is assumed to be from an exchange with another solar system in the early stages of the sun's life while it was still in the dense star forming region where it was born. Similar studies have been done with the exchange of stars among binaries by Malmberg et al. (2007b). The exchange once again allows the Kozai effect to bring about drastic change in the inner system. A planet is chosen as the outer object as, unlike a stellar companion, it would remain unseen by current radial velocity and direct observation methods, although it could be detected by

  18. The EOS and neutrino interactions in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, M.; Reddy, S. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The deleptonization and cooling times of a newly born neutron star depend on the equation of state (EOS) and neutrino opacities in dense matter. Through model calculations we show that effects of Pauli blocking and many-body correlations due to strong interactions reduce both the neutral and charged current neutrino cross sections by large factors compared to the case in which these effects are ignored. (orig.)

  19. Shrinkage/swelling of compacted clayey loose and dense soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein; Masrouri, Farimah

    2009-11-01

    This Note presents an experimental study performed on expansive compacted loose and dense samples using osmotic oedometers. Several successive wetting and drying cycles were applied in a suction range between 0 and 8 MPa under different values of constant net vertical stress (15, 30, and 60 kPa). During the suction cycles, the dense samples showed cumulative swelling strains, while the loose samples showed volumetric shrinkage accumulation. At the end of the suction cycles, the volumetric strains converged to an equilibrium stage that indicated elastic behavior of the swelling soil for any further hydraulic variations. At this stage, the compression curves for the studied soil at the different imposed suctions (0, 2, and 8 MPa) converged towards the saturated state curve for the high applied vertical stresses. We defined this pressure as the saturation stress(P). The compression curves provided sufficient data to examine the soil mechanical behavior at the equilibrium stage. To cite this article: H. Nowamooz, F. Masrouri, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  20. Rituximab-dose-dense chemotherapy with or without high-dose chemotherapy plus autologous stem-cell transplantation in high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLCL04): final results of a multicentre, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappella, Annalisa; Martelli, Maurizio; Angelucci, Emanuele; Brusamolino, Ercole; Evangelista, Andrea; Carella, Angelo Michele; Stelitano, Caterina; Rossi, Giuseppe; Balzarotti, Monica; Merli, Francesco; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pavone, Vincenzo; Rigacci, Luigi; Zaja, Francesco; D'Arco, Alfonso; Cascavilla, Nicola; Russo, Eleonora; Castellino, Alessia; Gotti, Manuel; Congiu, Angela Giovanna; Cabras, Maria Giuseppina; Tucci, Alessandra; Agostinelli, Claudio; Ciccone, Giovannino; Pileri, Stefano A; Vitolo, Umberto

    2017-08-01

    The prognosis of young patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma at high risk (age-adjusted International Prognostic Index [aa-IPI] score 2 or 3) treated with R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisone) is poor. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible benefit of intensification with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation as part of first-line treatment in these patients. We did a multicentre, open-label, randomised, controlled, phase 3 trial with a 2 × 2 factorial design to compare, at two different R-CHOP dose levels, a full course of rituximab-dose-dense chemotherapy (no transplantation group) versus an abbreviated course of rituximab-dose-dense chemotherapy followed by consolidation with R-MAD (rituximab plus high-dose cytarabine plus mitoxantrone plus dexamethasone) and high-dose BEAM chemotherapy (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan) plus autologous stem-cell transplantation (transplantation group) in young patients (18-65 years) with untreated high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (aa-IPI score 2-3). At enrolment, patients were stratified according to aa-IPI score and randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to receive R-CHOP (intravenous rituximab 375 mg/m 2 , cyclophosphamide 750 mg/m 2 , doxorubicin 50 mg/m 2 , and vincristine 1·4 mg/m 2 on day 1, plus oral prednisone 100 mg on days 1-5) delivered in a 14-day cycle (R-CHOP-14) for eight cycles; high-dose R-CHOP-14 (R-MegaCHOP-14; R-CHOP-14 except for cyclophosphamide 1200 mg/m 2 and doxorubicin 70 mg/m 2 ) for six cycles; R-CHOP-14 for four cycles followed by R-MAD (intravenous rituximab 375 mg/m 2 on day 1 or 4 plus intravenous cytarabine 2000 mg/m 2 and dexamethasone 4 mg/m 2 every 12 h on days 1-3 plus intravenous mitoxantrone 8 mg/m 2 on days 1-3) plus BEAM (intravenous carmustine 300 mg/m 2 on day -7, intravenous cytarabine 200 mg/m 2 twice a day on days -6 to -3, intravenous etoposide 100 mg/m 2 twice a day on days -6

  1. Inference by replication in densely connected systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neirotti, Juan P; Saad, David

    2007-10-01

    An efficient Bayesian inference method for problems that can be mapped onto dense graphs is presented. The approach is based on message passing where messages are averaged over a large number of replicated variable systems exposed to the same evidential nodes. An assumption about the symmetry of the solutions is required for carrying out the averages; here we extend the previous derivation based on a replica-symmetric- (RS)-like structure to include a more complex one-step replica-symmetry-breaking-like (1RSB-like) ansatz. To demonstrate the potential of the approach it is employed for studying critical properties of the Ising linear perceptron and for multiuser detection in code division multiple access (CDMA) under different noise models. Results obtained under the RS assumption in the noncritical regime give rise to a highly efficient signal detection algorithm in the context of CDMA; while in the critical regime one observes a first-order transition line that ends in a continuous phase transition point. Finite size effects are also observed. While the 1RSB ansatz is not required for the original problems, it was applied to the CDMA signal detection problem with a more complex noise model that exhibits RSB behavior, resulting in an improvement in performance.

  2. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  7. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing ...

  8. Dense Matter Physics with Rare Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngman

    Terrestrial dense matter from heavy ion collisions with rare isotope beams offers much opportunity to study compact stars, exotic nuclei and also many facets of QCD phase diagram with non-zero isospin asymmetry. We first review some recent results with a parity doublet model in dense matter and in nuclei to discuss the origin of nucleon mass other than that from chiral symmetry breaking. To study dense matter created in heavy ion collisions, a transport model is almost the only available tool on the market. We present a brief summary of a new transport code, DaeJeon Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck.

  9. Influence of galactic arm scale dynamics on the molecular composition of the cold and dense ISM. I. Observed abundance gradients in dense clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruaud, M.; Wakelam, V.; Gratier, P.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. We study the effect of large scale dynamics on the molecular composition of the dense interstellar medium during the transition between diffuse to dense clouds. Methods: We followed the formation of dense clouds (on sub-parsec scales) through the dynamics of the interstellar medium at galactic scales. We used results from smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations from which we extracted physical parameters that are used as inputs for our full gas-grain chemical model. In these simulations, the evolution of the interstellar matter is followed for 50 Myr. The warm low-density interstellar medium gas flows into spiral arms where orbit crowding produces the shock formation of dense clouds, which are held together temporarily by the external pressure. Results: We show that depending on the physical history of each SPH particle, the molecular composition of the modeled dense clouds presents a high dispersion in the computed abundances even if the local physical properties are similar. We find that carbon chains are the most affected species and show that these differences are directly connected to differences in (1) the electronic fraction, (2) the C/O ratio, and (3) the local physical conditions. We argue that differences in the dynamical evolution of the gas that formed dense clouds could account for the molecular diversity observed between and within these clouds. Conclusions: This study shows the importance of past physical conditions in establishing the chemical composition of the dense medium.

  10. Prevalence of mammographically dense breasts in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Brian L; Gangnon, Ronald E; Burt, Veronica; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Hampton, John M; Wellman, Robert D; Kerlikowske, Karla; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2014-10-01

    National legislation is under consideration that would require women with mammographically dense breasts to be informed of their breast density and encouraged to discuss supplemental breast cancer screening with their health care providers. The number of US women potentially affected by this legislation is unknown. We determined the mammographic breast density distribution by age and body mass index (BMI) using data from 1518 599 mammograms conducted from 2007 through 2010 at mammography facilities in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC). We applied these breast density distributions to age- and BMI-specific counts of the US female population derived from the 2010 US Census and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to estimate the number of US women with dense breasts. Overall, 43.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 43.1% to 43.4%) of women 40 to 74 years of age had heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts, and this proportion was inversely associated with age and BMI. Based on the age and BMI distribution of US women, we estimated that 27.6 million women (95% CI = 27.5 to 27.7 million) aged 40 to 74 years in the United States have heterogeneously or extremely dense breasts. Women aged 40 to 49 years (N = 12.3 million) accounted for 44.3% of this group. The prevalence of dense breasts among US women of common breast cancer screening ages exceeds 25 million. Policymakers and healthcare providers should consider this large prevalence when debating breast density notification legislation and designing strategies to ensure that women who are notified have opportunities to evaluate breast cancer risk and discuss and pursue supplemental screening options if deemed appropriate. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Astrophysics implication of dense matter phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedrakian, A.

    2010-01-01

    I will discuss the ways that astrophysics can help us to understand the phase diagram of dense matter. The examples will include gravitational wave from compact stars, cooling of compact stars, and effects on vorticity on compact star dynamics. (author)

  12. Kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graedel, T.E.; Langer, W.D.; Frerking, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds has been developed to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature, and other topics of interest. The full computation involves 328 individual reactions (expanded to 1067 to study carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry); photodegradation processes are unimportant in these dense clouds and are excluded

  13. The value of routine bone marrow biopsy in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma staged with PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alzahrani, M; El-Galaly, T C; Hutchings, M

    2016-01-01

    value 91%. Concordant histological involvement of the BM by DLBCL was associated with worse overall survival and progression-free survival than discordant or no involvement in univariate and multivariate analyses. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with DLBCL, staging PET/CT can miss BM involvement...

  14. METHOD OF PRODUCING DENSE CONSOLIDATED METALLIC REGULUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magel, T.T.

    1959-08-11

    A methcd is presented for reducing dense metal compositions while simultaneously separating impurities from the reduced dense metal and casting the reduced parified dense metal, such as uranium, into well consolidated metal ingots. The reduction is accomplished by heating the dense metallic salt in the presence of a reducing agent, such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal in a bomb type reacting chamber, while applying centrifugal force on the reacting materials. Separation of the metal from the impurities is accomplished essentially by the incorporation of a constricted passageway at the vertex of a conical reacting chamber which is in direct communication with a collecting chamber. When a centrifugal force is applled to the molten metal and slag from the reduction in a direction collinear with the axis of the constricted passage, the dense molten metal is forced therethrough while the less dense slag is retained within the reaction chamber, resulting in a simultaneous separation of the reduced molten metal from the slag and a compacting of the reduced metal in a homogeneous mass.

  15. THE JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEY: DENSE CORE CLUSTERS IN ORION A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, J.; Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Mairs, S.; Francesco, J. Di [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Sadavoy, S. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hatchell, J. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Berry, D. S. [East Asian Observatory, 660 N. A‘ohōkū Place, University Park, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Jenness, T. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 N. A‘ohōkū Place, University Park, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Hogerheijde, M. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ward-Thompson, D. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-12-10

    The Orion A molecular cloud is one of the most well-studied nearby star-forming regions, and includes regions of both highly clustered and more dispersed star formation across its full extent. Here, we analyze dense, star-forming cores identified in the 850 and 450 μ m SCUBA-2 maps from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify dense cores in a uniform manner across the Orion A cloud and analyze their clustering properties. Using two independent lines of analysis, we find evidence that clusters of dense cores tend to be mass segregated, suggesting that stellar clusters may have some amount of primordial mass segregation already imprinted in them at an early stage. We also demonstrate that the dense core clusters have a tendency to be elongated, perhaps indicating a formation mechanism linked to the filamentary structure within molecular clouds.

  16. THE JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEY: DENSE CORE CLUSTERS IN ORION A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, J.; Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Mairs, S.; Francesco, J. Di; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Berry, D. S.; Jenness, T.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2016-01-01

    The Orion A molecular cloud is one of the most well-studied nearby star-forming regions, and includes regions of both highly clustered and more dispersed star formation across its full extent. Here, we analyze dense, star-forming cores identified in the 850 and 450 μ m SCUBA-2 maps from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify dense cores in a uniform manner across the Orion A cloud and analyze their clustering properties. Using two independent lines of analysis, we find evidence that clusters of dense cores tend to be mass segregated, suggesting that stellar clusters may have some amount of primordial mass segregation already imprinted in them at an early stage. We also demonstrate that the dense core clusters have a tendency to be elongated, perhaps indicating a formation mechanism linked to the filamentary structure within molecular clouds.

  17. Projective block Lanczos algorithm for dense, Hermitian eigensystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, F.; Lo, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    Projection operators are used to effect open-quotes deflation by restrictionclose quotes and it is argued that this is an optimal Lanczos algorithm for memory minimization. Algorithmic optimization is constrained to dense, Hermitian eigensystems where a significant number of the extreme eigenvectors must be obtained reliably and completely. The defining constraints are operator algebra without a matrix representation and semi-orthogonalization without storage of Krylov vectors. other semi-orthogonalization strategies for Lanczos algorithms and conjugate gradient techniques are evaluated within these constraints. Large scale, sparse, complex numerical experiments are performed on clusters of magnetic dipoles, a quantum many-body system that is not block-diagonalizable. Plane-wave, density functional theory of beryllium clusters provides examples of dense complex eigensystems. Use of preconditioners and spectral transformations is evaluated in a preprocessor prior to a high accuracy self-consistent field calculation. 25 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Urban Stage 2014: Navigating Relationships during a Collaboration between Local Businesses, Nonprofits, a Large University, and a Mid-Sized City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Driskill

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Urban Stage was constructed as a temporary urbanism project to demonstrate environmental, cultural, economic and social sustainability in an urban environment. One block of Avenue J in downtown Lubbock, Texas was constructed and activated between October 30 and November 7, 2014. This paper will focus on the collaboration and decision making processes between the City of Lubbock, Texas Tech University, and community organizations that enabled this project to take place. The collaborative process between these diverse entities was inherently complex by virtue of the existing organizational structures and complicated further by bureaucratic inertia, the bureaucratic avoidance of responsibility. Leadership actions at various levels of organizational structure were required in order to overcome this bureaucratic inertia and install the Urban Stage.

  19. Endoscopic partial sphincterotomy coupled with large balloon papilla dilation – Single stage approach for management of extra-hepatic bile ducts macro-lithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Donatelli

    2014-01-01

    We conclude that endoscopic partial sphincterotomy plus large papillary balloon dilation seems a promising, effective and safe approach to treat giant extrahepatic biliary calculi, if performed after correct patient selection and under established guidelines.

  20. Rheological Behavior of Dense Assemblies of Granular Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, Sankaran; Tardos, Gabriel I.; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Assemblies of granular materials behave differently when they are owing rapidly, from when they are slowly deforming. The behavior of rapidly owing granular materials, where the particle-particle interactions occur largely through binary collisions, is commonly related to the properties of the constituent particles through the kinetic theory of granular materials. The same cannot be said for slowly moving or static assemblies of granular materials, where enduring contacts between particles are prevalent. For instance, a continuum description of the yield characteristics of dense assemblies of particles in the quasistatic ow regime cannot be written explicitly on the basis of particle properties, even for cohesionless particles. Continuum models for this regime have been proposed and applied, but these models typically assume that the assembly is at incipient yield and they are expressed in terms of the yield function, which we do not yet know how to express in terms of particle-level properties. The description of the continuum rheology in the intermediate regime is even less understood. Yet, many practically important flows in nature and in a wide range of technological applications occur in the dense flow regime and at the transition between dilute and dense regimes; the lack of validated continuum rheological models for particle assemblies in these regimes limits predictive modeling of such flows. This research project is aimed at developing such rheological models.

  1. Constitutive law of dense granular matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Takahiro

    2010-01-01

    The frictional properties of dense granular matter under steady shear flow are investigated using numerical simulation. Shear flow tends to localize near the driving boundary unless the coefficient of restitution is close to zero and the driving velocity is small. The bulk friction coefficient is independent of shear rate in dense and slow flow, whereas it is an increasing function of shear rate in rapid flow. The coefficient of restitution affects the friction coefficient only in such rapid flow. Contrastingly, in dense and slow regime, the friction coefficient is independent of the coefficient of restitution and mainly determined by the elementary friction coefficient and the rotation of grains. It is found that the mismatch between the vorticity of flow and the angular frequency of grains plays a key role to the frictional properties of sheared granular matter.

  2. A new machine learning approach for predicting the response to anemia treatment in a large cohort of End Stage Renal Disease patients undergoing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Carlo; Mari, Flavio; Stopper, Andrea; Gatti, Emanuele; Escandell-Montero, Pablo; Martínez-Martínez, José M; Martín-Guerrero, José D

    2015-06-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) anemia is one of the main common comorbidities in patients undergoing End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Iron supplement and especially Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agents (ESA) have become the treatment of choice for that anemia. However, it is very complicated to find an adequate treatment for every patient in each particular situation since dosage guidelines are based on average behaviors, and thus, they do not take into account the particular response to those drugs by different patients, although that response may vary enormously from one patient to another and even for the same patient in different stages of the anemia. This work proposes an advance with respect to previous works that have faced this problem using different methodologies (Machine Learning (ML), among others), since the diversity of the CKD population has been explicitly taken into account in order to produce a general and reliable model for the prediction of ESA/Iron therapy response. Furthermore, the ML model makes use of both human physiology and drug pharmacology to produce a model that outperforms previous approaches, yielding Mean Absolute Errors (MAE) of the Hemoglobin (Hb) prediction around or lower than 0.6 g/dl in the three countries analyzed in the study, namely, Spain, Italy and Portugal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Taurus II Stage Test Simulations: Using Large-Scale CFD Simulations to Provide Critical Insight into Plume Induced Environments During Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzenberg, L. L.; West, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the use of targeted Loci/CHEM CFD simulations to evaluate the effects of a dual-engine first-stage hot-fire test on an evolving integrated launch pad/test article design. This effort was undertaken as a part of the NESC Independent Assessment of the Taurus II Stage Test Series. The underlying conceptual model included development of a series of computational models and simulations to analyze the plume induced environments on the pad, facility structures and test article. A pathfinder simulation was first developed, capable of providing quick-turn around evaluation of plume impingement pressures on the flame deflector. Results from this simulation were available in time to provide data for an ongoing structural assessment of the deflector. The resulting recommendation was available in a timely manner and was incorporated into construction schedule for the new launch stand under construction at Wallops Flight Facility. A series of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) quasi-steady simulations representative of various key elements of the test profile was performed to identify potential concerns with the test configuration and test profile. As required, unsteady Hybrid-RANS/LES simulations were performed, to provide additional insight into critical aspects of the test sequence. Modifications to the test-specific hardware and facility structures thermal protection as well as modifications to the planned hot-fire test profile were implemented based on these simulation results.

  4. Nucleon structure and properties of dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.; Pethick, C.J.; Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL

    1988-01-01

    We consider the properties of dense matter in a framework of the Skyrme soliton model and the chiral bag model. The influence of the nucleon structure on the equation of state of dense matter is emphasized. We find that in both models the energy per unit volume is proportional to n 4/3 , n being the baryon number density. We discuss the properties of neutron stars with a derived equation of state. The role of many-body effects is investigated. The effect of including higher order terms in the chiral lagrangian is examined. The phase transition to quark matter is studied. 29 refs., 6 figs. (author)

  5. Nuclear Probing of Dense Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard Petrasso

    2007-01-01

    The object of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to compress a fuel capsule to a state with high enough density and temperature to ignite, starting a self-sustaining fusion burn that consumes much of the fuel and releases a large amount of energy. The national ICF research program is trying to reach this goal, especially through experiments at the OMEGA laser facility of the University of Rochester Laboratory of Laser Energetics (LLE), planned experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and experimental and theoretical work at other national laboratories. The work by MIT reported here has played several important roles in this national program. First, the development of new and improved charged-particle-based plasma diagnostics has allowed the gathering of new and unique diagnostic information about the implosions of fuel capsules in ICF experiments, providing new means for evaluating experiments and for studying capsule implosion dynamics. Proton spectrometers have become the standard for evaluating the mass assembly in compressed capsules in experiments at OMEGA; the measured energy downshift of either primary or secondary D3He fusion protons to determines the areal density, or ?R, of imploded capsules. The Proton Temporal Diagnostic measures the time history of fusion burn, and multiple proton emission imaging cameras reveal the 3-D spatial distribution of fusion burn. A new compact neutron spectrometer, for measuring fusion yield, is described here for the first time. And of especially high importance to future work is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), which is a neutron spectrometer that will be used to study a range of important performance parameters in future experiments at the NIF. A prototype is currently being prepared for testing at OMEGA, using a magnet funded by this grant. Second, MIT has used these diagnostic instruments to perform its own physics experiments

  6. Nuclear Probing of Dense Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Petrasso

    2007-02-14

    The object of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to compress a fuel capsule to a state with high enough density and temperature to ignite, starting a self-sustaining fusion burn that consumes much of the fuel and releases a large amount of energy. The national ICF research program is trying to reach this goal, especially through experiments at the OMEGA laser facility of the University of Rochester Laboratory of Laser Energetics (LLE), planned experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and experimental and theoretical work at other national laboratories. The work by MIT reported here has played several important roles in this national program. First, the development of new and improved charged-particle-based plasma diagnostics has allowed the gathering of new and unique diagnostic information about the implosions of fuel capsules in ICF experiments, providing new means for evaluating experiments and for studying capsule implosion dynamics. Proton spectrometers have become the standard for evaluating the mass assembly in compressed capsules in experiments at OMEGA; the measured energy downshift of either primary or secondary D3He fusion protons to determines the areal density, or ?R, of imploded capsules. The Proton Temporal Diagnostic measures the time history of fusion burn, and multiple proton emission imaging cameras reveal the 3-D spatial distribution of fusion burn. A new compact neutron spectrometer, for measuring fusion yield, is described here for the first time. And of especially high importance to future work is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), which is a neutron spectrometer that will be used to study a range of important performance parameters in future experiments at the NIF. A prototype is currently being prepared for testing at OMEGA, using a magnet funded by this grant. Second, MIT has used these diagnostic instruments to perform its own physics experiments

  7. No independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to end-stage renal disease in a large screen for chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Peralta, Carmen A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Li, Suying; Sachs, Michael; Shah, Anuja; Norris, Keith; Saab, Georges; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; McCullough, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Whether higher serum phosphorus levels are associated with a higher risk for death and/or progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not well established, and whether the association is confounded by access and barriers to care is unknown. To answer these questions, data of 10,672 individuals identified to have CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate disease (ESRD) (unadjusted hazards ratio, 6.72 (4.16–10.85)); however, the risk became nonsignificant on adjustment for potential confounders. There was no appreciable change in hazards ratio with inclusion of variables related to access and barriers to care. Additional analyses in subgroups based on 12 different variables yielded similar negative associations. Thus, in the largest cohort of individuals with early-stage CKD to date, we could not validate an independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to ESRD. PMID:23615501

  8. Parametric Dense Stereovision Implementation on a System-on Chip (SoC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Montejo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel hardware implementation of a dense recovery of stereovision 3D measurements. Traditionally 3D stereo systems have imposed the maximum number of stereo correspondences, introducing a large restriction on artificial vision algorithms. The proposed system-on-chip (SoC provides great performance and efficiency, with a scalable architecture available for many different situations, addressing real time processing of stereo image flow. Using double buffering techniques properly combined with pipelined processing, the use of reconfigurable hardware achieves a parametrisable SoC which gives the designer the opportunity to decide its right dimension and features. The proposed architecture does not need any external memory because the processing is done as image flow arrives. Our SoC provides 3D data directly without the storage of whole stereo images. Our goal is to obtain high processing speed while maintaining the accuracy of 3D data using minimum resources. Configurable parameters may be controlled by later/parallel stages of the vision algorithm executed on an embedded processor. Considering hardware FPGA clock of 100 MHz, image flows up to 50 frames per second (fps of dense stereo maps of more than 30,000 depth points could be obtained considering 2 Mpix images, with a minimum initial latency. The implementation of computer vision algorithms on reconfigurable hardware, explicitly low level processing, opens up the prospect of its use in autonomous systems, and they can act as a coprocessor to reconstruct 3D images with high density information in real time.

  9. Generation and characterisation of warm dense matter with intense lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper I discuss the subject of warm dense matter (WDM), which, apart from being of academic interest and relevant to inertial fusion capsules, is a subject of importance to those who wish to understand the formation and structure of planetary interiors and other astrophysical bodies. I broadly outline some key properties of WDM and go on to discuss various methods of generating samples in the laboratory using large laser facilities and outline some common techniques of diagnosis. It is not intended as a comprehensive review but rather a brief outline for scientists new to the field and those with an interest but not working in the field directly.

  10. Laterally cyclic loading of monopile in dense sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, Rasmus Tofte; Hededal, Ole; Svensson, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the response from laterally cyclic loading of monopiles a large centrifuge tests series is ongoing at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). This paper will present some of the tests carried out with a focus on the influence of accumulation of rotation when changing...... the loading conditions. In these tests the load conditions are controlled by two load characteristics, one controlling the level of the cyclic loading and one controlling the characteristic of the cyclic loading. The centrifuge tests were performed in dense dry sand on a pile with prototype dimensions...

  11. Low energy antiprotons from supernova exploding in dense clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, S. A.; Mauger, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    The antiproton spectrum resulting from a supernova, which exploded inside a dense cloud, is calculated by taking into account all energy loss processes including adiabatic deceleration during the expansion phase. The influence of various energy loss processes on the evolution of the spectrum as the supernova expands is investigated. It is shown that if about 25 percent of the cosmic ray nucleons are from such sources, the observed low energy antiprotons can be explained, provided the effect of solar modulation is not very large. The possibility of obtaining enhanced low energy spectrum by this process is also examined.

  12. Dense Alternating Sign Matrices and Extensions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Hall, F.J.; Stroev, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 444, 1 March (2014), s. 219-226 ISSN 0024-3795 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : alternating sign matrix * dense matrix * totally unimodular matrix * combined matrix * generalized complementary basic matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2014

  13. Precision Neuroscience: Dense Sampling of Individual Brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldrack, Russell A

    2017-08-16

    In this issue, Gordon et al. (2017) use dense sampling of resting and task fMRI within individuals to demonstrate that patterns of correlation in resting fMRI are closely aligned with functional architecture as identified using task fMRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Eculizumab in Pediatric Dense Deposit Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, Michiel J. S.; Garrelfs, Mark R.; Hoppe, Bernd; Florquin, Sandrine; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Amann, Kerstin; Davin, Jean-Claude; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Schriemer, Pietrik J.; Groothoff, Jaap W.

    2015-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD), a subtype of C3 glomerulopathy, is a rare disease affecting mostly children. Treatment options are limited. Debate exists whether eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against complement factor C5, is effective in DDD. Reported data are scarce, especially in children. The

  15. Preparation of a dense, polycrystalline ceramic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Jason; Chen, Ching-Fong; Alexander, David

    2010-12-07

    Ceramic nanopowder was sealed inside a metal container under a vacuum. The sealed evacuated container was forced through a severe deformation channel at an elevated temperature below the melting point of the ceramic nanopowder. The result was a dense nanocrystalline ceramic structure inside the metal container.

  16. Fluidized bed dry dense medium coal beneficiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    North, Brian C

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Coal beneficiation in South Africa is currently conducted mostly on a wet “float and sink” basis. This process is heavily water intensive and also potentially polluting. Dry beneficiation alternatives are being sought. The alternative of dry dense...

  17. A Note on Strongly Dense Matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Hall, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 4 (2015), s. 721-730 ISSN 2199-675X Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : strongly dense matrix * Boolean matrix * nonnegative matrix * idempotent matrix * intrinsic product * generalized complementary basic matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  19. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  20. Stage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shacter, J.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described of cycling gases through a plurality of diffusion stages comprising the steps of admitting the diffused gases from a first diffusion stage into an axial compressor, simultaneously admitting the undiffused gases from a second diffusion stage into an intermediate pressure zone of said compressor corresponding in pressure to the pressure of said undiffused gases, and then admitting the resulting compressed mixture of diffused and undiffused gases into a third diffusion stage

  1. A novel double patterning approach for 30nm dense holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Dennis Shu-Hao; Wang, Walter; Hsieh, Wei-Hsien; Huang, Chun-Yen; Wu, Wen-Bin; Shih, Chiang-Lin; Shih, Steven

    2011-04-01

    Double Patterning Technology (DPT) was commonly accepted as the major workhorse beyond water immersion lithography for sub-38nm half-pitch line patterning before the EUV production. For dense hole patterning, classical DPT employs self-aligned spacer deposition and uses the intersection of horizontal and vertical lines to define the desired hole patterns. However, the increase in manufacturing cost and process complexity is tremendous. Several innovative approaches have been proposed and experimented to address the manufacturing and technical challenges. A novel process of double patterned pillars combined image reverse will be proposed for the realization of low cost dense holes in 30nm node DRAM. The nature of pillar formation lithography provides much better optical contrast compared to the counterpart hole patterning with similar CD requirements. By the utilization of a reliable freezing process, double patterned pillars can be readily implemented. A novel image reverse process at the last stage defines the hole patterns with high fidelity. In this paper, several freezing processes for the construction of the double patterned pillars were tested and compared, and 30nm double patterning pillars were demonstrated successfully. A variety of different image reverse processes will be investigated and discussed for their pros and cons. An economic approach with the optimized lithography performance will be proposed for the application of 30nm DRAM node.

  2. Thermophysical properties of multi-shock compressed dense argon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q F; Zheng, J; Gu, Y J; Chen, Y L; Cai, L C; Shen, Z J

    2014-02-21

    In contrast to the single shock compression state that can be obtained directly via experimental measurements, the multi-shock compression states, however, have to be calculated with the aid of theoretical models. In order to determine experimentally the multiple shock states, a diagnostic approach with the Doppler pins system (DPS) and the pyrometer was used to probe multiple shocks in dense argon plasmas. Plasma was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The shock was produced using the flyer plate impact accelerated up to ∼6.1 km/s by a two-stage light gas gun and introduced into the plenum argon gas sample, which was pre-compressed from the environmental pressure to about 20 MPa. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were determined using a multi-wavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Simultaneously, the particle velocity profiles of the LiF window was measured with multi-DPS. The states of multi-shock compression argon plasma were determined from the measured shock velocities combining the particle velocity profiles. We performed the experiments on dense argon plasmas to determine the principal Hugonoit up to 21 GPa, the re-shock pressure up to 73 GPa, and the maximum measure pressure of the fourth shock up to 158 GPa. The results are used to validate the existing self-consistent variational theory model in the partial ionization region and create new theoretical models.

  3. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL research center workshop, equilibrium and non-equilibrium aspects of hot, dense QCD, Vol. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vega, H.J.; Boyanovsky, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation ∼2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vega, H.J.; Boyanovsky, D. [and others

    2000-07-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN/BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-EQUILIBRIM ASPECTTS OF HOT, DENSE QCD, VOLUME 28.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE VEGA,H.J.; BOYANOVSKY,D. [and others

    2000-07-17

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven, beginning operation this year, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, beginning operation {approximately}2005, will provide an unprecedented range of energies and luminosities that will allow us to probe the Gluon-Quark plasma. At RHIC and LHC, at central rapidity typical estimates of energy densities and temperatures are e * 1-10 GeV/fm3 and T0 * 300 - 900 MeV. Such energies are well above current estimates for the GQ plasma. Initially, this hot, dense plasma is far from local thermal equilibrium, making the theoretical study of transport phenomena, kinetic and chemical equilibration in dense and hot plasmas, and related issues a matter of fundamental importance. During the last few years a consistent framework to study collective effects in the Gluon-Quark plasma, and a microscopic description of transport in terms of the hard thermal (and dense) loops resummation program has emerged. This approach has the potential of providing a microscopic formulation of transport, in the regime of temperatures and densities to be achieved at RHIC and LHC. A parallel development over the last few years has provided a consistent formulation of non-equilibrium quantum field theory that provides a real-time description of phenomena out of equilibrium. Novel techniques including non-perturbative approaches and the dynamical renormalization group techniques lead to new insights into transport and relaxation. A deeper understanding of collective.excitations and transport phenomena in the GQ plasma could lead to recognize novel potential experimental signatures. New insights into small-c physics reveals a striking similarity between small-c and hard thermal loops, and novel real-time numerical simulations have recently studied the parton distributions and their thermalizations in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision.

  6. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow Physics Associated With End Wall Losses and Large Rotor Tip Clearances as Found in the Rear Stages of a High Pressure Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this work was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearance heights were studied with nominal tip clearance heights of 1.5%, 3.0%, and 4.0% based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was investigated at four corrected speedlines (100%, 90%, 80%, and 68%) for each of the three tip clearance configurations using total pressure and total temperature rakes distributed throughout the compressor. The results have confirmed results from previous authors showing a decrease of total pressure rise, isentropic efficiency, and stall margin which is approximately linear with increasing tip clearance height. The stall inception mechanisms have also been evaluated at the same corrected speeds for each of the tip clearance configurations. Detailed flow field measurements have been collected at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100% corrected speedline for the smallest and largest tip clearance heights (1.5% and 4.0%). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row have been supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data have helped to quantify the size of the leakage flow at the exit of each rotor. Thermal anemometry has also been implemented to evaluate the time-resolved three-dimensional components of velocity throughout the compressor and calculate blockage due to the rotor tip leakage flow throughout the compressor. These

  7. Use of an Amplatzer Device for Endoscopic Closure of a Large Bronchopleural Fistula following Lobectomy for a Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ottevaere

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bronchopleural fistulas can occur as a rare but severe complication after pulmonary resection. Established guidelines for the proper treatment of patients with bronchopleural fistulas do not exist. Apart from attempts to close the fistula, emphasis is placed on preventive measures, early treatment with antibiotics, drainage of the empyema and aggressive nutritional and rehabilitative support. For inoperable patients, endoscopic procedures are the only therapeutic option. Unfortunately, large (>8 mm or central bronchopleural fistulas are usually not suitable for such endoscopic management. Recently, some groups have published a few case reports about a novel technique for the endobronchial closure of bronchopleural fistulas, using an Amplatzer device, originally designed for transcatheter closure of cardiac septal defects. We applied the same technique as a life-saving treatment in a ventilated patient who was considered inoperable due to a high oxygen need. The operation was successful. The patient could be weaned from ventilation and was eventually discharged from the hospital to a rehabilitation facility several weeks after the insertion of the device. Until now, endoscopic techniques have only been useful for the treatment of small, peripheral, bronchopleural fistulas and even then only as a bridge to surgery in high-risk surgical patients. In this case report, we demonstrate that the use of an Amplatzer device can expand the importance of endoscopic techniques in the treatment of bronchopleural fistulas. An Amplatzer device, for endobronchial closure, can indeed be administered for large and central bronchopleural fistulas. Moreover, it can be considered as a definite alternative to surgery in inoperable patients.

