WorldWideScience

Sample records for stage continuous time

  1. A three-stage discrete-time population model: continuous versus seasonal reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleh, Azmy S; Dib, Youssef M; Jang, Sophia R-J

    2007-10-01

    We consider a three-stage discrete-time population model with density-dependent survivorship and time-dependent reproduction. We provide stability analysis for two types of birth mechanisms: continuous and seasonal. We show that when birth is continuous there exists a unique globally stable interior equilibrium provided that the inherent net reproductive number is greater than unity. If it is less than unity, then extinction is the population's fate. We then analyze the case when birth is a function of period two and show that the unique two-cycle is globally attracting when the inherent net reproductive number is greater than unity, while if it is less than unity the population goes to extinction. The two birth types are then compared. It is shown that for low birth rates the adult average number over a one-year period is always higher when reproduction is continuous. Numerical simulations suggest that this remains true for high birth rates. Thus periodic birth rates of period two are deleterious for the three-stage population model. This is different from the results obtained for a two-stage model discussed by Ackleh and Jang (J. Diff. Equ. Appl., 13, 261-274, 2007), where it was shown that for low birth rates seasonal breeding results in higher adult averages.

  2. Distributed synthesis in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanns, Holger; Krčál, Jan; Vester, Steen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a formalism modelling communication of distributed agents strictly in continuous-time. Within this framework, we study the problem of synthesising local strategies for individual agents such that a specified set of goal states is reached, or reached with at least a given probability...

  3. For Time-Continuous Optimisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Mary Katherine; Ayres, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for optimisation in design normatively assume an artefact end-point, disallowing continuous architecture that engages living systems, dynamic behaviour, and complex systems. In our Flora Robotica investigations of symbiotic plant-robot bio-hybrids, we re- quire computational tools...... and strategies that help us evaluate designed behaviours, rather than discrete ‘things’. In this paper, we present our strategy of using embodied interaction to facilitate engagement with a scenario’s full scope of possible states and their continuous changes over time. We detail the ways in which this approach...

  4. Chemical Continuous Time Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Tomás; Dentz, Marco

    2017-12-01

    Kinetic Monte Carlo methods such as the Gillespie algorithm model chemical reactions as random walks in particle number space. The interreaction times are exponentially distributed under the assumption that the system is well mixed. We introduce an arbitrary interreaction time distribution, which may account for the impact of incomplete mixing on chemical reactions, and in general stochastic reaction delay, which may represent the impact of extrinsic noise. This process defines an inhomogeneous continuous time random walk in particle number space, from which we derive a generalized chemical master equation. This leads naturally to a generalization of the Gillespie algorithm. Based on this formalism, we determine the modified chemical rate laws for different interreaction time distributions. This framework traces Michaelis-Menten-type kinetics back to finite-mean delay times, and predicts time-nonlocal macroscopic reaction kinetics as a consequence of broadly distributed delays. Non-Markovian kinetics exhibit weak ergodicity breaking and show key features of reactions under local nonequilibrium.

  5. On Continuous Time Markov Processes in Bargaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houba, H.E.D.

    2008-01-01

    For bilateral stochastic bargaining procedures embedded in stable homogeneous continuous-time Markov processes, we show unusual limit results when time between rounds vanish. Standard convergence results require that some states are instantaneous. © 2008.

  6. Structure of retracted tendons after staged repair following continuous traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Mazda; Gerber, Christian; Snedeker, Jess G; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Meyer, Dominik C

    2011-12-01

    The effect of staged repair involving continuous re-lengthening of the retracted musculotendinous unit after rotator cuff tear is not known. We quantified changes in chronically retracted tendons undergoing no repair or a staged repair involving an initial re-lengthening of the musculotendinous unit by traction in a sheep model of massive rotator cuff tear. Infraspinatus tendons of 12 sheep were released and allowed to retract for 4 months. Repair was performed after the retracted musculotendinous unit had been progressively returned to its original length through continuous traction in 8 sheep (group I). In the other 4 sheep (group II) traction was not successful and the tendons remained retracted. Tendon structure was assessed macroscopically, by MRI, histology, and TEM. Normalized to their contralateral controls, at sacrifice, tendon thickness was unchanged in group I (116%, n.s) and increased in group II (129%, P Retracted musculotendinous units have deteriorated tendons, characterized by increased collagen fiber crimp, and ultrastructural collagen fibril atrophy and disorganization. Continuous traction may arrest and partially restore degenerative changes in retracted tendon. The findings of this study might contribute to new approaches for the treatment of chronic "irreparable" rotator cuff tears.

  7. Structured population dynamics: continuous size and discontinuous stage structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffoni, Giuseppe; Pasquali, Sara

    2007-04-01

    A nonlinear stochastic model for the dynamics of a population with either a continuous size structure or a discontinuous stage structure is formulated in the Eulerian formalism. It takes into account dispersion effects due to stochastic variability of the development process of the individuals. The discrete equations of the numerical approximation are derived, and an analysis of the existence and stability of the equilibrium states is performed. An application to a copepod population is illustrated; numerical results of Eulerian and Lagrangian models are compared.

  8. Continuity of Local Time: An applied perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Jorge M.; Waymire, Edward C.; Thomann, Enrique A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of local time for Brownian motion ranks among the most notable mathematical results in the theory of stochastic processes. This article addresses its implications from the point of view of applications. In particular an extension of previous results on an explicit role of continuity of (natural) local time is obtained for applications to recent classes of problems in physics, biology and finance involving discontinuities in a dispersion coefficient. The main theorem and its corolla...

  9. Parameter Estimation in Continuous Time Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela M. ATANASIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will aim to presents the applications of a continuous-time parameter estimation method for estimating structural parameters of a real bridge structure. For the purpose of illustrating this method two case studies of a bridge pile located in a highly seismic risk area are considered, for which the structural parameters for the mass, damping and stiffness are estimated. The estimation process is followed by the validation of the analytical results and comparison with them to the measurement data. Further benefits and applications for the continuous-time parameter estimation method in civil engineering are presented in the final part of this paper.

  10. a Continuous-Time Positive Linear System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungsup Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a computational method to construct positive realizations with sparse matrices for continuous-time positive linear systems with multiple complex poles. To construct a positive realization of a continuous-time system, we use a Markov sequence similar to the impulse response sequence that is used in the discrete-time case. The existence of the proposed positive realization can be analyzed with the concept of a polyhedral convex cone. We provide a constructive algorithm to compute positive realizations with sparse matrices of some positive systems under certain conditions. A sufficient condition for the existence of a positive realization, under which the proposed constructive algorithm works well, is analyzed.

  11. Path probabilities of continuous time random walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eule, Stephan; Friedrich, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Employing the path integral formulation of a broad class of anomalous diffusion processes, we derive the exact relations for the path probability densities of these processes. In particular, we obtain a closed analytical solution for the path probability distribution of a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) process. This solution is given in terms of its waiting time distribution and short time propagator of the corresponding random walk as a solution of a Dyson equation. Applying our analytical solution we derive generalized Feynman–Kac formulae. (paper)

  12. Time-delay analyzer with continuous discretization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayatyan, G.L.; Darbinyan, K.T.; Mkrtchyan, K.K.; Stepanyan, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    A time-delay analyzer is described which when triggered by a start pulse of adjustable duration performs continuous discretization of the analyzed signal within nearly 22 ns time intervals, the recording in a memory unit with following slow read-out of the information to the computer and its processing. The time-delay analyzer consists of four CAMAC-VECTOR systems of unit width. With its help one can separate comparatively short, small-amplitude rare signals against the background of quasistationary noise processes. 4 refs.; 3 figs

  13. Path probabilities of continuous time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eule, Stephan; Friedrich, Rudolf

    2014-12-01

    Employing the path integral formulation of a broad class of anomalous diffusion processes, we derive the exact relations for the path probability densities of these processes. In particular, we obtain a closed analytical solution for the path probability distribution of a Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) process. This solution is given in terms of its waiting time distribution and short time propagator of the corresponding random walk as a solution of a Dyson equation. Applying our analytical solution we derive generalized Feynman-Kac formulae.

  14. Interaction-aided continuous time quantum search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joonwoo; Kwon, Younghun; Baek, Inchan; Yoon, Dalsun

    2005-01-01

    The continuous quantum search algorithm (based on the Farhi-Gutmann Hamiltonian evolution) is known to be analogous to the Grover (or discrete time quantum) algorithm. Any errors introduced in Grover algorithm are fatal to its success. In the same way the Farhi-Gutmann Hamiltonian algorithm has a severe difficulty when the Hamiltonian is perturbed. In this letter we will show that the interaction term in quantum search Hamiltonian (actually which is in the generalized quantum search Hamiltonian) can save the perturbed Farhi-Gutmann Hamiltonian that should otherwise fail. We note that this fact is quite remarkable since it implies that introduction of interaction can be a way to correct some errors on the continuous time quantum search

  15. Inference for Continuous-Time Probabilistic Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Proceedings of the European Conference in Machine Learn- ing and Principals and Practice of Knowledge and Discovery in Databases (ECML- PKDD). Williams , C. K . I...interaction net- works. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B, 75(5):821–849, 2013. [4] Christopher DuBois, Carter T. Butts, and Padhraic...pages 421–430, 2007. [20] E. Busra Celikkaya, Christian R. Shelton, and William Lam. Factored filtering of continuous- time systems. In Proceedings of

  16. Expectation propagation for continuous time stochastic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseke, Botond; Schnoerr, David; Sanguinetti, Guido; Opper, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    We consider the inverse problem of reconstructing the posterior measure over the trajectories of a diffusion process from discrete time observations and continuous time constraints. We cast the problem in a Bayesian framework and derive approximations to the posterior distributions of single time marginals using variational approximate inference, giving rise to an expectation propagation type algorithm. For non-linear diffusion processes, this is achieved by leveraging moment closure approximations. We then show how the approximation can be extended to a wide class of discrete-state Markov jump processes by making use of the chemical Langevin equation. Our empirical results show that the proposed method is computationally efficient and provides good approximations for these classes of inverse problems. (paper)

  17. A continuous time Cournot duopoly with delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gori, Luca; Guerrini, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the classical repeated duopoly model with quantity-setting firms of Bischi et al. (1998) by assuming that production of goods is subject to some gestation lags but exchanges take place continuously in the market. The model is expressed in the form of differential equations with discrete delays. By using some recent mathematical techniques and numerical experiments, results show some dynamic phenomena that cannot be observed when delays are absent. In addition, depending on the extent of time delays and inertia, synchronisation failure can arise even in the event of homogeneous firms.

  18. Heterogeneous continuous-time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.; Tupikina, Liubov

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a heterogeneous continuous-time random walk (HCTRW) model as a versatile analytical formalism for studying and modeling diffusion processes in heterogeneous structures, such as porous or disordered media, multiscale or crowded environments, weighted graphs or networks. We derive the exact form of the propagator and investigate the effects of spatiotemporal heterogeneities onto the diffusive dynamics via the spectral properties of the generalized transition matrix. In particular, we show how the distribution of first-passage times changes due to local and global heterogeneities of the medium. The HCTRW formalism offers a unified mathematical language to address various diffusion-reaction problems, with numerous applications in material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology, and social sciences.

  19. Continuous-Time Random Walks at All Times

    OpenAIRE

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2009-01-01

    Continuous-time random walks (CTRW) play important role in understanding of a wide range of phenomena. However, most theoretical studies of these models concentrate only on stationary-state dynamics. We present a new theoretical approach, based on generalized master equations picture, that allowed us to obtain explicit expressions for Laplace transforms for all dynamic quantities for different CTRW models. This theoretical method leads to the effective description of CTRW at all times. Specif...

  20. The Effect of Effluent Recirculation in a Semi-Continuous Two-Stage Anaerobic Digestion System

    OpenAIRE

    Solmaz Aslanzadeh; Karthik Rajendran; Azam Jeihanipour; Mohammad J. Taherzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The effect of recirculation in increasing organic loading rate (OLR) and decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) in a semi-continuous two-stage anaerobic digestion system using stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) was evaluated. Two-parallel processes were in operation for 100 days, one with recirculation (closed system) and the other without recirculation (open system). For this purpose, two structurally different carbohydrate-based substrates were used; st...

  1. Trapping shape-controlled nanoparticle nucleation and growth stages via continuous-flow chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    LaGrow, Alec P.

    2017-02-06

    Continuous flow chemistry is used to trap the nucleation and growth stages of platinum-nickel nano-octahedra with second time resolution and high throughputs to probe their properties ex situ. The growth starts from poorly crystalline particles (nucleation) at 5 seconds, to crystalline 1.5 nm particles bounded by the {111}-facets at 7.5 seconds, followed by truncation and further growth to octahedral nanoparticles at 20 seconds.

  2. Continuous-time random walks at all times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2009-12-21

    Continuous-time random walks (CTRW) play an important role in understanding of a wide range of phenomena. However, most theoretical studies of these models concentrate only on dynamics at long times. We present a new theoretical approach, based on generalized master equations picture, which allowed us to obtain explicit expressions for Laplace transforms for all dynamic quantities for different CTRW models. This theoretical method leads to the effective description of CTRW at all times. Specific calculations are performed for homogeneous, periodic models and for CTRW with irreversible detachments. The approach to stationary states for CTRW is analyzed. Our results are also used to analyze generalized fluctuations theorem.

  3. Continuous-time random walk with correlated waiting times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechkin, Aleksei V; Hofmann, Michael; Sokolov, Igor M

    2009-09-01

    Based on the Langevin description of the continuous time random walk (CTRW), we consider a generalization of CTRW in which the waiting times between the subsequent jumps are correlated. We discuss the cases of exponential and slowly decaying persistent power-law correlations between the waiting times as two generic examples and obtain the corresponding mean squared displacements as functions of time. In the case of exponential-type correlations the (sub)diffusion at short times is slower than in the absence of correlations. At long times the behavior of the mean squared displacement is the same as in uncorrelated CTRW. For power-law correlations we find subdiffusion characterized by the same exponent at all times, which appears to be smaller than the one in uncorrelated CTRW. Interestingly, in the limiting case of an extremely long power-law correlations, the (sub)diffusion exponent does not tend to zero, but is bounded from below by the subdiffusion exponent corresponding to a short-time behavior in the case of exponential correlations.

  4. Continuous removal of endocrine disruptors by versatile peroxidase using a two-stage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada-Puig, Roberto; Lu-Chau, Thelmo A; Eibes, Gemma; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Maria T; Lema, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    The oxidant Mn(3+) -malonate, generated by the ligninolytic enzyme versatile peroxidase in a two-stage system, was used for the continuous removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from synthetic and real wastewaters. One plasticizer (bisphenol-A), one bactericide (triclosan) and three estrogenic compounds (estrone, 17β-estradiol, and 17α-ethinylestradiol) were removed from wastewater at degradation rates in the range of 28-58 µg/L·min, with low enzyme inactivation. First, the optimization of three main parameters affecting the generation of Mn(3+) -malonate (hydraulic retention time as well as Na-malonate and H2 O2 feeding rates) was conducted following a response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal conditions, the degradation of the EDCs was proven at high (1.3-8.8 mg/L) and environmental (1.2-6.1 µg/L) concentrations. Finally, when the two-stage system was compared with a conventional enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR) using the same enzyme, a 14-fold increase of the removal efficiency was observed. At the same time, operational problems found during EDCs removal in the EMR system (e.g., clogging of the membrane and enzyme inactivation) were avoided by physically separating the stages of complex formation and pollutant oxidation, allowing the system to be operated for a longer period (∼8 h). This study demonstrates the feasibility of the two-stage enzymatic system for removing EDCs both at high and environmental concentrations. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Discounting Models for Outcomes over Continuous Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Charles M.; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    Events that occur over a period of time can be described either as sequences of outcomes at discrete times or as functions of outcomes in an interval of time. This paper presents discounting models for events of the latter type. Conditions on preferences are shown to be satisfied if and only if t...... if the preferences are represented by a function that is an integral of a discounting function times a scale defined on outcomes at instants of time....

  6. Spatially continuous interpolation of water stage and water depths using the Everglades depth estimation network (EDEN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlstine, Leonard; Higer, Aaron; Palaseanu, Monica; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Mazzotti, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) is an integrated network of real-time water-level monitoring, ground-elevation modeling, and water-surface modeling that provides scientists and managers with current (2000-present), online water-stage and water-depth information for the entire freshwater portion of the Greater Everglades. Continuous daily spatial interpolations of the EDEN network stage data are presented on a 400-square-meter grid spacing. EDEN offers a consistent and documented dataset that can be used by scientists and managers to (1) guide large-scale field operations, (2) integrate hydrologic and ecological responses, and (3) support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem responses to the implementation of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) The target users are biologists and ecologists examining trophic level responses to hydrodynamic changes in the Everglades.

  7. Poincare invariance for continuous-time histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvidou, Ntina

    2002-01-01

    We show that the relativistic analog of the two types of time translation in a nonrelativistic history theory is the existence of two distinct Poincare groups. The 'internal' Poincare group is analogous to the one that arises in the standard canonical quantization scheme; the 'external' Poincare group is similar to the group that arises in a Lagrangian description of the standard theory. In particular, it performs explicit changes of the space-time foliation that is implicitly assumed in standard canonical field theory

  8. Continuous-time quantum walks on star graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs. It is shown that quantum central limit theorem for a continuous-time quantum walk on star graphs for N-fold star power graph, which are invariant under the quantum component of adjacency matrix, converges to continuous-time quantum walk on K 2 graphs (complete graph with two vertices) and the probability of observing walk tends to the uniform distribution.

  9. Model checking conditional CSL for continuous-time Markov chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Yang; Xu, Ming; Zhan, Naijun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the model-checking problem of continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs) with respect to conditional logic. To the end, we extend Continuous Stochastic Logic introduced in Aziz et al. (2000) [1] to Conditional Continuous Stochastic Logic (CCSL) by introducing a conditional p...

  10. Language Emptiness of Continuous-Time Parametric Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benes, Nikola; Bezdek, Peter; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2015-01-01

    Parametric timed automata extend the standard timed automata with the possibility to use parameters in the clock guards. In general, if the parameters are real-valued, the problem of language emptiness of such automata is undecidable even for various restricted subclasses. We thus focus on the case...... of these clocks is compared with (an arbitrary number of) parameters, we show that the parametric language emptiness is decidable. The undecidability result tightens the bounds of a previous result which assumed six parameters, while the decidability result extends the existing approaches that deal with discrete...

  11. Continuity of nursing and the time of sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstad, Ingunn; Torjuul, Kirsti

    2009-04-01

    This paper explores the relationship between temporal continuity in nursing and temporal features of sickness. It is based on phenomenological and hermeneutical philosophy, empirical studies of sickness time, and the nursing theories of Nightingale, of Benner and of Benner and Wrubel. In the first part, temporal continuity is defined as distinct from interpersonal continuity. Tensions between temporal continuity and discontinuity are discussed in the contexts of care management, of conceptualisations of disease and of time itself. Temporal limitations to the methodological concept of situation are discussed. The main part of this paper explores nurses' possibilities to relate to their patients' time, and how temporal features of sickness may warrant temporal continuity of nursing. Three temporal characteristics of sickness are discussed: the immediacy of patients' suffering, the basic continuity of life through sickness and health care, and the indeterminism and precariousness of sickness. The timing of nursing acts is discussed. The paper explores how sickness is both part of the continuity of life, and threatens this continuity. It concludes that this tension is implicitly recognised in the temporal continuity of nursing, which allows for discontinuous and continuous aspects of sickness time. Nurses accordingly perceive the sick person's time at several levels of temporality, and distinguish highly complex temporal processes in their patients' trajectory. Temporal continuity provides the time, flexibility, and closeness for nurses to perceive and act into time dimensions of individual sickness. The paper shows that temporal continuity of nursing is grounded in temporal characteristics of severe sickness. It suggests that temporal continuity is an important theoretical concept in nursing.

  12. Divided Timed and Continuous Timed Assessment Protocols and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, David.

    2013-01-01

    Children from a low socioeconomic status (SES) are exposed to numerous stress factors that are negatively associated with sustained attention and academic performance. This association suggests that the timed component of lengthy assessments may be unfair for students from such backgrounds, as they may have an inability to sustain attention during…

  13. Continuous Time Structural Equation Modeling with R Package ctsem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Driver

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce ctsem, an R package for continuous time structural equation modeling of panel (N > 1 and time series (N = 1 data, using full information maximum likelihood. Most dynamic models (e.g., cross-lagged panel models in the social and behavioural sciences are discrete time models. An assumption of discrete time models is that time intervals between measurements are equal, and that all subjects were assessed at the same intervals. Violations of this assumption are often ignored due to the difficulty of accounting for varying time intervals, therefore parameter estimates can be biased and the time course of effects becomes ambiguous. By using stochastic differential equations to estimate an underlying continuous process, continuous time models allow for any pattern of measurement occasions. By interfacing to OpenMx, ctsem combines the flexible specification of structural equation models with the enhanced data gathering opportunities and improved estimation of continuous time models. ctsem can estimate relationships over time for multiple latent processes, measured by multiple noisy indicators with varying time intervals between observations. Within and between effects are estimated simultaneously by modeling both observed covariates and unobserved heterogeneity. Exogenous shocks with different shapes, group differences, higher order diffusion effects and oscillating processes can all be simply modeled. We first introduce and define continuous time models, then show how to specify and estimate a range of continuous time models using ctsem.

  14. A continuous-time control model on production planning network ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A continuous-time control model on production planning network. DEA Omorogbe, MIU Okunsebor. Abstract. In this paper, we give a slightly detailed review of Graves and Hollywood model on constant inventory tactical planning model for a job shop. The limitations of this model are pointed out and a continuous time ...

  15. Performance test of a 6-stage continuous reactor for palm methyl ester production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leevijit, T; Tongurai, C; Prateepchaikul, G; Wisutmethangoon, W

    2008-01-01

    Effects of residence time (3-12 min), stirrer speed (0-800 rpm), and NaOH concentration (0.25-1.0 wt% of oil) on the production performance of the designed 6-stage continuous reactor (2.272 l) for transesterification of palm oil were investigated at molar ratio of methanol to oil of 6:1 and temperature of 60 degrees C. Higher stirrer speed increased the reaction rate up to an appropriate speed but excessive stirrer speed decreased the reaction rate. Inappropriate stirrer speed runs dramatically decreased the production capacity of the reactor. Higher NaOH concentration significantly increased reaction rate and production capacity of the reactor. The reactor had a residence time distribution equivalent to 5.98 ideal CSTRs in series and a production performance equivalent to a plug flow reactor. At NaOH of 1.0 wt% of oil, the reactor could produce saleable biodiesel within residence time of 6 min in which a production capacity was 17.3 l/h and a power consumption of stirrer was 0.6 kW/m(3).

  16. Breast cancer stage at diagnosis: is travel time important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A; Boscoe, Francis P; Johnson, Christopher J; Goldberg, Daniel W; Sherman, Recinda; Cockburn, Myles

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have produced inconsistent results in their examination of the potential association between proximity to healthcare or mammography facilities and breast cancer stage at diagnosis. Using a multistate dataset, we re-examine this issue by investigating whether travel time to a patient's diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility impacts breast cancer stage at diagnosis. We studied 161,619 women 40 years and older diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from ten state population based cancer registries in the United States. For each woman, we calculated travel time to their diagnosing facility and nearest mammography facility. Logistic multilevel models of late versus early stage were fitted, and odds ratios were calculated for travel times, controlling for age, race/ethnicity, census tract poverty, rural/urban residence, health insurance, and state random effects. Seventy-six percent of women in the study lived less than 20 min from their diagnosing facility, and 93 percent lived less than 20 min from the nearest mammography facility. Late stage at diagnosis was not associated with increasing travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility. Diagnosis age under 50, Hispanic and Non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, high census tract poverty, and no health insurance were all significantly associated with late stage at diagnosis. Travel time to diagnosing facility or nearest mammography facility was not a determinant of late stage of breast cancer at diagnosis, and better geographic proximity did not assure more favorable stage distributions. Other factors beyond geographic proximity that can affect access should be evaluated more closely, including facility capacity, insurance acceptance, public transportation, and travel costs.

  17. Quantum states with continuous spectrum for a general time ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Harmonic oscillators which have time-variable mass and/or frequency may be good examples of ... time-dependent harmonic oscillator [3–8] and they can be applied to path-integral formulation of real-time ... study of the properties for time-independent Hamiltonian systems whose eigen- states are continuous ...

  18. Integral-Value Models for Outcomes over Continuous Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvey, Charles M.; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    Models of preferences between outcomes over continuous time are important for individual, corporate, and social decision making, e.g., medical treatment, infrastructure development, and environmental regulation. This paper presents a foundation for such models. It shows that conditions on prefere...... on preferences between real- or vector-valued outcomes over continuous time are satisfied if and only if the preferences are represented by a value function having an integral form......Models of preferences between outcomes over continuous time are important for individual, corporate, and social decision making, e.g., medical treatment, infrastructure development, and environmental regulation. This paper presents a foundation for such models. It shows that conditions...

  19. Delayed Nondeterminism in Continuous-Time Markov Decision Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuhausser, M.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Katoen, Joost P.

    2009-01-01

    Schedulers in randomly timed games can be classified as to whether they use timing information or not. We consider continuous-time Markov decision processes (CTMDPs) and define a hierarchy of positional (P) and history-dependent (H) schedulers which induce strictly tighter bounds on quantitative

  20. Continuous time structural equation modeling with R package ctsem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driver, C.C.; Oud, J.H.L.; Völkle, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce ctsem, an R package for continuous time structural equation modeling of panel (N > 1) and time series (N = 1) data, using full information maximum likelihood. Most dynamic models (e.g., cross-lagged panel models) in the social and behavioural sciences are discrete time models. An

  1. Continuous-time Markov decision processes theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Xianping

    2009-01-01

    This volume provides the first book entirely devoted to recent developments on the theory and applications of continuous-time Markov decision processes (MDPs). The MDPs presented here include most of the cases that arise in applications.

  2. The Effect of Effluent Recirculation in a Semi-Continuous Two-Stage Anaerobic Digestion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Rajendran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of recirculation in increasing organic loading rate (OLR and decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT in a semi-continuous two-stage anaerobic digestion system using stirred tank reactor (CSTR and an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB was evaluated. Two-parallel processes were in operation for 100 days, one with recirculation (closed system and the other without recirculation (open system. For this purpose, two structurally different carbohydrate-based substrates were used; starch and cotton. The digestion of starch and cotton in the closed system resulted in production of 91% and 80% of the theoretical methane yield during the first 60 days. In contrast, in the open system the methane yield was decreased to 82% and 56% of the theoretical value, for starch and cotton, respectively. The OLR could successfully be increased to 4 gVS/L/day for cotton and 10 gVS/L/day for starch. It is concluded that the recirculation supports the microorganisms for effective hydrolysis of polyhydrocarbons in CSTR and to preserve the nutrients in the system at higher OLRs, thereby improving the overall performance and stability of the process.

  3. A continuous time formulation of the Regge calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewin, Leo

    1988-01-01

    A complete continuous time formulation of the Regge calculus is presented by developing the associated continuous time Regge action. It is shown that the time constraint is, by way of the Bianchi identities conserved by the evolution equations. This analysis leads to an explicit first integral for each of the evolution equations. The dynamical equations of the theory are therefore reduced to a set of first-order differential equations. In this formalism the time constraints reduce to a simple sum of the integration constants. This result is unique to the Regge calculus-there does not appear to be a complete set of first integrals available for the vacuum Einstein equations. (author)

  4. Application of continuous-time random walk to statistical arbitrage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Osmekhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical statistical arbitrage strategy is proposed, where the distribution of the spread is modelled as a continuous-time random walk. Optimal boundaries, computed as a function of the mean and variance of the firstpassage time ofthe spread,maximises an objective function. The predictability of the trading strategy is analysed and contrasted for two forms of continuous-time random walk processes. We found that the waiting-time distribution has a significant impact on the prediction of the expected profit for intraday trading

  5. Enhanced biodiesel production in Neochloris oleoabundans by a semi-continuous process in two stage photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Se Young; Hong, Min Eui; Chang, Won Seok; Sim, Sang Jun

    2015-07-01

    Under autotrophic conditions, highly productive biodiesel production was achieved using a semi-continuous culture system in Neochloris oleoabundans. In particular, the flue gas generated by combustion of liquefied natural gas and natural solar radiation were used for cost-effective microalgal culture system. In semi-continuous culture, the greater part (~80%) of the culture volume containing vegetative cells grown under nitrogen-replete conditions in a first photobioreactor (PBR) was directly transferred to a second PBR and cultured sequentially under nitrogen-deplete conditions for accelerating oil accumulation. As a result, in semi-continuous culture, the productivities of biomass and biodiesel in the cells were increased by 58% (growth phase) and 51% (induction phase) compared to the cells in batch culture, respectively. The semi-continuous culture system using two stage photobioreactors is a very efficient strategy to further improve biodiesel production from microalgae under photoautotrophic conditions.

  6. Continuous time modeling of panel data by means of SEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, J.H.L.; Delsing, M.J.M.H.; Montfort, C.A.G.M.; Oud, J.H.L.; Satorra, A.

    2010-01-01

    After a brief history of continuous time modeling and its implementation in panel analysis by means of structural equation modeling (SEM), the problems of discrete time modeling are discussed in detail. This is done by means of the popular cross-lagged panel design. Next, the exact discrete model

  7. Continuous baseflow separation from time series of daily and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous baseflow separation procedures have been frequently used to differentiate total flows into the high-frequency, lowamplitude 'baseflow' component and the low-frequency, high-amplitude 'flood' flows. In the past, such procedures have normally been applied to streamflow time-series data with time steps of 1 day ...

  8. Identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents an introductory survey ofthe methodsthat have been developed for identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input-output data. The two basic approaches may be described as. the indirect method, where first a discrete-time model is estimated from the sampled data and then an ...

  9. Continuous-time capture-recapture in closed populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Matthew R; Barker, Richard J; Gelling, Nicholas

    2017-09-12

    The standard approach to fitting capture-recapture data collected in continuous time involves arbitrarily forcing the data into a series of distinct discrete capture sessions. We show how continuous-time models can be fitted as easily as discrete-time alternatives. The likelihood is factored so that efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms can be implemented for Bayesian estimation, available online in the R package ctime. We consider goodness-of-fit tests for behavior and heterogeneity effects as well as implementing models that allow for such effects. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Stages of Change – Continuous Measure (URICA-E2): psychometrics of a Norwegian version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdal, Anners; Moe, Britt; Digre, Elin; Harding, Thomas; Kristensen, Frode; Grov, Ellen K; Bakken, Linda N; Eklund, Marthe L; Ruud, Ireen; Rossi, Joseph S

    2009-01-01

    Title Stages of Change – Continuous Measure (URICA-E2): psychometrics of a Norwegian version. Aim This paper is a report of research to translate the English version of the Stages of Change continuous measure questionnaire (URICA-E2) into Norwegian and to test the validity of the questionnaire and its usefulness in predicting behavioural change. Background While the psychometric properties of the Stages of Change categorical measure have been tested extensively, evaluation of the psychometric properties of the continuous questionnaire has not been described elsewhere in the literature. Method Cross-sectional data were collected with a convenience sample of 198 undergraduate nursing students in 2005 and 2006. The English version of URICA-E2 was translated into Norwegian according to standardized procedures. Findings Principal components analysis clearly confirmed five of the dimensions of readiness to change (Precontemplation Non-Believers, Precontemplation Believers, Contemplation, Preparation and Maintenance), while the sixth dimension, Action, showed the lowest Eigenvalue (0·93). Findings from the cluster analysis indicate distinct profiles among the respondents in terms of readiness to change their exercise behaviour. Conclusion The URICA-E2 was for the most part replicated from Reed’s original work. The result of the cluster analysis of the items associated with the factor ‘Action’ suggests that these do not adequately measure the factor. PMID:19032513

  11. A continuous-time/discrete-time mixed audio-band sigma delta ADC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liu; Siliang, Hua; Donghui, Wang; Chaohuan, Hou

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a mixed continuous-time/discrete-time, single-loop, fourth-order, 4-bit audio-band sigma delta ADC that combines the benefits of continuous-time and discrete-time circuits, while mitigating the challenges associated with continuous-time design. Measurement results show that the peak SNR of this ADC reaches 100 dB and the total power consumption is less than 30 mW.

  12. A continuous-time/discrete-time mixed audio-band sigma delta ADC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Hua Siliang; Wang Donghui; Hou Chaohuan

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a mixed continuous-time/discrete-time, single-loop, fourth-order, 4-bit audio-band sigma delta ADC that combines the benefits of continuous-time and discrete-time circuits, while mitigating the challenges associated with continuous-time design. Measurement results show that the peak SNR of this ADC reaches 100 dB and the total power consumption is less than 30 mW. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. Informational and Causal Architecture of Continuous-time Renewal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Sarah; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-07-01

    We introduce the minimal maximally predictive models (ɛ {-machines }) of processes generated by certain hidden semi-Markov models. Their causal states are either discrete, mixed, or continuous random variables and causal-state transitions are described by partial differential equations. As an application, we present a complete analysis of the ɛ {-machines } of continuous-time renewal processes. This leads to closed-form expressions for their entropy rate, statistical complexity, excess entropy, and differential information anatomy rates.

  14. Continuous-time system identification of a smoking cessation intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timms, Kevin P.; Rivera, Daniel E.; Collins, Linda M.; Piper, Megan E.

    2014-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major global public health issue and the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Toward a goal of designing better smoking cessation treatments, system identification techniques are applied to intervention data to describe smoking cessation as a process of behaviour change. System identification problems that draw from two modelling paradigms in quantitative psychology (statistical mediation and self-regulation) are considered, consisting of a series of continuous-time estimation problems. A continuous-time dynamic modelling approach is employed to describe the response of craving and smoking rates during a quit attempt, as captured in data from a smoking cessation clinical trial. The use of continuous-time models provide benefits of parsimony, ease of interpretation, and the opportunity to work with uneven or missing data.

  15. Pseudo-Hermitian continuous-time quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, S; Sorouri, A, E-mail: shsalimi@uok.ac.i, E-mail: a.sorouri@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, PO Box 66177-15175, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    In this paper we present a model exhibiting a new type of continuous-time quantum walk (as a quantum-mechanical transport process) on networks, which is described by a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian possessing a real spectrum. We call it pseudo-Hermitian continuous-time quantum walk. We introduce a method to obtain the probability distribution of walk on any vertex and then study a specific system. We observe that the probability distribution on certain vertices increases compared to that of the Hermitian case. This formalism makes the transport process faster and can be useful for search algorithms.

  16. Identifying Continuing and Non-Continuing Adult 4-H Volunteers: How Have They Evolved over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Ken, III

    1996-01-01

    Responses from 534 of 1,183 current and former adult volunteer 4-H leaders in Indiana were used to develop a profile of typical volunteers. Continuing leaders had more children in 4-H, lived longer in the same location, spent less time per week volunteering, and were more positive about their individual club than were former leaders. (SK)

  17. Continuous Time Portfolio Selection under Conditional Capital at Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Dmitrasinovic-Vidovic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio optimization with respect to different risk measures is of interest to both practitioners and academics. For there to be a well-defined optimal portfolio, it is important that the risk measure be coherent and quasiconvex with respect to the proportion invested in risky assets. In this paper we investigate one such measure—conditional capital at risk—and find the optimal strategies under this measure, in the Black-Scholes continuous time setting, with time dependent coefficients.

  18. Continuous Time Random Walks with memory and financial distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Miquel; Masoliver, Jaume

    2017-11-01

    We study financial distributions from the perspective of Continuous Time Random Walks with memory. We review some of our previous developments and apply them to financial problems. We also present some new models with memory that can be useful in characterizing tendency effects which are inherent in most markets. We also briefly study the effect on return distributions of fractional behaviors in the distribution of pausing times between successive transactions.

  19. A Stochastic Continuous Time Model for Microgrid Energy Management

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, Benjamin; Frédéric Bonnans, J; Silva, Francisco; Jimenez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We propose a novel stochastic control formulation for the microgrid energy management problem and extend previous works on continuous time rolling horizon strategy to uncertain demand. We modelize the demand dynamics with a stochastic differential equation. We decompose this dynamics into three terms: an average drift, a time-dependent mean-reversion term and a Brownian noise. We use BOCOPHJB for the numerical simulations. This optimal control toolbox implements a semi...

  20. A mean-variance frontier in discrete and continuous time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents a mean-variance frontier based on dynamic frictionless investment strategies in continuous time. The result applies to a finite number of risky assets whose price process is given by multivariate geometric Brownian motion with deterministically varying coefficients. The derivation

  1. Incomplete Continuous-time Securities Markets with Stochastic Income Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Larsen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    We derive closed-form solutions for the equilibrium interest rate and market price of risk processes in an incomplete continuous-time market with uncertainty generated by Brownian motions. The economy has a finite number of heterogeneous exponential utility investors, who receive partially unspan...

  2. Modeling of water treatment plant using timed continuous Petri nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Fuady Adhalia, H.; Subiono, Adzkiya, Dieky

    2017-08-01

    Petri nets represent graphically certain conditions and rules. In this paper, we construct a model of the Water Treatment Plant (WTP) using timed continuous Petri nets. Specifically, we consider that (1) the water pump always active and (2) the water source is always available. After obtaining the model, the flow through the transitions and token conservation laws are calculated.

  3. Incomplete Continuous-Time Securities Markets with Stochastic Income Volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Larsen, Kasper

    In an incomplete continuous-time securities market governed by Brownian motions, we derive closed-form solutions for the equilibrium risk-free rate and equity premium processes. The economy has a finite number of heterogeneous exponential utility investors, who receive partially unspanned income ...

  4. Reachability in continuous-time Markov reward decision processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baier, Christel; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Hermanns, H.; Katoen, Joost P.; Flum, J.; Graedel, E.; Wilke, Th.

    Continuous-time Markov decision processes (CTMDPs) are widely used for the control of queueing systems, epidemic and manufacturing processes. Various results on optimal schedulers for discounted and average reward optimality criteria in CTMDPs are known, but the typical game-theoretic winning

  5. The deviation matrix of a continuous-time Markov chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen-Schrijner, Pauline; van Doorn, Erik A.

    2002-01-01

    he deviation matrix of an ergodic, continuous-time Markov chain with transition probability matrix $P(.)$ and ergodic matrix $\\Pi$ is the matrix $D \\equiv \\int_0^{\\infty} (P(t)-\\Pi)dt$. We give conditions for $D$ to exist and discuss properties and a representation of $D$. The deviation matrix of a

  6. The deviation matrix of a continuous-time Markov chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen-Schrijner, P.; van Doorn, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    The deviation matrix of an ergodic, continuous-time Markov chain with transition probability matrix $P(.)$ and ergodic matrix $\\Pi$ is the matrix $D \\equiv \\int_0^{\\infty} (P(t)-\\Pi)dt$. We give conditions for $D$ to exist and discuss properties and a representation of $D$. The deviation matrix of a

  7. Operation of a two-stage continuous fermentation process producing hydrogen and methane from artificial food wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Kohki; Mizuno, Shiho; Umeda, Yoshito; Sakka, Makiko [Toho Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Osaka, Noriko [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Sakka, Kazuo [Mie Univ. (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    An anaerobic two-stage continuous fermentation process with combined thermophilic hydrogenogenic and methanogenic stages (two-stage fermentation process) was applied to artificial food wastes on a laboratory scale. In this report, organic loading rate (OLR) conditions for hydrogen fermentation were optimized before operating the two-stage fermentation process. The OLR was set at 11.2, 24.3, 35.2, 45.6, 56.1, and 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} with a temperature of 60 C, pH5.5 and 5.0% total solids. As a result, approximately 1.8-2.0 mol-H{sub 2} mol-hexose{sup -1} was obtained at the OLR of 11.2-56.1 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}. In contrast, it was inferred that the hydrogen yield at the OLR of 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} decreased because of an increase in lactate concentration in the culture medium. The performance of the two-stage fermentation process was also evaluated over three months. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of methane fermentation was able to be shortened 5.0 days (under OLR 12.4 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} conditions) when the OLR of hydrogen fermentation was 44.0 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and the average gasification efficiency of the two-stage fermentation process was 81% at the time. (orig.)

  8. Continuous real-time water information: an important Kansas resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Brian L.; Putnam, James E.; Turk, Donita M.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous real-time information on streams, lakes, and groundwater is an important Kansas resource that can safeguard lives and property, and ensure adequate water resources for a healthy State economy. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates approximately 230 water-monitoring stations at Kansas streams, lakes, and groundwater sites. Most of these stations are funded cooperatively in partnerships with local, tribal, State, or other Federal agencies. The USGS real-time water-monitoring network provides long-term, accurate, and objective information that meets the needs of many customers. Whether the customer is a water-management or water-quality agency, an emergency planner, a power or navigational official, a farmer, a canoeist, or a fisherman, all can benefit from the continuous real-time water information gathered by the USGS.

  9. A stochastic surplus production model in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Wæver; Berg, Casper Willestofte

    2017-01-01

    surplus production model in continuous time (SPiCT), which in addition to stock dynamics also models the dynamics of the fisheries. This enables error in the catch process to be reflected in the uncertainty of estimated model parameters and management quantities. Benefits of the continuous-time state......Surplus production modelling has a long history as a method for managing data-limited fish stocks. Recent advancements have cast surplus production models as state-space models that separate random variability of stock dynamics from error in observed indices of biomass. We present a stochastic...... and improve estimation of reference points relative to discrete-time analysis of aggregated annual data. Finally, subannual data from five North Sea stocks are analysed with particular focus on using residual analysis to diagnose model insufficiencies and identify necessary model extensions such as robust...

  10. Continuous-time random walks that alter environmental transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstmann, C; Henry, B I

    2011-12-01

    We consider continuous-time random walks (CTRWs) in which the walkers have a finite probability to alter the waiting-time and/or step-length transport properties of their environment, resulting in possibly transient anomalous diffusion. We refer to these CTRWs as transmogrifying continuous-time random walks (TCTRWs) to emphasize that they change the form of the transport properties of their environment, and in a possibly strange way. The particular case in which the CTRW waiting-time density has a finite probability to be permanently altered at a given site, following a visitation by a walker, is considered in detail. Master equations for the probability density function of transmogrifying random walkers are derived, and results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An interesting finding is that TCTRWs can generate transient subdiffusion or transient superdiffusion without invoking truncated or tempered power law densities for either the waiting times or the step lengths. The transient subdiffusion or transient superdiffusion arises in TCTRWs with Gaussian step-length densities and exponential waiting-time densities when the altered average waiting time is greater than or less than, respectively, the original average waiting time.

  11. Coupled continuous time-random walks in quenched random environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdziarz, M.; Szczotka, W.

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a coupled continuous-time random walk with coupling which is characteristic for Lévy walks. Additionally we assume that the walker moves in a quenched random environment, i.e. the site disorder at each lattice point is fixed in time. We analyze the scaling limit of such a random walk. We show that for large times the behaviour of the analyzed process is exactly the same as in the case of uncoupled quenched trap model for Lévy flights.

  12. Verification of Continuous Dynamical Systems by Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Wisniewski, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for abstracting continuous dynamical systems by timed automata. The abstraction is based on partitioning the state space of a dynamical system using positive invariant sets, which form cells that represent locations of a timed automaton. The abstraction is intended......, which is generated utilizing sub-level sets of Lyapunov functions, as they are positive invariant sets. It is shown that this partition generates sound and complete abstractions. Furthermore, the complete abstractions can be composed of multiple timed automata, allowing parallelization...

  13. Validation of Continuous CHP Operation of a Two-Stage Biomass Gasifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Jensen, Torben Kvist

    2006-01-01

    The Viking gasification plant at the Technical University of Denmark was built to demonstrate a continuous combined heat and power operation of a two-stage gasifier fueled with wood chips. The nominal input of the gasifier is 75 kW thermal. To validate the continuous operation of the plant, a 9-day...... measurement campaign was performed. The campaign verified a stable operation of the plant, and the energy balance resulted in an overall fuel to gas efficiency of 93% and a wood to electricity efficiency of 25%. Very low tar content in the producer gas was observed: only 0.1 mg/Nm3 naphthalene could...... be measured in raw gas. A stable engine operation on the producer gas was observed, and very low emissions of aldehydes, N2O, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured....

  14. Experimental determination of residence time distribution in continuous dry granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Haress; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2017-05-30

    With increasing importance of continuous manufacturing, the interest in integrating dry granulation into a continuous manufacturing line is growing. Residence time distribution measurements are of importance as they provide information about duration of materials within the process. These data enable traceability and are highly beneficial for developing control strategies. A digital image analysis system was used to determine the residence time distribution of two materials with different deformation behavior (brittle, plastic) in the milling unit of dry granulation systems. A colorant was added to the material (20%w/w iron oxide), which did not affect the material properties excessively, so the milling process could be mimicked well. Experimental designs were conducted to figure out which parameters effect the mean residence time strongly. Moreover, two types of dry granulation systems were contrasted. Longer mean residence times were obtained for the oscillating mill (OM) compared to the conical mill (CM). For co-processed microcrystalline cellulose residence times of 19.8-44.4s (OM) and 11.6-29.1s (CM) were measured, mainly influenced by the specific compaction force, the mill speed and roll speed. For dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrate residence times from 17.7-46.4 (OM) and 5.4-10.2s (CM) were measured, while here the specific compaction force, the mill speed and their interactions with the roll speed had an influence on the mean residence time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clustered continuous-time random walks: diffusion and relaxation consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weron, Karina; Stanislavsky, Aleksander; Jurlewicz, Agnieszka; Meerschaert, Mark M; Scheffler, Hans-Peter

    2012-06-08

    We present a class of continuous-time random walks (CTRWs), in which random jumps are separated by random waiting times. The novel feature of these CTRWs is that the jumps are clustered. This introduces a coupled effect, with longer waiting times separating larger jump clusters. We show that the CTRW scaling limits are time-changed processes. Their densities solve two different fractional diffusion equations, depending on whether the waiting time is coupled to the preceding jump, or the following one. These fractional diffusion equations can be used to model all types of experimentally observed two power-law relaxation patterns. The parameters of the scaling limit process determine the power-law exponents and loss peak frequencies.

  16. Introducing the Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Luiz Cesar

    2013-04-01

    This article is an introduction to a new theory. The name of the theory is justified by the dimensional description of the continuous space-time of the matter, energy and empty space, that gathers all the real things that exists in the universe. The theory presents itself as the consolidation of the classical, quantum and relativity theories. A basic equation that describes the formation of the Universe, relating time, space, matter, energy and movement, is deduced. The four fundamentals physics constants, light speed in empty space, gravitational constant, Boltzmann's constant and Planck's constant and also the fundamentals particles mass, the electrical charges, the energies, the empty space and time are also obtained from this basic equation. This theory provides a new vision of the Big-Bang and how the galaxies, stars, black holes and planets were formed. Based on it, is possible to have a perfect comprehension of the duality between wave-particle, which is an intrinsic characteristic of the matter and energy. It will be possible to comprehend the formation of orbitals and get the equationing of atomics orbits. It presents a singular comprehension of the mass relativity, length and time. It is demonstrated that the continuous space-time is tridimensional, inelastic and temporally instantaneous, eliminating the possibility of spatial fold, slot space, worm hole, time travels and parallel universes. It is shown that many concepts, like dark matter and strong forces, that hypothetically keep the cohesion of the atomics nucleons, are without sense.

  17. Introducing the Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Luiz Cesar

    2013-01-01

    This article is an introduction to a new theory. The name of the theory is justified by the dimensional description of the continuous space-time of the matter, energy and empty space, that gathers all the real things that exists in the universe. The theory presents itself as the consolidation of the classical, quantum and relativity theories. A basic equation that describes the formation of the Universe, relating time, space, matter, energy and movement, is deduced. The four fundamentals physics constants, light speed in empty space, gravitational constant, Boltzmann's constant and Planck's constant and also the fundamentals particles mass, the electrical charges, the energies, the empty space and time are also obtained from this basic equation. This theory provides a new vision of the Big-Bang and how the galaxies, stars, black holes and planets were formed. Based on it, is possible to have a perfect comprehension of the duality between wave-particle, which is an intrinsic characteristic of the matter and energy. It will be possible to comprehend the formation of orbitals and get the equationing of atomics orbits. It presents a singular comprehension of the mass relativity, length and time. It is demonstrated that the continuous space-time is tridimensional, inelastic and temporally instantaneous, eliminating the possibility of spatial fold, slot space, worm hole, time travels and parallel universes. It is shown that many concepts, like dark matter and strong forces, that hypothetically keep the cohesion of the atomics nucleons, are without sense.

  18. Price discovery in a continuous-time setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Gustavo Fruet; Fernandes, Marcelo; Scherrer, Cristina

    We formulate a continuous-time price discovery model in which the price discovery measure varies (stochastically) at daily frequency. We estimate daily measures of price discovery using a kernel-based OLS estimator instead of running separate daily VECM regressions as standard in the literature. ...... show that our estimator is not only consistent, but also outperforms the standard daily VECM in finite samples. We illustrate our theoretical findings by studying the price discovery process of 10 actively traded stocks in the U.S. from 2007 to 2013.......We formulate a continuous-time price discovery model in which the price discovery measure varies (stochastically) at daily frequency. We estimate daily measures of price discovery using a kernel-based OLS estimator instead of running separate daily VECM regressions as standard in the literature. We...

  19. Discrete time population dynamics of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladino, Lilia M.; Mammana, Cristiana; Michetti, Elisabetta; Valverde, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    This work models and analyzes the dynamics of a two-stage species with recruitment and capture factors. It arises from the discretization of a previous model developed by Ladino and Valverde (2013), which represents a progress in the knowledge of the dynamics of exploited populations. Although the methods used here are related to the study of discrete-time systems and are different from those related to continuous version, the results are similar in both the discrete and the continuous case what confirm the skill in the selection of the factors to design the model. Unlike for the continuous-time case, for the discrete-time one some (non-negative) parametric constraints are derived from the biological significance of the model and become fundamental for the proofs of such results. Finally, numerical simulations show different scenarios of dynamics related to the analytical results which confirm the validity of the model.

  20. The Analysis, Optimization, and Simulation of a Two-Stage Tandem Queueing Model with Hyperexponential Service Time at Second Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Sağlam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze a tandem queueing model with two stages. The arrivals to the first stage are Poisson stream and the service time at this stage is exponential. There is no waiting room at first stage. The service time is hyperexponential and no waiting is allowed at second stage. The transition probabilities and loss probabilities of this model are obtained. In addition, the loss probability at second stage is optimized. Performance measures and the variance of the numbers of customers of this tandem queueing model are found. It is seen that the numbers of customers in first stage and second stage are dependent. Finally we have simulated this queueing model. For different values of parameters, exact values, simulated values, and optimal values of obtained performance measures of this model are numerically shown in tables and graphs.

  1. The problem with time in mixed continuous/discrete time modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovers, K.C.; Kuper, Jan; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    The design of cyber-physical systems requires the use of mixed continuous time and discrete time models. Current modelling tools have problems with time transformations (such as a time delay) or multi-rate systems. We will present a novel approach that implements signals as functions of time,

  2. Modeling electricity loads in California: a continuous-time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weron, R.; Kozłowska, B.; Nowicka-Zagrajek, J.

    2001-10-01

    In this paper we address the issue of modeling electricity loads and prices with diffusion processes. More specifically, we study models which belong to the class of generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. After comparing properties of simulated paths with those of deseasonalized data from the California power market and performing out-of-sample forecasts we conclude that, despite certain advantages, the analyzed continuous-time processes are not adequate models of electricity load and price dynamics.

  3. Continuous-Time Symmetric Hopfield Nets are Computationally Universal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šíma, Jiří; Orponen, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2003), s. 693-733 ISSN 0899-7667 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB2030007; GA ČR GA201/02/1456 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : continuous-time Hopfield network * Liapunov function * analog computation * computational power * Turing universality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.747, year: 2003

  4. Estimation of Continuous Time Models in Economics: an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford R. Wymer

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of economic behaviour is often developed in theory as a continuous time system. Rigorous estimation and testing of such systems, and the analysis of some aspects of their properties, is of particular importance in distinguishing between competing hypotheses and the resulting models. The consequences for the international economy during the past eighteen months of failures in the financial sector, and particularly the banking sector, make it essential that the dynamics of financia...

  5. Parallel algorithms for simulating continuous time Markov chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David M.; Heidelberger, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that the mathematical technique of uniformization can serve as the basis of synchronization for the parallel simulation of continuous-time Markov chains. This paper reviews the basic method and compares five different methods based on uniformization, evaluating their strengths and weaknesses as a function of problem characteristics. The methods vary in their use of optimism, logical aggregation, communication management, and adaptivity. Performance evaluation is conducted on the Intel Touchstone Delta multiprocessor, using up to 256 processors.

  6. Atomic clocks and the continuous-time random-walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichella, Valerio; Camparo, James; Tavella, Patrizia

    2017-11-01

    Atomic clocks play a fundamental role in many fields, most notably they generate Universal Coordinated Time and are at the heart of all global navigation satellite systems. Notwithstanding their excellent timekeeping performance, their output frequency does vary: it can display deterministic frequency drift; diverse continuous noise processes result in nonstationary clock noise (e.g., random-walk frequency noise, modelled as a Wiener process), and the clock frequency may display sudden changes (i.e., "jumps"). Typically, the clock's frequency instability is evaluated by the Allan or Hadamard variances, whose functional forms can identify the different operative noise processes. Here, we show that the Allan and Hadamard variances of a particular continuous-time random-walk, the compound Poisson process, have the same functional form as for a Wiener process with drift. The compound Poisson process, introduced as a model for observed frequency jumps, is an alternative to the Wiener process for modelling random walk frequency noise. This alternate model fits well the behavior of the rubidium clocks flying on GPS Block-IIR satellites. Further, starting from jump statistics, the model can be improved by considering a more general form of continuous-time random-walk, and this could bring new insights into the physics of atomic clocks.

  7. Efficient computation of time-bounded reachability probabilities in uniform continuous-time Markov decision processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, K; Baier, Christel; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Podelski, A.; Hermanns, H.; Katoen, Joost P.

    2004-01-01

    A continuous-time Markov decision process (CTMDP) is a generalization of a continuous-time Markov chain in which both probabilistic and nondeterministic choices co-exist. This paper presents an efficient algorithm to compute the maximum (or minimum) probability to reach a set of goal states within a

  8. Efficient computation of time-bounded reachability probabilities in uniform continuous-time Markov decision processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baier, Christel; Hermanns, H.; Katoen, Joost P.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2005-01-01

    A continuous-time Markov decision process (CTMDP) is a generalization of a continuous-time Markov chain in which both probabilistic and nondeterministic choices co-exist. This paper presents an efficient algorithm to compute the maximum (or minimum) probability to reach a set of goal states within a

  9. Dynamical continuous time random Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Chen, Xiaosong

    2016-03-01

    The Lévy flights' diffusive behavior is studied within the framework of the dynamical continuous time random walk (DCTRW) method, while the nonlinear friction is introduced in each step. Through the DCTRW method, Lévy random walker in each step flies by obeying the Newton's Second Law while the nonlinear friction f(v) = - γ0v - γ2v3 being considered instead of Stokes friction. It is shown that after introducing the nonlinear friction, the superdiffusive Lévy flights converges, behaves localization phenomenon with long time limit, but for the Lévy index μ = 2 case, it is still Brownian motion.

  10. Infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations with continuous coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhaojun; Hu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions to a class of 1-dimensional infinite time interval backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs) under the conditions that the coefficients are continuous and have linear growths. We also obtain the existence of a minimal solution. Furthermore, we study the existence and uniqueness theorem for [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] solutions of infinite time interval BSDEs with non-uniformly Lipschitz coefficients. It should be pointed out that the assumptions of this result is weaker than that of Theorem 3.1 in Zong (Turkish J Math 37:704-718, 2013).

  11. The Influence of Nutrient Availability on Trophic Energy Transfer Using Two-Stage Continuous Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeain, K. A.; Halsey, K.

    2016-02-01

    Areas of extreme nutrient limitation are expected to expand in the surface ocean as a consequence of climate change. Phytoplankton are the base of the marine food web and their physiology is strongly influenced by nutrient availability. Two-stage continuous cultures were used to investigate trophic energy and nutrient transfers between phytoplankton and microzooplankton under conditions simulating high and low nutrient availability. The first stage contained either fast (μ=1.2 d-1) or slow (μ=0.2 d-1) growing nitrogen-limited prey organisms: a green alga (Dunaliella tertiolecta) or a diatom (Thalassiosira pseudonana). The second stage contained the dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, which was fed a constant biomass of prey delivered from the first stage. Cultures were allowed to reach steady state before the physiologies of both prey and predator were analyzed. The population of O. marina was five-fold higher when fed with the fast growing D. tertiolecta compared to slow-growing D. tertiolecta. D. tertiolecta also supported a population of O. marina that was an order of magnitude higher than the diatom prey type. The fitness of the prey and O. marina under each nutrient limiting condition were further assessed using a suite of physiological measurements including chlorophyll, C:N:P ratios, lipid body formation, cell volume, motility, and fecal pellet accumulation. Regardless of prey type, O. marina were consistently larger and less abundant when fed prey growing at 0.2 d-1. These results suggest that major shifts in ecosystem food web structure are likely as surface waters become increasingly depleted of nutrients.

  12. Quantum trajectories and measurements in continuous time. The diffusive case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barchielli, Alberto; Gregoratti, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    continuous time for quantum systems. The two-level atom is again used to introduce and study an example of feedback based on the observed output. (orig.)

  13. Is the continuous two-stage anaerobic digestion process well suited for all substrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Jonas; Zielonka, Simon; Oechsner, Hans; Lemmer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Two-stage anaerobic digestion systems are often considered to be advantageous compared to one-stage processes. Although process conditions and fermenter setups are well examined, overall substrate degradation in these systems is controversially discussed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how substrates with different fibre and sugar contents (hay/straw, maize silage, sugar beet) influence the degradation rate and methane production. Intermediates and gas compositions, as well as methane yields and VS-degradation degrees were recorded. The sugar beet substrate lead to a higher pH-value drop 5.67 in the acidification reactor, which resulted in a six time higher hydrogen production in comparison to the hay/straw substrate (pH-value drop 5.34). As the achieved yields in the two-stage system showed a difference of 70.6% for the hay/straw substrate, and only 7.8% for the sugar beet substrate. Therefore two-stage systems seem to be only recommendable for digesting sugar rich substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-linear continuous time random walk models★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Helena; Fedotov, Sergei

    2017-11-01

    A standard assumption of continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes is that there are no interactions between the random walkers, such that we obtain the celebrated linear fractional equation either for the probability density function of the walker at a certain position and time, or the mean number of walkers. The question arises how one can extend this equation to the non-linear case, where the random walkers interact. The aim of this work is to take into account this interaction under a mean-field approximation where the statistical properties of the random walker depend on the mean number of walkers. The implementation of these non-linear effects within the CTRW integral equations or fractional equations poses difficulties, leading to the alternative methodology we present in this work. We are concerned with non-linear effects which may either inhibit anomalous effects or induce them where they otherwise would not arise. Inhibition of these effects corresponds to a decrease in the waiting times of the random walkers, be this due to overcrowding, competition between walkers or an inherent carrying capacity of the system. Conversely, induced anomalous effects present longer waiting times and are consistent with symbiotic, collaborative or social walkers, or indirect pinpointing of favourable regions by their attractiveness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  15. Distinct timing mechanisms produce discrete and continuous movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul Huys

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of discrete and continuous movement is one of the pillars of motor behavior classification. Discrete movements have a definite beginning and end, whereas continuous movements do not have such discriminable end points. In the past decade there has been vigorous debate whether this classification implies different control processes. This debate up until the present has been empirically based. Here, we present an unambiguous non-empirical classification based on theorems in dynamical system theory that sets discrete and continuous movements apart. Through computational simulations of representative modes of each class and topological analysis of the flow in state space, we show that distinct control mechanisms underwrite discrete and fast rhythmic movements. In particular, we demonstrate that discrete movements require a time keeper while fast rhythmic movements do not. We validate our computational findings experimentally using a behavioral paradigm in which human participants performed finger flexion-extension movements at various movement paces and under different instructions. Our results demonstrate that the human motor system employs different timing control mechanisms (presumably via differential recruitment of neural subsystems to accomplish varying behavioral functions such as speed constraints.

  16. Time-continuous open quantum walks (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Radhakrishnan; Liu, Chaobin

    2017-05-01

    Continuous-time open quantum walks (CTOQW) are introduced as the formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups of trace-preserving and completely positive linear maps (or quantum Markov semigroups) on graphs. We show that a CTOQW always converges to a steady state regardless of the initial state when a graph is connected. When the graph is both connected and regular, it is shown that the steady state is the maximally mixed state. The difference of long-time behaviors between CTOQW and other two continuous-time processes on graphs is exemplified. The examples demonstrate that the structure of a graph can affect a quantum coherence effect on CTOQW through a long time run. Precisely, a quantum coherence effect persists throughout the evolution of the CTOQW when the underlying topology is certain irregular graphs (such as a path or a star as shown in the examples). In contrast, a quantum coherence effect will eventually vanish from the open quantum system when the underlying topology is a regular graph (such as a cycle).

  17. Generalized Continuous-Time Random Walks (CTRW), Subordination by Hitting Times and Fractional Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kolokoltsov, Vassili N.

    2007-01-01

    Functional limit theorem for continuous-time random walks (CTRW) are found in general case of dependent waiting times and jump sizes that are also position dependent. The limiting anomalous diffusion is described in terms of fractional dynamics. Probabilistic interpretation of generalized fractional evolution is given in terms of the random time change (subordination) by means of hitting times processes.

  18. Subordinated diffusion and continuous time random walk asymptotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2010-12-01

    Anomalous transport is usually described either by models of continuous time random walks (CTRWs) or, otherwise, by fractional Fokker-Planck equations (FFPEs). The asymptotic relation between properly scaled CTRW and fractional diffusion process has been worked out via various approaches widely discussed in literature. Here, we focus on a correspondence between CTRWs and time and space fractional diffusion equation stemming from two different methods aimed to accurately approximate anomalous diffusion processes. One of them is the Monte Carlo simulation of uncoupled CTRW with a Lévy α-stable distribution of jumps in space and a one-parameter Mittag-Leffler distribution of waiting times. The other is based on a discretized form of a subordinated Langevin equation in which the physical time defined via the number of subsequent steps of motion is itself a random variable. Both approaches are tested for their numerical performance and verified with known analytical solutions for the Green function of a space-time fractional diffusion equation. The comparison demonstrates a trade off between precision of constructed solutions and computational costs. The method based on the subordinated Langevin equation leads to a higher accuracy of results, while the CTRW framework with a Mittag-Leffler distribution of waiting times provides efficiently an approximate fundamental solution to the FFPE and converges to the probability density function of the subordinated process in a long-time limit. © 2010 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) put to work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Harvey

    2017-12-01

    A personal history of the first applications of CTRW to the physics of transport and diffusion in disordered media is presented. The sequence of steps leading to the introduction of novel ψ(t), the probability density of particle-transfer times, without moments is briefly outlined. The key concept that emerged from those early applications is anomalous or non-Fickian transport. The latter involved spatial moments of the particle propagator with completely different time behavior, e.g., the mean ∝ tβ, 0 /σ = constant. With these results many puzzling experimental data were explained. The data ranged from electronic dynamics of amorphous films to chemical migration and interaction in the subsurface of the Earth. These were not anticipated results but a consequence of the CTRW with these special ψ(t). Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  20. Market Timing, lifecycle stage and Seasoned Equity offerings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Sousa Ismael da Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The tradeoff theory suggests that companies must issue shares to investments, when its leverage index is greater than your target rate, while the pecking order theory predicts that when capital offerings occur, the capital will be used to finance investments as the last source of funding, after their debt capacity have been exhausted. In contrast, the market timing theory predicts arguments that companies will adopt opportunistic behavior by issuing shares to take advantage of the high prices of the shares. Although the market timing theory has a significant influence on the decision to make a SEO, Brazilian literature contains little evidence about their economic importance and their effects. Thus, the present research aims to fill this gap in the Brazilian scenario. Specifically, we sought to assess the explanatory power of the relationship of market timing and the lifecycle theory in the issuance of SEO, which predicts that young companies with high market-to-book (MB and low operating cash flow sell shares to finance the investment, while mature companies, with low MB, pay dividends and fund investment internally. The sample was composed by non-financial companies with shares traded on BM&FBovespa. As main results, we can conclude that there is relationship between SEO and MB and size. On the other hand, were not observed evidence confirming the relationship between lifecycle stage and stock return, both in the previous year, and the year following the completion of the offer.

  1. Evidence-based medicine: the time has come to set standards for staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quirke, Phil; Cuvelier, Claude; Ensari, Arzu

    2010-01-01

    think that TNM should be a continual reactive process, rather than a proactive process. Changes should only occur after extensive discussion within the community, and before the introduction of any changes these should be tested for reproducibility and compared to the currently used gold standard. TNM......For international communication in cancer, staging systems such as TNM are essential; however, the principles and processes used to decide about changes in every new edition of TNM need to be subject to debate. Changes with major impact for patient treatment are introduced without evidence. We....... It is time for the principles of staging to be widely debated and new principles and processes to be introduced to ensure that we are not in the same situation in the future. The disparity between therapeutic decision making and TNM staging is marked and we would appeal for the radical overhaul of TNM...

  2. A continuous-time neural model for sequential action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, George; Wyatte, Dean; O'Reilly, Randall C; de Kleijn, Roy; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-11-05

    Action selection, planning and execution are continuous processes that evolve over time, responding to perceptual feedback as well as evolving top-down constraints. Existing models of routine sequential action (e.g. coffee- or pancake-making) generally fall into one of two classes: hierarchical models that include hand-built task representations, or heterarchical models that must learn to represent hierarchy via temporal context, but thus far lack goal-orientedness. We present a biologically motivated model of the latter class that, because it is situated in the Leabra neural architecture, affords an opportunity to include both unsupervised and goal-directed learning mechanisms. Moreover, we embed this neurocomputational model in the theoretical framework of the theory of event coding (TEC), which posits that actions and perceptions share a common representation with bidirectional associations between the two. Thus, in this view, not only does perception select actions (along with task context), but actions are also used to generate perceptions (i.e. intended effects). We propose a neural model that implements TEC to carry out sequential action control in hierarchically structured tasks such as coffee-making. Unlike traditional feedforward discrete-time neural network models, which use static percepts to generate static outputs, our biological model accepts continuous-time inputs and likewise generates non-stationary outputs, making short-timescale dynamic predictions. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring and modelling occupancy time in NHS continuing healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millard Peter H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to increasing demand and financial constraints, NHS continuing healthcare systems seek to find better ways of forecasting demand and budgeting for care. This paper investigates two areas of concern, namely, how long existing patients stay in service and the number of patients that are likely to be still in care after a period of time. Methods An anonymised dataset containing information for all funded admissions to placement and home care in the NHS continuing healthcare system was provided by 26 (out of 31 London primary care trusts. The data related to 11289 patients staying in placement and home care between 1 April 2005 and 31 May 2008 were first analysed. Using a methodology based on length of stay (LoS modelling, we captured the distribution of LoS of patients to estimate the probability of a patient staying in care over a period of time. Using the estimated probabilities we forecasted the number of patients that are likely to be still in care after a period of time (e.g. monthly. Results We noticed that within the NHS continuing healthcare system there are three main categories of patients. Some patients are discharged after a short stay (few days, some others staying for few months and the third category of patients staying for a long period of time (years. Some variations in proportions of discharge and transition between types of care as well as between care groups (e.g. palliative, functional mental health were observed. A close agreement of the observed and the expected numbers of patients suggests a good prediction model. Conclusions The model was tested for care groups within the NHS continuing healthcare system in London to support Primary Care Trusts in budget planning and improve their responsiveness to meet the increasing demand under limited availability of resources. Its applicability can be extended to other types of care, such as hospital care and re-ablement. Further work will be geared towards

  4. Continuous-Time Multiobjective Optimization Problems via Invexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriano A. De Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce some concepts of generalized invexity for the continuous-time multiobjective programming problems, namely, the concepts of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker invexity and Karush-Kuhn-Tucker pseudoinvexity. Using the concept of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker invexity, we study the relationship of the multiobjective problems with some related scalar problems. Further, we show that Karush-Kuhn-Tucker pseudoinvexity is a necessary and suffcient condition for a vector Karush-Kuhn-Tucker solution to be a weakly efficient solution.

  5. Continuous time random walk in homogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Wu, Jichun

    2013-12-01

    Continuous time random walk (CTRW) has been successfully applied in the description of anomalous transport in porous media in recent years. We simulate solute transport in randomly packed spheres with the same diameter and use CTRW to analyze the simulated results. From analysis, we find that there exists weak anomalous transport in the approximately homogeneous porous media. The anomaly becomes more apparent with the increase of Pe. This conclusion consists with previous simulations in two-dimensional homogeneous media and experimental data. We also calculate the trapping probabilities of solute particles in stagnant regions, which could give a physically based explanation for this non-Gaussian behavior. © 2013.

  6. A Monte Carlo study of time-aggregation in continuous-time and discrete-time parametric hazard models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, ter F.; Wedel, M.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of time aggregation in discrete and continuous-time hazard models. A Monte Carlo study is conducted in which data are generated according to various continuous and discrete-time processes, and aggregated into daily, weekly and monthly intervals. These data are

  7. Production of acids and alcohols from syngas in a two-stage continuous fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubackar, Haris Nalakath; Veiga, María C; Kennes, Christian

    2018-04-01

    A two-stage continuous system with two stirred tank reactors in series was utilized to perform syngas fermentation using Clostridium carboxidivorans. The first bioreactor (bioreactor 1) was maintained at pH 6 to promote acidogenesis and the second one (bioreactor 2) at pH 5 to stimulate solventogenesis. Both reactors were operated in continuous mode by feeding syngas (CO:CO 2 :H 2 :N 2 ; 30:10:20:40; vol%) at a constant flow rate while supplying a nutrient medium at different flow rates of 8.1, 15, 22 and 30 ml/h. A cell recycling unit was added to bioreactor 2 in order to recycle the cells back to the reactor, maintaining the OD 600 around 1 in bioreactor 2 throughout the experimental run. When comparing the flow rates, the best results in terms of solvent production were obtained with a flow rate of 22 ml/h, reaching the highest average outlet concentration for alcohols (1.51 g/L) and the most favorable alcohol/acid ratio of 0.32. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Correlated continuous time random walk and option pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Longjin; Xiao, Jianbin; Fan, Liangzhong; Ren, Fuyao

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a correlated continuous time random walk (CCTRW) with averaged waiting time, whose probability density function (PDF) is proved to follow stretched Gaussian distribution. Then, we apply this process into option pricing problem. Supposing the price of the underlying is driven by this CCTRW, we find this model captures the subdiffusive characteristic of financial markets. By using the mean self-financing hedging strategy, we obtain the closed-form pricing formulas for a European option with and without transaction costs, respectively. At last, comparing the obtained model with the classical Black-Scholes model, we find the price obtained in this paper is higher than that obtained from the Black-Scholes model. A empirical analysis is also introduced to confirm the obtained results can fit the real data well.

  9. Continuous time random walks for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Comolli, Alessandro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Lester, Daniel R.

    2016-11-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steady heterogeneous flows based on a stochastic relaxation process for the streamwise particle velocities. This approach describes the persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods, which model the persistence over a characteristic time scale. We first establish the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochrone sampling along streamlines, under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop a space-continuous CTRW approach for the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lagrangian velocities. While classical CTRW formulations have nonstationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, the proposed approach quantifies the evolution of the Lagrangian velocity statistics under both stationary and nonstationary conditions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity statistics and determine the behaviors of the mean particle velocity, velocity covariance, and particle dispersion. We find strong Lagrangian correlation and anomalous dispersion for velocity distributions that are tailed toward low velocities as well as marked differences depending on the initial conditions. The developed CTRW approach predicts the Lagrangian particle dynamics from an arbitrary initial condition based on the Eulerian velocity distribution and a characteristic correlation scale.

  10. On properties of continuous-time random walks with non-Poissonian jump-times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarroel, Javier [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca. Plaza Merced s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: javier@usal.es; Montero, Miquel [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: miquel.montero@ub.edu

    2009-10-15

    The usual development of the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) proceeds by assuming that the present is one of the jumping times. Under this restrictive assumption integral equations for the propagator and mean escape times have been derived. We generalize these results to the case when the present is an arbitrary time by recourse to renewal theory. The case of Erlang distributed times is analyzed in detail. Several concrete examples are considered.

  11. Timing skills and expertise: discrete and continuous timed movements among musicians and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun Janzen, Thenille; Thompson, William Forde; Ammirante, Paolo; Ranvaud, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Movement-based expertise relies on precise timing of movements and the capacity to predict the timing of events. Music performance involves discrete rhythmic actions that adhere to regular cycles of timed events, whereas many sports involve continuous movements that are not timed in a cyclical manner. It has been proposed that the precision of discrete movements relies on event timing (clock mechanism), whereas continuous movements are controlled by emergent timing. We examined whether movement-based expertise influences the timing mode adopted to maintain precise rhythmic actions. Timing precision was evaluated in musicians, athletes and control participants. Discrete and continuous movements were assessed using finger-tapping and circle-drawing tasks, respectively, based on the synchronization-continuation paradigm. In Experiment 1, no auditory feedback was provided in the continuation phase of the trials, whereas in Experiment 2 every action triggered a feedback tone. Analysis of precision in the continuation phase indicated that athletes performed significantly better than musicians and controls in the circle-drawing task, whereas musicians were more precise than controls in the finger tapping task. Interestingly, musicians were also more precise than controls in the circle-drawing task. RESULTS also showed that the timing mode adopted was dependent on expertise and the presence of auditory feedback. RESULTS showed that movement-based expertise is associated with enhanced timing, but these effects depend on the nature of the training. Expertise was found to influence the timing strategy adopted to maintain precise rhythmic movements, suggesting that event and emergent timing mechanisms are not strictly tied to specific tasks, but can both be adopted to achieve precise timing.

  12. Timing skills and expertise: discrete and continuous timed movements among musicians and athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thenille eBraun Janzen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Movement-based expertise relies on precise timing of movements and the capacity to predict the timing of events. Music performance involves discrete rhythmic actions that adhere to regular cycles of timed events, whereas many sports involve continuous movements that are not timed in a cyclical manner. It has been proposed that the precision of discrete movements relies on event timing (clock mechanism, whereas continuous movements are controlled by emergent timing. We examined whether movement-based expertise influences the timing mode adopted to maintain precise rhythmic actions. Materials and Method: Timing precision was evaluated in musicians, athletes and control participants. Discrete and continuous movements were assessed using finger-tapping and circle-drawing tasks, respectively, based on the synchronization-continuation paradigm. In Experiment 1, no auditory feedback was provided in the continuation phase of the trials, whereas in Experiment 2 every action triggered a feedback tone. Results: Analysis of precision in the continuation phase indicated that athletes performed significantly better than musicians and controls in the circle-drawing task, whereas musicians were more precise than controls in the finger tapping task. Interestingly, musicians were also more precise than controls in the circle-drawing task. Results also showed that the timing mode adopted was dependent on expertise and the presence of auditory feedback. Discussion: Results showed that movement-based expertise is associated with enhanced timing, but these effects depend on the nature of the training. Expertise was found to influence the timing strategy adopted to maintain precise rhythmic movements, suggesting that event and emergent timing mechanisms are not strictly tied to specific tasks, but can both be adopted to achieve precise timing.

  13. Timing skills and expertise: discrete and continuous timed movements among musicians and athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun Janzen, Thenille; Thompson, William Forde; Ammirante, Paolo; Ranvaud, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Movement-based expertise relies on precise timing of movements and the capacity to predict the timing of events. Music performance involves discrete rhythmic actions that adhere to regular cycles of timed events, whereas many sports involve continuous movements that are not timed in a cyclical manner. It has been proposed that the precision of discrete movements relies on event timing (clock mechanism), whereas continuous movements are controlled by emergent timing. We examined whether movement-based expertise influences the timing mode adopted to maintain precise rhythmic actions. Materials and Method: Timing precision was evaluated in musicians, athletes and control participants. Discrete and continuous movements were assessed using finger-tapping and circle-drawing tasks, respectively, based on the synchronization-continuation paradigm. In Experiment 1, no auditory feedback was provided in the continuation phase of the trials, whereas in Experiment 2 every action triggered a feedback tone. Results: Analysis of precision in the continuation phase indicated that athletes performed significantly better than musicians and controls in the circle-drawing task, whereas musicians were more precise than controls in the finger tapping task. Interestingly, musicians were also more precise than controls in the circle-drawing task. Results also showed that the timing mode adopted was dependent on expertise and the presence of auditory feedback. Discussion: Results showed that movement-based expertise is associated with enhanced timing, but these effects depend on the nature of the training. Expertise was found to influence the timing strategy adopted to maintain precise rhythmic movements, suggesting that event and emergent timing mechanisms are not strictly tied to specific tasks, but can both be adopted to achieve precise timing. PMID:25566154

  14. Eye of the Beholder: Stage Entrance Behavior and Facial Expression Affect Continuous Quality Ratings in Music Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Williamon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of music performance quality are commonly employed in music practice, education, and research. However, previous studies have demonstrated the limited reliability of such judgments, and there is now evidence that extraneous visual, social, and other “non-musical” features can unduly influence them. The present study employed continuous measurement techniques to examine how the process of forming a music quality judgment is affected by the manipulation of temporally specific visual cues. Video footage comprising an appropriate stage entrance and error-free performance served as the standard condition (Video 1. This footage was manipulated to provide four additional conditions, each identical save for a single variation: an inappropriate stage entrance (Video 2; the presence of an aural performance error midway through the piece (Video 3; the same error accompanied by a negative facial reaction by the performer (Video 4; the facial reaction with no corresponding aural error (Video 5. The participants were 53 musicians and 52 non-musicians (N = 105 who individually assessed the performance quality of one of the five randomly assigned videos via a digital continuous measurement interface and headphones. The results showed that participants viewing the “inappropriate” stage entrance made judgments significantly more quickly than those viewing the “appropriate” entrance, and while the poor entrance caused significantly lower initial scores among those with musical training, the effect did not persist long into the performance. The aural error caused an immediate drop in quality judgments that persisted to a lower final score only when accompanied by the frustrated facial expression from the pianist; the performance error alone caused a temporary drop only in the musicians' ratings, and the negative facial reaction alone caused no reaction regardless of participants' musical experience. These findings demonstrate the importance of

  15. Eye of the Beholder: Stage Entrance Behavior and Facial Expression Affect Continuous Quality Ratings in Music Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, George; Williamon, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Judgments of music performance quality are commonly employed in music practice, education, and research. However, previous studies have demonstrated the limited reliability of such judgments, and there is now evidence that extraneous visual, social, and other "non-musical" features can unduly influence them. The present study employed continuous measurement techniques to examine how the process of forming a music quality judgment is affected by the manipulation of temporally specific visual cues. Video footage comprising an appropriate stage entrance and error-free performance served as the standard condition (Video 1). This footage was manipulated to provide four additional conditions, each identical save for a single variation: an inappropriate stage entrance (Video 2); the presence of an aural performance error midway through the piece (Video 3); the same error accompanied by a negative facial reaction by the performer (Video 4); the facial reaction with no corresponding aural error (Video 5). The participants were 53 musicians and 52 non-musicians ( N = 105) who individually assessed the performance quality of one of the five randomly assigned videos via a digital continuous measurement interface and headphones. The results showed that participants viewing the "inappropriate" stage entrance made judgments significantly more quickly than those viewing the "appropriate" entrance, and while the poor entrance caused significantly lower initial scores among those with musical training, the effect did not persist long into the performance. The aural error caused an immediate drop in quality judgments that persisted to a lower final score only when accompanied by the frustrated facial expression from the pianist; the performance error alone caused a temporary drop only in the musicians' ratings, and the negative facial reaction alone caused no reaction regardless of participants' musical experience. These findings demonstrate the importance of visual information in

  16. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Emanuel; Werner, Philipp; Fuchs, Sebastian; Surer, Brigitte; Pruschke, Thomas; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers are algorithms that sample the partition function of an impurity model using diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques. The present paper describes codes that implement the interaction expansion algorithm originally developed by Rubtsov, Savkin, and Lichtenstein, as well as the hybridization expansion method developed by Werner, Millis, Troyer, et al. These impurity solvers are part of the ALPS-DMFT application package and are accompanied by an implementation of dynamical mean-field self-consistency equations for (single orbital single site) dynamical mean-field problems with arbitrary densities of states. Program summaryProgram title: dmft Catalogue identifier: AEIL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: ALPS LIBRARY LICENSE version 1.1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 899 806 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32 153 916 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Operating system: The ALPS libraries have been tested on the following platforms and compilers: Linux with GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher), and Intel C++ Compiler (icc version 7.0 and higher) MacOS X with GNU Compiler (g++ Apple-version 3.1, 3.3 and 4.0) IBM AIX with Visual Age C++ (xlC version 6.0) and GNU (g++ version 3.1 and higher) compilers Compaq Tru64 UNIX with Compq C++ Compiler (cxx) SGI IRIX with MIPSpro C++ Compiler (CC) HP-UX with HP C++ Compiler (aCC) Windows with Cygwin or coLinux platforms and GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher) RAM: 10 MB-1 GB Classification: 7.3 External routines: ALPS [1], BLAS/LAPACK, HDF5 Nature of problem: (See [2].) Quantum impurity models describe an atom or molecule embedded in a host material with which it can exchange electrons. They are basic to nanoscience as

  17. UVC-induced lysis and detritus production of Oscillatoria limnetica in a two-stage continuous-flow system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hannen, E.J.; Gons, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study in model systems the role of heterotrophic micro-organisms in the aquatic microbial food web, a natural food source consisting of senescent primary producer cells is indispensable. A two-stage continuous-flow system with the ability to produce detritus continuously is presented. In

  18. Stochastic calculus for uncoupled continuous-time random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Guido; Politi, Mauro; Scalas, Enrico; Schilling, René L

    2009-06-01

    The continuous-time random walk (CTRW) is a pure-jump stochastic process with several applications not only in physics but also in insurance, finance, and economics. A definition is given for a class of stochastic integrals driven by a CTRW, which includes the Itō and Stratonovich cases. An uncoupled CTRW with zero-mean jumps is a martingale. It is proved that, as a consequence of the martingale transform theorem, if the CTRW is a martingale, the Itō integral is a martingale too. It is shown how the definition of the stochastic integrals can be used to easily compute them by Monte Carlo simulation. The relations between a CTRW, its quadratic variation, its Stratonovich integral, and its Itō integral are highlighted by numerical calculations when the jumps in space of the CTRW have a symmetric Lévy alpha -stable distribution and its waiting times have a one-parameter Mittag-Leffler distribution. Remarkably, these distributions have fat tails and an unbounded quadratic variation. In the diffusive limit of vanishing scale parameters, the probability density of this kind of CTRW satisfies the space-time fractional diffusion equation (FDE) or more in general the fractional Fokker-Planck equation, which generalizes the standard diffusion equation, solved by the probability density of the Wiener process, and thus provides a phenomenologic model of anomalous diffusion. We also provide an analytic expression for the quadratic variation of the stochastic process described by the FDE and check it by Monte Carlo.

  19. Locally optimal-digital redesign of continuous-time systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Leang-San; Zhao, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Jian-Liang

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a new optimal digital redesign technique for finding a dynamic digital control law from the given continuous-time counterpart by minimizing a local quadratic performance index. The quadratic performance index is chosen as the integral of the weighted squared difference between the states of the original closed-loop system and those of the digitally controlled closed-loop system at any instant between each sampling period. The developed optimal digital redesign control law enables the states of the digitally controlled closed-loop system 10 closely match those of the original closed-loop system at any instant between each sampling period, and it can easily be implemented using microcomputers with a relatively large sampling period.

  20. A Continuous-Time Model for Valuing Foreign Exchange Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Kung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper makes use of stochastic calculus to develop a continuous-time model for valuing European options on foreign exchange (FX when both domestic and foreign spot rates follow a generalized Wiener process. Using the dollar/euro exchange rate as input for parameter estimation and employing our FX option model as a yardstick, we find that the traditional Garman-Kohlhagen FX option model, which assumes constant spot rates, values incorrectly calls and puts for different values of the ratio of exchange rate to exercise price. Specifically, it undervalues calls when the ratio is between 0.70 and 1.08, and it overvalues calls when the ratio is between 1.18 and 1.30, whereas it overvalues puts when the ratio is between 0.70 and 0.82, and it undervalues puts when the ratio is between 0.86 and 1.30.

  1. Time limit and time at VO2max' during a continuous and an intermittent run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarie, S; Koralsztein, J P; Billat, V

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to verify, by track field tests, whether sub-elite runners (n=15) could (i) reach their VO2max while running at v50%delta, i.e. midway between the speed associated with lactate threshold (vLAT) and that associated with maximal aerobic power (vVO2max), and (ii) if an intermittent exercise provokes a maximal and/or supra maximal oxygen consumption longer than a continuous one. Within three days, subjects underwent a multistage incremental test during which their vVO2max and vLAT were determined; they then performed two additional testing sessions, where continuous and intermittent running exercises at v50%delta were performed up to exhaustion. Subject's gas exchange and heart rate were continuously recorded by means of a telemetric apparatus. Blood samples were taken from fingertip and analysed for blood lactate concentration. In the continuous and the intermittent tests peak VO2 exceeded VO2max values, as determined during the incremental test. However in the intermittent exercise, peak VO2, time to exhaustion and time at VO2max reached significantly higher values, while blood lactate accumulation showed significantly lower values than in the continuous one. The v50%delta is sufficient to stimulate VO2max in both intermittent and continuous running. The intermittent exercise results better than the continuous one in increasing maximal aerobic power, allowing longer time at VO2max and obtaining higher peak VO2 with lower lactate accumulation.

  2. From Discrete-Time Models to Continuous-Time, Asynchronous Models of Financial Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Boer-Sorban (Katalin); U. Kaymak (Uzay); J. Spiering (Jaap)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractMost agent-based simulation models of financial markets are discrete-time in nature. In this paper, we investigate to what degree such models are extensible to continuous-time, asynchronous modelling of financial markets. We study the behaviour of a learning market maker in a market with

  3. Real-time aircraft continuous descent trajectory optimization with ATC time constraints using direct collocation methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoeven, Ronald; Dalmau Codina, Ramon; Prats Menéndez, Xavier; de Gelder, Nico

    2014-01-01

    1 Abstract In this paper an initial implementation of a real - time aircraft trajectory optimization algorithm is presented . The aircraft trajectory for descent and approach is computed for minimum use of thrust and speed brake in support of a “green” continuous descent and approach flight operation, while complying with ATC time constraints for maintaining runway throughput and co...

  4. Classification of sleep stages using multi-wavelet time frequency entropy and LDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiwan, L; Lweesy, K; Khasawneh, N; Fraiwan, M; Wenz, H; Dickhaus, H

    2010-01-01

    The process of automatic sleep stage scoring consists of two major parts: feature extraction and classification. Features are normally extracted from the polysomnographic recordings, mainly electroencephalograph (EEG) signals. The EEG is considered a non-stationary signal which increases the complexity of the detection of different waves in it. This work presents a new technique for automatic sleep stage scoring based on employing continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) using different mother wavelets to detect different waves embedded in the EEG signal. The use of different mother wavelets increases the ability to detect waves in the EEG signal. The extracted features were formed based on CWT time frequency entropy using three mother wavelets, and the classification was performed using the linear discriminant analysis. Thirty-two data sets from the MIT-BIH database were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Features of a single EEG signal were extracted successfully based on the time frequency entropy using the continuous wavelet transform with three mother wavelets. The proposed method has shown to outperform the classification based on a CWT using a single mother wavelet. The accuracy was found to be 0.84, while the kappa coefficient was 0.78. This work has shown that wavelet time frequency entropy provides a powerful tool for feature extraction for the non-stationary EEG signal; the accuracy of the classification procedure improved when using multiple wavelets compared to the use of single wavelet time frequency entropy.

  5. Steady states of continuous-time open quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaobin; Balu, Radhakrishnan

    2017-07-01

    Continuous-time open quantum walks (CTOQW) are introduced as the formulation of quantum dynamical semigroups of trace-preserving and completely positive linear maps (or quantum Markov semigroups) on graphs. We show that a CTOQW always converges to a steady state regardless of the initial state when a graph is connected. When the graph is both connected and regular, it is shown that the steady state is the maximally mixed state. As shown by the examples in this article, the steady states of CTOQW can be very unusual and complicated even though the underlying graphs are simple. The examples demonstrate that the structure of a graph can affect quantum coherence in CTOQW through a long-time run. Precisely, the quantum coherence persists throughout the evolution of the CTOQW when the underlying topology is certain irregular graphs (such as a path or a star as shown in the examples). In contrast, the quantum coherence will eventually vanish from the open quantum system when the underlying topology is a regular graph (such as a cycle).

  6. Chaos and unpredictability in evolution of cooperation in continuous time

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Taekho; Kwon, Minji; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Jung, Woo-Sung; Baek, Seung Ki

    2017-12-01

    Cooperators benefit others with paying costs. Evolution of cooperation crucially depends on the cost-benefit ratio of cooperation, denoted as c . In this work, we investigate the infinitely repeated prisoner's dilemma for various values of c with four of the representative memory-one strategies, i.e., unconditional cooperation, unconditional defection, tit-for-tat, and win-stay-lose-shift. We consider replicator dynamics which deterministically describes how the fraction of each strategy evolves over time in an infinite-sized well-mixed population in the presence of implementation error and mutation among the four strategies. Our finding is that this three-dimensional continuous-time dynamics exhibits chaos through a bifurcation sequence similar to that of a logistic map as c varies. If mutation occurs with rate μ ≪1 , the position of the bifurcation sequence on the c axis is numerically found to scale as μ0.1, and such sensitivity to μ suggests that mutation may have nonperturbative effects on evolutionary paths. It demonstrates how the microscopic randomness of the mutation process can be amplified to macroscopic unpredictability by evolutionary dynamics.

  7. The impact of conventional space-time aggregation on the dynamics of continuous-time rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, John; Bulla, Jan; Carey-Smith, Trevor; Thomson, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Rainfall is a continuous-time phenomenon typically characterized by precipitation states such as rain, showers, and dry whose dependence varies over a variety of space-time scales. Here attention is focused on the effective identification of rain and shower precipitation states over a region where these states have been determined by a hidden semi-Markov model of continuous-time precipitation. The states identified provide an accurate description of precipitation dynamics and can be regarded as close proxies to synoptic weather types of the same name. The stochastic properties and structure of these states (rather than precipitation amounts) are explored and delineated. A primary objective of the paper is to better understand the impact of conventional space-time aggregation on the dynamics of rainfall. What aggregation time scales result in more faithful descriptions of the space-time dynamics of continuous-time rainfall? While rain might be expected to be more spatially coherent than showers and involve longer time scales, dry periods involve much longer time and space scales again than either rain or showers. These issues are discussed and conclusions drawn which provide guidance and insights useful for the development of space-time precipitation models and, more generally, the design of rainfall observation networks and data archives.

  8. Continuous Fine-Fault Estimation with Real-Time GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norford, B. B.; Melbourne, T. I.; Szeliga, W. M.; Santillan, V. M.; Scrivner, C.; Senko, J.; Larsen, D.

    2017-12-01

    Thousands of real-time telemetered GNSS stations operate throughout the circum-Pacific that may be used for rapid earthquake characterization and estimation of local tsunami excitation. We report on the development of a GNSS-based finite-fault inversion system that continuously estimates slip using real-time GNSS position streams from the Cascadia subduction zone and which is being expanded throughout the circum-Pacific. The system uses 1 Hz precise point position streams computed in the ITRF14 reference frame using clock and satellite orbit corrections from the IGS. The software is implemented as seven independent modules that filter time series using Kalman filters, trigger and estimate coseismic offsets, invert for slip using a non-negative least squares method developed by Lawson and Hanson (1974) and elastic half-space Green's Functions developed by Okada (1985), smooth the results temporally and spatially, and write the resulting streams of time-dependent slip to a RabbitMQ messaging server for use by downstream modules such as tsunami excitation modules. Additional fault models can be easily added to the system for other circum-Pacific subduction zones as additional real-time GNSS data become available. The system is currently being tested using data from well-recorded earthquakes including the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, the 2010 Maule earthquake, the 2015 Illapel earthquake, the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake, the 2014 Iquique earthquake, the 2010 Mentawai earthquake, the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake, the 2016 Ecuador earthquake, the 2015 Gorkha earthquake, and others. Test data will be fed to the system and the resultant earthquake characterizations will be compared with published earthquake parameters. Seismic events will be assumed to occur on major faults, so, for example, only the San Andreas fault will be considered in Southern California, while the hundreds of other faults in the region will be ignored. Rake will be constrained along each subfault to be

  9. Relative performance of two-stage continual reassessment method in contrast to an optimal benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wages, Nolan A.; Conaway, Mark R.; O’Quigley, John

    2015-01-01

    Background The two-stage, likelihood-based continual reassessment method (CRM-L; O’Quigley and Shen [1]) entails the specification of a set of design parameters prior to the beginning of its use in a study. The impression of clinicians is that the success of model-based designs, such as CRM-L, depends upon some of the choices made in regard to these specifications, such as the choice of parametric dose-toxicity model and the initial guess of toxicity probabilities. Purpose In studying the efficiency and comparative performance of competing dose-finding designs for finite (typically small) samples, the non-parametric optimal benchmark (O’Quigley, Paoletti and Maccario [2]) is a useful tool. When comparing a dose-finding design to the optimal design, we are able to assess how much room there is for potential improvement. Methods The optimal method, based only on an assumption of monotonicity of the dose-toxicity function, is a valuable theoretical construct serving as a benchmark in theoretical studies, similar to that of a Cramer-Rao bound. We consider the performance of CRM-L under various design specifications and how it compares to the optimal design across a range of practical situations. Results Using simple recommendations for design specifications, the CRM-L will produce performances, in terms of identifying doses at and around the MTD, that are close to the optimal method on average over a broad group of dose-toxicity scenarios. Limitations Although the simulation settings vary the number of doses considered, the target toxicity rate and the sample size, the results here are presented for a small, though widely-used, set of two-stage CRM designs. Conclusions Based on simulations here, and many others not shown, CRM-L is almost as accurate, in many scenarios, as the (unknown and unavailable) optimal design. On average, there appears to be very little margin for improvement. Even if a finely tuned skeleton [3] offers some improvement over a simple skeleton

  10. Convergence of discrete-time Kalman filter estimate to continuous time estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, Atte

    2016-04-01

    This article is concerned with the convergence of the state estimate obtained from the discrete-time Kalman filter to the continuous time estimate as the temporal discretisation is refined. The convergence follows from Martingale convergence theorem as demonstrated below; however, surprisingly, no results exist on the rate of convergence. We derive convergence rate estimates for the discrete-time Kalman filter estimate for finite and infinite dimensional systems. The proofs are based on applying the discrete-time Kalman filter on a dense numerable subset of a certain time interval [0, T].

  11. Inverse Ising problem in continuous time: A latent variable approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Christian; Opper, Manfred

    2017-12-01

    We consider the inverse Ising problem: the inference of network couplings from observed spin trajectories for a model with continuous time Glauber dynamics. By introducing two sets of auxiliary latent random variables we render the likelihood into a form which allows for simple iterative inference algorithms with analytical updates. The variables are (1) Poisson variables to linearize an exponential term which is typical for point process likelihoods and (2) Pólya-Gamma variables, which make the likelihood quadratic in the coupling parameters. Using the augmented likelihood, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain the maximum likelihood estimate of network parameters. Using a third set of latent variables we extend the EM algorithm to sparse couplings via L1 regularization. Finally, we develop an efficient approximate Bayesian inference algorithm using a variational approach. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithms on data simulated from an Ising model. For data which are simulated from a more biologically plausible network with spiking neurons, we show that the Ising model captures well the low order statistics of the data and how the Ising couplings are related to the underlying synaptic structure of the simulated network.

  12. Inverse Ising problem in continuous time: A latent variable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Christian; Opper, Manfred

    2017-12-01

    We consider the inverse Ising problem: the inference of network couplings from observed spin trajectories for a model with continuous time Glauber dynamics. By introducing two sets of auxiliary latent random variables we render the likelihood into a form which allows for simple iterative inference algorithms with analytical updates. The variables are (1) Poisson variables to linearize an exponential term which is typical for point process likelihoods and (2) Pólya-Gamma variables, which make the likelihood quadratic in the coupling parameters. Using the augmented likelihood, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain the maximum likelihood estimate of network parameters. Using a third set of latent variables we extend the EM algorithm to sparse couplings via L1 regularization. Finally, we develop an efficient approximate Bayesian inference algorithm using a variational approach. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithms on data simulated from an Ising model. For data which are simulated from a more biologically plausible network with spiking neurons, we show that the Ising model captures well the low order statistics of the data and how the Ising couplings are related to the underlying synaptic structure of the simulated network.

  13. Anomalous transport in turbulent plasmas and continuous time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balescu, R. [Association Euratom-Etat Belge pour la Fusion, Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Code Postal 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1995-05-01

    The possibility of a model of anomalous transport problems in a turbulent plasma by a purely stochastic process is investigated. The theory of continuous time random walks (CTRW`s) is briefly reviewed. It is shown that a particular class, called the standard long tail CTRW`s is of special interest for the description of subdiffusive transport. Its evolution is described by a non-Markovian diffusion equation that is constructed in such a way as to yield exact values for all the moments of the density profile. The concept of a CTRW model is compared to an exact solution of a simple test problem: transport of charged particles in a fluctuating magnetic field in the limit of infinite perpendicular correlation length. Although the well-known behavior of the mean square displacement proportional to {ital t}{sup 1/2} is easily recovered, the exact density profile cannot be modeled by a CTRW. However, the quasilinear approximation of the kinetic equation has the form of a non-Markovian diffusion equation and can thus be generated by a CTRW.

  14. Transport behavior of coupled continuous-time random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, Marco; Scher, Harvey; Holder, Devora; Berkowitz, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The origin of anomalous or non-Fickian transport in disordered media is the broad spectrum of transition rates intrinsic to these systems. A system that contains within it heterogeneities over multiple length scales is geological formations. The continuous time random walk (CTRW) framework, which has been demonstrated to be an effective means to model non-Fickian transport features in these systems and to have predictive capacities, has at its core this full spectrum represented as a joint probability density psi(s,t) of random space time displacements (s,t) . Transport in a random fracture network (RFN) has been calculated with a coupled psi(s,t) and has subsequently been shown to be approximated well by a decoupled form psi(s,t)=F(s)psi(t) . The latter form has been used extensively to model non-Fickian transport in conjunction with a velocity distribution Phi(xi),xi identical with 1v, where v is the velocity magnitude. The power-law behavior of psi(t) proportional to (-1-beta), which determines non-Fickian transport, derives from the large xi dependence of Phi(xi) . In this study we use numerical CTRW simulations to explore the expanded transport phenomena derived from a coupled psi(s,t) . Specifically, we introduce the features of a power-law dependence in the s distribution with different Phi(xi) distributions (including a constant v) coupled by t=s(xi) . Unlike Lévy flights in this coupled scenario the spatial moments of the plumes are well defined. The shapes of the plumes depend on the entire Phi(xi) distribution, i.e., both small and large xi dependence; there is a competition between long displacements (which depend on the small xi dependence) and large time events (which depend on a power law for large xi). These features give rise to an enhanced range of transport behavior with a broader scope of applications, e.g., to correlated migrations in a RFN and in heterogeneous permeability fields. The approximation to the decoupled case is investigated as a

  15. Continuous time modelling with individually varying time intervals for oscillating and non-oscillating processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkle, Manuel C; Oud, Johan H L

    2013-02-01

    When designing longitudinal studies, researchers often aim at equal intervals. In practice, however, this goal is hardly ever met, with different time intervals between assessment waves and different time intervals between individuals being more the rule than the exception. One of the reasons for the introduction of continuous time models by means of structural equation modelling has been to deal with irregularly spaced assessment waves (e.g., Oud & Delsing, 2010). In the present paper we extend the approach to individually varying time intervals for oscillating and non-oscillating processes. In addition, we show not only that equal intervals are unnecessary but also that it can be advantageous to use unequal sampling intervals, in particular when the sampling rate is low. Two examples are provided to support our arguments. In the first example we compare a continuous time model of a bivariate coupled process with varying time intervals to a standard discrete time model to illustrate the importance of accounting for the exact time intervals. In the second example the effect of different sampling intervals on estimating a damped linear oscillator is investigated by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. We conclude that it is important to account for individually varying time intervals, and encourage researchers to conceive of longitudinal studies with different time intervals within and between individuals as an opportunity rather than a problem. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Continuous power generation and microbial community structure of the anode biofilms in a three-stage microbial fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Okabe, Satoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Urban and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-15

    A mediator-less three-stage two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) system was developed and operated continuously for more than 1.5 years to evaluate continuous power generation while treating artificial wastewater containing glucose (10 mM) concurrently. A stable power density of 28 W/m3 was attained with an anode hydraulic retention time of 4.5 h and phosphate buffer as the cathode electrolyte. An overall dissolved organic carbon removal ratio was about 85%, and coulombic efficiency was about 46% in this MFC system. We also analyzed the microbial community structure of anode biofilms in each MFC. Since the environment in each MFC was different due to passing on the products to the next MFC in series, the microbial community structure was different accordingly. The anode biofilm in the first MFC consisted mainly of bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria, identified as Aeromonas sp., while the Firmicutes dominated the anode biofilms in the second and third MFCs that were mainly fed with acetate. Cyclic voltammetric results supported the presence of a redox compound(s) associated with the anode biofilm matrix, rather than mobile (dissolved) forms, which could be responsible for the electron transfer to the anode. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the anode biofilms were comprised of morphologically different cells that were firmly attached on the anode surface and interconnected each other with anchor-like filamentous appendages, which might support the results of cyclic voltammetry. (orig.)

  17. Global dissipativity of continuous-time recurrent neural networks with time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Xiaoxin; Wang Jun

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the global dissipativity of a general class of continuous-time recurrent neural networks. First, the concepts of global dissipation and global exponential dissipation are defined and elaborated. Next, the sets of global dissipativity and global exponentially dissipativity are characterized using the parameters of recurrent neural network models. In particular, it is shown that the Hopfield network and cellular neural networks with or without time delays are dissipative systems

  18. All-time dynamics of continuous-time random walks on complex networks

    OpenAIRE

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of continuous-time random walks (CTRW) is a generalization of ordinary random walk models, and it is a powerful tool for investigating a broad spectrum of phenomena in natural, engineering, social and economic sciences. Recently, several theoretical approaches have been developed that allowed to analyze explicitly dynamics of CTRW at all times, which is critically important for understanding mechanisms of underlying phenomena. However, theoretical analysis has been done mostly for...

  19. Echocardiography as an indication of continuous-time cardiac quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, C. A.; Auffermann, W. F.; Shah, A. J.; Inan, O. T.; Bhatti, P. T.; Tridandapani, S.

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiography using prospective gating requires that data be acquired during intervals of minimal cardiac motion to obtain diagnostic images of the coronary vessels free of motion artifacts. This work is intended to assess B-mode echocardiography as a continuous-time indication of these quiescent periods to determine if echocardiography can be used as a cost-efficient, non-ionizing modality to develop new prospective gating techniques for cardiac CT. These new prospective gating approaches will not be based on echocardiography itself but on CT-compatible modalities derived from the mechanics of the heart (e.g. seismocardiography and impedance cardiography), unlike the current standard electrocardiogram. To this end, echocardiography and retrospectively-gated CT data were obtained from ten patients with varied cardiac conditions. CT reconstructions were made throughout the cardiac cycle. Motion of the interventricular septum (IVS) was calculated from both echocardiography and CT reconstructions using correlation-based, deviation techniques. The IVS was chosen because it (1) is visible in echocardiography images, whereas the coronary vessels generally are not, and (2) has been shown to be a suitable indicator of cardiac quiescence. Quiescent phases were calculated as the minima of IVS motion and CT volumes were reconstructed for these phases. The diagnostic quality of the CT reconstructions from phases calculated from echocardiography and CT data was graded on a four-point Likert scale by a board-certified radiologist fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic radiology. Using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test, no significant difference in the diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels was found between CT volumes reconstructed from echocardiography- and CT-selected phases. Additionally, there was a correlation of 0.956 between the echocardiography- and CT-selected phases. This initial work suggests that B-mode echocardiography can be used as a

  20. Simulation of an electrostatic soot-filter with continuous electrochemical conversion during the stages of development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muri, M.