  8. Dense neuron clustering explains connectivity statistics in cortical microcircuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Klinshov

    Full Text Available Local cortical circuits appear highly non-random, but the underlying connectivity rule remains elusive. Here, we analyze experimental data observed in layer 5 of rat neocortex and suggest a model for connectivity from which emerge essential observed non-random features of both wiring and weighting. These features include lognormal distributions of synaptic connection strength, anatomical clustering, and strong correlations between clustering and connection strength. Our model predicts that cortical microcircuits contain large groups of densely connected neurons which we call clusters. We show that such a cluster contains about one fifth of all excitatory neurons of a circuit which are very densely connected with stronger than average synapses. We demonstrate that such clustering plays an important role in the network dynamics, namely, it creates bistable neural spiking in small cortical circuits. Furthermore, introducing local clustering in large-scale networks leads to the emergence of various patterns of persistent local activity in an ongoing network activity. Thus, our results may bridge a gap between anatomical structure and persistent activity observed during working memory and other cognitive processes.

  9. Equation of state of partially-ionized dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes methods for calculating the equation of state of partially-ionized dense plasmas. The term dense plasma is used rather than strongly coupled plasma, since it is possible that at plasma conditions such that only a few levels can be observed spectroscopically the plasma coupling parameters are not large. Due mainly to their importance in theoretical astrophysics, the properties of partially ionized plasmas have been of interest for a long while. More recently, this interest has intensified due to the development of methods for producing partially ionized plasmas in the laboratory. This has opened up large programs of experimental investigation and of practical application. In this paper we consider detailed statistical mechanical methods that explicitly treat the distribution over ionic species and their energy level structure. These detailed approaches are generally characterized as being in the ''chemical picture'' when a free energy expression is minimized or in the ''physical picture'' when the starting point is the grand canonical ensemble. 52 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Studies Of Infrasonic Propagation Using Dense Seismic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, M. A.; deGroot-Hedlin, C. D.; Drob, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Although there are approximately 100 infrasonic arrays worldwide, more than ever before, the station density is still insufficient to provide validation for detailed propagation modeling. Relatively large infrasonic signals can be observed on seismic channels due to coupling at the Earth's surface. Recent research, using data from the 70-km spaced 400-station USArray and other seismic network deployments, has shown the value of dense seismic network data for filling in the gaps between infrasonic arrays. The dense sampling of the infrasonic wavefield has allowed us to observe complete travel-time branches of infrasound and address important research problems in infrasonic propagation. We present our analysis of infrasound created by a series of rocket motor detonations that occurred at the UTTR facility in Utah in 2007. These data were well recorded by the USArray seismometers. We use the precisely located blasts to assess the utility of G2S mesoscale models and methods to synthesize infrasonic propagation. We model the travel times of the branches using a ray-based approach and the complete wavefield using a FDTD algorithm. Although results from both rays and FDTD approaches predict the travel times to within several seconds, only about 40% of signals are predicted using rays largely due to penetration of sound into shadow zones. FDTD predicts some sound penetration into the shadow zone, but the observed shadow zones, as defined by the seismic data, have considerably narrower spatial extent than either method predicts, perhaps due to un-modeled small-scale structure in the atmosphere.

  11. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyiri, Agnes

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop the already existing, but far not complete Multi Module Model, specially focusing on the last module which describes the final stages of a heavy ion collision, as this module was still missing. The major original achievements summarized in this thesis correspond to the freeze out problem and calculation of an important measurable, the anisotropic flow. Summary of results: Freeze out: The importance of freeze out models is that they allow the evaluation of observables, which then can be compared to the experimental results. Therefore, it is crucial to find a realistic freeze out description, which is proved to be a non-trivial task. Recently, several kinetic freeze out models have been developed. Based on the earlier results, we have introduced new ideas and improved models, which may contribute to a more realistic description of the freeze out process. We have investigated the applicability of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to describe dynamical freeze out. We have introduced the so-called Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation, which has a form very similar to that of the BTE, but takes into account those characteristics of the FO process which the BTE can not handle, e.g. the rapid change of the phase-space distribution function in the direction normal to the finite FO layer. We have shown that the main features of earlier ad hoc kinetic FO models can be obtained from BTE and MBTE. We have discussed the qualitative differences between the two approaches and presented some quantitative comparison as well. Since the introduced modification of the BTE makes it very difficult to solve the FO problem from the first principles, it is important to work out simplified phenomenological models, which can explain the basic features of the FO process. We have built and discussed such a model. Flow analysis: The other main subject of this thesis has been the collective flow in heavy ion collisions. Collective flow from ultra

  12. Large scale collective modeling the final 'freeze out' stages of energetic heavy ion reactions and calculation of single particle measurables from these models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyiri, Agnes

    2005-07-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop the already existing, but far not complete Multi Module Model, specially focusing on the last module which describes the final stages of a heavy ion collision, as this module was still missing. The major original achievements summarized in this thesis correspond to the freeze out problem and calculation of an important measurable, the anisotropic flow. Summary of results: Freeze out: The importance of freeze out models is that they allow the evaluation of observables, which then can be compared to the experimental results. Therefore, it is crucial to find a realistic freeze out description, which is proved to be a non-trivial task. Recently, several kinetic freeze out models have been developed. Based on the earlier results, we have introduced new ideas and improved models, which may contribute to a more realistic description of the freeze out process. We have investigated the applicability of the Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) to describe dynamical freeze out. We have introduced the so-called Modified Boltzmann Transport Equation, which has a form very similar to that of the BTE, but takes into account those characteristics of the FO process which the BTE can not handle, e.g. the rapid change of the phase-space distribution function in the direction normal to the finite FO layer. We have shown that the main features of earlier ad hoc kinetic FO models can be obtained from BTE and MBTE. We have discussed the qualitative differences between the two approaches and presented some quantitative comparison as well. Since the introduced modification of the BTE makes it very difficult to solve the FO problem from the first principles, it is important to work out simplified phenomenological models, which can explain the basic features of the FO process. We have built and discussed such a model. Flow analysis: The other main subject of this thesis has been the collective flow in heavy ion collisions. Collective flow from ultra

  13. Thermal and nonthermal motions in dense cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, P.C.; Ladd, E.F.; Fuller, G.A. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Kinetic temperature and NH3 line width data for 61 dense cores with embedded IRAS sources show that the nonthermal component of the core motions increases with source luminosity more rapidly than does the thermal component. The trends cross in the luminosity range 7-22 solar luminosities, which divides the regimes of thermal and nonthermal motions. Maps of line widths in dense cores and their surrounding clouds indicate that nonthermal line broadening is due not only to stellar winds, but also to gas properties independent of the star. The 'initial conditions' for motions in cores forming lower-mass stars are primarily thermal, while those in cores forming higher mass stars are probably primarily nonthermal. These differences in core properties may arise from differences in the relative proportion of magnetic and gravitational energy in the condensing core. 30 refs.

  14. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  15. Deterministic dense coding with partially entangled states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozes, Shay; Oppenheim, Jonathan; Reznik, Benni

    2005-01-01

    The utilization of a d -level partially entangled state, shared by two parties wishing to communicate classical information without errors over a noiseless quantum channel, is discussed. We analytically construct deterministic dense coding schemes for certain classes of nonmaximally entangled states, and numerically obtain schemes in the general case. We study the dependency of the maximal alphabet size of such schemes on the partially entangled state shared by the two parties. Surprisingly, for d>2 it is possible to have deterministic dense coding with less than one ebit. In this case the number of alphabet letters that can be communicated by a single particle is between d and 2d . In general, we numerically find that the maximal alphabet size is any integer in the range [d,d2] with the possible exception of d2-1 . We also find that states with less entanglement can have a greater deterministic communication capacity than other more entangled states.

  16. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  17. Dense Output for Strong Stability Preserving Runge–Kutta Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2016-12-10

    We investigate dense output formulae (also known as continuous extensions) for strong stability preserving (SSP) Runge–Kutta methods. We require that the dense output formula also possess the SSP property, ideally under the same step-size restriction as the method itself. A general recipe for first-order SSP dense output formulae for SSP methods is given, and second-order dense output formulae for several optimal SSP methods are developed. It is shown that SSP dense output formulae of order three and higher do not exist, and that in any method possessing a second-order SSP dense output, the coefficient matrix A has a zero row.

  18. Accelerating Dense Linear Algebra on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    and matrix-vector operations on GPUs. Such operations form the backbone of level 1 and level 2 routines in the Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS) library and are therefore of great importance in many scientific applications. The target hardware is the most recent NVIDIA Tesla 20-series (Fermi...... architecture). Most of the techniques I discuss for accelerating dense linear algebra are applicable to memory-bound GPU algorithms in general....

  19. Particle identification system based on dense aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnyakov, A.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Barnyakov, M.Yu. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20, Karl Marx prospect, Novosibirsk, 630092 (Russian Federation); Beloborodov, K.I., E-mail: K.I.Beloborodov@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Bobrovnikov, V.S.; Buzykaev, A.R. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Danilyuk, A.F. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, 5, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Golubev, V.B. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Gulevich, V.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kononov, S.A.; Kravchenko, E.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Onuchin, A.P.; Martin, K.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20, Karl Marx prospect, Novosibirsk, 630092 (Russian Federation); Serednyakov, S.I. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11, akademika Lavrentieva prospect, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2, Pirogova Street, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-12-21

    A threshold Cherenkov counter based on dense aerogel with refraction index n=1.13 is described. This counter is used for kaon identification at momenta below 1 GeV/c in the SND detector, which takes data at the VEPP-2000 e{sup +}e{sup −} collider. The results of measurements of the counter efficiency using electrons, muons, pions, and kaons produced in e{sup +}e{sup −} annihilation are presented.

  20. Trading stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2012-01-01

    because they are hard to use and interpret, and tools for age and stage structured populations are missing. We present easily interpretable expressions for the sensitivities and elasticities of life expectancy to vital rates in age-stage models, and illustrate their application with two biological......Interest in stage-and age structured models has recently increased because they can describe quantitative traits such as size that are left out of age-only demography. Available methods for the analysis of effects of vital rates on lifespan in stage-structured models have not been widely applied...... examples. Much of our approach relies on trading of time and mortality risk in one stage for time and risk in others. Our approach contributes to the new framework of the study of age- and stage-structured biodemography....

  1. Dense Aluminum Plasma Equation of State Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, J.; Tierney, T.; Kyrala Benage, G., Jr.

    1997-11-01

    Knowledge of the equation of state for any material is essential to a full understanding of its intrinsic and dynamic properties. Accurate experimental measurements of the equation of state for strongly coupled plasmas (Γ >= 1), relevant to astrophysical, geologic and ICF applications, have been extremely difficult. We present preliminary results on a novel method for off-Hugoniot measurements of the equation of state for dense plasmas (3 Marx pulsed power device to create plasma densities of up to one-tenth solid and temperatures of a few eV from a 200 μm diameter aluminum wire. Density and temperature profiles of the dense aluminum plasma are determined using laser-produced temporally- and spatially-resolved x-ray backlighters and optical streak records. Simulations indicate that the use of a laser-generated shock wave in the dense plasma can provide megabar pressures at 10 eV temperatures with ion densities of up to 10 times the initial density. Future experiments will concentrate on the use of this laser-generated shock to determine the equation of state through accurate density and shock-speed measurements.

  2. Multishock Compression Properties of Warm Dense Argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Chen, Qifeng; Yunjun, Gu; Li, Zhiguo; Shen, Zhijun

    2015-10-01

    Warm dense argon was generated by a shock reverberation technique. The diagnostics of warm dense argon were performed by a multichannel optical pyrometer and a velocity interferometer system. The equations of state in the pressure-density range of 20-150 GPa and 1.9-5.3 g/cm3 from the first- to fourth-shock compression were presented. The single-shock temperatures in the range of 17.2-23.4 kK were obtained from the spectral radiance. Experimental results indicates that multiple shock-compression ratio (ηi = ρi/ρ0) is greatly enhanced from 3.3 to 8.8, where ρ0 is the initial density of argon and ρi (i = 1, 2, 3, 4) is the compressed density from first to fourth shock, respectively. For the relative compression ratio (ηi’ = ρi/ρi-1), an interesting finding is that a turning point occurs at the second shocked states under the conditions of different experiments, and ηi’ increases with pressure in lower density regime and reversely decreases with pressure in higher density regime. The evolution of the compression ratio is controlled by the excitation of internal degrees of freedom, which increase the compression, and by the interaction effects between particles that reduce it. A temperature-density plot shows that current multishock compression states of argon have distributed into warm dense regime.

  3. Parallel Access of Out-Of-Core Dense Extendible Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Rotem, Doron

    2007-07-26

    Datasets used in scientific and engineering applications are often modeled as dense multi-dimensional arrays. For very large datasets, the corresponding array models are typically stored out-of-core as array files. The array elements are mapped onto linear consecutive locations that correspond to the linear ordering of the multi-dimensional indices. Two conventional mappings used are the row-major order and the column-major order of multi-dimensional arrays. Such conventional mappings of dense array files highly limit the performance of applications and the extendibility of the dataset. Firstly, an array file that is organized in say row-major order causes applications that subsequently access the data in column-major order, to have abysmal performance. Secondly, any subsequent expansion of the array file is limited to only one dimension. Expansions of such out-of-core conventional arrays along arbitrary dimensions, require storage reorganization that can be very expensive. Wepresent a solution for storing out-of-core dense extendible arrays that resolve the two limitations. The method uses a mapping function F*(), together with information maintained in axial vectors, to compute the linear address of an extendible array element when passed its k-dimensional index. We also give the inverse function, F-1*() for deriving the k-dimensional index when given the linear address. We show how the mapping function, in combination with MPI-IO and a parallel file system, allows for the growth of the extendible array without reorganization and no significant performance degradation of applications accessing elements in any desired order. We give methods for reading and writing sub-arrays into and out of parallel applications that run on a cluster of workstations. The axial-vectors are replicated and maintained in each node that accesses sub-array elements.

  4. Dense vertical SU-8 microneedles drawn from a heated mold with precisely controlled volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Zhuolin; Wang, Hao; Yen, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Chengkuo; Murugappan, Suresh Kanna; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    Drawing lithography technology has recently become a popular technique to fabricate (3D) microneedles. The conventional drawing process shows some limitations in fabricating dense, scale-up and small microneedles. In this study, we demonstrate a new drawing lithography process from a self-loading mold which is able to overcome these challenges. Different from the conventional molds which have difficult alignment and loading issues, a released SU-8 membrane is attached onto a SU-8 coated wafer to generate an innovative self-loading mold. The physically distinct SU-8 colloid in this mold successfully avoids the merging of the microneedle tips in the drawing process. Meanwhile, the same SU-8 colloid in mold can provide microneedles with uniform lengths on a large surface area. Furthermore, a low temperature drawing process with this improved technique prevents sharp tips from bending during the solidification stage. Remarkably, this new drawing lithography technology can fabricate microneedles with various lengths and they are strong enough to penetrate the outermost skin layer, namely the stratum corneum. The spacing between two adjacent microneedles is optimized to maximize the penetration rate through the skin. Histology images and drug diffusion testing demonstrate that microchannels are successfully created and the drugs can permeate the tissue under the skin. The fabricated microneedles are demonstrated to deliver insulin in vivo and lower blood glucose levels, suggesting future possible applications for minimally invasive transdermal delivery of macromolecules. (paper)

  5. Multi-Dimensional Radiation Transport in Dense Z-pinch Wire Array Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, C. A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Sherlock, M.; Lebedev, S. V.

    2004-11-01

    Z-pinch wire arrays have proven to be an extremely efficient high yield, short pulse x-ray source with potential application to ICF. The characteristics of the x-ray pulse produced have been shown to be largely determined by non-uniform break up of the wires leading to a highly irregular distribution of mass which implodes towards the axis. Modelling the inherent 3D nature of these plasmas is already computationally very expensive, and so energy exchange through radiation is frequently neglected, assuming instead an optically thin radiation loss model. With a significant fraction of the total energy at late stages being radiated through a dense, optically thick plasma this approach is potentially inadequate in fully describing the implosion. We analyse the effects of radiative cooling and radiation transport on stagnation and precursor development in wire array z-pinch implosions. A three temperature multidimensional MHD code using a single group radiation diffusion model is used to study radiation trapping in the precursor, and the effects of preheating on the implosion dynamics. Energy exchange in the final stagnated plasma and its effects on the x-ray pulse shape is also discussed. This work was partially supported by the SSAA program of the NNSA through DoE cooperative agreement DE-F03-02NA00057.

  6. About chiral models of dense matter and its magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, M.

    1990-12-01

    The chiral models of dense nucleon matter are discussed. The quark matter with broken chiral symmetry is described. The magnetic properties of dense matter are presented and conclusions are given. 37 refs. (A.S.)

  7. TEXTURE-AWARE DENSE IMAGE MATCHING USING TERNARY CENSUS TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Textureless and geometric discontinuities are major problems in state-of-the-art dense image matching methods, as they can cause visually significant noise and the loss of sharp features. Binary census transform is one of the best matching cost methods but in textureless areas, where the intensity values are similar, it suffers from small random noises. Global optimization for disparity computation is inherently sensitive to parameter tuning in complex urban scenes, and must compromise between smoothness and discontinuities. The aim of this study is to provide a method to overcome these issues in dense image matching, by extending the industry proven Semi-Global Matching through 1 developing a ternary census transform, which takes three outputs in a single order comparison and encodes the results in two bits rather than one, and also 2 by using texture-information to self-tune the parameters, which both preserves sharp edges and enforces smoothness when necessary. Experimental results using various datasets from different platforms have shown that the visual qualities of the triangulated point clouds in urban areas can be largely improved by these proposed methods.

  8. Overlapping communities from dense disjoint and high total degree clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongli; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Yue

    2018-04-01

    Community plays an important role in the field of sociology, biology and especially in domains of computer science, where systems are often represented as networks. And community detection is of great importance in the domains. A community is a dense subgraph of the whole graph with more links between its members than between its members to the outside nodes, and nodes in the same community probably share common properties or play similar roles in the graph. Communities overlap when nodes in a graph belong to multiple communities. A vast variety of overlapping community detection methods have been proposed in the literature, and the local expansion method is one of the most successful techniques dealing with large networks. The paper presents a density-based seeding method, in which dense disjoint local clusters are searched and selected as seeds. The proposed method selects a seed by the total degree and density of local clusters utilizing merely local structures of the network. Furthermore, this paper proposes a novel community refining phase via minimizing the conductance of each community, through which the quality of identified communities is largely improved in linear time. Experimental results in synthetic networks show that the proposed seeding method outperforms other seeding methods in the state of the art and the proposed refining method largely enhances the quality of the identified communities. Experimental results in real graphs with ground-truth communities show that the proposed approach outperforms other state of the art overlapping community detection algorithms, in particular, it is more than two orders of magnitude faster than the existing global algorithms with higher quality, and it obtains much more accurate community structure than the current local algorithms without any priori information.

  9. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  10. Graph Quasicontinuous Functions and Densely Continuous Forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubica Hola

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Let $X, Y$ be topological spaces. A function $f: X \\to Y$ is said to be graph quasicontinuous if there is a quasicontinuous function $g: X \\to Y$ with the graph of $g$ contained in the closure of the graph of $f$. There is a close relation between the notions of graph quasicontinuous functions and minimal usco maps as well as the notions of graph quasicontinuous functions and densely continuous forms. Every function with values in a compact Hausdorff space is graph quasicontinuous; more generally every locally compact function is graph quasicontinuous.

  11. Leeuwpan fine coal dense medium plant

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lundt, M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Leeuwpan Colliery is located close to Delmas in the Mpumalanga Province, and is one of eight coal mines in the Exxaro Resources group. The dense media separation (DMS) plant at Leeuwpan was commissioned in 1997. The plant originally treated... three Witbank coal seams, namely seams no. 2, 4 and 5. A coal jig plant was built in 2005 to treat the top layer of coal—Seams 4 and 5—to supply a 30% ash coal to power stations. When the jig plant was commissioned, it increased the DMS plant...

  12. Dense hydrogen plasma: Comparison between models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerouin, J.G.; Bernard, S.

    1997-01-01

    Static and dynamical properties of the dense hydrogen plasma (ρ≥2.6gcm -3 , 0.1< T<5eV) in the strongly coupled regime are compared through different numerical approaches. It is shown that simplified density-functional molecular-dynamics simulations (DFMD), without orbitals, such as Thomas-Fermi Dirac or Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Weiszaecker simulations give similar results to more sophisticated descriptions such as Car-Parrinello (CP), tight binding, or path-integral Monte Carlo, in a wide range of temperatures. At very low temperature, screening effects predicted by DFMD are still less pronounced than CP simulations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  13. Oscillating propagators in heavy-dense QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlund, Oscar; Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2016-10-11

    Using Monte Carlo simulations and extended mean field theory calculations we show that the $3$-dimensional $\\mathbb{Z}_3$ spin model with complex external fields has non-monotonic correlators in some regions of its parameter space. This model serves as a proxy for heavy-dense QCD in $(3+1)$ dimensions. Non-monotonic correlators are intrinsically related to a complex mass spectrum and a liquid-like (or crystalline) behavior. A liquid phase could have implications for heavy-ion experiments, where it could leave detectable signals in the spatial correlations of baryons.

  14. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  15. Extinction measurement of dense media by an optical coherence tomography technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ago, Tomoki; Iwai, Toshiaki; Yokota, Ryoko

    2016-10-01

    The optical coherence tomography will make progress as the next stage toward a spectroscopic analysis technique. The spectroscopic analysis is based on the Beer-Lambert law. The absorption and scattering coefficients even for the dense medium can be measured by the Beer-Lambert law because the OCT can detect only the light keeping the coherency which propagated rectilinearly and retro-reflected from scatters. This study is concerned with the quantitative verification of Beer-Lambert law in the OCT imaging.

  16. Characterising and modelling extended conducted electromagnetic interference in densely packed DC-DC converter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, Inus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Extended Conducted Electromagnetic Interference in Densely Packed DC- DC Converter I Grobler1 and MN Gitau2 Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Pretoria, South Africa. igrobler@csir.co.za1, mgitau.... This will improve the overall design efficiency and shorten the crucial time to market period [1]. It is of utmost importance to try and model the electromagnetic compatibility concurrent with the power processor design stage. The marketplace is in need...

  17. Interpretation of the complex viscosity of dense hard-sphere dispersions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, J.; van der Werff, J.C.; Blom, C.; de Kruif, C.G.

    1989-01-01

    The complex viscosity of dense hard-sphere dispersions has been determined recently over a large frequency range. If conceived as a homogeneous system with continuously distributed elasticity and viscosity, the complex viscosity can be described theoretically with a constant relaxation strength and

  18. Neutrino interactions in hot and dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, S.; Prakash, M.; Lattimer, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    We study the charged and neutral current weak interaction rates relevant for the determination of neutrino opacities in dense matter found in supernovae and neutron stars. We establish an efficient formalism for calculating differential cross sections and mean free paths for interacting, asymmetric nuclear matter at arbitrary degeneracy. The formalism is valid for both charged and neutral current reactions. Strong interaction corrections are incorporated through the in-medium single particle energies at the relevant density and temperature. The effects of strong interactions on the weak interaction rates are investigated using both potential and effective field-theoretical models of matter. We investigate the relative importance of charged and neutral currents for different astrophysical situations, and also examine the influence of strangeness-bearing hyperons. Our findings show that the mean free paths are significantly altered by the effects of strong interactions and the multi-component nature of dense matter. The opacities are then discussed in the context of the evolution of the core of a protoneutron star. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  20. Predicting diffusivities in dense fluid mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DARIVA

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation, as corrected by Speedy, together with the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA perturbation theory of liquids is employed in correlating and predicting self-diffusivities of dense fluids. Afterwards this theory is used to estimate mutual diffusion coefficients of solutes at infinite dilution in sub and supercritical solvents. We have also investigated the behavior of Fick diffusion coefficients in the proximity of a binary vapor-liquid critical point since this subject is of great interest for extraction purposes. The approach presented here, which makes use of a density and temperature dependent hard-sphere diameter, is shown to be excellent for predicting diffusivities in dense pure fluids and fluid mixtures. The calculations involved highly nonideal mixtures as well as systems with high molecular asymmetry. The predicted diffusivities are in good agreement with the experimental data for the pure and binary systems. The methodology proposed here makes only use of pure component information and density of mixtures. The simple algebraic relations are proposed without any binary adjustable parameters and can be readily used for estimating diffusivities in multicomponent mixtures.

  1. Quantum Linear System Algorithm for Dense Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wossnig, Leonard; Zhao, Zhikuan; Prakash, Anupam

    2018-02-01

    Solving linear systems of equations is a frequently encountered problem in machine learning and optimization. Given a matrix A and a vector b the task is to find the vector x such that A x =b . We describe a quantum algorithm that achieves a sparsity-independent runtime scaling of O (κ2√{n }polylog(n )/ɛ ) for an n ×n dimensional A with bounded spectral norm, where κ denotes the condition number of A , and ɛ is the desired precision parameter. This amounts to a polynomial improvement over known quantum linear system algorithms when applied to dense matrices, and poses a new state of the art for solving dense linear systems on a quantum computer. Furthermore, an exponential improvement is achievable if the rank of A is polylogarithmic in the matrix dimension. Our algorithm is built upon a singular value estimation subroutine, which makes use of a memory architecture that allows for efficient preparation of quantum states that correspond to the rows of A and the vector of Euclidean norms of the rows of A .

  2. Dense, layered, inclined flows of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James T.; Larcher, Michele

    2017-12-01

    We consider dense, inclined flows of spheres in which the particles translate in layers, whose existence may be promoted by the presence of a rigid base and/or sidewalls. We imagine that in such flows a sphere of a layer is forced up the back of a sphere of the layer below, lifting a column of spheres above it, and then falls down the front of the lower sphere, until it bumps against the preceding sphere of the lower layer. We calculate the forces and rate of momentum transfer associated with this process of rub, lift, fall, and bump and determine a relation between the ratio of shear stress to normal stress and the rate of strain that may be integrated to obtain the velocity profile. The fall of a sphere and that of the column above it results in a linear increase in the magnitude of the velocity fluctuations with distance from the base of the flow. We compare the predictions of the model with measured profiles of velocity and granular temperature in several different dense, inclined flows.

  3. Wireless Fractal Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yixue; Chen, Min; Hu, Long; Song, Jeungeun; Volk, Mojca; Humar, Iztok

    2017-04-12

    With the ever-growing number of mobile devices, there is an explosive expansion in mobile data services. This represents a challenge for the traditional cellular network architecture to cope with the massive wireless traffic generated by mobile media applications. To meet this challenge, research is currently focused on the introduction of a small cell base station (BS) due to its low transmit power consumption and flexibility of deployment. However, due to a complex deployment environment and low transmit power of small cell BSs, the coverage boundary of small cell BSs will not have a traditional regular shape. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the coverage boundary of an ultra-dense small cell network and give its main features: aeolotropy of path loss fading and fractal coverage boundary. Simple performance analysis is given, including coverage probability and transmission rate, etc., based on stochastic geometry theory and fractal theory. Finally, we present an application scene and discuss challenges in the ultra-dense small cell network.

  4. Oblique Multi-Camera Systems - Orientation and Dense Matching Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupnik, E.; Nex, F.; Remondino, F.

    2014-03-01

    The use of oblique imagery has become a standard for many civil and mapping applications, thanks to the development of airborne digital multi-camera systems, as proposed by many companies (Blomoblique, IGI, Leica, Midas, Pictometry, Vexcel/Microsoft, VisionMap, etc.). The indisputable virtue of oblique photography lies in its simplicity of interpretation and understanding for inexperienced users allowing their use of oblique images in very different applications, such as building detection and reconstruction, building structural damage classification, road land updating and administration services, etc. The paper reports an overview of the actual oblique commercial systems and presents a workflow for the automated orientation and dense matching of large image blocks. Perspectives, potentialities, pitfalls and suggestions for achieving satisfactory results are given. Tests performed on two datasets acquired with two multi-camera systems over urban areas are also reported.

  5. Mixed molecular and atomic phase of dense hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Ross T; Guillaume, Christophe L; Scheler, Thomas; Goncharov, Alexander F; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2012-03-23

    We used Raman and visible transmission spectroscopy to investigate dense hydrogen (deuterium) up to 315 (275) GPa at 300 K. At around 200 GPa, we observe the phase transformation, which we attribute to phase III, previously observed only at low temperatures. This is succeeded at 220 GPa by a reversible transformation to a new phase, IV, characterized by the simultaneous appearance of the second vibrational fundamental and new low-frequency phonon excitations and a dramatic softening and broadening of the first vibrational fundamental mode. The optical transmission spectra of phase IV show an overall increase of absorption and a closing band gap which reaches 1.8 eV at 315 GPa. Analysis of the Raman spectra suggests that phase IV is a mixture of graphenelike layers, consisting of elongated H2 dimers experiencing large pairing fluctuations, and unbound H2 molecules.

  6. Preconditioner-free Wiener filtering with a dense noise matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffenberger, Kevin M.

    2018-05-01

    This work extends the Elsner & Wandelt (2013) iterative method for efficient, preconditioner-free Wiener filtering to cases in which the noise covariance matrix is dense, but can be decomposed into a sum whose parts are sparse in convenient bases. The new method, which uses multiple messenger fields, reproduces Wiener-filter solutions for test problems, and we apply it to a case beyond the reach of the Elsner & Wandelt (2013) method. We compute the Wiener-filter solution for a simulated Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) map that contains spatially varying, uncorrelated noise, isotropic 1/f noise, and large-scale horizontal stripes (like those caused by atmospheric noise). We discuss simple extensions that can filter contaminated modes or inverse-noise-filter the data. These techniques help to address complications in the noise properties of maps from current and future generations of ground-based Microwave Background experiments, like Advanced ACTPol, Simons Observatory, and CMB-S4.

  7. Susceptibility of different developmental stages of large pine weevil Hylobius abietis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to entomopathogenic fungi and effect of fungal infection to adult weevils by formulation and application methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Minshad A; Butt, Tariq M

    2012-09-15

    The large pine weevil, Hylobius abietis, is a major pest in European conifer forests causing millions of Euros of damage annually. Larvae develop in the stumps of recently felled trees; the emerging adults feed on the bark of seedlings and may kill them. This study investigated the susceptibility of different developmental stages of H. abietis to commercial and commercially viable isolates of entomopathogenic fungi, Metarhizium and Beauveria. All the developmental stages of H. abietis can be killed by Metarhizium robertsii, Metarhizium brunneum, and Beauveria bassiana. The most virulent isolate of M. robertsii ARSEF4556 caused 100% mortality of pupae, larvae and adults on day 4, 6 and 12, respectively. This strain was further tested against adult weevils in different concentrations (10(5)-10(8) conidia cm(-2) or ml(-1)) using two types of fungal formulation: 'dry' conidia and 'wet' conidia (suspended in 0.03% aq. Tween 80) applied on different substrates (tissue paper, peat and Sitka spruce seedlings). 'Dry' conidia were more effective than 'wet' conidia on tissue paper and on spruce or 'dry' conidia premixed in peat. The LC(50) value for 'dry' conidia of isolate ARSEF4556 was three folds lower than 'wet' conidia on tissue paper. This study showed that 'dry' conidia are more effective than 'wet' conidia, causing 100% adult mortality within 12 days. Possible strategies for fungal applications are discussed in light of the high susceptibility of larvae and pupae to fungal pathogen. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2008-04-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement—MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  9. Warm dense mater: another application for pulsed power hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics (PPH) is an application of low-impedance pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology to the study of advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties. PPH can potentially be applied to the study of the properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties of warm dense matter such as equation of state, viscosity, conductivity is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to slightly above solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Conditions characteristic of WDM are difficult to obtain, and even more difficult to diagnose. One approach to producing WDM uses laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers are applying these techniques. Pulsed power hydrodynamic techniques, such as large convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through multiple shock compression and heating of normal density material between a massive, high density, energetic liner and a high density central 'anvil' are possible ways to reach relevant conditions. Another avenue to WDM conditions is through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. In this paper we will examine the challenges to pulsed power technology and to pulsed power systems presented by the opportunity to explore this interesting region of parameter space.

  10. Evaluation of a rapid water-surface sweeping method to accurately estimate numbers of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) late larval stages in large water-storage containers: comparison with pupal estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Claudia M E; Llinás, Humberto; Falconar, Andrew K I

    2010-01-01

    Since the methodologies used to calculate Stegomyia indices have been shown to be inadequate for assessing the risk of dengue virus transmission and targeting Aedes aegypti control strategies, new surveillance methods are needed. To evaluate the water-surface sweeping method in combination with calibration factors to estimate the total number of Ae. aegypti late larval stages (L3/L4) in large water-storage containers at different temperatures at which transmission of dengue virus occurs. Calibration factors were derived based on the proportion of L3/L4 recovered from a predetermined number of larvae using a net of specific dimensions and water-storage containers of different capacities and water levels in semi-field conditions and at four different altitudes (14, 358, 998 and 1,630 meters above sea level). The calibration factors obtained at 14 masl were then fully validated in a field study site at this altitude. Four calibration factors were derived at 14 masl (28-30°C) that were used to estimate the total L3/L4 numbers in large water storage containers greater than 20 L (n=478) at 1/3, 2/3 and full water-levels. This methodology was accurate and robust within and between the 10 pairs of field workers who applied it. Different calibration factors were, however, derived to accurately estimate the total L3/L4 numbers at each of the study sites located at 358, 998 and 1,630 masl, where average temperatures were 19°C, 24°C, and 26°C respectively. The accurate estimates of L3/L4 numbers calculated using the water surface sweeping method can be useful for evaluating intervention strategies directed against the larval stages.