    1996-04-01

    The dissertation describes the simulation of an electrostatic Diesel-Soot-Converter during its stages of development. This simulation is not only necessary for the interpretation of the experimental results, it also shows results for assumptions that cannot be received experimentally. The Diesel-Soot-Converter consists of a charging electrode, which charges the particles by a high-voltage and a ceramic monolith, where the particles are precipitated in the open channels because of an electric field created also by a high-voltage. Afterwards the particles are burned by a plasma. The filter-function of the Diesel-Soot-Converter was formulated and the efficiency for a vehicle was calculated. In the first part of the calculation the mass flow of a BMW 318tds and a BMW 325tds was determined for an US-FTP75-testcycle and for fuel load. In the second part the efficiency of different Diesel-Soot-Converter-types was calculated for the US-FTP75-testcycle and for full load. The use of the program with other testcycles is possible. The results of the calculations show the best configuration of the Diesel-Soot-Converter for the corresponding vehicle. Therefore with the help of this program time and money for the production of the ceramic can be saved. (author)

  1. Ferrite treatment of actinide waste solutions: multi-stage continuous processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, T.E.; Kochen, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    Ferrite waste treatment experiments were performed in which a total of 2.0 g ferrite was added per liter of waste solution using a three stage treatment process instead of one. As observed in previous work using a single stage treatment, plutonium concentrations were consistently lowered from approximately 10 -4 g/l to the 10 -8 g/1 range or less. However, a multi-stage ferrite process would require the addition of substantially less ferrite and would result in concomitantly less waste solids generation. Whereas the single stage treatment produced 3.0 to 3.5 g/l solids, the multi-stage process could yield as little as 2.0 to 2.5 g/l solids based on design data for the new waste treatment facility at Rocky Flats

  2. Interim PET After Two ABVD Cycles in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Outcomes Following the Continuation of Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simontacchi, Gabriele [Radiotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciammella, Patrizia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Advanced Technology, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Buglione, Michela [Radiation Oncology Department, University and Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Saieva, Calogero [Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, Florence (Italy); Magrini, Stefano Maria [Radiation Oncology Department, University and Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Livi, Lorenzo [Radiotherapy Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Iotti, Cinzia [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Advanced Technology, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Botto, Barbara [Hematology Unit, Città della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, Torino (Italy); Vaggelli, Luca [Nuclear Medicine Department, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Careggi, University of Florence, Florence (Italy); Re, Alessandro [Hematology Unit, University and Spedali Civili, Brescia (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Hematology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: This multicenter retrospective study was designed to evaluate the prognostic role of interim fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (i-FDG-PET) in a cohort of patients affected with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated initially with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, and to assess the role of chemotherapy continuation plus radiation therapy for i-FDG-PET-positive patients. Methods and Materials: Data from 257 patients were retrieved from 4 hematology and radiation oncology departments. Inclusion criteria were stage I to IIAB HL, “intention-to-treat” AVBD plus radiation therapy, and FDG-PET at diagnosis and after the first 2 ABVD cycles. All i-FDG-PET scans underwent blinded local review by using the Deauville 5-point scoring system; patients were stratified as negative or positive using 2 Deauville score cutoff values, ≥3 or ≥4. Results: Median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 9-163 months); 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for the whole cohort were 97.5% and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 95.6%. After i-FDG-PET revision, 43 of 257 patients (16.7%) had a positive i-FDG-PET (Deauville scores: 3-5). Five-year PFS rates for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients were 98.1% and 83.7%, respectively, if using a Deauville score cutoff of 3, and 97.7% and 78.6%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.0001). Five-year OS for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients was 98.5% and 93.0%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 3, and 98.6% and 89.3%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.029 and P=.002). At univariate regression analysis, i-FDG-PET positivity was associated with worse OS and PFS. At multivariate analysis, performed only for PFS, i-FDG-PET positivity confirmed its negative impact (P=.002). Conclusions: i-FDG-PET is prognostic for PFS and OS in early-stage HL

  3. Interim PET After Two ABVD Cycles in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Outcomes Following the Continuation of Chemotherapy Plus Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simontacchi, Gabriele; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Ciammella, Patrizia; Buglione, Michela; Saieva, Calogero; Magrini, Stefano Maria; Livi, Lorenzo; Iotti, Cinzia; Botto, Barbara; Vaggelli, Luca; Re, Alessandro; Merli, Francesco; Ricardi, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This multicenter retrospective study was designed to evaluate the prognostic role of interim fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (i-FDG-PET) in a cohort of patients affected with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated initially with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy, and to assess the role of chemotherapy continuation plus radiation therapy for i-FDG-PET-positive patients. Methods and Materials: Data from 257 patients were retrieved from 4 hematology and radiation oncology departments. Inclusion criteria were stage I to IIAB HL, “intention-to-treat” AVBD plus radiation therapy, and FDG-PET at diagnosis and after the first 2 ABVD cycles. All i-FDG-PET scans underwent blinded local review by using the Deauville 5-point scoring system; patients were stratified as negative or positive using 2 Deauville score cutoff values, ≥3 or ≥4. Results: Median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 9-163 months); 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) for the whole cohort were 97.5% and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 95.6%. After i-FDG-PET revision, 43 of 257 patients (16.7%) had a positive i-FDG-PET (Deauville scores: 3-5). Five-year PFS rates for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients were 98.1% and 83.7%, respectively, if using a Deauville score cutoff of 3, and 97.7% and 78.6%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.0001). Five-year OS for i-FDG-PET-negative and i-FDG-PET-positive patients was 98.5% and 93.0%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 3, and 98.6% and 89.3%, respectively, if using a cutoff of 4 (P=.029 and P=.002). At univariate regression analysis, i-FDG-PET positivity was associated with worse OS and PFS. At multivariate analysis, performed only for PFS, i-FDG-PET positivity confirmed its negative impact (P=.002). Conclusions: i-FDG-PET is prognostic for PFS and OS in early-stage HL

  4. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making : An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease

  5. Optimization-based control of constrained nonlinear systems with continuous-time models: Adaptive time-grid refinement algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Fernando A. C. C.; Paiva, Luís T.

    2016-10-01

    We address optimal control problems for nonlinear systems with pathwise state-constraints. These are challenging non-linear problems for which the number of discretization points is a major factor determining the computational time. Also, the location of these points has a major impact in the accuracy of the solutions. We propose an algorithm that iteratively finds an adequate time-grid to satisfy some predefined error estimate on the obtained trajectories, which is guided by information on the adjoint multipliers. The obtained results show a highly favorable comparison against the traditional equidistant-spaced time-grid methods, including the ones using discrete-time models. This way, continuous-time plant models can be directly used. The discretization procedure can be automated and there is no need to select a priori the adequate time step. Even if the optimization procedure is forced to stop in an early stage, as might be the case in real-time problems, we can still obtain a meaningful solution, although it might be a less accurate one. The extension of the procedure to a Model Predictive Control (MPC) context is proposed here. By defining a time-dependent accuracy threshold, we can generate solutions that are more accurate in the initial parts of the receding horizon, which are the most relevant for MPC.

  6. Continuous time modelling of dynamical spatial lattice data observed at sparsely distributed times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jakob Gulddahl; Møller, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    , and they exhibit spatial interaction. For specificity we consider a particular dynamical spatial lattice data set which has previously been analysed by a discrete time model involving unknown normalizing constants. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using continuous time processes compared......Summary. We consider statistical and computational aspects of simulation-based Bayesian inference for a spatial-temporal model based on a multivariate point process which is only observed at sparsely distributed times. The point processes are indexed by the sites of a spatial lattice...

  7. Influence of dispatching rules on average production lead time for multi-stage production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübl, Alexander; Jodlbauer, Herbert; Altendorfer, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    In this paper the influence of different dispatching rules on the average production lead time is investigated. Two theorems based on covariance between processing time and production lead time are formulated and proved theoretically. Theorem 1 links the average production lead time to the "processing time weighted production lead time" for the multi-stage production systems analytically. The influence of different dispatching rules on average lead time, which is well known from simulation and empirical studies, can be proved theoretically in Theorem 2 for a single stage production system. A simulation study is conducted to gain more insight into the influence of dispatching rules on average production lead time in a multi-stage production system. We find that the "processing time weighted average production lead time" for a multi-stage production system is not invariant of the applied dispatching rule and can be used as a dispatching rule independent indicator for single-stage production systems.

  8. Occupation times and ergodicity breaking in biased continuous time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel, Golan; Barkai, Eli [Physics Department, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2005-12-14

    Continuous time random walk (CTRW) models are widely used to model diffusion in condensed matter. There are two classes of such models, distinguished by the convergence or divergence of the mean waiting time. Systems with finite average sojourn time are ergodic and thus Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics can be applied. We investigate the statistical properties of CTRW models with infinite average sojourn time; in particular, the occupation time probability density function is obtained. It is shown that in the non-ergodic phase the distribution of the occupation time of the particle on a given lattice point exhibits bimodal U or trimodal W shape, related to the arcsine law. The key points are as follows. (a) In a CTRW with finite or infinite mean waiting time, the distribution of the number of visits on a lattice point is determined by the probability that a member of an ensemble of particles in equilibrium occupies the lattice point. (b) The asymmetry parameter of the probability distribution function of occupation times is related to the Boltzmann probability and to the partition function. (c) The ensemble average is given by Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics for either finite or infinite mean sojourn time, when detailed balance conditions hold. (d) A non-ergodic generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics for systems with infinite mean sojourn time is found.

  9. Stylised facts of financial time series and hidden Markov models in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Peter; Madsen, Henrik; Lindström, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hidden Markov models are often applied in quantitative finance to capture the stylised facts of financial returns. They are usually discrete-time models and the number of states rarely exceeds two because of the quadratic increase in the number of parameters with the number of states. This paper...... presents an extension to continuous time where it is possible to increase the number of states with a linear rather than quadratic growth in the number of parameters. The possibility of increasing the number of states leads to a better fit to both the distributional and temporal properties of daily returns....

  10. Mathematical modeling of a continuous alcoholic fermentation process in a two-stage tower reactor cascade with flocculating yeast recycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Samuel Conceição; de Castro, Heizir Ferreira; Visconti, Alexandre Eliseu Stourdze; Giudici, Reinaldo

    2015-03-01

    Experiments of continuous alcoholic fermentation of sugarcane juice with flocculating yeast recycle were conducted in a system of two 0.22-L tower bioreactors in series, operated at a range of dilution rates (D 1 = D 2 = 0.27-0.95 h(-1)), constant recycle ratio (α = F R /F = 4.0) and a sugar concentration in the feed stream (S 0) around 150 g/L. The data obtained in these experimental conditions were used to adjust the parameters of a mathematical model previously developed for the single-stage process. This model considers each of the tower bioreactors as a perfectly mixed continuous reactor and the kinetics of cell growth and product formation takes into account the limitation by substrate and the inhibition by ethanol and biomass, as well as the substrate consumption for cellular maintenance. The model predictions agreed satisfactorily with the measurements taken in both stages of the cascade. The major differences with respect to the kinetic parameters previously estimated for a single-stage system were observed for the maximum specific growth rate, for the inhibition constants of cell growth and for the specific rate of substrate consumption for cell maintenance. Mathematical models were validated and used to simulate alternative operating conditions as well as to analyze the performance of the two-stage process against that of the single-stage process.

  11. Primary radiotherapy of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. A comparison of continuous versus sequential regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.; Nemeskeri, C.; Petnehazi, C.; Varga, S.; Naszaly, A.; Borgulya, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background: comprehensive literature on cervical cancer demonstrates, even today, the need for optimization of the timing of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in the treatment of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. Patients and methods: 210 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were treated in the Municipal Center of Oncoradiology between January 1991 and December 1996 (FIGO IIA: n = 10, FIGO IIB: n = 113, and FIGO IIIB: n = 87). Two regimens were compared: sequential radiation therapy (SRT) with 4 x 8 Gy HDR-BT to point A followed by EBRT, and continuous radiation therapy (CRT) in which 5 x 6 Gy HDR-BT to point A, one session per week, was integrated into the EBRT. A total dose of 68-70 Gy to point A and 52-54 Gy to point B was given in EBRT with SRT, five fractions per week were applied. Four fractions per week were applied in CRT, i.e., no EBRT was performed on the day of HDR-BT. Total doses to points A and B were identical in both regimens. Overall treatment time (OTT) amounted to 56 days for SRT and 35 days for CRT. Median follow-up time was 3.4 (2.5-4.2) years. Results: progression-free 5-year-survival (PFS) was 71% in the CRT and 56% in the SRT group. Nevertheless, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 1.00), and the same was found in a subgroup analysis of the different tumor stages, showing, however, an unequivocal trend. Late bladder and rectal injuries occurred in 13% and 25%, respectively. Late rectal injuries were significantly more frequent with SRT than CRT (35 patients in the SRT and 18 patients in the CRT group; p = 0.037). This was due to the higher doses per fraction of HDR-BT in the SRT group. No difference was found regarding late bladder injuries (p = 0.837). Conclusion: for the patients included in this study, no advantage has been found so far in using CRT, i.e., shortening the OTT by weekly integration of HDR-BT into EBRT. Nevertheless, an obvious trend exists. The dose of 8 Gy per

  12. Primary radiotherapy of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. A comparison of continuous versus sequential regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, A.; Nemeskeri, C.; Petnehazi, C.; Varga, S.; Naszaly, A. [Center of Oncoradiology, Uzsoki Hospital, Budapest (Hungary); Borgulya, G. [National Pediatric Cancer Registry of the Hungarian Pediatric Oncology Working Group, 2nd Dept. of Pediatrics, Semmelweis Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    2004-04-01

    Background: comprehensive literature on cervical cancer demonstrates, even today, the need for optimization of the timing of external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in the treatment of stage IIA/B-IIIB cervical carcinoma. Patients and methods: 210 patients with carcinoma of the cervix were treated in the Municipal Center of Oncoradiology between January 1991 and December 1996 (FIGO IIA: n = 10, FIGO IIB: n = 113, and FIGO IIIB: n = 87). Two regimens were compared: sequential radiation therapy (SRT) with 4 x 8 Gy HDR-BT to point A followed by EBRT, and continuous radiation therapy (CRT) in which 5 x 6 Gy HDR-BT to point A, one session per week, was integrated into the EBRT. A total dose of 68-70 Gy to point A and 52-54 Gy to point B was given in EBRT with SRT, five fractions per week were applied. Four fractions per week were applied in CRT, i.e., no EBRT was performed on the day of HDR-BT. Total doses to points A and B were identical in both regimens. Overall treatment time (OTT) amounted to 56 days for SRT and 35 days for CRT. Median follow-up time was 3.4 (2.5-4.2) years. Results: progression-free 5-year-survival (PFS) was 71% in the CRT and 56% in the SRT group. Nevertheless, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 1.00), and the same was found in a subgroup analysis of the different tumor stages, showing, however, an unequivocal trend. Late bladder and rectal injuries occurred in 13% and 25%, respectively. Late rectal injuries were significantly more frequent with SRT than CRT (35 patients in the SRT and 18 patients in the CRT group; p = 0.037). This was due to the higher doses per fraction of HDR-BT in the SRT group. No difference was found regarding late bladder injuries (p = 0.837). Conclusion: for the patients included in this study, no advantage has been found so far in using CRT, i.e., shortening the OTT by weekly integration of HDR-BT into EBRT. Nevertheless, an obvious trend exists. The dose of 8 Gy per

  13. Cluster Observations of Non-Time Continuous Magnetosonic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Simon N.; Demekhov, Andrei G.; Boardsen, Scott A.; Ganushkina, Natalia Y.; Sibeck, David G.; Balikhin, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial magnetosonic waves are normally observed as temporally continuous sets of emissions lasting from minutes to hours. Recent observations, however, have shown that this is not always the case. Using Cluster data, this study identifies two distinct forms of these non temporally continuous use missions. The first, referred to as rising tone emissions, are characterized by the systematic onset of wave activity at increasing proton gyroharmonic frequencies. Sets of harmonic emissions (emission elements)are observed to occur periodically in the region +/- 10 off the geomagnetic equator. The sweep rate of these emissions maximizes at the geomagnetic equator. In addition, the ellipticity and propagation direction also change systematically as Cluster crosses the geomagnetic equator. It is shown that the observed frequency sweep rate is unlikely to result from the sideband instability related to nonlinear trapping of suprathermal protons in the wave field. The second form of emissions is characterized by the simultaneous onset of activity across a range of harmonic frequencies. These waves are observed at irregular intervals. Their occurrence correlates with changes in the spacecraft potential, a measurement that is used as a proxy for electron density. Thus, these waves appear to be trapped within regions of localized enhancement of the electron density.

  14. All-time dynamics of continuous-time random walks on complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B

    2013-02-28

    The concept of continuous-time random walks (CTRW) is a generalization of ordinary random walk models, and it is a powerful tool for investigating a broad spectrum of phenomena in natural, engineering, social, and economic sciences. Recently, several theoretical approaches have been developed that allowed to analyze explicitly dynamics of CTRW at all times, which is critically important for understanding mechanisms of underlying phenomena. However, theoretical analysis has been done mostly for systems with a simple geometry. Here we extend the original method based on generalized master equations to analyze all-time dynamics of CTRW models on complex networks. Specific calculations are performed for models on lattices with branches and for models on coupled parallel-chain lattices. Exact expressions for velocities and dispersions are obtained. Generalized fluctuations theorems for CTRW models on complex networks are discussed.

  15. Course Development Cycle Time: A Framework for Continuous Process Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Erinn

    2003-01-01

    Details Edinboro University's efforts to reduce the extended cycle time required to develop new courses and programs. Describes a collaborative process improvement framework, illustrated data findings, the team's recommendations for improvement, and the outcomes of those recommendations. (EV)

  16. A novel approach for fast scanning of nuclear emulsions with continuous motion of the microscope stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Tioukov, V.

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear emulsions have been used in particle physics experiments for many decades because of their unique spatial resolution. The use of nuclear emulsions as precise tracking detectors in large experiments has recently been made possible due to advances in the production of emulsion films and to the development of very fast automatic scanning devices. The present scanning speed of the European Scanning System (ESS), which has been developed within the OPERA Collaboration, is about 20 cm2/h. In addition to the scanning of OPERA films, the ESS is used for other applications with ever-growing demands for scanning speed, such as the muon radiography of volcanoes. In order to further increase the scanning speed of the ESS, we are testing a novel approach different from the standard stop-and-go motion of the microscope stage in the horizontal plane. Indeed we perform data acquisition with the stage moving at constant speed, using an objective lens with wide field of view. Unlike the implementation realized in Japan where the movement of objective lens and stage are synchronized to pile up images of the same view in a vertical stack, in this approach only the stage is moving horizontally. Thus images at different depths are not fully overlapped and special care is needed in the reconstruction. This approach can give a substantial increase in the scanning speed, especially for thin emulsion layers and wide field of view. In this paper we demonstrate that, after applying special corrections, the emulsion data quality can be as good as with the standard stop-and-go approach. This technique allows to double the scanning speed of the ESS, bringing it to 40 cm2/h without any hardware modification.

  17. Asymptotic absolute continuity for perturbed time-dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Under various conditions on the second term, the perturbation, including (as a mini- mum) boundedness of second order derivatives (being locally uniform in t), we study the large-time behaviour of the dynamics U(t) generated by the family of H(t)'s. We are interested in a generalization of the notion of asymptotic velocity ...

  18. Identification of continuous-time systems from samples of input ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Identification of process parameters for control purposes must often be done using a digital computer, from samples of input±output observations. On the other hand, the .... As stated earlier, it is convenient to divide the problem into two subproblems. The first of these is the determination of a suitable discrete-time model from ...

  19. An automated quasi-continuous capillary refill timing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaxter, L L; Morris, D E; Crowe, J A; Hayes-Gill, B R; Henry, C; Hill, S; Sharkey, D; Vyas, H

    2016-01-01

    Capillary refill time (CRT) is a simple means of cardiovascular assessment which is widely used in clinical care. Currently, CRT is measured through manual assessment of the time taken for skin tone to return to normal colour following blanching of the skin surface. There is evidence to suggest that manually assessed CRT is subject to bias from ambient light conditions, a lack of standardisation of both blanching time and manually applied pressure, subjectiveness of return to normal colour, and variability in the manual assessment of time. We present a novel automated system for CRT measurement, incorporating three components: a non-invasive adhesive sensor incorporating a pneumatic actuator, a diffuse multi-wavelength reflectance measurement device, and a temperature sensor; a battery operated datalogger unit containing a self contained pneumatic supply; and PC based data analysis software for the extraction of refill time, patient skin surface temperature, and sensor signal quality. Through standardisation of the test, it is hoped that some of the shortcomings of manual CRT can be overcome. In addition, an automated system will facilitate easier integration of CRT into electronic record keeping and clinical monitoring or scoring systems, as well as reducing demands on clinicians. Summary analysis of volunteer (n  =  30) automated CRT datasets are presented, from 15 healthy adults and 15 healthy children (aged from 5 to 15 years), as their arms were cooled from ambient temperature to 5°C. A more detailed analysis of two typical datasets is also presented, demonstrating that the response of automated CRT to cooling matches that of previously published studies. (paper)

  20. Personal Continuing Education (PECE) Plan: Stage 2. A Model to Supply Physicians' Perceived Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Colin R.

    1990-01-01

    Replies of 35 physicians practicing in rural Ontario detailed their learning needs for the Personal Continuing Education Plan. Desired structured learning topics emphasized updates on acute aspects of diseases in course format. Preferences for self-learning were for reprints rather than abstracts; 23 percent desired computer-assisted instruction.…

  1. Continuous radon measurements in schools: time variations and related parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovani, C.; Cappelletto, C.; Garavaglia, M.; Pividore, S.; Villalta, R.

    2004-01-01

    Some results are reported of observations made within a four-year survey, during different seasons and in different conditions of school building use. Natural radon variations (day-night cycles, seasonal and temperature dependent variations etc..) and artificial ones (opening of windows, weekends and vacations, deployment of air conditioning or heating systems. etc.) were investigated as parameters affecting time dependent radon concentrations. (P.A.)

  2. Mental time travel: a case for evolutionary continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corballis, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    In humans, hippocampal activity responds to the imagining of past or future events. In rats, hippocampal activity is tied to particular locations in a maze, occurs after the animal has been in the maze, and sometimes corresponds to locations the animal did not actually visit. This suggests that mental time travel has neurophysiological underpinnings that go far back in evolution, and may not be, as some (including myself) have claimed, unique to humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-time continuous nitrate monitoring in Illinois in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Kelly L.; Terrio, Paul J.; Straub, Timothy D.; Roseboom, Donald; Johnson, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    Many sources contribute to the nitrogen found in surface water in Illinois. Illinois is located in the most productive agricultural area in the country, and nitrogen fertilizer is commonly used to maximize corn production in this area. Additionally, septic/wastewater systems, industrial emissions, and lawn fertilizer are common sources of nitrogen in urban areas of Illinois. In agricultural areas, the use of fertilizer has increased grain production to meet the needs of a growing population, but also has resulted in increases in nitrogen concentrations in many streams and aquifers (Dubrovsky and others, 2010). The urban sources can increase nitrogen concentrations, too. The Federal limit for nitrate nitrogen in water that is safe to drink is 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/nitrate.cfm, accessed on May 24, 2013). In addition to the concern with nitrate nitrogen in drinking water, nitrogen, along with phosphorus, is an aquatic concern because it feeds the intensive growth of algae that are responsible for the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. The largest nitrogen flux to the waters feeding the Gulf of Mexico is from Illinois (Alexander and others, 2008). Most studies of nitrogen in surface water and groundwater include samples for nitrate nitrogen collected weekly or monthly, but nitrate concentrations can change rapidly and these discrete samples may not capture rapid changes in nitrate concentrations that can affect human and aquatic health. Continuous monitoring for nitrate could inform scientists and water-resource managers of these changes and provide information on the transport of nitrate in surface water and groundwater.

  4. Nocturnal continuous glucose and sleep stage data in adults with type 1 diabetes in real-world conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feupe, Stephanie Feudjio; Frias, Patrick F; Mednick, Sara C; McDevitt, Elizabeth A; Heintzman, Nathaniel D

    2013-09-01

    Sleep plays an important role in health, and poor sleep is associated with negative impacts on diabetes management, but few studies have objectively evaluated sleep in adults with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Nocturnal glycemia and sleep characteristics in T1DM were evaluated using body-worn sensors in real-world conditions. Analyses were performed on data collected by the Diabetes Management Integrated Technology Research Initiative pilot study of 17 T1DM subjects: 10 male, 7 female; age 19-61 years; T1DM duration 14.9 ± 11.0 years; hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 7.3% ± 1.3% (mean ± standard deviation). Each subject was equipped with a continuous glucose monitor and a wireless sleep monitor (WSM) for four nights. Sleep stages [rapid eye movement (REM), light, and deep sleep] were continuously recorded by the WSM. Nocturnal glycemia (mg/dl) was evaluated as hypoglycemia (250 mg/dl) and by several indices of glycemic variability. Glycemia was analyzed within each sleep stage. Subjects slept 358 ± 48 min per night, with 85 ± 27 min in REM sleep, 207 ± 42 min in light sleep, and 66 ± 30 min in deep sleep (mean ± standard deviation). Increased time in deep sleep was associated with lower HbA1c (R2 = 0.42; F = 9.37; p < .01). Nocturnal glycemia varied widely between and within subjects. Glycemia during REM sleep was hypoglycemia 5.5% ± 18.1%, low 6.6% ± 18.5%, euglycemia 44.6% ± 39.5%, high 37.9% ± 39.7%, and hyperglycemia 5.5% ± 21.2%; glycemia during light sleep was hypoglycemia 4.8% ± 12.4%, low 7.3% ± 12.9%, euglycemia 42.1% ± 33.7%, high 39.2% ± 34.6%, and hyperglycemia 6.5% ± 20.5%; and glycemia during deep sleep was hypoglycemia 0.5% ± 2.2%, low 5.8% ± 14.3%, euglycemia 48.0% ± 37.5%, high 39.5% ± 37.6%, and hyperglycemia 6.2% ± 19.5%. Significantly less time was spent in the hypoglycemic range during deep sleep compared with light sleep (p = .02). Increased time in deep sleep was associated with lower HbA1c, and less hypoglycemia occurred in

  5. CFD simulation of transient stage of continuous countercurrent hydrolysis of canola oil

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Weicheng

    2012-08-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling of a continuous countercurrent hydrolysis process was performed using ANSYS-CFX. The liquid properties and flow behavior such as density, specific heats, dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansivity as well as water solubility of the hydrolysis components triglyceride, diglyceride, monoglyceride, free fatty acid, and glycerol were calculated. Chemical kinetics for the hydrolysis reactions were simulated in this model by applying Arrhenius parameters. The simulation was based on actual experimental reaction conditions including temperature and water-to-oil ratio. The results not only have good agreement with experimental data but also show instantaneous distributions of concentrations of every component in hydrolysis reaction. This model provided visible insight into the continuous countercurrent hydrolysis process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Langevin formulation of a subdiffusive continuous-time random walk in physical time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairoli, Andrea; Baule, Adrian

    2015-07-01

    Systems living in complex nonequilibrated environments often exhibit subdiffusion characterized by a sublinear power-law scaling of the mean square displacement. One of the most common models to describe such subdiffusive dynamics is the continuous-time random walk (CTRW). Stochastic trajectories of a CTRW can be described in terms of the subordination of a normal diffusive process by an inverse Lévy-stable process. Here, we propose an equivalent Langevin formulation of a force-free CTRW without subordination. By introducing a different type of non-Gaussian noise, we are able to express the CTRW dynamics in terms of a single Langevin equation in physical time with additive noise. We derive the full multipoint statistics of this noise and compare it with the scaled Brownian motion (SBM), an alternative stochastic model describing subdiffusive dynamics. Interestingly, these two noises are identical up to the second order correlation functions, but different in the higher order statistics. We extend our formalism to general waiting time distributions and force fields and compare our results with those of the SBM. In the presence of external forces, our proposed noise generates a different class of stochastic processes, resembling a CTRW but with forces acting at all times.

  7. Ageing first passage time density in continuous time random walks and quenched energy landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüsemann, Henning; Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    We study the first passage dynamics of an ageing stochastic process in the continuous time random walk (CTRW) framework. In such CTRW processes the test particle performs a random walk, in which successive steps are separated by random waiting times distributed in terms of the waiting time probability density function \\psi (t)≃ {t}-1-α (0≤slant α ≤slant 2). An ageing stochastic process is defined by the explicit dependence of its dynamic quantities on the ageing time ta, the time elapsed between its preparation and the start of the observation. Subdiffusive ageing CTRWs with 0\\lt α \\lt 1 describe systems such as charge carriers in amorphous semiconducters, tracer dispersion in geological and biological systems, or the dynamics of blinking quantum dots. We derive the exact forms of the first passage time density for an ageing subdiffusive CTRW in the semi-infinite, confined, and biased case, finding different scaling regimes for weakly, intermediately, and strongly aged systems: these regimes, with different scaling laws, are also found when the scaling exponent is in the range 1\\lt α \\lt 2, for sufficiently long ta. We compare our results with the ageing motion of a test particle in a quenched energy landscape. We test our theoretical results in the quenched landscape against simulations: only when the bias is strong enough, the correlations from returning to previously visited sites become insignificant and the results approach the ageing CTRW results. With small bias or without bias, the ageing effects disappear and a change in the exponent compared to the case of a completely annealed landscape can be found, reflecting the build-up of correlations in the quenched landscape.

  8. Improving care transitions through meaningful use stage 2: continuity of care document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lyn Stankiewicz; Wilson, Marisa L; Newhouse, Robin P

    2013-02-01

    In this department, Drs Murphy, Wilson, and Newhouse highlight hot topics in nursing outcomes, research, and evidence-based practice relevant to the nurse administrator. The goal is to discuss the practical implications for nurse leaders in diverse healthcare settings. Content includes evidence-based projects and decision making, locating measurement tools for quality improvement and safety projects, using outcome measures to evaluate quality, practice implications of administrative research, and exemplars of projects that demon strate innovative approaches to organizational problems. In this article, the authors describe the elements of continuity of care documentation, how sharing information can improve the quality and safety of care transitions and the implications for nurse executives.

  9. New Techniques for Real-Time Stage Forecasting for Tributaries in the Nashville Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charley, W.; Moran, B.; LaRosa, J.

    2011-12-01

    On Saturday, May 1, 2010, heavy rain began falling in the Cumberland River Valley, Tennessee, and continued through the following day. 13.5 inches was measured at Nashville, an unprecedented amount that doubled the previous 2-day record, and exceeded the May monthly total record of 11 inches. Elsewhere in the valley, amounts of over 19 inches were measured. This intensity of rainfall quickly overwhelmed tributaries to the Cumberland in the Nashville area, causing wide-spread and serious flooding. Tractor-trailers and houses were seen floating down Mill Creek, a primary tributary in the south eastern area of Nashville. Twenty-six people died and over 2 billion dollars in damage occurred as a result of the flood. Since that time, several other significant rainfall events have occurred in the area. As a result of the flood, agencies in the Nashville area want better capabilities to forecast stages for the local tributaries. Better stage forecasting will help local agencies close roads, evacuate homes and businesses and similar actions. An interagency group, consisting of Metro Nashville Water Services and Office of Emergency Management, the National Weather Service, the US Geological Survey and the US Army Corps of Engineers, has been established to seek ways to better forecast short-term events in the region. It should be noted that the National Weather Service has the official responsibility of forecasting stages. This paper examines techniques and algorithms that are being developed to meet this need and the practical aspects of integrating them into a usable product that can quickly and accurately forecast stages in the short-time frame of the tributaries. This includes not only the forecasting procedure, but also the procedure to acquire the latest precipitation and stage data to make the forecasts. These procedures are integrated into the program HEC-RTS, the US Army Corps of Engineers Real-Time Simulation program. HEC-RTS is a Java-based integration tool that

  10. A low power CMOS 3.3 Gbps continuous-time adaptive equalizer for serial link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Hao; Zhou Yumei; Zhao Jianzhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes using a high-speed continuous-time analog adaptive equalizer as the front-end of a receiver for a high-speed serial interface, which is compliant with many serial communication specifications such as USB2.0, PCI-E2.0 and Rapid IO. The low and high frequency loops are merged to decrease the effect of delay between the two paths, in addition, the infinite input impedance facilitates the cascade stages in order to improve the high frequency boosting gain. The implemented circuit architecture could facilitate the wide frequency range from 1 to 3.3 Gbps with different length FR4-PCB traces, which brings as much as 25 dB loss. The replica control circuits are injected to provide a convenient way to regulate common-mode voltage for full differential operation. In addition, AC coupling is adopted to suppress the common input from the forward stage. A prototype chip was fabricated in 0.18-μm 1P6M mixed-signal CMOS technology. The actual area is 0.6 x 0.57 mm 2 and the analog equalizer operates up to 3.3 Gbps over FR4-PCB trace with 25 dB loss. The overall power dissipation is approximately 23.4 mW. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  11. A low power CMOS 3.3 Gbps continuous-time adaptive equalizer for serial link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ju; Yumei, Zhou; Jianzhong, Zhao

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes using a high-speed continuous-time analog adaptive equalizer as the front-end of a receiver for a high-speed serial interface, which is compliant with many serial communication specifications such as USB2.0, PCI-E2.0 and Rapid IO. The low and high frequency loops are merged to decrease the effect of delay between the two paths, in addition, the infinite input impedance facilitates the cascade stages in order to improve the high frequency boosting gain. The implemented circuit architecture could facilitate the wide frequency range from 1 to 3.3 Gbps with different length FR4-PCB traces, which brings as much as 25 dB loss. The replica control circuits are injected to provide a convenient way to regulate common-mode voltage for full differential operation. In addition, AC coupling is adopted to suppress the common input from the forward stage. A prototype chip was fabricated in 0.18-μm 1P6M mixed-signal CMOS technology. The actual area is 0.6 × 0.57 mm2 and the analog equalizer operates up to 3.3 Gbps over FR4-PCB trace with 25 dB loss. The overall power dissipation is approximately 23.4 mW.

  12. The optimal timing of continuous renal replacement therapy for patients with sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huanhuan; Sun, Ting; Hao, Dong; Wang, Tao; Li, Zhi; Han, Shasha; Qi, Zhijiang; Dong, Zhaoju; Lv, Changjun; Wang, Xiaozhi

    2014-10-01

    High mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) is probably associated with sepsis-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). The aim of this study is to explore which stage of AKI may be the optimal timing for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). A retrospective analysis of 160 critically ill patients with septic AKI, treated with or without CRRT was performed in Binzhou medical college affiliated hospital ICU. The parameters including 28-days mortality rate, renal recovery, ventilation time and ICU stay between CRRT group and control group were assessed. Renal recovery, defined as independence from dialysis at discharge, was documented for 64/76 (84.2 %) of the surviving patients (48.1 % of total subjects included in the study). The mortality rate increased proportionally with acute kidney injury Network stages in CRRT subgroups (P = 0.001) and control groups (P = 0.029). CRRT initiation at stage 2 of AKI significantly reduced the 28-day mortality (P = 0.048) and increased the 28-day survival rate (P = 0.036) compared with those in control group. In addition, the ICU stay and ventilation time were shorter in CRRT group than that of control group in stage 2 of AKI. The stage 2 AKI might be the optimal timing for performing CRRT.

  13. Is Travel Time to Colonoscopy Associated With Late-Stage Colorectal Cancer Among Medicare Beneficiaries in Iowa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Mary E; Matthews, Kevin A; Gaglioti, Anne; Bay, Camden; McDowell, Bradley D; Ward, Marcia M; Levy, Barcey T

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to decrease the incidence of late-stage colorectal cancer, yet a substantial proportion of Americans do not receive screening. Those in rural areas may face barriers to colonoscopy services based on travel time, and previous studies have demonstrated lower screening among rural residents. Our purpose was to assess factors associated with late-stage CRC, and specifically to determine if longer travel time to colonoscopy was associated with late-stage CRC among an insured population in Iowa. SEER-Medicare data were used to identify individuals ages 65 to 84 years old diagnosed with CRC in Iowa from 2002 to 2009. The distance between the centroid of the ZIP code of residence and the ZIP code of colonoscopy was computed for each individual who had continuous Medicare fee-for-service coverage for a 3- to 4-month period prior to diagnosis, and a professional claim for colonoscopy within that time frame. Demographic characteristics and travel times were compared between those diagnosed with early- versus late-stage CRC. Also, demographic differences between those who had colonoscopy claims identified within 3-4 months prior to diagnosis (81%) were compared to patients with no colonoscopy claims identified (19%). A total of 5,792 subjects met inclusion criteria; 31% were diagnosed with early-stage versus 69% with late-stage CRC. Those divorced or widowed (vs married) were more likely to be diagnosed with late-stage CRC (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.06-1.37). Travel time was not associated with diagnosis of late-stage CRC. Among a Medicare-insured population, there was no relationship between travel time to colonoscopy and disease stage at diagnosis. It is likely that factors other than distance to colonoscopy present more pertinent barriers to screening in this insured population. Additional research should be done to determine reasons for nonadherence to screening among those with access to CRC screening services, given that over

  14. Developmental stage of strongyle eggs affects the outcome variations of real-time PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla Vestergaard; Haakansson, I. T.; Roust, Tina

    2013-01-01

    extent developmental stages can affect the variation of diagnostic test results. This study investigated the influence of developmental stages of strongyle eggs on the variation real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results. Mixed species strongyle eggs were obtained from the faeces of a naturally...

  15. Progression Analysis and Stage Discovery in Continuous Physiological Processes Using Image Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrucci Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an image computing-based method for quantitative analysis of continuous physiological processes that can be sensed by medical imaging and demonstrate its application to the analysis of morphological alterations of the bone structure, which correlate with the progression of osteoarthritis (OA. The purpose of the analysis is to quantitatively estimate OA progression in a fashion that can assist in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Ultimately, the texture analysis will be able to provide an alternative OA scoring method, which can potentially reflect the progression of the disease in a more direct fashion compared to the existing clinically utilized classification schemes based on radiology. This method can be useful not just for studying the nature of OA, but also for developing and testing the effect of drugs and treatments. While in this paper we demonstrate the application of the method to osteoarthritis, its generality makes it suitable for the analysis of other progressive clinical conditions that can be diagnosed and prognosed by using medical imaging.

  16. Influence of capacity- and time-constrained intermediate storage in two-stage food production systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akkerman, Renzo; van Donk, Dirk Pieter; Gaalman, Gerard

    2007-01-01

    In food processing, two-stage production systems with a batch processor in the first stage and packaging lines in the second stage are common and mostly separated by capacity- and time-constrained intermediate storage. This combination of constraints is common in practice, but the literature hardly...... of systems like this. Contrary to the common sense in operations management, the LPT rule is able to maximize the total production volume per day. Furthermore, we show that adding one tank has considerable effects. Finally, we conclude that the optimal setup frequency for batches in the first stage...

  17. Accurate Lithium-ion battery parameter estimation with continuous-time system identification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Bing; Zhao, Xin; Callafon, Raymond de; Garnier, Hugues; Nguyen, Truong; Mi, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Continuous-time system identification is applied in Lithium-ion battery modeling. • Continuous-time and discrete-time identification methods are compared in detail. • The instrumental variable method is employed to further improve the estimation. • Simulations and experiments validate the advantages of continuous-time methods. - Abstract: The modeling of Lithium-ion batteries usually utilizes discrete-time system identification methods to estimate parameters of discrete models. However, in real applications, there is a fundamental limitation of the discrete-time methods in dealing with sensitivity when the system is stiff and the storage resolutions are limited. To overcome this problem, this paper adopts direct continuous-time system identification methods to estimate the parameters of equivalent circuit models for Lithium-ion batteries. Compared with discrete-time system identification methods, the continuous-time system identification methods provide more accurate estimates to both fast and slow dynamics in battery systems and are less sensitive to disturbances. A case of a 2 nd -order equivalent circuit model is studied which shows that the continuous-time estimates are more robust to high sampling rates, measurement noises and rounding errors. In addition, the estimation by the conventional continuous-time least squares method is further improved in the case of noisy output measurement by introducing the instrumental variable method. Simulation and experiment results validate the analysis and demonstrate the advantages of the continuous-time system identification methods in battery applications.

  18. An Examination of Models of Relaxation in Complex Systems. I. Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-04

    M NRL Memorandum Report 5719 An Examination of Models of Relaxation in Complex Systems 1. Continuous Time Random Walk ( CTRW ) Models K. L. NGAI, R. W...Examination of Models of Relaxation in Complex Systems I. Continuous Time Random Walk ( CTRW ) Models E. PSRSONAL AUTHOR(S) Ntgi, K.L., Rendell. R.W...necessary and idenrify by block number) Models of relaxation in complex systemL based on the continuous time random walk ( CTRW ) formalism are examined on

  19. Delay-dependent dynamical analysis of complex-valued memristive neural networks: Continuous-time and discrete-time cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Jiang, Haijun; Ma, Tianlong; Hu, Cheng

    2018-05-01

    This paper considers the delay-dependent stability of memristive complex-valued neural networks (MCVNNs). A novel linear mapping function is presented to transform the complex-valued system into the real-valued system. Under such mapping function, both continuous-time and discrete-time MCVNNs are analyzed in this paper. Firstly, when activation functions are continuous but not Lipschitz continuous, an extended matrix inequality is proved to ensure the stability of continuous-time MCVNNs. Furthermore, if activation functions are discontinuous, a discontinuous adaptive controller is designed to acquire its stability by applying Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals. Secondly, compared with techniques in continuous-time MCVNNs, the Halanay-type inequality and comparison principle are firstly used to exploit the dynamical behaviors of discrete-time MCVNNs. Finally, the effectiveness of theoretical results is illustrated through numerical examples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Achievement of VO2max criteria during a continuous graded exercise test and a verification stage performed by college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Constance M; Alexander, Ryan P; Mageean, Amanda L

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of meeting specific VO2max criteria and to test the effectiveness of a VO2max verification stage in college athletes. Thirty-five subjects completed a continuous graded exercise test (GXT) to volitional exhaustion. The frequency of achieving various respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and age-predicted maximum heart rate (HRmax) criteria and a VO2 plateau within 2 and 2.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (active recovery, 10 subjects who did not demonstrate a plateau completed a verification stage performed at supramaximal intensity. From the GXT, the number of subjects meeting VO2max plateau was 5 (≤2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and 7 (≤2.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)), RER criteria 34 (≥1.05), 32 (≥1.10), and 24 (≥1.15), HRmax criteria, 35 (athlete's ability to achieve VO2max plateau and certain RER and HR criteria. The use of a verification stage increases the frequency of VO2max achievement and may be an effective method to improve the accuracy of VO2max measurements in college athletes.

  1. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...... examples to show how reproductive timing Tc and level R0 are shaped by stage dynamics (individual trait changes), selection on the trait, and parent-offspring phenotypic correlation. We also show how population structure can affect dispersion in reproduction among ages and stages. These macroscopic...... features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  2. Two-stage continuous process of methyl ester from high free fatty acid mixed crude palm oil using static mixer coupled with high-intensity of ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somnuk, Krit; Smithmaitrie, Pruittikorn; Prateepchaikul, Gumpon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Mixed crude palm oil was used in the two-step continuous process. • Two-step continuous process was performed using static mixer coupled with ultrasound. • The maximum obtained yield was 92.5 vol.% after the purification process. • The residence time less than 20 s was achieved in ultrasonic reactors. - Abstract: The two-stage continuous process of methyl ester from high free fatty acid (FFA) mixed crude palm oil (MCPO) was performed by using static mixer coupled with high-intensity of ultrasound. The 2 × 1000 W ultrasonic homogenizers were operated at 18 kHz frequency in the 2 × 100 mL continuous reactors. For the first-step, acid-catalyzed esterification was employed with 18 vol.% of methanol, 2.7 vol.% of sulfuric acid, 60 °C of temperature, and 20 L h −1 of MCPO flow rate, for reducing the acid value from 28 mg KOH g −1 to less than 2 mg KOH g −1 . For the second-step, base-catalyzed transesterification was carried out under 18 vol.% of methanol, 8 g KOH L −1 of oil, and 20 L h −1 of esterified oil flow rate at 30 °C. The high yields of esterified oil and crude biodiesel were attained within the residence time of less than 20 s in the ultrasonic reactors. The yields of each stage process were: 103.3 vol.% of esterified oil, 105.4 vol.% of crude biodiesel, and 92.5 vol.% of biodiesel when compared with 100 vol.% MCPO. The quality of the biodiesel meets the specification of biodiesel standard in Thailand

  3. Continuous production of biohythane from hydrothermal liquefied cornstalk biomass via two-stage high-rate anaerobic reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Bu-Chun; Li, Jia-Ming; Zhu, Zhang-Bing; Zhang, Yuan-Hui; Lu, Jian-Wen; Shen, Rui-Xia; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui; Liu, Zhidan

    2016-01-01

    Biohythane production via two-stage fermentation is a promising direction for sustainable energy recovery from lignocellulosic biomass. However, the utilization of lignocellulosic biomass suffers from specific natural recalcitrance. Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) is an emerging technology for the liquefaction of biomass, but there are still several challenges for the coupling of HTL and two-stage fermentation. One particular challenge is the limited efficiency of fermentation reactors at a high solid content of the treated feedstock. Another is the conversion of potential inhibitors during fermentation. Here, we report a novel strategy for the continuous production of biohythane from cornstalk through the integration of HTL and two-stage fermentation. Cornstalk was converted to solid and liquid via HTL, and the resulting liquid could be subsequently fed into the two-stage fermentation systems. The systems consisted of two typical high-rate reactors: an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) and a packed bed reactor (PBR). The liquid could be efficiently converted into biohythane via the UASB and PBR with a high density of microbes at a high organic loading rate. Biohydrogen production decreased from 2.34 L/L/day in UASB (1.01 L/L/day in PBR) to 0 L/L/day as the organic loading rate (OLR) of the HTL liquid products increased to 16 g/L/day. The methane production rate achieved a value of 2.53 (UASB) and 2.54 L/L/day (PBR), respectively. The energy and carbon recovery of the integrated HTL and biohythane fermentation system reached up to 79.0 and 67.7%, respectively. The fermentation inhibitors, i.e., 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (41.4-41.9% of the initial quantity detected) and furfural (74.7-85.0% of the initial quantity detected), were degraded during hydrogen fermentation. Compared with single-stage fermentation, the methane process during two-stage fermentation had a more efficient methane production rate, acetogenesis, and COD removal. The microbial distribution

  4. Origins and applications of the Montroll-Weiss continuous time random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlesinger, Michael F.

    2017-05-01

    The Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) was introduced by Montroll and Weiss in 1965 in a purely mathematical paper. Its antecedents and later applications beginning in 1973 are discussed, especially for the case of fractal time where the mean waiting time between jumps is infinite. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  5. Simulation, design and proof-of-concept of a two-stage continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis reactor for synthesis of functionalized nano-sized inorganic composite materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielke, Philipp; Xu, Yu; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations were employed to evaluate several mixer geometries for a novel two-stage continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis reactor. The addition of a second stage holds the promise of allowing the synthesis of functionalized nano-materials as for example core......-shell or decorated particles. Based on the simulation results, a reactor system employing a confined jet mixer in the first and a counter-flow mixer in the second stage was designed and built. The two-stage functionality and synthesis capacity is shown on the example of single- and two-stage syntheses of pure...

  6. Nanocomposite YSZ-NiO Particles with Tailored Structure Synthesized in a Two-Stage Continuous Hydrothermal Flow Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zielke, Philipp; Xu, Yu; Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar

    2016-01-01

    The increasing amount of fluctuating electricity generation from renewable sources requires a flexible energy system and storage technologies to ensure that energy services can be covered in a stable and affordable manner. In order to become truly independent from fossil fuels, increasing...... the performance of energy storage and conversion devices such as fuel cells, electrolyzers and batteries is important. One promising approach to further improve these devices is the use of carefully structured nanosized materials. Nano-composite particles combining different materials in advanced geometries like......-composites. Here we report on the design of the two-stage continuous hydrothermal flow synthesis reactor and first results on obtaining structured nano-composite consisting of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and NiO materials. These materials are commonly applied in the fuel electrodes of today’s state...

  7. THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL DEVELOPMENT OF THE ETHYLBENZENE DEHYDROGENATION PROCESS KINETICS IN A TWO-STAGE ADIABATIC CONTINUOUS REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bityukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the mathematical modeling of the kinetics of ethyl benzene dehydrogenation in a two-stage adiabatic reactor with a catalytic bed functioning on continuous technology. The analysis of chemical reactions taking place parallel to the main reaction of styrene formation has been carried out on the basis of which a number of assumptions were made proceeding from which a kinetic scheme describing the mechanism of the chemical reactions during the dehydrogenation process was developed. A mathematical model of the dehydrogenation process, describing the dynamics of chemical reactions taking place in each of the two stages of the reactor block at a constant temperature is developed. The estimation of the rate constants of direct and reverse reactions of each component, formation and exhaustion of the reacted mixture was made. The dynamics of the starting material concentration variations (ethyl benzene batch was obtained as well as styrene formation dynamics and all byproducts of dehydrogenation (benzene, toluene, ethylene, carbon, hydrogen, ect.. The calculated the variations of the component composition of the reaction mixture during its passage through the first and second stages of the reactor showed that the proposed mathematical description adequately reproduces the kinetics of the process under investigation. This demonstrates the advantage of the developed model, as well as loyalty to the values found for the rate constants of reactions, which enable the use of models for calculating the kinetics of ethyl benzene dehydrogenation under nonisothermal mode in order to determine the optimal temperature trajectory of the reactor operation. In the future, it will reduce energy and resource consumption, increase the volume of produced styrene and improve the economic indexes of the process.

  8. Controlled time of arrival windows for already initiated energy-neutral continuous descent operations

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmau Codina, Ramon; Prats Menéndez, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Continuous descent operations with controlled times of arrival at one or several metering fixes could enable environmentally friendly procedures without compromising terminal airspace capacity. This paper focuses on controlled time of arrival updates once the descent has been already initiated, assessing the feasible time window (and associated fuel consumption) of continuous descent operations requiring neither thrust nor speed-brake usage along the whole descent (i.e. only elevator control ...

  9. Using cheese whey for hydrogen and methane generation in a two-stage continuous process with alternative pH controlling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetsaneas, Nikolaos; Antonopoulou, Georgia; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Kornaros, Michael; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2009-08-01

    This study focuses on the exploitation of cheese whey as a source for hydrogen and methane, in a two-stage continuous process. Mesophilic fermentative hydrogen production from undiluted cheese whey was investigated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 24 h. Alkalinity addition (NaHCO(3)) or an automatic pH controller were used, to maintain the pH culture at a constant value of 5.2. The hydrogen production rate was 2.9+/-0.2 L/Lreactor/d, while the yield of hydrogen produced was approximately 0.78+/-0.05 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed, with alkalinity addition, while the respective values when using pH control were 1.9+/-0.1 L/Lreactor/d and 0.61+/-0.04 mol H(2)/mol glucose consumed. The corresponding yields of hydrogen produced were 2.9 L of H(2)/L cheese whey and 1.9 L of H(2)/L cheese whey, respectively. The effluent from the hydrogenogenic reactor was further digested to biogas in a continuous mesophilic anaerobic bioreactor. The anaerobic digester was operated at an HRT of 20 d and produced approximately 1L CH(4)/d, corresponding to a yield of 6.7 L CH(4)/L of influent. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) elimination reached 95.3% demonstrating that cheese whey could be efficiently used for hydrogen and methane production, in a two-stage process.

  10. Managing time in a changing world: Timing of avian annual cycle stages under climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomotani, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Animals need to time their seasonal activities such as breeding and migration to occur at the right time. They use cues from the environment to predict changes and organise their activities accordingly. What happens, then, when climate change interferes with this ability to make predictions? Climate

  11. Superior memory efficiency of quantum devices for the simulation of continuous-time stochastic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Thomas J.; Gu, Mile

    2018-03-01

    Continuous-time stochastic processes pervade everyday experience, and the simulation of models of these processes is of great utility. Classical models of systems operating in continuous-time must typically track an unbounded amount of information about past behaviour, even for relatively simple models, enforcing limits on precision due to the finite memory of the machine. However, quantum machines can require less information about the past than even their optimal classical counterparts to simulate the future of discrete-time processes, and we demonstrate that this advantage extends to the continuous-time regime. Moreover, we show that this reduction in the memory requirement can be unboundedly large, allowing for arbitrary precision even with a finite quantum memory. We provide a systematic method for finding superior quantum constructions, and a protocol for analogue simulation of continuous-time renewal processes with a quantum machine.

  12. CMOS continuous-time adaptive equalizers for high-speed serial links

    CERN Document Server

    Gimeno Gasca, Cecilia; Aldea Chagoyen, Concepción

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the design of adaptive equalization solutions integrated in standard CMOS technology for high-speed serial links. Since continuous-time equalizers offer various advantages as an alternative to discrete-time equalizers at multi-gigabit rates, this book provides a detailed description of continuous-time adaptive equalizers design - both at transistor and system levels-, their main characteristics and performances. The authors begin with a complete review and analysis of the state of the art of equalizers for wireline applications, describing why they are necessary, their types, and their main applications. Next, theoretical fundamentals of continuous-time adaptive equalizers are explored. Then, new structures are proposed to implement the different building blocks of the adaptive equalizer: line equalizer, loop-filters, power comparator, etc.  The authors demonstrate the design of a complete low-power, low-voltage, high-speed, continuous-time adaptive equalizer. Finally, a cost-...

  13. Finite-time stabilisation of simple mechanical systems using continuous feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Amit K.; Bohn, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Stabilisation of simple mechanical systems in finite time with continuous state feedback is considered here. The dynamics are represented by generalised (local) coordinates. A general methodology to construct control Lyapunov functions that are Hölder continuous and that can be used to show finite-time stability of the feedback controlled system, is presented. This construction also gives the feedback control law, and results in the feedback system being Hölder continuous as well. Unlike Lipschitz continuous feedback control systems, the feedback control scheme given here converges to the desired equilibrium in finite time. Moreover, unlike discontinuous and hybrid control schemes, the feedback control law does not lead to chattering in the presence of measurement noise, does not excite unmodelled high-frequency dynamics, and can be implemented with actuators that can only deliver continuous control inputs. The advantages of continuous finite-time stabilisation over continuous asymptotic stabilisation of mechanical systems, has been described in some prior research on finite-time stabilisation of the double integrator. The finite-time stabilisation scheme given here generalises this prior research to multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. A numerical comparison is carried out through numerical simulations on two example systems that are representative of a broad class of simple mechanical systems.

  14. Soundness of Timed-Arc Workflow Nets in Discrete and Continuous-Time Semantics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Jose Antonio; Srba, Jiri; Sørensen, Mathias Grund

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of workflow processes with quantitative aspectslike timing is of interest in numerous time-critical applications. We suggest a workflow model based on timed-arc Petri nets and studythe foundational problems of soundness and strong (time-bounded) soundness.We first consider the discrete......-time semantics (integer delays)and explore the decidability of the soundness problemsand show, among others, that soundness is decidable for monotonic workflow nets while reachability is undecidable.For general timed-arc workflow nets soundness andstrong soundness become undecidable, though we can design......, and a blood transfusion workflow.The implementation of the algorithms is freely available as a part of the model checker TAPAAL (www.tapaal.net)....

  15. Duration of Second Stage of Labour at Term and Pushing Time: Risk Factors for Postpartum Haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looft, Emelie; Simic, Marija; Ahlberg, Mia; Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Stephansson, Olof

    2017-03-01

    Prolonged labour is associated with increased risk of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), but the role of active pushing time and the relation with management during labour remains poorly understood. A population-based cohort study from electronic medical record data in the Stockholm-Gotland Region, Sweden. We included 57 267 primiparous women with singleton, term gestation, livebirths delivered vaginally in cephalic presentation in 2008-14. We performed multivariable Poisson regression to estimate the association between length of second stage, pushing time, and PPH (estimated blood loss >500 mL during delivery), adjusting for maternal, delivery, and fetal characteristics as potential confounders. The incidence of PPH was 28.9%. The risk of PPH increased with each passing hour of second stage: compared with a second stage risk (RR) for PPH were for 1 to risk of PPH. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Continuous uniformly finite time exact disturbance observer based control for fixed-time stabilization of nonlinear systems with mismatched disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Junkang; Liu, Chongxin; Liu, Hang

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous composite control scheme to achieve fixed-time stabilization for nonlinear systems with mismatched disturbances. The composite controller is constructed in two steps: First, uniformly finite time exact disturbance observers are proposed to estimate and compensate the disturbances. Then, based on adding a power integrator technique and fixed-time stability theory, continuous fixed-time stable state feedback controller and Lyapunov functions are constructed to achieve global fixed-time system stabilization. The proposed control method extends the existing fixed-time stable control results to high order nonlinear systems with mismatched disturbances and achieves global fixed-time system stabilization. Besides, the proposed control scheme improves the disturbance rejection performance and achieves performance recovery of nominal system. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness, the superiority and the applicability of the proposed control scheme.

  17. Assessment of bidirectional influences between family relationships and adolescent problem behavior: Discrete versus continuous time analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsing, M.J.M.H.; Oud, J.H.L.; Bruyn, E.E.J. De

    2005-01-01

    In family research, bidirectional influences between the family and the individual are usually analyzed in discrete time. Results from discrete time analysis, however, have been shown to be highly dependent on the length of the observation interval. Continuous time analysis using stochastic

  18. A Four-Stage Hybrid Model for Hydrological Time Series Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Chongli; Yang, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaochao

    2014-01-01

    Hydrological time series forecasting remains a difficult task due to its complicated nonlinear, non-stationary and multi-scale characteristics. To solve this difficulty and improve the prediction accuracy, a novel four-stage hybrid model is proposed for hydrological time series forecasting based on the principle of ‘denoising, decomposition and ensemble’. The proposed model has four stages, i.e., denoising, decomposition, components prediction and ensemble. In the denoising stage, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is utilized to reduce the noises in the hydrological time series. Then, an improved method of EMD, the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), is applied to decompose the denoised series into a number of intrinsic mode function (IMF) components and one residual component. Next, the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is adopted to predict the trend of all of the components obtained in the decomposition stage. In the final ensemble prediction stage, the forecasting results of all of the IMF and residual components obtained in the third stage are combined to generate the final prediction results, using a linear neural network (LNN) model. For illustration and verification, six hydrological cases with different characteristics are used to test the effectiveness of the proposed model. The proposed hybrid model performs better than conventional single models, the hybrid models without denoising or decomposition and the hybrid models based on other methods, such as the wavelet analysis (WA)-based hybrid models. In addition, the denoising and decomposition strategies decrease the complexity of the series and reduce the difficulties of the forecasting. With its effective denoising and accurate decomposition ability, high prediction precision and wide applicability, the new model is very promising for complex time series forecasting. This new forecast model is an extension of nonlinear prediction models. PMID:25111782

  19. Real-Time Predictive Flutter Analysis and Continuous Parameter Identification of Acclerating Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farhat, Charbel

    2000-01-01

    ... at the University 0 Colorado in Boulder, This research project pertains to the development of a real-time predictive flutter analysis capability, and the design of a continuous parameter identification method...

  20. A statistical approach for segregating cognitive task stages from multivariate fMRI BOLD time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanuele, Charmaine; Bähner, Florian; Plichta, Michael M; Kirsch, Peter; Tost, Heike; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis can reveal new information from neuroimaging data to illuminate human cognition and its disturbances. Here, we develop a methodological approach, based on multivariate statistical/machine learning and time series analysis, to discern cognitive processing stages from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) time series. We apply this method to data recorded from a group of healthy adults whilst performing a virtual reality version of the delayed win-shift radial arm maze (RAM) task. This task has been frequently used to study working memory and decision making in rodents. Using linear classifiers and multivariate test statistics in conjunction with time series bootstraps, we show that different cognitive stages of the task, as defined by the experimenter, namely, the encoding/retrieval, choice, reward and delay stages, can be statistically discriminated from the BOLD time series in brain areas relevant for decision making and working memory. Discrimination of these task stages was significantly reduced during poor behavioral performance in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), but not in the primary visual cortex (V1). Experimenter-defined dissection of time series into class labels based on task structure was confirmed by an unsupervised, bottom-up approach based on Hidden Markov Models. Furthermore, we show that different groupings of recorded time points into cognitive event classes can be used to test hypotheses about the specific cognitive role of a given brain region during task execution. We found that whilst the DLPFC strongly differentiated between task stages associated with different memory loads, but not between different visual-spatial aspects, the reverse was true for V1. Our methodology illustrates how different aspects of cognitive information processing during one and the same task can be separated and attributed to specific brain regions based on information contained in

  1. A statistical approach for segregating cognitive task stages from multivariate fMRI BOLD time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine eDemanuele

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate pattern analysis can reveal new information from neuroimaging data to illuminate human cognition and its disturbances. Here, we develop a methodological approach, based on multivariate statistical/machine learning and time series analysis, to discern cognitive processing stages from fMRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD time series. We apply this method to data recorded from a group of healthy adults whilst performing a virtual reality version of the delayed win-shift radial arm maze task. This task has been frequently used to study working memory and decision making in rodents. Using linear classifiers and multivariate test statistics in conjunction with time series bootstraps, we show that different cognitive stages of the task, as defined by the experimenter, namely, the encoding/retrieval, choice, reward and delay stages, can be statistically discriminated from the BOLD time series in brain areas relevant for decision making and working memory. Discrimination of these task stages was significantly reduced during poor behavioral performance in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, but not in the primary visual cortex (V1. Experimenter-defined dissection of time series into class labels based on task structure was confirmed by an unsupervised, bottom-up approach based on Hidden Markov Models. Furthermore, we show that different groupings of recorded time points into cognitive event classes can be used to test hypotheses about the specific cognitive role of a given brain region during task execution. We found that whilst the DLPFC strongly differentiated between task stages associated with different memory loads, but not between different visual-spatial aspects, the reverse was true for V1. Our methodology illustrates how different aspects of cognitive information processing during one and the same task can be separated and attributed to specific brain regions based on information contained in multivariate patterns of voxel

  2. Relationships among developmental stage, metamorphic timing, and concentrations of elements in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snodgrass, J.W.; Hopkins, W.A.; Roe, J.H. [Towson University, Towson, MD (United States). Dept. for Biological Science

    2003-07-01

    We collected bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) larvae from a coal combustion waste settling basin to investigate the effects of developmental stage and timing of metamorphosis on concentrations of a series of trace elements in bullfrog tissues. Bullfrogs at four stages of development (from no hind limbs to recently metamorphosed juveniles) and bullfrogs that metamorphosed in the fall or overwintered in the contaminated basin and metamorphosed in the spring were analyzed for whole-body concentrations of Al, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, As, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ag, Sr, and Se. After the effects of dry mass were removed, tissue concentrations of six elements (Al, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, As, and Pb) decreased from the late larval stage through metamorphosis. Decreases in concentrations through metamorphosis ranged from 40% for Cu to 97% for Al. Tissue concentrations of these elements were also similar or higher in spring; Al and Cr concentrations were 34 and 90% higher in the spring, respectively, whereas As, Ni, Cu, and Pb concentrations were {lt} 10% higher. Concentrations of Cd, Se, and Ag varied among seasons but not among stages; Cd and Ag concentrations were 40 and 62% lower, respectively, and Se concentrations were 21% higher in spring. Concentrations of Zn varied only among stages; concentrations decreased gradually through late larval stage and then increased through metamorphosis. Concentrations of Sr varied among stages, but this variation was dependent on the season. Concentrations of Sr were higher in larval stages during the spring, but because concentrations of Sr increased 122% through metamorphosis in the fall and only 22% in the spring, concentrations were higher in fall metamorphs when compared with spring metamorphs. Our results indicate that metamorphosis and season of metamorphosis affects trace element concentrations in bullfrogs and may have important implications for the health of juveniles and the transfer of pollutants from the aquatic to the terrestrial environment.

  3. Predictive Event Triggered Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Continuous Time Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear Continuous-Time Systems In this paper, a novel predictive event-triggered control...method based on heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) algorithm is developed for nonlinear continuous-time systems. A model network is used to estimate...College Road, Suite II Kingston, RI 02881 -1967 ABSTRACT Predictive Event-Triggered Control based on Heuristic Dynamic Programming for Nonlinear

  4. Mutual Information-Based Planning for Informative Windowed Forecasting of Continuous-Time Linear Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Han-Lim

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents expression of mutual information that defines the information gain in planning of sensing resources, when the goal is to reduce the forecast uncertainty of some quantities of interest and the system dynamics is described as a continuous-time linear system. The method extends the smoother approach in [5] to handle more general notion of verification entity - continuous sequence of variables over some finite time window in the future. The expression of mutual information for...

  5. Estimation in continuous-time stochastic| volatility models using nonlinear filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan Nygaard; Vestergaard, M.; Madsen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Presents a correction to the authorship of the article 'Estimation in Continuous-Time Stochastic Volatility Models Using Nonlinear Filters,' published in the periodical 'International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance,' Vol. 3, No. 2., pp. 279-308.......Presents a correction to the authorship of the article 'Estimation in Continuous-Time Stochastic Volatility Models Using Nonlinear Filters,' published in the periodical 'International Journal of Theoretical and Applied Finance,' Vol. 3, No. 2., pp. 279-308....

  6. Effects of daytime versus night-time cesarean deliveries on Stage II lactogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlhan, Gülşah; Atmaca, Fatma V; Çümen, Ayşenur; Zebitay, Ali G; Güngör, Emre S; Karasu, Ayşe F G

    2018-01-05

    The circadian timing system has a rhythm and one of the roles of this system is the mediation of hormonal and metabolic adaptations to lactation. This study was conducted to determine whether the time to stage II lactogenesis differed in women who underwent cesarean section (CS) in the daytime (DT) or night-time (NT). This study was conducted at Süleymaniye Research and Education Hospital between June and December 2016. Two hundred and eighty-eight mothers who had a cesarean delivery and their healthy singleton neonates were included. Clinical and demographic data of the mothers and neonates, time of initiation of breastfeeding and time to stage II lactogenesis were analyzed according to DT or NT CS groups. There were no statistically significant differences in age, gravida, parity, body mass index, week of gestation at birth, postoperative hemoglobin level, cesarean indications, anesthesia type, previous history of breastfeeding, transfusion need, Apgar scores or birth weight-height of neonates between the DT and NT CS groups. While the time of initiation of breastfeeding did not differ statistically in terms of DT or NT CS groups, the time to stage II lactogenesis was significantly longer in the NT CS group. NT cesarean delivery is a risk factor for the delayed onset of lactogenesis. The results of this study may be useful to clinical practitioners counseling mothers who undergo NT cesarean delivery. © 2018 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Exact subthreshold integration with continuous spike times in discrete-time neural network simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Abigail; Straube, Sirko; Plesser, Hans Ekkehard; Diesmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Very large networks of spiking neurons can be simulated efficiently in parallel under the constraint that spike times are bound to an equidistant time grid. Within this scheme, the subthreshold dynamics of a wide class of integrate-and-fire-type neuron models can be integrated exactly from one grid point to the next. However, the loss in accuracy caused by restricting spike times to the grid can have undesirable consequences, which has led to interest in interpolating spike times between the grid points to retrieve an adequate representation of network dynamics. We demonstrate that the exact integration scheme can be combined naturally with off-grid spike events found by interpolation. We show that by exploiting the existence of a minimal synaptic propagation delay, the need for a central event queue is removed, so that the precision of event-driven simulation on the level of single neurons is combined with the efficiency of time-driven global scheduling. Further, for neuron models with linear subthreshold dynamics, even local event queuing can be avoided, resulting in much greater efficiency on the single-neuron level. These ideas are exemplified by two implementations of a widely used neuron model. We present a measure for the efficiency of network simulations in terms of their integration error and show that for a wide range of input spike rates, the novel techniques we present are both more accurate and faster than standard techniques.

  8. Long-term bio-H2 and bio-CH4 production from food waste in a continuous two-stage system: Energy efficiency and conversion pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algapani, Dalal E; Qiao, Wei; di Pumpo, Francesca; Bianchi, David; Wandera, Simon M; Adani, Fabrizio; Dong, Renjie

    2018-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is a well-established technology for treating organic waste, but it is still under challenge for food waste due to process stability problems. In this work, continuous H 2 and CH 4 production from canteen food waste (FW) in a two-stage system were successfully established by optimizing process parameters. The optimal hydraulic retention time was 5d for H 2 and 15d for CH 4 . Overall, around 59% of the total COD in FW was converted into H 2 (4%) and into CH 4 (55%). The fluctuations of FW characteristics did not significantly affect process performance. From the energy point view, the H 2 reactor contributed much less than the methane reactor to total energy balance, but it played a key role in maintaining the stability of anaerobic treatment of food waste. Microbial characterization indicated that methane formation was through syntrophic acetate oxidation combined with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis pathway. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Time Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry Techniques with Continuous Wave Laser and their Application to Transient Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Chiara

    convected downstream by the time the actuator is fully deployed. Other vortices of weaker strength continue to shed off the tip after the full deployment of the actuator as in the case for the steady state. A strong standing horseshoe vortex is seen to be established in front of the actuator at a late stage of the deployment. The velocity data obtained by the TR-PIV techniques is also used to analyze the aerodynamic forces based on the flow field velocity data. This analysis shows a significant contribution of force terms involved unsteady vorticity, lamb vector, and inertial motion of the actuator. Viscous terms had almost no contribution to the total aerodynamic forces in both the drag and the lift directions.

  10. A mathematical approach for evaluating Markov models in continuous time without discrete-event simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rosmalen, Joost; Toy, Mehlika; O'Mahony, James F

    2013-08-01

    Markov models are a simple and powerful tool for analyzing the health and economic effects of health care interventions. These models are usually evaluated in discrete time using cohort analysis. The use of discrete time assumes that changes in health states occur only at the end of a cycle period. Discrete-time Markov models only approximate the process of disease progression, as clinical events typically occur in continuous time. The approximation can yield biased cost-effectiveness estimates for Markov models with long cycle periods and if no half-cycle correction is made. The purpose of this article is to present an overview of methods for evaluating Markov models in continuous time. These methods use mathematical results from stochastic process theory and control theory. The methods are illustrated using an applied example on the cost-effectiveness of antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The main result is a mathematical solution for the expected time spent in each state in a continuous-time Markov model. It is shown how this solution can account for age-dependent transition rates and discounting of costs and health effects, and how the concept of tunnel states can be used to account for transition rates that depend on the time spent in a state. The applied example shows that the continuous-time model yields more accurate results than the discrete-time model but does not require much computation time and is easily implemented. In conclusion, continuous-time Markov models are a feasible alternative to cohort analysis and can offer several theoretical and practical advantages.

  11. Neural-Fuzzy Digital Strategy of Continuous-Time Nonlinear Systems Using Adaptive Prediction and Random-Local-Optimization Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ren Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A tracking problem, time-delay, uncertainty and stability analysis of a predictive control system are considered. The predictive control design is based on the input and output of neural plant model (NPM, and a recursive fuzzy predictive tracker has scaling factors which limit the value zone of measured data and cause the tuned parameters to converge to obtain a robust control performance. To improve the further control performance, the proposed random-local-optimization design (RLO for a model/controller uses offline initialization to obtain a near global optimal model/controller. Other issues are the considerations of modeling error, input-delay, sampling distortion, cost, greater flexibility, and highly reliable digital products of the model-based controller for the continuous-time (CT nonlinear system. They are solved by a recommended two-stage control design with the first-stage (offline RLO and second-stage (online adaptive steps. A theorizing method is then put forward to replace the sensitivity calculation, which reduces the calculation of Jacobin matrices of the back-propagation (BP method. Finally, the feedforward input of reference signals helps the digital fuzzy controller improve the control performance, and the technique works to control the CT systems precisely.

  12. Time to treatment as a quality metric in lung cancer: Staging studies, time to treatment, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Daniel R.; Liao, Kai-Ping; Swisher, Stephen G.; Blumenschein, George R.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Prompt staging and treatment are crucial for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We determined if predictors of treatment delay after diagnosis were associated with prognosis. Materials and methods: Medicare claims from 28,732 patients diagnosed with NSCLC in 2004–2007 were used to establish the diagnosis-to-treatment interval (ideally ⩽35 days) and identify staging studies during that interval. Factors associated with delay were identified with multivariate logistic regression, and associations between delay and survival by stage were tested with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: Median diagnosis-to-treatment interval was 27 days. Receipt of PET was associated with delays (57.4% of patients with PET delayed [n = 6646/11,583] versus 22.8% of those without [n = 3908/17,149]; adjusted OR = 4.48, 95% CI 4.23–4.74, p < 0.001). Median diagnosis-to-PET interval was 15 days; PET-to-clinic, 5 days; and clinic-to-treatment, 12 days. Diagnosis-to-treatment intervals <35 days were associated with improved survival for patients with localized disease and those with distant disease surviving ⩾1 year but not for patients with distant disease surviving <1 year. Conclusion: Delays between diagnosing and treating NSCLC are common and associated with use of PET for staging. Reducing time to treatment may improve survival for patients with manageable disease at diagnosis

  13. Exploratory Study for Continuous-time Parameter Estimation of Ankle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreja, Sunil L.; Boyle, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a parallel pathway model to describe ankle dynamics was proposed. This model provides a relationship between ankle angle and net ankle torque as the sum of a linear and nonlinear contribution. A technique to identify parameters of this model in discrete-time has been developed. However, these parameters are a nonlinear combination of the continuous-time physiology, making insight into the underlying physiology impossible. The stable and accurate estimation of continuous-time parameters is critical for accurate disease modeling, clinical diagnosis, robotic control strategies, development of optimal exercise protocols for longterm space exploration, sports medicine, etc. This paper explores the development of a system identification technique to estimate the continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. The effectiveness of this approach is assessed via simulation of a continuous-time model of ankle dynamics with typical parameters found in clinical studies. The results show that although this technique improves estimates, it does not provide robust estimates of continuous-time parameters of ankle dynamics. Due to this we conclude that alternative modeling strategies and more advanced estimation techniques be considered for future work.

  14. Continuous Time Open Quantum Random Walks and Non-Markovian Lindblad Master Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Clément

    2014-02-01

    A new type of quantum random walks, called Open Quantum Random Walks, has been developed and studied in Attal et al. (Open quantum random walks, preprint) and (Central limit theorems for open quantum random walks, preprint). In this article we present a natural continuous time extension of these Open Quantum Random Walks. This continuous time version is obtained by taking a continuous time limit of the discrete time Open Quantum Random Walks. This approximation procedure is based on some adaptation of Repeated Quantum Interactions Theory (Attal and Pautrat in Annales Henri Poincaré Physique Théorique 7:59-104, 2006) coupled with the use of correlated projectors (Breuer in Phys Rev A 75:022103, 2007). The limit evolutions obtained this way give rise to a particular type of quantum master equations. These equations appeared originally in the non-Markovian generalization of the Lindblad theory (Breuer in Phys Rev A 75:022103, 2007). We also investigate the continuous time limits of the quantum trajectories associated with Open Quantum Random Walks. We show that the limit evolutions in this context are described by jump stochastic differential equations. Finally we present a physical example which can be described in terms of Open Quantum Random Walks and their associated continuous time limits.

  15. Toward Continuous GPS Carrier-Phase Time Transfer: Eliminating the Time Discontinuity at an Anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jian; Levine, Judah; Weiss, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The wide application of Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier-phase (CP) time transfer is limited by the problem of boundary discontinuity (BD). The discontinuity has two categories. One is "day boundary discontinuity," which has been studied extensively and can be solved by multiple methods [1-8]. The other category of discontinuity, called "anomaly boundary discontinuity (anomaly-BD)," comes from a GPS data anomaly. The anomaly can be a data gap (i.e., missing data), a GPS measurement error (i.e., bad data), or a cycle slip. Initial study of the anomaly-BD shows that we can fix the discontinuity if the anomaly lasts no more than 20 min, using the polynomial curve-fitting strategy to repair the anomaly [9]. However, sometimes, the data anomaly lasts longer than 20 min. Thus, a better curve-fitting strategy is in need. Besides, a cycle slip, as another type of data anomaly, can occur and lead to an anomaly-BD. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a new strategy, i.e., the satellite-clock-aided curve fitting strategy with the function of cycle slip detection. Basically, this new strategy applies the satellite clock correction to the GPS data. After that, we do the polynomial curve fitting for the code and phase data, as before. Our study shows that the phase-data residual is only ~3 mm for all GPS satellites. The new strategy also detects and finds the number of cycle slips by searching the minimum curve-fitting residual. Extensive examples show that this new strategy enables us to repair up to a 40-min GPS data anomaly, regardless of whether the anomaly is due to a data gap, a cycle slip, or a combination of the two. We also find that interference of the GPS signal, known as "jamming", can possibly lead to a time-transfer error, and that this new strategy can compensate for jamming outages. Thus, the new strategy can eliminate the impact of jamming on time transfer. As a whole, we greatly improve the robustness of the GPS CP time transfer.

  16. Assessment of the prognostic value of the 8th AJCC staging system for patients with clinically staged prostate cancer; A time to sub-classify stage IV?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    Full Text Available The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC staging system (8th edition for prostate cancer has been published. The current study seeks to validate the prognostic performance of the changes in the new system among clinically staged prostate cancer patients registered within the surveillance, epidemiology and end results (SEER database.SEER database (2004-2014 has been accessed through SEER*Stat program and AJCC 7th and 8th edition stages were calculated utilizing T, N and M stages as well as baseline prostatic specific antigen (PSA and grade group. Cancer-specific and overall survival analyses according to 6th, 7th and 8th editions were conducted through Kaplan-Meier analysis. Moreover, multivariate analysis was conducted through a Cox proportional hazard model.A total of 110499 patients with prostate cancer were identified in the period from 2004-2014.For cancer- specific survival according to 8th AJCC, all pair wise P values for comparison were significant (<0.01 except for stage IIA vs. IIB; while for overall survival according to 8th AJCC, all pair wise P values for comparison were significant (<0.02 except for stage IIIA vs. IIIB. Results of c-index assessment for cancer-specific survival for the three AJCC editions were as follows: c-index for AJCC 6th edition was 0.816; c-index for AJCC 7th edition was 0.897; c-index for AJCC 8th edition was 0.907. For stage IVB prostate cancer (i.e.M1 disease, further sub-staging was proposed according to M1 sub-stage (i.e. M1a, M1b and M1c. Pair wise comparison between these proposed sub-stages was conducted for both cancer-specific and overall survival. For both cancer-specific and overall survival, all pair wise P values for comparisons were <0.0001.Compared to older staging systems (6th and 7th, the 8th system is more discriminatory. Further sub-classification of stage IV disease is suggested.

  17. Dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in the continuous-time mutation-selection model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Wonpyong

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of the crossing time on the sequence length in the coupled and the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection models in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape with a positive asymmetric parameter, r, was examined for a fixed extension parameter, E, which is defined as the average Hamming distance from the optimal allele of the initial quasispecies divided by the sequence length. Two versions of the coupled mutation-selection model, the continuous-time version and discrete-time version, were found to have the same boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions, which is different from the boundary between the deterministic and the stochastic regions in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model. The maximum sequence length for a finite population that can evolve through the fitness barrier, e.g., within 10 6 generations in the decoupled continuous-time mutation-selection model, increased by approximately eight sequence elements with increasing population size by a factor of a thousand when E = 0.1 and r = 0.1. The crossing time for a finite population in the decoupled model in the stochastic region was shorter than the crossing time for a finite population in the coupled model, and the maximum evolvable sequence length for a finite population in the decoupled model was longer than the maximum evolvable sequence length for a finite population in the coupled model. This suggests that a mutation allowed at any time during the life cycle might be more effective than a mutation allowed only at reproduction events when a finite population transits to a higher fitness peak through the fitness barrier in an asymmetric sharply-peaked landscape.

  18. Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Correa, Candace R.; Hayman, James A.; Zhao Lujun; Cease, Kemp; Brenner, Dean; Arenberg, Doug; Curtis, Jeffery; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Kong, F.-M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT.

  19. Clinical stage of oral cancer patients at the time of initial diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, I.; Sefvan, O.; Luqman, Z.; Ibrahim, W.; Mehmood, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral cancer. Early diagnosis ensures better prognosis. Late diagnosis is however common around the world and contributes to the high morbidity and mortality related to oral cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical stage of oral cancer patients at the time of diagnosis. Methods: This retrospective study was carried out on 334 oral cancer patients who presented to the outdoor departments of Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry, and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi from July 2008 to December 2009. The records that were reviewed included history and clinical examination findings, OPG and CT scans of the head and neck region, chest X-rays, abdominal ultrasounds and liver function tests. Size of the primary tumour, the size, number and laterality of the involved cervical lymph nodes and the presence/absence of distant metastases were documented and statistically analysed using SPSS-17. Results: Out of the 334 patients, 203 (60.8%) were males and 131 (39.2%) females. The age range was from 21 to 88 years. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly involved site (32 %). The primary tumour was 4 Cm or more in size, (T3/T4) 71.25% of the cases. Cervical lymph nodes were involved in 211 patients (63.2%) and distant metastases were present in 39 patients (11.7%). Overall, clinical stage IV was the most common (57.18%) followed by stage III(24.55%), stage II (13.77%) and stage I (4.49%). Conclusion: Oral cancers are diagnosed late (Stage III and IV) in Pakistan and need immediate public and professional attention. (author)

  20. Continuous enzymatic biodiesel production from coconut oil in two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating an extracting column to remove glycerol formed as by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa E Silva, William; Freitas, Larissa; Oliveira, Pedro C; de Castro, Heizir F

    2016-10-01

    The transesterification of coconut oil with ethanol catalyzed by Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized on polysiloxane-polyvinyl alcohol was performed in a continuous flow. The experimental design consisted of a two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating a column with cationic resin (Lewatit GF 202) to remove the glycerol formed as by-product and the reactor performance was quantified for three different flow rates corresponding to space-times from 10 to 14 h. The influence of space-time on the ethyl ester (FAEE) concentrations, yields and productivities was determined. The reactor operation was demonstrated for space-time of 14 h attaining FAEE concentrations of 58.5 ± 0.87 wt%, FAEE yields of 97.3 ± 1.9 % and productivities of 41.6  ± 1.0 mgester g medium (-1)  h(-1). Biodiesel purified samples showed average kinematic viscosity values of 5.5 ± 0.3 mm(2) s(-1) that meet the criteria established by the American National Standard ASTM (D6751). The immobilized lipase was found to be stable regarding its morphological and catalytic characteristics, showing half-life time (t 1/2) around 1540 h. The continuous packed-bed reactor connected in series with simultaneous glycerol removal has a great potential to attain high level of transesterification yields, raising biodiesel productivity.

  1. Time Delayed Stage-Structured Predator-Prey Model with Birth Pulse and Pest Control Tactics

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Mei; Li, Yongfeng; Xiang, Zhongyi

    2014-01-01

    Normally, chemical pesticides kill not only pests but also their natural enemies. In order to better control the pests, two-time delayed stage-structured predator-prey models with birth pulse and pest control tactics are proposed and analyzed by using impulsive differential equations in present work. The stability threshold conditions for the mature prey-eradication periodic solutions of two models are derived, respectively. The effects of key parameters including killing efficiency rate, pul...

  2. Reaction Time Is Negatively Associated with Corpus Callosum Area in the Early Stages of CADASIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, S; De Guio, F; Reyes, S; Jabouley, A; Chabriat, H; Jouvent, E

    2017-11-01

    Reaction time was recently recognized as a marker of subtle cognitive and behavioral alterations in the early clinical stages of CADASIL, a monogenic cerebral small-vessel disease. In unselected patients with CADASIL, brain atrophy and lacunes are the main imaging correlates of disease severity, but MR imaging correlates of reaction time in mildly affected patients are unknown. We hypothesized that reaction time is independently associated with the corpus callosum area in the early clinical stages of CADASIL. Twenty-six patients with CADASIL without dementia (Mini-Mental State Examination score > 24 and no cognitive symptoms) and without disability (modified Rankin Scale score ≤ 1) were compared with 29 age- and sex-matched controls. Corpus callosum area was determined on 3D-T1 MR imaging sequences with validated methodology. Between-group comparisons were performed with t tests or χ 2 tests when appropriate. Relationships between reaction time and corpus callosum area were tested using linear regression modeling. Reaction time was significantly related to corpus callosum area in patients (estimate = -7.4 × 10 3 , standard error = 3.3 × 10 3 , P = .03) even after adjustment for age, sex, level of education, and scores of depression and apathy (estimate = -12.2 × 10 3 , standard error = 3.8 × 10 3 , P = .005). No significant relationship was observed in controls. Corpus callosum area, a simple and robust imaging parameter, appears to be an independent correlate of reaction time at the early clinical stages of CADASIL. Further studies will determine whether corpus callosum area can be used as an outcome in future clinical trials in CADASIL or in more prevalent small-vessel diseases. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. A discounted-cost continuous-time flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model solved by deconvexification over time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaves, B.C.; Rothblum, U.G.

    1990-08-01

    A discounted-cost, continuous-time, infinite-horizon version of a flexible manufacturing and operator scheduling model is solved. The solution procedure is to convexify the discrete operator-assignment constraints to obtain a linear program, and then to regain the discreteness and obtain an approximate manufacturing schedule by deconvexification of the solution of the linear program over time. The strong features of the model are the accommodation of linear inequality relations among the manufacturing activities and the discrete manufacturing scheduling, whereas the weak features are intra-period relaxation of inventory availability constraints, and the absence of inventory costs, setup times, and setup charges.

  4. When Dread Risks Are More Dreadful than Continuous Risks: Comparing Cumulative Population Losses over Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Bodemer

    Full Text Available People show higher sensitivity to dread risks, rare events that kill many people at once, compared with continuous risks, relatively frequent events that kill many people over a longer period of time. The different reaction to dread risks is often considered a bias: If the continuous risk causes the same number of fatalities, it should not be perceived as less dreadful. We test the hypothesis that a dread risk may have a stronger negative impact on the cumulative population size over time in comparison with a continuous risk causing the same number of fatalities. This difference should be particularly strong when the risky event affects children and young adults who would have produced future offspring if they had survived longer. We conducted a series of simulations, with varying assumptions about population size, population growth, age group affected by risky event, and the underlying demographic model. Results show that dread risks affect the population more severely over time than continuous risks that cause the same number of fatalities, suggesting that fearing a dread risk more than a continuous risk is an ecologically rational strategy.

  5. When Dread Risks Are More Dreadful than Continuous Risks: Comparing Cumulative Population Losses over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Nicolai; Ruggeri, Azzurra; Galesic, Mirta

    2013-01-01

    People show higher sensitivity to dread risks, rare events that kill many people at once, compared with continuous risks, relatively frequent events that kill many people over a longer period of time. The different reaction to dread risks is often considered a bias: If the continuous risk causes the same number of fatalities, it should not be perceived as less dreadful. We test the hypothesis that a dread risk may have a stronger negative impact on the cumulative population size over time in comparison with a continuous risk causing the same number of fatalities. This difference should be particularly strong when the risky event affects children and young adults who would have produced future offspring if they had survived longer. We conducted a series of simulations, with varying assumptions about population size, population growth, age group affected by risky event, and the underlying demographic model. Results show that dread risks affect the population more severely over time than continuous risks that cause the same number of fatalities, suggesting that fearing a dread risk more than a continuous risk is an ecologically rational strategy.

  6. Continuous-Time Random Walk with multi-step memory: an application to market dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard

    2017-11-01

    An extended version of the Continuous-Time Random Walk (CTRW) model with memory is herein developed. This memory involves the dependence between arbitrary number of successive jumps of the process while waiting times between jumps are considered as i.i.d. random variables. This dependence was established analyzing empirical histograms for the stochastic process of a single share price on a market within the high frequency time scale. Then, it was justified theoretically by considering bid-ask bounce mechanism containing some delay characteristic for any double-auction market. Our model appeared exactly analytically solvable. Therefore, it enables a direct comparison of its predictions with their empirical counterparts, for instance, with empirical velocity autocorrelation function. Thus, the present research significantly extends capabilities of the CTRW formalism. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  7. Continuous-Time Discrete-Distribution Theory for Activity-Driven Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zino, Lorenzo; Rizzo, Alessandro; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    Activity-driven networks are a powerful paradigm to study epidemic spreading over time-varying networks. Despite significant advances, most of the current understanding relies on discrete-time computer simulations, in which each node is assigned an activity potential from a continuous distribution. Here, we establish a continuous-time discrete-distribution framework toward an analytical treatment of the epidemic spreading, from its onset to the endemic equilibrium. In the thermodynamic limit, we derive a nonlinear dynamical system to accurately model the epidemic spreading and leverage techniques from the fields of differential inclusions and adaptive estimation to inform short- and long-term predictions. We demonstrate our framework through the analysis of two real-world case studies, exemplifying different physical phenomena and time scales.

  8. Continuous-Discrete Time Prediction-Error Identification Relevant for Linear Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2007-01-01

    A Prediction-error-method tailored for model based predictive control is presented. The prediction-error method studied are based on predictions using the Kalman filter and Kalman predictors for a linear discrete-time stochastic state space model. The linear discrete-time stochastic state space...... model is realized from a continuous-discrete-time linear stochastic system specified using transfer functions with time-delays. It is argued that the prediction-error criterion should be selected such that it is compatible with the objective function of the predictive controller in which the model...

  9. utomated real-time classification of functional states: the significance of individual tuning stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galatenko, Vladimir V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Automated classification of a human functional state is an important problem, with applications including stress resistance evaluation, supervision over operators of critical infrastructure, teaching and phobia therapy. Such classification is particularly efficient in systems for teaching and phobia therapy that include a virtual reality module, and provide the capability for dynamic adjustment of task complexity. In this paper, a method for automated real-time binary classification of human functional states (calm wakefulness vs. stress based on discrete wavelet transform of EEG data is considered. It is shown that an individual tuning stage of the classification algorithm — a stage that allows the involvement of certain information on individual peculiarities in the classification, using very short individual learning samples, significantly increases classification reliability. The experimental study that proved this assertion was based on a specialized scenario in which individuals solved the task of detecting objects with given properties in a dynamic set of flying objects.

  10. The developmental stage of strongyle eggs affects the outcome of real-time PCR analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roust, Tina; Haakansson, Ida T.; Rhod, Maria

    Several molecular diagnostic tests are based upon measuring and quantifying DNA obtained from parasite eggs. It is well-known that such eggs undergo development during storage, but it remains unknown to which extent the stage of development can affect the diagnostic test result. This project...... investigated whether the developmental stage of strongyle eggs affects real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results. Mixed species strongyle eggs were obtained from the faeces of a naturally infected horse. Eggs were isolated and placed in microtiter plates with demineralised water. A total of 25 wells...... using a commercial kit previously validated for strongyle type eggs. PCR reactions were performed with a primer set specific for the ribosomal DNA region for all strongyle type parasites (NC1, NC2). PCRs were performed in triplicates using SYBR Green as fluorescent dye. PCR results were registered...

  11. Continuous relaxation time spectrum of α-process in glass-like B2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenev, G.M.; Lomovskij, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    α-process of relaxation of glass-like B 2 O 3 was investigated in a wide temperature range. Continuous spectrum of relaxation times H(τ) for this process was constructed, using data of dynamic methods of investigation. It is shown that increase of temperature of α-process investigation leads to change of glass-like BaO 3 structure in such a way, that H(τ) spectrum tends to the maxwell one with a unit relaxation time

  12. Value Function and Optimal Rule on the Optimal Stopping Problem for Continuous-Time Markov Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the optimal stopping problem for continuous-time Markov processes. We describe the methodology and solve the optimal stopping problem for a broad class of reward functions. Moreover, we illustrate the outcomes by some typical Markov processes including diffusion and Lévy processes with jumps. For each of the processes, the explicit formula for value function and optimal stopping time is derived. Furthermore, we relate the derived optimal rules to some other optimal problems.

  13. Application of continuous time random walks to transport in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, G.; Berkowitz, B.

    2000-04-27

    The behavior of chemical species as they migrate through heterogeneous porous media is considered. The so-called anomalous transport patterns frequently measured in these materials are quantified in the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) formalism. The physical basis for application of the CTRW is discussed, and new solutions for the first passage time distribution are presented to cover the entire range of transport behaviors. Application of these solutions to analysis of experimental data is also discussed.

  14. The effect of large decoherence on mixing time in continuous-time quantum walks on long-range interacting cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salimi, S; Radgohar, R, E-mail: shsalimi@uok.ac.i, E-mail: r.radgohar@uok.ac.i [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Ave, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-28

    In this paper, we consider decoherence in continuous-time quantum walks on long-range interacting cycles (LRICs), which are the extensions of the cycle graphs. For this purpose, we use Gurvitz's model and assume that every node is monitored by the corresponding point-contact induced by the decoherence process. Then, we focus on large rates of decoherence and calculate the probability distribution analytically and obtain the lower and upper bounds of the mixing time. Our results prove that the mixing time is proportional to the rate of decoherence and the inverse of the square of the distance parameter (m). This shows that the mixing time decreases with increasing range of interaction. Also, what we obtain for m = 0 is in agreement with Fedichkin, Solenov and Tamon's results [48] for cycle, and we see that the mixing time of CTQWs on cycle improves with adding interacting edges.

  15. A 10 MHz Bandwidth Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2016-01-01

    A fourth-order 1-bit continuous-time delta-sigma modulator designed in a 65 nm process for portable ultrasound scanners is presented in this paper. The loop filter consists of RCintegrators, with programmable capacitor arrays and resistors, and the quantizer is implemented with a high-speed clocked...

  16. Robustness of quantized continuous-time nonlinear systems to encoder/decoder mismatch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persis, Claudio De

    2009-01-01

    The robustness of quantized continuous-time nonlinear systems with respect to the discrepancy (mismatch) between the ranges of the encoder and the decoder quantizers is investigated. A condition which guarantees asymptotic stability and which describes the interplay between quantization density and

  17. Characterizing the continuously acquired cardiovascular time series during hemodialysis, using median hybrid filter preprocessing noise reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson S

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scott Wilson,1,2 Andrea Bowyer,3 Stephen B Harrap4 1Department of Renal Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI, Melbourne, 3Department of Anaesthesia, Royal Melbourne Hospital, 4University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia Abstract: The clinical characterization of cardiovascular dynamics during hemodialysis (HD has important pathophysiological implications in terms of diagnostic, cardiovascular risk assessment, and treatment efficacy perspectives. Currently the diagnosis of significant intradialytic systolic blood pressure (SBP changes among HD patients is imprecise and opportunistic, reliant upon the presence of hypotensive symptoms in conjunction with coincident but isolated noninvasive brachial cuff blood pressure (NIBP readings. Considering hemodynamic variables as a time series makes a continuous recording approach more desirable than intermittent measures; however, in the clinical environment, the data signal is susceptible to corruption due to both impulsive and Gaussian-type noise. Signal preprocessing is an attractive solution to this problem. Prospectively collected continuous noninvasive SBP data over the short-break intradialytic period in ten patients was preprocessed using a novel median hybrid filter (MHF algorithm and compared with 50 time-coincident pairs of intradialytic NIBP measures from routine HD practice. The median hybrid preprocessing technique for continuously acquired cardiovascular data yielded a dynamic regression without significant noise and artifact, suitable for high-level profiling of time-dependent SBP behavior. Signal accuracy is highly comparable with standard NIBP measurement, with the added clinical benefit of dynamic real-time hemodynamic information. Keywords: continuous monitoring, blood pressure

  18. Bisimulation and Logical Preservation for Continuous-Time Markov Decision Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neuhausser, M.; Katoen, Joost P.

    This paper introduces strong bisimulation for continuous-time Markov decision processes (CTMDPs), a stochastic model which allows for a nondeterministic choice between exponential distributions, and shows that bisimulation preserves the validity of CSL. To that end, we interpret the semantics of CSL

  19. Continuous performance test assessed with time-domain functional near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Caffini, Matteo; Butti, Michele; Baselli, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Anna M.; Bardoni, Alessandra; Cerutti, Sergio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2007-07-01

    A time-domain fNIRS multichannel system was used in a sustained attention protocol (continuous performance test) to study activation of the prefrontal cortex. Preliminary results on volounteers show significant activation (decrease in deoxy-hemoglobin and increase in oxy-hemoglobin) in both left and right prefrontal cortex.

  20. A Corrigendum to "Games with Imperfectly Observable Actions in Continuous Time"

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, Tadashi

    2007-01-01

    Sannikov (2007) investigates properties of perfect public equilibria in continuous time repeated games. This note points out that the proof of Lemma 6, required for the proof of the main theorem (Theorem 2), contains an error in computing a Hessian matrix. A correct proof of Lemma 6 is provided using an additional innocuous assumption and a generalized version of Lemma 5.

  1. Limit Properties of Transition Functions of Continuous-Time Markov Branching Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam A. Imomov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the Markov Branching Process with continuous time. Our focus is on the limit properties of transition functions of this process. Using differential analogue of the Basic Lemma we prove local limit theorems for all cases and observe invariant properties of considering process.

  2. Real-time cost monitoring by continuous sensor-based data collection and transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lupek, T.; Mischo, H.; Benndorf, J.; Buxton, M.; Nienhaus, K.; Rattmann, L.; Korre, A.; Soares, A.; De Jong, A.; Jeannee, N.; Graham, P.; Buttgereit, D.; Gehlen, C.; Eijkelkamp, F.; Sandtke, M.; Wilsnack, T.

    2016-01-01

    With regard to the EU funded project 'Real-Time Mining' a sensorbased acquisition, collection and transmission of data for the resource extraction process will be developed. The key concept promotes the change in paradigm from a discontinuous to a continuous process monitoring. Especially concerning

  3. Exploring Continuity of Care in Patients with Alcohol Use Disorders Using Time-Variant Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. de Vries (Sjoerd); A.I. Wierdsma (André)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Aims: We used time-variant measures of continuity of care to study fluctuations in long-term treatment use by patients with alcohol-related disorders. Methods: Data on service use were extracted from the Psychiatric Case Register for the Rotterdam Region, The Netherlands.

  4. Estimating and Testing Continuous-Time Models in Finance: The Role of Transition Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Yacine Aït-Sahalia

    2009-01-01

    This article surveys recent developments to estimate and test continuous-time models in finance using discrete observations on the underlying asset price or derivative securities' prices. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are described. All these methods share a common focus on the transition density as the central object for inference and testing of the model.

  5. On the relationship between multiple porosity models and continuous time random walk

    OpenAIRE

    Nordbotten, Jan Martin; Vasilyev, Leonid

    2010-01-01

    We derive a multiple porosity model based on the continuous time random walk model (CTRW). In particular, we show how the parameters of the multiple porosity models relate to the transition probability function which is at the heart of the CTRW formulation. A simple example is included to illustrate the results.

  6. Bayesian inference and the analytic continuation of imaginary-time quantum Monte Carlo data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernatis, J.E.; Bonca, J.; Jarrell, M.

    1995-01-01

    We present brief description of how methods of Bayesian inference are used to obtain real frequency information by the analytic continuation of imaginary-time quantum Monte Carlo data. We present the procedure we used, which is due to R. K. Bryan, and summarize several bottleneck issues

  7. Period, epoch, and prediction errors of ephemerides from continuous sets of timing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, H. J.

    2015-06-01

    Space missions such as Kepler and CoRoT have led to large numbers of eclipse or transit measurements in nearly continuous time series. This paper shows how to obtain the period error in such measurements from a basic linear least-squares fit, and how to correctly derive the timing error in the prediction of future transit or eclipse events. Assuming strict periodicity, a formula for the period error of these time series is derived, σP = σT (12 / (N3-N))1 / 2, where σP is the period error, σT the timing error of a single measurement, and N the number of measurements. Compared to the iterative method for period error estimation by Mighell & Plavchan (2013), this much simpler formula leads to smaller period errors, whose correctness has been verified through simulations. For the prediction of times of future periodic events, usual linear ephemeris were epoch errors are quoted for the first time measurement, are prone to an overestimation of the error of that prediction. This may be avoided by a correction for the duration of the time series. An alternative is the derivation of ephemerides whose reference epoch and epoch error are given for the centre of the time series. For long continuous or near-continuous time series whose acquisition is completed, such central epochs should be the preferred way for the quotation of linear ephemerides. While this work was motivated from the analysis of eclipse timing measures in space-based light curves, it should be applicable to any other problem with an uninterrupted sequence of discrete timings for which the determination of a zero point, of a constant period and of the associated errors is needed.

  8. The theory behind, and the challenges of, conserving nature's stage in a time of rapid change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Joshua J; Ackerly, David D; Albano, Christine M; Anderson, Mark G; Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Gill, Jacquelyn L; Heller, Nicole E; Pressey, Robert L; Sanderson, Eric W; Weiss, Stuart B

    2015-06-01

    Most conservation planning to date has focused on protecting today's biodiversity with the assumption that it will be tomorrow's biodiversity. However, modern climate change has already resulted in distributional shifts of some species and is projected to result in many more shifts in the coming decades. As species redistribute and biotic communities reorganize, conservation plans based on current patterns of biodiversity may fail to adequately protect species in the future. One approach for addressing this issue is to focus on conserving a range of abiotic conditions in the conservation-planning process. By doing so, it may be possible to conserve an abiotically diverse "stage" upon which evolution will play out and support many actors (biodiversity). We reviewed the fundamental underpinnings of the concept of conserving the abiotic stage, starting with the early observations of von Humboldt, who mapped the concordance of abiotic conditions and vegetation, and progressing to the concept of the ecological niche. We discuss challenges posed by issues of spatial and temporal scale, the role of biotic drivers of species distributions, and latitudinal and topographic variation in relationships between climate and landform. For example, abiotic conditions are not static, but change through time-albeit at different and often relatively slow rates. In some places, biotic interactions play a substantial role in structuring patterns of biodiversity, meaning that patterns of biodiversity may be less tightly linked to the abiotic stage. Furthermore, abiotic drivers of biodiversity can change with latitude and topographic position, meaning that the abiotic stage may need to be defined differently in different places. We conclude that protecting a diversity of abiotic conditions will likely best conserve biodiversity into the future in places where abiotic drivers of species distributions are strong relative to biotic drivers, where the diversity of abiotic settings will be

  9. On the gap and time interval between the first two maxima of long continuous time random walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounaix, Philippe; Schehr, Grégory; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2016-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional continuous time random walk (CTRW) on a fixed time interval T where at each time step the walker waits a random time τ, before performing a jump drawn from a symmetric continuous probability distribution function (PDF) f(η ) , of Lévy index 0μ /2 ). We investigate the joint PDF of the gap g between the first two highest positions of the CTRW and the time t separating these two maxima. We show that this PDF reaches a stationary limiting joint distribution p(g, t) in the limit of long CTRW, T\\to ∞ . Our exact analytical results show a very rich behavior of this joint PDF in the (γ,μ ) plane, which we study in great detail. Our main results are verified by numerical simulations. This work provides a non trivial extension to CTRWs of the recent study in the discrete time setting by Majumdar et al (2014 J. Stat. Mech. P09013).

  10. Risk assessment framework on time impact: Infrastructure projects in soft soil during construction stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, W. W.; Wong, K. S.; Lee, J. L.

    2018-04-01

    With the growth of economy and population, there is an increase in infrastructure construction projects. As such, it is unavoidable to have construction projects on soft soil. Without proper risk management plan, construction projects are vulnerable to different types of risks which will have negative impact on project’s time, cost and quality. Literature review showed that little or none of the research is focused on the risk assessment on the infrastructure project in soft soil. Hence, the aim of this research is to propose a risk assessment framework in infrastructure projects in soft soil during the construction stage. This research was focused on the impact of risks on project time and internal risk factors. The research method was Analytical Hierarchy Process and the sample population was experienced industry experts who have experience in infrastructure projects. Analysis was completed and result showed that for internal factors, the five most significant risks on time element are lack of special equipment, potential contractual disputes and claims, shortage of skilled workers, delay/lack of materials supply, and insolvency of contractor/sub-contractor. Results indicated that resources risk factor play a critical role on project time frame in infrastructure projects in soft soil during the construction stage.

  11. A Coupled Continuous Time Random Walk Approach For Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, M.; Scher, H.; Holder, D.; Berkowitz, B.

    2008-12-01

    We present a coupled continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach as an effective model for transport in highly heterogeneous media. This approach models solute transport by a coupled system of Langevin equations for random movements in the spatial and temporal domains. Motivated by transport in random fracture networks, here we consider a model that is characterized by given distributions of transition lengths (fracture length) and velocities. Thus, transition lengths and times are intrinsically related. Fracture length and velocity define the transition time. A maximum transition time is given by the diffusion time over the fracture length. Diffusion into the matrix can be modeled explicitly by a distribution of retention times. We study spatial distributions, and effective apparent transport coefficients as well as first arrival time distributions for a series of scenarios. The scaling behavior of such a fully coupled walk is different from the one observed in uncoupled walks. We investigate the competition between long jumps and long waiting times in this fully coupled continuous time random walk and determine scaling laws for the spatial moments of concentration.

  12. Time-series analysis of sleep wake stage of rat EEG using time-dependent pattern entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Ryuji; Shinba, Toshikazu; Mugishima, Go; Haraguchi, Hikaru; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2008-05-01

    We performed electroencephalography (EEG) for six male Wistar rats to clarify temporal behaviors at different levels of consciousness. Levels were identified both by conventional sleep analysis methods and by our novel entropy method. In our method, time-dependent pattern entropy is introduced, by which EEG is reduced to binary symbolic dynamics and the pattern of symbols in a sliding temporal window is considered. A high correlation was obtained between level of consciousness as measured by the conventional method and mean entropy in our entropy method. Mean entropy was maximal while awake (stage W) and decreased as sleep deepened. These results suggest that time-dependent pattern entropy may offer a promising method for future sleep research.

  13. Multi-stage Continuous Culture Fermentation of Glucose-Xylose Mixtures to Fuel Ethanol using Genetically Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae 424A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-stage continuous (chemostat) culture fermentation (MCCF) with variable fermentor volumes was carried out to study utilizing glucose and xylose for ethanol production by means of mixed sugar fermentation (MSF). Variable fermentor volumes were used to enable enhanced sugar u...

  14. Learning of temporal motor patterns: An analysis of continuous vs. reset timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eLaje

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to generate well-timed sequences of movements is critical to an array of behaviors, including the ability to play a musical instrument or a video game. Here we address two questions relating to timing with the goal of better understanding the neural mechanisms underlying temporal processing. First, how does accuracy and variance change over the course of learning of complex spatiotemporal patterns? Second, is the timing of sequential responses most consistent with starting and stopping an internal timer at each interval or with continuous timing?To address these questions we used a psychophysical task in which subjects learned to reproduce a sequence of finger taps in the correct order and at the correct times—much like playing a melody at the piano. This task allowed us to calculate the variance of the responses at different time points using data from the same trials. Our results show that while standard Weber’s law is clearly violated, variance does increase as a function of time squared, as expected according to the generalized form of Weber’s law—which separates the source of variance into time-dependent and time-independent components. Over the course of learning, both the time-independent variance and the coefficient of the time-dependent term decrease. Our analyses also suggest that timing of sequential events does not rely on the resetting of an internal timer at each event.We describe and interpret our results in the context of computer simulations that capture some of our psychophysical findings. Specifically, we show that continuous timing, as opposed to reset timing, is expected from population clock models in which timing emerges from the internal dynamics of recurrent neural networks.

  15. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system.

  16. Strategic Application of Residence-Time Control in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mándity, István M; Ötvös, Sándor B; Fülöp, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    As a sustainable alternative for conventional batch-based synthetic techniques, the concept of continuous-flow processing has emerged in the synthesis of fine chemicals. Systematic tuning of the residence time, a key parameter of continuous-reaction technology, can govern the outcome of a chemical reaction by determining the reaction rate and the conversion and by influencing the product selectivity. This review furnishes a brief insight into flow reactions in which high chemo- and/or stereoselectivity can be attained by strategic residence-time control and illustrates the importance of the residence time as a crucial parameter in sustainable method development. Such a fine reaction control cannot be performed in conventional batch reaction set-ups. PMID:26246983

  17. Summary statistics for end-point conditioned continuous-time Markov chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Jensen, Jens Ledet

    two states and the distribution of the total number of jumps) for discretely observed continuous time Markov chains. Three alternative methods for calculating properties of summary statistics are described and the pros and cons of the methods are discussed. The methods are based on (i) an eigenvalue...... decomposition of the rate matrix, (ii) the uniformization method, and (iii) integrals of matrix exponentials. In particular we develop a framework that allows for analyses of rather general summary statistics using the uniformization method.......Continuous-time Markov chains are a widely used modelling tool. Applications include DNA sequence evolution, ion channel gating behavior and mathematical finance. We consider the problem of calculating properties of summary statistics (e.g. mean time spent in a state, mean number of jumps between...