  11. The dynamics of dense galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Man Hoi

    In this thesis, two topics on the dynamics of dense galactic nuclei are studied. They are relevant to the formation of massive black holes and the observations of several nearby galactic nuclei. An overview of the observations is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the dynamical evolution of dense clusters of compact stars is studied. The formation of binaries and their subsequent merging by gravitational radiation emission is important to the evolution of such clusters. Aarseth's NBODY5 N-body simulation code, which is modified to include these processes, is used to simulate small N clusters with different initial velocity dispersions. The initial evolution is similar to previous results from Fokker-Planck simulations and shows orderly formation of heavy objects. However, the late evolution shows runaway growth for the most massive object in the cluster. We present arguments to show that merger by gravitational radiation (and possibly hydrodynamic merger of normal stars) is expected to be unstable to runaway growth. These results suggest that a seed massive black hole can be formed by runaway growth in a dense cluster of compact stars. In Chapter 3, the effects of stellar encounters on rotating stellar systems with central massive black holes are studied. For axisymmetric stellar systems with distribution functions that depend only on the energy E and the angular momentum about one axis Jx, the steady-state stellar distribution is found by directly integrating the Fokker-Planck equation in E, J subx) space. Two sets of models with simple assumptions about the loss cone in phase space (due to loss of stars to the central black hole) are presented: the loss cone in the Jx direction is either ignored or completely empty. We find that the depletion of stars due to an empty loss cone is significant. Density and kinematic profiles are also presented. The ratio of rotation velocity to velocity dispersion, V/sigma at small radii is higher than that of the background

  12. Left ventricular strain and its pattern estimated from cine CMR and validation with DENSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Hao; Luo, Xiaoyu; Allan, Andrew; McComb, Christie; Berry, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of local strain provides insight into the biomechanical significance of viable myocardium. We attempted to estimate myocardial strain from cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images by using a b-spline deformable image registration method. Three healthy volunteers and 41 patients with either recent or chronic myocardial infarction (MI) were studied at 1.5 Tesla with both cine and DENSE CMR. Regional circumferential and radial left ventricular strains were estimated from cine and DENSE acquisitions. In all healthy volunteers, there was no difference for peak circumferential strain (− 0.18 ± 0.04 versus − 0.18 ± 0.03, p = 0.76) between cine and DENSE CMR, however peak radial strain was overestimated from cine (0.84 ± 0.37 versus 0.49 ± 0.2, p < 0.01). In the patient study, the peak strain patterns predicted by cine were similar to the patterns from DENSE, including the strain evolution related to recovery time and strain patterns related to MI scar extent. Furthermore, cine-derived strain disclosed different strain patterns in MI and non-MI regions, and regions with transmural and non-transmural MI as DENSE. Although there were large variations with radial strain measurements from cine CMR images, useful circumferential strain information can be obtained from routine clinical CMR imaging. Cine strain analysis has potential to improve the diagnostic yield from routine CMR imaging in clinical practice. (paper)

  13. Left ventricular strain and its pattern estimated from cine CMR and validation with DENSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hao; Allan, Andrew; McComb, Christie; Luo, Xiaoyu; Berry, Colin

    2014-07-07

    Measurement of local strain provides insight into the biomechanical significance of viable myocardium. We attempted to estimate myocardial strain from cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images by using a b-spline deformable image registration method. Three healthy volunteers and 41 patients with either recent or chronic myocardial infarction (MI) were studied at 1.5 Tesla with both cine and DENSE CMR. Regional circumferential and radial left ventricular strains were estimated from cine and DENSE acquisitions. In all healthy volunteers, there was no difference for peak circumferential strain (- 0.18 ± 0.04 versus - 0.18 ± 0.03, p = 0.76) between cine and DENSE CMR, however peak radial strain was overestimated from cine (0.84 ± 0.37 versus 0.49 ± 0.2, p cine were similar to the patterns from DENSE, including the strain evolution related to recovery time and strain patterns related to MI scar extent. Furthermore, cine-derived strain disclosed different strain patterns in MI and non-MI regions, and regions with transmural and non-transmural MI as DENSE. Although there were large variations with radial strain measurements from cine CMR images, useful circumferential strain information can be obtained from routine clinical CMR imaging. Cine strain analysis has potential to improve the diagnostic yield from routine CMR imaging in clinical practice.

  14. Anomalous effects of dense matter under rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Nishimura, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2018-02-01

    We study the anomaly induced effects of dense baryonic matter under rotation. We derive the anomalous terms that account for the chiral vortical effect in the low-energy effective theory for light Nambu-Goldstone modes. The anomalous terms lead to new physical consequences, such as the anomalous Hall energy current and spontaneous generation of angular momentum in a magnetic field (or spontaneous magnetization by rotation). In particular, we show that, due to the presence of such anomalous terms, the ground state of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under sufficiently fast rotation becomes the "chiral soliton lattice" of neutral pions that has lower energy than the QCD vacuum and nuclear matter. We briefly discuss the possible realization of the chiral soliton lattice induced by a fast rotation in noncentral heavy ion collisions.

  15. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Secure safety, resistance to weapons material proliferation and problems of long-lived wastes remain the most important 'painful points' of nuclear power. Many innovative reactor concepts have been developed aimed at a radical enhancement of safety. The promising potential of innovative nuclear reactors allows for shifting accents in current reactor safety 'strategy' to reveal this worth. Such strategy is elaborated focusing on the priority for intrinsically secure safety features as well as on sure protection being provided by the first barrier of defence. Concerning the potential of fast reactors (i.e. sodium cooled, lead-cooled, etc.), there are no doubts that they are able to possess many favourable intrinsically secure safety features and to lay the proper foundation for a new reactor generation. However, some of their neutronic characteristics have to be radically improved. Among intrinsically secure safety properties, the following core parameters are significantly important: reactivity margin values, reactivity feed-back and coolant void effects. Ways of designing intrinsically secure safety features in fast reactors (titled hereafter as Intrinsically Secure Fast Reactors - ISFR) can be found in the frame of current reactor technologies by radical enhancement of core neutron economy and by optimization of core compositions. Simultaneously, respecting resistance to proliferation, by using non-enriched fuel feed as well as a core breeding gain close to zero, are considered as the important features (long-lived waste problems will be considered in a separate paper). This implies using the following reactor design options as well as closed fuel cycles with natural U as the reactor feed: ·Ultra-plate 'dense cores' of the ordinary (monolithic) type with negative total coolant void effects. ·Modular type cores. Multiple dense modules can be embedded in the common reflector for achieving the desired NPP total power. The modules can be used also independently (as

  16. Kaon condensation in dense stellar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Hwan; Rho, M.; Washington Univ., Seattle, WA

    1995-03-01

    This article combines two talks given by the authors and is based on Works done in collaboration with G.E. Brown and D.P. Min on kaon condensation in dense baryonic medium treated in chiral perturbation theory using heavy-baryon formalism. It contains, in addition to what was recently published, astrophysical backgrounds for kaon condensation discussed by Brown and Bethe, a discussion on a renormalization-group analysis to meson condensation worked out together with H.K. Lee and S.J. Sin, and the recent results of K.M. Westerberg in the bound-state approach to the Skyrme model. Negatively charged kaons are predicted to condense at a critical density 2 approx-lt ρ/ρo approx-lt 4, in the range to allow the intriguing new phenomena predicted by Brown and Bethe to take place in compact star matter

  17. Frontiers and challenges in warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Desjarlais, Michael; Redmer, Ronald; Trickey, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) occupies a loosely defined region of phase space intermediate between solid, liquid, gas, and plasma, and typically shares characteristics of two or more of these phases. WDM is generally associated with the combination of strongly coupled ions and moderately degenerate electrons, and careful attention to quantum physics and electronic structure is essential. The lack of a small perturbation parameter greatly limits approximate attempts at its accurate description. Since WDM resides at the intersection of solid state and high energy density physics, many high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments pass through this difficult region of phase space. Thus, understanding and modeling WDM is key to the success of experiments on diverse facilities. These include the National Ignition Campaign centered on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), pulsed-power driven experiments on the Z machine, ion-beam-driven WDM experiments on the NDCX-II, and fundamental WDM research at the Linear Coherent...

  18. Medical device disinfection by dense carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoloni, G; Bertucco, A; Rassu, M; Vezzù, K

    2011-01-01

    The employment of disinfection-sterilisation processes for the re-use of medical devices without negative effects such as the presence of toxic residues, material degradation or other modifications is an important consideration for reducing the costs of surgical and medical procedures. Ethylene oxide is the most commonly used low temperature sterilisation technique in healthcare facilities, but its associated toxicity has reduced interest in this technology for the reprocessing of medical equipment. The aim of this study was to examine the disinfection efficiency of a novel low temperature approach, based on dense carbon dioxide on artificially contaminated catheters. The results obtained demonstrated that this method provided a complete inactivation of all bacteria and yeast strains tested, and that no obvious modifications to the surfaces tested were observed with multiple treatments. Copyright © 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Coherent neutrino interactions in a dense medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiers, K.; Weiss, N.

    1997-01-01

    Motivated by the effect of matter on neutrino oscillations (the MSW effect) we study in more detail the propagation of neutrinos in a dense medium. The dispersion relation for massive neutrinos in a medium is known to have a minimum at nonzero momentum p∼G F ρ/√(2). We study in detail the origin and consequences of this dispersion relation for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos both in a toy model with only neutral currents and a single neutrino flavor and in a realistic open-quotes standard modelclose quotes with two neutrino flavors. We find that for a range of neutrino momenta near the minimum of the dispersion relation, Dirac neutrinos are trapped by their coherent interactions with the medium. This effect does not lead to the trapping of Majorana neutrinos. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  20. Development and fate of electron-dense microbodies in trap cells of the nematophagous fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, Marten; Nordbring-Hertz, Birgit; Harder, Willem

    1985-01-01

    The development of electron-dense microbodies in cells of capture organs of the nematophagous fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora was studied with different ultrastructural techniques. Kinetic experiments revealed that the synthesis of these microbodies started in a very early stage of trap formation;

  1. Multiple and dependent scattering by densely packed discrete spheres: Comparison of radiative transfer and Maxwell theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.X.; Tan, J.Y.; Zhao, J.M.; Wang, F.Q.; Wang, C.A.

    2017-01-01

    The radiative transfer equation (RTE) has been widely used to deal with multiple scattering of light by sparsely and randomly distributed discrete particles. However, for densely packed particles, the RTE becomes questionable due to strong dependent scattering effects. This paper examines the accuracy of RTE by comparing with the exact electromagnetic theory. For an imaginary spherical volume filled with randomly distributed, densely packed spheres, the RTE is solved by the Monte Carlo method combined with the Percus–Yevick hard model to consider the dependent scattering effect, while the electromagnetic calculation is based on the multi-sphere superposition T-matrix method. The Mueller matrix elements of the system with different size parameters and volume fractions of spheres are obtained using both methods. The results verify that the RTE fails to deal with the systems with a high-volume fraction due to the dependent scattering effects. Apart from the effects of forward interference scattering and coherent backscattering, the Percus–Yevick hard sphere model shows good accuracy in accounting for the far-field interference effects for medium or smaller size parameters (up to 6.964 in this study). For densely packed discrete spheres with large size parameters (equals 13.928 in this study), the improvement of dependent scattering correction tends to deteriorate. The observations indicate that caution must be taken when using RTE in dealing with the radiative transfer in dense discrete random media even though the dependent scattering correction is applied. - Highlights: • The Muller matrix of randomly distributed, densely packed spheres are investigated. • The effects of multiple scattering and dependent scattering are analyzed. • The accuracy of radiative transfer theory for densely packed spheres is discussed. • Dependent scattering correction takes effect at medium size parameter or smaller. • Performance of dependent scattering correction

  2. Efficient Online Aggregates in Dense-Region-Based Data Cube Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadin, Kais; Lauer, Tobias

    In-memory OLAP systems require a space-efficient representation of sparse data cubes in order to accommodate large data sets. On the other hand, most efficient online aggregation techniques, such as prefix sums, are built on dense array-based representations. These are often not applicable to real-world data due to the size of the arrays which usually cannot be compressed well, as most sparsity is removed during pre-processing. A possible solution is to identify dense regions in a sparse cube and only represent those using arrays, while storing sparse data separately, e.g. in a spatial index structure. Previous dense-region-based approaches have concentrated mainly on the effectiveness of the dense-region detection (i.e. on the space-efficiency of the result). However, especially in higher-dimensional cubes, data is usually more cluttered, resulting in a potentially large number of small dense regions, which negatively affects query performance on such a structure. In this paper, our focus is not only on space-efficiency but also on time-efficiency, both for the initial dense-region extraction and for queries carried out in the resulting hybrid data structure. We describe two methods to trade available memory for increased aggregate query performance. In addition, optimizations in our approach significantly reduce the time to build the initial data structure compared to former systems. Also, we present a straightforward adaptation of our approach to support multi-core or multi-processor architectures, which can further enhance query performance. Experiments with different real-world data sets show how various parameter settings can be used to adjust the efficiency and effectiveness of our algorithms.

  3. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  4. A constitutive law for dense granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jop, Pierre; Forterre, Yoël; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2006-06-08

    A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

  5. Mean field dynamics and color conductivity of cold and dense quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chao; Zheng Xiaoping

    2002-01-01

    The authors first review the non-Abelian transport theory and its mean field dynamics. The theory is then applied for studying the color electric dynamics of cold and dense quark matter at large chemical potential, and color conductivity with non-perturbation effect is obtained. Finally, the authors compare the results at large chemical potential with that at high temperature, and discuss possible applications in the field of astrophysics

  6. Module discovery by exhaustive search for densely connected, co-expressed regions in biomolecular interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Colak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational prediction of functionally related groups of genes (functional modules from large-scale data is an important issue in computational biology. Gene expression experiments and interaction networks are well studied large-scale data sources, available for many not yet exhaustively annotated organisms. It has been well established, when analyzing these two data sources jointly, modules are often reflected by highly interconnected (dense regions in the interaction networks whose participating genes are co-expressed. However, the tractability of the problem had remained unclear and methods by which to exhaustively search for such constellations had not been presented.We provide an algorithmic framework, referred to as Densely Connected Biclustering (DECOB, by which the aforementioned search problem becomes tractable. To benchmark the predictive power inherent to the approach, we computed all co-expressed, dense regions in physical protein and genetic interaction networks from human and yeast. An automatized filtering procedure reduces our output which results in smaller collections of modules, comparable to state-of-the-art approaches. Our results performed favorably in a fair benchmarking competition which adheres to standard criteria. We demonstrate the usefulness of an exhaustive module search, by using the unreduced output to more quickly perform GO term related function prediction tasks. We point out the advantages of our exhaustive output by predicting functional relationships using two examples.We demonstrate that the computation of all densely connected and co-expressed regions in interaction networks is an approach to module discovery of considerable value. Beyond confirming the well settled hypothesis that such co-expressed, densely connected interaction network regions reflect functional modules, we open up novel computational ways to comprehensively analyze the modular organization of an organism based on prevalent and largely

  7. Experiments on two-step heating of a dense plasma in the GOL-3 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrelin, V.T.; Burdakov, A.V.; Koidan, V.S.; Mekler, K.I.; Mel'nikov, P.I.; Postupaev, V.V.; Shcheglov, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments on two-stage heating of a dense plasma by a relativistic electron beam in the GOL-3 facility. A dense plasma with a length of about a meter and a hydrogen density up to 10 17 cm -3 was created in the main plasma, whose density was 10 15 cm -3 . In the process of interacting with the plasma, the electron beam (1 MeV, 40 kA, 4 μs) imparts its energy to the electrons of the main plasma through collective effects. The heated electrons, as they disperse along the magnetic field lines, in turn reach the region of dense plasma and impart their energy to it by pairwise collisions. Estimates based on experimental data are given for the parameters of the flux of hot plasma electrons, the energy released in the dense plasma, and the energy balance of the beam-plasma system. The paper discusses the dynamics of the plasma, which is inhomogeneous in density and temperature, including the appearance of pressure waves

  8. Object-Based Dense Matching Method for Maintaining Structure Characteristics of Linear Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Nan; Yan, Yiming; Qiu, Mingjie; Zhao, Chunhui; Wang, Liguo

    2018-03-29

    In this paper, we proposed a novel object-based dense matching method specially for the high-precision disparity map of building objects in urban areas, which can maintain accurate object structure characteristics. The proposed framework mainly includes three stages. Firstly, an improved edge line extraction method is proposed for the edge segments to fit closely to building outlines. Secondly, a fusion method is proposed for the outlines under the constraint of straight lines, which can maintain the building structural attribute with parallel or vertical edges, which is very useful for the dense matching method. Finally, we proposed an edge constraint and outline compensation (ECAOC) dense matching method to maintain building object structural characteristics in the disparity map. In the proposed method, the improved edge lines are used to optimize matching search scope and matching template window, and the high-precision building outlines are used to compensate the shape feature of building objects. Our method can greatly increase the matching accuracy of building objects in urban areas, especially at building edges. For the outline extraction experiments, our fusion method verifies the superiority and robustness on panchromatic images of different satellites and different resolutions. For the dense matching experiments, our ECOAC method shows great advantages for matching accuracy of building objects in urban areas compared with three other methods.

  9. Object-Based Dense Matching Method for Maintaining Structure Characteristics of Linear Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Su

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we proposed a novel object-based dense matching method specially for the high-precision disparity map of building objects in urban areas, which can maintain accurate object structure characteristics. The proposed framework mainly includes three stages. Firstly, an improved edge line extraction method is proposed for the edge segments to fit closely to building outlines. Secondly, a fusion method is proposed for the outlines under the constraint of straight lines, which can maintain the building structural attribute with parallel or vertical edges, which is very useful for the dense matching method. Finally, we proposed an edge constraint and outline compensation (ECAOC dense matching method to maintain building object structural characteristics in the disparity map. In the proposed method, the improved edge lines are used to optimize matching search scope and matching template window, and the high-precision building outlines are used to compensate the shape feature of building objects. Our method can greatly increase the matching accuracy of building objects in urban areas, especially at building edges. For the outline extraction experiments, our fusion method verifies the superiority and robustness on panchromatic images of different satellites and different resolutions. For the dense matching experiments, our ECOAC method shows great advantages for matching accuracy of building objects in urban areas compared with three other methods.

  10. Dense shelf water cascading in the northwestern Mediterranean during the cold winter 2005: Quantification of the export through the Gulf of Lion and the Catalan margin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulses, C.; Estournel, C.; Puig, P.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Marsaleix, P.

    2008-01-01

    Dense shelf water cascading in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea during winter 2005, which was shown to cause large erosion in the canyons and to influence deep benthic ecosystem, was investigated using numerical modeling validated with temperature and current observations. Intense dense water

  11. A parallel solver for huge dense linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, J. M.; Movilla, J. L.; Climente, J. I.; Castillo, M.; Marqués, M.; Mayo, R.; Quintana-Ortí, E. S.; Planelles, J.

    2011-11-01

    HDSS (Huge Dense Linear System Solver) is a Fortran Application Programming Interface (API) to facilitate the parallel solution of very large dense systems to scientists and engineers. The API makes use of parallelism to yield an efficient solution of the systems on a wide range of parallel platforms, from clusters of processors to massively parallel multiprocessors. It exploits out-of-core strategies to leverage the secondary memory in order to solve huge linear systems O(100.000). The API is based on the parallel linear algebra library PLAPACK, and on its Out-Of-Core (OOC) extension POOCLAPACK. Both PLAPACK and POOCLAPACK use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) as the communication layer and BLAS to perform the local matrix operations. The API provides a friendly interface to the users, hiding almost all the technical aspects related to the parallel execution of the code and the use of the secondary memory to solve the systems. In particular, the API can automatically select the best way to store and solve the systems, depending of the dimension of the system, the number of processes and the main memory of the platform. Experimental results on several parallel platforms report high performance, reaching more than 1 TFLOP with 64 cores to solve a system with more than 200 000 equations and more than 10 000 right-hand side vectors. New version program summaryProgram title: Huge Dense System Solver (HDSS) Catalogue identifier: AEHU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHU_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 87 062 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 069 110 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90, C Computer: Parallel architectures: multiprocessors, computer clusters Operating system

  12. Mechanical characterization of densely welded Apache Leap tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-06-01

    An empirical criterion is formulated to describe the compressive strength of the densely welded Apache Leap tuff. The criterion incorporates the effects of size, L/D ratio, loading rate and density variations. The criterion improves the correlation between the test results and the failure envelope. Uniaxial and triaxial compressive strengths, Brazilian tensile strength and elastic properties of the densely welded brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff have been determined using the ASTM standard test methods. All tuff samples are tested dry at room temperature (22 ± 2 degrees C), and have the core axis normal to the flow layers. The uniaxial compressive strength is 73.2 ± 16.5 MPa. The Brazilian tensile strength is 5.12 ± 1.2 MPa. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio are 22.6 ± 5.7 GPa and 0.20 ± 0.03. Smoothness and perpendicularity do not fully meet the ASTM requirements for all samples, due to the presence of voids and inclusions on the sample surfaces and the sample preparation methods. The investigations of loading rate, L/D radio and cyclic loading effects on the compressive strength and of the size effect on the tensile strength are not conclusive. The Coulomb strength criterion adequately represents the failure envelope of the tuff under confining pressures from 0 to 62 MPa. Cohesion and internal friction angle are 16 MPa and 43 degrees. The brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff is highly heterogeneous as suggested by large variations of the test results. The high intrinsic variability of the tuff is probably caused by the presence of flow layers and by nonuniform distributions of inclusions, voids and degree of welding. Similar variability of the properties has been found in publications on the Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain. 57 refs., 32 figs., 29 tabs

  13. Operational characteristics of a high voltage dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, D. M.

    1985-11-01

    A high voltage dense plasma focus powered by a single stage Marx bank was designed, built and operated. The maximum bank parameters are: voltage--120 kV, energy--20 kJ, short circuit current--600kA. The bank impedance is about 200 millohms. The plasma focus center electrode diameter is 1.27 cm. The outer electrode diameter is 10.16 cm. Rundown length is about 10 cm, corresponding to a bank quarter period of about 900 millohms ns. Rundown L is about 50 milliohms. The context of this work is established with a review of previous plasma focus theoretical, experimental and computational work and related topics. Theoretical motivation for high voltage operation is presented. The design, construction and operation of this device are discussed in detail. Results and analysis of measurements obtained are presented. Device operation was investigated primarily at 80 kV (9 kJ), with a gas fill of about 1 torr H2, plus 3-5 percent A. The following diagnostics were used: gun voltage and current measurements; filtered, time resolved x ray PIN measurements of the pinch region; time integrated x ray pinhole photographs of the pinch region; fast frame visible light photographs of the sheath during rundown; and B probe measurements of the current sheath shortly before collapse.

  14. PHOSPHORUS-BEARING MOLECULES IN MASSIVE DENSE CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontani, F.; Rivilla, V. M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caselli, P.; Vasyunin, A. [Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Palau, A. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2016-05-10

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects; hence, its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here, we show new detections of phosphorus nitride (PN) in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact H ii regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ≃5 km s{sup −1}, and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 10{sup 11–12} cm{sup −2}, marginally lower than the values derived in the few high-mass star-forming regions detected so far. New constraints on the abundance of phosphorus monoxide, the fundamental unit of biologically relevant molecules, are also given.

  15. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  16. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hee Jung; Ko, Eun Sook; Yi, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results

  17. Staging Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole B.

    In recent years, the social sciences have taken a “mobilities turn.” There has been a developing realisation that mobilities do not “just happen.” Mobilities are carefully and meticulously designed, planned and staged (from above). However, they are equally importantly acted out, performed and li......, the book asks: what are the physical, social, technical, and cultural conditions to the staging of contemporary urban mobilities?...... that mobility is more than movement between point A and B. It explores how the movement of people, goods, information, and signs influences human understandings of self, other and the built environment. Moving towards a new understanding of the relationship between movement, interaction and environments...

  18. Ultrafast visualization of the structural evolution of dense hydrogen towards warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Hot dense hydrogen far from equilibrium is ubiquitous in nature occurring during some of the most violent and least understood events in our universe such as during star formation, supernova explosions, and the creation of cosmic rays. It is also a state of matter important for applications in inertial confinement fusion research and in laser particle acceleration. Rapid progress occurred in recent years characterizing the high-pressure structural properties of dense hydrogen under static or dynamic compression. Here, we show that spectrally and angularly resolved x-ray scattering measure the thermodynamic properties of dense hydrogen and resolve the ultrafast evolution and relaxation towards thermodynamic equilibrium. These studies apply ultra-bright x-ray pulses from the Linac Coherent Light (LCLS) source. The interaction of rapidly heated cryogenic hydrogen with a high-peak power optical laser is visualized with intense LCLS x-ray pulses in a high-repetition rate pump-probe setting. We demonstrate that electron-ion coupling is affected by the small number of particles in the Debye screening cloud resulting in much slower ion temperature equilibration than predicted by standard theory. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  19. SD-SEM: sparse-dense correspondence for 3D reconstruction of microscopic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaie, Ahmadreza; Tafti, Ahmad P; Owen, Heather A; D'Souza, Roshan M; Yu, Zeyun

    2017-06-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging has been a principal component of many studies in biomedical, mechanical, and materials sciences since its emergence. Despite the high resolution of captured images, they remain two-dimensional (2D). In this work, a novel framework using sparse-dense correspondence is introduced and investigated for 3D reconstruction of stereo SEM images. SEM micrographs from microscopic samples are captured by tilting the specimen stage by a known angle. The pair of SEM micrographs is then rectified using sparse scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) features/descriptors and a contrario RANSAC for matching outlier removal to ensure a gross horizontal displacement between corresponding points. This is followed by dense correspondence estimation using dense SIFT descriptors and employing a factor graph representation of the energy minimization functional and loopy belief propagation (LBP) as means of optimization. Given the pixel-by-pixel correspondence and the tilt angle of the specimen stage during the acquisition of micrographs, depth can be recovered. Extensive tests reveal the strength of the proposed method for high-quality reconstruction of microscopic samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved models of dense anharmonic lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenau, P., E-mail: rosenau@post.tau.ac.il; Zilburg, A.

    2017-01-15

    We present two improved quasi-continuous models of dense, strictly anharmonic chains. The direct expansion which includes the leading effect due to lattice dispersion, results in a Boussinesq-type PDE with a compacton as its basic solitary mode. Without increasing its complexity we improve the model by including additional terms in the expanded interparticle potential with the resulting compacton having a milder singularity at its edges. A particular care is applied to the Hertz potential due to its non-analyticity. Since, however, the PDEs of both the basic and the improved model are ill posed, they are unsuitable for a study of chains dynamics. Using the bond length as a state variable we manipulate its dispersion and derive a well posed fourth order PDE. - Highlights: • An improved PDE model of a Newtonian lattice renders compacton solutions. • Compactons are classical solutions of the improved model and hence amenable to standard analysis. • An alternative well posed model enables to study head on interactions of lattices' solitary waves. • Well posed modeling of Hertz potential.

  1. Dense Gravity Currents with Breaking Internal Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yukinobu; Hogg, Charlie; Ouellette, Nicholas; Koseff, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    Shoaling and breaking internal waves along a pycnocline may lead to mixing and dilution of dense gravity currents, such as cold river inflows into lakes or brine effluent from desalination plants in near-coastal environments. In order to explore the interaction between gravity currents and breaking interfacial waves a series of laboratory experiments was performed in which a sequence of internal waves impinge upon a shelf-slope gravity current. The waves are generated in a two-layer thin-interface ambient water column under a variety of conditions characterizing both the waves and the gravity currents. The mixing of the gravity current is measured through both intrusive (CTD probe) and nonintrusive (Planar-laser inducted fluorescence) techniques. We will present results over a full range of Froude number (characterizing the waves) and Richardson number (characterizing the gravity current) conditions, and will discuss the mechanisms by which the gravity current is mixed into the ambient environment including the role of turbulence in the process. National Science Foundation.

  2. Thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Kunal; Burnley, Pamela; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1994-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations under mantle conditions have identified a suite of dense hydrous magnesium silicate (DHMS) phases that could be conduits to transport water to at least the 660 km discontinuity via mature, relatively cold, subducting slabs. Water released from successive dehydration of these phases during subduction could be responsible for deep focus earthquakes, mantle metasomatism and a host of other physico-chemical processes central to our understanding of the earth's deep interior. In order to construct a thermodynamic data base that can delineate and predict the stability ranges for DHMS phases, reliable thermochemical and thermophysical data are required. One of the major obstacles in calorimetric studies of phases synthesized under high pressure conditions has been limitation due to the small (less than 5 mg) sample mass. Our refinement of calorimeter techniques now allow precise determination of enthalpies of solution of less than 5 mg samples of hydrous magnesium silicates. For example, high temperature solution calorimetry of natural talc (Mg(0.99) Fe(0.01)Si4O10(OH)2), periclase (MgO) and quartz (SiO2) yield enthalpies of drop solution at 1044 K to be 592.2 (2.2), 52.01 (0.12) and 45.76 (0.4) kJ/mol respectively. The corresponding enthalpy of formation from oxides at 298 K for talc is minus 5908.2 kJ/mol agreeing within 0.1 percent to literature values.

  3. Characterisation of Ferrosilicon Dense Medium Separation Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Mans, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ferrosilicon is used in the dense medium separation of iron ore at Kumba resources, Sishen, South Africa. Due to high cost and losses that occur during use, maximum recovery by means of magnetic separation is aimed for. The purpose of this project was to determine the characteristics of the unused Fe-Si and then to characterise the changes that occur during storage and use thereof. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the composition of each sample, whilst Moessbauer spectroscopy yielded a two-sextet spectrum with hyperfine magnetic field strengths of 20 and 31 T, respectively, for the fresh samples. Additional hematite oxide peaks appeared in the Moessbauer spectra after use of the Fe-Si over a length of time, but this did not result in a dramatic degradation of the medium. No definite changes occurred during correct storage methods. It was, however, found that the biggest loss of Fe-Si was due to the abrasion of the particles, which resulted in the formation of an oxihydroxide froth, during the process.

  4. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daranlot, Julien; Hincelin, Ugo; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M

    2012-06-26

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N(2), with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N(2) is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimeter-wavelength transitions. Therefore, its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N(2)H(+). Two main formation mechanisms, each involving two radical-radical reactions, are the source of N(2) in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction, down to 56 K. The measured rate constants for this reaction, and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N(2) formation, are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N(2) depends on the competition between its gas-phase formation and the depletion of atomic nitrogen onto grains. As the reactions controlling N(2) formation are inefficient, we argue that N(2) does not represent the main reservoir species for interstellar nitrogen. Instead, elevated abundances of more labile forms of nitrogen such as NH(3) should be present on interstellar ices, promoting the eventual formation of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules.

  5. Deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, T.J.; Bennett, A.; Herbst, E.

    1989-01-01

    The time-dependent gas-phase chemistry of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds ranging in temperature between 10 and 70 K was investigated using a pseudo-time-dependent model similar to that of Brown and Rice (1986). The present approach, however, considers much more complex species, uses more deuterium fractionation reactions, and includes the use of new branching ratios for dissociative recombinations reactions. Results indicate that, in cold clouds, the major and most global source of deuterium fractionation is H2D(+) and ions derived from it, such as DCO(+) and H2DO(+). In warmer clouds, reactions of CH2D(+), C2HD(+), and associated species lead to significant fractionation even at 70 K, which is the assumed Orion temperature. The deuterium abundance ratios calculated at 10 K are consistent with those observed in TMC-1 for most species. However, a comparison between theory and observatiom for Orion, indicates that, for species in the ambient molecular cloud, the early-time results obtained with the old dissociative recombination branching ratios are superior if a temperature of 70 K is utilized. 60 refs

  6. Deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, T. J.; Bennett, A.; Herbst, Eric

    1989-05-01

    The time-dependent gas-phase chemistry of deuterium fractionation in dense interstellar clouds ranging in temperature between 10 and 70 K was investigated using a pseudo-time-dependent model similar to that of Brown and Rice (1986). The present approach, however, considers much more complex species, uses more deuterium fractionation reactions, and includes the use of new branching ratios for dissociative recombinations reactions. Results indicate that, in cold clouds, the major and most global source of deuterium fractionation is H2D(+) and ions derived from it, such as DCO(+) and H2DO(+). In warmer clouds, reactions of CH2D(+), C2HD(+), and associated species lead to significant fractionation even at 70 K, which is the assumed Orion temperature. The deuterium abundance ratios calculated at 10 K are consistent with those observed in TMC-1 for most species. However, a comparison between theory and observatiom for Orion, indicates that, for species in the ambient molecular cloud, the early-time results obtained with the old dissociative recombination branching ratios are superior if a temperature of 70 K is utilized.

  7. Load Designs For MJ Dense Plasma Foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, A.; Povlius, A.; Anaya, R.; Anderson, M. G.; Angus, J. R.; Cooper, C. M.; Falabella, S.; Goerz, D.; Higginson, D.; Holod, I.; McMahon, M.; Mitrani, J.; Koh, E. S.; Pearson, A.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Prasad, R.; van Lue, D.; Watson, J.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches are compact pulse power driven devices with coaxial electrodes. The discharge of DPF consists of three distinct phases: first generation of a plasma sheath, plasma rail gun phase where the sheath is accelerated down the electrodes and finally an implosion phase where the plasma stagnates into a z-pinch geometry. During the z-pinch phase, DPFs can produce MeV ion beams, x-rays and neutrons. Megaampere class DPFs with deuterium fills have demonstrated neutron yields in the 1012 neutrons/shot range with pulse durations of 10-100 ns. Kinetic simulations using the code Chicago are being used to evaluate various load configurations from initial sheath formation to the final z-pinch phase for DPFs with up to 5 MA and 1 MJ coupled to the load. Results will be presented from the preliminary design simulations. LLNL-ABS-734785 This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and with support from the Computing Grand Challenge program at LLNL.

  8. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-07

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  10. Research and development program on dense TPC's at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oddone, P; Nemethy, P.

    1982-01-01

    We have initiated a research and development program at LBL to develop high density TPC's. We are motivated by their potential use as tracking calorimeters to study nucleon decay. They may also be useful in the study of cosmic neutrino fluxes, double β decay and other low rate processes. Of these applications, the use of dense TPC's to study nucleon decay is the most challenging one because it requires instrumenting very large masses. Our R and D program is aimed at developing large TPC's which are competitive in cost with other proposed nucleon decay detectors while offering superior capabilities for energy resolution, particle identification and uniformity of response. There are two ways of obtaining high density TPC's: the first is to use a cryogenic liquid such as liquid argon or liquid methane; the second is to pressurize a gas such as argon or methane to several hundred atmospheres where the density of the gas approaches that of the liquid state. While we are interested in studying both approaches, we are concentrating on the high pressure approach since it offers the potential advantage of proportional wire amplification. A wire amplification of about 3 orders of magnitude would eliminate the noise problems which are inherent in ionization mode detectors such as liquid argon chambers. A possible 10 kton detector is described, and its properties are discussed in terms of tracking, energy measurements and particle identification

  11. Staging Collaborative Innovation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Clausen, Christian

    Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation...... and public private innovation partnerships. Based on a case study of a collaborative design process in a large electronics company the paper points to the key importance of staging and navigation of collaborative innovation process. Staging and navigation is presented as a combined activity: 1) to translate...