  18. Finite-Time and -Size Scalings in the Evaluation of Large Deviation Functions. Numerical Analysis in Continuous Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Nemoto, Takahiro; Lecomte, Vivien

    Rare trajectories of stochastic systems are important to understand because of their potential impact. However, their properties are by definition difficult to sample directly. Population dynamics provide a numerical tool allowing their study, by means of simulating a large number of copies of the system, which are subjected to a selection rule that favors the rare trajectories of interest. However, such algorithms are plagued by finite simulation time- and finite population size- effects that can render their use delicate. Using the continuous-time cloning algorithm, we analyze the finite-time and finite-size scalings of estimators of the large deviation functions associated to the distribution of the rare trajectories. We use these scalings in order to propose a numerical approach which allows to extract the infinite-time and infinite-size limit of these estimators.

  19. Finite-Time Robust H∞ Control for Uncertain Linear Continuous-Time Singular Systems with Exogenous Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songlin Wo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Singular systems arise in a great deal of domains of engineering and can be used to solve problems which are more difficult and more extensive than regular systems to solve. Therefore, in this paper, the definition of finite-time robust H∞ control for uncertain linear continuous-time singular systems is presented. The problem we address is to design a robust state feedback controller which can deal with the singular system with time-varying norm-bounded exogenous disturbance, such that the singular system is finite-time robust bounded (FTRB with disturbance attenuation γ. Sufficient conditions for the existence of solutions to this problem are obtained in terms of linear matrix equalities (LMIs. When these LMIs are feasible, the desired robust controller is given. A detailed solving method is proposed for the restricted linear matrix inequalities. Finally, examples are given to show the validity of the methodology.

  20. Time Delayed Stage-Structured Predator-Prey Model with Birth Pulse and Pest Control Tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normally, chemical pesticides kill not only pests but also their natural enemies. In order to better control the pests, two-time delayed stage-structured predator-prey models with birth pulse and pest control tactics are proposed and analyzed by using impulsive differential equations in present work. The stability threshold conditions for the mature prey-eradication periodic solutions of two models are derived, respectively. The effects of key parameters including killing efficiency rate, pulse period, the maximum birth effort per unit of time of natural enemy, and maturation time of prey on the threshold values are discussed in more detail. By comparing the two threshold values of mature prey-extinction, we provide the fact that the second control tactic is more effective than the first control method.

  1. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in diabetic patients with end-stage renal failure in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M K; Lam, S S; Chiu, K W

    1987-01-01

    The authors' experience in managing 17 diabetic patients among their first 100 consecutive patients treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) was reviewed. The diabetics were significantly older than the non-diabetics, but their biochemistry was comparable to that of the non-diabetics. With three exchanges a day, the requirement for antihypertensives was high (60%). Exit-site infection occurred at a rate of one episode per 9.7 patient-months, and the frequency of peritonitis averaged one episode per 9.4 patient-months; the main culprit was Staphylococcus pyogenes. Rehabilitation was good because the patients had to finance their treatment. In spite of old age, 23% worked full-time. There was no progressive increase in serum cholesterol or triglycerides. Glycemic control was good and was comparable whether the patients were given insulin subcutaneously or intraperitoneally. There was a highly significant (p less than 0.001) positive correlation between fasting blood glucose levels and HbA1 concentrations. Fasting blood glucose concentrations did not correlate with either serum cholesterol or triglyceride concentrations. Diabetic retinopathy progressed in five patients, to the point that their vision was severely impaired. There was no relationship between the degree of glycemic control and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Two patients died of cardiovascular causes, but there were no peritonitis-related deaths. Cummulative patient survival at 2 years was 86%, and the corresponding technique survival, 100%.

  2. Regulatory T cells predict the time to initial treatment in early stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Lukas; Melchardt, Thomas; Egle, Alexander; Grabmer, Christoph; Greil, Richard; Tinhofer, Inge

    2011-05-15

    Early stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia is characterized by a highly variable course of disease. Because it is believed that regulatory T cells (T(regs) ) are potent suppressors of antitumor immunity, the authors hypothesized that increased T(regs) may favor disease progression. T(reg) levels (cluster of differentiation 3 [CD3]-positive, [CD4]-positive, CD25-positive, and CD127-negative) in peripheral blood from 102 patients were analyzed by flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was used to evaluate correlations with clinical data. The relative T(reg) numbers in CD4-positive T cells were significantly greater in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared with the numbers in a control group of 170 healthy individuals (P = .001). Patients were divided into 2 groups using a median T(reg) value of 9.7% (the percentage of CD4-positive T cells). Patients with higher T(reg) levels had a significantly shorter time to initial treatment (median, 5.9 years) compared with patients who had lower T(reg) levels (median, 11.7 years; log-rank P = .019). Furthermore, T(reg) levels (the percentage of CD4-positive T cells) had significant prognostic power to predict the time to initial treatment in univariate analysis (P = .023) and in multivariate Cox regression analysis that included the variables Rai stage, immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region gene mutational status, chromosomal aberrations, and CD38 expression (P = .028). Higher T(reg) levels had significant and independent prognostic power for predicting the time to initial treatment in patients with low to intermediate stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia. 2010 American Cancer Society.

  3. Primary sleep enuresis in childhood: polysomnography evidences of sleep stage and time modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Reimäo

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate enuretic events and its relations to sleep stages, sleep cycles and time durations in a selected group of children with primary essential sleep enuresis. We evaluated 18 patients with mean age of 8.2 years old (ranging from 5 to 12 years; 10 were males and 8 females (n.s.. They were referred to the Sleep Disorders Center with the specific complaint of enuresis since the first years of life (primary. Pediatric, urologic and neurologic workup did not show objective abnormalities (essential. The standard all-night polysomnography including an enuresis sensor attached to the shorts in the crotch area was performed. Only enuretic events nights were included. All were drug free patients for two weeks prior to polysomnography. In this report, only one polysomnography per patient was considered. The enuretic events were phase related, occurring predominantly in non-REM (NREM sleep (p<0.05. There was no predominance of enuretic events among the NREM stages (n.s.. A tendency of these events to occur in the first two sleep cycles was detected but may be due to the longer duration of these cycles. The events were time modulated, adjusted to a normal distribution with a mean of 213.4 min of recording time.

  4. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection with Random Horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the continuous-time mean-variance optimal portfolio selection problem with random market parameters and random time horizon. Treating this problem as a linearly constrained stochastic linear-quadratic optimal control problem, I explicitly derive the efficient portfolios and efficient frontier in closed forms based on the solutions of two backward stochastic differential equations. Some related issues such as a minimum variance portfolio and a mutual fund theorem are also addressed. All the results are markedly different from those in the problem with deterministic exit time. A key part of my analysis involves proving the global solvability of a stochastic Riccati equation, which is interesting in its own right

  5. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection with Random Horizon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhiyong, E-mail: yuzhiyong@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong University, School of Mathematics (China)

    2013-12-15

    This paper examines the continuous-time mean-variance optimal portfolio selection problem with random market parameters and random time horizon. Treating this problem as a linearly constrained stochastic linear-quadratic optimal control problem, I explicitly derive the efficient portfolios and efficient frontier in closed forms based on the solutions of two backward stochastic differential equations. Some related issues such as a minimum variance portfolio and a mutual fund theorem are also addressed. All the results are markedly different from those in the problem with deterministic exit time. A key part of my analysis involves proving the global solvability of a stochastic Riccati equation, which is interesting in its own right.

  6. Bi-Criteria System Optimum Traffic Assignment in Networks With Continuous Value of Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available For an elastic demand transportation network with continuously distributed value of time, the system disutility can be measured either in time units or in cost units. The user equilibrium model and the system optimization model are each formulated in two different criteria. The conditions required for making the system optimum link flow pattern equivalent to the user equilibrium link flow pattern are derived. Furthermore, a bi-objective model has been developed which minimizes simultaneously the system travel time and the system travel cost. The existence of a pricing scheme with anonymous link tolls which can decentralize a Pareto system optimum into the user equilibrium has been investigated.

  7. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  8. Gender and age effects on the continuous reaction times method in volunteers and patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Mette Enok Munk; Grønbæk, Henning; Næser, Esben

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a metabolic brain disorder occurring in patients with liver cirrhosis. MHE lessens a patient's quality of life, but is treatable when identified. The continuous reaction times (CRT) method is used in screening for MHE. Gender and age effects...... on the CRT method are unknown and may confound the results. The aim of this study was to standardise the CRT method outcomes for age and gender effects. We studied 121 volunteers without known disease and 181 patients with cirrhosis by a CRT test. Reaction time to an auditory signal was measured 100 times......, the 10th, 50th, and 90th reaction time percentiles were recorded, and the CRT index was calculated as the 50th percentile/(90th percentile-10th percentile), as a measure of intra-individual stability in reaction times. In volunteers, men reacted faster than women and their reaction times slowed with age...

  9. Parameters and Fractional Differentiation Orders Estimation for Linear Continuous-Time Non-Commensurate Fractional Order Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Belkhatir, Zehor

    2017-05-31

    This paper proposes a two-stage estimation algorithm to solve the problem of joint estimation of the parameters and the fractional differentiation orders of a linear continuous-time fractional system with non-commensurate orders. The proposed algorithm combines the modulating functions and the first-order Newton methods. Sufficient conditions ensuring the convergence of the method are provided. An error analysis in the discrete case is performed. Moreover, the method is extended to the joint estimation of smooth unknown input and fractional differentiation orders. The performance of the proposed approach is illustrated with different numerical examples. Furthermore, a potential application of the algorithm is proposed which consists in the estimation of the differentiation orders of a fractional neurovascular model along with the neural activity considered as input for this model.

  10. Path statistics, memory, and coarse-graining of continuous-time random walks on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Michael; Kion-Crosby, Willow; Morozov, Alexandre V.

    2015-12-01

    Continuous-time random walks (CTRWs) on discrete state spaces, ranging from regular lattices to complex networks, are ubiquitous across physics, chemistry, and biology. Models with coarse-grained states (for example, those employed in studies of molecular kinetics) or spatial disorder can give rise to memory and non-exponential distributions of waiting times and first-passage statistics. However, existing methods for analyzing CTRWs on complex energy landscapes do not address these effects. Here we use statistical mechanics of the nonequilibrium path ensemble to characterize first-passage CTRWs on networks with arbitrary connectivity, energy landscape, and waiting time distributions. Our approach can be applied to calculating higher moments (beyond the mean) of path length, time, and action, as well as statistics of any conservative or non-conservative force along a path. For homogeneous networks, we derive exact relations between length and time moments, quantifying the validity of approximating a continuous-time process with its discrete-time projection. For more general models, we obtain recursion relations, reminiscent of transfer matrix and exact enumeration techniques, to efficiently calculate path statistics numerically. We have implemented our algorithm in PathMAN (Path Matrix Algorithm for Networks), a Python script that users can apply to their model of choice. We demonstrate the algorithm on a few representative examples which underscore the importance of non-exponential distributions, memory, and coarse-graining in CTRWs.

  11. Characterizing the continuously acquired cardiovascular time series during hemodialysis, using median hybrid filter preprocessing noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott; Bowyer, Andrea; Harrap, Stephen B

    2015-01-01

    The clinical characterization of cardiovascular dynamics during hemodialysis (HD) has important pathophysiological implications in terms of diagnostic, cardiovascular risk assessment, and treatment efficacy perspectives. Currently the diagnosis of significant intradialytic systolic blood pressure (SBP) changes among HD patients is imprecise and opportunistic, reliant upon the presence of hypotensive symptoms in conjunction with coincident but isolated noninvasive brachial cuff blood pressure (NIBP) readings. Considering hemodynamic variables as a time series makes a continuous recording approach more desirable than intermittent measures; however, in the clinical environment, the data signal is susceptible to corruption due to both impulsive and Gaussian-type noise. Signal preprocessing is an attractive solution to this problem. Prospectively collected continuous noninvasive SBP data over the short-break intradialytic period in ten patients was preprocessed using a novel median hybrid filter (MHF) algorithm and compared with 50 time-coincident pairs of intradialytic NIBP measures from routine HD practice. The median hybrid preprocessing technique for continuously acquired cardiovascular data yielded a dynamic regression without significant noise and artifact, suitable for high-level profiling of time-dependent SBP behavior. Signal accuracy is highly comparable with standard NIBP measurement, with the added clinical benefit of dynamic real-time hemodynamic information.

  12. A new continuous-time formulation for scheduling crude oil operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, P. Chandra Prakash; Karimi, I.A.; Srinivasan, R.

    2004-01-01

    In today's competitive business climate characterized by uncertain oil markets, responding effectively and speedily to market forces, while maintaining reliable operations, is crucial to a refinery's bottom line. Optimal crude oil scheduling enables cost reduction by using cheaper crudes intelligently, minimizing crude changeovers, and avoiding ship demurrage. So far, only discrete-time formulations have stood up to the challenge of this important, nonlinear problem. A continuous-time formulation would portend numerous advantages, however, existing work in this area has just begun to scratch the surface. In this paper, we present the first complete continuous-time mixed integer linear programming (MILP) formulation for the short-term scheduling of operations in a refinery that receives crude from very large crude carriers via a high-volume single buoy mooring pipeline. This novel formulation accounts for real-world operational practices. We use an iterative algorithm to eliminate the crude composition discrepancy that has proven to be the Achilles heel for existing formulations. While it does not guarantee global optimality, the algorithm needs only MILP solutions and obtains excellent maximum-profit schedules for industrial problems with up to 7 days of scheduling horizon. We also report the first comparison of discrete- vs. continuous-time formulations for this complex problem. (Author)

  13. Continuous robust sound event classification using time-frequency features and deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Ian; Zhang, Haomin; Xie, Zhipeng; Song, Yan; Xiao, Wei; Phan, Huy

    2017-01-01

    The automatic detection and recognition of sound events by computers is a requirement for a number of emerging sensing and human computer interaction technologies. Recent advances in this field have been achieved by machine learning classifiers working in conjunction with time-frequency feature representations. This combination has achieved excellent accuracy for classification of discrete sounds. The ability to recognise sounds under real-world noisy conditions, called robust sound event classification, is an especially challenging task that has attracted recent research attention. Another aspect of real-word conditions is the classification of continuous, occluded or overlapping sounds, rather than classification of short isolated sound recordings. This paper addresses the classification of noise-corrupted, occluded, overlapped, continuous sound recordings. It first proposes a standard evaluation task for such sounds based upon a common existing method for evaluating isolated sound classification. It then benchmarks several high performing isolated sound classifiers to operate with continuous sound data by incorporating an energy-based event detection front end. Results are reported for each tested system using the new task, to provide the first analysis of their performance for continuous sound event detection. In addition it proposes and evaluates a novel Bayesian-inspired front end for the segmentation and detection of continuous sound recordings prior to classification.

  14. SPATIAL CONTINUITY OF DENDROMETRIC CHARACTERISTICS IN CLONAL CULTIVATED EUCALYPTUS SP. TRHOUGHOUT THE TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Carolina de Lima Guedes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the spatial continuity of the dendrometric characteristics average dominant height, volume and mean annual increment, throughout five different continuous ages. The experimental area was planted in 2003, accounting for 1,072.6 hectares. The data sets were derived from 116 permanent plots where successive forest inventory was carried out between 2006 and 2010. Using least squares weighted method, spherical, exponential and gaussian semivariogram models were fitted to the experimental semivariogram. To select the best model, reduced average error and standard deviation of the mean reduced error were analyzed. The spatial continuity assessment at along the time was carried out by comparison of the scaled semivariograms plotted considering the data sets from each age. Exponential semivariogram model has presented the best fitting and all the dendrometric characteristics has presented spatial continuity. The evaluated models were similar for each age and the studied characteristics as well. The results obtained with this study show that the use of geostatistical procedures to evaluate the growth of the trees throughout the time is an important planning tool, allowing a better management and prediction of wood volume in the forest.

  15. Continuous-time random walk and parametric subordination in fractional diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorenflo, Rudolf [Department of Mathematics and Informatics, Free University of Berlin, Arnimallee 3, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Mainardi, Francesco [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: mainardi@bo.infn.it; Vivoli, Alessandro [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2007-10-15

    The well-scaled transition to the diffusion limit in the framework of the theory of continuous-time random walk (CTRW) is presented starting from its representation as an infinite series that points out the subordinated character of the CTRW itself. We treat the CTRW as a combination of a random walk on the axis of physical time with a random walk in space, both walks happening in discrete operational time. In the continuum limit, we obtain a (generally non-Markovian) diffusion process governed by a space-time fractional diffusion equation. The essential assumption is that the probabilities for waiting times and jump-widths behave asymptotically like powers with negative exponents related to the orders of the fractional derivatives. By what we call parametric subordination, applied to a combination of a Markov process with a positively oriented Levy process, we generate and display sample paths for some special cases.

  16. Biogas upgrading by injection of hydrogen in a two-stage Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassani, Ilaria; Kougias, Panagiotis; Treu, Laura

    methanogens. In this study, a novel serial biogas reactor system is presented, in which the produced biogas from the first stage reactor was introduced in the second stage, where also H2 was injected. The effects of the H2 addition on the process performance and on the microbial community were investigated....... The profiles of the microbial communities prior and after the H2 addition showed distinct differences. Changes in the archaeal community and more specifically increase in the relative abundance of Methanobrevibacter sp. and Methanoculleus sp. indicated that the methanogenic pathway was clearly shifted from...

  17. Continuous and discreet methods in the aggregation and des fuzzy stages of a diffuse controller of neutron power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najera H, M.C.; Benitez R, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a comparative study are presented of: to) A denominated diffuse controller 'exact', designed by means of an innovative method that determines analytically so much the group of exit resultant in the aggregation stage like the de fuzzy process, and b) a diffuse controller denominated 'discreet' based on the discretization of the variable of having left as much for the aggregation as for the de fuzzy. These stages incorporated to the control algorithms whose objective is the ascent and regulation of the neutron power, carrying out an analysis of its performance. (Author)

  18. Aerodynamics of cyclist posture, bicycle and helmet characteristics in time trial stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabroux, Vincent; Barelle, Caroline; Favier, Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The present work is focused on the aerodynamic study of different parameters, including both the posture of a cyclist's upper limbs and the saddle position, in time trial (TT) stages. The aerodynamic influence of a TT helmet large visor is also quantified as a function of the helmet inclination. Experiments conducted in a wind tunnel on nine professional cyclists provided drag force and frontal area measurements to determine the drag force coefficient. Data statistical analysis clearly shows that the hands positioning on shifters and the elbows joined together are significantly reducing the cyclist drag force. Concerning the saddle position, the drag force is shown to be significantly increased (about 3%) when the saddle is raised. The usual helmet inclination appears to be the inclination value minimizing the drag force. Moreover, the addition of a large visor on the helmet is shown to provide a drag coefficient reduction as a function of the helmet inclination. Present results indicate that variations in the TT cyclist posture, the saddle position and the helmet visor can produce a significant gain in time (up to 2.2%) during stages.

  19. Use of Short-Term Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Continuous Intraperitoneal Insulin Infusion : A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Susan J. J.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    Background: In diabetes, strict glycemic control reduces risk of complications. One mode of therapy is continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII). With CIPII, like all intensified treatment strategies, frequent assessment of glucose levels is mandatory. Real-time (RT)-continuous glucose

  20. Continuous-Time Models, Realized Volatilities, and Testable Distributional Implications for Daily Stock Returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben G.; Bollerslev, Tim; Frederiksen, Per Houmann

    that might have generated the data. As such, the tests may serve as a useful diagnostic tool in the specification of empirically more realistic asset pricing models. Our results are also directly related to the popular mixture-of-distributions hypoth- esis and the role of the corresponding latent information......We provide an empirical framework for assessing the distributional properties of daily specu- lative returns within the context of the continuous-time modeling paradigm traditionally used in asset pricing finance. Our approach builds directly on recently developed realized variation measures...... and non-parametric jump detection statistics constructed from high-frequency intra- day data. A sequence of relatively simple-to-implement moment-based tests involving various transforms of the daily returns speak directly to the import of different features of the under- lying continuous-time processes...

  1. Transport properties of continuous-time quantum walks on Sierpinski fractals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darázs, Zoltán; Anishchenko, Anastasiia; Kiss, Tamás; Blumen, Alexander; Mülken, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    We model quantum transport, described by continuous-time quantum walks (CTQWs), on deterministic Sierpinski fractals, differentiating between Sierpinski gaskets and Sierpinski carpets, along with their dual structures. The transport efficiencies are defined in terms of the exact and the average return probabilities, as well as by the mean survival probability when absorbing traps are present. In the case of gaskets, localization can be identified already for small networks (generations). For carpets, our numerical results indicate a trend towards localization, but only for relatively large structures. The comparison of gaskets and carpets further implies that, distinct from the corresponding classical continuous-time random walk, the spectral dimension does not fully determine the evolution of the CTQW.

  2. A Wearable System for Real-Time Continuous Monitoring of Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Taffoni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, wearable systems have gained interest for monitoring of physiological variables, promoting health, and improving exercise adherence in different populations ranging from elite athletes to patients. In this paper, we present a wearable system for the continuous real-time monitoring of respiratory frequency (fR, heart rate (HR, and movement cadence during physical activity. The system has been experimentally tested in the laboratory (by simulating the breathing pattern with a mechanical ventilator and by collecting data from one healthy volunteer. Results show the feasibility of the proposed device for real-time continuous monitoring of fR, HR, and movement cadence both in resting condition and during activity. Finally, different synchronization techniques have been investigated to enable simultaneous data collection from different wearable modules.

  3. Continuous-Time Classical and Quantum Random Walk on Direct Product of Cayley Graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, S.; Jafarizadeh, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we define direct product of graphs and give a recipe for obtaining probability of observing particle on vertices in the continuous-time classical and quantum random walk. In the recipe, the probability of observing particle on direct product of graph is obtained by multiplication of probability on the corresponding to sub-graphs, where this method is useful to determining probability of walk on complicated graphs. Using this method, we calculate the probability of continuous-time classical and quantum random walks on many of finite direct product Cayley graphs (complete cycle, complete K n , charter and n-cube). Also, we inquire that the classical state the stationary uniform distribution is reached as t → ∞ but for quantum state is not always satisfied. (general)

  4. Impulsive Control for Continuous-Time Markov Decision Processes: A Linear Programming Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, F., E-mail: dufour@math.u-bordeaux1.fr [Bordeaux INP, IMB, UMR CNRS 5251 (France); Piunovskiy, A. B., E-mail: piunov@liv.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Department of Mathematical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, we investigate an optimization problem for continuous-time Markov decision processes with both impulsive and continuous controls. We consider the so-called constrained problem where the objective of the controller is to minimize a total expected discounted optimality criterion associated with a cost rate function while keeping other performance criteria of the same form, but associated with different cost rate functions, below some given bounds. Our model allows multiple impulses at the same time moment. The main objective of this work is to study the associated linear program defined on a space of measures including the occupation measures of the controlled process and to provide sufficient conditions to ensure the existence of an optimal control.

  5. Adaptive modification of the delayed feedback control algorithm with a continuously varying time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyragas, V.; Pyragas, K.

    2011-01-01

    We propose a simple adaptive delayed feedback control algorithm for stabilization of unstable periodic orbits with unknown periods. The state dependent time delay is varied continuously towards the period of controlled orbit according to a gradient-descent method realized through three simple ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm with the Roessler and Mackey-Glass chaotic systems. The stability of the controlled orbits is proven by computation of the Lyapunov exponents of linearized equations. -- Highlights: → A simple adaptive modification of the delayed feedback control algorithm is proposed. → It enables the control of unstable periodic orbits with unknown periods. → The delay time is varied continuously according to a gradient descend method. → The algorithm is embodied by three simple ordinary differential equations. → The validity of the algorithm is proven by computation of the Lyapunov exponents.

  6. i QIST: An open source continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Wang, Yilin; Meng, Zi Yang; Du, Liang; Werner, Philipp; Dai, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Quantum impurity solvers have a broad range of applications in theoretical studies of strongly correlated electron systems. Especially, they play a key role in dynamical mean-field theory calculations of correlated lattice models and realistic materials. Therefore, the development and implementation of efficient quantum impurity solvers is an important task. In this paper, we present an open source interacting quantum impurity solver toolkit (dubbed i QIST). This package contains several highly optimized quantum impurity solvers which are based on the hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm, as well as some essential pre- and post-processing tools. We first introduce the basic principle of continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm and then discuss the implementation details and optimization strategies. The software framework, major features, and installation procedure for i QIST are also explained. Finally, several simple tutorials are presented in order to demonstrate the usage and power of i QIST.

  7. Continuous time sigma delta ADC design and non-idealities analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jun; Chen Zhenhai; Yang Yintang; Zhang Zhaofeng; Wu Jun; Wang Chao; Qian Wenrong

    2011-01-01

    A wide bandwidth continuous time sigma delta ADC is implemented in 130 nm CMOS. A detailed non-idealities analysis (excess loop delay, clock jitter, finite gain and GBW, comparator offset and DAC mismatch) is performed developed in Matlab/Simulink. This design is targeted for wide bandwidth applications such as video or wireless base-stations. Athird-order continuous time sigma delta modulator comprises a third-order RC operational-amplifier-based loop filter and 3-bit internal quantizer operated at 512 MHz clock frequency. The sigma delta ADC achieves 60 dB SNR and 59.3 dB SNDR over a 16-MHz signal band at an OSR of 16. The power consumption of the CT sigma delta modulator is 22 mW from the 1.2-V supply. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  8. Fermion bag approach to Hamiltonian lattice field theories in continuous time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Emilie; Chandrasekharan, Shailesh

    2017-12-01

    We extend the idea of fermion bags to Hamiltonian lattice field theories in the continuous time formulation. Using a class of models we argue that the temperature is a parameter that splits the fermion dynamics into small spatial regions that can be used to identify fermion bags. Using this idea we construct a continuous time quantum Monte Carlo algorithm and compute critical exponents in the 3 d Ising Gross-Neveu universality class using a single flavor of massless Hamiltonian staggered fermions. We find η =0.54 (6 ) and ν =0.88 (2 ) using lattices up to N =2304 sites. We argue that even sizes up to N =10 ,000 sites should be accessible with supercomputers available today.

  9. Continuous-time quantum walks: Models for coherent transport on complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muelken, Oliver, E-mail: muelken@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Blumen, Alexander

    2011-05-15

    This paper reviews recent advances in continuous-time quantum walks (CTQW) and their application to transport in various systems. The introduction gives a brief survey of the historical background of CTQW. After a short outline of the theoretical ideas behind CTQW and of its relation to classical continuous-time random walks (CTRW), implications for the efficiency of the transport are presented. This paper gives an overview of different types of networks on which CTQW have been studied so far. Extensions of CTQW to systems with long-range interactions and with static disorder are also discussed. Systems with traps, i.e., systems in which a walker's probability to remain inside the system is not conserved, are presented. Relations to similar approaches to the transport are studied. This paper closes with an outlook on possible future directions.

  10. The continuous time random walk, still trendy: fifty-year history, state of art and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Ryszard; Masoliver, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    In this article we demonstrate the very inspiring role of the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) formalism, the numerous modifications permitted by its flexibility, its various applications, and the promising perspectives in the various fields of knowledge. A short review of significant achievements and possibilities is given. However, this review is still far from completeness. We focused on a pivotal role of CTRWs mainly in anomalous stochastic processes discovered in physics and beyond. This article plays the role of an extended announcement of the Eur. Phys. J. B Special Issue [ctrw-50-years-on">http://epjb.epj.org/open-calls-for-papers/123-epj-b/1090-ctrw-50-years-on] containing articles which show incredible possibilities of the CTRWs. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  11. Optimization of Modulator and Circuits for Low Power Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma ADC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker-Villumsen, Niels; Bruun, Erik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new optimization method for achieving a minimum current consumption in a continuous-time Delta-Sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The method is applied to a continuous-time modulator realised with active-RC integrators and with a folded-cascode operational transconduc......- tance amplifier (OTA). Based on a detailed circuit analysis of the integrator and the OTA, key expression are derived relating the biasing current of the OTA to the noise requirements of the integrator. In the optimization the corner frequency of the modulator loop filter and the number of quantizer...... levels are swept. Based on the results of the circuit analysis, for each modulator combination the summed current consumption of the 1st integrator and quantizer of the ADC is determined. By also sweeping the partitioning of the noise power for the different circuit parts, the optimum modulator...

  12. Stage-independent, single lead EEG sleep spindle detection using the continuous wavelet transform and local weighted smoothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios eTsanas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are critical in characterizing sleep and have been associated with cognitive function and pathophysiological assessment. Typically, their detection relies on the subjective and time-consuming visual examination of electroencephalogram (EEG signal(s by experts, and has led to large inter-rater variability as a result of poor definition of sleep spindle characteristics. Hitherto, many algorithmic spindle detectors inherently make signal stationarity assumptions (e.g. Fourier transform-based approaches which are inappropriate for EEG signals, and frequently rely on additional information which may not be readily available in many practical settings (e.g. more than one EEG channels, or prior hypnogram assessment. This study proposes a novel signal processing methodology relying solely on a single EEG channel, and provides objective, accurate means towards probabilistically assessing the presence of sleep spindles in EEG signals. We use the intuitively appealing continuous wavelet transform (CWT with a Morlet basis function, identifying regions of interest where the power of the CWT coefficients corresponding to the frequencies of spindles (11-16 Hz is large. The potential for assessing the signal segment as a spindle is refined using local weighted smoothing techniques. We evaluate our findings on two databases: the MASS database comprising 19 healthy controls and the DREAMS sleep spindle database comprising eight participants diagnosed with various sleep pathologies. We demonstrate that we can replicate the experts’ sleep spindles assessment accurately in both databases (MASS database: sensitivity: 84%, specificity: 90%, false discovery rate 83%, DREAMS database: sensitivity: 76%, specificity: 92%, false discovery rate: 67%, outperforming six competing automatic sleep spindle detection algorithms in terms of correctly replicating the experts’ assessment of detected spindles.

  13. Mean-variance Optimal Reinsurance-investment Strategy in Continuous Time

    OpenAIRE

    Daheng Peng; Fang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, Lagrange method is used to solve the continuous-time mean-variance reinsurance-investment problem. Proportional reinsurance, multiple risky assets and risk-free asset are considered synthetically in the optimal strategy for insurers. By solving the backward stochastic differential equation for the Lagrange multiplier, we get the mean-variance optimal reinsurance-investment strategy and its effective frontier in explicit forms.

  14. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection under the CEV Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Hui-qiang

    2014-01-01

    We consider a continuous-time mean-variance portfolio selection model when stock price follows the constant elasticity of variance (CEV) process. The aim of this paper is to derive an optimal portfolio strategy and the efficient frontier. The mean-variance portfolio selection problem is formulated as a linearly constrained convex program problem. By employing the Lagrange multiplier method and stochastic optimal control theory, we obtain the optimal portfolio strategy and mean-variance effici...

  15. Mean-variance Optimal Reinsurance-investment Strategy in Continuous Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daheng Peng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Lagrange method is used to solve the continuous-time mean-variance reinsurance-investment problem. Proportional reinsurance, multiple risky assets and risk-free asset are considered synthetically in the optimal strategy for insurers. By solving the backward stochastic differential equation for the Lagrange multiplier, we get the mean-variance optimal reinsurance-investment strategy and its effective frontier in explicit forms.

  16. Quality Time: Temporal Constraints to Continual Process Development in the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    QUALITY TIME: TEMPORAL CONSTRAINTS TO CONTINUAL PROCESS DEVELOPMENT IN THE AIR FORCE BY MAJOR PAUL A. La TOUR A THESIS PRESENTED TO...a deductive system-dynamics methodology to analyze the application of quality management policies to an Air Force system. The work provides an...alternate explanation to the existing body of literature on the failure of Total Quality Management (TQM) and Quality Air Force (QAF) programs. The

  17. Distributed Optimization Design of Continuous-Time Multiagent Systems With Unknown-Frequency Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghu; Hong, Yiguang; Yi, Peng; Ji, Haibo; Kang, Yu

    2017-05-24

    In this paper, a distributed optimization problem is studied for continuous-time multiagent systems with unknown-frequency disturbances. A distributed gradient-based control is proposed for the agents to achieve the optimal consensus with estimating unknown frequencies and rejecting the bounded disturbance in the semi-global sense. Based on convex optimization analysis and adaptive internal model approach, the exact optimization solution can be obtained for the multiagent system disturbed by exogenous disturbances with uncertain parameters.

  18. Stability Tests of Positive Fractional Continuous-time Linear Systems with Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Kaczorek

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Necessary and sufficient conditions for the asymptotic stability of positive fractional continuous-time linear systems with many delays are established. It is shown that: 1 the asymptotic stability of the positive fractional system is independent of their delays, 2 the checking of the asymptotic stability of the positive fractional systems with delays can be reduced to checking of the asymptotic stability of positive standard linear systems without delays.

  19. Continuous time Boolean modeling for biological signaling: application of Gillespie algorithm.

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, Gautier; Viara, Eric; Barillot, Emmanuel; Calzone, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mathematical modeling is used as a Systems Biology tool to answer biological questions, and more precisely, to validate a network that describes biological observations and predict the effect of perturbations. This article presents an algorithm for modeling biological networks in a discrete framework with continuous time. Background There exist two major types of mathematical modeling approaches: (1) quantitative modeling, representing various chemical species concentrations by real...

  20. A comparison of numerical methods for the solution of continuous-time DSGE models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parra-Alvarez, Juan Carlos

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of a set of techniques that approximate the solution of continuous-time DSGE models. Using the neoclassical growth model I compare linear-quadratic, perturbation and projection methods. All techniques are applied to the HJB equation and the optimality conditions...... parameters of the model and suggest the use of projection methods when a high degree of accuracy is required....

  1. System of delay difference equations with continuous time with lag function between two known functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnalka Péics

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The asymptotic behavior of solutions of the system of difference equations with continuous time and lag function between two known real functions is studied. The cases when the lag function is between two linear delay functions, between two power delay functions and between two constant delay functions are observed and illustrated by examples. The asymptotic estimates of solutions of the considered system are obtained.

  2. Power comparator for continuous-time adaptive equalization in Ethernet-based instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, E.; Gimeno, C.; Sánchez-Azqueta, C.; Celma, S.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, Ethernet has been chosen as a replacement for standard-based instrumentation. Its performance is increasing, thanks to speeds of 1 Gbps, 10 Gbps and beyond on backplanes, which expands the instrumentation and measurement potential. However, these high-speed serial links need to be able to retain the integrity of the data stream through some type of equalization. This paper proposes a new differential power comparator, to be used in continuous-time adaptive equalizers inside these Ethernet-based instruments.

  3. A continuous time model of the bandwagon effect in collective action

    OpenAIRE

    Arieh Gavious; Shlomo Mizrahi

    2001-01-01

    The paper offers a complex and systematic model of the bandwagon effect in collective action using continuous time equations. The model treats the bandwagon effect as a process influenced by ratio between the mobilization efforts of social activists and the resources invested by the government to counteract this activity. The complex modeling approach makes it possible to identify the conditions for specific types of the bandwagon effect, and determines the scope of that effect. Relying on ce...

  4. Validation of Prototype Continuous Real-Time Vital Signs Video Analytics Monitoring System CCATT Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-26

    10 3.5 Auxiliary Function and System Pressure Test ............................................................... 11 4.0 VALIDATION IN A REAL TRAUMA...release. Distribution is unlimited. Cleared, 88PA, Case # 2018-0730, 20 Feb 2018. To test the new system’s accuracy, reliability , and robustness, we...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2018-0003 Validation of Prototype Continuous Real-Time Vital Signs Video Analytics Monitoring System “CCATT Viewer

  5. The decline of venture capital investment in early-stage life sciences poses a challenge to continued innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    A key element required for translating new knowledge into effective therapies is early-stage venture capital that finances the work needed to identify a lead molecule or medical device prototype and to develop it to the proof-of-concept stage. This early investment is distinguished by great uncertainty over whether the molecule or prototype is safe and effective, the stability of the regulatory standards to which clinical trials are designed, and the likelihood that large follow-on investments for commercial development can be secured. Regulatory and reimbursement policies have a profound impact on the amount of capital and the types of life science projects that investors pursue. In this article I analyze several recent trends in early-stage venture capital funding, describe how these trends are influenced by regulatory and reimbursement policies, and discuss the role of policy makers in bringing new treatments to market. Policy makers can foster renewed private investment into critically needed early-stage products by increasing Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding and public support for clinical trials in targeted areas of interest; creating regulatory pathways to enable early testing of experimental compounds in limited populations; and offering economic incentives for investors and developers in designated therapeutic areas. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  6. Investigation of continuous-time quantum walk via modules of Bose-Mesner and Terwilliger algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarizadeh, M A; Salimi, S

    2006-01-01

    The continuous-time quantum walk on the underlying graphs of association schemes has been studied, via the algebraic combinatorics structures of association schemes, namely semi-simple modules of their Bose-Mesner and Terwilliger algebras. It is shown that the Terwilliger algebra stratifies the graph into a (d + 1) disjoint union of strata which is different from the stratification based on distance, except for distance regular graphs. In underlying graphs of association schemes, the probability amplitudes and average probabilities are given in terms of dual eigenvalues of association schemes, such that the amplitudes of observing the continuous-time quantum walk on all sites belonging to a given stratum are the same, therefore there are at most (d + 1) different observing probabilities. The importance of association scheme in continuous-time quantum walk is shown by some worked out examples such as arbitrary finite group association schemes followed by symmetric S n , Dihedral D 2m and cyclic groups. At the end it is shown that the highest irreducible representations of Terwilliger algebras pave the way to use the spectral distributions method of Jafarizadeh and Salimi (2005 Preprint quant-ph/0510174) in studying quantum walk on some rather important graphs called distance regular graphs

  7. Continuous time random walk model with asymptotical probability density of waiting times via inverse Mittag-Leffler function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjie; Chen, Wen

    2018-04-01

    The mean squared displacement (MSD) of the traditional ultraslow diffusion is a logarithmic function of time. Recently, the continuous time random walk model is employed to characterize this ultraslow diffusion dynamics by connecting the heavy-tailed logarithmic function and its variation as the asymptotical waiting time density. In this study we investigate the limiting waiting time density of a general ultraslow diffusion model via the inverse Mittag-Leffler function, whose special case includes the traditional logarithmic ultraslow diffusion model. The MSD of the general ultraslow diffusion model is analytically derived as an inverse Mittag-Leffler function, and is observed to increase even more slowly than that of the logarithmic function model. The occurrence of very long waiting time in the case of the inverse Mittag-Leffler function has the largest probability compared with the power law model and the logarithmic function model. The Monte Carlo simulations of one dimensional sample path of a single particle are also performed. The results show that the inverse Mittag-Leffler waiting time density is effective in depicting the general ultraslow random motion.

  8. On-line parameter and delay estimation of continuous-time dynamic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozłowski Janusz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of on-line identification of non-stationary delay systems is considered. The dynamics of supervised industrial processes are usually modeled by ordinary differential equations. Discrete-time mechanizations of continuous-time process models are implemented with the use of dedicated finite-horizon integrating filters. Least-squares and instrumental variable procedures mechanized in recursive forms are applied for simultaneous identification of input delay and spectral parameters of the system models. The performance of the proposed estimation algorithms is verified in an illustrative numerical simulation study.

  9. Offset-Free Direct Power Control of DFIG Under Continuous-Time Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Errouissi, Rachid; Al-Durra, Ahmed; Muyeen, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a robust continuous-time model predictive direct power control for doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). The proposed approach uses Taylor series expansion to predict the stator current in the synchronous reference frame over a finite time horizon. The predicted stator current...... without encompassing the parameters of the machine itself. Hence, no extra power control loop is required in the control structure to ensure smooth operation of the DFIG. The feasibility of the proposed strategy is verified by the experimental results of the grid-connected DFIG and satisfactory...

  10. Scaling Properties of Field-Induced Superdiffusion in Continuous Time Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burioni, R.; Gradenigo, G.; Sarracino, A.; Vezzani, A.; Vulpiani, A.

    2014-10-01

    We consider a broad class of Continuous Time Random Walks (CTRW) with large fluctuations effects in space and time distributions: a random walk with trapping, describing subdiffusion in disordered and glassy materials, and a Lévy walk process, often used to model superdiffusive effects in inhomogeneous materials. We derive the scaling form of the probability distributions and the asymptotic properties of all its moments in the presence of a field by two powerful techniques, based on matching conditions and on the estimate of the contribution of rare events to power-law tails in a field.

  11. Volmer-Weber growth stages of polycrystalline metal films probed by in situ and real-time optical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadias, G.; Simonot, L.; Colin, J. J.; Michel, A.; Camelio, S.; Babonneau, D.

    2015-11-01

    The Volmer-Weber growth of high-mobility metal films is associated with the development of a complex compressive-tensile-compressive stress behavior as the film deposition proceeds through nucleation of islands, coalescence, and formation of a continuous layer. The tensile force maximum has been attributed to the end of the islands coalescence stage, based on ex situ morphological observations. However, microstructural rearrangements are likely to occur in such films during post-deposition, somewhat biasing interpretations solely based on ex situ analysis. Here, by combining two simultaneous in situ and real-time optical sensing techniques, based on surface differential reflectance spectroscopy (SDRS) and change in wafer curvature probed by multibeam optical stress sensor (MOSS), we provide direct evidence that film continuity does coincide with tensile stress maximum during sputter deposition of a series of metal (Ag, Au, and Pd) films on amorphous SiOx. Stress relaxation after growth interruption was testified from MOSS, whose magnitude scaled with adatom mobility, while no change in SDRS signal could be revealed, ruling out possible changes of the surface roughness at the micron scale.

  12. Controlling Energy Performance on the Big Stage - The New York Times Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyre, Kevin [Sustainable IQ, Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Times partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program to develop a post-occupancy evaluation (POE) of three EEMs that were implemented during the construction of The Times building between 2004-2006. With aggressive goals to reduce energy use and carbon emissions at a national level, one strategy of the US Department of Energy is looking to exemplary buildings that have already invested in new approaches to achieving the energy performance goals that are now needed at scale. The Times building incorporated a number of innovative technologies, systems and processes that make their project a model for widespread replication in new and existing buildings. The measured results from the post occupancy evaluation study, the tools and processes developed, and continuous improvements in the performance and cost of the systems studied suggest that these savings are scalable and replicable in a wide range of commercial buildings nationwide.

  13. Fluctuations around equilibrium laws in ergodic continuous-time random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Johannes H P; Barkai, Eli

    2015-06-01

    We study occupation time statistics in ergodic continuous-time random walks. Under thermal detailed balance conditions, the average occupation time is given by the Boltzmann-Gibbs canonical law. But close to the nonergodic phase, the finite-time fluctuations around this mean are large and nontrivial. They exhibit dual time scaling and distribution laws: the infinite density of large fluctuations complements the Lévy-stable density of bulk fluctuations. Neither of the two should be interpreted as a stand-alone limiting law, as each has its own deficiency: the infinite density has an infinite norm (despite particle conservation), while the stable distribution has an infinite variance (although occupation times are bounded). These unphysical divergences are remedied by consistent use and interpretation of both formulas. Interestingly, while the system's canonical equilibrium laws naturally determine the mean occupation time of the ergodic motion, they also control the infinite and Lévy-stable densities of fluctuations. The duality of stable and infinite densities is in fact ubiquitous for these dynamics, as it concerns the time averages of general physical observables.

  14. Continuous-time random walk for open systems: fluctuation theorems and counting statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Lindenberg, Katja

    2008-05-01

    We consider continuous-time random walks (CTRW) for open systems that exchange energy and matter with multiple reservoirs. Each waiting time distribution (WTD) for times between steps is characterized by a positive parameter alpha , which is set to alpha=1 if it decays at least as fast as t{-2} at long times and therefore has a finite first moment. A WTD with alphaCTRW. However, R can be identified as a trajectory entropy change only if the WTDs have alpha=1 and satisfy separability (also called "direction time independence"). For nonseparable WTDs with alpha=1 , R can only be identified as a trajectory entropy change at long times, and a fluctuation theorem for the entropy change then only holds at long times. For WTDs with 0times.

  15. Continuous-time random walk approach to on-off diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Syuji; Harada, Tomohiro; Budiyono, Agung [Kyoto Univ., Graduate School of Informatics, Department of Applied Analysis and Complex Dynamical Systems, Kyoto (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    Statistical properties and scale invariances of on-off diffusion, which is an anomalous transport phenomenon caused by on-off intermittency, are studied on the basis of the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) approach. The anomalous production of heat is also analyzed. Scaling functions of the time evolution of the mean square displacement and the probability density function (PDF) of the position are analytically derived. It is found that there is a characteristic time separating two regimes of time intervals with different scaling laws for the PDF. In the interval that exists at times much smaller than the characteristic time, anomalous subdiffusion appears, which is followed by normal diffusion. In the earlier time interval, aside from the neighborhood of the origin, the PDF takes the form of a power law multiplied by a stretched exponential function, whereas in the later time interval, the PDF becomes a Gaussian. The results are compared with these model simulations. Good agreement between the theory and the simulation is obtained. (author)

  16. The Identification of Hail Storms in the Early Stage Using Time Series Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Shi, Jinyu; Hou, Jinyi; Hu, Yan

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of hail storms and cumulonimbus storms in China from 2005 to 2016. Ten features are proposed to identify storm cells that can produce hail, especially in the early stage of hail formation. These features describe hail storms based on three factors: the height and thickness of the cell core, the radar echo intensity, and the overhang structure and the horizontal reflectivity gradient. The 10 features are transformed into two-dimensional comprehensive features by principal component analysis (PCA). The two comprehensive features are named the volume measurement comprehensive feature (VMCF) and the height-gradient comprehensive feature (HGCF). Through an analysis of 49 hail cases and 35 heavy rainfall cases with S-band radar data, the time series exhibit a distinct increase in VMCF or HGCF values in the early stage of a hail storm. However, the VMCF and HGCF values of heavy rainfall events remain relatively stable throughout the storm life cycle. An experiment involving real-storm events, including 31 hail cases and 33 heavy rainfall cases, indicated that the probability of detection of hail storms was 93.33% and the false alarm ratio was 15.66%. In the cases that could be successfully identified as hail storms, 80.00% were detected within 18 min of reaching a hail storm reflectivity of 40 dBZ.

  17. Effects of hemodialysis on ventricular activation time in children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszki-Szcząchor, Krystyna; Polak-Jonkisz, Dorota; Zwolińska, Danuta; Makulska, Irena; Rehan, Leopold; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease are affected by cardiovascular complications, including disturbances of the heart intraventricular conduction. Body surface potential mapping is a non-invasive electrocardiographic detection method of initial disturbances in heart activation propagation. A goal of the study was to analyze the effects of single hemodialysis (HD) session on ventricular activation time (VAT) maps obtained from hemodialyzed children. The study group consisted of 13 hemodialyzed children (age: 6-18 years). The control group is composed of 26 healthy subjects. In each HD patient, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiography examinations were performed. Isochrone heart maps, reflecting body surface distribution of VAT isolines, were recorded from an 87-electrode HPM-7100 system for body surface potential mapping, before (group B) and after HD session (group A). The distribution of isochrones and VAT values, as recorded in the HD patients, differed significantly from the reference VAT map for controls. The highest VAT maximal value was noted in group B (Me: 110 vs. 62 ms in the control group; P children with end-stage renal disease exhibited disturbances of intraventricular conduction within the left bundle branch block, undetectable on standard electrocardiogram. A single HD session resulted in VAT map improvement related to overall HD treatment duration. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  18. Analysis of discrete and continuous distributions of ventilatory time constants from dynamic computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doebrich, Marcus [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Markstaller, Klaus [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Karmrodt, Jens [Department of Anesthesiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Eberle, Balthasar [Department of Anesthesiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Weiler, Norbert [Department of Anesthesiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Thelen, Manfred [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany); Schreiber, Wolfgang G [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz (Germany)

    2005-04-21

    In this study, an algorithm was developed to measure the distribution of pulmonary time constants (TCs) from dynamic computed tomography (CT) data sets during a sudden airway pressure step up. Simulations with synthetic data were performed to test the methodology as well as the influence of experimental noise. Furthermore the algorithm was applied to in vivo data. In five pigs sudden changes in airway pressure were imposed during dynamic CT acquisition in healthy lungs and in a saline lavage ARDS model. The fractional gas content in the imaged slice (FGC) was calculated by density measurements for each CT image. Temporal variations of the FGC were analysed assuming a model with a continuous distribution of exponentially decaying time constants. The simulations proved the feasibility of the method. The influence of experimental noise could be well evaluated. Analysis of the in vivo data showed that in healthy lungs ventilation processes can be more likely characterized by discrete TCs whereas in ARDS lungs continuous distributions of TCs are observed. The temporal behaviour of lung inflation and deflation can be characterized objectively using the described new methodology. This study indicates that continuous distributions of TCs reflect lung ventilation mechanics more accurately compared to discrete TCs.

  19. Analysis of discrete and continuous distributions of ventilatory time constants from dynamic computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doebrich, Marcus; Markstaller, Klaus; Karmrodt, Jens; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Eberle, Balthasar; Weiler, Norbert; Thelen, Manfred; Schreiber, Wolfgang G

    2005-01-01

    In this study, an algorithm was developed to measure the distribution of pulmonary time constants (TCs) from dynamic computed tomography (CT) data sets during a sudden airway pressure step up. Simulations with synthetic data were performed to test the methodology as well as the influence of experimental noise. Furthermore the algorithm was applied to in vivo data. In five pigs sudden changes in airway pressure were imposed during dynamic CT acquisition in healthy lungs and in a saline lavage ARDS model. The fractional gas content in the imaged slice (FGC) was calculated by density measurements for each CT image. Temporal variations of the FGC were analysed assuming a model with a continuous distribution of exponentially decaying time constants. The simulations proved the feasibility of the method. The influence of experimental noise could be well evaluated. Analysis of the in vivo data showed that in healthy lungs ventilation processes can be more likely characterized by discrete TCs whereas in ARDS lungs continuous distributions of TCs are observed. The temporal behaviour of lung inflation and deflation can be characterized objectively using the described new methodology. This study indicates that continuous distributions of TCs reflect lung ventilation mechanics more accurately compared to discrete TCs

  20. The New Big Bang Theory according to Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Luiz Cesar

    2014-04-01

    This New View of the Big Bang Theory results from the Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory, for which the introduction was presented in [1]. This theory is based on the concept that the primitive Universe before the Big Bang was constituted only from elementary cells of potential energy disposed side by side. In the primitive Universe there were no particles, charges, movement and the Universe temperature was absolute zero Kelvin. The time was always present, even in the primitive Universe, time is the integral part of the empty space, it is the dynamic energy of space and it is responsible for the movement of matter and energy inside the Universe. The empty space is totally stationary; the primitive Universe was infinite and totally occupied by elementary cells of potential energy. In its event, the Big Bang started a production of matter, charges, energy liberation, dynamic movement, temperature increase and the conformation of galaxies respecting a specific formation law. This article presents the theoretical formation of the Galaxies starting from a basic equation of the Dimensional Continuous Space-time Theory.

  1. The new Big Bang Theory according to dimensional continuous space-time theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martini, Luiz Cesar

    2014-01-01

    This New View of the Big Bang Theory results from the Dimensional Continuous Space-Time Theory, for which the introduction was presented in [1]. This theory is based on the concept that the primitive Universe before the Big Bang was constituted only from elementary cells of potential energy disposed side by side. In the primitive Universe there were no particles, charges, movement and the Universe temperature was absolute zero Kelvin. The time was always present, even in the primitive Universe, time is the integral part of the empty space, it is the dynamic energy of space and it is responsible for the movement of matter and energy inside the Universe. The empty space is totally stationary; the primitive Universe was infinite and totally occupied by elementary cells of potential energy. In its event, the Big Bang started a production of matter, charges, energy liberation, dynamic movement, temperature increase and the conformation of galaxies respecting a specific formation law. This article presents the theoretical formation of the Galaxies starting from a basic equation of the Dimensional Continuous Space-time Theory.

  2. Real-time electrocardiogram transmission from Mount Everest during continued ascent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wei-Fong; Huang, Jyh-How; Kuo, Terry B J; Chang, Po-Lun; Chang, Wen-Chen; Chan, Kuo-Hung; Liu, Wen-Hsiung; Wang, Shih-Hao; Su, Tzu-Yao; Chiang, Hsiu-chen; Chen, Jin-Jong

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of a real-time electrocardiogram (ECG) transmission via satellite phone from Mount Everest to determine a climber's suitability for continued ascent was examined. Four Taiwanese climbers were enrolled in the 2009 Mount Everest summit program. Physiological measurements were taken at base camp (5300 m), camp 2 (6400 m), camp 3 (7100 m), and camp 4 (7950 m) 1 hour after arrival and following a 10 minute rest period. A total of 3 out of 4 climbers were able to summit Mount Everest successfully. Overall, ECG and global positioning system (GPS) coordinates of climbers were transmitted in real-time via satellite phone successfully from base camp, camp 2, camp 3, and camp 4. At each camp, Resting Heart Rate (RHR) was transmitted and recorded: base camp (54-113 bpm), camp 2 (94-130 bpm), camp 3 (98-115 bpm), and camp 4 (93-111 bpm). Real-time ECG and GPS coordinate transmission via satellite phone is feasible for climbers on Mount Everest. Real-time RHR data can be used to evaluate a climber's physiological capacity to continue an ascent and to summit.

  3. Real-time electrocardiogram transmission from Mount Everest during continued ascent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Fong Kao

    Full Text Available The feasibility of a real-time electrocardiogram (ECG transmission via satellite phone from Mount Everest to determine a climber's suitability for continued ascent was examined. Four Taiwanese climbers were enrolled in the 2009 Mount Everest summit program. Physiological measurements were taken at base camp (5300 m, camp 2 (6400 m, camp 3 (7100 m, and camp 4 (7950 m 1 hour after arrival and following a 10 minute rest period. A total of 3 out of 4 climbers were able to summit Mount Everest successfully. Overall, ECG and global positioning system (GPS coordinates of climbers were transmitted in real-time via satellite phone successfully from base camp, camp 2, camp 3, and camp 4. At each camp, Resting Heart Rate (RHR was transmitted and recorded: base camp (54-113 bpm, camp 2 (94-130 bpm, camp 3 (98-115 bpm, and camp 4 (93-111 bpm. Real-time ECG and GPS coordinate transmission via satellite phone is feasible for climbers on Mount Everest. Real-time RHR data can be used to evaluate a climber's physiological capacity to continue an ascent and to summit.

  4. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10 –9 to 10 –7 Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  5. The effect of unsteadiness on the time-mean thermal loads in a turbine stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtley, K. R.; Celestina, M. L.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    Two steady numerical analysis methods and one unsteady method are used to study the viscous three-dimensional flow in the middle stage of the Pratt & Whitney alternate design Space Shuttle Main Engine fuel turbine. The principal characteristic of this flow is that the secondary flows generated in the rotor blade reconfigure a radial inlet total temperature distortion into one with a pitchwise exit hot streak distortion. Secondary flows in the following vane redistribute the radial variation while unsteadiness causes a segregation of hot and cold flow from the hot streak within the vane. Such redistribution and segregation can lead to unexpected thermal loads and reduced durability. The physical phenomena and the ability of a steady analysis to capture them are investigated by performing a numerical experiment whereby the results of the two steady analysis methods are compared to the time-mean of the unsteady simulation. The flow physics related to the segregation and mixing of total temperature are discussed.

  6. Single passband microwave photonic filter using continuous-time impulse response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Thomas X H; Yi, Xiaoke; Minasian, Robert A

    2011-03-28

    A single passband microwave photonic signal processor based on continuous time impulse response that has high resolution, multiple-taps and baseband-free response as well as exhibiting a square-top passband and tunability, is presented. The design and synthesis of the frequency response are based on a full systematic model for single passband microwave photonic filters to account for arbitrary spectrum slice shapes, which for the first time investigates the combined effects from both the dispersion-induced carrier suppression effect and the RF decay effect due to the spectrum slice width, to enable the optimum design to be realized by utilizing the carrier suppression effect to improve the filter performance. Experimental results demonstrate a high order microwave filter showing high resolution single passband filtering as well as exhibiting reconfiguration, square-top passband and tunability, for the first time to our best knowledge.

  7. The continuous reaction times method for diagnosing, grading, and monitoring minimal/covert hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Mette Enok Munk; Thiele, Maja; Kimer, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Existing tests for minimal/covert hepatic encephalopathy (m/cHE) are time- and expertise consuming and primarily useable for research purposes. An easy-to-use, fast and reliable diagnostic and grading tool is needed. We here report on the background, experience, and ongoing research...... a broad outcome span reflecting the degree of brain impairment, it shows no learning effect, and it is independent on age and gender. The CRTindex is, therefore, a candidate tool for routine screening, detecting, grading, and monitoring m/cHE. Still, however, further methodological and clinical validation...... regarding the continuous reaction times (CRT) method. The method has been in clinical use for decades in Denmark for the stated purpose. The method is a 10-minutes, computerised registration of a series of motor reaction times to an auditory stimulus, with results reported as the CRTindex (50 percentile/(90...

  8. Estimating the continuous-time dynamics of energy and fat metabolism in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juen Guo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse has become the most popular organism for investigating molecular mechanisms of body weight regulation. But understanding the physiological context by which a molecule exerts its effect on body weight requires knowledge of energy intake, energy expenditure, and fuel selection. Furthermore, measurements of these variables made at an isolated time point cannot explain why body weight has its present value since body weight is determined by the past history of energy and macronutrient imbalance. While food intake and body weight changes can be frequently measured over several weeks (the relevant time scale for mice, correspondingly frequent measurements of energy expenditure and fuel selection are not currently feasible. To address this issue, we developed a mathematical method based on the law of energy conservation that uses the measured time course of body weight and food intake to estimate the underlying continuous-time dynamics of energy output and net fat oxidation. We applied our methodology to male C57BL/6 mice consuming various ad libitum diets during weight gain and loss over several weeks and present the first continuous-time estimates of energy output and net fat oxidation rates underlying the observed body composition changes. We show that transient energy and fat imbalances in the first several days following a diet switch can account for a significant fraction of the total body weight change. We also discovered a time-invariant curve relating body fat and fat-free masses in male C57BL/6 mice, and the shape of this curve determines how diet, fuel selection, and body composition are interrelated.

  9. Effect of time of harvest, stage of fruit ripening, and post-harvest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seeds were extracted from half of the fruits harvested from each stage immediately after harvest while the other halves were stored at room temperature to ripen to the soft-red stage before seed extraction. Fruit weight in both cultivars decreased with plant age. Fruits harvested at the yellow-ripe stage produced the highest ...

  10. Two-stage alkaline hydrothermal liquefaction of wood to biocrude in a continuous bench-scale system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sintamarean, Iulia-Maria; Grigoras, Ionela; Jensen, Claus Uhrenholt

    2017-01-01

    Feedstock pumpability is one of the main obstacles for continuous processing of biomass through hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), due to their tendency to form heterogeneous slurries. In this work, a novel strategy is proposed to ensure lignocellulosic feed pumpability in HTL processing, even while...

  11. The Study of Liquefaction Time Stages due to a Short Duration Shaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindung Zalbuin Mase

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During the 2006 Yogyakarta earthquake, liquefactions were massively found in Opak River, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Learning from those events, an experimental study of liquefaction using shaking table was performed, especially to investigate the effect of short shaking duration to liquefaction potential.  Several experimental tests were performed under varied accelerations (0.3g, 0.35g, and 0.4g and vibration frequencies (1.4 Hz, 1.6 Hz, and 1.8 Hz, with a short shaking duration of 8 seconds. The liquefaction parameter used in this study was the excess pore water pressure ratio. The results revealed that liquefaction occurs in every loading criteria and the short shaking duration applied on each loading influences time stages of liquefaction, i.e. the liquefaction duration, the initial time of liquefaction, and the initial time of pore water pressure dissipation. In addition, the dynamic loads applied in a short duration influenced the maximum excess pore water pressure ratio.

  12. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and its relation to survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, A C R K; van Erning, F N; van Gestel, Y R B M; Creemers, G J M; Punt, C J A; van Oijen, M G H; Lemmens, V E P P

    2015-11-01

    Currently available data suggest that delaying the start of adjuvant chemotherapy in colon cancer patients has a detrimental effect on survival. We analysed which factors impact on the timing of adjuvant chemotherapy and evaluated the influence on overall survival (OS). Stage III colon cancer patients who underwent resection and received adjuvant chemotherapy between 2008 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Timing of adjuvant chemotherapy was subdivided into: ⩽ 4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, 11-12 and 13-16 weeks post-surgery. Multivariable regressions were performed to assess the influence of several factors on the probability of starting treatment within 8 weeks post-surgery and to evaluate the association of timing of adjuvant chemotherapy with 5-year OS. 6620 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, 14% commenced after 8 weeks. Factors associated with starting treatment after 8 weeks were older age (Odds ratio (OR) 65-74 versus colon cancer patients within 8 weeks post-surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Staged Inference using Conditional Deep Learning for energy efficient real-time smart diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, Maryam; Panda, Priyadarshini; Sen, Shreyas; Roy, Kaushik

    2017-07-01

    Recent progress in biosensor technology and wearable devices has created a formidable opportunity for remote healthcare monitoring systems as well as real-time diagnosis and disease prevention. The use of data mining techniques is indispensable for analysis of the large pool of data generated by the wearable devices. Deep learning is among the promising methods for analyzing such data for healthcare applications and disease diagnosis. However, the conventional deep neural networks are computationally intensive and it is impractical to use them in real-time diagnosis with low-powered on-body devices. We propose Staged Inference using Conditional Deep Learning (SICDL), as an energy efficient approach for creating healthcare monitoring systems. For smart diagnostics, we observe that all diagnoses are not equally challenging. The proposed approach thus decomposes the diagnoses into preliminary analysis (such as healthy vs unhealthy) and detailed analysis (such as identifying the specific type of cardio disease). The preliminary diagnosis is conducted real-time with a low complexity neural network realized on the resource-constrained on-body device. The detailed diagnosis requires a larger network that is implemented remotely in cloud and is conditionally activated only for detailed diagnosis (unhealthy individuals). We evaluated the proposed approach using available physiological sensor data from Physionet databases, and achieved 38% energy reduction in comparison to the conventional deep learning approach.

  14. Reduced Order Modelling in searches for continuous gravitational waves - I. barycentering time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkin, M.; Doolan, S.; McMenamin, L.; Wette, K.

    2018-02-01

    The frequencies and phases of emission from extra-solar sources measured by Earth-bound observers are modulated by the motions of the observer with respect to the source, and through relativistic effects. These modulations depend critically on the source's sky-location. Precise knowledge of the modulations are required to coherently track the source's phase over long observations, for example, in pulsar timing, or searches for continuous gravitational waves. The modulations can be modelled as sky-location and time dependent time delays that convert arrival times at the observer to the inertial frame of the source, which can often be the solar system barycentre (SSB). We study the use of Reduced Order Modelling for speeding up the calculation of this time delay for any sky-location. We find that the time delay model can be decomposed into just four basis vectors, and with these the delay for any sky-location can be reconstructed to sub-nanosecond accuracy. When compared to standard routines for time delay calculation in gravitational wave searches, using the reduced basis can lead to speed-ups of 30 times. We have also studied components of time delays for sources in binary systems. Assuming eccentricities speed-ups of a factor of 10, or factors of two when interpolating the basis for different orbital periods or time stamps. In long-duration phase-coherent searches for sources with sky-position uncertainties, or binary parameter uncertainties, these speed-ups could allow enhancements in their scopes without large additional computational burdens.

  15. The influence of evaluation protocol on time spent exercising at a high level of oxygen uptake during continuous cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, K L; Glaister, M; Howatson, G; Van Someren, K

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of protocol variation on the time spent exercising at ≥95% V̇O2max during cycle ergometer trials performed at the exercise intensity associated with V̇O2max (iV̇O2max). Nine male triathletes (age: 32±10 years; body mass: 73.3±6.1 kg; stature: 1.79±0.07 m; V̇O2max: 3.58±0.45 L.min(-1)) performed four exercise tests. During tests 1 and 2, participants performed a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test using different stage durations (1 min and 3 min) for the determination of iV̇O2max (1 min) and iV̇O2max (3 min). During tests 3 and 4, participants performed a continuous bout of exhaustive cycling at iV̇O2max (1 min) (CONT1) and iV̇O2max (3 min) (CONT3). iV̇O2max (1 min) was significantly greater (PCONT3 was significantly longer (PCONT3 than CONT1 (146±158 s vs. 11±20 s), and time spent at ≥95% V̇O2max was significantly longer (P=0.005) during CONT3 than CONT1 (326±211 s vs. 57±51 s). These results show that when exercising continuously at iV̇O2max, time spent at ≥95% V̇O2max is influenced by the initial measurement of iV̇O2max.

  16. Continuous-time digital front-ends for multistandard wireless transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Nuyts, Pieter A J; Dehaene, Wim

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the design of fully digital multistandard transmitter front-ends which can directly drive one or more switching power amplifiers, thus eliminating all other analog components.  After reviewing different architectures, the authors focus on polar architectures using pulse width modulation (PWM), which are entirely based on unclocked delay lines and other continuous-time digital hardware.  As a result, readers are enabled to shift accuracy concerns from the voltage domain to the time domain, to coincide with submicron CMOS technology scaling.  The authors present different architectural options and compare them, based on their effect on the signal and spectrum quality.  Next, a high-level theoretical analysis of two different PWM-based architectures – baseband PWM and RF PWM – is made.  On the circuit level, traditional digital components and design techniques are revisited from the point of view of continuous-time digital circuits.  Important design criteria are identified and diff...

  17. Prospects for quantitative and time-resolved double and continuous exposure off-axis electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migunov, Vadim, E-mail: v.migunov@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Dwyer, Christian [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Boothroyd, Chris B. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Pozzi, Giulio [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale B. Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    The technique of double exposure electron holography, which is based on the superposition of two off-axis electron holograms, was originally introduced before the availability of digital image processing to allow differences between electron-optical phases encoded in two electron holograms to be visualised directly without the need for holographic reconstruction. Here, we review the original method and show how it can now be extended to permit quantitative studies of phase shifts that oscillate in time. We begin with a description of the theory of off-axis electron hologram formation for a time-dependent electron wave that results from the excitation of a specimen using an external stimulus with a square, sinusoidal, triangular or other temporal dependence. We refer to the more general method as continuous exposure electron holography, present preliminary experimental measurements and discuss how the technique can be used to image electrostatic potentials and magnetic fields during high frequency switching experiments. - Highlights: • Double and continuous exposure electron holography are described in detail. • The ability to perform quantitative studies of phase shifts that are oscillating in time is illustrated. • Theoretical considerations related to noise are presented. • Future high frequency electromagnetic switching experiments are proposed.

  18. Timing of stage II lactogenesis is predicted by antenatal metabolic health in a cohort of primiparas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nommsen-Rivers, Laurie A; Dolan, Lawrence M; Huang, Bin

    2012-02-01

    Time to onset of stage II lactogenesis varies widely, and delayed onset of lactogenesis (OL) is common among first-time mothers in the United States. Higher body mass index, older age, and larger infant birth weight are identified risk factors for delayed OL; all are known correlates with glucose metabolism. Our objective was to prenatally assess maternal biomarkers related to metabolic health and determine the extent to which these biomarkers predict timing of OL. We enrolled a population-based sample of expectant primiparas attending a single prenatal clinic. We obtained a blood sample 1-hour post-glucose load from an antenatal oral glucose challenge test and assayed for the following biomarkers: serum insulin, glucose, adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our outcome measure was timing of OL, based on maternal report at 3-5 days postpartum. We used linear regression to model OL hour. Twenty-six of 29 (90%) agreed to screening, 18 delivered at term and initiated breastfeeding, and 16 have complete data. Median (minimum-maximum) postpartum body mass index was 27.4 (21.8-34.7) kg/m(2), and median time to OL was 64 (10-121) hours. The model, OL = 232 - 34.9(ln[ratio insulin/glucose]) - 1.4(adiponectin), explained 56% of the variation in OL hour (p = 0.005) and was not weakened by potential confounders. Higher serum insulin secretion relative to serum glucose after a glucose challenge and higher serum adiponectin are associated with earlier onset of OL. These findings suggest that factors associated with better glucose tolerance predict earlier OL.

  19. Transmembrane protein CD93 diffuses by a continuous time random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiko, Maria; de Bruyn, John; Heit, Bryan

    Molecular motion within the cell membrane is a poorly-defined process. In this study, we characterized the diffusion of the transmembrane protein CD93. By careful analysis of the dependence of the ensemble-averaged mean squared displacement (EA-MSD, r2) on time t and the ensemble-averaged, time-averaged MSD (EA-TAMSD, δ2) on lag time τ and total measurement time T, we showed that the motion of CD93 is well-described by a continuous-time random walk (CTRW). CD93 tracks were acquired using single particle tracking. The tracks were classified as confined or free, and the behavior of the MSD analyzed. EA-MSDs of both populations grew non-linearly with t, indicative of anomalous diffusion. Their EA-TAMSDs were found to depend on both τ and T, indicating non-ergodicity. Free molecules had r2 tα and δ2 (τ /T 1 - α) , with α 0 . 5 , consistent with a CTRW. Mean maximal excursion analysis supported this result. Confined CD93 had r2 t0 and δ2 (τ / T) α , with α 0 . 3 , consistent with a confined CTRW. CTRWs are described by a series of random jumps interspersed with power-law distributed waiting times, and may arise due to the interactions of CD93 with the endocytic machinery. NSERC.

  20. Time- and space- resolved species determination in diesel combustion using continuous flow gas sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, K.T.; Myers, P.S.; Uyehara, O.A.

    1978-01-01

    Gas concentrations under different engine operating conditions and different locations relative to the fuel spray are presented. The gas that is sampled is ''snatched'' from a continuous flow sampling probe. The time of snatching is controlled. The concentrations of CO, CO/sub 2/, NOx, and O/sub 2/ are plotted against crank position. The sampled gases were analyzed for concentration in the as taken state and after the sampled gas had passed through a heated catalytic oxidation converter. Analyses have been performed and plots are presented of the findings. The analytic procedure developed for the data analysis is presented in detail.

  1. Policy Iteration for Continuous-Time Average Reward Markov Decision Processes in Polish Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanxin Zhu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the policy iteration algorithm (PIA for continuous-time jump Markov decision processes in general state and action spaces. The corresponding transition rates are allowed to be unbounded, and the reward rates may have neither upper nor lower bounds. The criterion that we are concerned with is expected average reward. We propose a set of conditions under which we first establish the average reward optimality equation and present the PIA. Then under two slightly different sets of conditions we show that the PIA yields the optimal (maximum reward, an average optimal stationary policy, and a solution to the average reward optimality equation.

  2. On improving the convergence rate of linear continuous-time systems subject to asymmetrically constrained control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baddou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper solves the problem of controlling linear continuous-time systems subject to control signals constrained in magnitude (maybe asymmetrically. A controller design methodology is proposed, based on using an asymmetric Lyapunov function, that avoids the discontinuities in the control vector components resulting from the application of a piecewise linear control law previously proposed. The proposed method gives improved speed of convergence without discontinuities of the control vector components, respecting always the imposed asymmetric constraints. An example illustrates the approach.

  3. Multi-point Distribution Function for the Continuous Time Random Walk

    OpenAIRE

    Barkai, E.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2007-01-01

    We derive an explicit expression for the Fourier-Laplace transform of the two-point distribution function $p(x_1,t_1;x_2,t_2)$ of a continuous time random walk (CTRW), thus generalizing the result of Montroll and Weiss for the single point distribution function $p(x_1,t_1)$. The multi-point distribution function has a structure of a convolution of the Montroll-Weiss CTRW and the aging CTRW single point distribution functions. The correlation function $$ for the biased CTRW process is found. T...

  4. Parrondo-like behavior in continuous-time random walks with memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Miquel

    2011-11-01

    The continuous-time random walk (CTRW) formalism can be adapted to encompass stochastic processes with memory. In this paper we will show how the random combination of two different unbiased CTRWs can give rise to a process with clear drift, if one of them is a CTRW with memory. If one identifies the other one as noise, the effect can be thought of as a kind of stochastic resonance. The ultimate origin of this phenomenon is the same as that of the Parrondo paradox in game theory.

  5. Using continuous underway isotope measurements to map water residence time in hydrodynamically complex tidal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Kraus, Tamara; Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffery A.; von Dessonneck, Travis

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotopes present in water (δ2H, δ18O) have been used extensively to evaluate hydrological processes on the basis of parameters such as evaporation, precipitation, mixing, and residence time. In estuarine aquatic habitats, residence time (τ) is a major driver of biogeochemical processes, affecting trophic subsidies and conditions in fish-spawning habitats. But τ is highly variable in estuaries, owing to constant changes in river inflows, tides, wind, and water height, all of which combine to affect τ in unpredictable ways. It recently became feasible to measure δ2H and δ18O continuously, at a high sampling frequency (1 Hz), using diffusion sample introduction into a cavity ring-down spectrometer. To better understand the relationship of τ to biogeochemical processes in a dynamic estuarine system, we continuously measured δ2H and δ18O, nitrate and water quality parameters, on board a small, high-speed boat (5 to >10 m s–1) fitted with a hull-mounted underwater intake. We then calculated τ as is classically done using the isotopic signals of evaporation. The result was high-resolution (∼10 m) maps of residence time, nitrate, and other parameters that showed strong spatial gradients corresponding to geomorphic attributes of the different channels in the area. The mean measured value of τ was 30.5 d, with a range of 0–50 d. We used the measured spatial gradients in both τ and nitrate to calculate whole-ecosystem uptake rates, and the values ranged from 0.006 to 0.039 d–1. The capability to measure residence time over single tidal cycles in estuaries will be useful for evaluating and further understanding drivers of phytoplankton abundance, resolving differences attributable to mixing and water sources, explicitly calculating biogeochemical rates, and exploring the complex linkages among time-dependent biogeochemical processes in hydrodynamically complex environments such as estuaries.

  6. Modeling commodity salam contract between two parties for discrete and continuous time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Azie Farhani Badrol; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2017-08-01

    In order for Islamic finance to remain competitive as the conventional, there needs a new development of Islamic compliance product such as Islamic derivative that can be used to manage the risk. However, under syariah principles and regulations, all financial instruments must not be conflicting with five syariah elements which are riba (interest paid), rishwah (corruption), gharar (uncertainty or unnecessary risk), maysir (speculation or gambling) and jahl (taking advantage of the counterparty's ignorance). This study has proposed a traditional Islamic contract namely salam that can be built as an Islamic derivative product. Although a lot of studies has been done on discussing and proposing the implementation of salam contract as the Islamic product however they are more into qualitative and law issues. Since there is lack of quantitative study of salam contract being developed, this study introduces mathematical models that can value the appropriate salam price for a commodity salam contract between two parties. In modeling the commodity salam contract, this study has modified the existing conventional derivative model and come out with some adjustments to comply with syariah rules and regulations. The cost of carry model has been chosen as the foundation to develop the commodity salam model between two parties for discrete and continuous time series. However, the conventional time value of money results from the concept of interest that is prohibited in Islam. Therefore, this study has adopted the idea of Islamic time value of money which is known as the positive time preference, in modeling the commodity salam contract between two parties for discrete and continuous time series.

  7. Anomalous dispersion in correlated porous media: a coupled continuous time random walk approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Dentz, Marco

    2017-09-01

    We study the causes of anomalous dispersion in Darcy-scale porous media characterized by spatially heterogeneous hydraulic properties. Spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity leads to spatial variability in the flow properties through Darcy's law and thus impacts on solute and particle transport. We consider purely advective transport in heterogeneity scenarios characterized by broad distributions of heterogeneity length scales and point values. Particle transport is characterized in terms of the stochastic properties of equidistantly sampled Lagrangian velocities, which are determined by the flow and conductivity statistics. The persistence length scales of flow and transport velocities are imprinted in the spatial disorder and reflect the distribution of heterogeneity length scales. Particle transitions over the velocity length scales are kinematically coupled with the transition time through velocity. We show that the average particle motion follows a coupled continuous time random walk (CTRW), which is fully parameterized by the distribution of flow velocities and the medium geometry in terms of the heterogeneity length scales. The coupled CTRW provides a systematic framework for the investigation of the origins of anomalous dispersion in terms of heterogeneity correlation and the distribution of conductivity point values. We derive analytical expressions for the asymptotic scaling of the moments of the spatial particle distribution and first arrival time distribution (FATD), and perform numerical particle tracking simulations of the coupled CTRW to capture the full average transport behavior. Broad distributions of heterogeneity point values and lengths scales may lead to very similar dispersion behaviors in terms of the spatial variance. Their mechanisms, however are very different, which manifests in the distributions of particle positions and arrival times, which plays a central role for the prediction of the fate of dissolved substances in

  8. Continuous time boolean modeling for biological signaling: application of Gillespie algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoll Gautier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mathematical modeling is used as a Systems Biology tool to answer biological questions, and more precisely, to validate a network that describes biological observations and predict the effect of perturbations. This article presents an algorithm for modeling biological networks in a discrete framework with continuous time. Background There exist two major types of mathematical modeling approaches: (1 quantitative modeling, representing various chemical species concentrations by real numbers, mainly based on differential equations and chemical kinetics formalism; (2 and qualitative modeling, representing chemical species concentrations or activities by a finite set of discrete values. Both approaches answer particular (and often different biological questions. Qualitative modeling approach permits a simple and less detailed description of the biological systems, efficiently describes stable state identification but remains inconvenient in describing the transient kinetics leading to these states. In this context, time is represented by discrete steps. Quantitative modeling, on the other hand, can describe more accurately the dynamical behavior of biological processes as it follows the evolution of concentration or activities of chemical species as a function of time, but requires an important amount of information on the parameters difficult to find in the literature. Results Here, we propose a modeling framework based on a qualitative approach that is intrinsically continuous in time. The algorithm presented in this article fills the gap between qualitative and quantitative modeling. It is based on continuous time Markov process applied on a Boolean state space. In order to describe the temporal evolution of the biological process we wish to model, we explicitly specify the transition rates for each node. For that purpose, we built a language that can be seen as a generalization of Boolean equations. Mathematically, this approach can be

  9. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  10. Continuing medical and dental education on the global stage: the nexus of supporting international Christian healthcare workers and developing educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov D Slashcheva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges facing international healthcare missionaries is that of maintaining up-to-date knowledge and staying current with professional certification. Since 1978, annual programs by the Christian Medical and Dental Associations have offered professional continuing education to thousands of US healthcare professionals serving as missionaries in the regions of Africa, Asia, and, in more recent years, globally. In addition, conference programming is designed to prepare, train, and support healthcare missionaries to, in turn, serve as educators in their places of ministry. The program is designed for both professional education and personal encouragement. Utilizing historical documents from program facilitation and interviews from those involved with its implementation, this paper describes the history, vision, and favorable quantitative growth and qualitative impact on participants. The program continues to grow as healthcare missionaries are educated near their places of service, while reinforcing their own roles as educators.

  11. Advances in Continuous Flow Left Ventricular Assist Device Support for End-Stage Heart Failure: A Therapy in Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Omar; Jorde, Ulrich P

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent advances and challenges in the clinical implementation of continuous flow left ventricular assist devices (CF LVADs) in patients with advanced heart failure. Post approval studies of CF LVAD therapy continue to show a progressive improvement in survival and reduction in adverse events. Major trials are ongoing to compare outcomes of an axial flow device (Heart Mate II) and smaller centrifugal flow pumps (HeartWare VADs and Heart Mate III). Numerous studies have investigated strategies to reduce major hematologic and neurologic adverse events by evaluating hemolysis, antithrombotic therapy, and blood pressure control. This review will present the current findings that are centered around the impact of CF LVADs on improving survival and reducing adverse events through an evolution in management and design.

  12. A Hybrid Secure Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks against Timing Attacks Using Continuous-Time Markov Chain and Queueing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Tianhui; Li, Xiaofan; Zhang, Sha; Zhao, Yubin

    2016-09-28

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) have recently gained popularity for a wide spectrum of applications. Monitoring tasks can be performed in various environments. This may be beneficial in many scenarios, but it certainly exhibits new challenges in terms of security due to increased data transmission over the wireless channel with potentially unknown threats. Among possible security issues are timing attacks, which are not prevented by traditional cryptographic security. Moreover, the limited energy and memory resources prohibit the use of complex security mechanisms in such systems. Therefore, balancing between security and the associated energy consumption becomes a crucial challenge. This paper proposes a secure scheme for WSNs while maintaining the requirement of the security-performance tradeoff. In order to proceed to a quantitative treatment of this problem, a hybrid continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) and queueing model are put forward, and the tradeoff analysis of the security and performance attributes is carried out. By extending and transforming this model, the mean time to security attributes failure is evaluated. Through tradeoff analysis, we show that our scheme can enhance the security of WSNs, and the optimal rekeying rate of the performance and security tradeoff can be obtained.

  13. Arterial Stiffness and Walk Time in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Abbi D.; Wu, Pei-Tzu; Kistler, Brandon; Fitschen, Peter; Tomayko, Emily; Jeong, Jin-Hee; Chung, Hae Ryung; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant M.; Phillips, Shane; Fernhall, Bo; Wilund, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Background End-stage renal disease patients experience increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease. Heart-artery interaction may be shifted, impacting blood pressure lability, and exercise tolerance. The coupling ratio consists of the ratio of indexed arterial elastance (EaI, arterial load) to ElvI, a measure of cardiac contractility or stiffness. Our purpose was to explore the relationship between elastances and functional capacity. We hypothesized that arterial stiffness (central pulse wave velocity, PWV) and elastances would be correlated to shuttle walk time. Methods We used applanation tonometry, ultrasonography, and a shuttle walk test to evaluate our hypothesis. Spearman's correlations were used to assess relationships between variables. Block regression was also performed. Results Forty-two subjects on maintenance hemodialysis participated. Average age=44±5 years, body surface area=2.01 kg/m2. Mean EaI=4.45 and mean ElvI=6.89; the coupling ratio=0.82. Mean aortic pulse pressure=51 mmHg and PWV=9.6 m/s. PWV(r=-0.385) and EaI (r=-0.424) were significantly and inversely related to walking time while stroke volume index (SVI) was positively correlated to shuttle walk time (r=0.337), p<0.05 for all. Conclusions We conclude that, like other clinical populations, both arterial and heart function predict walking ability and represent potential targets for intervention; arterial stiffness and SVI are strongly related to shuttle walk time in patients with ESRD. PMID:23653111

  14. An approach to the drone fleet survivability assessment based on a stochastic continues-time model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vyacheslav; Fesenko, Herman; Doukas, Nikos

    2017-09-01

    An approach and the algorithm to the drone fleet survivability assessment based on a stochastic continues-time model are proposed. The input data are the number of the drones, the drone fleet redundancy coefficient, the drone stability and restoration rate, the limit deviation from the norms of the drone fleet recovery, the drone fleet operational availability coefficient, the probability of the drone failure-free operation, time needed for performing the required tasks by the drone fleet. The ways for improving the recoverable drone fleet survivability taking into account amazing factors of system accident are suggested. Dependencies of the drone fleet survivability rate both on the drone stability and the number of the drones are analysed.

  15. From Walras’ auctioneer to continuous time double auctions: a general dynamic theory of supply and demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donier, J.; Bouchaud, J.-P.

    2016-12-01

    In standard Walrasian auctions, the price of a good is defined as the point where the supply and demand curves intersect. Since both curves are generically regular, the response to small perturbations is linearly small. However, a crucial ingredient is absent of the theory, namely transactions themselves. What happens after they occur? To answer the question, we develop a dynamic theory for supply and demand based on agents with heterogeneous beliefs. When the inter-auction time is infinitely long, the Walrasian mechanism is recovered. When transactions are allowed to happen in continuous time, a peculiar property emerges: close to the price, supply and demand vanish quadratically, which we empirically confirm on the Bitcoin. This explains why price impact in financial markets is universally observed to behave as the square root of the excess volume. The consequences are important, as they imply that the very fact of clearing the market makes prices hypersensitive to small fluctuations.

  16. Critical flicker frequency and continuous reaction times for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Mette Enok Munk; Jepsen, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    -to-perform reproducible bedside methods: the critical flicker frequency (CFF) and continuous reaction times (CRT) tests. A CFF reaction times) indicates cerebral dysfunction. 154 patients with acute or chronic liver disease with out overt hepatic...... encephalopathy (HE) underwent both tests at the same occasion. Both tests were abnormal in 20% of the patients and both tests were normal in 40% of the patients. In more than 1/3 the two tests were not in agreement as CFF classified 32% and CRT-index classified 48% of the patients as having MHE (p ....005). The two tests were weakly linearly correlated (r(2) = 0.14, p test correlated with the metabolic liver function measured by the Galactose Elimination Capacity (GEC), nor with the blood ammonia concentration. Both tests identified a large fraction of the patients as having MHE...

  17. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...... results. The CRT method is a 10-minute computerized test of a patient's motor reaction time stability (CRTindex) to 150 auditory stimuli. The PSE test is a 20-minute paper-pencil test evaluating psychomotor speed. Both tests were performed at the same occasion in 129 patients. Both tests were normal......Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is a frequent complication to liver cirrhosis that causes poor quality of life, a great burden to caregivers, and can be treated. For diagnosis and grading the international guidelines recommend the use of psychometric tests of different modalities (computer...

  18. Absolute continuity under time shift of trajectories and related stochastic calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Löbus, Jörg-Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The text is concerned with a class of two-sided stochastic processes of the form X=W+A. Here W is a two-sided Brownian motion with random initial data at time zero and A\\equiv A(W) is a function of W. Elements of the related stochastic calculus are introduced. In particular, the calculus is adjusted to the case when A is a jump process. Absolute continuity of (X,P) under time shift of trajectories is investigated. For example under various conditions on the initial density with respect to the Lebesgue measure, m, and on A with A_0=0 we verify \\frac{P(dX_{\\cdot -t})}{P(dX_\\cdot)}=\\frac{m(X_{-t})}{m(X_0)}\\cdot \\prod_i\\left|\

  19. Real-time Continuous Assessment Method for Mental and Physiological Condition using Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Kiyoko; Ishii, Naohiro

    It is necessary to monitor the daily health condition for preventing stress syndrome. In this study, it was proposed the method assessing the mental and physiological condition, such as the work stress or the relaxation, using heart rate variability at real time and continuously. The instantanuous heart rate (HR), and the ratio of the number of extreme points (NEP) and the number of heart beats were calculated for assessing mental and physiological condition. In this method, 20 beats heart rate were used to calculate these indexes. These were calculated in one beat interval. Three conditions, which are sitting rest, performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie, were assessed using our proposed algorithm. The assessment accuracies were 71.9% and 55.8%, when performing mental arithmetic and watching relaxation movie respectively. In this method, the mental and physiological condition was assessed using only 20 regressive heart beats, so this method is considered as the real time assessment method.

  20. Modelling large-particle diffusion in porous media as anisotropic continuous-time random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Shahar; Blumenfeld, Raphael

    We test the fidelity of modelling diffusion of finite-size particles in porous media by continuous-time random walk (CTRW), where the step-size and waiting-time distributions of the former, Pl and Pt, are used as input to the latter. As the particle size is increased, the diffusion undergoes a transition from normal to anomalous. We find that, based only on Pl and Pt, CTRW does not predict correctly this transition. We show that the discrepancy is due to the change in effective connectivity (topology) of the porous media with increasing particle size. We propose a method to capture this within the CTRW model by adding anisotropy. This adjustment yields good agreement with the simulated diffusion process, making it possible to use CTRW, with all its advantages, to model diffusion of any finite size particle in confined geometries.

  1. Continuous Time Random Walks in finite domains and general boundary conditions: some formal considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Milligen, B. Ph. [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT; Calvo, Ivan [CIEMAT, Madrid; Sanchez, Raul [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The present work studies continuous time random walks (CTRWs) in a finite domain. A broad class of boundary conditions, of which absorbing and reflecting boundaries are particular cases, is considered. It is shown how any CTRW in this class can be mapped to a CTRW in an infinite domain. This may allow applying well-known techniques for infinite CTRWs to the problem of obtaining the fluid limit for finite domain CTRWs, where the fluid limit (or hydrodynamic limit) refers to the partial differential equation describing the long time and large distance behavior of the system. As an illustration, the fluid limit equation and its propagator are obtained explicitly in the case of purely reflecting boundaries. We also derive the modification of the Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operators implementing the reflecting boundary conditions.

  2. V-Langevin equations, continuous time random walks and fractional diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balescu, R. [Association Euratom-Etat Belge, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP 231, Campus Plaine ULB, Bd du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-10-15

    The following question is addressed: under what conditions can a strange diffusive process, defined by a semi-dynamical V-Langevin equation or its associated hybrid kinetic equation (HKE), be described by an equivalent purely stochastic process, defined by a continuous time random walk (CTRW) or by a fractional differential equation (FDE)? More specifically, does there exist a class of V-Langevin equations with long-range (algebraic) velocity temporal correlation, that leads to a time-fractional superdiffusive process? The answer is always affirmative in one dimension. It is always negative in two dimensions: any algebraically decaying temporal velocity correlation (with a Gaussian spatial correlation) produces a normal diffusive process. General conditions relating the diffusive nature of the process to the temporal exponent of the Lagrangian velocity correlation (in Corrsin approximation) are derived. It is shown that a bifurcation occurs as the latter parameter is varied. Above that bifurcation value the process is always diffusive.

  3. Continuous time random walks in finite domains and general boundary conditions: some formal considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B Ph van; Calvo, I [Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT para Fusion, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, R [Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)], E-mail: boudewijn.vanmilligen@ciemat.es

    2008-05-30

    The present work studies continuous time random walks (CTRWs) in a finite domain. A broad class of boundary conditions, of which absorbing and reflecting boundaries are particular cases, is considered. It is shown how any CTRW in this class can be mapped to a CTRW in an infinite domain. This may allow applying well-known techniques for infinite CTRWs to the problem of obtaining the fluid limit for finite domain CTRWs, where the fluid limit (or hydrodynamic limit) refers to the partial differential equation describing the long time and large distance behaviour of the system. As an illustration, the fluid limit equation and its propagator are obtained explicitly in the case of purely reflecting boundaries. We also derive the modification of the Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operators implementing the reflecting boundary conditions.

  4. Method for Determining the Time Constants Characterizing the Intensity of Steel Mixing in Continuous Casting Tundish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieprzyca J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A common method used in identification of hydrodynamics phenomena occurring in Continuous Casting (CC device's tundish is to determine the RTD curves of time. These curves allows to determine the way of the liquid steel flowing and mixing in the tundish. These can be identified either as the result of numerical simulation or by the experiments - as the result of researching the physical models. Special problem is to objectify it while conducting physical research. It is necessary to precisely determine the time constants which characterize researched phenomena basing on the data acquired in the measured change of the concentration of the tracer in model liquid's volume. The mathematical description of determined curves is based on the approximate differential equations formulated in the theory of fluid mechanics. Solving these equations to calculate the time constants requires a special software and it is very time-consuming. To improve the process a method was created to calculate the time constants with use of automation elements. It allows to solve problems using algebraic method, which improves interpretation of the research results of physical modeling.

  5. Life and Death of Stationary Linear Response in Anomalous Continuous Time Random Walk Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igor, Goychuk

    2014-10-01

    Linear theory of stationary response in systems at thermal equilibrium requires to find equilibrium correlation function of unperturbed responding system. Studies of the response of the systems exhibiting anomalously slow dynamics are often based on the continuous time random walk description (CTRW) with divergent mean waiting times. The bulk of the literature on anomalous response contains linear response functions like one by Cole-Cole calculated from such a CTRW theory and applied to systems at thermal equilibrium. Here we show within a fairly simple and general model that for the systems with divergent mean waiting times the stationary response at thermal equilibrium is absent, in accordance with some recent studies. The absence of such stationary response (or dying to zero non-stationary response in aging experiments) would confirm CTRW with divergent mean waiting times as underlying physical relaxation mechanism, but reject it otherwise. We show that the absence of stationary response is closely related to the breaking of ergodicity of the corresponding dynamical variable. As an important new result, we derive a generalized Cole-Cole response within ergodic CTRW dynamics with finite waiting time. Moreover, we provide a physically reasonable explanation of the origin and wide presence of 1/f noise in condensed matter for ergodic dynamics close to normal, rather than strongly deviating.

  6. A real-time PCR approach to detect predation on anchovy and sardine early life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuende, Elsa; Mendibil, Iñaki; Bachiller, Eneko; Álvarez, Paula; Cotano, Unai; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara

    2017-12-01

    Recruitment of sardine (Sardina pilchardus Walbaum, 1792) and anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus Linnaeus, 1758) is thought to be regulated by predation of their eggs and larvae. Predators of sardine and anchovy can be identified by visual taxonomic identification of stomach contents, but this method is time consuming, tedious and may underestimate predation, especially in small predators such as fish larvae. Alternatively, genetic tools may offer a more cost-effective and accurate alternative. Here, we have developed a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay based on TaqMan probes to simultaneously detect sardine and anchovy remains in gut contents of potential predators. The assay combines previously described and newly generated species-specific primers and probes for anchovy and sardine detection respectively, and allows the detection of 0,001 ng of target DNA (which corresponds to about one hundredth of the total DNA present in a single egg). We applied the method to candidate anchovy and sardine egg predators in the Bay of Biscay, Atlantic Mackerel (Scomber scombrus) larvae. Egg predation observed was limited primarily to those stations where sardine and/or anchovy eggs were present. Our developed assay offers a suitable tool to understand the effects of predation on the survival of anchovy and sardine early life stages.

  7. Backward jump continuous-time random walk: An application to market trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubiec, Tomasz; Kutner, Ryszard

    2010-10-01

    The backward jump modification of the continuous-time random walk model or the version of the model driven by the negative feedback was herein derived for spatiotemporal continuum in the context of a share price evolution on a stock exchange. In the frame of the model, we described stochastic evolution of a typical share price on a stock exchange with a moderate liquidity within a high-frequency time scale. The model was validated by satisfactory agreement of the theoretical velocity autocorrelation function with its empirical counterpart obtained for the continuous quotation. This agreement is mainly a result of a sharp backward correlation found and considered in this article. This correlation is a reminiscence of such a bid-ask bounce phenomenon where backward price jump has the same or almost the same length as preceding jump. We suggested that this correlation dominated the dynamics of the stock market with moderate liquidity. Although assumptions of the model were inspired by the market high-frequency empirical data, its potential applications extend beyond the financial market, for instance, to the field covered by the Le Chatelier-Braun principle of contrariness.

  8. The real-time link between person perception and action: brain potential evidence for dynamic continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jonathan B; Ambady, Nalini; Midgley, Katherine J; Holcomb, Phillip J

    2011-01-01

    Using event-related potentials, we investigated how the brain extracts information from another's face and translates it into relevant action in real time. In Study 1, participants made between-hand sex categorizations of sex-typical and sex-atypical faces. Sex-atypical faces evoked negativity between 250 and 550 ms (N300/N400 effects), reflecting the integration of accumulating sex-category knowledge into a coherent sex-category interpretation. Additionally, the lateralized readiness potential revealed that the motor cortex began preparing for a correct hand response while social category knowledge was still gradually evolving in parallel. In Study 2, participants made between-hand eye-color categorizations as part of go/no-go trials that were contingent on a target's sex. On no-go trials, although the hand did not actually move, information about eye color partially prepared the motor cortex to move the hand before perception of sex had finalized. Together, these findings demonstrate the dynamic continuity between person perception and action, such that ongoing results from face processing are immediately and continuously cascaded into the motor system over time. The preparation of action begins based on tentative perceptions of another's face before perceivers have finished interpreting what they just saw. © 2010 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business

  9. Time for Awareness: The Influence of Temporal Properties of the Mask on Continuous Flash Suppression Effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Zhu

    Full Text Available Visual processing is not instantaneous, but instead our conscious perception depends on the integration of sensory input over time. In the case of Continuous Flash Suppression (CFS, masks are flashed to one eye, suppressing awareness of stimuli presented to the other eye. One potential explanation of CFS is that it depends, at least in part, on the flashing mask continually interrupting visual processing before the stimulus reaches awareness. We investigated the temporal features of masks in two ways. First, we measured the suppression effectiveness of a wide range of masking frequencies (0-32Hz, using both complex (faces/houses and simple (closed/open geometric shapes stimuli. Second, we varied whether the different frequencies were interleaved within blocks or separated in homogenous blocks, in order to see if suppression was stronger or weaker when the frequency remained constant across trials. We found that break-through contrast differed dramatically between masking frequencies, with mask effectiveness following a skewed-normal curve peaking around 6Hz and little or no masking for low and high temporal frequencies. Peak frequency was similar for trial-randomized and block randomized conditions. In terms of type of stimulus, we found no significant difference in peak frequency between the stimulus groups (complex/simple, face/house, closed/open. These findings suggest that temporal factors play a critical role in perceptual awareness, perhaps due to interactions between mask frequency and the time frame of visual processing.

  10. Staging of malignant lymphoma with three-station black-blood fast short-inversion time inversion recovery (STIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tajika, Kenji; Uchiyama, Nachiko; Takahama, Katsuya; Dan, Kazuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of three-station black-blood fast short-inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) imaging in detecting and staging malignant lymphoma. Seventeen patients with malignant lymphoma were examined with a 1.5T imager. The findings and stagings determined with three-station black-blood fast STIR imaging were compared with reference standards (e.g., computed tomography [CT] findings and clinical stagings). Three-station black-blood fast STIR imaging provided a fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging contrast with fewer flow artifacts and revealed nodal involvement as well as bone marrow and spleen involvement to an extent comparable with CT. Especially notable was the excellent specificity (94%) of this imaging technique. Regarding disease staging, significant agreement was observed between clinical staging (k=0.60) and staging as evaluated by three-station black-blood fast STIR, although the detection of lymphadenopathy in the thorax was relatively poor. The average time required for this imaging was approximately 30 min. Three-station black-blood fast STIR MR imaging may be useful as a staging tool for malignant lymphoma because this imaging technique reveals lymphoma lesions, which determine the staging, without radiation exposure or the use of contrast agents.

  11. Optical Time Division Switching Using Multiple Stages of Fiber Optic Delay Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanke, Ronald Anthony

    Optical Time Slot Interchanges (OTSIs) can be realized by guided wave LiNbO_3 optical switches performing space division switching of optical fiber delay lines. In this dissertation the problems of reducing the total length of fiber required and also of improving the SNR characteristics of this OTSI function are addressed. Several new OTSI architectures are proposed to reduce the total fiber length while still obtaining excellent SNR characteristics. These reduced fiber architectures include the Distributed Input Delay, Distributed Output Delay, the 2-Stage decomposition and the Distributed Input/Output Delay architectures. A Parallel Feedback (PFB) OTSI architecture is proposed that achieves the theoretical minimum number of delay fibers and the theoretical minimum total length of delay fiber for a given OTSI function. Broadcast OTSI architectures are proposed that enable the data in an incoming time slot to be broadcast to one or more outgoing time slots. These broadcast OTSI architectures include the Time-Dup-Time (TDT) system, Passive Splitter/Active Combiner (PS/AC) equivalents of the point -to-point reduced fiber architectures, and the broadcast PFB architecture. For each of the point-to-point and the broadcast OTSI architectures proposed, a detailed characterization of the architecture is performed including an analysis of number of fibers, total fiber length, number of optical switches and drivers, attenuation and SNR characteristics. This dissertation also proposes several new techniques for improving the system SNR and for calibration of the OTSI architectures. A cascaded noise reduction and a differential attenuation compensation technique are used to achieve a significantly higher system SNR at the output of the OTSI. In-situ calibration techniques are discussed to determine the optimum operating voltages for the LiNbO _3 switches when alternating between states every time slot. These techniques attempt to compensate for an output power drift problem

  12. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canavan, Joycelin, E-mail: canavanjoycelin@gmail.com [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L. [Radiation Therapy Program and Breast Cancer Outcomes Unit, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre, University of British Columbia, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Olivotto, Ivo A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary (Canada)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  13. Continuous-time system identification from discrete-time measurements with application to natural gas pipeline modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Everton St. Patrick

    This work was motivated by the need to model a network of natural gas pipelines and its corresponding demand pipeline, in order to make predictions of the pressures at critical junctions in the network Development of such a model amounts to a system identification problem with limited information. In order to solve this problem, we developed a demand model that would provide estimates of the gas usage for the communities serviced by the pipeline network. The parameters of the demand model were estimated using an adaptive genetic algorithm. This new algorithm was first developed and compared with existing genetic algorithms. A discussion of the role played by crossover and mutation operators in the genetic algorithm was also presented. Based on the theory of gas dynamics and the known pipeline network topology, a resistor-capacitor network analog to the pipeline network was developed. The parameters of the resistor-capacitor model were estimated using ordinary least squares techniques. We first studied and developed a number principles and guidelines for a class of system identification problems. One of the main areas studied was the development of a generalized framework for least squares "parameter" identification of continuous-time systems from discrete-time measurements of the states of the continuous-time system. Subsequently, we extended our generalized framework to the least squares parameter identification of a class of resistor-capacitor networks. We also studied the effects on the estimated results of the integration scheme used in the process and the noise levels in the measured data. A demonstration of the benefits of the incorporation of the maximum available structural information of the system being modeled was also presented. Finally, we developed a set of guidelines for the required input signal frequencies and sampling frequencies to provide acceptable identification results for both the plant-model-match and reduced-order modeling problems

  14. A continuous time random walk (CTRW) integro-differential equation with chemical interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi, Rami; Nissan, Alon; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2018-01-01

    A nonlocal-in-time integro-differential equation is introduced that accounts for close coupling between transport and chemical reaction terms. The structure of the equation contains these terms in a single convolution with a memory function M ( t), which includes the source of non-Fickian (anomalous) behavior, within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW). The interaction is non-linear and second-order, relevant for a bimolecular reaction A + B → C. The interaction term ΓP A ( s, t) P B ( s, t) is symmetric in the concentrations of A and B (i.e. P A and P B ); thus the source terms in the equations for A, B and C are similar, but with a change in sign for that of C. Here, the chemical rate coefficient, Γ, is constant. The fully coupled equations are solved numerically using a finite element method (FEM) with a judicious representation of M ( t) that eschews the need for the entire time history, instead using only values at the former time step. To begin to validate the equations, the FEM solution is compared, in lieu of experimental data, to a particle tracking method (CTRW-PT); the results from the two approaches, particularly for the C profiles, are in agreement. The FEM solution, for a range of initial and boundary conditions, can provide a good model for reactive transport in disordered media.

  15. Comparison of methods for calculating conditional expectations of sufficient statistics for continuous time Markov chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tataru Paula

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous time Markov chains (CTMCs is a widely used model for describing the evolution of DNA sequences on the nucleotide, amino acid or codon level. The sufficient statistics for CTMCs are the time spent in a state and the number of changes between any two states. In applications past evolutionary events (exact times and types of changes are unaccessible and the past must be inferred from DNA sequence data observed in the present. Results We describe and implement three algorithms for computing linear combinations of expected values of the sufficient statistics, conditioned on the end-points of the chain, and compare their performance with respect to accuracy and running time. The first algorithm is based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the rate matrix (EVD, the second on uniformization (UNI, and the third on integrals of matrix exponentials (EXPM. The implementation in R of the algorithms is available at http://www.birc.au.dk/~paula/. Conclusions We use two different models to analyze the accuracy and eight experiments to investigate the speed of the three algorithms. We find that they have similar accuracy and that EXPM is the slowest method. Furthermore we find that UNI is usually faster than EVD.

  16. Uncoupled continuous-time random walk model: Analytical and numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2014-05-01

    Solutions for the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model are known in few cases. In this work, the uncoupled CTRW model is investigated analytically and numerically. In particular, the probability density function (PDF) and n-moment are obtained and analyzed. Exponential and Gaussian functions are used for the jump length PDF, whereas the Mittag-Leffler function and a combination of exponential and power-laws function is used for the waiting time PDF. The exponential and Gaussian jump length PDFs have finite jump length variances and they give the same second moment; however, their distribution functions present different behaviors near the origin. The combination of exponential and power-law function for the waiting time PDF can generate a crossover from anomalous regime to normal regime. Moreover, the parameter of the exponential jump length PDF does not change the behavior of the n-moment for all time intervals, and for the Gaussian jump length PDF the n-moment also indicates a similar behavior.

  17. Comparison of health-related quality of life between patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease and patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Jeong; Son, Heesook

    2016-01-01

    This study compared health-related quality of life in patients with early to mid-stage chronic kidney disease. This study utilized a comparative descriptive design. Patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis were recruited from a hospital in Korea. Information from patients with stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease was obtained from Korean national survey data. A total of 75 pairs were matched using the propensity score method. Health-related quality of life was compared using the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions questionnaire. Only 4% of patients with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease are aware of their disease. These patients have decreased mobility and ability to perform their usual activities (χ(2)  = 10.77, P = 0.001; χ(2)  = 7.22, P = 0.007, respectively). However, they have lower levels of anxiety and depression than patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (χ(2)  = 13.37, P chronic kidney disease. Educational intervention in asymptomatic patients is important to increase awareness and early detection of chronic kidney disease. © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  18. Continuous real-time monitoring and recording of glycemia during scuba diving: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, Massimo; Cialoni, Danilo; Marroni, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes has been considered a scuba diving contraindication. This is currently being reconsidered for well-controlled diabetes. We developed a real-time continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to check glycemia, or blood glucose (BG), during diving, both for prospective studies and to increase diabetic diver safety, allowing for real-time control of glycemia and hypoglycemia prevention. To ensure CGM measurement accuracy we tested the method under hyperbaric conditions. Two experienced diabetic divers were studied during a one-week diving cruise. BG was monitored every five minutes on every dive, by a dedicated CGM, and values were visible to the divers throughout their dives. The mean of relative difference (MRD) between CGM and capillary blood glucose was calculated. Measurement accuracy was assessed according to ISO guideline 15197 and by Clarke Error Grid (CEG) analysis. Both divers showed gradual BG decrease during diving. Hyperbaric chamber accuracy tests showed two of 26 MRD values (7.7%) slightly exceeding the ISO-15197 allowed difference (5%). However, our data suggest that this discrepancy may have been an artefact. Our data (even limited to two subjects only) agree with the current literature showing that also in our investigated subjects diving does not imply significant risks of hypoglycemia. The use of a real-time CGM by diabetic divers during their dives can provide immediate information on BG values and trends, thus significantly improving diving safety. The accuracy tests comparing continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and capillary blood glucose measurement (CBM) data recorded under hyperbaric conditions showed that data recorded under pressure are very close to the ISO-15197 and CEG acceptable limits.