  12. Relationship between damage clustering and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus in early and late stages of the disease: cluster analyses in a large cohort from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pego-Reigosa, José María; Lois-Iglesias, Ana; Rúa-Figueroa, Íñigo; Galindo, María; Calvo-Alén, Jaime; de Uña-Álvarez, Jacobo; Balboa-Barreiro, Vanessa; Ibáñez Ruan, Jesús; Olivé, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Gómez, Manuel; Fernández Nebro, Antonio; Andrés, Mariano; Erausquin, Celia; Tomero, Eva; Horcada Rubio, Loreto; Uriarte Isacelaya, Esther; Freire, Mercedes; Montilla, Carlos; Sánchez-Atrio, Ana I; Santos-Soler, Gregorio; Zea, Antonio; Díez, Elvira; Narváez, Javier; Blanco-Alonso, Ricardo; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Ruiz-Lucea, María Esther; Fernández-Castro, Mónica; Hernández-Beriain, José Ángel; Gantes-Mora, Marian; Hernández-Cruz, Blanca; Pérez-Venegas, José; Pecondón-Español, Ángela; Marras Fernández-Cid, Carlos; Ibáñez-Barcelo, Mónica; Bonilla, Gema; Torrente-Segarra, Vicenç; Castellví, Iván; Alegre, Juan José; Calvet, Joan; Marenco de la Fuente, José Luis; Raya, Enrique; Vázquez-Rodríguez, Tomás Ramón; Quevedo-Vila, Víctor; Muñoz-Fernández, Santiago; Otón, Teresa; Rahman, Anisur; López-Longo, Francisco Javier

    2016-07-01

    To identify patterns (clusters) of damage manifestations within a large cohort of SLE patients and evaluate the potential association of these clusters with a higher risk of mortality. This is a multicentre, descriptive, cross-sectional study of a cohort of 3656 SLE patients from the Spanish Society of Rheumatology Lupus Registry. Organ damage was ascertained using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index. Using cluster analysis, groups of patients with similar patterns of damage manifestations were identified. Then, overall clusters were compared as well as the subgroup of patients within every cluster with disease duration shorter than 5 years. Three damage clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (80.6% of patients) presented a lower amount of individuals with damage (23.2 vs 100% in clusters 2 and 3, P Cluster 2 (11.4% of patients) was characterized by musculoskeletal damage in all patients. Cluster 3 (8.0% of patients) was the only group with cardiovascular damage, and this was present in all patients. The overall mortality rate of patients in clusters 2 and 3 was higher than that in cluster 1 (P clusters. Both in early and late stages of the disease, there was a significant association of these clusters with an increased risk of mortality. Physicians should pay special attention to the early prevention of damage in these two systems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Dense matter in strong gravitational field of neutron star

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sajad A. Bhat

    2018-02-10

    Feb 10, 2018 ... Abstract. Mass, radius and moment of inertia are direct probes of compositions and Equation of State (EoS) of dense matter in neutron star interior. These are computed for novel phases of dense matter involving hyperons and antikaon condensate and their observable consequences are discussed in this ...

  14. Dense graph limits under respondent-driven sampling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Siva Athreya

    Sub-graph count (fingerprints). Source: IUPUI Network Sampling course. Page 15. Aim and Result. • Motivation: provide a rigorous framework for Respondent. Driven Sampling on dense graphs. • Theorem : (in words). Limit of a dense graph sequence constructed via R.D.S., where the sequence of the vertex-sets is ergodic, ...

  15. Interparticle interaction and transport processes in dense semiclassical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baimbetov, F.B.; Giniyatova, Sh.G.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of the density response formalism an expression for the pseudopotential of dense semiclassical plasma, which takes account of quantum-mechanical effects, local field corrections, and electronic screening effects is obtained. The static structure factors taking into account both local fields and quantum-mechanical effects are calculated. An electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, and viscosity of dense semiclassical plasma are studied

  16. Dynamics of dense direct-seeded stands of southern pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.C.G. Goelz

    2006-01-01

    Direct seeding of southern pines is an effective method of artificial regeneration, producing extremely dense stands when survival exceeds expectations. Long-term studies of dense direct-seeded stands provide ideal data for exploring development of stands as they approach the limit of maximum stand density. I present data from seven studies with ages of stands ranging...

  17. Dense-body aggregates as plastic structures supporting tension in smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Herrera, Ana M; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2010-11-01

    The wall of hollow organs of vertebrates is a unique structure able to generate active tension and maintain a nearly constant passive stiffness over a large volume range. These properties are predominantly attributable to the smooth muscle cells that line the organ wall. Although smooth muscle is known to possess plasticity (i.e., the ability to adapt to large changes in cell length through structural remodeling of contractile apparatus and cytoskeleton), the detailed structural basis for the plasticity is largely unknown. Dense bodies, one of the most prominent structures in smooth muscle cells, have been regarded as the anchoring sites for actin filaments, similar to the Z-disks in striated muscle. Here, we show that the dense bodies and intermediate filaments formed cable-like structures inside airway smooth muscle cells and were able to adjust the cable length according to cell length and tension. Stretching the muscle cell bundle in the relaxed state caused the cables to straighten, indicating that these intracellular structures were connected to the extracellular matrix and could support passive tension. These plastic structures may be responsible for the ability of smooth muscle to maintain a nearly constant tensile stiffness over a large length range. The finding suggests that the structural plasticity of hollow organs may originate from the dense-body cables within the smooth muscle cells.

  18. Eculizumab in Pediatric Dense Deposit Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterveld, Michiel J S; Garrelfs, Mark R; Hoppe, Bernd; Florquin, Sandrine; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van den Heuvel, L P; Amann, Kerstin; Davin, Jean-Claude; Bouts, Antonia H M; Schriemer, Pietrik J; Groothoff, Jaap W

    2015-10-07

    Dense deposit disease (DDD), a subtype of C3 glomerulopathy, is a rare disease affecting mostly children. Treatment options are limited. Debate exists whether eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against complement factor C5, is effective in DDD. Reported data are scarce, especially in children. The authors analyzed clinical and histologic data of five pediatric patients with a native kidney biopsy diagnosis of DDD. Patients received eculizumab as therapy of last resort for severe nephritic or nephrotic syndrome with alternative pathway complement activation; this therapy was given only when the patients had not or only marginally responded to immunosuppressive therapy. Outcome measures were kidney function, proteinuria, and urine analysis. In all, seven disease episodes were treated with eculizumab (six episodes of severe nephritic syndrome [two of which required dialysis] and one nephrotic syndrome episode). Median age at treatment start was 8.4 (range, 5.9-13) years. For three treatment episodes, eculizumab was the sole immunosuppressive treatment. In all patients, both proteinuria and renal function improved significantly within 12 weeks of treatment (median urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio of 8.5 [range, 2.2-17] versus 1.1 [range, 0.2-2.0] g/g, P<0.005, and eGFR of 58 [range, 17-114] versus 77 [range, 50-129] ml/min per 1.73 m(2), P<0.01). A striking finding was the disappearance of leukocyturia within 1 week after the first eculizumab dose in all five episodes with leukocyturia at treatment initiation. In this case series of pediatric patients with DDD, eculizumab treatment was associated with reduction in proteinuria and increase in eGFR. Leukocyturia resolved within 1 week of initiation of eculizumab treatment. These results underscore the need for a randomized trial of eculizumab in DDD. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. 16. Hot dense plasma atomic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Dappen; Totsuji, H.; Nishii, Y.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers 13 articles whose common feature is to deal with atomic processes in hot plasmas. Density functional molecular dynamics method is applied to the hydrogen plasma in the domain of liquid metallic hydrogen. The effects of the density gradient are taken into account in both the electronic kinetic energy and the exchange energy and it is shown that they almost cancel with each other, extending the applicability of the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac approximation to the cases where the density gradient is not negligible. Another article reports about space and time resolved M-shell X-ray measurements of a laser-produced gas jet xenon plasma. Plasma parameters have been measured by ion acoustic and electron plasma waves Thomson scattering. Photo-ionization becomes a dominant atomic process when the density and the temperature of plasmas are relatively low and when the plasma is submitted to intense external radiation. It is shown that 2 plasmas which have a very different density but have the same ionization parameters, are found in a similar ionization state. Most radiation hydrodynamics codes use radiative opacity data from available libraries of atomic data. Several articles are focused on the determination of one group Rosseland and Planck mean analytical formulas for several single elements used in inertial fusion targets. In another paper the plasma density effect on population densities, effective ionization, recombination rate coefficients and on emission lines from carbon and Al ions in hot dense plasma, is studied. The last article is devoted to a new atomic model in plasmas that considers the occupation probability of the bound state and free state density in the presence of the plasma micro-field. (A.C.)

  20. Performance of μ-RWELL detector vs resistivity of the resistive stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencivenni, G.; De Oliveira, R.; Felici, G.; Gatta, M.; Morello, G.; Ochi, A.; Lener, M. Poli; Tskhadadze, E.

    2018-04-01

    The μ-RWELL is a compact spark-protected single amplification stage Micro-Pattern-Gaseous-Detector (MPGD). The detector amplification stage is realized with a polyimide structure, micro-patterned with a dense matrix of blind-holes, integrated into the readout structure. The anode is formed by a thin Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) resistive layer separated by an insulating glue layer from the readout strips. The introduction of the resistive layer strongly suppressing the transition from streamer to spark gives the possibility to achieve large gains (> 104), without significantly affecting the capability to be efficiently operated in high particle fluxes. In this work we present the results of a systematic study of the μ-RWELL performance as a function of the DLC resistivity. The tests have been performed either with collimated 5.9 keV X-rays or with pion and muon beams at the SPS Secondary Beamline H4 and H8 at CERN.

  1. On the Virtual Cell Transmission in Ultra Dense Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultra dense networks (UDN are identified as one of the key enablers for 5G, since they can provide an ultra high spectral reuse factor exploiting proximal transmissions. By densifying the network infrastructure equipment, it is highly possible that each user will have one or more dedicated serving base station antennas, introducing the user-centric virtual cell paradigm. However, due to irregular deployment of a large amount of base station antennas, the interference environment becomes rather complex, thus introducing severe interferences among different virtual cells. This paper focuses on the downlink transmission scheme in UDN where a large number of users and base station antennas is uniformly spread over a certain area. An interference graph is first created based on the large-scale fadings to give a potential description of the interference relationship among the virtual cells. Then, base station antennas and users in the virtual cells within the same maximally-connected component are grouped together and merged into one new virtual cell cluster, where users are jointly served via zero-forcing (ZF beamforming. A multi-virtual-cell minimum mean square error precoding scheme is further proposed to mitigate the inter-cluster interference. Additionally, the interference alignment framework is proposed based on the low complexity virtual cell merging to eliminate the strong interference between different virtual cells. Simulation results show that the proposed interference graph-based virtual cell merging approach can attain the average user spectral efficiency performance of the grouping scheme based on virtual cell overlapping with a smaller virtual cell size and reduced signal processing complexity. Besides, the proposed user-centric transmission scheme greatly outperforms the BS-centric transmission scheme (maximum ratio transmission (MRT in terms of both the average user spectral efficiency and edge user spectral efficiency. What is more

  2. Nonlinear graphene-based nanophotonic switch working in dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth L., A. J.; Ferreira, A. C.; Sombra, A. S. B.

    2017-05-01

    Fiber-based devices for operation in fully optical networks are relatively large in size and can not be used in photonic integrated circuits (PICs). We have developed an efficient graphene-based nanophotonic switching nanocell, working in linear regime (cross state) and in non-linear regime (bar state) with relatively low optical power, so that they can be cascaded and integrated in PICs. Indeed, that device is a fully optical switch, which can work in dense wavelength division multiplexing systems.

  3. Rates of Thermonuclear Reactions in Dense Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsytovich, V.N.; Bornatici, M.

    2000-01-01

    The problem of plasma screening of thermonuclear reactions has attracted considerable scientific interest ever since Salpeter's seminal paper, but it is still faced with controversial statements and without any definite conclusion. It is of relevant importance to thermonuclear reactions in dense astrophysical plasmas, for which charge screening can substantially affect the reaction rates. Whereas Salpeter and a number of subsequent investigations have dealt with static screening, Carraro, Schafer, and Koonin have drawn attention to the fact that plasma screening of thermonuclear reactions is an essentially dynamic effect. In addressing the issue of collective plasma effects on the thermonuclear reaction rates, the first critical overview of most of the work carried out so far is presented and the validity of the test particle approach is assessed. In contrast to previous investigations, we base our description on the kinetic equation for nonequilibrium plasmas, which accounts for the effects on the rates of thermonuclear reactions of both plasma fluctuations and screening and allows one to analyze explicitly the effects of the fluctuations on the reaction rates. Such a kinetic formulation is more general than both Salpeter's approach and the recently developed statistical approaches and makes it possible to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the problem. A noticeable result of the fluctuation approach is that the static screening, which affects both the interaction and the self-energy of the reacting nuclei, does not affect the reaction rates, in contrast with the results obtained so far. Instead, a reduction of the thermonuclear reaction rates is obtained as a result of the effect of plasma fluctuations related to the free self-energy of the reacting nuclei. A simple physical explanation of the slowing down of the reaction rates is given, and the relation to the dynamically screened test particle approach is discussed. Corrections to the reaction rates

  4. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  5. Community Mining Method of Label Propagation Based on Dense Pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WENG Wei

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the popularity of handheld Internet equipments like mobile phones, increasing numbers of people are becoming involved in the virtual social network. Because of its large amount of data and complex structure, the network faces new challenges of community mining. A label propagation algorithm with low time complexity and without prior parameters deals easily with a large networks. This study explored a new method of community mining, based on label propagation with two stages. The first stage involved identifying closely linked nodes according to their local adjacency relations that gave rise to a micro-community. The second stage involved expanding and adjusting this community through a label propagation algorithm (LPA to finally obtain the community structure of the entire social network. This algorithm reduced the number of initial labels and avoided the merging of small communities in general LPAs. Thus, the quality of community discovery was improved, and the linear time complexity of the LPA was maintained.

  6. Like a cannonball: origin of dense spherical basaltic ejecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Piazza, Andrea; Del Bello, Elisabetta; Mollo, Silvio; Vona, Alessandro; Alvarado, Guillermo E.; Masotta, Matteo

    2017-05-01

    Cannonballs are rare spherical to sub-spherical eruptive products associated with basaltic explosive activity. The origin of cannonballs is still debated and subjected to a wide spectrum of different interpretations. In order to better understand the physicochemical mechanisms controlling the formation of these explosive products, we investigated the textural and chemical features of cannonballs from the Cerro Chopo monogenetic volcano (Costa Rica). These explosive products ubiquitously show a core domain with coalesced bubbles (30-36% porosity) wrapped in a dense rim domain with small, isolated bubbles (20-27% porosity). Both domains are identical in terms of bulk rock composition and mineral chemistry and are portions of the same magma batch. Results from combined petrological and thermodynamic modeling indicate that a low-viscosity ( 20 Pa s) melt containing early-formed olivine phenocrysts ( 9 vol.%) ascended from storage at a decompression rate of 0.5 MPa s-1 until it reached a depth of 4.5 km (equivalent to a pressure of 150 MPa). While rising from depth to 4.5 km, the melt underwent rapid decompression (0.5-2.6 MPa s-1) and H2O exsolution, driving late-stage crystallization of the groundmass. The fast ascent velocity (21-110 m s-1) while rising between 4.5 km and the surface induced turbulent (Re >103), annular flow development in the uppermost region of the conduit. We propose that cannonballs represent blebs of fluid magmas that underwent shear-driven detachment from the annulus of magma lining the conduit walls at depths lower than 4.5 km. The formation of such cannonballs is dictated by magma transport dynamics of low-viscosity, phenocryst-poor, and volatile-rich melts that rapidly accelerate within the shallow conduit.

  7. X-ray Spectral Measurements of a Dense Plasma Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Robert R.; Dozier, Charles M.; Newman, Daniel A.; Petr, Rodney A.; Freshman, Jay; Hoey, David W.; Heaton, John

    2002-10-01

    Absolute intensities of spectra in a dense-plasma-focus (DPF) source have been recorded and analyzed. This DPF source has been identified as one of the more promising sources for X-ray lithography. The source, developed by Science Research Laboratory, Inc., is currently undergoing testing and further development at BAE Systems, Inc. The DPF operates at 60 Hz and produces an average output pulse of ~5 J of X rays into 4π steradians in a continuous operation mode. In all runs, there was an initial number of pulses, typically between 30 to 40, during which the X-ray output increased and the DPF appeared to be undergoing a conditioning process, and after which a "steady-state" mode was achieved where the average X-ray power was relatively constant. Each spectral run was exposed to ~600 J of output, as measured by the PIN. The X-ray spectral region between 0.8 and 3 keV was recorded on Kodak DEF film in a potassium acid phthalate (KAP) convex curved-crystal spectrograph. The source emits neon line radiation from Ne IX and Ne X ionization stages in the 900 to 1300 eV region, suitable for lithographic exposures of photoresist. Two helium-like neon lines contribute more than 50% of the total energy. From continuum shape, plasma temperatures were found to be approximately 170-200 eV. The absolute, integrated spectral outputs were verified to within 30% by comparison with measurements by a PIN detector and a radiachromic X-ray dosimeter.

  8. Association of Transforming Growth Factor Beta-1 (TGF-β1) Genetic Variation with Type 2 Diabetes and End Stage Renal Disease in Two Large Population Samples from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Priyanka; Sikka, Ruhi; Kaur, Ramandeep; Sokhi, Jasmine; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Singh, Virinder; Bhanwer, A J S

    2015-05-01

    Geographic and ethnic differences impart an immense influence on the genetic susceptibility to Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diabetic nephropathy (DN). Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), a ubiquitously expressed pro-fibrotic cytokine plays a pivotal role in mediating the hypertrophic and fibrotic manifestations of DN. The present study is aimed to study the association of TGF-β1 g.869T>C (rs1800470) and g.-509C>T (rs1800469) polymorphism in T2D and end stage renal disease (ESRD) cases from the two geographically and ethnically different populations from North India. A total of 1313 samples comprising 776 samples from Punjab (204 with ESRD, 257 without ESRD, and 315 healthy controls) and 537 samples from Jammu and Kashmir (150 with ESRD, 187 without ESRD, and 200 controls) were genotyped for TGF-β1 (rs1800470 and rs1800469) using ARMS-PCR. The CC genotype of rs1800470 increased ESRD risk by 3.1-4.5-fold in both populations. However, for rs1800469, the TT genotype provided 5.5-fold risk towards ESRD cases from Jammu and Kashmir and no risk for the cases from Punjab. The haplotype C-T conferred nearly a 2-3-fold risk towards T2D and ESRD and diplotype CC-CT conferred a 4-fold risk towards ESRD. Our results conclude that TGF-β1 (rs1800470) may increase the risk of both ESRD and T2D in both populations, but TGF-β1 (rs1800469) provided risk for only ESRD in the population of Jammu and Kashmir. The present study is one of the large sample sized genetic association studies of T2D and ESRD from Indian population and adds to the scholarship on global health omics.

  9. Dense particle cloud dispersion by a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, M.; Johansen, C.; Ciccarelli, G.; Zhang, F.

    2013-09-01

    A dense particle flow is generated by the interaction of a shock wave with an initially stationary packed granular bed. High-speed particle dispersion research is motivated by the energy release enhancement of explosives containing solid particles. The initial packed granular bed is produced by compressing loose powder into a wafer with a particle volume fraction of . The wafer is positioned inside the shock tube, uniformly filling the entire cross-section. This results in a clean experiment where no flow obstructing support structures are present. Through high-speed shadowgraph imaging and pressure measurements along the length of the channel, detailed information about the particle shock interaction was obtained. Due to the limited strength of the incident shock wave, no transmitted shock wave is produced. The initial solid-like response of the particle wafer acceleration forms a series of compression waves that eventually coalesce to form a shock wave. Breakup is initiated along the periphery of the wafer as the result of shear that forms due to the fixed boundary condition. Particle breakup is initiated by local failure sites that result in the formation of particle jets that extend ahead of the accelerating, largely intact, wafer core. In a circular tube, the failure sites are uniformly distributed along the wafer circumference. In a square channel, the failure sites, and the subsequent particle jets, initially form at the corners due to the enhanced shear. The wafer breakup subsequently spreads to the edges forming a highly non-uniform particle cloud.

  10. PIC Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Z-pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Blackfield, D.; Tang, V.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2011-10-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) Z-pinches are abundant sources of radiation, including neutrons, x-rays, and energetic electron and ion beams. Energetic protons and deuterons up to 10 MeV have been observed from cm-scale-length pinches, implying average acceleration gradients up to 1 GV/m. Gradients of this magnitude could potentially be exploited in the design of a compact accelerator. However, the physical mechanisms behind these immense electric fields are not well understood and thus DPF design cannot currently be optimized to maximize these gradients. At LLNL, we have assembled a DPF Z-pinch experiment and will be using a 4 MV ion probe beam to directly measure pinch-induced gradients. LSP, a fully relativistic electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code is used to perform time-dependent simulations of the pinch phase of the DPF and to gain insight into the origin and evolution of the large accelerating fields. LSP can be used in 2D or 3D geometries and can model the ions kinetically with fluid electrons (hybrid model) or model both species kinetically (fully kinetic model). We present results from both pressure and sheath width scans using LSP. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (11-ERD-063) at LLNL.

  11. Local order and crystallization of dense polydisperse hard spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Ozawa, Misaki; Berthier, Ludovic

    2018-04-01

    Computer simulations give precious insight into the microscopic behavior of supercooled liquids and glasses, but their typical time scales are orders of magnitude shorter than the experimentally relevant ones. We recently closed this gap for a class of models of size polydisperse fluids, which we successfully equilibrate beyond laboratory time scales by means of the swap Monte Carlo algorithm. In this contribution, we study the interplay between compositional and geometric local orders in a model of polydisperse hard spheres equilibrated with this algorithm. Local compositional order has a weak state dependence, while local geometric order associated to icosahedral arrangements grows more markedly but only at very high density. We quantify the correlation lengths and the degree of sphericity associated to icosahedral structures and compare these results to those for the Wahnström Lennard-Jones mixture. Finally, we analyze the structure of very dense samples that partially crystallized following a pattern incompatible with conventional fractionation scenarios. The crystal structure has the symmetry of aluminum diboride and involves a subset of small and large particles with size ratio approximately equal to 0.5.

  12. Advances of dense plasma physics with particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, GSI-Darmstadt, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D. [DarmstadtTechnische Univ., Institut fur Kernphysik (Germany); Jacoby, J. [Frankfurt Univ., Institut fur Angewandte Physik (Germany); Zioutas, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Patras Univ., Dept. of Physics (Greece); Sharkov, B.Y. [Institut for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    High intensity particle beams from accelerators induce high energy density states in bulk matter. The SIS-18 heavy ion synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) now routinely delivers intense Uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Due to the specific nature of the ion-matter interaction a volume of matter is heated uniformly with low gradients of temperature and pressure in the initial phase, depending on the pulse structure of the beam with respect to space and time. The new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. One special piece of accelerator equipment a superconducting high field dipole magnet, developed for the LHC at CERN is now serving as a key instrument to diagnose the dense plasma of the sun interior plasma, thus providing an extremely interesting combination of accelerator physics, plasma physics and particle physics. (authors)

  13. Advances of dense plasma physics with particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Jacoby, J.; Zioutas, K.; Sharkov, B.Y.

    2006-01-01

    High intensity particle beams from accelerators induce high energy density states in bulk matter. The SIS-18 heavy ion synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) now routinely delivers intense Uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Due to the specific nature of the ion-matter interaction a volume of matter is heated uniformly with low gradients of temperature and pressure in the initial phase, depending on the pulse structure of the beam with respect to space and time. The new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. One special piece of accelerator equipment a superconducting high field dipole magnet, developed for the LHC at CERN is now serving as a key instrument to diagnose the dense plasma of the sun interior plasma, thus providing an extremely interesting combination of accelerator physics, plasma physics and particle physics. (authors)

  14. DENSE MULTIPLE STEREO MATCHING OF HIGHLY OVERLAPPING UAV IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Haala

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available UAVs are becoming standard platforms for applications aiming at photogrammetric data capture. Since these systems can be completely built-up at very reasonable prices, their use can be very cost effective. This is especially true while aiming at large scale aerial mapping of areas at limited extent. In principle, the photogrammetric evaluation of UAV-based imagery is feasible by of-the-shelf commercial software products. Thus, standard steps like aerial triangulation, the generation of Digital Surface Models and ortho image computation can be performed effectively. However, this processing pipeline can be hindered due to the limited quality of UAV data. This is especially true if low-cost sensor components are applied. To overcome potential problems in AAT, UAV imagery is frequently captured at considerable overlaps. As it will be discussed in the paper, such highly overlapping image blocks are not only beneficial during georeferencing, but are especially advantageous while aiming at a dense and accurate image based 3D surface reconstruction.

  15. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A; Potenza, Marco A C; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G

    2015-07-01

    Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10(-3) of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in lysozyme and glucose isomerase solutions are locations for crystal nucleation.

  16. Dense interstellar cloud chemistry: Basic issues and possible dynamical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, S.S.; Heere, K.R.; Tarafdar, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Standing at crossroad of enthusiasm and frustration, dense intertellar cloud chemistry has a squarely posed fundamental problem: Why do the grains appear to play at best a minor role in the chemistry? Grain surface chemistry creates considerable difficulties when the authors treat dense clouds as static objects and ignore the implications of the processes by which the clouds became dense in the first place. A new generation of models which treat chemical and dynamical evolutions concurrently are therefore presented as possible solution to the current frustrations. The proposed modeling philosophy and agenda could make the next decade quite exciting for interstellar chemistry

  17. THE BLAST SURVEY OF THE VELA MOLECULAR CLOUD: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF THE DENSE CORES IN VELA-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmi, Luca; Angles-Alcazar, Daniel; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; De Luca, Massimo; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon; Klein, Jeff; Elia, Davide; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Marengo, Massimo; Giannini, Teresa; Lorenzetti, Dario; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) carried out a 250, 350, and 500 μm survey of the galactic plane encompassing the Vela Molecular Ridge, with the primary goal of identifying the coldest dense cores possibly associated with the earliest stages of star formation. Here, we present the results from observations of the Vela-D region, covering about 4 deg 2 , in which we find 141 BLAST cores. We exploit existing data taken with the Spitzer MIPS, IRAC, and SEST-SIMBA instruments to constrain their (single-temperature) spectral energy distributions, assuming a dust emissivity index β = 2.0. This combination of data allows us to determine the temperature, luminosity, and mass of each BLAST core, and also enables us to separate starless from protostellar sources. We also analyze the effects that the uncertainties on the derived physical parameters of the individual sources have on the overall physical properties of starless and protostellar cores, and we find that there appear to be a smooth transition from the pre- to the protostellar phase. In particular, for protostellar cores we find a correlation between the MIPS24 flux, associated with the central protostar, and the temperature of the dust envelope. We also find that the core mass function of the Vela-D cores has a slope consistent with other similar (sub)millimeter surveys.

  18. Modelling compressible dense and dilute two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurel, Richard; Chinnayya, Ashwin; Carmouze, Quentin

    2017-06-01

    Many two-phase flow situations, from engineering science to astrophysics, deal with transition from dense (high concentration of the condensed phase) to dilute concentration (low concentration of the same phase), covering the entire range of volume fractions. Some models are now well accepted at the two limits, but none are able to cover accurately the entire range, in particular regarding waves propagation. In the present work, an alternative to the Baer and Nunziato (BN) model [Baer, M. R. and Nunziato, J. W., "A two-phase mixture theory for the deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in reactive granular materials," Int. J. Multiphase Flow 12(6), 861 (1986)], initially designed for dense flows, is built. The corresponding model is hyperbolic and thermodynamically consistent. Contrarily to the BN model that involves 6 wave speeds, the new formulation involves 4 waves only, in agreement with the Marble model [Marble, F. E., "Dynamics of a gas containing small solid particles," Combustion and Propulsion (5th AGARD Colloquium) (Pergamon Press, 1963), Vol. 175] based on pressureless Euler equations for the dispersed phase, a well-accepted model for low particle volume concentrations. In the new model, the presence of pressure in the momentum equation of the particles and consideration of volume fractions in the two phases render the model valid for large particle concentrations. A symmetric version of the new model is derived as well for liquids containing gas bubbles. This model version involves 4 characteristic wave speeds as well, but with different velocities. Last, the two sub-models with 4 waves are combined in a unique formulation, valid for the full range of volume fractions. It involves the same 6 wave speeds as the BN model, but at a given point of space, 4 waves only emerge, depending on the local volume fractions. The non-linear pressure waves propagate only in the phase with dominant volume fraction. The new model is tested numerically on various

  19. Densely Aligned Graphene Nanoribbon Arrays and Bandgap Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Justin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Chen, Changxin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gong, Ming [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kenney, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Graphene has attracted great interest for future electronics due to its high mobility and high thermal conductivity. However, a two-dimensional graphene sheet behaves like a metal, lacking a bandgap needed for the key devices components such as field effect transistors (FETs) in digital electronics. It has been shown that, partly due to quantum confinement, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with ~2 nm width can open up sufficient bandgaps and evolve into semiconductors to exhibit high on/off ratios useful for FETs. However, a challenging problem has been that, such ultra-narrow GNRs (~2 nm) are difficult to fabricate, especially for GNRs with smooth edges throughout the ribbon length. Despite high on/off ratios, these GNRs show very low mobility and low on-state conductance due to dominant scattering effects by imperfections and disorders at the edges. Wider GNRs (>5 nm) show higher mobility, higher conductance but smaller bandgaps and low on/off ratios undesirable for FET applications. It is highly desirable to open up bandgaps in graphene or increase the bandgaps in wide GNRs to afford graphene based semiconductors for high performance (high on-state current and high on/off ratio) electronics. Large scale ordering and dense packing of such GNRs in parallel are also needed for device integration but have also been challenging thus far. It has been shown theoretically that uniaxial strains can be applied to a GNR to engineer its bandgap. The underlying physics is that under uniaxial strain, the Dirac point moves due to stretched C-C bonds, leading to an increase in the bandgap of armchair GNRs by up to 50% of its original bandgap (i.e. bandgap at zero strain). For zigzag GNRs, due to the existence of the edge states, changes of bandgap are smaller under uniaxial strain and can be increased by ~30%. This work proposes a novel approach to the fabrication of densely aligned graphene nanoribbons with highly smooth edges afforded by anisotropic etching and uniaxial strain for

  20. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is expected that at very large densities and/or temperatures a quark-hadron phase transition takes place. Lattice QCD calculations at zero baryon density indicate that the transition occurs at c∼ 150-170 MeV. The transition is likely to be second order or a cross over phenomenon. Although not much is known about the ...

  1. INPIStron switched pulsed power for dense plasma pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    The inverse plasma switch INPIStron was employed for 10kJ/40kV capacitor bank discharge system to produce focused dense plasmas in hypocycloidal-pinch (HCP) devices. A single unit and an array of multiple HCP's were coupled as the load of the pulsed power circuit. The geometry and switching plasma dynamics were found advantageous and convenient for commutating the large current pulse from the low impedance transmission line to the low impedance plasma load. The pulse power system with a single unit HCP, the system A, was used for production of high temperature plasma focus and its diagnostics. The radially running down plasma dynamics, revealed in image converter photographs, could be simulated by a simple snow-plow model with a correction for plasma resistivity. The system B with an array of 8-HCP units which forms a long coaxial discharge chamber was used for pumping a Ti-sapphire laser. The intense UV emission from the plasma was frequency shifted with dye-solution jacket to match the absorption band of the Ti crystal laser near 500 nm. An untuned laser pulse energy of 0.6 J/pulse was obtained for 6.4 kJ/40 kV discharge, or near 103 times of the explosion limit of conventional flash lamps. For both systems the advantages of the INPIStron were well demonstrated: a single unit is sufficient for a large current (greater than 50 kA) without increasing the system impedance, highly reliable and long life operation and implied scalability for the high power ranges above I(sub peak) = 1 MA and V(sub hold) = 100 kV.

  2. Exploring interspace: open space opportunities in dense urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Gobster; Kathleen E. Dickhut

    1995-01-01

    Using ideas from landscape ecology, this paper explores how small open spaces can aid urban forestry efforts in dense urban areas. A case study in Chicago illustrates the physical and social lessons learned in dealing with these spaces.

  3. Rheology and Segregation of Granular Mixtures in Dense Flows

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devang Khakhar

    IIT Bombay. Rheology and Segregation of. Granular Mixtures in Dense Flows. Devang Khakhar. Department of Chemical Engineering. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. Mumbai, India. Acknowledgment: Anurag Tripathi. 77th Annual Meeting of IASc, Ahmedabad, 18-20 Nov, 2011 ...

  4. Automated Motion Estimation for 2D Cine DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Andrew D.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2013-01-01

    Cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) is a magnetic resonance (MR) method that directly encodes tissue displacement into MR phase images. This technique has successfully interrogated many forms of tissue motion, but is most commonly used to evaluate cardiac mechanics. Currently, motion analysis from cine DENSE images requires manually delineated anatomical structures. An automated analysis would improve measurement throughput, simplify data interpretation, and potentially access important physiological information during the MR exam. In this article, we present the first fully automated solution for the estimation of tissue motion and strain from 2D cine DENSE data. Results using both simulated and human cardiac cine DENSE data indicate good agreement between the automated algorithm and the standard semi-manual analysis method. PMID:22575669

  5. Interference Management with Successive Cancellation for Dense Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Steiner, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Network-Assisted Interference Cancellation and Suppression (NAICS) receivers have appeared as a promising way to curb inter-cell interference in future dense network deployments. This investigation compares the performance of a NAICS receiver with successive interference cancellation capabilities...

  6. Fine coal processing with dense-medium cyclones

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Korte, GJ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available . The paper provides a brief overview of past and current application of dense medium cyclones in the processing of fine coal and reviews some of the important considerations for the successful application of the technique....

  7. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .2. Thermal and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Stenekes, R.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of two densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxane systems were investigated in relation to the molecular structure. The networks were prepared from functional branched prepolymers and crosslinked via a hydrosilylation curing reaction. The prepolymers having only

  8. Physics of dense matter, neutron stars, and supernova

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1989-02-01

    Nuclear and astrophysical evidence on the equation of state of dense matter is examined. The role of hyperonization of matter in the development of proto-neutron stars is briefly discussed. 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, George [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-01-14

    The Topical Collaboration for Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense matter brought together researchers from a variety of nuclear science specialties and a number of institutions to address nuclear physics and neutrino physics problems associated with dense matter and the origin of the elements. See attached final technical reports for (1) the UCSD award and (2) a copy of the report for the whole TC

  10. Dense matter in compact stars a pedagogical introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cold and dense nuclear and/or quark matter can be found in the interior of compact stars. It is very challenging to determine the ground state and properties of this matter because of the strong-coupling nature of QCD. I give a pedagogical introduction to microscopic calculations based on phenomenological models, effective theories, and perturbative QCD. I discuss how the results of these calculations can be related to astrophysical observations to potentially rule out or confirm candidate phases of dense matter.

  11. The connecticut experiment: the role of ultrasound in the screening of women with dense breasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Jean; Steenbergen, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the potential of screening breast ultrasound to improve breast cancer detection in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts. Six Connecticut radiology practices with 12 total sites participated in a retrospective chart review. The total number of screening mammograms, screening ultrasounds broken down by BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) codes, and the number of positive and negative biopsies were collected from November 2009 through November 2010. Demographic data on the patients with positive biopsies as well as cancer staging were also collected. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive Predictive Value, and Negative Predictive Value were calculated. A total of 72,030 screening mammograms and 8,647 screening ultrasounds were performed at the research sites during the study period. Relevant research indicates that 41% of the female population has dense breasts. In this study, 12% (8,647/72,030) underwent follow-up breast ultrasound screening. A total of 86% (7,451/8,647) of the ultrasounds were BIRADS 1 or 2, 9% (767/8,647) were BIRADS 3, 5% (429/8,647) were BIRADS 4 or 5. Of those 429 recommended to undergo biopsy 418 were performed and 28 cancers were found. There was one false negative. Screening breast ultrasound in women with mammographically normal, but dense breasts has a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 6.7% (28/418), Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of 99.9% (7,450/7,451), sensitivity of 96.6% (28/29), and a specificity of 94.9% (7,450/7,851). Screening ultrasound had an additional yield of 3.25 per 1,000 cancers in women with dense breasts and normal mammograms and no additional risk factors. As with all screening tests, time, cost, and false positive risk must be considered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A shallow water model for dense gas simulation in urban areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Mike D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gowardhan, Akshay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brambilla, Sara [POLITECNICO DI MILANO; Manca, Davide [POLITECNICO DI MILANO

    2009-01-01

    Large quantities of toxic chemicals are stored at industrial facilities and transported around the country via train and truck. In the event of an accidental release, many of these chemicals are released as heavier-than-air gases that stay low to the ground as they are transported by the wind . Breathing height concentrations can remain high due to reduced vertical mixing and hazard zone coverage area can be larger due to near-source gravitational slumping . A number of fast-response dense gas dispersion models have been developed and are routinely used to deal with heavier-than-air releases over unobstructed terrain. If a release were to occur in a built-up environment, however, the effects of buildings and other obstacles will significantly alter the initial spreading, the transport direction, and the amount of mixing of the dense gas cloud . We have developed a new fast-running dense gas dispersion model that is intended for handling releases in cities and at large industrial facilities. In this paper we describe the scheme employed and how the model has been integrated into the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) dispersion modeling system.

  13. Evaluation of Radar-Rainfall Uncertainties by a Highly Dense Rain Gauge Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarini, G.; Mandapaka, P. V.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2007-05-01

    It is well acknowledged that there are large uncertainties associated with radar-rainfall estimates. Numerous sources of these errors are due to parameter estimation, the observational system and measurement principle, and not fully understood physical processes. To describe these uncertainties, rain gauge data are usually considered as a good approximation of the true rainfall values. However, in the vast majority of the cases, the available networks are too sparse to accurately describe the true rainfall process, adding uncertainties to the radar-rain gauge comparison. The authors will use a large (seven years) dataset of rainfall measurements by a highly dense rain gauge network deployed during the HYdrological Radar EXperiment (HYREX) in the Brue catchment, south-west part of England. This network presents unprecedented opportunity for the investigation of radar-rainfall uncertainties. In addition to the length of the dataset, one unique characteristic resides in its configuration: on a regular grid with 2×2 km2 resolution, there are 20 pixels with one gauge, seven pixels with two gauges and two super-dense pixels with eight gauges. The radar-rainfall estimates for the same time period are from C-band weather radar located at approximately 40 km from the catchment. Focusing on the two very dense pixels, the authors describe the uncertainties in radar-rainfall estimates for different accumulation times (5-minute to daily), modeling the errors using an additive and a multiplicative model.

  14. A Pipeline for Classifying Relationships Using Dense SNP/SNV Data and Putative Pedigree Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhen; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Wei; Mukhopadhyay, Nandita; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-02-01

    When genome-wide association studies (GWAS) or sequencing studies are performed on family-based datasets, the genotype data can be used to check the structure of putative pedigrees. Even in datasets of putatively unrelated people, close relationships can often be detected using dense single-nucleotide polymorphism/variant (SNP/SNV) data. A number of methods for finding relationships using dense genetic data exist, but they all have certain limitations, including that they typically use average genetic sharing, which is only a subset of the available information. Here, we present a set of approaches for classifying relationships in GWAS datasets or large-scale sequencing datasets. We first propose an empirical method for detecting identity by descent segments in close relative pairs using un-phased dense SNP data and demonstrate how that information can assist in building a relationship classifier. We then develop a strategy to take advantage of putative pedigree information to enhance classification accuracy. Our methods are tested and illustrated with two datasets from two distinct populations. Finally, we propose classification pipelines for checking and identifying relationships in datasets containing a large number of small pedigrees. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  15. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration.

  16. Tracking in Dense Environments for the HL-LHC ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cormier, Felix; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Tracking in dense environments, such as in the cores of high-energy jets, will be key for new physics searches as well as measurements of the Standard Model at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The HL-LHC will operate in challenging conditions with large radiation doses and high pile-up (up to $\\mu=200$). The current tracking detector will be replaced with a new all-silicon Inner Tracker for the Phase II upgrade of the ATLAS detector. In this talk, characterization of the HL-LHC tracker performance for collimated, high-density charged particles arising from high-momentum decays is presented. In such decays the charged-particle separations are of the order of the tracking detector granularity, leading to challenging reconstruction. The ability of the HL-LHC ATLAS tracker to reconstruct the tracks in such dense environments is discussed and compared to ATLAS Run-2 performance for a variety of relevant physics processes.

  17. Basic physical phenomena, neutron production and scaling of the dense plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeppeler, H.J.

    This paper presents an attempt at establishing a model theory for the dense plasma focus in order to present a consistent interpretation of the basic physical phenomena leading to neutron production from both acceleration and thermal processes. To achieve this, the temporal history of the focus is divided into the compression of the plasma sheath, a qiescent and very dense phase with ensuing expansion, and an instable phase where the focus plasma is disrupted by instabilities. Finally, the decay of density, velocity and thermal fields is considered. Under the assumption that Io 2 /sigmaoRo 2 = const and to/Tc = const, scaling laws for plasma focus devices are derived. It is shown that while generally the neutron yield scales with the fourth power of maximum current, neutron production from thermal processes becomes increasingly important for large devices, while in the small devices neutron production from acceleration processes is by far predominant. (orig.) [de

  18. Small dense low-density lipoprotein as a potential risk factor of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam Abd-Allha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The risk for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes is about 30-40%, and it is considered the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL particles are believed to be atherogenic, and its predominance has been accepted as an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. This study aimed to assess small dense LDL as a potential risk factor and a possible predictor for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients and Methods: According to microalbuminuria test, 40 diabetic patients were categorized into two groups: Diabetic patients without nephropathy (microalbuminuria negative group and diabetic patients with nephropathy (microalbuminuria positive group, each group consists of 20 patients and all were non-obese and normotensive. The patients were re-classified into three sub-groups depending on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Results: The mean of small dense LDL level in the microalbuminuria positive group was higher than that in the microalbuminuria negative group, but without statistical significance. It was significantly higher in patients with either mild or moderate decrease in estimated GFR than in patients with normal estimated GFR. There was statistically significant correlation between small dense LDL and albuminuria and significant inverse correlation between small dense LDL and estimated GFR in all patients in the study. Based on microalbuminuria, the sensitivity and specificity of small dense LDL in the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy was 40% and 80%, respectively, with cutoff values of small dense LDL >55.14 mg/dl. On the other hand, based on GFR, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.24% and 73.91% respectively, with cutoff values of small dense LDL >41.89 mg/dl. Conclusion: Small dense LDL is correlated with the incidence and severity of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. It should be considered as a potential risk factor and as a diagnostic

  19. A pulsed power hydrodynamics approach to exploring properties of warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Pulsed Power Hydrodynamics, as an application of low-impedance, pulsed power, and high magnetic field technology developed over the last decade to study advanced hydrodynamic problems, instabilities, turbulence, and material properties, can potentially be applied to the study of the behavior and properties of warm dense matter (WDM) as well. Exploration of the properties, such as equation of state and conductivity, of warm dense matter is an emerging area of study focused on the behavior of matter at density near solid density (from 10% of solid density to a few times solid density) and modest temperatures ({approx}1-10 eV). Warm dense matter conditions can be achieved by laser or particle beam heating of very small quantities of matter on timescales short compared to the subsequent hydrodynamic expansion timescales (isochoric heating) and a vigorous community of researchers is applying these techniques using petawatt scale laser systems, but the microscopic size scale of the WDM produced in this way limits access to some physics phenomena. Pulsed power hydrodynamics techniques, either through high convergence liner compression of a large volume, modest density, low temperature plasma to densities approaching solid density or through the explosion and subsequent expansion of a conductor (wire) against a high pressure (density) gas background (isobaric expansion) techniques both offer the prospect for producing warm dense matter in macroscopic quantities. However, both techniques demand substantial energy, proper power conditioning and delivery, and an understanding of the hydrodynamic and instability processes that limit each technique. Similarly, liner compression of normal density material, perhaps using multiple reflected shocks can provide access to the challenging region above normal density -- again with the requirement of very large amounts of driving energy. In this paper we will provide an introduction to techniques that might be applied to explore this

  20. Staging Collaborative Innovation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Clausen, Christian

    Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation...... and public private innovation partnerships. Based on a case study of a collaborative design process in a large electronics company the paper points to the key importance of staging and navigation of collaborative innovation process. Staging and navigation is presented as a combined activity: 1) to translate...... the diverse matters of concern into a coherent product or service concept, and 2) in the same process move these diverse holders of the matters of concern into a translated actor network which carry or support the concept....

  1. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  2. Hot dense nuclear matter and its disassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samaddar, S.K.; Pal, Subrata; De, J.N.

    1996-01-01

    Transient hot and compressed nuclear matter created in energetic nuclear collisions responds to the perturbation through a sudden expansion and subsequent emission of a large number of light particles as well as intermediate mass fragments (IMFs). These particles carry the imprint of the thermal energy as well as the collective flow energy of the disassembling system. The effect of radial collective flow on the element distribution in prompt nuclear multifragmentation is studied in a quantum statistical model. The production of very light particles is seen to increase with flow energy at all temperatures. The yield of IMFs is enhanced only at relatively low temperatures and suppressed at high temperatures. The IMF-IMF correlation functions have also been studied and it is seen that the peak-structure of the functions are washed out with increasing flow energy. (author). 18 refs., 5 figs

  3. Dense Iterative Contextual Pixel Classification using Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Loog, Marco; Brandt, Sami

    2009-01-01

    have been proposed to this end, e.g., iterative contextual pixel classification, iterated conditional modes, and other approaches related to Markov random fields. A problem of these methods, however, is their computational complexity, especially when dealing with high-resolution images in which......In medical applications, segmentation has become an ever more important task. One of the competitive schemes to perform such segmentation is by means of pixel classification. Simple pixel-based classification schemes can be improved by incorporating contextual label information. Various methods...... relatively long range interactions may play a role. We propose a new method based on Kriging that makes it possible to include such long range interactions, while keeping the computations manageable when dealing with large medical images....

  4. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maes, Dominique, E-mail: dommaes@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Vorontsova, Maria A. [University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Sleutel, Mike [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Giglio, Marzio [Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vekilov, Peter G. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States); University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2015-06-27

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10{sup −3} of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  5. Do protein crystals nucleate within dense liquid clusters?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, Dominique; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Sanvito, Tiziano; Sleutel, Mike; Giglio, Marzio; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS) and depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy. Newly nucleated crystals within protein-rich clusters were detected directly. These observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters are locations for crystal nucleation. Protein-dense liquid clusters are regions of high protein concentration that have been observed in solutions of several proteins. The typical cluster size varies from several tens to several hundreds of nanometres and their volume fraction remains below 10 −3 of the solution. According to the two-step mechanism of nucleation, the protein-rich clusters serve as locations for and precursors to the nucleation of protein crystals. While the two-step mechanism explained several unusual features of protein crystal nucleation kinetics, a direct observation of its validity for protein crystals has been lacking. Here, two independent observations of crystal nucleation with the proteins lysozyme and glucose isomerase are discussed. Firstly, the evolutions of the protein-rich clusters and nucleating crystals were characterized simultaneously by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confocal depolarized dynamic light scattering (cDDLS), respectively. It is demonstrated that protein crystals appear following a significant delay after cluster formation. The cDDLS correlation functions follow a Gaussian decay, indicative of nondiffusive motion. A possible explanation is that the crystals are contained inside large clusters and are driven by the elasticity of the cluster surface. Secondly, depolarized oblique illumination dark-field microscopy reveals the evolution from liquid clusters without crystals to newly nucleated crystals contained in the clusters to grown crystals freely diffusing in the solution. Collectively, the observations indicate that the protein-rich clusters in

  6. Understanding cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detailed information about the cancer stage. TNM Staging System The most common system for staging cancer in the form of solid tumor is the TNM system. Most providers and cancer centers use it to stage ...

  7. Experimental Studies of the Transport Parameters of Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouffani, Khalid [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to establish fundamental properties of matter and energy under extreme physical conditions. Although high energy density physics (HEDP) research spans a wide range of plasma conditions, there is one unifying regime that is of particular importance and complexity: that of warm dense matter, the transitional state between solid state condensed matter and energetic plasmas. Most laboratory experimental conditions, including inertial confinement implosion, fall into this regime. Because all aspects of laboratory-created high-energy-density plasmas transition through the warm dense matter regime, understanding the fundamental properties to determine how matter and energy interact in this regime is an important aspect of major research efforts in HEDP. Improved understanding of warm dense matter would have significant and wide-ranging impact on HEDP science, from helping to explain wire initiation studies on the Sandia Z machine to increasing the predictive power of inertial confinement fusion modeling. The central goal or objective of our proposed research is to experimentally determine the electrical resistivity, temperature, density, and average ionization state of a variety of materials in the warm dense matter regime, without the use of theoretical calculations. Since the lack of an accurate energy of state (EOS) model is primarily due to the lack of experimental data, we propose an experimental study of the transport coefficients of warm dense matter.

  8. Self-Diffusion in Dense Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Julie; Murillo, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Large angle scattering has been shown to be important in ICF plasmas [Turrell et al. PRL 112, 245002 (2014)]. We use molecular dynamics to obtain effective Coulomb logarithms across coupling regimes through a careful study of self-diffusion in screened ionic systems. Through a theoretical analysis of the MD data, we assess the applicability of the Coulomb logarithm in different regimes, finding three distinct regimes of transport. Although theoretical models of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck typically model Brownian motion processes, they cannot fully capture collective dynamics in all regimes of plasma coupling. Modified memory based theoretical OU models are introduced. In order to make the models more accurate, the role of stochastic charge fluctuations relative to the mean ionization state is investigated. The Yukawa pair potential is combined with a Stewart-Pyatt continuum-lowered Saha method. Transport coefficients using average charges are compared with charge state distributions {Z i } . We model the time-evolving charge state fluctuations using a discrete stochastic evolution algorithm. Mixtures are investigated and compared to single-species. *murillo@lanl.gov

  9. Two-Stage Series-Resonant Inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Thomas A.

    1994-01-01

    Two-stage inverter includes variable-frequency, voltage-regulating first stage and fixed-frequency second stage. Lightweight circuit provides regulated power and is invulnerable to output short circuits. Does not require large capacitor across ac bus, like parallel resonant designs. Particularly suitable for use in ac-power-distribution system of aircraft.

  10. Massive relic galaxies prefer dense environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta de Arriba, Luis; Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio; Cebrián, María; Balcells, Marc

    2016-09-01

    We study the preferred environments of z ∼ 0 massive relic galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ galaxies with little or no growth from star formation or mergers since z ∼ 2). Significantly, we carry out our analysis on both a large cosmological simulation and an observed galaxy catalogue. Working on the Millennium I-WMAP7 simulation we show that the fraction of today massive objects which have grown less than 10 per cent in mass since z ∼ 2 is ∼0.04 per cent for the whole massive galaxy population with M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙. This fraction rises to ∼0.18 per cent in galaxy clusters, confirming that clusters help massive galaxies remain unaltered. Simulations also show that massive relic galaxies tend to be closer to cluster centres than other massive galaxies. Using the New York University Value-Added Galaxy Catalogue, and defining relics as M⋆ ≳ 1010 M⊙ early-type galaxies with colours compatible with single-stellar population ages older than 10 Gyr, and which occupy the bottom 5-percentile in the stellar mass-size distribution, we find 1.11 ± 0.05 per cent of relics among massive galaxies. This fraction rises to 2.4 ± 0.4 per cent in high-density environments. Our findings point in the same direction as the works by Poggianti et al. and Stringer et al. Our results may reflect the fact that the cores of the clusters are created very early on, hence the centres host the first cluster members. Near the centres, high-velocity dispersions and harassment help cluster core members avoid the growth of an accreted stellar envelope via mergers, while a hot intracluster medium prevents cold gas from reaching the galaxies, inhibiting star formation.

  11. Hyperacuity test to evaluate vision through dense cataracts: research preliminary to a clinical study in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Jay M.; Giraldez, Maria J.; Huang, Doahua; Hirose, Hiroshi; Knowles, Richard A.; Namperumalsamy, P.; LaBree, Lauri; Azen, Stanley P.

    1995-03-01

    Using high luminance point-of-light stimuli, Vernier judgments can be made in the presence of markedly degraded retinal imagery. Without coaching, observers perform center-of-gravity assessments of relative locations of degraded point images. We seek to defined, presurgery, individuals who will derive the most benefit from advanced cataract removal (a form of triage), and to determine which of two cataractous eyes has the better postsurgical visual prognosis. There are incredible and growing backlogs of patients with severe cataracts (and other dense media opacities) in the developing world, and generally, limited resources are available for provision of health care. Postcataract surgical failure rates for good visual function are often high, and only one eye is operated on in over 95% of indigent patients treated. Prior to initiating advanced studies in the developing world, at Berkeley we conducted preliminary research on Vernier acuity test techniques on normal adult subjects. We sought to determine the number of repeat trials necessary; to compare a two-point and a three-point Vernier display; to determine the shape of the measured response function at large gap separations between test points (required when testing advanced cataract patients); to assess the effect(s) of a broad range of uncorrected refractive errors on outcomes; and to consider means to minimize refraction-based errors. From these and prior data and analyses, we defined a protocol for use in the developing world. Using a newly designed and rugged precision instrument, these tests were repeated on an advanced cataract population at Aravind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India. Although we had much prior experience in India, the initial protocol required major revision on site. Necessary changes in test methods and analytical approaches were made, and next stages in this program were planned. And a new and simple gap `visual acuity' (gap `VA') test was added to the protocol, which greatly facilitated

  12. Study on flow regimes of high-pressure and dense-phase pneumatic conveying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Peng; Chen Xiaoping; Liang Cai; Pu Wenhao; Zhou Yun; Xu Pan; Zhao Changsui

    2009-01-01

    High-pressure and dense-phase pneumatic conveying of pulverized coal is a key technology in the field of large-scale entrained bed coal gasification. Flow regime plays an important role in two-phase flow because it affects not only flow behavior and safety operation, but also the reliability of practical processes. Few references and experiences in high-pressure and dense-phase conveying are available, especially for the flow regimes. And because of the high stickiness and electrostatic attraction of pulverized coal to the pipe wall, it is very difficult to make out the flow regimes in the conveying pipe by visualization method. Thus quartz powder was chosen as the conveyed material to study the flow regime. High-speed digital video camera was employed to photograph the flow patterns. Experiments were conducted on a pilot scale experimental setup at the pressure up to 3.6MPa. With the decrease in superficial gas velocity, three distinguishable flow regimes were observed: stratified flow, dune flow and plug flow. The characteristics of pressure traces acquired by high frequency response pressure transmitter and their EMD (Empirical Mode Decomposition) characteristics were correlated strongly with the flow regimes. Combining high-speed photography and pressure signal analysis together can make the recognition of flow patterns in the high-pressure and dense-phase pneumatic conveying system more accurate. The present work will lead to better understanding of the flow regime transition under high-pressure.

  13. Whale sharks target dense prey patches of sergestid shrimp off Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Christoph A; Armstrong, Amelia J; Pierce, Simon J; Prebble, Clare E M; Cagua, E Fernando; Cochran, Jesse E M; Berumen, Michael L; Richardson, Anthony J

    2015-03-01

    Large planktivores require high-density prey patches to make feeding energetically viable. This is a major challenge for species living in tropical and subtropical seas, such as whale sharks Rhincodon typus . Here, we characterize zooplankton biomass, size structure and taxonomic composition from whale shark feeding events and background samples at Mafia Island, Tanzania. The majority of whale sharks were feeding (73%, 380 of 524 observations), with the most common behaviour being active surface feeding (87%). We used 20 samples collected from immediately adjacent to feeding sharks and an additional 202 background samples for comparison to show that plankton biomass was ∼10 times higher in patches where whale sharks were feeding (25 vs. 2.6 mg m -3 ). Taxonomic analyses of samples showed that the large sergestid Lucifer hanseni (∼10 mm) dominated while sharks were feeding, accounting for ∼50% of identified items, while copepods (Mafia Island target patches of dense, large, zooplankton dominated by sergestids. Large planktivores, such as whale sharks, which generally inhabit warm oligotrophic waters, aggregate in areas where they can feed on dense prey to obtain sufficient energy.

  14. Whale sharks target dense prey patches of sergestid shrimp off Tanzania

    KAUST Repository

    Rohner, C. A.

    2015-03-17

    Large planktivores require high-density prey patches to make feeding energetically viable. This is a major challenge for species living in tropical and subtropical seas, such as whale sharks Rhincodon typus. Here, we characterize zooplankton biomass, size structure and taxonomic composition from whale shark feeding events and background samples at Mafia Island, Tanzania. The majority of whale sharks were feeding (73%, 380 of 524 observations), with the most common behaviour being active surface feeding (87%). We used 20 samples collected from immediately adjacent to feeding sharks and an additional 202 background samples for comparison to show that plankton biomass was ∼10 times higher in patches where whale sharks were feeding (25 vs. 2.6 mg m-3). Taxonomic analyses of samples showed that the large sergestid Lucifer hanseni (∼10 mm) dominated while sharks were feeding, accounting for ∼50% of identified items, while copepods (<2 mm) dominated background samples. The size structure was skewed towards larger animals representative of L.hanseni in feeding samples. Thus, whale sharks at Mafia Island target patches of dense, large, zooplankton dominated by sergestids. Large planktivores, such as whale sharks, which generally inhabit warm oligotrophic waters, aggregate in areas where they can feed on dense prey to obtain sufficient energy. © 2015 © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  15. Warm dense matter and Thomson scattering at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeustlin, Roland Rainer

    2010-05-01

    X-ray free electron lasers are powerful tools to investigate moderately to strongly correlated solid density low temperature plasmas, named warm dense matter. These plasmas are of most interest for astrophysics and laser plasma interaction, particularly inertial confinement fusion. This work utilizes the ultrashort soft x-ray pulse duration and high brilliance of the free electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH, to generate warm dense matter and to study its ultrafast processes. The techniques applied are absorption measurement, emission spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. Radiative hydrodynamics and Thomson scattering simulations are used to investigate the impact of temperature and density gradients in the sample and to fit the experimental data. The measurements result in a comprehensive picture of soft x-ray matter interaction related to warm dense matter and yield insight into ultrafast equilibration and relaxation mechanisms, in particular impact ionization and radiative recombination. (orig.)

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor/gravitational instability in dense magnetoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ahmad, I.

    2009-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated in a nonuniform dense quantum magnetoplasma. For this purpose, a quantum hydrodynamical model is used for the electrons whereas the ions are assumed to be cold and classical. The dispersion relation for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes modified with the quantum corrections associated with the Fermi pressure law and the quantum Bohm potential force. Numerically, it is found that the quantum speed and density gradient significantly modify the growth rate of RT instability. In a dense quantum magnetoplasma case, the linear growth rate of RT instability becomes significantly higher than its classical value and the modes are found to be highly localized. The present investigation should be useful in the studies of dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas as well as in laser-produced plasmas.

  17. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  18. Holographic stereogram using camera array in dense arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Oi, Ryutaro; Senoh, Takanori; Ichihashi, Yasuyuki; Kurita, Taiichiro

    2011-02-01

    Holographic stereograms can display 3D objects by using ray information. To display high quality representations of real 3D objects by using holographic stereograms, relatively dense ray information must be prepared as the 3D object information. One promising method of obtaining this information uses a combination of a camera array and view interpolation which is signal processing technique. However, it is still technically difficult to synthesize ray information without visible error by using view interpolation. Our approach uses a densely arranged camera array to reduce this difficulty. Even though view interpolation is a simple signal processing technique, the synthesized ray information produced by this camera array should be adequate. We designed and manufactured a densely arranged camera array and used it to generate holographic stereograms.

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor/gravitational instability in dense magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S., E-mail: shahid.ali@ncp.edu.p [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan); IPFN, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ahmed, Z. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Wah Campus (Pakistan); Mirza, Arshad M. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Group, Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ahmad, I. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Islamabad Campus (Pakistan)

    2009-08-10

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated in a nonuniform dense quantum magnetoplasma. For this purpose, a quantum hydrodynamical model is used for the electrons whereas the ions are assumed to be cold and classical. The dispersion relation for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes modified with the quantum corrections associated with the Fermi pressure law and the quantum Bohm potential force. Numerically, it is found that the quantum speed and density gradient significantly modify the growth rate of RT instability. In a dense quantum magnetoplasma case, the linear growth rate of RT instability becomes significantly higher than its classical value and the modes are found to be highly localized. The present investigation should be useful in the studies of dense astrophysical magnetoplasmas as well as in laser-produced plasmas.

  20. Warm dense matter and Thomson scattering at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeustlin, Roland Rainer

    2010-05-15

    X-ray free electron lasers are powerful tools to investigate moderately to strongly correlated solid density low temperature plasmas, named warm dense matter. These plasmas are of most interest for astrophysics and laser plasma interaction, particularly inertial confinement fusion. This work utilizes the ultrashort soft x-ray pulse duration and high brilliance of the free electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH, to generate warm dense matter and to study its ultrafast processes. The techniques applied are absorption measurement, emission spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. Radiative hydrodynamics and Thomson scattering simulations are used to investigate the impact of temperature and density gradients in the sample and to fit the experimental data. The measurements result in a comprehensive picture of soft x-ray matter interaction related to warm dense matter and yield insight into ultrafast equilibration and relaxation mechanisms, in particular impact ionization and radiative recombination. (orig.)

  1. Finding low-conductance sets with dense interactions (FLCD) for better protein complex prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2017-03-14

    Intuitively, proteins in the same protein complexes should highly interact with each other but rarely interact with the other proteins in protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Surprisingly, many existing computational algorithms do not directly detect protein complexes based on both of these topological properties. Most of them, depending on mathematical definitions of either "modularity" or "conductance", have their own limitations: Modularity has the inherent resolution problem ignoring small protein complexes; and conductance characterizes the separability of complexes but fails to capture the interaction density within complexes. In this paper, we propose a two-step algorithm FLCD (Finding Low-Conductance sets with Dense interactions) to predict overlapping protein complexes with the desired topological structure, which is densely connected inside and well separated from the rest of the networks. First, FLCD detects well-separated subnetworks based on approximating a potential low-conductance set through a personalized PageRank vector from a protein and then solving a mixed integer programming (MIP) problem to find the minimum-conductance set within the identified low-conductance set. At the second step, the densely connected parts in those subnetworks are discovered as the protein complexes by solving another MIP problem that aims to find the dense subnetwork in the minimum-conductance set. Experiments on four large-scale yeast PPI networks from different public databases demonstrate that the complexes predicted by FLCD have better correspondence with the yeast protein complex gold standards than other three state-of-the-art algorithms (ClusterONE, LinkComm, and SR-MCL). Additionally, results of FLCD show higher biological relevance with respect to Gene Ontology (GO) terms by GO enrichment analysis.

  2. Observations of the initial stages of colloidal band formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanrong; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Yee, Andrew; Yoda, Minami

    2017-11-01

    A number of studies have shown that particles suspended in a conducting fluid near a wall are subject to wall-normal repulsive ``lift'' forces, even in the absence of interparticle interactions, in a flowing suspension. Evanescent-wave visualizations have shown that colloidal particles in a dilute (volume fractions channels by a pressure gradient and an electric field when the resulting combined Poiseuille and electroosmotic (EO) flow are in opposite direction, i.e., ``counterflow,'' although the particles and channel walls both have negative zeta-potentials. Above a minimum ``threshold'' electric field magnitude |Emin | , the particles assemble into dense ``bands'' with cross-sectional dimensions of a few μm and length comparable to that of the channel (i.e., a few cm). The results suggest that the threshold field |Emin | is large enough so that there is a region of ``reverse'' flow, along the direction of the EO flow, near the wall. Visualization of a large segment of the channel (>300 hydraulic diameters) at frame rates as great as 1 kHz is used to determine banding maps for a variety of dilute colloidal suspensions and to investigate the initial stages of band formation over a wide range of flow conditions. Supported by US Army Research Office.

  3. The equation of state of dense Skyrmion matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walhout, T.S.

    1990-01-01

    In the context of effective topological soliton theories of baryonic interactions, methods for determining the thermodynamic properties of dense matter in the solid and liquid states are presented. In particular, simulation involving a face-centered cubic lattice of skyrmions are used to construct the equation of state for dense neutron matter. The implications for neutron star structure are discussed, and comparisons are made with previous calculations. These techniques are also applied with some success to both symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter in the Skyrme model. Possibilities for further improvement are outlined. (orig.)

  4. Predictions of x-ray scattering spectra in warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starrett, Charles E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Souza, Andre N. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Perkins, David J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-12

    This presentation gives an Introduction to our model of warm dense matter; How x-ray scattering spectra are calculated from it; Comparisons with experiments: Room temperature/pressure beryllium Warm dense beryllium Warm dense aluminum; Predictions for warm dense beryllium and titanium; and, Conclusions.

  5. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of fluid in the column, contributing either to warming or cooling depending on local density and temperature. The molecular basis for this variation is described. Sample calculations of dissipation and temperature profiles of several model fluids including carbon dioxide-methanol mixtures are presented, based on the NIST REFPROP program including select equations of state and property calculation software. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of rituximab for the treatment of DLBCL (I): dose-dense rituximab in the DENSE-R-CHOP-14 trial of the DSHNHL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, N; Pfreundschuh, M; Zeynalova, S; Poeschel, V; Hänel, M; Held, G; Schmitz, N; Viardot, A; Schmidt, C; Hallek, M; Witzens-Harig, M; Trümper, L; Rixecker, T; Zwick, C

    2014-09-01

    To improve outcome of elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, dose-dense rituximab was evaluated in the prospective DENSE-R-CHOP-14 trial. Rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) was given on days 0, 1, 4, 8, 15, 22, 29, 43, 57, 71, 85, and 99 together with six CHOP-14 cycles. Results were to be compared with patients who had received the same chemotherapy in combination with eight 2-week applications of rituximab in RICOVER-60. One hundred twenty-four patients are assessable. Dose-dense rituximab resulted in considerably higher serum levels during the first 50 days of treatment, but rituximab exposure time was not prolonged. Grade 3 and 4 infections were exceptionally high in the first 20 patients without anti-infective prophylaxis, but decreased after introduction of prophylaxis with aciclovir and cotrimoxazole in the remaining 104 patients (from 13% to 6% per cycle and from 35% to 18% per patient; P = 0.007 and P = 0.125, respectively). Patients with international prognostic index = 3-5 had higher complete response/complete response unconfirmed rates (82% versus 68%; P = 0.033) than in the respective RICOVER-60 population, but this did not translate into better long-term outcome, even though male hazard was decreased (event-free survival: from 1.5 to 1.1; progression-free survival: from 1.7 to 1.1; overall survival: from 1.4 to 1.0). Dose-dense rituximab achieved higher rituximab serum levels, but was not more effective than eight 2-week applications in the historical control population, even though minor improvements in poor-prognosis and male patients cannot be excluded. The increased, though manageable toxicity, precludes its use in routine practice. Our results strongly support anti-infective prophylaxis with aciclovir and cotrimoxazole for all patients receiving R-CHOP. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Human Action Recognition Using Improved Salient Dense Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwu Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human action recognition in videos is a topic of active research in computer vision. Dense trajectory (DT features were shown to be efficient for representing videos in state-of-the-art approaches. In this paper, we present a more effective approach of video representation using improved salient dense trajectories: first, detecting the motion salient region and extracting the dense trajectories by tracking interest points in each spatial scale separately and then refining the dense trajectories via the analysis of the motion saliency. Then, we compute several descriptors (i.e., trajectory displacement, HOG, HOF, and MBH in the spatiotemporal volume aligned with the trajectories. Finally, in order to represent the videos better, we optimize the framework of bag-of-words according to the motion salient intensity distribution and the idea of sparse coefficient reconstruction. Our architecture is trained and evaluated on the four standard video actions datasets of KTH, UCF sports, HMDB51, and UCF50, and the experimental results show that our approach performs competitively comparing with the state-of-the-art results.

  8. Gas-particle interactions in dense gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of heterogeneous flow structures in gas-particle flows seriously affects gas¿solid contacting and transport processes in dense gas-fluidized beds. A computational study, using a discrete particle method based on Molecular Dynamics techniques, has been carried out to explore the

  9. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  10. Dense Focal Plane Arrays for Pushbroom Satellite Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a dense focal plane array feeding an offset toroidal reflector antenna system is studied and discussed in the context of a potential application in multi-beam radiometers for ocean surveillance. We present a preliminary design of the array feed for the 5-m diameter antenna at X...

  11. Ranks of dense alternating sign matrices and their sign patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Gao, W.; Hall, F.J.; Jing, G.; Li, Z.; Stroev, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 471, April (2015), s. 109-121 ISSN 0024-3795 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-07880S Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : alternating sign matrix * dense matrix * sign pattern matrix Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.965, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024379515000257

  12. A comparative study of fast dense stereo vision algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunyoto, H.; Mark, W. van der; Gavrila, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    With recent hardware advances, real-time dense stereo vision becomes increasingly feasible for general-purpose processors. This has important benefits for the intelligent vehicles domain, alleviating object segmentation problems when sensing complex, cluttered traffic scenes. In this paper, we

  13. Length scales and selforganization in dense suspension flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düring, G.; Lerner, E.; Wyart, M.

    2014-01-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its

  14. Influence of Food Packaging on Children's Energy-dense Snack ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This research will study the influence of food packaging on Guatemalan preschool and school-aged children's energy-dense snack (EDS) food preferences. In 2010 ... Based on lessons learned from the tobacco control movement, banning licensed characters on advertising will help decrease children's product recognition.

  15. Dense 3D Map Construction for Indoor Search and Rescue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellekilde, Lars-Peter; Huang, Shoudong; Miró, Jaime Valls

    2007-01-01

    The main contribution of this paper is a new simultaneous localization and mapping  SLAM algorithm for building dense three-dimensional maps using information ac- quired from a range imager and a conventional camera, for robotic search and rescue in unstructured indoor environments. A key challenge...