  19. Discrete- vs. Continuous-Time Modeling of Unequally Spaced Experience Sampling Method Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia de Haan-Rietdijk

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Experience Sampling Method is a common approach in psychological research for collecting intensive longitudinal data with high ecological validity. One characteristic of ESM data is that it is often unequally spaced, because the measurement intervals within a day are deliberately varied, and measurement continues over several days. This poses a problem for discrete-time (DT modeling approaches, which are based on the assumption that all measurements are equally spaced. Nevertheless, DT approaches such as (vector autoregressive modeling are often used to analyze ESM data, for instance in the context of affective dynamics research. There are equivalent continuous-time (CT models, but they are more difficult to implement. In this paper we take a pragmatic approach and evaluate the practical relevance of the violated model assumption in DT AR(1 and VAR(1 models, for the N = 1 case. We use simulated data under an ESM measurement design to investigate the bias in the parameters of interest under four different model implementations, ranging from the true CT model that accounts for all the exact measurement times, to the crudest possible DT model implementation, where even the nighttime is treated as a regular interval. An analysis of empirical affect data illustrates how the differences between DT and CT modeling can play out in practice. We find that the size and the direction of the bias in DT (VAR models for unequally spaced ESM data depend quite strongly on the true parameter in addition to data characteristics. Our recommendation is to use CT modeling whenever possible, especially now that new software implementations have become available.

  20. Theta-frequency resonance at the cerebellum input stage improves spike-timing on the millisecond time-scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eGandolfi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal circuits of the brain are thought to use resonance and oscillations to improve communication over specific frequency bands (Llinas, 1988; Buzsaki, 2006. However, the properties and mechanism of these phenomena in brain circuits remain largely unknown. Here we show that, at the cerebellum input stage, the granular layer generates its maximum response at 5-7 Hz both in vivo following tactile sensory stimulation of the whisker pad and in acute slices following mossy fiber-bundle stimulation. The spatial analysis of granular layer activity performed using voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging revealed 5-7 Hz resonance covering large granular layer areas. In single granule cells, resonance appeared as a reorganization of output spike bursts on the millisecond time-scale, such that the first spike occurred earlier and with higher temporal precision and the probability of spike generation increased. Resonance was independent from circuit inhibition, as it persisted with little variation in the presence of the GABAA receptor blocker, gabazine. However, circuit inhibition reduced the resonance area more markedly at 7 Hz. Simulations with detailed computational models suggested that resonance depended on intrinsic granule cells ionic mechanisms: specifically, Kslow (M-like and KA currents acted as resonators and the persistent Na current and NMDA current acted as amplifiers. This form of resonance may play an important role for enhancing coherent spike emission from the granular layer when theta-frequency bursts are transmitted by the cerebral cortex and peripheral sensory structures during sensory-motor processing, cognition and learning.

  1. Normalisation of haemodynamics in patients with end-stage heart failure with continuous-flow left ventricular assist device therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sunil; Woldendorp, Kei; Muthiah, Kavitha; Robson, Desiree; Prichard, Roslyn; Macdonald, Peter S; Keogh, Anne M; Kotlyar, Eugene; Jabbour, Andrew; Dhital, Kumud; Granger, Emily; Spratt, Phillip; Jansz, Paul; Hayward, Christopher S

    2014-10-01

    New generation continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) utilise centrifugal pumps. Data concerning their effect on patient haemodynamics, ventricular function and tissue perfusion is limited. We aimed to document these parameters following HeartWare centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD (HVAD) implantation and to assess the impact of post-operative right heart failure (RHF). We reviewed 53 consecutive patients (mean age 49.5 ± 14.1 yrs) with HVAD implanted in the left ventricle, at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, between January 2007 and August 2012. Available paired right heart catheterisation (n=35) and echocardiography (n=39) data was reviewed to assess response of invasive haemodynamics and ventricular function to LVAD support. A total of 28 patients (53%) were implanted from interim mechanical circulatory support. Seventeen patients (32%) required short-term post-implant veno-pulmonary artery extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. At 100 ± 61 days post-implant, mean pulmonary artery pressure and mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure decreased from 38.8 ± 7.7 to 22.9 ± 7.7 mmHg and 28.3 ± 6.4 to 13.4 ± 5.4 mmHg respectively (p<0.001). LV end diastolic diameter decreased from 71.3 ± 12.7 to 61.1 ± 13.7 mm and LV end-systolic diameter from 62.7 ± 12.3 to 53.9 ± 14.4mm (p<0.001). Aortic regurgitation remained trivial. Serum sodium increased from 133.3 ± 5.7 to 139.3 ± 2.8 mmol/L and creatinine decreased from 109.1 ± 42.5 to 74.3 ± 26.2 μmol/L (p<0.001). Across the entire cohort, the six-month survival/transplant rate was significantly lower for RHF patients (72.2%, n=18) compared to those without (96.9%, n=35, p=0.01). HVAD support improves haemodynamics, LV dimensions and renal function. Following implantation with a centrifugal continuous-flow LVAD, RHF remains a significant risk with a tendency to worse outcomes in the short to medium term. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fitting and interpreting continuous-time latent Markov models for panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jane M; Minin, Vladimir N

    2013-11-20

    Multistate models characterize disease processes within an individual. Clinical studies often observe the disease status of individuals at discrete time points, making exact times of transitions between disease states unknown. Such panel data pose considerable modeling challenges. Assuming the disease process progresses accordingly, a standard continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) yields tractable likelihoods, but the assumption of exponential sojourn time distributions is typically unrealistic. More flexible semi-Markov models permit generic sojourn distributions yet yield intractable likelihoods for panel data in the presence of reversible transitions. One attractive alternative is to assume that the disease process is characterized by an underlying latent CTMC, with multiple latent states mapping to each disease state. These models retain analytic tractability due to the CTMC framework but allow for flexible, duration-dependent disease state sojourn distributions. We have developed a robust and efficient expectation-maximization algorithm in this context. Our complete data state space consists of the observed data and the underlying latent trajectory, yielding computationally efficient expectation and maximization steps. Our algorithm outperforms alternative methods measured in terms of time to convergence and robustness. We also examine the frequentist performance of latent CTMC point and interval estimates of disease process functionals based on simulated data. The performance of estimates depends on time, functional, and data-generating scenario. Finally, we illustrate the interpretive power of latent CTMC models for describing disease processes on a dataset of lung transplant patients. We hope our work will encourage wider use of these models in the biomedical setting. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Continued Investigations of the Accretion History of Extraterrestrial Matter over Geologic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    This grant supported our ongoing project to characterize the accretion rate of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) to Earth over geologic time using He-3 as a tracer. IDPs are derived from collisions in the asteroid belt and from disaggregation of active comets. Owing to their small size (few to few hundred micrometers diameter) these particles spiral into the sun under Poynting-Robertson drag typically in less than a few tens of kyrs. Thus IDPs must be continually resupplied to the zodiacal cloud, and because the processes of IDP production are likely to be sporadic, time variation in the IDP accretion rate to Earth is likely to be time-varying. For example, major asteroidal collisions and comet showers should greatly enhance the IDP accretion rate. Our ultimate objective (still ongoing) is to document this time variance so as to better understand the history of the solar system, the source of IDPs accreting to Earth, and the details of the mechanism by which particles are captured by Earth. To document variations in IDP accretion rate through time we use He-3 as a tracer. This isotope is in extremely low abundance in terrestrial matter, but IDPs have very high concentrations of He-3 from implantation of solar wind ions. By measuring He-3 in seafloor sediments, we can estimate the IDP accretion rate for at least the last few hundred Myrs. Under an earlier NASA grant we identified the existence of a large increase in He-3 flux in the Late Eocene (35 Myr ago), coincident with the two largest impact craters of the Cenozoic Era. The simplest interpretation of this observation is the occurrence of a shower of long period comets at that time, simultaneously increasing the impact cratering probability and accretion rate of IDPs to Earth (Farley et al., 1998). Comet showers produced by stellar perturbation of the Oort cloud should be fairly common in the geologic record, so this is not an unreasonable interpretation of our observations.

  4. Fluid limit of the continuous-time random walk with general Levy jump distribution functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartea, A. [Birbeck College, University of London; Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) is a natural generalization of the Brownian random walk that allows the incorporation of waiting time distributions psi(t) and general jump distribution functions eta(x). There are two well-known fluid limits of this model in the uncoupled case. For exponential decaying waiting times and Gaussian jump distribution functions the fluid limit leads to the diffusion equation. On the other hand, for algebraic decaying waiting times psi similar to t(-(1+beta)) and algebraic decaying jump distributions eta similar to x(-(1+alpha)) corresponding to Levy stable processes, the fluid limit leads to the fractional diffusion equation of order alpha in space and order beta in time. However, these are two special cases of a wider class of models. Here we consider the CTRW for the most general Levy stochastic processes in the Levy-Khintchine representation for the jump distribution function and obtain an integrodifferential equation describing the dynamics in the fluid limit. The resulting equation contains as special cases the regular and the fractional diffusion equations. As an application we consider the case of CTRWs with exponentially truncated Levy jump distribution functions. In this case the fluid limit leads to a transport equation with exponentially truncated fractional derivatives which describes the interplay between memory, long jumps, and truncation effects in the intermediate asymptotic regime. The dynamics exhibits a transition from superdiffusion to subdiffusion with the crossover time scaling as tau(c)similar to lambda(-alpha/beta), where 1/lambda is the truncation length scale. The asymptotic behavior of the propagator (Green's function) of the truncated fractional equation exhibits a transition from algebraic decay for t <>tau(c).

  5. Transport properties of the continuous-time random walk with a long-tailed waiting-time density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, H.; Havlin, S. (BarIlan Univ., Ramat Gan (Israel)); Weiss, G.H. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-10-01

    The authors derive asymptotic properties of the propagator p(r, t) of a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) in which the waiting time density has the asymptotic form {psi}(t) {approximately} T{sup {alpha}}/t{sup {alpha}+1} when t >> T and 0 < {alpha} < 1. Several cases are considered; the main ones are those that assume that the variance of the displacement in a single step of the walk is finite. Under this assumption they consider both random walks with and without a bias. The principle results of their analysis is that one needs two forms to characterize p(r, t), depending on whether r is large or small, and that the small-r expansion cannot be characterized by a scaling form, although it is possible to find such a form for large r. Several results can be demonstrated that contrast with the case in which = {integral}{sub 0}{sup {infinity}} {tau}{psi}({tau})d{tau} is finite. One is that the asymptotic behavior of p(0, t) is demonstrated by the waiting time at the origin rather than by the dimension. The second difference is that in the presence of a field p(r, t) no longer remains symmetric around a moving peak. Rather, it is shown that the peak of this probability always occurs at r = 0, and the effect of the field is to break the symmetry that occurs when < {infinity}. Finally, they calculate similar properties, although in not such great detail, for the case in which the single-step jump probabilities themselves have an infinite mean.

  6. Continuous Time Monte Carlo for Lattice QCD in the Strong Coupling Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    We present results for lattice QCD with staggered fermions in the limit of infinite gauge coupling, obtained from a worm-type Monte Carlo algorithm on a discrete spatial lattice but with continuous Euclidean time. This is achieved by sending both the anisotropy parameter $\\gamma^2\\simeq a/\\at$ and the number of time-slices $N_\\tau$ to infinity, keeping the ratio $\\gamma^2/N_\\tau \\simeq aT$ fixed. In this limit, ambiguities arising from the anisotropy parameter $\\gamma$ are eliminated and discretization errors usually introduced by a finite temporal lattice extent $\\Nt$ are absent. The obvious gain is that no continuum extrapolation $N_\\tau \\rightarrow \\infty$ has to be carried out. Moreover, the algorithm is faster and the sign problem disappears completely. As a first application, we determine the phase diagram as a function of temperature and real and imaginary baryon chemical potential. We compare our computations with those on lattices with discrete Euclidean time. Discretization errors due to finite $\\Nt...

  7. Application of Time-Series Analysis for Predicting Defects in Continuous Steel Casting Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodziewicz A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was testing suitability of the time-series analysis for quality control of the continuous steel casting process in production conditions. The analysis was carried out on industrial data collected in one of Polish steel plants. The production data concerned defective fractions of billets obtained in the process. The procedure of the industrial data preparation is presented. The computations for the time-series analysis were carried out in two ways, both using the authors’ own software. The first one, applied to the real numbers type of the data has a wide range of capabilities, including not only prediction of the future values but also detection of important periodicity in data. In the second approach the data were assumed in a binary (categorical form, i.e. the every heat(melt was labeled as ‘Good’ or ‘Defective’. The naïve Bayesian classifier was used for predicting the successive values. The most interesting results of the analysis include good prediction accuracies obtained by both methodologies, the crucial influence of the last preceding point on the predicted result for the real data time-series analysis as well as obtaining an information about the type of misclassification for binary data. The possibility of prediction of the future values can be used by engineering or operational staff with an expert knowledge to decrease fraction of defective products by taking appropriate action when the forthcoming period is identified as critical.

  8. Dispersion in porous media, continuous-time random walks, and percolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahimi, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    A promising approach to the modeling of anomalous (non-Gaussian) dispersion in flow through heterogeneous porous media is the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) method. In such a formula on the waiting time distribution ψ(t) is usually assumed to be given by ψ(t)∼t-1-α, with α fitted to the experimental data. The exponent α is also related to the power-law growth of the mean-square displacement of the solute with the time t ∼ tζ. Invoking percolation and using a scaling analysis, we relate α to the geometrical exponents of percolation (ν, β, and βB) as well as the exponents μ and e that characterize the power-law behavior of the effective conductivity and permeability of porous media near the percolation threshold. We then explain the cause of the nonuniversality of α in terms of the nonuniversality of μ and e in continuum systems, and in percolation models with long-range correlations, and propose bounds for it. The results are consistent with the experimental data, both at the laboratory and field scales.

  9. Continuous, real-time bioimaging of chemical bioavailability and toxicology using autonomously bioluminescent human cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Close, Dan M.; Webb, James D.; Price, Sarah L.; Ripp, Steven A.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2013-05-01

    Bioluminescent imaging is an emerging biomedical surveillance strategy that uses external cameras to detect in vivo light generated in small animal models of human physiology or in vitro light generated in tissue culture or tissue scaffold mimics of human anatomy. The most widely utilized of reporters is the firefly luciferase (luc) gene; however, it generates light only upon addition of a chemical substrate, thus only generating intermittent single time point data snapshots. To overcome this disadvantage, we have demonstrated substrate-independent bioluminescent imaging using an optimized bacterial bioluminescence (lux) system. The lux reporter produces bioluminescence autonomously using components found naturally within the cell, thereby allowing imaging to occur continuously and in real-time over the lifetime of the host. We have validated this technology in human cells with demonstrated chemical toxicological profiling against exotoxin exposures at signal strengths comparable to existing luc systems (~1.33 × 107 photons/second). As a proof-in-principle demonstration, we have engineered breast carcinoma cells to express bioluminescence for real-time screening of endocrine disrupting chemicals and validated detection of 17β-estradiol (EC50 = ~ 10 pM). These and other applications of this new reporter technology will be discussed as potential new pathways towards improved models of target chemical bioavailability, toxicology, efficacy, and human safety.

  10. An approximation approach for the deviation matrix of continuous-time Markov processes with application to Markov decision theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidergott, B.F.; Hordijk, A.; Leder, N.

    2010-01-01

    We present an update formula that allows the expression of the deviation matrix of a continuous-time Markov process with denumerable state space having generator matrix Q* through a continuous-time Markov process with generator matrix Q. We show that under suitable stability conditions the algorithm

  11. Evaluation of a novel real-time continuous glucose-monitoring system for use in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, S; Tschuor, F; Osto, M; Franchini, M; Wichert, B; Ackermann, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E; Zini, E

    2010-01-01

    The Guardian REAL-Time is a continuous glucose-monitoring system (CGMS) recently developed to provide instantaneous interstitial glucose concentrations; the system does not require a monitor being fixed to the animal. The CGMS provides accurate and reproducible real-time readings of glucose concentration in cats. Thirty-two diabetic cats, 2 cats with suspected insulinoma, and 5 healthy cats. Prospective, observational study. CGMS accuracy was compared with a reference glucose meter at normal, high, and low blood glucose concentrations using error grid analysis. Reading variability of 2 simultaneously used CGMS was determined in diabetic cats by calculating correlation and percentage of concordance of paired data at different glycemic ranges. The time interval between increasing glycemia and a rise in interstitial fluid glucose measured by the CGMS was assessed in healthy cats receiving glucose IV; the time point of maximal increase in interstitial glucose concentrations was calculated. The CGMS was 100, 96.1, and 91.0% accurate at normal, high, and low blood glucose concentrations. Measurements deviated from reference by -12.7 +/- 70.5 mg/dL at normal, -12.1 +/- 141.5 mg/dL at high, and -1.9 +/- 40.9 mg/dL at low glucose concentrations. Overall, paired CGMS readings correlated significantly (r = 0.95, P glucose to an increase in interstitial glucose was 11.4 minutes (range: 8.8-19.7 minutes). Although some readings substantially deviated from reference values, the CGMS yields reproducible results, is clinically accurate in cats with hyperglycemia and euglycemia, and is slightly less accurate if blood glucose concentrations are low. Rapidly increasing interstitial glucose after a glycemic rise suggests that the CGMS is suitable for real-time measurement under clinical conditions.

  12. Continuous real-time digital data acquisition with high-resolution visible and infrared CCD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stufflebeam, Joseph L.; Waldie, Arthur H.; Qualtrough, John A.; Soules, David B.; Ambrose, Joseph G.; Reed, Michelle F.

    1993-08-01

    A high speed digital interface has been developed to accept real time digital pixel data from high resolution CCD cameras. The interface is currently in use with both a 640 X 486 12-bit digital infrared camera operating in non-interlaced mode at 30 frames per second, and a 756 X 484 8-bit digital visible camera operating in interlaced mode at 60 fields per second. Using programmable logic, the interface is reconfigurable to accept digital data from a variety of sensors at data rates of up to 18 megabytes per second. The buffered digital data is recorded on a hard disk array consisting of up to nine individual drives, with a present capacity exceeding 5.9 gigabytes. Continuous recording is achieved by implementing a loop function on the disk array.

  13. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection: A Stochastic LQ Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.Y.; Li, D.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a continuous-time mean-variance portfolio selection model that is formulated as a bicriteria optimization problem. The objective is to maximize the expected terminal return and minimize the variance of the terminal wealth. By putting weights on the two criteria one obtains a single objective stochastic control problem which is however not in the standard form due to the variance term involved. It is shown that this nonstandard problem can be 'embedded' into a class of auxiliary stochastic linear-quadratic (LQ) problems. The stochastic LQ control model proves to be an appropriate and effective framework to study the mean-variance problem in light of the recent development on general stochastic LQ problems with indefinite control weighting matrices. This gives rise to the efficient frontier in a closed form for the original portfolio selection problem

  14. A Random Parameter Model for Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Asset-Liability Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-qiang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a continuous-time mean-variance asset-liability management problem in a market with random market parameters; that is, interest rate, appreciation rates, and volatility rates are considered to be stochastic processes. By using the theories of stochastic linear-quadratic (LQ optimal control and backward stochastic differential equations (BSDEs, we tackle this problem and derive optimal investment strategies as well as the mean-variance efficient frontier analytically in terms of the solution of BSDEs. We find that the efficient frontier is still a parabola in a market with random parameters. Comparing with the existing results, we also find that the liability does not affect the feasibility of the mean-variance portfolio selection problem. However, in an incomplete market with random parameters, the liability can not be fully hedged.

  15. Continuous-Time Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection under the CEV Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-qiang Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a continuous-time mean-variance portfolio selection model when stock price follows the constant elasticity of variance (CEV process. The aim of this paper is to derive an optimal portfolio strategy and the efficient frontier. The mean-variance portfolio selection problem is formulated as a linearly constrained convex program problem. By employing the Lagrange multiplier method and stochastic optimal control theory, we obtain the optimal portfolio strategy and mean-variance efficient frontier analytically. The results show that the mean-variance efficient frontier is still a parabola in the mean-variance plane, and the optimal strategies depend not only on the total wealth but also on the stock price. Moreover, some numerical examples are given to analyze the sensitivity of the efficient frontier with respect to the elasticity parameter and to illustrate the results presented in this paper. The numerical results show that the price of risk decreases as the elasticity coefficient increases.

  16. Forecasting the Global Mean Sea Level, a Continuous-Time State-Space Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrini, Lorenzo

    ) and the temperature reconstruction from Hansen et al. (2010). We compare the forecasting performance of the proposed specification to the procedures developed in Rahmstorf (2007b) and Vermeer and Rahmstorf (2009). Finally, we compute projections for the sea-level rise conditional on the 21st century SRES temperature......In this paper we propose a continuous-time, Gaussian, linear, state-space system to model the relation between global mean sea level (GMSL) and the global mean temperature (GMT), with the aim of making long-term projections for the GMSL. We provide a justification for the model specification based...... on popular semi-empirical methods present in the literature and on zero-dimensional energy balance models. We show that some of the models developed in the literature on semi-empirical models can be analysed within this framework. We use the sea-level data reconstruction developed in Church and White (2011...

  17. A coverage metric to evaluate tests for continuous-time dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skruch, Paweł

    2011-06-01

    We present a test quality measure that allows for quantifying the completeness of black-box tests for continuous-time dynamic systems. The measure is based on a state space model of the system under test. The metric has been called the state space coverage. The classical coverage metrics, such as statement, branch, and path coverage, are not appropriate for dynamic systems because such systems are defined by differential equations and usually have an infinite number of states. The objective of the paper is to develop a necessary foundation for the metric as well as to present guidance on its application to software systems that incorporate dynamic behavior. The purpose of the proposed solution is to better assure the test engineer that a given test set is sufficient and to indicate where additional testing is required. An application example is presented to illustrate theoretical analysis and mathematical formulation.

  18. Numerical solution of continuous-time DSGE models under Poisson uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf; Trimborn, Timo

    We propose a simple and powerful method for determining the transition process in continuous-time DSGE models under Poisson uncertainty numerically. The idea is to transform the system of stochastic differential equations into a system of functional differential equations of the retarded type. We...... then use the Waveform Relaxation algorithm to provide a guess of the policy function and solve the resulting system of ordinary differential equations by standard methods and fix-point iteration. Analytical solutions are provided as a benchmark from which our numerical method can be used to explore broader...... classes of models. We illustrate the algorithm simulating both the stochastic neoclassical growth model and the Lucas model under Poisson uncertainty which is motivated by the Barro-Rietz rare disaster hypothesis. We find that, even for non-linear policy functions, the maximum (absolute) error is very...

  19. Low Power Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma ADC with Current Output DAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marker-Villumsen, Niels; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2015-01-01

    CT ∆Σ ADC for audio applications, designed in a 0.18 µm CMOS process, with active-RC integrators, a 7-level Flash ADC quantizer and current output DAC for the feedback. From simulations the ADC achieves a dynamic range of 95.0 dB in the audio band, with a current consumption of 284 µA for a 1.7 V......The paper presents a continuous-time (CT) DeltaSigma (∆Σ) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using a current output digital-to-analog converter (DAC) for the feedback. From circuit analysis it is shown that using a current output DAC makes it possible to relax the noise requirements of the 1st...

  20. A toolbox for safety instrumented system evaluation based on improved continuous-time Markov chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardana, Awang N. I.; Kurniady, Rahman; Pambudi, Galih; Purnama, Jaka; Suryopratomo, Kutut

    2017-08-01

    Safety instrumented system (SIS) is designed to restore a plant into a safe condition when pre-hazardous event is occur. It has a vital role especially in process industries. A SIS shall be meet with safety requirement specifications. To confirm it, SIS shall be evaluated. Typically, the evaluation is calculated by hand. This paper presents a toolbox for SIS evaluation. It is developed based on improved continuous-time Markov chain. The toolbox supports to detailed approach of evaluation. This paper also illustrates an industrial application of the toolbox to evaluate arch burner safety system of primary reformer. The results of the case study demonstrates that the toolbox can be used to evaluate industrial SIS in detail and to plan the maintenance strategy.

  1. Stochastic Games for Continuous-Time Jump Processes Under Finite-Horizon Payoff Criterion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingda, E-mail: weiqd@hqu.edu.cn [Huaqiao University, School of Economics and Finance (China); Chen, Xian, E-mail: chenxian@amss.ac.cn [Peking University, School of Mathematical Sciences (China)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper we study two-person nonzero-sum games for continuous-time jump processes with the randomized history-dependent strategies under the finite-horizon payoff criterion. The state space is countable, and the transition rates and payoff functions are allowed to be unbounded from above and from below. Under the suitable conditions, we introduce a new topology for the set of all randomized Markov multi-strategies and establish its compactness and metrizability. Then by constructing the approximating sequences of the transition rates and payoff functions, we show that the optimal value function for each player is a unique solution to the corresponding optimality equation and obtain the existence of a randomized Markov Nash equilibrium. Furthermore, we illustrate the applications of our main results with a controlled birth and death system.

  2. Highly reconfigurable microwave photonic single-bandpass filter with complex continuous-time impulse responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiaoxiao; Zheng, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2012-11-19

    We propose a novel structure of complex-tap microwave photonic filter (MPF) employing an incoherent broadband optical source (BOS) and a programmable optical spectrum processor. By tailoring the optical spectral amplitude and phase, arbitrary complex continuous-time impulse responses of the MPF can be constructed. Frequency responses with a single flat-top, highly chirped, or arbitrary-shape passband are demonstrated, respectively. The passband center can also be tuned in a wide range only limited by the opto-electrical devices. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first demonstration of an incoherent-BOS-based MPF which is single-bandpass, widely tunable, and highly reconfigurable with complex taps.

  3. Method for near-real-time continuous air monitoring of phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Frank G.; Paul, Donald G.

    1996-11-01

    A sorbent-based gas chromatographic method provides continuous quantitative measurement of phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride in ambient air. These compounds are subject to workplace exposure limits as well as regulation under terms of the Chemical Arms Treaty and Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. The method was developed for on-sit use in a mobile laboratory during remediation operations. Incorporated into the method are automated multi-level calibrations at time weighted average concentrations, or lower. Gaseous standards are prepared in fused silica lined air sampling canisters, then transferred to the analytical system through dynamic spiking. Precision and accuracy studies performed to validate the method are described. Also described are system deactivation and passivation techniques critical to optimum method performance.

  4. Accuracy evaluation of a new real-time continuous glucose monitoring algorithm in hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoudi, Zeinab; Jensen, Morten Hasselstrøm; Johansen, Mette Dencker

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Abstract Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a new continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) calibration algorithm and to compare it with the Guardian(®) REAL-Time (RT) (Medtronic Diabetes, Northridge, CA) calibration algorithm in hypoglycemia. SUBJECTS...... AND METHODS: CGM data were obtained from 10 type 1 diabetes patients undergoing insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Data were obtained in two separate sessions using the Guardian RT CGM device. Data from the same CGM sensor were calibrated by two different algorithms: the Guardian RT algorithm and a new calibration...... algorithm. The accuracy of the two algorithms was compared using four performance metrics. RESULTS: The median (mean) of absolute relative deviation in the whole range of plasma glucose was 20.2% (32.1%) for the Guardian RT calibration and 17.4% (25.9%) for the new calibration algorithm. The mean (SD...

  5. Distributed Continuous-Time Algorithms for Resource Allocation Problems Over Weight-Balanced Digraphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhenhua; Liang, Shu; Hong, Yiguang

    2017-10-17

    In this paper, a distributed resource allocation problem with nonsmooth local cost functions is considered, where the interaction among agents is depicted by strongly connected and weight-balanced digraphs. Here the decision variable of each agent is within a local feasibility constraint described as a convex set, and all the decision variables have to satisfy a network resource constraint, which is the sum of available resources. To solve the problem, a distributed continuous-time algorithm is developed by virtue of differentiated projection operations and differential inclusions, and its convergence to the optimal solution is proved via the set-valued LaSalle invariance principle. Furthermore, the exponential convergence of the proposed algorithm can be achieved when the local cost functions are differentiable with Lipschitz gradients and there are no local feasibility constraints. Finally, numerical examples are given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.In this paper, a distributed resource allocation problem with nonsmooth local cost functions is considered, where the interaction among agents is depicted by strongly connected and weight-balanced digraphs. Here the decision variable of each agent is within a local feasibility constraint described as a convex set, and all the decision variables have to satisfy a network resource constraint, which is the sum of available resources. To solve the problem, a distributed continuous-time algorithm is developed by virtue of differentiated projection operations and differential inclusions, and its convergence to the optimal solution is proved via the set-valued LaSalle invariance principle. Furthermore, the exponential convergence of the proposed algorithm can be achieved when the local cost functions are differentiable with Lipschitz gradients and there are no local feasibility constraints. Finally, numerical examples are given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms.

  6. Influence of solids retention time on continuous H{sub 2} production using membrane bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Yeol [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies,16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8506 (Japan); Li, Yu-You [Department of Environmental Science, Tohoku University, 6-6-06 Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980 8579 (Japan); Noike, Tatsuya [Advanced Research Institute for the Sciences and Humanities, Nihon University 12-5, Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102 8251 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of solids retention time (SRT) on continuous H{sub 2} production in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) was investigated using mixed mesophilic microflora. The bioreactor was continuously operated at the four SRTs of 2, 4, 12.5 and 90 d on a glucose medium under the hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 9 h and the mesophilic condition of 35 C {+-} 0.5. Stable biogas production with H{sub 2} content of 50.8%-60% was achieved at SRTs ranging from 2 to 12.5 d. No methane gas was observed in monitoring the experimental conditions. The H{sub 2} production increased from 17.62 to 26.1 l-H{sub 2}/d when the SRT increased from 2 to 12.5 d, but decreased to 9.1 l-H{sub 2}/d at the 90 d SRT. The best H{sub 2} yield, 1.19 mol-H{sub 2}/mol-glucose, was observed at the SRT of 2 d and the highest H{sub 2} production rate, 5.8 l-H{sub 2}/l/d, was obtained at the SRT of 12.5 d. Stable H{sub 2} production was achieved by maintaining the SRT in the range of 2 - 12.5 d, regardless of the fermentative pathway related to higher lactate production. The decrease in H{sub 2} yield was observed at long SRTs due to the low volatile suspended solids/total suspended solids (VSS/TSS) as well as the high extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentrations. These results suggest that the SRT is the key factor enabling sustainable H{sub 2} fermentation in MBR, and that an SLR value of around 1.6 kg-DOC/kg-VSS/d might be the specific condition for achieving optimum H{sub 2} production. (author)

  7. Ice-free intervals continuing into Marine Isotope Stage 3 at Sokli in the central area of the Fennoscandian glaciations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin F. Helmens

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusually long and continuous Late Quaternary sedimentary sequence has been preserved in a sedimentary basin formed in the Sokli Carbonatite Massif in eastern-central Finnish Lapland. A nearly complete sediment recovery from the central Sokli basin combinedwith palynological results from sediments not earlier recovered and an independent OSL/AMS 14C chronology allow us here to define the Late Quaternary climate-stratigraphy at Sokli and describe in detail the environmental record. Three interstadial intervals of Weichselian age are distinguished that correlate with MIS 5c, 5a and part of MIS 3 in the marine oxygen-isotope record. The interstadials of MIS 5c and 3 age are here defined as the Sokli and Tulppio Interstadials, respectively. The MIS 5a interstadial is correlated with the Maaselkä/Peräpohjola Interstadials of Finnish Lapland, which previously have been tentatively assigned a MIS 5c age. Till beds in the Sokli sequence (deposited during stadials 3–1 correlate to MIS 5b, 4 and 3/2, respectively. Depositional environments and vegetational changes during the ice-free intervals at Sokli are discussed. The Sokli sedimentary sequence indicates significantly less extensive and more variable ice-cover over Finnish Lapland duringthe Weichselian than has been earlier suggested based on the long-distance correlation of litho- and bio-stratigraphic fragmentary evidence.

  8. Continuous-time random-walk model for anomalous diffusion in expanding media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vot, F.; Abad, E.; Yuste, S. B.

    2017-09-01

    Expanding media are typical in many different fields, e.g., in biology and cosmology. In general, a medium expansion (contraction) brings about dramatic changes in the behavior of diffusive transport properties such as the set of positional moments and the Green's function. Here, we focus on the characterization of such effects when the diffusion process is described by the continuous-time random-walk (CTRW) model. As is well known, when the medium is static this model yields anomalous diffusion for a proper choice of the probability density function (pdf) for the jump length and the waiting time, but the behavior may change drastically if a medium expansion is superimposed on the intrinsic random motion of the diffusing particle. For the case where the jump length and the waiting time pdfs are long-tailed, we derive a general bifractional diffusion equation which reduces to a normal diffusion equation in the appropriate limit. We then study some particular cases of interest, including Lévy flights and subdiffusive CTRWs. In the former case, we find an analytical exact solution for the Green's function (propagator). When the expansion is sufficiently fast, the contribution of the diffusive transport becomes irrelevant at long times and the propagator tends to a stationary profile in the comoving reference frame. In contrast, for a contracting medium a competition between the spreading effect of diffusion and the concentrating effect of contraction arises. In the specific case of a subdiffusive CTRW in an exponentially contracting medium, the latter effect prevails for sufficiently long times, and all the particles are eventually localized at a single point in physical space. This "big crunch" effect, totally absent in the case of normal diffusion, stems from inefficient particle spreading due to subdiffusion. We also derive a hierarchy of differential equations for the moments of the transport process described by the subdiffusive CTRW model in an expanding medium

  9. Transport and Reactive Flow Modelling Using A Particle Tracking Method Based on Continuous Time Random Walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.; Colbourne, A.; Sederman, A. J.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.

    2017-12-01

    Mixing and reactive processes have a large impact on the viability of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects that involve acid stimulation and CO2 injection. To achieve a successful design of the injection schemes an accurate understanding of the interplay between pore structure, flow and reactive transport is necessary. Dependent on transport and reactive conditions, this complex coupling can also be dependent on initial rock heterogeneity across a variety of scales. To address these issues, we devise a new method to study transport and reactive flow in porous media at multiple scales. The transport model is based on an efficient Particle Tracking Method based on Continuous Time Random Walks (CTRW-PTM) on a lattice. Transport is modelled using an algorithm described in Rhodes and Blunt (2006) and Srinivasan et al. (2010); this model is expanded to enable for reactive flow predictions in subsurface rock undergoing a first-order fluid/solid chemical reaction. The reaction-induced alteration in fluid/solid interface is accommodated in the model through changes in porosity and flow field, leading to time dependent transport characteristics in the form of transit time distributions which account for rock heterogeneity change. This also enables the study of concentration profiles at the scale of interest. Firstly, we validate transport model by comparing the probability of molecular displacement (propagators) measured by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) with our modelled predictions for concentration profiles. The experimental propagators for three different porous media of increasing complexity, a beadpack, a Bentheimer sandstone and a Portland carbonate, show a good agreement with the model. Next, we capture the time evolution of the propagators distribution in a reactive flow experiment, where hydrochloric acid is injected into a limestone rock. We analyse the time-evolving non-Fickian signatures for the transport during reactive flow and observe an increase in

  10. Continuous-Time Semi-Markov Models in Health Economic Decision Making: An Illustrative Example in Heart Failure Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Buskens, Erik; Feenstra, Talitha; Jaarsma, Tiny; Hillege, Hans; Postmus, Douwe

    2016-01-01

    Continuous-time state transition models may end up having large unwieldy structures when trying to represent all relevant stages of clinical disease processes by means of a standard Markov model. In such situations, a more parsimonious, and therefore easier-to-grasp, model of a patient's disease progression can often be obtained by assuming that the future state transitions do not depend only on the present state (Markov assumption) but also on the past through time since entry in the present state. Despite that these so-called semi-Markov models are still relatively straightforward to specify and implement, they are not yet routinely applied in health economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions. To facilitate a better understanding of this type of model among applied health economic analysts, the first part of this article provides a detailed discussion of what the semi-Markov model entails and how such models can be specified in an intuitive way by adopting an approach called vertical modeling. In the second part of the article, we use this approach to construct a semi-Markov model for assessing the long-term cost-effectiveness of 3 disease management programs for heart failure. Compared with a standard Markov model with the same disease states, our proposed semi-Markov model fitted the observed data much better. When subsequently extrapolating beyond the clinical trial period, these relatively large differences in goodness-of-fit translated into almost a doubling in mean total cost and a 60-d decrease in mean survival time when using the Markov model instead of the semi-Markov model. For the disease process considered in our case study, the semi-Markov model thus provided a sensible balance between model parsimoniousness and computational complexity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Learning a Continuous-Time Streaming Video QoE Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiyaram, Deepti; Pan, Janice; Bovik, Alan C

    2018-05-01

    Over-the-top adaptive video streaming services are frequently impacted by fluctuating network conditions that can lead to rebuffering events (stalling events) and sudden bitrate changes. These events visually impact video consumers' quality of experience (QoE) and can lead to consumer churn. The development of models that can accurately predict viewers' instantaneous subjective QoE under such volatile network conditions could potentially enable the more efficient design of quality-control protocols for media-driven services, such as YouTube, Amazon, Netflix, and so on. However, most existing models only predict a single overall QoE score on a given video and are based on simple global video features, without accounting for relevant aspects of human perception and behavior. We have created a QoE evaluator, called the time-varying QoE Indexer, that accounts for interactions between stalling events, analyzes the spatial and temporal content of a video, predicts the perceptual video quality, models the state of the client-side data buffer, and consequently predicts continuous-time quality scores that agree quite well with human opinion scores. The new QoE predictor also embeds the impact of relevant human cognitive factors, such as memory and recency, and their complex interactions with the video content being viewed. We evaluated the proposed model on three different video databases and attained standout QoE prediction performance.

  12. Persistence of a continuous stochastic process with discrete-time sampling: non-Markov processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, George C M A; Bray, Alan J; Majumdar, Satya N

    2002-04-01

    We consider the problem of "discrete-time persistence," which deals with the zero crossings of a continuous stochastic process X(T) measured at discrete times T=nDeltaT. For a Gaussian stationary process the persistence (no crossing) probability decays as exp(-theta(D)T)=[rho(a)](n) for large n, where a=exp(-DeltaT/2) and the discrete persistence exponent theta(D) is given by theta(D)=(ln rho)/(2 ln a). Using the "independent interval approximation," we show how theta(D) varies with DeltaT for small DeltaT and conclude that experimental measurements of persistence for smooth processes, such as diffusion, are less sensitive to the effects of discrete sampling than measurements of a randomly accelerated particle or random walker. We extend the matrix method developed by us previously [Phys. Rev. E 64, 015101(R) (2001)] to determine rho(a) for a two-dimensional random walk and the one-dimensional random-acceleration problem. We also consider "alternating persistence," which corresponds to a<0, and calculate rho(a) for this case.

  13. Continuous-Time Public Good Contribution Under Uncertainty: A Stochastic Control Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Giorgio; Riedel, Frank; Steg, Jan-Henrik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study continuous-time stochastic control problems with both monotone and classical controls motivated by the so-called public good contribution problem. That is the problem of n economic agents aiming to maximize their expected utility allocating initial wealth over a given time period between private consumption and irreversible contributions to increase the level of some public good. We investigate the corresponding social planner problem and the case of strategic interaction between the agents, i.e. the public good contribution game. We show existence and uniqueness of the social planner’s optimal policy, we characterize it by necessary and sufficient stochastic Kuhn–Tucker conditions and we provide its expression in terms of the unique optional solution of a stochastic backward equation. Similar stochastic first order conditions prove to be very useful for studying any Nash equilibria of the public good contribution game. In the symmetric case they allow us to prove (qualitative) uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium, which we again construct as the unique optional solution of a stochastic backward equation. We finally also provide a detailed analysis of the so-called free rider effect.

  14. Continuous time random walk analysis of solute transport in fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Cortis, Andrea; Birkholzer, Jens

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this work is to discuss solute transport phenomena in fractured porous media, where the macroscopic transport of contaminants in the highly permeable interconnected fractures can be strongly affected by solute exchange with the porous rock matrix. We are interested in a wide range of rock types, with matrix hydraulic conductivities varying from almost impermeable (e.g., granites) to somewhat permeable (e.g., porous sandstones). In the first case, molecular diffusion is the only transport process causing the transfer of contaminants between the fractures and the matrix blocks. In the second case, additional solute transfer occurs as a result of a combination of advective and dispersive transport mechanisms, with considerable impact on the macroscopic transport behavior. We start our study by conducting numerical tracer experiments employing a discrete (microscopic) representation of fractures and matrix. Using the discrete simulations as a surrogate for the 'correct' transport behavior, we then evaluate the accuracy of macroscopic (continuum) approaches in comparison with the discrete results. However, instead of using dual-continuum models, which are quite often used to account for this type of heterogeneity, we develop a macroscopic model based on the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, which characterizes the interaction between the fractured and porous rock domains by using a probability distribution function of residence times. A parametric study of how CTRW parameters evolve is presented, describing transport as a function of the hydraulic conductivity ratio between fractured and porous domains.

  15. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  16. A joint logistic regression and covariate-adjusted continuous-time Markov chain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Maria Laura; Chan, Wenyaw; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Robertson, Claudia Sue

    2017-12-10

    The use of longitudinal measurements to predict a categorical outcome is an increasingly common goal in research studies. Joint models are commonly used to describe two or more models simultaneously by considering the correlated nature of their outcomes and the random error present in the longitudinal measurements. However, there is limited research on joint models with longitudinal predictors and categorical cross-sectional outcomes. Perhaps the most challenging task is how to model the longitudinal predictor process such that it represents the true biological mechanism that dictates the association with the categorical response. We propose a joint logistic regression and Markov chain model to describe a binary cross-sectional response, where the unobserved transition rates of a two-state continuous-time Markov chain are included as covariates. We use the method of maximum likelihood to estimate the parameters of our model. In a simulation study, coverage probabilities of about 95%, standard deviations close to standard errors, and low biases for the parameter values show that our estimation method is adequate. We apply the proposed joint model to a dataset of patients with traumatic brain injury to describe and predict a 6-month outcome based on physiological data collected post-injury and admission characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the information provided by physiological changes over time may help improve prediction of long-term functional status of these severely ill subjects. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Optimal Compensation with Hidden Action and Lump-Sum Payment in a Continuous-Time Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvitanic, Jaksa; Wan, Xuhu; Zhang Jianfeng

    2009-01-01

    We consider a problem of finding optimal contracts in continuous time, when the agent's actions are unobservable by the principal, who pays the agent with a one-time payoff at the end of the contract. We fully solve the case of quadratic cost and separable utility, for general utility functions. The optimal contract is, in general, a nonlinear function of the final outcome only, while in the previously solved cases, for exponential and linear utility functions, the optimal contract is linear in the final output value. In a specific example we compute, the first-best principal's utility is infinite, while it becomes finite with hidden action, which is increasing in value of the output. In the second part of the paper we formulate a general mathematical theory for the problem. We apply the stochastic maximum principle to give necessary conditions for optimal contracts. Sufficient conditions are hard to establish, but we suggest a way to check sufficiency using non-convex optimization

  18. Event-Triggered Fault Detection Filter Design for a Continuous-Time Networked Control System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Long; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew; Liu, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    This paper studies the problem of event-triggered fault detection filter (FDF) and controller coordinated design for a continuous-time networked control system (NCS) with biased sensor faults. By considering sensor-to-FDF network-induced delays and packet dropouts, which do not impose a constraint on the event-triggering mechanism, and proposing the simultaneous network bandwidth utilization ratio and fault occurrence probability-based event-triggering mechanism, a new closed-loop model for the considered NCS is established. Based on the established model, the event-triggered H ∞ performance analysis, and FDF and controller coordinated design are presented. The combined mutually exclusive distribution and Wirtinger-based integral inequality approach is proposed for the first time to deal with integral inequalities for products of vectors. This approach is proved to be less conservative than the existing Wirtinger-based integral inequality approach. The designed FDF and controller can guarantee the sensitivity of the residual signal to faults and the robustness of the NCS to external disturbances. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed event-triggering mechanism, and the FDF and controller coordinated design.

  19. Real-Time, Model-Based Spray-Cooling Control System for Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrus, Bryan; Zheng, Kai; Zhou, X.; Thomas, Brian G.; Bentsman, Joseph

    2011-02-01

    This article presents a new system to control secondary cooling water sprays in continuous casting of thin steel slabs (CONONLINE). It uses real-time numerical simulation of heat transfer and solidification within the strand as a software sensor in place of unreliable temperature measurements. The one-dimensional finite-difference model, CON1D, is adapted to create the real-time predictor of the slab temperature and solidification state. During operation, the model is updated with data collected by the caster automation systems. A decentralized controller configuration based on a bank of proportional-integral controllers with antiwindup is developed to maintain the shell surface-temperature profile at a desired set point. A new method of set-point generation is proposed to account for measured mold heat flux variations. A user-friendly monitor visualizes the results and accepts set-point changes from the caster operator. Example simulations demonstrate how a significantly better shell surface-temperature control is achieved.

  20. Continuous Time Random Walks and the Causes of Non-Fickian Transport in Heterogeneous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, M.; Le Borgne, T.; Kang, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    Solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is in generalnon-Fickian, this means it shows behaviors that do not conform toadvection-dispersion models characterized by constant equivalent transportparameters. The causes for such behaviors are manifold, while their quantitative relation to large scale non-Fickian transport is often not known. We address the questions of (i) how different heterogeneity and microscale transport mechanisms manifest in large scale transport behavior, (ii) which are their impacts on anomalous solute dispersion, and (iii) how they can be quantified in terms of large scale dynamics. We focus here on the roles of medium and flow heterogeneity, mass transfer between mobile and immobile zones, as well as spatially variable retardation properties on large scale anomalous transport. Starting from the different microscale heterogeneity and transport dynamics, we use a stochastic modeling approach to coarse grain and average particle transport in a Lagrangian modeling framework, and quantify the large scale particle dynamics in terms of continuous time random walks (CTRW). The large scale particle movements are characterized in terms of a random space increment, which can be related to the heterogeneity structure and geometry, and a random time increment, which is quantified in terms of the heterogeneity distribution. We present the CTRW models resulting from the differentheterogeneity scenarios and analyze their transport signatures in terms of solute dispersion and breakthrough curves.

  1. Continuous-Time Public Good Contribution Under Uncertainty: A Stochastic Control Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.ferrari@uni-bielefeld.de; Riedel, Frank, E-mail: frank.riedel@uni-bielefeld.de; Steg, Jan-Henrik, E-mail: jsteg@uni-bielefeld.de [Bielefeld University, Center for Mathematical Economics (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper we study continuous-time stochastic control problems with both monotone and classical controls motivated by the so-called public good contribution problem. That is the problem of n economic agents aiming to maximize their expected utility allocating initial wealth over a given time period between private consumption and irreversible contributions to increase the level of some public good. We investigate the corresponding social planner problem and the case of strategic interaction between the agents, i.e. the public good contribution game. We show existence and uniqueness of the social planner’s optimal policy, we characterize it by necessary and sufficient stochastic Kuhn–Tucker conditions and we provide its expression in terms of the unique optional solution of a stochastic backward equation. Similar stochastic first order conditions prove to be very useful for studying any Nash equilibria of the public good contribution game. In the symmetric case they allow us to prove (qualitative) uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium, which we again construct as the unique optional solution of a stochastic backward equation. We finally also provide a detailed analysis of the so-called free rider effect.

  2. Well-posedness and accuracy of the ensemble Kalman filter in discrete and continuous time

    KAUST Repository

    Kelly, D. T B

    2014-09-22

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a method for combining a dynamical model with data in a sequential fashion. Despite its widespread use, there has been little analysis of its theoretical properties. Many of the algorithmic innovations associated with the filter, which are required to make a useable algorithm in practice, are derived in an ad hoc fashion. The aim of this paper is to initiate the development of a systematic analysis of the EnKF, in particular to do so for small ensemble size. The perspective is to view the method as a state estimator, and not as an algorithm which approximates the true filtering distribution. The perturbed observation version of the algorithm is studied, without and with variance inflation. Without variance inflation well-posedness of the filter is established; with variance inflation accuracy of the filter, with respect to the true signal underlying the data, is established. The algorithm is considered in discrete time, and also for a continuous time limit arising when observations are frequent and subject to large noise. The underlying dynamical model, and assumptions about it, is sufficiently general to include the Lorenz \\'63 and \\'96 models, together with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation on a two-dimensional torus. The analysis is limited to the case of complete observation of the signal with additive white noise. Numerical results are presented for the Navier-Stokes equation on a two-dimensional torus for both complete and partial observations of the signal with additive white noise.

  3. Improving biogas production from anaerobic co-digestion of Thickened Waste Activated Sludge (TWAS) and fat, oil and grease (FOG) using a dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic semi-continuous reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqaralleh, Rania Mona; Kennedy, Kevin; Delatolla, Robert

    2018-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and advantages of using a dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic semi-continuous reactor system for the co-digestion of Thickened Waste Activated Sludge (TWAS) and Fat, Oil and Grease (FOG) to produce biogas in high quantity and quality. The performance of the dual-stage hyper-thermophilic (70°C)/thermophilic (55°C) anaerobic co-digestion system is evaluated and compared to the performance of a single-stage thermophilic (55°C) reactor that was used to co-digest the same FOG-TWAS mixtures. Both co-digestion reactors were compared to a control reactor (the control reactor was a single-stage thermophilic reactor that only digested TWAS). The effect of FOG% in the co-digestion mixture (based on total volatile solids) and the reactor hydraulic retention time (HRT) on the biogas/methane production and the reactors' performance were thoroughly investigated. The FOG% that led to the maximum methane yield with a stable reactor performance was determined for both reactors. The maximum FOG% obtained for the single-stage thermophilic reactor at 15 days HRT was found to be 65%. This 65% FOG resulted in 88.3% higher methane yield compared to the control reactor. However, the dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic co-digestion reactor proved to be more efficient than the single-stage thermophilic co-digestion reactor, as it was able to digest up to 70% FOG with a stable reactor performance. The 70% FOG in the co-digestion mixture resulted in 148.2% higher methane yield compared to the control at 15 days HRT. 70% FOG (based on total volatile solids) is so far the highest FOG% that has been proved to be useful and safe for semi-continuous reactor application in the open literature. Finally, the dual-stage hyper-thermophilic/thermophilic co-digestion reactor also proved to be efficient and stable in co-digesting 40% FOG mixtures at lower HRTs (i.e., 9 and 12 days) and still produce high methane yields and Class A effluents

  4. Performance of real-time elastography for the staging of hepatic fibrosis: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huisuo Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the rapid development of real-time elastography (RTE, a variety of measuring methods have been developed for the assessment of hepatic fibrosis. We evaluated the overall performance of four methods based on RTE by performing meta-analysis of published literature. METHODS: Online journal databases and a manual search from April 2000 to April 2014 were used. Studies from different databases that meet inclusion criteria were enrolled. The statistical analysis was performed using a random-effects model and fixed-effects model for the overall effectiveness of RTE. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC was calculated for various means. Fagan plot analysis was used to estimate the clinical utility of RTE, and the heterogeneity of the studies was explored with meta-regression analysis. RESULTS: Thirteen studies from published articles were enrolled and analyzed. The combined AUROC of the liver fibrosis index (LFI for the evaluation of significant fibrosis (F≥2, advanced fibrosis (F≥3, and cirrhosis (F = 4 were 0.79, 0.94, and 0.85, respectively. The AUROC of the elasticity index (EI ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for F≥2 and 0.66 to 0.85 for F = 4. The overall AUROC of the elastic ratio of the liver for the intrahepatic venous vessels were 0.94, 0.93, and 0.96, respectively. The AUROC of the elastic ratio of the liver for the intercostal muscle in diagnosing advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis were 0.96 and 0.92, respectively. There was significant heterogeneity in the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR for F≥2 of LFI mainly due to etiology (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: The elastic ratio of the liver for the intrahepatic vein has excellent precision in differentiating each stage of hepatic fibrosis and is recommend to be applied to the clinic.

  5. Impairment of reaction time among children awakened during stage 4 sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splaingard, Mark; Hayes, John; Smith, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    Sleep inertia refers to impairments in cognitive/motor performance and the tendency to return to sleep after awakening. As part of a project studying the effect of different types of 100 decibel (dB) sounds on awakening children during stage 4 sleep (S4S), we hypothesized that children with the greatest impairment in auditory arousal during S4S, manifested by the inability to either awaken to 100 dB sounds or successfully perform a self-rescue sequence (SRS), would have greater impairments in reaction time (RT) upon awakening than children who awoke and successfully accomplish a SRS. Observational study. Pediatric hospital-based sleep center. Healthy children aged 6-12 years. N/A. RT was measured in 44 children approximately 90 minutes before bedtime and again after awakening by either 100 dB alarms or manually during the first and second cycles of S4S. Overall, mean and median RT slowed significantly by 37% and 22%, respectively, from baseline. Slowing of RT was most evident in the youngest children (aged 6-7 years) and after awakening from the second S4S cycle. Impairments in RT were not significantly different among children who successfully awakened to the alarm and performed a SRS compared with children who did not. The degree of slowing of RT was not significantly different among children who awakened and performed an SRS compared with children who did not. The greatest slowing of RT was seen among younger children and after awakening from the second S4S cycle.

  6. Real Time Data From the Plate Boundary Observatory Continuous GPS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M.; Borsa, A.; Feaux, K.; Walls, C.; Mencin, D.