  16. Sparse symmetric preconditioners for dense linear systems in electromagnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpentieri, Bruno; Duff, Iain S.; Giraud, Luc; Monga Made, M. Magolu

    2004-01-01

    We consider symmetric preconditioning strategies for the iterative solution of dense complex symmetric non-Hermitian systems arising in computational electromagnetics. In particular, we report on the numerical behaviour of the classical incomplete Cholesky factorization as well as some of its recent

  17. Influence of Food Packaging on Children's Energy-dense Snack ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Childhood obesity is a major global public health concern. Rates of obese and overweight children have increased in low- and middle-income countries such as Guatemala. This research will study the influence of food packaging on Guatemalan preschool and school-aged children's energy-dense snack (EDS) food ...

  18. Spaces in which every dense subset is a G δ

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A topological space X is called a DG-space if every subset of X is a G-set in its closure. In this paper we study DG-spaces that contains subspaces in which every dense subset is open and spaces in which every subset is a G. We give some new results in these classes of topological spaces.

  19. Real-Time Dense Stereo for Intelligent Vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gavrila, D.M.; Mark, W. van der

    2006-01-01

    Stereo vision is an attractive passive sensing technique for obtaining three-dimensional (3-D) measurements. Recent hardware advances have given rise to a new class of real-time dense disparity estimation algorithms. This paper examines their suitability for intelligent vehicle (IV) applications. In

  20. Light localization in cold and dense atomic ensemble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    We report on results of theoretical analysis of possibilities of light strong (Anderson) localization in a cold atomic ensemble. We predict appearance of localization in dense atomic systems in strong magnetic field. We prove that in absence of the field the light localization is impossible. (paper)

  1. A proxy for variance in dense matching over homogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altena, Bas; Cockx, Liesbet; Goedemé, Toon

    2014-05-01

    Automation in photogrammetry and avionics have brought highly autonomous UAV mapping solutions on the market. These systems have great potential for geophysical research, due to their mobility and simplicity of work. Flight planning can be done on site and orientation parameters are estimated automatically. However, one major drawback is still present: if contrast is lacking, stereoscopy fails. Consequently, topographic information cannot be obtained precisely through photogrammetry for areas with low contrast. Even though more robustness is added in the estimation through multi-view geometry, a precise product is still lacking. For the greater part, interpolation is applied over these regions, where the estimation is constrained by uniqueness, its epipolar line and smoothness. Consequently, digital surface models are generated with an estimate of the topography, without holes but also without an indication of its variance. Every dense matching algorithm is based on a similarity measure. Our methodology uses this property to support the idea that if only noise is present, no correspondence can be detected. Therefore, the noise level is estimated in respect to the intensity signal of the topography (SNR) and this ratio serves as a quality indicator for the automatically generated product. To demonstrate this variance indicator, two different case studies were elaborated. The first study is situated at an open sand mine near the village of Kiezegem, Belgium. Two different UAV systems flew over the site. One system had automatic intensity regulation, and resulted in low contrast over the sandy interior of the mine. That dataset was used to identify the weak estimations of the topography and was compared with the data from the other UAV flight. In the second study a flight campaign with the X100 system was conducted along the coast near Wenduine, Belgium. The obtained images were processed through structure-from-motion software. Although the beach had a very low

  2. Gas migration mechanism of saturated dense bentonite and its modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yukihisa; Hironaga, Michihiko; Kudo, Koji

    2007-01-01

    In the current concept of repository for nuclear waste disposal, compacted bentonite will be used as an engineered barrier mainly for inhibiting migration of radioactive nuclides. Hydrogen gas can be generated inside the engineered barrier by anaerobic corrosion of metals used for containers, etc. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules inside of the engineered barrier, gas will accumulate in the void space inside of the engineered barrier until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. It is expected to be not easy for gas to entering into the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase because the pore of compacted bentonite is so minute. Therefore it is necessary to investigate the following subjects: a) Effect of the accumulated gas pressure on surrounding objects such as concrete lining, rock mass. b) Effect of gas breakthrough on the barrier function of bentonite. c) Revealing and modeling gas migration mechanism for overcoming the scale effects in laboratory specimen test. Therefore in this study, gas migration tests for compacted and saturated bentonite to investigate and to model the mechanism of gas migration phenomenon. Firstly, the following conclusions were obtained through by the results of the gas migration tests which are conducted in this study: 1) Bubbles appear in the semitransparent drainage tube at first when the total gas is equal to the initial total axial stress or somewhat smaller. By increasing the gas pressure more, breakthrough of gas migration, which is defined as a sudden increase of amount of emission gas, occurred. When the total gas pressure exceeds the initial total axial stress, the total axial stress is always equal to the total gas pressure because specimens shrink in the axial direction with causing the clearance between the end of the specimen and porous metal. 2) Effective gas conductivity after breakthrough of gas migration is times larger than that

  3. CRUNCH, Dispersion Model for Continuous Dense Vapour Release in Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The situation modelled is as follows. A dense gas emerges from a source such that it can be considered to emerge through a rectangular area, placed in the vertical plane and perpendicular to the plume direction, which assumes that of the ambient wind. The gas flux at the source, and in every plane perpendicular to the plume direction, is constant in time and a stationary flow field has been attained. For this to apply, the characteristic time of release must be much larger than that for dispersal of the contaminant. The plume can be thought to consist of a number of rectangular elements or 'puffs' emerging from the source at regular time intervals. The model follows the development of these puffs at a series of downwind points. These puffs are immediately assumed to advect with the ambient wind at their half-height. The plume also slumps due to the action of gravity and is allowed to entrain air through its sides and top surface. Spreading of a fluid element is caused by pressure differences across this element and since the pressure gradient in the wind direction is small, the resulting pressure differences and slumping velocities are small also, thus permitting this convenient approximation. Initially, as the plume slumps, its vertical dimension decreases and with it the slumping velocity and advection velocity. Thus the plume advection velocity varies as a function of downwind distance. With the present steady state modelling, and to satisfy continuity constraints, there must be consequent adjustment of plume height. Calculation of this parameter from the volume flux ensures this occurs. As the cloud height begins to grow, the advection velocity increases and the plume height decreases accordingly. With advection downwind, the cloud gains buoyancy by entraining air and, if the cloud is cold, by absorbing heat from the ground. Eventually the plume begins to disperse as would a passive pollutant, through the action of

  4. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  5. Fast heating of a dense plasma by high-power electron beam at the GOL-3-II facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Astrelin, V.T.; Burdakov, A.V.; Koidan, V.S.; Mekler, K.I.; Melnikov, P.I.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Postupaev, V.V.; Rovenskikh, A.F.; Sinitsky, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Recent results on dense plasma heating by 200 kJ-electron beam at GOL-3-II facility are presented. The efficiency of collective electron beam deceleration up to 40% is achieved in 10 15 cm -3 plasma. The characteristic electron temperature of ∼2 keV at plasma density (1-2)x10 15 cm -3 is obtained. At the two-stage heating of a dense (∼10 16 cm -3 ) plasma the electron temperature of 300-500 eV and the ion temperature of 100-200 eV are reached. Prospects of experiments on 'wall' and multimirror plasma confinement at GOL-3-II facility are discussed. (author)

  6. Numerical modelling of rise and fall of a dense layer in salt diapirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Koyi, H.; Schmeling, H.

    2008-01-01

    Numerical models are used to study the entrainment of a dense anhydrite layer by a diapir. The anhydrite layer is initially horizontally embedded within a viscous salt layer. The diapir is down-built by aggradation of non-Newtonian sediments (n = 4, constant temperature) placed on the top...... of the salt layer. Several parameters (sedimentation rate, salt viscosity, perturbation width and stratigraphic position of the anhydrite layer) are studied systematically to understand their role in governing the entrainment of the anhydrite layer. High sedimentation rates during the early stages...... of the diapir evolution bury the initial perturbation and, thus, no diapir forms. The anhydrite layer sinks within the buried salt layer. For the same sedimentation rate, increasing viscosity of the salt layer decreases the rise rate of the diapir and reduces the amount (volume) of the anhydrite layer...

  7. Accelerator and Ion Beam Tradeoffs for Studies of Warm Dense Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Barnard, John J; Callahan, Debra; Davidson, Ronald C; Friedman, Alex; Grant-Logan, B; Grisham, Larry; Lee, Edward; Lee, Richard; Olson, Craig; Rose, David; Santhanam, Parthiban; Sessler, Andrew M; Staples, John W; Tabak, Max; Welch, Dale; Wurtele, Jonathan; Yu, Simon

    2005-01-01

    One approach to heat a target to "Warm Dense Matter" conditions (similar, for example, to the interiors of giant planets or certain stages in Inertial Confinement Fusion targets), is to use intense ion beams as the heating source. By consideration of ion beam phase space constraints, both at the injector, and at the final focus, and consideration of simple equations of state, approximate conditions at a target foil may be calculated. Thus target temperature and pressure may be calculated as a function of ion mass, ion energy, pulse duration, velocity tilt, and other accelerator parameters. We examine the variation in target performance as a function of various beam and accelerator parameters, in the context of several different accelerator concepts, recently proposed for WDM studies.

  8. Plasma dynamics in a staged pinch device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattak, N.A.D.; Ahmed, Z.; Mirza, A.M.; Murtaza, G.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma parameters in fiber initiated fast and dense theta-pinch plasma driven by an annular finite-thickness gas-puff Z-pinch are studied. The imploding gas-puff Z-pinch plasma traps an axial magnetic field B/sub z/, compressing it to large values (of the order of several megagauss) in an extremely short time. The rapidly changing magnetic flux of this field induces an azimuthal current on the surface of the coaxially placed fiber, with a rise time an order of magnitude shorter than the applied Z-pinch current. The shorter rise time of the current stabilizes the pinch against sausage mode of MHD instabilities. Our numerical results demonstrate that for a relatively thick gas-puff layer, the compression occurs before the current saturates. At the peak compression the fuel densities of the order of 10/sup 25/ cm/sup -3/ and temperature above 10 keV can be achieved on a time scale of 0.1 nanoseconds, yielding the Lawson Criterion parameters n tau is approximately equal to 10/sup 14/ sec cm/sup -3/ for D-T fuel. The snow-plow effect incorporated in our model exercise a strong influence on the onset and growth rate of sausage and Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) modes of instabilities. Imposing a rotational velocity on the outer thin gas-puff plasma can control the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical results indicate that the choice of the spin velocity is critical. Large values of the spin velocity, though provide stabilization against the R-T instability at the final stage of compression, however, it adversely reduce the plasma parameters so essential to achieve controlled fusion. Our analysis, therefore, suggests that a judicious choice of the spin velocity is necessary to obtain the desired temperature and density, especially when we seed D-T fiber plasma with a small fraction of high-Z Kr impurity to initiate the radiative collapse. (author)

  9. Dense plasma chemistry of hydrocarbons at conditions relevant to planetary interiors and inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Dominik

    2017-10-01

    Carbon-hydrogen demixing and subsequent diamond precipitation has been predicted to strongly participate in shaping the internal structure and evolution of icy giant planets like Neptune and Uranus. The very same dense plasma chemistry is also a potential concern for CH plastic ablator materials in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments where similar conditions are present during the first compression stage of the imploding capsule. Here, carbon-hydrogen demixing may enhance the hydrodynamic instabilities occurring in the following compression stages. First experiments applying dynamic compression and ultrafast in situ X-ray diffraction at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source demonstrated diamond formation from polystyrene (CH) at 150 GPa and 5000 K. Very recent experiments have now investigated the influence of oxygen, which is highly abundant in icy giant planets on the phase separation process. Compressing PET (C5H4O2) and PMMA(C5H8O2), we find again diamond formation at pressures above 150 GPa and temperatures of several thousand kelvins, showing no strong effect due to the presence of oxygen. Thus, diamond precipitation deep inside icy giant planets seems very likely. Moreover, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was added to the platform, which determines an upper limit for the diamond particle size, while the width of the diffraction features provides a lower limit. We find that diamond particles of several nanometers in size are formed on a nanosecond timescale. Finally, spectrally resolved X-ray scattering is used to scale amorphous diffraction signals and allows for determining the amount of carbon-hydrogen demixing inside the compressed samples even if no crystalline diamond is formed. This whole set of diagnostics provides unprecedented insights into the nanosecond kinetics of dense plasma chemistry.

  10. The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2008-05-11

    Accidents that involve large (multi-ton) releases of toxic industrial chemicals and form dense-gas clouds often yield far fewer fatalities, casualties and environmental effects than standard assessment and emergency response models predict. This modeling study, which considers both dense-gas turbulence suppression and deposition to environmental objects (e.g. buildings), demonstrates that dry deposition to environmental objects may play a significant role in reducing the distance at which adverse impacts occur - particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. The degree to which the released chemical sticks to (or reacts with) environmental surfaces is likely a key parameter controlling hazard extents. In all modeled cases, the deposition to vertical surfaces of environmental objects (e.g. building walls) was more efficient in reducing atmospheric chemical concentrations than deposition to the earth's surface. This study suggests that (1) hazard extents may vary widely by release environment (e.g. grasslands vs. suburbia) and release conditions (e.g. sunlight or humidity may change the rate at which chemicals react with a surface) and (2) greenbelts (or similar structures) may dramatically reduce the impacts of large-scale releases. While these results are demonstrated to be qualitatively consistent with the downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine releases, critical knowledge gaps exist and this study provides recommendations for additional experimental studies.

  11. Challenging the Time Complexity of Exact Subgraph Isomorphism for Huge and Dense Graphs with VF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carletti, Vincenzo; Foggia, Pasquale; Saggese, Alessia; Vento, Mario

    2018-04-01

    Graph matching is essential in several fields that use structured information, such as biology, chemistry, social networks, knowledge management, document analysis and others. Except for special classes of graphs, graph matching has in the worst-case an exponential complexity; however, there are algorithms that show an acceptable execution time, as long as the graphs are not too large and not too dense. In this paper we introduce a novel subgraph isomorphism algorithm, VF3, particularly efficient in the challenging case of graphs with thousands of nodes and a high edge density. Its performance, both in terms of time and memory, has been assessed on a large dataset of 12,700 random graphs with a size up to 10,000 nodes, made publicly available. VF3 has been compared with four other state-of-the-art algorithms, and the huge experimentation required more than two years of processing time. The results confirm that VF3 definitely outperforms the other algorithms when the graphs become huge and dense, but also has a very good performance on smaller or sparser graphs.

  12. Between Stage and Screen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tornqvist, Egil

    1996-01-01

    Ingmar Bergman is worldwide known as a film and stage director. Yet no-one has attempted to compare his stage and screen activities. In Between stage and screen Egil Tornqvist examines formal and thematical correspondences and differences between a number of Bergman's stage, screen, and radio

  13. Propagation of monochromatic light in a hot and dense medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Samina S.

    2017-12-01

    Photons, as quanta of electromagnetic fields, determine the electromagnetic properties of an extremely hot and dense medium. Considering the properties of the photons in the interacting medium of charged particles, we explicitly calculate the electromagnetic properties such as the electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, refractive index and the propagation speed of electromagnetic signals in an extremely hot and dense background. Photons acquire a dynamically generated mass in such a medium. The screening mass of the photon, the Debye shielding length and the plasma frequency are calculated as functions of the statistical parameters of the medium. We study the properties of the propagating particles in astrophysical systems of distinct statistical conditions. The modifications in the properties of the medium lead to the equation of state of the system. We mainly calculate all these parameters for extremely high temperatures of the early universe.

  14. Partial jamming and non-locality in dense granular flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharel Prashidha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense granular flows can exhibit non-local flow behaviours that cannot be predicted by local constitutive laws alone. Such behaviour is accompanied by the existence of diverging cooperativity length. Here we show that this length can be attributed to the development of transient clusters of jammed particles within the flow. By performing DEM simulation of dense granular flows, we directly measure the size of such clusters which scales with the inertial number with a power law. We then derive a general non-local relation based on kinematic compatibility for the existence of clusters in an arbitrary non-homogenous flow. The kinematic nature of this derivation suggests that non-locality should be expected in any material regardless of their local constitutive law, as long as transient clusters exist within the flow.

  15. The electron-atom interaction in partially ionized dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omarbakiyeva, Yu A; Ramazanov, T S; Roepke, G [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: yultuz@physics.kz

    2009-05-29

    The electron-atom interaction is considered in dense partially ionized plasmas. The separable potential is constructed from scattering data using effective radius theory. Parameters of the interaction potential were obtained from phase shifts, scattering length and effective radius. The binding energy of the electron in the H{sup -} ion is determined for the singlet channel on the basis of the reconstructed separable potential. In dense plasmas, the influence of the Pauli exclusion principle on the phase shifts and the binding energy is considered. Due to the Pauli blocking, the binding energy vanishes at the Mott density. At that density the behavior of the phase shifts is drastically changed. This leads to modifications of macroscopic properties such as composition and transport coefficients.

  16. Propagation of monochromatic light in a hot and dense medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masood, Samina S. [University of Houston Clear Lake, Department of Physical and Applied Sciences, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Photons, as quanta of electromagnetic fields, determine the electromagnetic properties of an extremely hot and dense medium. Considering the properties of the photons in the interacting medium of charged particles, we explicitly calculate the electromagnetic properties such as the electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, refractive index and the propagation speed of electromagnetic signals in an extremely hot and dense background. Photons acquire a dynamically generated mass in such a medium. The screening mass of the photon, the Debye shielding length and the plasma frequency are calculated as functions of the statistical parameters of the medium. We study the properties of the propagating particles in astrophysical systems of distinct statistical conditions. The modifications in the properties of the medium lead to the equation of state of the system. We mainly calculate all these parameters for extremely high temperatures of the early universe. (orig.)

  17. Observations of non-linear plasmon damping in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, B. B. L.; Sperling, P.; French, M.; Recoules, V.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2018-05-01

    We present simulations using finite-temperature density-functional-theory molecular-dynamics to calculate dynamic dielectric properties in warm dense aluminum. The comparison between exchange-correlation functionals in the Perdew, Burke, Ernzerhof approximation, Strongly Constrained and Appropriately Normed Semilocal Density Functional, and Heyd, Scuseria, Ernzerhof (HSE) approximation indicates evident differences in the electron transition energies, dc conductivity, and Lorenz number. The HSE calculations show excellent agreement with x-ray scattering data [Witte et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 225001 (2017)] as well as dc conductivity and absorption measurements. These findings demonstrate non-Drude behavior of the dynamic conductivity above the Cooper minimum that needs to be taken into account to determine optical properties in the warm dense matter regime.

  18. A look at scalable dense linear algebra libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States) Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); van de Geijn, R. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences); Walker, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-07-01

    We discuss the essential design features of a library of scalable software for performing dense linear algebra computations on distributed memory concurrent computers. The square block scattered decomposition is proposed as a flexible and general-purpose way of decomposing most, if not all, dense matrix problems. An object- oriented interface to the library permits more portable applications to be written, and is easy to learn and use, since details of the parallel implementation are hidden from the user. Experiments on the Intel Touchstone Delta system with a prototype code that uses the square block scattered decomposition to perform LU factorization are presented and analyzed. It was found that the code was both scalable and efficient, performing at about 14 Gflop/s (double precision) for the largest problem considered.

  19. Anomalous axion interactions and topological currents in dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metlitski, Max A.; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2005-01-01

    Recently an effective Lagrangian for the interactions of photons, Nambu-Goldstone bosons and superfluid phonons in dense quark matter has been derived using anomaly matching arguments. In this paper we illuminate the nature of certain anomalous terms in this Lagrangian by an explicit microscopic calculation. We also generalize the corresponding construction to introduce the axion field. We derive an anomalous axion effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of axions with photons and superfluid phonons in the dense matter background. This effective Lagrangian, among other things, implies that an axion current will be induced in the presence of magnetic field. We speculate that this current may be responsible for the explanation of neutron star kicks

  20. A review of flow modeling for dense medium cyclones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Narasimha; M.S. Brennan; P.N. Holtham [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India). R& amp; D Division

    2006-06-15

    A critical assessment is presented for the existing fluid flow models used for dense medium cyclones (DMCs) and hydrocyclones. As the present discussion indicates, the understanding of dense medium cyclone flow is still far from the complete. However, its similarity to the hydrocyclone provides a basis for improved understanding of fluid flow in DMCs. The complexity of fluid flow in DMCs is basically due to the existence of medium as well as the dominance of turbulent particle size and density effects on separation. Both the theoretical and experimental analysis is done with respect to two-phase motions and solid phase flow in hydrocyclones or DMCs. A detailed discussion is presented on the empirical, semiempirical, and the numerical models based upon both the vorticity-stream function approach and Navier-Stokes equations in their primitive variables and in cylindrical coordinates available in literature. The existing equations describing turbulence and multiphase flows in cyclone are also critically reviewed.

  1. Water Cooled TJ Dense Array Modules for Parabolic Dishes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeckenhoff, Ruediger; Kubera, Tim; Rasch, Klaus Dieter

    2010-01-01

    AZUR SPACE Solar Power GmbH has developed a novel type of dense array module for use in parabolic dishes. Such dishes never produce a perfectly homogeneous, rectangular light spot but an inhomogeneous light distribution. A regular module would use this light distribution very inefficiently. Therefore AZUR SPACE developed a dense array module concept which can be adapted to inhomogeneous light spots. It is populated with state of the art triple junction solar cells.The modules are designed for light intensities in the range of 50-100 W/cm 2 and are actively water cooled. Prototypes are installed in 11 m 2 parabolic dishes produced by Zenith Solar. A peak output of 2.3 kW electrical and 5.5 kW thermal power could be demonstrated. The thermal power may be used for solar heating, solar cooling or warm water.

  2. Fine structure of the vapor field in evaporating dense sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villermaux, Emmanuel; Moutte, Alexandre; Amielh, Muriel; Meunier, Patrice

    2017-11-01

    Making use of an original technique which permits the simultaneous measurement of both the displacement field of evaporating droplets in a spray, and of their vapor, we investigate the relevance of a scenario introduced earlier to describe the evaporation dynamics of dense sprays. A plume of dense acetone droplets evaporating in air is studied, for which the stirring field is measured by particle image velocimetry of the droplets, and the vapor field is imaged quantitatively by laser-induced fluorescence. We show, thanks to these unique in situ measurements, that the spray boundary with the diluting environment is slaved to the dynamics of its saturating vapor concentration field, whose structure is analyzed for different well defined local flow topologies.

  3. Temperature Measurements of Dense Plasmas by Detailed Balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Ropke, G; Reinholz, H; Thiele, R; Fortmann, C; Forster, E; Cao, L; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Glenzer, S H

    2006-01-01

    Plasmas at high electron densities of n e = 10 20 - 10 26 cm -3 and moderate temperatures T e = 1 - 20 eV are important for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. These plasmas are usually referred to as Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and are characterized by a coupling parameter of Λ ∼> 1 where correlations become important. The characterization of such plasmas is still a challenging task due to the lack of direct measurement techniques for temperatures and densities. They propose to measure the Thomson scattering spectrum of vacuum-UV radiation off density fluctuations in the plasma. Collective Thomson scattering provides accurate data for the electron temperature applying first principles. Further, this method takes advantage of the spectral asymmetry resulting from detailed balance and is independent of collisional effects in these dense systems

  4. ALMA FOLLOWS STREAMING OF DENSE GAS DOWN TO 40 pc FROM THE SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE IN NGC 1097

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathi, Kambiz; Piñol-Ferrer, Nuria; Lundgren, Andreas A.; Wiklind, Tommy; Kohno, Kotaro; Izumi, Takuma; Martín, Sergio; Espada, Daniel; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S.; Nakai, Naomasa; Sheth, Kartik; Turner, Jean; Van de Ven, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    We present a kinematic analysis of the dense molecular gas in the central 200 pc of the nearby galaxy NGC 1097, based on Cycle 0 observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use the HCN(4-3) line to trace the densest interstellar molecular gas (n H 2 ∼10 8 cm –3 ), and quantify its kinematics, and estimate an inflow rate for the molecular gas. We find a striking similarity between the ALMA kinematic data and the analytic spiral inflow model that we have previously constructed based on ionized gas velocity fields on larger scales. We are able to follow dense gas streaming down to 40 pc distance from the supermassive black hole in this Seyfert 1 galaxy. In order to fulfill marginal stability, we deduce that the dense gas is confined to a very thin disk, and we derive a dense gas inflow rate of 0.09 M ☉ yr –1 at 40 pc radius. Combined with previous values from the Hα and CO gas, we calculate a combined molecular and ionized gas inflow rate of ∼0.2 M ☉ yr –1 at 40 pc distance from the central supermassive black hole of NGC 1097.

  5. The Role of Ultrasound in Screening Dense Breasts—A Review of the Literature and Practical Solutions for Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Thigpen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Estimates indicate a nearly 40% breast cancer mortality reduction when screening women annually starting at age 40. Although mammography is well known to be a powerful screening tool in the detection of early breast cancer, it is imperfect, particularly for women with dense breasts. In women with dense breast tissue, the sensitivity of mammography is reduced. Additionally, women with dense breasts have an increased risk of developing breast cancer while mammography has a lower sensitivity. Screening ultrasound, both handheld and automated, is effective in detecting mammographically occult cancer in women with dense tissue. Studies have shown that ultrasound significantly increases detection of clinically important, small, largely invasive, node-negative cancers. The purpose of this review article is to summarize the literature to date regarding screening breast ultrasound, emphasizing differences in cancer detection in high risk and intermediate risk women, and to discuss practical ways to implement screening ultrasound in clinical practice, including automated whole breast ultrasound, as a viable solution to the increasing need for additional screening.

  6. Composition and thermodynamic properties of dense alkali metal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabdullin, M.T. [NNLOT, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Str., Almaty 050035 (Kazakhstan); Ramazanov, T.S.; Dzhumagulova, K.N. [IETP, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Str., Almaty 050035 (Kazakhstan)

    2012-04-15

    In this work composition and thermodynamic properties of dense alkali metal plasmas (Li, Na) were investigated. Composition was derived by solving the Saha equations with corrections due to nonideality. The lowering of the ionization potentials was calculated on the basis of pseudopotentials by taking screening and quantum effects into account (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Dense Molecular Gas in the Starburst Nucleus of NGC 1808

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salak, Dragan; Tomiyasu, Yuto; Nakai, Naomasa; Kuno, Nario; Miyamoto, Yusuke; Kaneko, Hiroyuki

    2018-04-01

    Dense molecular gas tracers in the central 1 kpc region of the superwind galaxy NGC 1808 have been imaged by ALMA at a resolution of 1″ (∼50 pc). Integrated intensities and line intensity ratios of HCN (1–0), H13CN (1–0), HCO+ (1–0), H13CO+ (1–0), HOC+ (1–0), HCO+ (4–3), CS (2–1), C2H (1–0), and previously detected CO (1–0) and CO (3–2) are presented. SiO (2–1) and HNCO (4–3) are detected toward the circumnuclear disk (CND), indicating the presence of shocked dense gas. There is evidence that an enhanced intensity ratio of HCN (1–0)/HCO+ (1–0) reflects star formation activity, possibly in terms of shock heating and electron excitation in the CND and a star-forming ring at radius ∼300 pc. A non-local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis indicates that the molecular gas traced by HCN, H13CN, HCO+, and H13CO+ in the CND is dense ({n}{{{H}}2}∼ {10}5 {cm}}-3) and warm (20 K ≲ T k ≲ 100 K). The calculations yield a low average gas density of {n}{{{H}}2}∼ {10}2{--}{10}3 {cm}}-3 for a temperature of {T}{{k}}≳ 30 {{K}} in the nuclear outflow. Dense gas tracers HCN (1–0), HCO+ (1–0), CS (2–1), and C2H (1–0) are detected for the first time in the superwind of NGC 1808, confirming the presence of a velocity gradient in the outflow direction.

  8. Memory-efficient analysis of dense functional connectomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Loewe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of the human brain relies on the interplay and integration of numerous individual units within a complex network. To identify network configurations characteristic of specific cognitive tasks or mental illnesses, functional connectomes can be constructed based on the assessment of synchronous fMRI activity at separate brain sites, and then analyzed using graph-theoretical concepts. In most previous studies, relatively coarse parcellations of the brain were used to define regions as graphical nodes. Such parcellated connectomes are highly dependent on parcellation quality because regional and functional boundaries need to be relatively consistent for the results to be interpretable. In contrast, dense connectomes are not subject to this limitation, since the parcellation inherent to the data is used to define graphical nodes, also allowing for a more detailed spatial mapping of connectivity patterns. However, dense connectomes are associated with considerable computational demands in terms of both time and memory requirements. The memory required to explicitly store dense connectomes in main memory can render their analysis infeasible, especially when considering high-resolution data or analyses across multiple subjects or conditions. Here, we present an object-based matrix representation that achieves a very low memory footprint by computing matrix elements on demand instead of explicitly storing them. In doing so, memory required for a dense connectome is reduced to the amount needed to store the underlying time series data. Based on theoretical considerations and benchmarks, different matrix object implementations and additional programs (based on available Matlab functions and Matlab-based third-party software are compared with regard to their computational efficiency in terms of memory requirements and computation time. The matrix implementation based on on-demand computations has very low memory requirements thus enabling

  9. Topical Collaboration "Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-18

    This is the final technical report describing contributions from the University of New Mexico to Topical Collaboration on "Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter" in the period June 2010 through May 2015. During the funding period, the University of New Mexico successfully hired Huaiyu Duan as a new faculty member with the support from DOE, who has contributed to the Topical Collaboration through his research and collaborations.

  10. Pulsars and cosmic rays in the dense supernova shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezinsky, V.S.; Prilutsky, O.F.

    1977-01-01

    Cosmic rays (c.r.) injected by a young pulsar in the dense supernova shell are considered. The maintenance of the Galactic c.r. pool by pulsar production is shown to have a difficulty: adiabatic energy losses of c.r. in the expanding shell demand a high initial c.r. luminosity of pulsar, which results in too high flux of γ-radiation produced through π 0 -decays (in excess over diffuse γ-ray background). (author)

  11. Non-dense domain operator matrices and Cauchy problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalaoui Rhali, S.

    2002-12-01

    In this work, we study Cauchy problems with non-dense domain operator matrices. By assuming that the entries of an unbounded operator matrix are Hille-Yosida operators, we give a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring that the part of this operator matrix generates a semigroup in the closure of its domain. This allows us to prove the well-posedness of the corresponding Cauchy problem. Our results are applied to delay and neutral differential equations. (author)

  12. Studies of RF Breakdown of Metals in Dense Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Hanlet, Pierrick M; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Johnson, Rolland P; Kaplan, Daniel; Kuchnir, Moyses; Moretti, Alfred; Paul, Kevin; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-01-01

    A study of RF breakdown of metals in gases has begun as part of a program to develop RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas to be used for muon ionization cooling. A pressurized 800 MHz test cell has been used at Fermilab to compare the conditioning and breakdown behavior of copper, molybdenum, chromium, and beryllium electrodes as functions of hydrogen and helium gas density. These results are compared to the predicted or known RF breakdown behavior of these metals in vacuum.

  13. Locating sources within a dense sensor array using graph clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstoft, P.; Riahi, N.

    2017-12-01

    We develop a model-free technique to identify weak sources within dense sensor arrays using graph clustering. No knowledge about the propagation medium is needed except that signal strengths decay to insignificant levels within a scale that is shorter than the aperture. We then reinterpret the spatial coherence matrix of a wave field as a matrix whose support is a connectivity matrix of a graph with sensors as vertices. In a dense network, well-separated sources induce clusters in this graph. The geographic spread of these clusters can serve to localize the sources. The support of the covariance matrix is estimated from limited-time data using a hypothesis test with a robust phase-only coherence test statistic combined with a physical distance criterion. The latter criterion ensures graph sparsity and thus prevents clusters from forming by chance. We verify the approach and quantify its reliability on a simulated dataset. The method is then applied to data from a dense 5200 element geophone array that blanketed of the city of Long Beach (CA). The analysis exposes a helicopter traversing the array and oil production facilities.

  14. Rheology of dense suspensions of non colloidal particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guazzelli Élisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense suspensions are materials with broad applications both in industrial processes (e.g. waste disposal, concrete, drilling muds, metalworking chip transport, and food processing and in natural phenomena (e.g. flows of slurries, debris, and lava. Despite its long research history and its practical relevance, the mechanics of dense suspensions remain poorly understood. The major difficulty is that the grains interact both by hydrodynamic interactions through the liquid and by mechanical contact. These systems thus belong to an intermediate regime between pure suspensions and granular flows. We show that we can unify suspension and granular rheology under a common framework by transferring the frictional approach of dry granular media to wet suspensions of spherical particles. We also discuss non-Newtonian behavior such as normal-stress differences and shear-induced migration. Beyond the classical problem of dense suspension of hard spheres which is far from being completely resolved, there are also entirely novel avenues of study concerning more complex mixtures of particles and fluids such as those involving other types of particles (e.g. fibers or non-Newtonian fluids that we will also address.

  15. Exploring warm dense water by using Free-Electron-Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, P.; Kim, J.; Chen, Z.; French, M.; Curry, C.; Koralek, J.; Mo, M.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Rodel, R.; Redmer, R.; Toleikis, S.; Zalden, P.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2017-10-01

    Warm dense water is predicted in the interior of giant planets and has an important impact on planetary evolutions. As such, the electrical and thermal properties in this regime are critically important for modelling astrophysical objects. We present electrical property measurements in warm dense water by using a novel planar water jet compatible with high repetition rate studies. The liquid density water is isochorically and uniformly heated to non-equilibrium warm dense matter by FLASH free-electron laser irradiation (5.5 nm, 0.1 - 20 μ J). The dielectric function can be extracted from optical transmission and reflection measurements on the picosecond timescale before significant expansion and subsequent relaxation occurs. The time-dependent dielectric function reveals the electronic properties of water at different temperatures of the electronic and ionic subsystem during the heating and relaxation process, that allow to infer the electron-ion energy coupling. Comparison with 2-temperature density-functional-theory molecular-dynamic simulations show good agreement, that can not be achieved by standard theories of plasma physics. This work is supported by DOE FES under FWP 100182.

  16. Geophysical Age Dating of Seamounts using Dense Core Flexure Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gyuha; Kim, Seung-Sep

    2016-04-01

    Lithospheric flexure of oceanic plate is thermo-mechanical response of an elastic plate to the given volcanic construct (e.g., seamounts and ocean islands). If the shape and mass of such volcanic loads are known, the flexural response is governed by the thickness of elastic plate, Te. As the age of oceanic plate increases, the elastic thickness of oceanic lithosphere becomes thicker. Thus, we can relate Te with the age of plate at the time of loading. To estimate the amount of the driving force due to seamounts on elastic plate, one needs to approximate their density structure. The most common choice is uniform density model, which utilizes constant density value for a seamount. This approach simplifies computational processes for gravity prediction and error estimates. However, the uniform density model tends to overestimate the total mass of the seamount and hence produces more positive gravitational contributions from the load. Minimization of gravity misfits using uniform density, therefore, favors thinner Te in order to increase negative contributions from the lithospheric flexure, which can compensate for the excessive positives from the seamount. An alternative approach is dense core model, which approximate the heterogeneity nature of seamount density as three bodies of infill sediment, edifice, and dense core. In this study, we apply the dense core model to the Louisville Seamount Chain for constraining flexural deformation. We compare Te estimates with the loading time of the examined seamounts to redefine empirical geophysical age dating of seamounts.

  17. Rheology of dense suspensions of non colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2017-06-01

    Dense suspensions are materials with broad applications both in industrial processes (e.g. waste disposal, concrete, drilling muds, metalworking chip transport, and food processing) and in natural phenomena (e.g. flows of slurries, debris, and lava). Despite its long research history and its practical relevance, the mechanics of dense suspensions remain poorly understood. The major difficulty is that the grains interact both by hydrodynamic interactions through the liquid and by mechanical contact. These systems thus belong to an intermediate regime between pure suspensions and granular flows. We show that we can unify suspension and granular rheology under a common framework by transferring the frictional approach of dry granular media to wet suspensions of spherical particles. We also discuss non-Newtonian behavior such as normal-stress differences and shear-induced migration. Beyond the classical problem of dense suspension of hard spheres which is far from being completely resolved, there are also entirely novel avenues of study concerning more complex mixtures of particles and fluids such as those involving other types of particles (e.g. fibers) or non-Newtonian fluids that we will also address.

  18. Enhanced Productivity of Chemical Processes Using Dense Fluidized Beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibashis Banerjee; Alvin Chen; Rutton Patel; Dale Snider; Ken Williams; Timothy O' Hern; Paul Tortora

    2008-02-29

    The work detailed in this report addresses Enabling Technologies within Computational Technology by integrating a “breakthrough” particle-fluid computational technology into traditional Process Science and Engineering Technology. The work completed under this DOE project addresses five major development areas 1) gas chemistry in dense fluidized beds 2) thermal cracking of liquid film on solids producing gas products 3) liquid injection in a fluidized bed with particle-to-particle liquid film transport 4) solid-gas chemistry and 5) first level validation of models. Because of the nature of the research using tightly coupled solids and fluid phases with a Lagrangian description of the solids and continuum description of fluid, the work provides ground-breaking advances in reactor prediction capability. This capability has been tested against experimental data where available. The commercial product arising out of this work is called Barracuda and is suitable for a wide (dense-to-dilute) range of industrial scale gas-solid flows with and without reactions. Commercial applications include dense gas-solid beds, gasifiers, riser reactors and cyclones.

  19. Compressible, Dense, Three-Dimensional Holey Graphene Monolithic Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaogang; Yang, Zhi; Zhao, Bin; Zhu, Shuze; Zhou, Lihui; Dai, Jiaqi; Kim, Jae-Woo; Liu, Boyang; Connell, John W; Li, Teng; Yang, Bao; Lin, Yi; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-03-28

    By creating holes in 2D nanosheets, tortuosity and porosity can be greatly tunable, which enables a fast manufacturing process (i.e., fast removal of gas and solvent) toward various nanostructures. We demonstrated outstanding compressibility of holey graphene nanosheets, which is impossible for pristine graphene. Holey graphene powder can be easily compressed into dense and strong monoliths with different shapes at room temperature without using any solvents or binders. The remarkable compressibility of holey graphene, which is in sharp contrast with pristine graphene, not only enables the fabrication of robust, dense graphene products that exhibit high density (1.4 g/cm 3 ), excellent specific mechanical strength [18 MPa/(g/cm 3 )], and good electrical (130 S/cm) and thermal (20 W/mK) conductivities, but also provides a binder-free dry process that overcomes the disadvantages of wet processes required for fabrication of three-dimensional graphene products. Fundamentally different from graphite, the holey graphene products are both dense and porous, which can enable possible broader applications such as energy storage and gas separation membranes.

  20. N-Body Evolution of Dense Clusters of Compact Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Man Hoi

    1993-11-01

    The dynamical evolution of dense clusters of compact stars is studied using direct N-body simulations. The formation of binaries and their subsequent merging by gravitational radiation emission is important to the evolution of such clusters. Aarseth's NBODY5 N-body simulation code is modified to include the lowest order gravitational radiation force during two-body encounters and to handle the decay and merger of radiating binaries. It is used to study the evolution of small-N (= 1000) clusters with different initial velocity dispersions. The initial evolution is similar to that obtained by Quinlan & Shapiro (1989) using a multimass Fokker-Planck code and shows orderly formation of heavy objects. However, the late evolution differs qualitatively from previous results. In particular, we find runaway growth for the most massive object in the cluster: it acquires a mass much larger than that of the other objects and is detached from the smooth mass spectrum of the rest of the objects. We discuss why the Fokker-Planck equation with a mean-rate approach to the merger process cannot model runaway growth, and we present arguments to show that merger by gravitational radiation is expected to be unstable to runaway growth. The results suggest that a seed massive black hole can be formed by runaway growth in a dense cluster of compact stars. The possibility of runaway growth in dense clusters of normal stars is also discussed.

  1. Accurate segmentation of dense nanoparticles by partially discrete electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelandts, T., E-mail: tom.roelandts@ua.ac.be [IBBT-Vision Lab University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [IBBT-Vision Lab University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Biermans, E. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Kuebel, C. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bals, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Sijbers, J. [IBBT-Vision Lab University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    Accurate segmentation of nanoparticles within various matrix materials is a difficult problem in electron tomography. Due to artifacts related to image series acquisition and reconstruction, global thresholding of reconstructions computed by established algorithms, such as weighted backprojection or SIRT, may result in unreliable and subjective segmentations. In this paper, we introduce the Partially Discrete Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (PDART) for computing accurate segmentations of dense nanoparticles of constant composition. The particles are segmented directly by the reconstruction algorithm, while the surrounding regions are reconstructed using continuously varying gray levels. As no properties are assumed for the other compositions of the sample, the technique can be applied to any sample where dense nanoparticles must be segmented, regardless of the surrounding compositions. For both experimental and simulated data, it is shown that PDART yields significantly more accurate segmentations than those obtained by optimal global thresholding of the SIRT reconstruction. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel reconstruction method for partially discrete electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It accurately segments dense nanoparticles directly during reconstruction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gray level to use for the nanoparticles is determined objectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method expands the set of samples for which discrete tomography can be applied.

  2. Ultra High Intensity laser produced fast electron transport in under-dense and over-dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manclossi, Mauro

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is related to inertial fusion research, and particularly concerns the approach to fast ignition, which is based on the use of ultra-intense laser pulses to ignite the thermonuclear fuel. Until now, the feasibility of this scheme has not been proven and depends on many fundamental aspects of the underlying physics, which are not yet fully understood and which are also very far from controls. The main purpose of this thesis is the experimental study of transport processes in the material over-dense (solid) and under-dense (gas jet) of a beam of fast electrons produced by pulse laser at a intensity of some 10 19 Wcm -2 . (author)

  3. Path Integral Monte Carlo Simulations of Warm Dense Matter and Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Militzer, Burkhard [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2018-01-13

    New path integral Monte Carlo simulation (PIMC) techniques will be developed and applied to derive the equation of state (EOS) for the regime of warm dense matter and dense plasmas where existing first-principles methods cannot be applied. While standard density functional theory has been used to accurately predict the structure of many solids and liquids up to temperatures on the order of 10,000 K, this method is not applicable at much higher temperature where electronic excitations become important because the number of partially occupied electronic orbitals reaches intractably large numbers and, more importantly, the use of zero-temperature exchange-correlation functionals introduces an uncontrolled approximation. Here we focus on PIMC methods that become more and more efficient with increasing temperatures and still include all electronic correlation effects. In this approach, electronic excitations increase the efficiency rather than reduce it. While it has commonly been assumed such methods can only be applied to elements without core electrons like hydrogen and helium, we recently showed how to extend PIMC to heavier elements by performing the first PIMC simulations of carbon and water plasmas [Driver, Militzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 (2012) 115502]. Here we propose to continue this important development to extend the reach of PIMC simulations to yet heavier elements and also lower temperatures. The goal is to provide a robust first-principles simulation method that can accurately and efficiently study materials with excited electrons at solid-state densities in order to access parts of the phase diagram such the regime of warm dense matter and plasmas where so far only more approximate, semi-analytical methods could be applied.

  4. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the ULIRG IRAS 13120–5453

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privon, G. C.; Treister, E. [Instituto de Astrofśica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Aalto, S.; Falstad, N.; Muller, S.; Costagliola, F. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 94 Onsala (Sweden); González-Alfonso, E. [Universidad de Alcalá, Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Campus Universitario, E-28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Sliwa, K. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Armus, L. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Garcia-Burillo, S. [Observatorio de Madrid, OAN-IGN, Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014-Madrid (Spain); Izumi, T. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Sakamoto, K. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, 10617, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Werf, P. van der [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Chu, J. K. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array Band 7 (∼340 GHz) observations of the dense gas tracers HCN, HCO{sup +}, and CS in the local, single-nucleus, ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 13120–5453. We find centrally enhanced HCN (4–3) emission, relative to HCO{sup +} (4–3), but do not find evidence for radiative pumping of HCN. Considering the size of the starburst (0.5 kpc) and the estimated supernovae rate of ∼1.2 yr{sup −1}, the high HCN/HCO{sup +} ratio can be explained by an enhanced HCN abundance as a result of mechanical heating by the supernovae, though the active galactic nucleus and winds may also contribute additional mechanical heating. The starburst size implies a high Σ{sub IR} of 4.7 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ⊙} kpc{sup −2}, slightly below predictions of radiation-pressure limited starbursts. The HCN line profile has low-level wings, which we tentatively interpret as evidence for outflowing dense molecular gas. However, the dense molecular outflow seen in the HCN line wings is unlikely to escape the Galaxy and is destined to return to the nucleus and fuel future star formation. We also present modeling of Herschel observations of the H{sub 2}O lines and find a nuclear dust temperature of ∼40 K. IRAS 13120–5453 has a lower dust temperature and Σ{sub IR} than is inferred for the systems termed “compact obscured nuclei (CONs)” (such as Arp 220 and Mrk 231). If IRAS 13120–5453 has undergone a CON phase, we are likely witnessing it at a time when the feedback has already inflated the nuclear ISM and diluted star formation in the starburst/active galactic nucleus core.

  5. Prediction of a Densely Loaded Particle-Laden Jet using a Euler-Lagrange Dense Spray Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakseresht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh V.

    2017-11-01

    Modeling of a dense spray regime using an Euler-Lagrange discrete-element approach is challenging because of local high volume loading. A subgrid cluster of droplets can lead to locally high void fractions for the disperse phase. Under these conditions, spatio-temporal changes in the carrier phase volume fractions, which are commonly neglected in spray simulations in an Euler-Lagrange two-way coupling model, could become important. Accounting for the carrier phase volume fraction variations, leads to zero-Mach number, variable density governing equations. Using pressure-based solvers, this gives rise to a source term in the pressure Poisson equation and a non-divergence free velocity field. To test the validity and predictive capability of such an approach, a round jet laden with solid particles is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulation and compared with available experimental data for different loadings. Various volume fractions spanning from dilute to dense regimes are investigated with and without taking into account the volume displacement effects. The predictions of the two approaches are compared and analyzed to investigate the effectiveness of the dense spray model. Financial support was provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  6. The German and European laws and regulations providing for participation of the public in vertically staged procedures for the licensing of large-scale projects with an impact on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellmann, U.

    1992-01-01

    Participation of the public in licensing procedures for large-scale projects has been an item of discussion since the sixties in the legal sciences and on the political level. The introduction of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) as a legal requirement in EC law and its implementation in practice was the occasion to once again investigate the principle of participation of the public in the current legal framework. The study in hand reviews the legal provisions found in administrative law, constitutional law and European Community law governing the right of participation of the public and also takes a look at the situation in practice. The results show both the legal status and conditions of enforcement as prevailing after the coming into force in 1989 of the Act on Performance of an EIA, as well as inadequacies and deficits in the current legal framework. (orig.) [de

  7. The VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). The distinct build-up of dense and normal massive passive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, A.; Bolzonella, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Krywult, J.; De Lucia, G.; Guzzo, L.; Garilli, B.; Granett, B. R.; de la Torre, S.; Abbas, U.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; Davidzon, I.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Haines, C.; Hawken, A. J.; Iovino, A.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Małek, K.; Marulli, F.; Moutard, T.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Tasca, L. A. M.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bel, J.; Branchini, E.; Coupon, J.; Ilbert, O.; Moscardini, L.; Peacock, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    We have used the final data from the VIPERS redshift survey to extract an unparalleled sample of more than 2000 massive ℳ≥1011 M⊙ passive galaxies (MPGs) at redshift 0.5≤z≤1.0, based on their NUVrK colours. This has enabled us to investigate how the population of these objects was built up over cosmic time. We find that the evolution of the number density depends on the galaxy mean surface stellar mass density, Σ. In particular, dense (Σ≥2000 M⊙ pc-2) MPGs show a constant comoving number density over this redshift range, whilst this increases by a factor of approximately four for the least dense objects, defined as having Σ ages for the MPG population both fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) and through the D4000n index, obtaining results in good agreement. Our findings are consistent with passive ageing of the stellar content of dense MPGs. We show that at any redshift the less dense MPGs are younger than dense ones and that their stellar populations evolve at a slower rate than predicted by passive evolution. This points to a scenario in which the overall population of MPGs was built up over the cosmic time by continuous addition of less dense galaxies: on top of an initial population of dense objects that passively evolves, new, larger, and younger MPGs continuously join the population at later epochs. Finally, we demonstrate that the observed increase in the number density of MPGs is totally accounted for by the observed decrease in the number density of correspondingly massive star forming galaxies (I.e. all the non-passive ℳ≥1011 M⊙ objects). Such systems observed at z ≃ 1 in VIPERS, therefore, represent the most plausible progenitors of the subsequent emerging class of larger MPGs. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal, Chile, using the Very Large Telescope under programs 182.A-0886 and partly 070.A-9007. Also based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint

  8. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  9. Seven Stages of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dementias . Learn more: Daily Care and Behaviors Severe Alzheimer's disease (late-stage) Get support Late-stage care decisions can be some of the hardest families face. Connect with other caregivers who have been through the process on our ...

  10. Stages of Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Stages of Adolescence Page Content Article Body Adolescence, these years from puberty to adulthood, may be roughly divided into three stages: early adolescence, generally ages eleven to fourteen; middle adolescence, ages ...

  11. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Tajima, T.

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas

  12. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, S. (ed.) (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. (ed.) (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  13. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, S. [ed.] [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tajima, T. [ed.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  14. ALMA Maps of Dust and Warm Dense Gas Emission in the Starburst Galaxy IC 5179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yinghe [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Lu, Nanyao; Xu, C. Kevin [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Díaz-Santos, Tanio [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Gao Yu [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Charmandaris, Vassilis [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Werf, Paul van der [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zhang Zhi-Yu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Cao, Chen, E-mail: zhaoyinghe@ynao.ac.cn [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai, Shandong 264209 (China)

    2017-08-10

    We present our high-resolution (0.″15 × 0.″13, ∼34 pc) observations of the CO (6−5) line emission, which probes the warm and dense molecular gas, and the 434 μ m dust continuum emission in the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy IC 5179, conducted with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The CO (6−5) emission is spatially distributed in filamentary structures with many dense cores and shows a velocity field that is characteristic of a circumnuclear rotating gas disk, with 90% of the rotation speed arising within a radius of ≲150 pc. At the scale of our spatial resolution, the CO (6−5) and dust emission peaks do not always coincide, with their surface brightness ratio varying by a factor of ∼10. This result suggests that their excitation mechanisms are likely different, as further evidenced by the southwest to northeast spatial gradient of both CO-to-dust continuum ratio and Pa- α equivalent width. Within the nuclear region (radius ∼ 300 pc) and with a resolution of ∼34 pc, the CO line flux (dust flux density) detected in our ALMA observations is 180 ± 18 Jy km s{sup −1} (71 ± 7 mJy), which accounts for 22% (2.4%) of the total value measured by Herschel .

  15. ODTbrain: a Python library for full-view, dense diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Paul; Schürmann, Mirjam; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-04

    Analyzing the three-dimensional (3D) refractive index distribution of a single cell makes it possible to describe and characterize its inner structure in a marker-free manner. A dense, full-view tomographic data set is a set of images of a cell acquired for multiple rotational positions, densely distributed from 0 to 360 degrees. The reconstruction is commonly realized by projection tomography, which is based on the inversion of the Radon transform. The reconstruction quality of projection tomography is greatly improved when first order scattering, which becomes relevant when the imaging wavelength is comparable to the characteristic object size, is taken into account. This advanced reconstruction technique is called diffraction tomography. While many implementations of projection tomography are available today, there is no publicly available implementation of diffraction tomography so far. We present a Python library that implements the backpropagation algorithm for diffraction tomography in 3D. By establishing benchmarks based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations, we showcase the superiority of the backpropagation algorithm over the backprojection algorithm. Furthermore, we discuss how measurment parameters influence the reconstructed refractive index distribution and we also give insights into the applicability of diffraction tomography to biological cells. The present software library contains a robust implementation of the backpropagation algorithm. The algorithm is ideally suited for the application to biological cells. Furthermore, the implementation is a drop-in replacement for the classical backprojection algorithm and is made available to the large user community of the Python programming language.

  16. Breast-Volume Displacement Using an Extended Glandular Flap for Small Dense Breasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Ogawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We defined the glandular flap including fat in the subclavicular area as an extended glandular flap, which has been used for breast-conserving reconstruction in the upper portion of the breast. Indication. The excision volume was 20% to 40% of the breast volume, and the breast density was dense. Surgical Technique. The upper edge of the breast at the subclavicular area was drawn in the standing position before surgery. After partial mastectomy, an extended glandular flap was made by freeing the breast from both the skin and the pectoralis fascia up to the preoperative marking in the subclavicular area. It is important to keep the perforators of the internal mammary artery and/or the branches of the lateral thoracic artery intact while making the flap. Results. Seventeen patients underwent remodeling using an extended glandular flap. The cosmetic results at 1 year after the operation: excellent in 11, good in 1, fair in 3, and poor in 2. All cases of unacceptable outcome except one were cases with complications, and more than 30% resection of moderate or large size breasts did not obtain an excellent result for long-term followup. Conclusion. This technique is useful for performing the breast-conserving reconstruction of small dense breasts.

  17. Clustering-based energy-saving algorithm in ultra-dense network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junwei; Zhou, Pengguang; Teng, Deyang; Zhang, Renchi; Xu, Hao

    2017-06-01

    In Ultra-dense Networks (UDN), dense deployment of low power small base stations will cause serious small cells interference and a large amount of energy consumption. The purpose of this paper is to explore the method of reducing small cells interference and energy saving system in UDN, and we innovatively propose a sleep-waking-active (SWA) scheme. The scheme decreases the user outage causing by failure to detect users’ service requests, shortens the opening time of active base stations directly switching to sleep mode; we further proposes a Vertex Surrounding Clustering(VSC) algorithm, which first colours the small cells with the most strongest interference and next extends to the adjacent small cells. VSC algorithm can use the least colour to stain the small cell, reduce the number of iterations and promote the efficiency of colouring. The simulation results show that SWA scheme can effectively improve the system Energy Efficiency (EE), the VSC algorithm can reduce the small cells interference and optimize the users’ Spectrum Efficiency (SE) and throughput.

  18. An Incompressible Three-Dimensional Multiphase Particle-in-Cell Model for Dense Particle Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D. M.

    2001-07-01

    A three-dimensional, incompressible, multiphase particle-in-cell method is presented for dense particle flows. The numerical technique solves the governing equations of the fluid phase using a continuum model and those of the particle phase using a Lagrangian model. Difficulties associated with calculating interparticle interactions for dense particle flows with volume fractions above 5% have been eliminated by mapping particle properties to an Eulerian grid and then mapping back computed stress tensors to particle positions. A subgrid particle, normal stress model for discrete particles which is robust and eliminates the need for an implicit calculation of the particle normal stress on the grid is presented. Interpolation operators and their properties are defined which provide compact support, are conservative, and provide fast solution for a large particle population. The solution scheme allows for distributions of types, sizes, and density of particles, with no numerical diffusion from the Lagrangian particle calculations. Particles are implicitly coupled to the fluid phase, and the fluid momentum and pressure equations are implicitly solved, which gives a robust solution.

  19. Ionospheric modifications detected by a dense network of single frequency GNSS receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrak, S.; Semeter, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    It has been predicted that the region of totality during a total solar eclipse can launch atmospheric gravity waves with large enough amplitude to cause traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). We report initial results from a remote sensing campaign involving a dense hybrid network of single- and dual-frequency GNSS receivers deployed underneath the 21 August 2017 solar eclipse. The campaign took place in central Missouri, involving 84 Trimble dual-frequency receivers, complemented by 2 additional 50 Hz dual-frequency receivers and 15 single-frequency receivers, together constructing 100 receivers with average mutual separation of less than 25 km and with a time resolution of 1 second or better. The initial results show a crescent shaped enhancement bulge in front of region of totality, extending all the way from Canada to Gulf of Mexico. In addition, in the path of totality is noticed a great depletion region, followed by a pair of transverse waves propagating in west-east direction. In the following months, we will explore the transition region carried by the totality by a virtue of hyper dense network of GNSS receivers with 1 second resolution. In addition to TEC data decomposition we will explore effects of the totality on the raw measurements (phase, code and signal intensity), and to the navigation solution which is likely to be effected by a different propagation conditions with respect to other days.

  20. Beyond Erikson's Eight Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    Erik Erikson has described eight stages of the healthy personality. This essay offers a revised version of the eight stages. Although most individuals develop through the eight stages, each is personally unique because patterns of fluctuation between safety and growth differ from one individual to another. (Author)

  1. A comparison of earthquake backprojection imaging methods for dense local arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskardes, G. D.; Hole, J. A.; Wang, K.; Michaelides, M.; Wu, Q.; Chapman, M. C.; Davenport, K. K.; Brown, L. D.; Quiros, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    Backprojection imaging has recently become a practical method for local earthquake detection and location due to the deployment of densely sampled, continuously recorded, local seismograph arrays. While backprojection sometimes utilizes the full seismic waveform, the waveforms are often pre-processed and simplified to overcome imaging challenges. Real data issues include aliased station spacing, inadequate array aperture, inaccurate velocity model, low signal-to-noise ratio, large noise bursts and varying waveform polarity. We compare the performance of backprojection with four previously used data pre-processing methods: raw waveform, envelope, short-term averaging/long-term averaging and kurtosis. Our primary goal is to detect and locate events smaller than noise by stacking prior to detection to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The objective is to identify an optimized strategy for automated imaging that is robust in the presence of real-data issues, has the lowest signal-to-noise thresholds for detection and for location, has the best spatial resolution of the source images, preserves magnitude, and considers computational cost. Imaging method performance is assessed using a real aftershock data set recorded by the dense AIDA array following the 2011 Virginia earthquake. Our comparisons show that raw-waveform backprojection provides the best spatial resolution, preserves magnitude and boosts signal to detect events smaller than noise, but is most sensitive to velocity error, polarity error and noise bursts. On the other hand, the other methods avoid polarity error and reduce sensitivity to velocity error, but sacrifice spatial resolution and cannot effectively reduce noise by stacking. Of these, only kurtosis is insensitive to large noise bursts while being as efficient as the raw-waveform method to lower the detection threshold; however, it does not preserve the magnitude information. For automatic detection and location of events in a large data set, we

  2. Structural relaxation in dense liquids composed of anisotropic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tianqi; Schreck, Carl; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Freed, Denise E; O'Hern, Corey S

    2012-10-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of dense liquids composed of bidisperse dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles in two dimensions that interact via purely repulsive contact forces. We measure the structural relaxation times obtained from the long-time α decay of the self part of the intermediate scattering function for the translational and rotational degrees of freedom (DOF) as a function of packing fraction φ, temperature T, and aspect ratio α. We are able to collapse the packing-fraction and temperature-dependent structural relaxation times for disks, and dimers and ellipses over a wide range of α, onto a universal scaling function F(±)(|φ-φ(0)|,T,α), which is similar to that employed in previous studies of dense liquids composed of purely repulsive spherical particles in three dimensions. F(±) for both the translational and rotational DOF are characterized by the α-dependent scaling exponents μ and δ and packing fraction φ(0)(α) that signals the crossover in the scaling form F(±) from hard-particle dynamics to super-Arrhenius behavior for each aspect ratio. We find that the fragility of structural relaxation at φ(0), m(φ(0)), decreases monotonically with increasing aspect ratio for both ellipses and dimers. For α>α(p), where α(p) is the location of the peak in the packing fraction φ(J) at jamming onset, the rotational DOF are strongly coupled to the translational DOF, and the dynamic scaling exponents and φ(0) are similar for the rotational and translational DOF. For 1composed of dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles are qualitatively the same, despite the fact that zero-temperature static packings of dimers are isostatic, while static packings of ellipses are hypostatic. Thus, zero-temperature contact counting arguments do not apply to structural relaxation of dense liquids of anisotropic particles near the glass transition.

  3. Inhomogeneous quasistationary state of dense fluids of inelastic hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study closed dense collections of freely cooling hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (ISs) where the density profile is spatially nonuniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature valid when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modeling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state) using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. Thus the IS is the exact state of this dense many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving nonuniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction that generalizes previous results. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like a gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: The inelastic decay of energy is a power law [1+t/t(c)](-2), where t(c) diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This is reinforced by observing that for supercritical systems the IS coincide in most of the space with the steady states of granular systems heated at one of the walls. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries.

  4. Bayesian quantification of thermodynamic uncertainties in dense gas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merle, X.; Cinnella, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Bayesian inference methodology is developed for calibrating complex equations of state used in numerical fluid flow solvers. Precisely, the input parameters of three equations of state commonly used for modeling the thermodynamic behavior of the so-called dense gas flows, – i.e. flows of gases characterized by high molecular weights and complex molecules, working in thermodynamic conditions close to the liquid–vapor saturation curve – are calibrated by means of Bayesian inference from reference aerodynamic data for a dense gas flow over a wing section. Flow thermodynamic conditions are such that the gas thermodynamic behavior strongly deviates from that of a perfect gas. In the aim of assessing the proposed methodology, synthetic calibration data – specifically, wall pressure data – are generated by running the numerical solver with a more complex and accurate thermodynamic model. The statistical model used to build the likelihood function includes a model-form inadequacy term, accounting for the gap between the model output associated to the best-fit parameters and the true phenomenon. Results show that, for all of the relatively simple models under investigation, calibrations lead to informative posterior probability density distributions of the input parameters and improve the predictive distribution significantly. Nevertheless, calibrated parameters strongly differ from their expected physical values. The relationship between this behavior and model-form inadequacy is discussed. - Highlights: • Development of a Bayesian inference procedure for calibrating dense-gas flow solvers. • Complex thermodynamic models calibrated by using aerodynamic data for the flow. • Preliminary Sobol analysis used to reduce parameter space. • Piecewise polynomial surrogate model constructed to reduce computational cost. • Calibration results show the crucial role played by model-form inadequacies

  5. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  6. Exp6-polar thermodynamics of dense supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2007-12-13

    We introduce a simple polar fluid model for the thermodynamics of dense supercritical water based on a Buckingham (exp-6) core and point dipole representation of the water molecule. The proposed exp6-polar thermodynamics, based on ideas originally applied to dipolar hard spheres, performs very well when tested against molecular dynamics simulations. Comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data available for supercritical water yield excellent agreement for the shock Hugoniot, isotherms and sound speeds, and are also quite good for the self-diffusion constant and relative dielectric constant. We expect the present approach to be also useful for other small polar molecules and their mixtures.

  7. Performance analysis of simultaneous dense coding protocol under decoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Zhang, Cai; Situ, Haozhen

    2017-09-01

    The simultaneous dense coding (SDC) protocol is useful in designing quantum protocols. We analyze the performance of the SDC protocol under the influence of noisy quantum channels. Six kinds of paradigmatic Markovian noise along with one kind of non-Markovian noise are considered. The joint success probability of both receivers and the success probabilities of one receiver are calculated for three different locking operators. Some interesting properties have been found, such as invariance and symmetry. Among the three locking operators we consider, the SWAP gate is most resistant to noise and results in the same success probabilities for both receivers.

  8. On the spatial distributions of dense cores in Orion B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Richard J.

    2018-05-01

    We quantify the spatial distributions of dense cores in three spatially distinct areas of the Orion B star-forming region. For L1622, NGC 2068/NGC 2071, and NGC 2023/NGC 2024, we measure the amount of spatial substructure using the Q-parameter and find all three regions to be spatially substructured (Q Orion B, the mass segregation cannot be dynamical. Our results are also inconsistent with simulations in which the most massive stars form via competitive accretion, and instead hint that magnetic fields may be important in influencing the primordial spatial distributions of gas and stars in star-forming regions.

  9. Plasmon-polariton modes of dense Au nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hongdan; Lemmens, Peter; Wulferding, Dirk; Cetin, Mehmet Fatih [IPKM, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Tornow, Sabine; Zwicknagl, Gertrud [IMP, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany); Krieg, Ulrich; Pfnuer, Herbert [IFP, LU Hannover (Germany); Daum, Winfried; Lilienkamp, Gerhard [IEPT, TU Clausthal (Germany); Schilling, Meinhard [EMG, TU-BS, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Using optical absorption and other techniques we study plasmon-polariton modes of dense Au nanowire arrays as function of geometrical parameters and coupling to molecular degrees of freedom. For this instance we electrochemically deposit Au nanowires in porous alumina with well controlled morphology and defect concentration. Transverse and longitudinal modes are observed in the absorption spectra resulting from the anisotropic plasmonic structure. The longitudinal mode shows a blue shift of energy with increasing length of the wires due to the more collective nature of this response. We compare our observations with model calculations and corresponding results on 2D Ag nanowire lattices.

  10. Dilution in a Dense Bottom Jet in Cross Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, O.; Larsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    A 3-dimensional numerical model describing the dilution in the near field around dense vertical jets in a cross flow is formulated and validated against laboratory experiments. The validation shows that the model reproduces the flow pattern well, though the dilution is underestimated by 20......%. The model is applied to a case study where the dilution from two vertical jets at an angle in shallow water is described. It is demonstrated that a 20% increase in dilution is possible. It is concluded that the model may become a valuable tool in diffusor design....

  11. Graham's law of effusion in dense systems with nonuniform interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohazzabi, P.; Cumaranatunge, L.

    2003-09-01

    We investigate Graham's law of effusion in a series of molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the law remains valid not only in a dilute gas, but also in fluids dense enough to cause localization, even when various particles of the system interact according to varying interatomic force laws. Although Maxwellian velocity distribution is a sufficient condition for Graham's law of effusion to hold, it is not strictly necessary, in the sense that the law is obeyed even by systems that deviate significantly from Maxwellian.

  12. Ultrasound propagation in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, K; Ohmori, K; Abe, S; Kanamori, K; Nakanishi, K

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal ultrasound propagation was studied in dense aerogels filled with liquid 4 He. Sound velocity and attenuation were measured at the frequency of 6 MHz in both normal and superfluid phases. Pressure dependence of velocity and attenuation were also studied. Studied aerogels had porosities about 85%. They had two different types of structure, tangled strand structure and aggregated particles structure. The pore size distributions were narrow. Reduction of superfluid transition temperature mainly depended on not porosity but mean pore size. The structure of gel played an important role in sound velocity and attenuation.

  13. Dense grid sibling frames with linear phase filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Farras

    2013-09-01

    We introduce new 5-band dyadic sibling frames with dense time-frequency grid. Given a lowpass filter satisfying certain conditions, the remaining filters are obtained using spectral factorization. The analysis and synthesis filterbanks share the same lowpass and bandpass filters but have different and oversampled highpass filters. This leads to wavelets approximating shift-invariance. The filters are FIR, have linear phase, and the resulting wavelets have vanishing moments. The filters are designed using spectral factorization method. The proposed method leads to smooth limit functions with higher approximation order, and computationally stable filterbanks.

  14. A continuous stochastic model for non-equilibrium dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, M.; Gorji, M. H.

    2017-12-01

    While accurate simulations of dense gas flows far from the equilibrium can be achieved by direct simulation adapted to the Enskog equation, the significant computational demand required for collisions appears as a major constraint. In order to cope with that, an efficient yet accurate solution algorithm based on the Fokker-Planck approximation of the Enskog equation is devised in this paper; the approximation is very much associated with the Fokker-Planck model derived from the Boltzmann equation by Jenny et al. ["A solution algorithm for the fluid dynamic equations based on a stochastic model for molecular motion," J. Comput. Phys. 229, 1077-1098 (2010)] and Gorji et al. ["Fokker-Planck model for computational studies of monatomic rarefied gas flows," J. Fluid Mech. 680, 574-601 (2011)]. The idea behind these Fokker-Planck descriptions is to project the dynamics of discrete collisions implied by the molecular encounters into a set of continuous Markovian processes subject to the drift and diffusion. Thereby, the evolution of particles representing the governing stochastic process becomes independent from each other and thus very efficient numerical schemes can be constructed. By close inspection of the Enskog operator, it is observed that the dense gas effects contribute further to the advection of molecular quantities. That motivates a modelling approach where the dense gas corrections can be cast in the extra advection of particles. Therefore, the corresponding Fokker-Planck approximation is derived such that the evolution in the physical space accounts for the dense effects present in the pressure, stress tensor, and heat fluxes. Hence the consistency between the devised Fokker-Planck approximation and the Enskog operator is shown for the velocity moments up to the heat fluxes. For validation studies, a homogeneous gas inside a box besides Fourier, Couette, and lid-driven cavity flow setups is considered. The results based on the Fokker-Planck model are

  15. Chemical potential calculations in dense liquids using metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Giberti, F.; Parrinello, M.

    2016-10-01

    The calculation of chemical potential has traditionally been a challenge in atomistic simulations. One of the most used approaches is Widom's insertion method in which the chemical potential is calculated by periodically attempting to insert an extra particle in the system. In dense systems this method fails since the insertion probability is very low. In this paper we show that in a homogeneous fluid the insertion probability can be increased using metadynamics. We test our method on a supercooled high density binary Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that we can obtain efficiently converged results even when Widom's method fails.

  16. Repetitively pulsed capacitor bank for the dense-plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes a 1 pulse per second capacitor bank designed to energize a dense-plasma focus (DPF). The DPF is a neutron source capable (with moderate scaling) of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse or neutron flux of 2 x 10 13 N/cm 2 . s. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue due to the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. This small source size high flux neutron source could be extremely useful to qualify fission reactor material irradiation results for fusion reactor design

  17. Polyatomic Trilobite Rydberg Molecules in a Dense Random Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Perttu J J; Rost, Jan-Michael

    2017-11-17

    Trilobites are exotic giant dimers with enormous dipole moments. They consist of a Rydberg atom and a distant ground-state atom bound together by short-range electron-neutral attraction. We show that highly polar, polyatomic trilobite states unexpectedly persist and thrive in a dense ultracold gas of randomly positioned atoms. This is caused by perturbation-induced quantum scarring and the localization of electron density on randomly occurring atom clusters. At certain densities these states also mix with an s state, overcoming selection rules that hinder the photoassociation of ordinary trilobites.

  18. Coherent nonlinear structures in dense electron—positron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S. A.; Wazir, Z.

    2013-02-01

    It is shown that rarefactive-type double layer structures exist in ultradense electron—positron plasma. For this purpose, an extended Korteweg de Vries equation is derived and solved analytically in the low amplitude limit by employing the appropriate fluid equations. A strong influence of quantum degeneracy pressure of electrons and positrons, quantum diffraction effects and concentration of background positive ions on double layer is noticed. It is also pointed out that the amplitude and steepness of the double layer increases with an increase in ion concentration or ion charge number. The results are examined numerically for some interesting cases of dense plasmas with illustrations.

  19. Explosive and solitary excitations in a very dense magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabry, R. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: refaatsabry@mans.edu.eg; Moslem, W.M. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: wmmoslem@hotmail.com; Shukla, P.K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: ps@tp4.rub.de

    2008-08-25

    A two-component dense magnetoplasma consisting of ions and degenerate electrons is considered. The basic set of hydrodynamic and Poisson equations are reduced to the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation by using the reductive perturbation technique. The basic features of the electrostatic excitations are investigated by applying a new direct method to the ZK equation. It is found that the latter has new solutions, which admit the propagation of either solitary or explosive pulses. The relevance of the new direct method to other nonlinear partial differential equations is also discussed.

  20. Dense distributed processing in a hindlimb scratch motor network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzulaitis, Robertas; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær

    2014-01-01

    elegans), we show that ventral horn interneurons in mid-thoracic spinal segments are functionally integrated in the hindlimb scratch network. First, mid-thoracic interneurons receive intense synaptic input during scratching and behave like neurons in the hindlimb enlargement. Second, some mid......-thoracic interneurons activated during scratching project descending axons toward the hindlimb enlargement. Third, elimination of mid-thoracic segments leads to a weakening of scratch rhythmicity. We conclude that densely innervated interneurons in mid-thoracic segments contribute to hindlimb scratching and may be part...

  1. Interaction of CO2 laser radiation with dense plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Raoof, Wasfi Sharkawy

    1980-01-01

    The instabilities which occur in the interaction of CO2 laser radiation with a dense plasma have been studied. A TEA CO2 laser provided pulses of up to 30 joules of energy with a duration of 50 nanoseconds. By focussing the radiation on to a plane target a focal spot of about 180 micrometers diameter was formed with a irradiance of 10 to 10 W cm. The scattered radiation was collected by a laser focussing lens and analysed with a grating spectrometer. Linear relationships have been found betwe...

  2. Molecules ionization at phase transition in warm dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Saitov, I. M.

    2018-01-01

    An idea is suggested that the fluid–fluid phase transition in warm dense hydrogen is related to the partial ionization of molecules H2 with formation of molecular ions {{{H}}}2+ {{and}} {{{H}}}3+. Conventional ab initio quantum modeling is applied. Proton pair correlation functions (PCF) obtained are used for the nonconventional diagnostics of the phase transition and elucidation of its nature for temperatures 700–1500 K. Short- and long-range changes of PCFs are studied. H2 molecules ionization and molecular ions {{{H}}}2+ {{and}} {{{H}}}3+ appearance is revealed. The validity of the soft sphere model is tested for the long-range order.

  3. Supersonic minimum length nozzle design for dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldo, Andrew C.; Argrow, Brian M.

    1993-01-01

    Recently, dense gases have been investigated for many engineering applications such as for turbomachinery and wind tunnels. Supersonic nozzle design for these gases is complicated by their nonclassical behavior in the transonic flow regime. In this paper a method of characteristics (MOC) is developed for two-dimensional (planar) and, primarily, axisymmetric flow of a van der Waals gas. Using a straight aortic line assumption, a centered expansion is used to generate an inviscid wall contour of minimum length. The van der Waals results are compared to previous perfect gas results to show the real gas effects on the flow properties and inviscid wall contours.

  4. Reiterated inclusions of dipoles in a dense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naouri, Gerard

    1983-01-01

    This thesis introduces a simple model made up for the calculation of pressure effects in dense and partially ionized 3 D two component plasma. The technic used is the description of the overlapping of atomic orbitals by means of interacting dipoles incased in one another. By iteration of this procedure we get an effective two-body potential which allows us to calculate line shifts of hydrogenic ions. In conclusion we suggest a possible improvement of the method by substituting a self consistent potential to the Debye one for the calculation of the wave functions. [fr

  5. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fuente, Asunción [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bontemps, Sylvain [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Star formation: study of the collapse of pre-stellar dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercon, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    One of the priorities of contemporary astrophysics remains to understand the mechanisms which lead to star formation. In the dense cores where star formation occurs, temperature, pressure, etc... are such that it is impossible to reproduce them in the laboratory. Numerical calculations remain the only mean to study physical phenomena that are involved in the star formation process. The focus of this thesis has been on the numerical methods that are used in the star formation context to describe highly non-linear and multi-scale phenomena. In particular, I have concentrated my work on the first stages of the pre-stellar dense cores collapse. This work is divided in 4 linked part. In a first study, I use a 1D Lagrangian code in spherical symmetry (Audit et al. 2002) to compare three models that incorporate radiative transfer and matter-radiation interactions. This comparison was based on simple gravitational collapse calculations which lead to the first Larson core formation. It was found that the Flux Limited Diffusion model is appropriate for star formation calculations. I also took benefit from this first work to study the properties of the accretion shock on the first Larson core. We developed a semi-analytic model based on well-known assumptions, which reproduces the jump properties at the shock. The second study consisted in implementing the Flux Limited Diffusion model with the radiation-hydrodynamics equations in the RAMSES code (Teyssier 2002). After a first step of numerical tests that validate the scheme, we used RAMSES to perform the first multidimensional collapse calculations that combine magnetic field and radiative transfer effects at small scales with a high numerical resolution. Our results show that the radiative transfer has a significant impact on the fragmentation in the collapse of pre-stellar dense cores. I also present a comparison we made between the RAMSES code (Eulerian approach) and the SPH code DRAGON (Goodwin 2004, Lagrangian approach

  7. Contribution to the knowledge of spouted beds, including in particular an experimental study on the void fraction of the dense phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eljas, Yves.

    1975-10-01

    The spouted bed is a gas-solid contact technique used to replace fluidisation when the solid particles are too large and too dense. Part one gives a bibliographical study on the aerodynamic aspect of spouted beds. Part two describes an experimental study of the void fraction distribution in a two-dimensional bed [fr

  8. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  9. Orbital free molecular dynamics; Approche sans orbitale des plasmas denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, F

    2007-08-15

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  10. Stochastic entangled chain dynamics of dense polymer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivotides, Demosthenes; Wilkin, S Louise; Theofanous, Theo G

    2010-10-14

    We propose an adjustable-parameter-free, entangled chain dynamics model of dense polymer solutions. The model includes the self-consistent dynamics of molecular chains and solvent by describing the former via coarse-grained polymer dynamics that incorporate hydrodynamic interaction effects, and the latter via the forced Stokes equation. Real chain elasticity is modeled via the inclusion of a Pincus regime in the polymer's force-extension curve. Excluded volume effects are taken into account via the combined action of coarse-grained intermolecular potentials and explicit geometric tracking of chain entanglements. We demonstrate that entanglements are responsible for a new (compared to phantom chain dynamics), slow relaxation mode whose characteristic time scale agrees very well with experiment. Similarly good agreement between theory and experiment is also obtained for the equilibrium chain size. We develop methods for the solution of the model in periodic flow domains and apply them to the computation of entangled polymer solutions in equilibrium. We show that the number of entanglements Π agrees well with the number of entanglements expected on the basis of tube theory, satisfactorily reproducing the latter's scaling of Π with the polymer volume fraction φ. Our model predicts diminishing chain size with concentration, thus vindicating Flory's suggestion of excluded volume effects screening in dense solutions. The predicted scaling of chain size with φ is consistent with the heuristic, Flory theory based value.

  11. Reciprocal locomotion of dense swimmers in Stokes flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lauga, Eric [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)], E-mail: davidgr@alum.mit.edu, E-mail: elauga@ucsd.edu

    2009-05-20

    Due to the kinematic reversibility of Stokes flow, a body executing a reciprocal motion (a motion in which the sequence of body configurations remains identical under time reversal) cannot propel itself in a viscous fluid in the limit of negligible inertia; this result is known as Purcell's scallop theorem. In this limit, the Reynolds numbers based on the fluid inertia and on the body inertia are all zero. Previous studies characterized the breakdown of the scallop theorem with fluid inertia. In this paper we show that, even in the absence of fluid inertia, certain dense bodies undergoing reciprocal motion are able to swim. Using Lorentz's reciprocal theorem, we first derive the general differential equations that govern the locomotion kinematics of a dense swimmer. We demonstrate that no reciprocal swimming is possible if the body motion consists only of tangential surface deformation (squirming). We then apply our general formulation to compute the locomotion of four simple swimmers, each with a different spatial asymmetry, that perform normal surface deformations. We show that the resulting swimming speeds (or rotation rates) scale as the first power of a properly defined 'swimmer Reynolds number', demonstrating thereby a continuous breakdown of the scallop theorem with body inertia.

  12. Statistical mechanics of dense plasmas: numerical simulation and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, H.E.

    1977-10-01

    Recent Monte Carlo calculations from Paris and from Livermore for dense one and two component plasmas have led to systematic and accurate results for the thermodynamic properties of dense Coulombic fluids. This talk will summarize the results of these numerical experiments, and the simple analytic expressions for the equation of state and other thermodynamic functions that have been obtained. The thermal energy for the one component plasma has a simple power law dependence on temperature that is identical to Monte Carlo results on strongly coupled fluids governed by l/r/sup n/ potentials. A universal model for fluids governed by simple repulsive forces is suggested. For two component plasmas the ion-sphere model is shown to accurately reproduce the Monte Carlo data for the static portion of the energy. Electron screening is included using the Lindhard dielectric function and linear response theory. Free energy expressions have been constructed for one and two component plasmas that allow easy computation of all thermodynamic functions

  13. Signatures of personality on dense 3D facial images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sile; Xiong, Jieyi; Fu, Pengcheng; Qiao, Lu; Tan, Jingze; Jin, Li; Tang, Kun

    2017-03-06

    It has long been speculated that cues on the human face exist that allow observers to make reliable judgments of others' personality traits. However, direct evidence of association between facial shapes and personality is missing from the current literature. This study assessed the personality attributes of 834 Han Chinese volunteers (405 males and 429 females), utilising the five-factor personality model ('Big Five'), and collected their neutral 3D facial images. Dense anatomical correspondence was established across the 3D facial images in order to allow high-dimensional quantitative analyses of the facial phenotypes. In this paper, we developed a Partial Least Squares (PLS) -based method. We used composite partial least squares component (CPSLC) to test association between the self-tested personality scores and the dense 3D facial image data, then used principal component analysis (PCA) for further validation. Among the five personality factors, agreeableness and conscientiousness in males and extraversion in females were significantly associated with specific facial patterns. The personality-related facial patterns were extracted and their effects were extrapolated on simulated 3D facial models.

  14. Spaced resolved analysis of suprathermal electrons in dense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinard A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the hot electron fraction is a crucial topic for high energy density laser driven plasmas: first, energy losses and radiative properties depend strongly on the hot electron fraction and, second, in ICF hohlraums suprathermal electrons preheat the D-T-capsule and seriously reduce the fusion performance. In the present work we present our first experimental and theoretical studies to analyze single shot space resolved hot electron fractions inside dense plasmas via optically thin X-ray line transitions from autoionizing states. The benchmark experiment has been carried out at an X-pinch in order to create a dense, localized plasma with a well defined symmetry axis of hot electron propagation. Simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution in the X-ray spectral range has been obtained with a spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal. The high performance of the X-ray diagnostics allowed to identify space resolved hot electron fractions via the X-ray spectral distribution of multiple excited states.

  15. Study of warm dense plasma electronic dynamics by optical interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deneuville, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime is characterised by a density close to the solid density and an electron temperature close to the Fermi temperature. In this work, the nonequilibrium Warm Dense Matter is studied during the solid to liquid phase transition induced by an ultra short laser interacting with a solid. A 30 femtosecond time resolution pump-probe experiment (FDI) is set up, yielding to the measurement of the heated sample complex reflectivity for both S and P polarisation. We have determined a criterion based on the measured reflectivities, which permits to control the interface shape of the probed matter. For pump laser fluences around 1 J/cm 2 , the hydrodynamics of the heated matter is studied and experimental results are compared to the two-temperatures code ESTHER. Furthermore, the evolution of the dielectric function at 800 nm and 400 nm is inferred from our measurements on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Within the Drude-Lorentz model for the conduction electrons, the dielectric function yields information such as ionisation state, electronic temperature and electron collision frequency. (author) [fr

  16. Handover management in dense cellular networks: A stochastic geometry approach

    KAUST Repository

    Arshad, Rabe

    2016-07-26

    Cellular operators are continuously densifying their networks to cope with the ever-increasing capacity demand. Furthermore, an extreme densification phase for cellular networks is foreseen to fulfill the ambitious fifth generation (5G) performance requirements. Network densification improves spectrum utilization and network capacity by shrinking base stations\\' (BSs) footprints and reusing the same spectrum more frequently over the spatial domain. However, network densification also increases the handover (HO) rate, which may diminish the capacity gains for mobile users due to HO delays. In highly dense 5G cellular networks, HO delays may neutralize or even negate the gains offered by network densification. In this paper, we present an analytical paradigm, based on stochastic geometry, to quantify the effect of HO delay on the average user rate in cellular networks. To this end, we propose a flexible handover scheme to reduce HO delay in case of highly dense cellular networks. This scheme allows skipping the HO procedure with some BSs along users\\' trajectories. The performance evaluation and testing of this scheme for only single HO skipping shows considerable gains in many practical scenarios. © 2016 IEEE.

  17. Time evolution of cell size distributions in dense cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khain, Evgeniy

    2015-03-01

    Living cells in a dense system are all in contact with each other. The common assumption is that such cells stop dividing due to a lack of space. Recent experimental observations have shown, however, that cells continue dividing for a while, but other cells in the system must shrink, to allow the newborn cells to grow to a normal size. Due to these ``pressure'' effects, the average cell size dramatically decreases with time, and the dispersion in cell sizes decreases, too. The collective cell behavior becomes even more complex when the system is expanding: cells near the edges are larger and migrate faster, while cells deep inside the colony are smaller and move slower. This exciting experimental data still needs to be described theoretically, incorporating the distribution of cell sizes in the system. We propose a mathematical model for time evolution of cell size distribution both in a closed and open system. The model incorporates cell proliferation, cell growth after division, cell shrinking due to ``pressure'' from other cells, and possible cell detachment from the interface of a growing colony. This research sheds light on physical and biological mechanisms of cell response to a dense environment and on the role of mechanical stresses in determining the distribution of cell sizes in the system.

  18. Probing Dense Sprays with Gated, Picosecond, Digital Particle Field Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Trolinger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes work that demonstrated the feasibility of producing a gated digital holography system that is capable of producing high-resolution images of three-dimensional particle and structure details deep within dense particle fields of a spray. We developed a gated picosecond digital holocamera, using optical Kerr cell gating, to demonstrate features of gated digital holography that make it an exceptional candidate for this application. The Kerr cell gate shuttered the camera after the initial burst of ballistic and snake photons had been recorded, suppressing longer path, multiple scattered illumination. By starting with a CW laser without gating and then incorporating a picosecond laser and an optical Kerr gate, we were able to assess the imaging quality of the gated holograms, and determine improvement gained by gating. We produced high quality images of 50–200 μm diameter particles, hairs and USAF resolution charts from digital holograms recorded through turbid media where more than 98% of the light was scattered from the field. The system can gate pulses as short as 3 mm in pathlength (10 ps, enabling image-improving features of the system. The experiments lead us to the conclusion that this method has an excellent capability as a diagnostics tool in dense spray combustion research.

  19. SU-C-207B-04: Automated Segmentation of Pectoral Muscle in MR Images of Dense Breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, E; Waard, SN de; Veldhuis, WB; Gils, CH van; Gilhuijs, KGA [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fully automated method for segmentation of the pectoral muscle boundary in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of dense breasts. Methods: Segmentation of the pectoral muscle is an important part of automatic breast image analysis methods. Current methods for segmenting the pectoral muscle in breast MRI have difficulties delineating the muscle border correctly in breasts with a large proportion of fibroglandular tissue (i.e., dense breasts). Hence, an automated method based on dynamic programming was developed, incorporating heuristics aimed at shape, location and gradient features.To assess the method, the pectoral muscle was segmented in 91 randomly selected participants (mean age 56.6 years, range 49.5–75.2 years) from a large MRI screening trial in women with dense breasts (ACR BI-RADS category 4). Each MR dataset consisted of 178 or 179 T1-weighted images with voxel size 0.64 × 0.64 × 1.00 mm3. All images (n=16,287) were reviewed and scored by a radiologist. In contrast to volume overlap coefficients, such as DICE, the radiologist detected deviations in the segmented muscle border and determined whether the result would impact the ability to accurately determine the volume of fibroglandular tissue and detection of breast lesions. Results: According to the radiologist’s scores, 95.5% of the slices did not mask breast tissue in such way that it could affect detection of breast lesions or volume measurements. In 13.1% of the slices a deviation in the segmented muscle border was present which would not impact breast lesion detection. In 70 datasets (78%) at least 95% of the slices were segmented in such a way it would not affect detection of breast lesions, and in 60 (66%) datasets this was 100%. Conclusion: Dynamic programming with dedicated heuristics shows promising potential to segment the pectoral muscle in women with dense breasts.

  20. Ionization-potential depression and dynamical structure factor in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chengliang; Röpke, Gerd; Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich; Reinholz, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    The properties of a bound electron system immersed in a plasma environment are strongly modified by the surrounding plasma. The modification of an essential quantity, the ionization energy, is described by the electronic and ionic self-energies, including dynamical screening within the framework of the quantum statistical theory. Introducing the ionic dynamical structure factor as the indicator for the ionic microfield, we demonstrate that ionic correlations and fluctuations play a critical role in determining the ionization potential depression. This is, in particular, true for mixtures of different ions with large mass and charge asymmetry. The ionization potential depression is calculated for dense aluminum plasmas as well as for a CH plasma and compared to the experimental data and more phenomenological approaches used so far.

  1. LPM Interference and Cherenkov-like Gluon Bremsstrahlung in DenseMatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, Abhijit; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-07-26

    Gluon bremsstrahlung induced by multiple parton scattering in a finite dense medium has a unique angular distribution with respect to the initial parton direction. A dead-cone structure with an opening angle; theta2{sub 0}; approx 2(1-z)/(zLE) for gluons with fractional energy z arises from the Landau-Pomeran chuck-Migdal (LPM) interference. In a medium where the gluon's dielectric constant is; epsilon>1, the LPM interference pattern is shown to become Cherenkov-like with an increased opening angle determined by the dielectric constant$/cos2/theta{sub c}=z+(1-z)//epsilon$. For a large dielectric constant/epsilon; gg 1+2/z2LE, the corresponding total radiative parton energy loss is about twice that from normal gluon bremsstrahlung. Implications of this Cherenkov-like gluon bremsstrahlung to the jet correlation pattern in high-energy heavy-ion collisions is discussed.

  2. Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.; Barnard, John J.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik P.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Grote, David P.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Lidia, Steven M.; Stettler, Matthew; Takakuwa, Jeffrey H.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, by generating beam spots size with radius rTesla short focal length solenoid compresses the beam in the presence of the large volume plasma near the end of this section before the target. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including selected topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Here we describe the accelerator commissioning and time-resolved ionoluminescence measurements of yttrium aluminum perovskite using the fully integrated accelerator and neutralized drift compression components.

  3. Ferromagnetic Convection in a Densely Packed Porous Medium with Magnetic-Field-Dependent Viscosity - Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jyoti; Kumar, Pankaj; Kumari, Kultaran; Manan, Shweta

    2018-02-01

    The effect of magnetic-field-dependent (MFD) viscosity on the thermal convection in a ferromagnetic fluid in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field is investigated for a fluid layer saturating a densely packed porous medium using the Darcy model. A correction is applied to the model by Sunil et al. [Z. Naturforsch. 59, 397 (2004)], which is very important to predict the correct behaviour of MFD viscosity. A linear stability analysis is carried out for stationary modes. The critical wave number and critical Rayleigh number for the onset of instability, for the case of free boundaries, are determined numerically for sufficiently large values of the magnetic parameter M1. Numerical results are obtained and illustrated graphically. It is shown that MFD viscosity has stabilizing effect on the system, whereas medium permeability has a destabilizing effect.

  4. Observations of the contracting dense core ahead of HH 80N using deuterated species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masqué, Josep-Maria; Beltran, Maite; Girart, Josep Miquel; Estalella, Robert

    2008-04-01

    HH 80N is the northern counterpart of the brightest Herbig-Haro objects known, HH 80-81. A massive (~ 20 M_sun) and large (~ 0.2) dense clump was found ahead of HH 80N. This core appears to be contracting at supersonic infall velocities and it harbors a very young protostar which is powering a bipolar outflow. Observations of several molecular species reveals an interesting complex cheistry within the core, which may be caused by the UV photons coming from HH 80N. All thses features make this region an interesting target to study. We propose to observe several deuterated species as a probes for the high density gas, in order to understand this peculiar core

  5. Jets and high pT hadrons in dense matter: recent results from STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Peter; Klay, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    We review recent measurements of high transverse momentum (high pT) hadron production in nuclear collisions by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC. The previously observed suppression in central Au+Au collisions has been extended to much higher pT. New measurements from d+Au collisions are presented which help disentangle the mechanisms responsible for the suppression. Inclusive single hadron spectra are enhanced in d+Au relative to p+p, while two-particle azimuthal distributions are observed to be similar in p+p, d+Au and peripheral Au+Au collisions. The large suppression of inclusive hadron production and absence of the away-side jet-like correlations in central Au+Au collisions are shown to be due to interactions of the jets with the very dense medium produced in these collisions

  6. Multiple solutions to dense systems in radar scattering using a preconditioned block GMRES solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyse, W.E. [Advanced Software Resources, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Multiple right-hand sides occur in radar scattering calculations in the computation of the simulated radar return from a body at a large number of angles. Each desired angle requires a right-hand side vector to be computed and the solution generated. These right-hand sides are naturally smooth functions of the angle parameters and this property is utilized in a novel way to compute solutions an order of magnitude faster than LINPACK The modeling technique addressed is the Method of Moments (MOM), i.e. a boundary element method for time harmonic Maxwell`s equations. Discretization by this method produces general complex dense systems of rank 100`s to 100,000`s. The usual way to produce the required multiple solutions is via LU factorization and solution routines such as found in LINPACK. Our method uses the block GMRES iterative method to directly iterate a subset of the desired solutions to convergence.

  7. The Effects of Dense Shelf-Water Cascading in the World Ocean Seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblas, D.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Micallef, A.

    2016-12-01

    Dense shelf-water cascading (DSWC) is a seasonal phenomenon that occurs in marine regions around the globe. DSWC starts when surface waters over the continental shelf become denser than surrounding waters (by cooling, evaporation or sea-ice formation with brine rejection) and sink, generating near-bottom gravity flows that move downslope along the seabed, often using submarine canyons as preferential conduits. This process contributes to deep-ocean ventilation, plays a role in the global thermohaline circulation (and hence global climate), and involves large-scale transfer of energy and matter (including sedimentary particles, organic carbon, chemical pollutants and light litter) from shallow to deep waters. The large volumes involved in DSWC flows can result in appreciable sediment erosion and downslope transport. However, very few field studies discuss DSWC as an effective seafloor-sculpting agent, and none of them at a global scale. Here we present a new project that investigates the seafloor imprint of DSWC on modern continental shelves and slopes. This study represents a timely updated inventory of global DSWC occurrences and, in selected areas, provides a geomorphologic and geomorphometric analysis focused on identifying the seafloor drainage signature of DSWC. The study should provide a better characterization of the distribution, hydrodynamics and sculpting capacity of dense shelf-water currents, as well as their morphological evolution through time under the influence of dynamic processes. This will allow us to make predictions about the future trends (intensification vs. lessening, and geographic shifts) and role of DSWC on seafloor dynamics under a changing climate on different continental margins worldwide.

  8. Multiple stage railgun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaland, K.; Hawke, R.S.; Scudder, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    A multiple stage magnetic railgun accelerator for accelerating a projectile by movement of a plasma arc along the rails. The railgun is divided into a plurality of successive rail stages which are sequentially energized by separate energy sources as the projectile moves through the bore of the railgun. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can be prevented by connection of the energy sources to the rails through isolation diodes. Propagation of energy from an energized rail stage back towards the breech end of the railgun can also be prevented by dividing the rails into electrically isolated rail sections. In such case means are used to extinguish the arc at the end of each energized stage and a fuse or laser device is used to initiate a new plasma arc in the next energized rail stage

  9. Turbine stage model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantsev, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    A model of turbine stage for calculations of NPP turbine department dynamics in real time was developed. The simulation results were compared with manufacturer calculations for NPP low-speed and fast turbines. The comparison results have shown that the model is valid for real time simulation of all modes of turbines operation. The model allows calculating turbine stage parameters with 1% accuracy. It was shown that the developed turbine stage model meets the accuracy requirements if the data of turbine blades setting angles for all turbine stages are available [ru

  10. ON THE FORMATION OF GLYCOLALDEHYDE IN DENSE MOLECULAR CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Paul M.; Kelly, George; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Burke, Daren J.; Raza, Zamaan, E-mail: paul.woods@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a simple monosaccharide sugar linked to prebiotic chemistry. Recently, it was detected in a molecular core in the star-forming region G31.41+0.31 at a reasonably high abundance. We investigate the formation of glycolaldehyde at 10 K to determine whether it can form efficiently under typical dense core conditions. Using an astrochemical model, we test five different reaction mechanisms that have been proposed in the astrophysical literature, finding that a gas-phase formation route is unlikely. Of the grain-surface formation routes, only two are efficient enough at very low temperatures to produce sufficient glycolaldehyde to match the observational estimates, with the mechanism culminating in CH{sub 3}OH + HCO being favored. However, when we consider the feasibility of these mechanisms from a reaction chemistry perspective, the second grain-surface route looks more promising, H{sub 3}CO + HCO.

  11. Dense plasmas at the PUC (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui, Hernan

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the major results obtained in the research program of the Pontifical Catholic University's Optics and Plasma Laboratory in the area of transient discharges in dense plasmas during the past decade. The most significant results in plasma focus, Z-pinch based on neutral gas, vacuum spark and X-pinch are presented. The work carried out to date has led to the design and construction of a new pulse power generator, LLAMPUDKEN which will aid in the continued development of the area. The most significant characteristics of this generator's design is presented, as well as their relevance to the program's future. The novel aspects of the design which make LLAMPUDKEN a unique instrument worldwide are emphasized. A schedule for future work is presented

  12. The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharzeev, Dmitri E. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2012-05-10

    This technical report describes the work done under the DOE grant DE-FG-88ER41723 (final award number DE-SC0005645), "The physics of hot and dense quark-gluon matter", during the year of 12/01/2010 through 11/30/2011. As planned in the proposal, the performed research focused along two main thrusts: 1) topological effects in hot quark-gluon matter and 2) phenomenology of relativistic heavy ion collisions. The results of research are presented in 12 papers published in reputable refereed journals (Physical Review Letters, Physical Review, Physics Letters and Nuclear Physics). All of the performed research is directly related to the experimental programs of DOE, especially at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. Much of it also has broader interdisciplinary implications - for example, the work on the non-dissipative chiral magnetic current is directly relevant for quantum computing. The attached report describes the performed work in detail.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of temperature equilibration in dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosli, J. N.; Graziani, F. R.; More, R. M.; Murillo, M. S.; Streitz, F. H.; Surh, M. P.; Benedict, L. X.; Hau-Riege, S.; Langdon, A. B.; London, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    The temperature equilibration rate between electrons and protons in dense hydrogen has been calculated with molecular dynamics simulations for temperatures between 10 and 600eV and densities between 1020cm-3to1024cm-3 . Careful attention has been devoted to convergence of the simulations, including the role of semiclassical potentials. We find that for Coulomb logarithms L≳1 , a model by Gericke-Murillo-Schlanges (GMS) [D. O. Gericke , Phys. Rev. E 65, 036418 (2002)] based on a T -matrix method and the approach by Brown-Preston-Singleton [L. S. Brown , Phys. Rep. 410, 237 (2005)] agrees with the simulation data to within the error bars of the simulation. For smaller Coulomb logarithms, the GMS model is consistent with the simulation results. Landau-Spitzer models are consistent with the simulation data for L>4 .

  14. Dynamical density functional theory for dense atomic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, A J

    2006-01-01

    Starting from Newton's equations of motion, we derive a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) applicable to atomic liquids. The theory has the feature that it requires as input the Helmholtz free energy functional from equilibrium density functional theory. This means that, given a reliable equilibrium free energy functional, the correct equilibrium fluid density profile is guaranteed. We show that when the isothermal compressibility is small, the DDFT generates the correct value for the speed of sound in a dense liquid. We also interpret the theory as a dynamical equation for a coarse grained fluid density and show that the theory can be used (making further approximations) to derive the standard mode coupling theory that is used to describe the glass transition. The present theory should provide a useful starting point for describing the dynamics of inhomogeneous atomic fluids

  15. Dense hadron star in quark degree of freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzeng Yiharn

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The quark degree of freedom may play an important role as one studies dense hadron stars which can help to understand the universe origin. We add a temperature dependence to the effective quark mass adopted from a quark-quark interaction on the QCD basis to probe properties of the star in the quark degree of freedom. Based on this interaction, the quark matter’s equation of state is obtained and its thermodynamic characteristics is investigated in detail. Stability of a star made of such matter is examined with and without strange quarks. The Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov equation along with the condition that dm=dr = 4πr2E are used to calculate mass and radius of such a star. Exact computations are made to calculate the star’s radius and mass at several temperatures. Comparisons of results from these temperatures are made and the significance is carefully investigated and discussed.

  16. Simultaneous dense coding affected by fluctuating massless scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiming; Ye, Yiyong; Luo, Darong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the simultaneous dense coding (SDC) protocol affected by fluctuating massless scalar field. The noisy model of SDC protocol is constructed and the master equation that governs the SDC evolution is deduced. The success probabilities of SDC protocol are discussed for different locking operators under the influence of vacuum fluctuations. We find that the joint success probability is independent of the locking operators, but other success probabilities are not. For quantum Fourier transform and double controlled-NOT operators, the success probabilities drop with increasing two-atom distance, but SWAP operator is not. Unlike the SWAP operator, the success probabilities of Bob and Charlie are different. For different noisy interval values, different locking operators have different robustness to noise.

  17. Quantum Control of Open Systems and Dense Atomic Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Christopher

    Controlling the dynamics of open quantum systems; i.e. quantum systems that decohere because of interactions with the environment, is an active area of research with many applications in quantum optics and quantum computation. My thesis expands the scope of this inquiry by seeking to control open systems in proximity to an additional system. The latter could be a classical system such as metal nanoparticles, or a quantum system such as a cluster of similar atoms. By modelling the interactions between the systems, we are able to expand the accessible state space of the quantum system in question. For a single, three-level quantum system, I examine isolated systems that have only normal spontaneous emission. I then show that intensity-intensity correlation spectra, which depend directly on the density matrix of the system, can be used detect whether transitions share a common energy level. This detection is possible due to the presence of quantum interference effects between two transitions if they are connected. This effect allows one to asses energy level structure diagrams in complex atoms/molecules. By placing an open quantum system near a nanoparticle dimer, I show that the spontaneous emission rate of the system can be changed "on demand" by changing the polarization of an incident, driving field. In a three-level, Lambda system, this allows a qubit to both retain high qubit fidelity when it is operating, and to be rapidly initialized to a pure state once it is rendered unusable by decoherence. This type of behaviour is not possible in a single open quantum system; therefore adding a classical system nearby extends the overall control space of the quantum system. An open quantum system near identical neighbours in a dense ensemble is another example of how the accessible state space can be expanded. I show that a dense ensemble of atoms rapidly becomes disordered with states that are not directly excited by an incident field becoming significantly populated

  18. Integrals of motion for critical dense polymers and symplectic fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigro, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    We consider critical dense polymers L(1,2). We obtain for this model the eigenvalues of the local integrals of motion of the underlying conformal field theory by means of a thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. We give a detailed description of the relation between this model and symplectic fermions including some examples of the indecomposable structure of the transfer matrix in the continuum limit. Integrals of motion are defined directly on the lattice in terms of the Temperley–Lieb algebra and their eigenvalues are obtained and expressed as an infinite sum of the eigenvalues of the continuum integrals of motion. An elegant decomposition of the transfer matrix in terms of a finite number of lattice integrals of motion is obtained, thus providing a reason for their introduction

  19. Field electron emission from dense array of microneedles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Aoyagi, M.; Kitai, T.; Ishikawa, K.

    1978-01-01

    Characteristics of field electron emission from the dense array of microneedles of tungsten prepared on a 10-μm tungsten filament were measured at an environmental pressure of approx.1 x 10 -8 Torr (1.33 x 10 -6 Pa). Electron emission was not uniform over the filament surface, but the variation of emission current with applied voltage explicitly obeyed the Fowler-Nordheim relationship. At an emission current of approx.10 -4 A, a vacuum arc was induced that led to a permanent change in current-voltage characteristic. Current fluctuation was dependent on emitter temperature and applied voltage, and the lowest fluctuation of about 4% was routinely obtained at approx.550 K and at applied voltages several percent lower than the arc-inducing voltage. Macroscopic current density amounted to approx.20-80 mA/cm 2 at the best stability

  20. Integrals of motion for critical dense polymers and symplectic fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Alessandro

    2009-10-01

    We consider critical dense polymers \\mathcal {L}(1,2) . We obtain for this model the eigenvalues of the local integrals of motion of the underlying conformal field theory by means of a thermodynamic Bethe ansatz. We give a detailed description of the relation between this model and symplectic fermions including some examples of the indecomposable structure of the transfer matrix in the continuum limit. Integrals of motion are defined directly on the lattice in terms of the Temperley-Lieb algebra and their eigenvalues are obtained and expressed as an infinite sum of the eigenvalues of the continuum integrals of motion. An elegant decomposition of the transfer matrix in terms of a finite number of lattice integrals of motion is obtained, thus providing a reason for their introduction.