    2009-05-01

    EarthScope's Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) runs a network of 1,100 continuous GPS stations in North America and has the potential to be a major provider of real-time GPS data for scientific research, hazard monitoring and survey control. PBO is planning to implement real time data flow for its three volcanic subnetworks (at Mt. Saint Helens and Alaksa's Akutan and Unimak Islands) to maximize the return of scientifically important data to detect the onset of eruptive activity. GPS sites with collocated instruments for meteorological measurement are also targeted for both GPS and met data streaming in the near future. On a larger scale, the USGS and a handful of academic institutions are doing research on integrating GPS into earthquake early warning (EEW) networks. The implementation of GPS-based EEW will involve real time streaming from GPS sites on major faults and in areas of high seismic hazard, and PBO is partnering with the USGS to help develop the first implementation of this early warning capability. Finally, planning is underway to develop open statewide real time networks to serve surveying communities and the general public, and PBO is positioned to be a key data provider for these efforts. PBO has been operating a pilot program to provide real-time GPS streams to the public from 75+ stations from the Salton Sea to Alaska. PBO's streaming data is provided exclusively via the NTrip protocol, from servers located at UNAVCO headquarters in Boulder, CO. The formats supported are BINEX and RTCM 2.3 at 1 second sampling, with RTCM 3.0 to be added in the near future. Access to PBO data streams is currently unrestricted and users are free to rebroadcast these streams provided they do not charge for these services. Our experience with this program indicates that we are technically capable of streaming low-latency, real time GPS data from most of our network using existing telemetry, although PBO's IT infrastructure would have to be upgraded to support an

  7. Initial Experience With Real-Time Continuous Physical Activity Monitoring in Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Justin K; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Keefe, Malla K; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Burton, Douglas C; Hart, Robert A; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Smith, Zachary A; Koski, Tyler R; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-12-01

    Multicenter prospective pilot study. To evaluate if continuous physical activity monitoring by a personal electronic 3-dimensional accelerometer device is feasible and can provide objective data that correlates with patient-reported outcomes following spine surgery. Self-reported health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) metrics are inherently limited by being very subjective, having a low frequency of data collection, and inconsistent follow-up. Inclusion criteria: adults (18+), thoracolumbar deformity or degenerative disease, and regular access to a computer with internet connection. Physical activity parameters included: number of daily steps, maximum hourly steps, and activity intensity. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the Short-Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36), and the Scoliosis Research Society-22r (SRS22) preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Thirty-two patients were enrolled, 8 (25%) withdrew, 1 (3.1%) died, and 1 (3.1%) did not end up undergoing surgery resulting in 22 (68.8%) available patients. Mean preoperative and postoperative step ranges were 1278±767 to 17,800±6464 and 891±587 to 12,655±7038, respectively. Eleven patients improved in mean total daily steps at the final postoperative month with 2 having significant improvements (P0.05) and 6 patients had significantly lower mean total daily steps at 6 months (PPhysical Component Summary, SRS Activity, SRS Appearance, SRS Mental, SRS Satisfaction, and SRS Total score at 6 months postoperative (PPhysical Component Summary were significantly correlated with preoperative average total daily steps (r=-0.61, P=0.0058 and r=0.60, P=0.0114, respectively). No other HRQOL metrics were significantly correlated at baseline or at 6 months postoperative (P>0.05). A prospective pilot study for continuous real-time physical activity monitoring was successfully completed. This is the first study of its kind and demonstrates a foundation to continuous physical

  8. Near-Optimal Controller for Nonlinear Continuous-Time Systems With Unknown Dynamics Using Policy Iteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Samrat; Patchaikani, Prem Kumar; Behera, Laxmidhar

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a single-network adaptive critic-based controller for continuous-time systems with unknown dynamics in a policy iteration (PI) framework. It is assumed that the unknown dynamics can be estimated using the Takagi-Sugeno-Kang fuzzy model with arbitrary precision. The successful implementation of a PI scheme depends on the effective learning of critic network parameters. Network parameters must stabilize the system in each iteration in addition to approximating the critic and the cost. It is found that the critic updates according to the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman formulation sometimes lead to the instability of the closed-loop systems. In the proposed work, a novel critic network parameter update scheme is adopted, which not only approximates the critic at current iteration but also provides feasible solutions that keep the policy stable in the next step of training by combining a Lyapunov-based linear matrix inequalities approach with PI. The critic modeling technique presented here is the first of its kind to address this issue. Though multiple literature exists discussing the convergence of PI, however, to the best of our knowledge, there exists no literature, which focuses on the effect of critic network parameters on the convergence. Computational complexity in the proposed algorithm is reduced to the order of (Fz)(n-1) , where n is the fuzzy state dimensionality and Fz is the number of fuzzy zones in the states space. A genetic algorithm toolbox of MATLAB is used for searching stable parameters while minimizing the training error. The proposed algorithm also provides a way to solve for the initial stable control policy in the PI scheme. The algorithm is validated through real-time experiment on a commercial robotic manipulator. Results show that the algorithm successfully finds stable critic network parameters in real time for a highly nonlinear system.

  9. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  10. Climate change leads to differential shifts in the timing of annual cycle stages in a migratory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomotani, Barbara M; van der Jeugd, Henk; Gienapp, Phillip; de la Hera, Iván; Pilzecker, Jos; Teichmann, Corry; Visser, Marcel E

    2018-02-01

    Shifts in reproductive phenology due to climate change have been well documented in many species but how, within the same species, other annual cycle stages (e.g. moult, migration) shift relative to the timing of breeding has rarely been studied. When stages shift at different rates, the interval between stages may change resulting in overlaps, and as each stage is energetically demanding, these overlaps may have negative fitness consequences. We used long-term data of a population of European pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to investigate phenological shifts in three annual cycle stages: spring migration (arrival dates), breeding (egg-laying and hatching dates) and the onset of postbreeding moult. We found different advancements in the timing of breeding compared with moult (moult advances faster) and no advancement in arrival dates. To understand these differential shifts, we explored which temperatures best explain the year-to-year variation in the timing of these stages, and show that they respond differently to temperature increases in the Netherlands, causing the intervals between arrival and breeding and between breeding and moult to decrease. Next, we tested the fitness consequences of these shortened intervals. We found no effect on clutch size, but the probability of a fledged chick to recruit increased with a shorter arrival-breeding interval (earlier breeding). Finally, mark-recapture analyses did not detect an effect of shortened intervals on adult survival. Our results suggest that the advancement of breeding allows more time for fledgling development, increasing their probability to recruit. This may incur costs to other parts of the annual cycle, but, despite the shorter intervals, there was no effect on adult survival. Our results show that to fully understand the consequences of climate change, it is necessary to look carefully at different annual cycle stages, especially for organisms with complex cycles, such as migratory birds. © 2017

  11. An adaptive three-stage extended Kalman filter for nonlinear discrete-time system in presence of unknown inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mengli; Zhang, Yongbo; Wang, Zhihua; Fu, Huimin

    2018-04-01

    Considering the performances of conventional Kalman filter may seriously degrade when it suffers stochastic faults and unknown input, which is very common in engineering problems, a new type of adaptive three-stage extended Kalman filter (AThSEKF) is proposed to solve state and fault estimation in nonlinear discrete-time system under these conditions. The three-stage UV transformation and adaptive forgetting factor are introduced for derivation, and by comparing with the adaptive augmented state extended Kalman filter, it is proven to be uniformly asymptotically stable. Furthermore, the adaptive three-stage extended Kalman filter is applied to a two-dimensional radar tracking scenario to illustrate the effect, and the performance is compared with that of conventional three stage extended Kalman filter (ThSEKF) and the adaptive two-stage extended Kalman filter (ATEKF). The results show that the adaptive three-stage extended Kalman filter is more effective than these two filters when facing the nonlinear discrete-time systems with information of unknown inputs not perfectly known. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search-based Three-Stage Matheuristic for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jonas Mark; Røpke, Stefan

    The Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW) consist of determining a set of feasible vehicle routes to deliver goods to a set of customers using a hierarchical objective; first minimising the number of vehicles used and, second, the total driving distance. A three-stage method is proposed...... for the VRPTW. The first stage aims at minimising the number of vehicle used, whereas the second and third phase aims at minimising the travel distance. The first stage maintains an ejection pool with temporarily unserved customers, and tries to insert these customer into the existing solution. If a new...... candidate solution for the minimum number of vehicles is found, a route is removed and the customers from the route is placed in the ejection pool. If the heuristic terminates without finding a new candidate solution where all customers are served, the first stage returns the last found candidate solution...

  13. Shortening feedback time in continuous integration environment in large-scale embedded software development with test selection

    OpenAIRE

    Koivuniemi, J. (Jarmo)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Continuous integration is one of the Extreme Programming practices and is used in agile software development to provide rapid feedback and to have a working system at all times. In continuous integration, a developer commits code to projects mainline at least once a day which triggers automated build and tests. Large projects can struggle with continuous integration because with growing code base the number of test...

  14. Development of analytically capable time-of-flight mass spectrometer with continuous ion introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hárs, György; Dobos, Gábor

    2010-03-01

    The present article describes the results and findings explored in the course of the development of the analytically capable prototype of continuous time-of-flight (CTOF) mass spectrometer. Currently marketed pulsed TOF (PTOF) instruments use ion introduction with a 10 ns or so pulse width, followed by a waiting period roughly 100 μs. Accordingly, the sample is under excitation in 10-4 part of the total measuring time. This very low duty cycle severely limits the sensitivity of the PTOF method. A possible approach to deal with this problem is to use linear sinusoidal dual modulation technique (CTOF) as described in this article. This way the sensitivity of the method is increased, due to the 50% duty cycle of the excitation. All other types of TOF spectrometer use secondary electron multiplier (SEM) for detection, which unfortunately discriminates in amplification in favor of the lighter ions. This discrimination effect is especially undesirable in a mass spectrometric method, which targets high mass range. In CTOF method, SEM is replaced with Faraday cup detector, thus eliminating the mass discrimination effect. Omitting SEM is made possible by the high ion intensity and the very slow ion detection with some hundred hertz detection bandwidth. The electrometer electronics of the Faraday cup detector operates with amplification 1010 V/A. The primary ion beam is highly monoenergetic due to the construction of the ion gun, which made possible to omit any electrostatic mirror configuration for bunching the ions. The measurement is controlled by a personal computer and the intelligent signal generator Type Tabor WW 2571, which uses the direct digital synthesis technique for making arbitrary wave forms. The data are collected by a Labjack interface board, and the fast Fourier transformation is performed by the software. Noble gas mixture has been used to test the analytical capabilities of the prototype setup. Measurement presented proves the results of the mathematical

  15. Evaluating Continuous-Time Slam Using a Predefined Trajectory Provided by a Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, B.; Leblebici, R.; Martell, A.; Jörissen, S.; Schilling, K.; Nüchter, A.

    2017-09-01

    Recently published approaches to SLAM algorithms process laser sensor measurements and output a map as a point cloud of the environment. Often the actual precision of the map remains unclear, since SLAMalgorithms apply local improvements to the resulting map. Unfortunately, it is not trivial to compare the performance of SLAMalgorithms objectively, especially without an accurate ground truth. This paper presents a novel benchmarking technique that allows to compare a precise map generated with an accurate ground truth trajectory to a map with a manipulated trajectory which was distorted by different forms of noise. The accurate ground truth is acquired by mounting a laser scanner on an industrial robotic arm. The robotic arm is moved on a predefined path while the position and orientation of the end-effector tool are monitored. During this process the 2D profile measurements of the laser scanner are recorded in six degrees of freedom and afterwards used to generate a precise point cloud of the test environment. For benchmarking, an offline continuous-time SLAM algorithm is subsequently applied to remove the inserted distortions. Finally, it is shown that the manipulated point cloud is reversible to its previous state and is slightly improved compared to the original version, since small errors that came into account by imprecise assumptions, sensor noise and calibration errors are removed as well.

  16. Self-learning robust optimal control for continuous-time nonlinear systems with mismatched disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiong; He, Haibo

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a novel adaptive dynamic programming(ADP)-based self-learning robust optimal control scheme for input-affine continuous-time nonlinear systems with mismatched disturbances. First, the stabilizing feedback controller for original nonlinear systems is designed by modifying the optimal control law of the auxiliary system. It is also demonstrated that this feedback controller can optimize a specified value function. Then, within the framework of ADP, a single critic network is constructed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation associated with the auxiliary system optimal control law. To update the critic network weights, an indicator function and a concurrent learning technique are employed. By using the proposed update law for the critic network, the restrictive conditions including the initial admissible control and the persistence of excitation condition are relaxed. Moreover, the stability of the closed-loop auxiliary system is guaranteed in the sense that all the signals are uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the applicability of the developed control strategy is illustrated through simulations for an unstable nonlinear plant and a power system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Continuous hydrological modelling in the context of real time flood forecasting in alpine Danube tributary catchments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanzel, Ph; Kahl, B; Haberl, U; Herrnegger, M; Nachtnebel, H P

    2008-01-01

    A hydrological modelling framework applied within operational flood forecasting systems in three alpine Danube tributary basins, Traisen, Salzach and Enns, is presented. A continuous, semi-distributed rainfall-runoff model, accounting for the main hydrological processes of snow accumulation and melt, interception, evapotranspiration, infiltration, runoff generation and routing is set up. Spatial discretization relies on the division of watersheds into subbasins and subsequently into hydrologic response units based on spatial information on soil types, land cover and elevation bands. The hydrological models are calibrated with meteorological ground measurements and with meteorological analyses incorporating radar information. Operationally, each forecasting sequence starts with the re-calculation of the last 24 to 48 hours. Errors between simulated and observed runoff are minimized by optimizing a correction factor for the input to provide improved system states. For the hydrological forecast quantitative 48 or 72 hour forecast grids of temperature and precipitation - deterministic and probabilistic - are used as input. The forecasted hydrograph is corrected with an autoregressive model. The forecasting sequences are repeated each 15 minutes. First evaluations of resulting hydrological forecasts are presented and reliability of forecasts with different lead times is discussed.

  18. Neural Networks as a Tool for Constructing Continuous NDVI Time Series from AVHRR and MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; Lary, David J.; Vrieling, Anton; Stathakis, Demetris; Mussa, Hamse

    2008-01-01

    The long term Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer-Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (AVHRR-NDVI) record provides a critical historical perspective on vegetation dynamics necessary for global change research. Despite the proliferation of new sources of global, moderate resolution vegetation datasets, the remote sensing community is still struggling to create datasets derived from multiple sensors that allow the simultaneous use of spectral vegetation for time series analysis. To overcome the non-stationary aspect of NDVI, we use an artificial neural network (ANN) to map the NDVI indices from AVHRR to those from MODIS using atmospheric, surface type and sensor-specific inputs to account for the differences between the sensors. The NDVI dynamics and range of MODIS NDVI data at one degree is matched and extended through the AVHRR record. Four years of overlap between the two sensors is used to train a neural network to remove atmospheric and sensor specific effects on the AVHRR NDVI. In this paper, we present the resulting continuous dataset, its relationship to MODIS data, and a validation of the product.

  19. A lattice-model representation of continuous-time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Daniel [School of Mathematics, Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Manchester, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Mendez, Vicenc [Grup de Fisica Estadistica, Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)], E-mail: daniel.campos@uab.es, E-mail: vicenc.mendez@uab.es

    2008-02-29

    We report some ideas for constructing lattice models (LMs) as a discrete approach to the reaction-dispersal (RD) or reaction-random walks (RRW) models. The analysis of a rather general class of Markovian and non-Markovian processes, from the point of view of their wavefront solutions, let us show that in some regimes their macroscopic dynamics (front speed) turns out to be different from that by classical reaction-diffusion equations, which are often used as a mean-field approximation to the problem. So, the convenience of a more general framework as that given by the continuous-time random walks (CTRW) is claimed. Here we use LMs as a numerical approach in order to support that idea, while in previous works our discussion was restricted to analytical models. For the two specific cases studied here, we derive and analyze the mean-field expressions for our LMs. As a result, we are able to provide some links between the numerical and analytical approaches studied.

  20. Implementation of a two-group likelihood time-to-event continual reassessment method using SAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Amber; Morgan, Charity; Aban, Inmaculada B

    2015-10-01

    Dose finding trials using model-based methods have the ability to handle the increasingly complex landscape being seen in clinical trials. Issues such as patient heterogeneity in trial populations are important to address in the designing of a trial in addition to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Designs accommodating patient heterogeneity have been described using the continual reassessment method (CRM) and time-to-event CRM (TITE-CRM), yet, the implementation of these trials in practice have been limited. These methods and other model-based methods generally need statisticians to help design and conduct these trials. However, the statistical programs which facilitate the use of these methods, currently available focus on estimation in the one-sample case. A SAS program to accommodate two groups using the TITE-CRM and likelihood estimation has been developed. The program consists of macros that assist with the planning and implementation of a trial accounting for patient heterogeneity. Description of the program is given as well as examples using the programs. For planning purposes, an example will be provided showing how the program can be used to guide sample size estimates for the trial. This program provides researchers with a valuable tool for designing dose-finding studies to account for the presence of patient heterogeneity and conduct a trial using a hypothetical example. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficient Transition Probability Computation for Continuous-Time Branching Processes via Compressed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jason; Minin, Vladimir N

    2015-07-01

    Branching processes are a class of continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs) with ubiquitous applications. A general difficulty in statistical inference under partially observed CTMC models arises in computing transition probabilities when the discrete state space is large or uncountable. Classical methods such as matrix exponentiation are infeasible for large or countably infinite state spaces, and sampling-based alternatives are computationally intensive, requiring integration over all possible hidden events. Recent work has successfully applied generating function techniques to computing transition probabilities for linear multi-type branching processes. While these techniques often require significantly fewer computations than matrix exponentiation, they also become prohibitive in applications with large populations. We propose a compressed sensing framework that significantly accelerates the generating function method, decreasing computational cost up to a logarithmic factor by only assuming the probability mass of transitions is sparse. We demonstrate accurate and efficient transition probability computations in branching process models for blood cell formation and evolution of self-replicating transposable elements in bacterial genomes.

  2. The cascade model of teachers’ continuing professional development in Kenya: A time for change?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Kipkemoi Bett

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenya is one of the countries whose teachers the UNESCO (2015 report cited as lacking curriculum support in the classroom. As is the case in many African countries, a large portion of teachers in Kenya enter the teaching profession when inadequately prepared, while those already in the field receive insufficient support in their professional lives. The cascade model has often been utilized in the country whenever need for teachers’ continuing professional development (TCPD has arisen, especially on a large scale. The preference for the model is due to, among others, its cost effectiveness and ability to reach out to many teachers within a short period of time. Many researchers have however cast aspersions with this model for its glaring shortcomings. On the contrary, TCPD programmes that are collaborative in nature and based on teachers’ contexts have been found to be more effective than those that are not. This paper briefly examines cases of the cascade model in Kenya, the challenges associated with this model and proposes the adoption of collaborative and institution-based models to mitigate these challenges. The education sectors in many nations in Africa, and those in the developing world will find the discussions here relevant.

  3. Continuous-time ΣΔ ADC with implicit variable gain amplifier for CMOS image sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fang; Bermak, Amine; Abbes, Amira; Benammar, Mohieddine Amor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a column-parallel continuous-time sigma delta (CTSD) ADC for mega-pixel resolution CMOS image sensor (CIS). The sigma delta modulator is implemented with a 2nd order resistor/capacitor-based loop filter. The first integrator uses a conventional operational transconductance amplifier (OTA), for the concern of a high power noise rejection. The second integrator is realized with a single-ended inverter-based amplifier, instead of a standard OTA. As a result, the power consumption is reduced, without sacrificing the noise performance. Moreover, the variable gain amplifier in the traditional column-parallel read-out circuit is merged into the front-end of the CTSD modulator. By programming the input resistance, the amplitude range of the input current can be tuned with 8 scales, which is equivalent to a traditional 2-bit preamplification function without consuming extra power and chip area. The test chip prototype is fabricated using 0.18 μm CMOS process and the measurement result shows an ADC power consumption lower than 63.5 μW under 1.4 V power supply and 50 MHz clock frequency.

  4. Gain-Scheduled ℋ2 Controller Synthesis for Continuous-Time Polytopic LPV Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangbin Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of gain-scheduled ℋ2 controller synthesis for continuous-time linear parameter-varying systems. In this problem, the system matrices in the state-space form are polytopic and patameterized and the admissible values of the parameters are assumed to be measurable on-line in a polytope space. By employing a basis-parameter-dependent Lyapunov function and introducing some slack variables to the well-established performance conditions, sufficient conditions for the existence of the desired gain-scheduled ℋ2 state feedback and dynamic output feedback controllers are established in terms of parameterized linear matrix inequalities. Based on the polytopic characteristic of the dependent parameters and a convexification method, the corresponding controller synthesis problem is then cast into finite-dimensional convex optimization problem which can be efficiently solved by using standard numerical softwares. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and advantage of the proposed methods.

  5. Systolic Time Interval Estimation Using Continuous Wave Radar With On-Body Antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxi, Dilpreet; Hermeling, Evelien; Mercuri, Marco; Beutel, Fabian; van der Westen, Roberto Garcia; Torfs, Tom; Redoute, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2018-01-01

    The estimation of systolic time intervals (STIs) is done using continuous wave (CW) radar at 2.45 GHz with an on-body antenna. In the state of the art, typically bioimpedance, heart sounds and/or ultrasound are used to measure STIs. All three methods suffer from insufficient accuracy of STI estimation due to various reasons. CW radar is investigated for its ability to overcome the deficiencies in the state of the art. Ten healthy male subjects aged 25-45 were asked to lie down at a 30 incline. Recordings of 60 s were taken without breathing and with paced breathing. Heart sounds, electrocardiogram, respiration, and impedance cardiogram were measured simultaneously as reference. The radar antennas were placed at two positions on the chest. The antennas were placed directly on the body as well as with cotton textile in between. The beat to beat STIs have been determined from the reference signals as well as CW radar signals. The results indicate that CW radar can be used to estimate STIs in ambulatory monitoring. The results pave way to a potentially more compact method of estimating STIs, which can be integrated into a wearable device.

  6. Systematic dimensionality reduction for continuous-time quantum walks of interacting fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaac, J. A.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-09-01

    To extend the continuous-time quantum walk (CTQW) to simulate P distinguishable particles on a graph G composed of N vertices, the Hamiltonian of the system is expanded to act on an NP-dimensional Hilbert space, in effect, simulating the multiparticle CTQW on graph G via a single-particle CTQW propagating on the Cartesian graph product G□P. The properties of the Cartesian graph product have been well studied, and classical simulation of multiparticle CTQWs are common in the literature. However, the above approach is generally applied as is when simulating indistinguishable particles, with the particle statistics then applied to the propagated NP state vector to determine walker probabilities. We address the following question: How can we modify the underlying graph structure G□P in order to simulate multiple interacting fermionic CTQWs with a reduction in the size of the state space? In this paper, we present an algorithm for systematically removing "redundant" and forbidden quantum states from consideration, which provides a significant reduction in the effective dimension of the Hilbert space of the fermionic CTQW. As a result, as the number of interacting fermions in the system increases, the classical computational resources required no longer increases exponentially for fixed N .

  7. Low-cost, real-time, continuous flow PCR system for pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Carballo, B Leticia; McGuiness, Ian; McBeth, Christine; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Borrós, Salvador; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a portable and low cost point-of-care (POC) PCR system for quantitative detection of pathogens. Our system is based on continuous flow PCR which maintains fixed temperatures zones and pushes the PCR solution between two heated areas allowing for faster heat transfer and as a result, a faster PCR. The PCR system is built around a 46.0 mm × 30.9 mm × 0.4 mm disposable thermoplastic chip. In order to make the single-use chip economically viable, it was manufactured by hot embossing and was designed to be compatible with roll-to-roll embossing for large scale production. The prototype instrumentation surrounding the chip includes two heaters, thermal sensors, and an optical system. The optical system allows for pathogen detection via real time fluorescence measurements. FAM probes were used as fluorescent reporters of the amplicons generated during the PCR. To demonstrate the function of the chip, two infectious bacteria targets were selected: Chlamydia trachomatis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. For both bacteria, the limit of detection of the system was determined, PCR efficiencies were calculated, and different flow velocities were tested. We have demonstrated successful detection for these two bacterial pathogens highlighting the versatility and broad utility of our portable, low-cost, and rapid PCR diagnostic device.

  8. The general critical analysis for continuous-time UPPAM recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Chen; Jing, Wen-Feng; Fang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Ping

    2016-01-29

    The uniformly pseudo-projection-anti-monotone (UPPAM) neural network model, which can be considered as the unified continuous-time neural networks (CNNs), includes almost all of the known CNNs individuals. Recently, studies on the critical dynamics behaviors of CNNs have drawn special attentions due to its importance in both theory and applications. In this paper, we will present the analysis of the UPPAM network under the general critical conditions. It is shown that the UPPAM network possesses the global convergence and asymptotical stability under the general critical conditions if the network satisfies one quasi-symmetric requirement on the connective matrices, which is easy to be verified and applied. The general critical dynamics have rarely been studied before, and this work is an attempt to gain an meaningful assurance of general critical convergence and stability of CNNs. Since UPPAM network is the unified model for CNNs, the results obtained here can generalize and extend the existing critical conclusions for CNNs individuals, let alone those non-critical cases. Moreover, the easily verified conditions for general critical convergence and stability can further promote the applications of CNNs.

  9. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digester performance under variations in solids retention time and feeding frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Nathan D; Mihelcic, James R; Ergas, Sarina J

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this research was to understand the effect of solids retention time (SRT) and feeding frequency on the performance of anaerobic digesters used to recover bioenergy from swine waste. Semi-continuous mesophilic anaerobic digesters were operated at varying SRTs and feeding frequencies. Performance metrics included biogas and methane production rates, biomass robustness and functionality and removals of volatile solids, soluble chemical oxygen demand, the fecal-indicator bacteria Escherichia coli, and the human pathogen Salmonella. Biochemical methane formation potential and specific methanogenic activity assays were used to demonstrate biomass robustness and functionality. Results indicated that anaerobic digesters fed weekly had higher average methane yields (0.20 vs. 0.18m(3)CH4/kg-VSadded), specific methanogenic activities (40 vs. 35ml/day), and fecal indicator bacteria destruction (99.9% vs. 99.4%) than those fed every-other day. Salmonella, soluble COD, and VS destruction did not change with varied feeding frequency; however, higher removals were observed with longer SRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. D Fluid Deformation and Mixing via a Continuous Time Random Walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. R.; Dentz, M.; Le Borgne, T.; de Barros, F.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid stretching and deformation as quantified by the fluid deformation gradient tensor directly controls mixing of diffusive species in both chaotic and non-chaotic, 2D and 3D flows at the pore- and Darcy scales. Indeed, recent advances [LeBorgne et. al. PRL, 110, 204501, 2013] in the prediction of mixing and scalar dissipation require the distribution of fluid deformation rates as quantitative inputs. However, these measures are often difficult to link to medium properties or statistical heterogeneity controls. To advance this problem, we present a novel Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) to model stochastic evolution of the 3D fluid deformation tensor in a Protean (streamline) coordinate frame. This approach allows topological constraints imposed by the flow kinematics to be naturally obeyed, and furthermore flow features that generate non-Fickian transport can be clearly elucidated. For simple flows, this framework allows the distribution of deformation rates (and hence mixing) to be expressed in terms of heterogenenity controls, and for more complex flows, this approach clearly identifies what flow features govern anomalous transport and how their statistics can be measured as model inputs.

  11. Natural Organic Matter Transport Modeling with a Continuous Time Random Walk Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnis, Daniel P; Bolster, Diogo; Maurice, Patricia A

    2014-02-01

    In transport experiments through columns packed with naturally Fe/Al oxide-coated quartz sand, breakthrough curves (BTCs) of natural organic matter (NOM) displayed strong and persistent power law tailing that could not be described by the classical advection-dispersion equation. Tailing was not observed in BTCs for a nonreactive tracer (sulforhodamine B); therefore, the anomalous transport is attributed to diverse adsorptive behavior of the polydisperse NOM sample rather than to physical heterogeneity of the porous medium. NOM BTC tailing became more pronounced with decreases in pH and increases in ionic strength, conditions previously shown to be associated with enhanced preferential adsorption of intermediate to high molecular weight NOM components. Drawing from previous work on anomalous solute transport, we develop an approach to model NOM transport within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW) and show that under all conditions examined, the CTRW model is able to capture tailing of NOM BTCs by accounting for differences in transport rates of NOM fractions through a distribution of effective retardation factors. These results demonstrate the importance of considering effects of adsorptive fractionation on NOM mobility, and illustrate the ability of the CTRW model to describe transport of a multicomponent solute.

  12. Solvable continuous-time random walk model of the motion of tracer particles through porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Holzner, Markus

    2016-08-01

    We consider the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model of tracer motion in porous medium flows based on the experimentally determined distributions of pore velocity and pore size reported by Holzner et al. [M. Holzner et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 013015 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.013015]. The particle's passing through one channel is modeled as one step of the walk. The step (channel) length is random and the walker's velocity at consecutive steps of the walk is conserved with finite probability, mimicking that at the turning point there could be no abrupt change of velocity. We provide the Laplace transform of the characteristic function of the walker's position and reductions for different cases of independence of the CTRW's step duration τ , length l , and velocity v . We solve our model with independent l and v . The model incorporates different forms of the tail of the probability density of small velocities that vary with the model parameter α . Depending on that parameter, all types of anomalous diffusion can hold, from super- to subdiffusion. In a finite interval of α , ballistic behavior with logarithmic corrections holds, which was observed in a previously introduced CTRW model with independent l and τ . Universality of tracer diffusion in the porous medium is considered.

  13. Continuous-time interval model identification of blood glucose dynamics for type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchsteiger, Harald; Johansson, Rolf; Renard, Eric; del Re, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    While good physiological models of the glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic patients are well known, their parameterisation is difficult. The high intra-patient variability observed is a further major obstacle. This holds for data-based models too, so that no good patient-specific models are available. Against this background, this paper proposes the use of interval models to cover the different metabolic conditions. The control-oriented models contain a carbohydrate and insulin sensitivity factor to be used for insulin bolus calculators directly. Available clinical measurements were sampled on an irregular schedule which prompts the use of continuous-time identification, also for the direct estimation of the clinically interpretable factors mentioned above. An identification method is derived and applied to real data from 28 diabetic patients. Model estimation was done on a clinical data-set, whereas validation results shown were done on an out-of-clinic, everyday life data-set. The results show that the interval model approach allows a much more regular estimation of the parameters and avoids physiologically incompatible parameter estimates.

  14. "I had a good time when I was young": Interpreting descriptions of continuity among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breheny, Mary; Griffiths, Zoë

    2017-04-01

    Messages describing how best to age are prominent in gerontological theory, research and the media. These prescriptions for ageing may foster positive experiences in later life; however, they may also obscure the social and situated nature of expectations for ageing well. Continuity Theory proposes ageing well is achieved through continuity of activity and stability of relationships and identity over the life course. Continuity seems adaptive, yet prioritising continuity may not match the expectations, desires and realities of older people. To understand continuity among older people, the present study used interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to analyse transcripts from eleven participants over the age of 79 years. Continuity was important for older people in this study, who described a range of practices that supported internal and external continuity. Participants acknowledged both positive and negative changes in roles and obligations as they aged which impacted on continuity of identity. Continuity of identity was linked both to being 'just like always' and 'just like everyone else'. Examining these accounts shows how they are tied to expectations that older people should both maintain earlier patterns of behaviour while also negotiating changing social expectations for behaviour that are linked to age. These tensions point to the balance between physical, environmental and interpersonal change and the negotiation of social expectations which together structure possibilities for ageing well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The timing of the shrew: continuous melatonin treatment maintains youthful rhythmic activity in aging Crocidura russula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Magnanou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory conditions nullify the extrinsic factors that determine the wild expected lifespan and release the intrinsic or potential lifespan. Thus, wild animals reared in a laboratory often show an increased lifespan, and consequently an increased senescence phase. Senescence is associated with a broad suite of physiological changes, including a decreased responsiveness of the circadian system. The time-keeping hormone melatonin, an important chemical player in this system, is suspected to have an anti-aging role. The Greater White-toothed shrew Crocidura russula is an ideal study model to address questions related to aging and associated changes in biological functions: its lifespan is short and is substantially increased in captivity; daily and seasonal rhythms, while very marked the first year of life, are dramatically altered during the senescence process which starts during the second year. Here we report on an investigation of the effects of melatonin administration on locomotor activity of aging shrews.1 The diel fluctuations of melatonin levels in young, adult and aging shrews were quantified in the pineal gland and plasma. In both, a marked diel rhythm (low diurnal concentration; high nocturnal concentration was present in young animals but then decreased in adults, and, as a result of a loss in the nocturnal production, was absent in old animals. 2 Daily locomotor activity rhythm was monitored in pre-senescent animals that had received either a subcutaneous melatonin implant, an empty implant or no implant at all. In non-implanted and sham-implanted shrews, the rhythm was well marked in adults. A marked degradation in both period and amplitude, however, started after the age of 14-16 months. This pattern was considerably delayed in melatonin-implanted shrews who maintained the daily rhythm for significantly longer.This is the first long term study (>500 days observation of the same individuals that investigates the effects of

  16. The timing of the shrew: continuous melatonin treatment maintains youthful rhythmic activity in aging Crocidura russula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnanou, Elodie; Attia, Joël; Fons, Roger; Boeuf, Gilles; Falcon, Jack

    2009-06-15

    Laboratory conditions nullify the extrinsic factors that determine the wild expected lifespan and release the intrinsic or potential lifespan. Thus, wild animals reared in a laboratory often show an increased lifespan, and consequently an increased senescence phase. Senescence is associated with a broad suite of physiological changes, including a decreased responsiveness of the circadian system. The time-keeping hormone melatonin, an important chemical player in this system, is suspected to have an anti-aging role. The Greater White-toothed shrew Crocidura russula is an ideal study model to address questions related to aging and associated changes in biological functions: its lifespan is short and is substantially increased in captivity; daily and seasonal rhythms, while very marked the first year of life, are dramatically altered during the senescence process which starts during the second year. Here we report on an investigation of the effects of melatonin administration on locomotor activity of aging shrews. 1) The diel fluctuations of melatonin levels in young, adult and aging shrews were quantified in the pineal gland and plasma. In both, a marked diel rhythm (low diurnal concentration; high nocturnal concentration) was present in young animals but then decreased in adults, and, as a result of a loss in the nocturnal production, was absent in old animals. 2) Daily locomotor activity rhythm was monitored in pre-senescent animals that had received either a subcutaneous melatonin implant, an empty implant or no implant at all. In non-implanted and sham-implanted shrews, the rhythm was well marked in adults. A marked degradation in both period and amplitude, however, started after the age of 14-16 months. This pattern was considerably delayed in melatonin-implanted shrews who maintained the daily rhythm for significantly longer. This is the first long term study (>500 days observation of the same individuals) that investigates the effects of continuous melatonin

  17. Effect of continuous versus intermittent turning on nursing and non-nursing care time for acute spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugaresti, J M; Tator, C H; Szalai, J P

    1991-06-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether automated, continuous turning beds would reduce the nursing care time for spinal cord injured (SCI) patients by freeing hospital staff from manual turning of patients every 2 hours. Seventeen patients were randomly assigned to continuous or intermittent turning and were observed during the 8 hour shift for 1 to 18 days following injury. Trained observers recorded the time taken for patient contact activities performed by the nursing staff (direct nursing care) and other hospital staff. The mean direct nursing care time per dayshift per patient was 130 +/- 22 (mean +/- SD) minutes for 9 patients managed with continuous turning and 115 +/- 41 (mean +/- SD) minutes for 8 patients managed with intermittent turning. The observed difference in care time between the two treatment groups was not significant (p greater than 0.05). Numerous factors including neurological level, time following injury, and medical complications appeared to affect the direct nursing care time. Although continuous turning did not reduce nursing care time it offered major advantages for the treatment of selected cases of acute SCI. Some major advantages of continuous turning treatment were observed. Spinal alignment was easier to maintain during continuous turning in patients with injuries of the cervical spine. Continuous turning allowed radiological procedures on the spine, chest and abdomen to be more easily performed without having to alter the patients' position in bed. Therapy and nursing staff indicated that the continuous turning bed facilitated patient positioning for such activities as chest physiotherapy. With continuous turning, one nurse was sufficient to provide care for an individual SCI patient without having to rely on the assistance of other nurses on the ward for patient turning every 2 hours.

  18. Evidence-based medicine: the time has come to set standards for staging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quirke, Phil; Cuvelier, Claude; Ensari, Arzu; Glimelius, Bengt; Laurberg, Søren; Ortiz, Hector; Piard, Francoise; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Glenthoj, Anders; Pennickx, Freddy; Seymour, Matt; Valentini, Vincenzo; Williams, Geraint; Nagtegaal, Iris D.

    2010-01-01

    For international communication in cancer, staging systems such as TNM are essential; however, the principles and processes used to decide about changes in every new edition of TNM need to be subject to debate. Changes with major impact for patient treatment are introduced without evidence. We think

  19. Modelling and real-time simulation of continuous-discrete systems in mechatronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindow, H. [Rostocker, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    This work presents a methodology for simulation and modelling of systems with continuous - discrete dynamics. It derives hybrid discrete event models from Lagrange`s equations of motion. This method combines continuous mechanical, electrical and thermodynamical submodels on one hand with discrete event models an the other hand into a hybrid discrete event model. This straight forward software development avoids numeric overhead.

  20. The Effect of the Timing of Intramuscular Oxytocin Injection on Maternal Bleeding during the Third Stage of Labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakine Mohamadian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: The third stage of labour is one of the most troublesome stages of child delivery. The basic principle of the third stage management is administrating prophylactic uterotonics. However, the time of its administration varies in different hospitals. This study aimed to determine the effect of intramuscular oxytocin injection after emergence of the fetal anterior shoulder or placental expulsion on bleeding in the third stage of labour. Methodology: This clinical trial was conducted on 100 pregnant women with gestational age of 38-42 weeks, and singleton pregnancies. Subjects were selected using convenience sampling and were then randomly assigned to intervention (injection of 10 IU intramuscular oxytocin after emergence of the fetal anterior shoulder and control (injection of 10 IU intramuscular oxytocin after placental expulsion groups. Blood was collected in containers and weighed with a weighing scale.  A checklist was used to record labor and delivery related data. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5, using Chi-square and t-test. Findings: The mean amount of bleeding during the third stage of labour was 183.4 ± 145.8 and 202.2 ±208.8 ml in intervention and control group, respectively. No significant difference was found between two groups in terms of maternal bleeding. Conclusion: Injection of intramuscular oxytocin either after emergence of the fetal anterior shoulder or placental expulsion does not affect the amount of maternal bleeding during the third stage of labour.

  1. Fractional diffusion in the multiple-trapping regime and revision of the equivalence with the continuous-time random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisquert, Juan

    2003-07-04

    We investigate the macroscopic diffusion of carriers in the multiple-trapping (MT) regime, in relation with electron transport in nanoscaled heterogeneous systems, and we describe the differences, as well as the similarities, between MT and the continuous-time random walk (CTRW). Diffusion of free carriers in MT can be expressed as a generalized continuity equation based on fractional time derivatives, while the CTRW model for diffusive transport generalizes the constitutive equation for the carrier flux.

  2. A virtual remote sensing observation network for continuous, near-real-time monitoring of atmospheric instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporov, Maria; Löhnert, Ulrich; Potthast, Roland; Cimini, Domenico; De Angelis, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Short-term forecasts of current high-resolution numerical weather prediction models still have large deficits in forecasting the exact temporal and spatial location of severe, locally influenced weather such as summer-time convective storms or cool season lifted stratus or ground fog. Often, the thermodynamic instability - especially in the boundary layer - plays an essential role in the evolution of weather events. While the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere is well measured close to the surface (i.e. 2 m) by in-situ sensors and in the upper troposphere by satellite sounders, the planetary boundary layer remains a largely under-sampled region of the atmosphere where only sporadic information from radiosondes or aircraft observations is available. The major objective of the presented DWD-funded project ARON (Extramural Research Programme) is to overcome this observational gap and to design an optimized network of ground based microwave radiometers (MWR) and compact Differential Absorption Lidars (DIAL) for a continuous, near-real-time monitoring of temperature and humidity in the atmospheric boundary layer in order to monitor thermodynamic (in)stability. Previous studies showed, that microwave profilers are well suited for continuously monitoring the temporal development of atmospheric stability (i.e. Cimini et al., 2015) before the initiation of deep convection, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer. However, the vertical resolution of microwave temperature profiles is best in the lowest kilometer above the surface, decreasing rapidly with increasing height. In addition, humidity profile retrievals typically cannot be resolved with more than two degrees of freedom for signal, resulting in a rather poor vertical resolution throughout the troposphere. Typical stability indices used to assess the potential of convection rely on temperature and humidity values not only in the region of the boundary layer but also in the layers above. Therefore, satellite

  3. Child mortality inequalities across Rwanda districts: a geoadditive continuous-time survival analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Niragire

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Child survival programmes are efficient when they target the most significant and area-specific factors. This study aimed to assess the key determinants and spatial variation of child mortality at the district level in Rwanda. Data from the 2010 Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey were analysed for 8817 live births that occurred during five years preceding the survey. Out of the children born, 433 had died before survey interviews were carried out. A full Bayesian geo-additive continuous-time hazard model enabled us to maximise data utilisation and hence improve the accuracy of our estimates. The results showed substantial district- level spatial variation in childhood mortality in Rwanda. District-specific spatial characteristics were particularly associated with higher death hazards in two districts: Musanze and Nyabihu. The model estimates showed that there were lower death rates among children from households of medium and high economic status compared to those from low-economic status households. Factors, such as four antenatal care visits, delivery at a health facility, prolonged breastfeeding and mothers younger than 31 years were associated with lower child death rates. Long preceding birth intervals were also associated with fewer hazards. For these reasons, programmes aimed at reducing child mortality gaps between districts in Rwanda should target maternal factors and take into consideration district-specific spatial characteristics. Further, child survival gains require strengthening or scaling-up of existing programmes pertaining to access to, and utilisation of maternal and child health care services as well as reduction of the household gap in the economic status.

  4. Continuous time random walk model better describes the tailing of atrazine transport in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jiancai; Jiang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Hu, Weiping; Crawford, John W

    2008-05-01

    Contaminant transport in soils is complicated and involves some physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. In this research, the soil column displacement experiments of Cl(-) and atrazine under different flow velocities were carried out. The data sets of Cl(-) transport in sandy loam fitted to the convection dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (TRM) indicated that the effects of physical nonequilibrium process produced by immobile water on the breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Cl(-) and atrazine transport through the repacking soil columns were negligible. The two-site model (TSM) and the continuous time random walk (CTRW) were also used to fit atrazine transport behavior at the flow rate of 19.86 cm h(-1). The CTRW convincingly captured the full evolution of atrazine BTC in the soil column, especially for the part of long tailing. However, the TSM failed to characterize the tailing of atrazine BTC in the soil column. The calculated fraction of equilibrium sorption sites, F, ranging from 0.78 to 0.80 for all flow rates suggested the contribution of nonequilibrium sorption sites to the asymmetry of atrazine BTCs. Furthermore, the data sets for the flow rates of 6.68 cm h(-1) and 32.81 cm h(-1) were predicted by the TSM and the CTRW. As to the flow rate of 6.68 cm h(-1), the CTRW predicted the entire BTC of atrazine transport better than the TSM did. For the flow rate of 32.81 cm h(-1), the CTRW characterized the late part of the tail better, while the TSM failed to predict the tailings of atrazine BTC.

  5. Application of continuous time random walk theory to nonequilibrium transport in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Ren, Li

    2009-09-01

    Continuous time random walk (CTRW) formulations have been demonstrated to provide a general and effective approach that quantifies the behavior of solute transport in heterogeneous media in field, laboratory, and numerical experiments. In this paper we first apply the CTRW approach to describe the sorbing solute transport in soils under chemical (or) and physical nonequilibrium conditions by curve-fitting. Results show that the theoretical solutions are in a good agreement with the experimental measurements. In case that CTRW parameters cannot be determined directly or easily, an alternative method is then proposed for estimating such parameters independently of the breakthrough curve data to be simulated. We conduct numerical experiments with artificial data sets generated by the HYDRUS-1D model for a wide range of pore water velocities (upsilon) and retardation factors (R) to investigate the relationship between CTRW parameters for a sorbing solute and these two quantities (upsilon, R) that can be directly measured in independent experiments. A series of best-fitting regression equations are then developed from the artificial data sets, which can be easily used as an estimation or prediction model to assess the transport of sorbing solutes under steady flow conditions through soil. Several literature data sets of pesticides are used to validate these relationships. The results show reasonable performance in most cases, thus indicating that our method could provide an alternative way to effectively predict sorbing solute transport in soils. While the regression relationships presented are obtained under certain flow and sorption conditions, the methodology of our study is general and may be extended to predict solute transport in soils under different flow and sorption conditions.

  6. Asymmetric continuous-time neural networks without local traps for solving constraint satisfaction problems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botond Molnár

    Full Text Available There has been a long history of using neural networks for combinatorial optimization and constraint satisfaction problems. Symmetric Hopfield networks and similar approaches use steepest descent dynamics, and they always converge to the closest local minimum of the energy landscape. For finding global minima additional parameter-sensitive techniques are used, such as classical simulated annealing or the so-called chaotic simulated annealing, which induces chaotic dynamics by addition of extra terms to the energy landscape. Here we show that asymmetric continuous-time neural networks can solve constraint satisfaction problems without getting trapped in non-solution attractors. We concentrate on a model solving Boolean satisfiability (k-SAT, which is a quintessential NP-complete problem. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the stable fixed points of the neural network and the k-SAT solutions and we present numerical evidence that limit cycles may also be avoided by appropriately choosing the parameters of the model. This optimal parameter region is fairly independent of the size and hardness of instances, this way parameters can be chosen independently of the properties of problems and no tuning is required during the dynamical process. The model is similar to cellular neural networks already used in CNN computers. On an analog device solving a SAT problem would take a single operation: the connection weights are determined by the k-SAT instance and starting from any initial condition the system searches until finding a solution. In this new approach transient chaotic behavior appears as a natural consequence of optimization hardness and not as an externally induced effect.

  7. Short time step continuous rainfall modeling and simulation of extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callau Poduje, A. C.; Haberlandt, U.

    2017-09-01

    The design, planning, operation and overall assessment of urban drainage systems require long and continuous rain series in a high temporal resolution. Unfortunately, the availability of this data is usually short. Nevertheless a precipitation model could be used to tackle this shortcoming; therefore it is in the aim of this study to present a stochastic point precipitation model to reproduce average rainfall event properties along with extreme values. For this purpose a model is proposed to generate long synthetic series of rainfall for a temporal resolution of 5 min. It is based on an alternating renewal framework and events are characterized by variables describing durations, amounts and peaks. A group of 24 stations located in the north of Germany is used to set up and test the model. The adequate modeling of joint behaviour of rainfall amount and duration is found to be essential for reproducing the observed properties, especially for the extreme events. Copulas are advantageous tools for modeling these variables jointly; however caution must be taken in the selection of the proper copula. The inclusion of seasonality and small events is as well tested and found to be useful. The model is directly validated by generating long synthetic time series and comparing them with observed ones. An indirect validation is as well performed based on a fictional urban hydrological system. The proposed model is capable of reproducing seasonal behaviour and main characteristics of the rainfall events including extremes along with urban flooding and overflow behaviour. Overall the performance of the model is acceptable compared to the design practice. The proposed model is simple to interpret, fast to implement and to transfer to other regions, whilst showing acceptable results.

  8. Improving prehospital trauma care in Rwanda through continuous quality improvement: an interrupted time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Nyinawankusi, Jeanne D'Arc; Enumah, Samuel; Maine, Rebecca; Uwitonze, Eric; Hu, Yihan; Kabagema, Ignace; Byiringiro, Jean Claude; Riviello, Robert; Jayaraman, Sudha

    2017-07-01

    Injury is a major cause of premature death and disability in East Africa, and high-quality pre-hospital care is essential for optimal trauma outcomes. The Rwandan pre-hospital emergency care service (SAMU) uses an electronic database to evaluate and optimize pre-hospital care through a continuous quality improvement programme (CQIP), beginning March 2014. The SAMU database was used to assess pre-hospital quality metrics including supplementary oxygen for hypoxia (O2), intravenous fluids for hypotension (IVF), cervical collar placement for head injuries (c-collar), and either splinting (splint) or administration of pain medications (pain) for long bone fractures. Targets of >90% were set for each metric and daily team meetings and monthly feedback sessions were implemented to address opportunities for improvement. These five pre-hospital quality metrics were assessed monthly before and after implementation of the CQIP. Met and unmet needs for O2, IVF, and c-collar were combined into a summative monthly SAMU Trauma Quality Scores (STQ score). An interrupted time series linear regression model compared the STQ score during 14 months before the CQIP implementation to the first 14 months after. During the 29-month study period 3,822 patients met study criteria. 1,028 patients needed one or more of the five studied interventions during the study period. All five endpoints had a significant increase between the pre-CQI and post-CQI periods (pimprovement of +6.1% (p=0.017) and sustained monthly improvements in care delivery-improving at a rate of 0.7% per month (p=0.028). The SAMU experience demonstrates the utility of a responsive, data-driven quality improvement programme to yield significant immediate and sustained improvements in pre-hospital care for trauma in Rwanda. This programme may be used as an example for additional efforts engaging frontline staff with real-time data feedback in order to rapidly translate data collection efforts into improved care for the

  9. Patient satisfaction and barriers to initiating real-time continuous glucose monitoring in early pregnancy in women with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, A L; Madsen, A B; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate self-reported satisfaction and barriers to initiating real-time continuous glucose monitoring in early pregnancy among women with pregestational diabetes. Methods: Fifty-four women with Type 1 diabetes and 14 women with Type 2 diabetes were offered continuous glucose monitoring...... of initial monitoring). Ten women (15%) did not wish to use continuous glucose monitoring again in pregnancy. Main causes behind early removal of continuous glucose monitoring were self-reported skin irritation, technical problems and continuous glucose monitoring inaccuracy. No differences were found...... for 6 days at median 9 (range 6-14) gestational weeks and were asked to answer a semi-structured questionnaire on patient satisfaction. Results: Median HbA(1c) was 49 (range 34-86) mmol/mol) [6.6 (5.3-10.0) %] and duration of diabetes was 12 (0.5-37) years. Continuous glucose monitoring was used for 6...

  10. Tectonic stages in Southern Greater Caucasus and Adjara Trialeti belt in Georgia: new results on timing and structures of inverted basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candaux, Zoé; Sosson, Marc; Adamia, Shota; Sadradze, Nino; Alania, Victor; Enukidze, Onise; Chabukiani, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    The Greater Caucasus mountain belt is the result of a long live subduction process and collisions of continental microplates (e.g. Dercourt et al., 1986; Barrier and Vrielynck, 2008). The northward subduction of Tethys beneath Eurasian plate initiated a back-arc basin: the Greater Caucasus basin (e.g. Adamia et al., 1981; Zonenshain and Le Pichon, 1986; Roberston et al., 1996; Stephenson and Schellart, 2010 among others). It took place from Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous. First compression stage started at the end of Cretaceous in the Lesser Caucasus (e.g. Rolland et al., 2010; Sosson et al. 2010, 2016) and Palaeocene-early Eocene in Crimean Mountains (northwestern continuation of the Greater Caucasus) (Sheremet et al., 2016). In southern Greater Caucasus (Georgian area) the age of deformation during the beginning of the collision is still a subject of debate: Oligocene-Lower Miocene at the frontal part (e.g. Adamia et al. 2010) or Eocene (Mosar et al., 2010). The deformation continues at Miocene, Pliocene and actual time in Kura and Rioni foreland basins (Forte et al., 2010; 2013; Mosar et al., 2010). The different timing is interpreted to be the result of the Taurides-Anatolides-South Armenian microcontinent collision with Eurasia, followed by the collision with Arabia. During the first collision, during Paleocene-Eocene, the so-called Adjara-Trialeti basin opened north of the volcanic arc. One question is if this local extension affect the timing of compression observed in the Greater Caucasus or not. In Georgia, we investigated new structural analyses, and considered unconformities and growth strata at the frontal part of deformations in Kura and Rioni forelands basins (in front of the Greater Caucasus). Our results evidence different tectonic stages and their timing. In Adjara-Trialeti, Kura and south Rioni basins deformation starts at Middle-Late Miocene. In northern Rioni basin Upper Cretaceous-Lower Paleocene compression is evidenced. The structures

  11. Efficient implementation of the continuous-time hybridization expansion quantum impurity solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafermann, Hartmut; Werner, Philipp; Gull, Emanuel

    2013-04-01

    Strongly correlated quantum impurity problems appear in a wide variety of contexts ranging from nanoscience and surface physics to material science and the theory of strongly correlated lattice models, where they appear as auxiliary systems within dynamical mean-field theory. Accurate and unbiased solutions must usually be obtained numerically, and continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo algorithms, a family of algorithms based on the stochastic sampling of partition function expansions, perform well for such systems. With the present paper we provide an efficient and generic implementation of the hybridization expansion quantum impurity solver, based on the segment representation. We provide a complete implementation featuring most of the recently developed extensions and optimizations. Our implementation allows one to treat retarded interactions and provides generalized measurement routines based on improved estimators for the self-energy and for vertex functions. The solver is embedded in the ALPS-DMFT application package. Catalogue identifier: AEOL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEOL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Use of the hybridization expansion impurity solvers requires citation of this paper. Use of any ALPS program requires citation of the ALPS [1] paper. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 650044 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 20553265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++/Python. Computer: Desktop PC, high-performance computers. Operating system: Unix, Linux, OSX, Windows. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, MPI parallelized. RAM: 1 GB Classification: 7.3. External routines: ALPS [1, 2, 3], BLAS [4, 5], LAPACK [6], HDF5 [7] Nature of problem: Quantum impurity models were originally introduced to describe a magnetic transition metal ion in a non

  12. Two-stage categorization in brand extension evaluation: electrophysiological time course evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Ma

    Full Text Available A brand name can be considered a mental category. Similarity-based categorization theory has been used to explain how consumers judge a new product as a member of a known brand, a process called brand extension evaluation. This study was an event-related potential study conducted in two experiments. The study found a two-stage categorization process reflected by the P2 and N400 components in brand extension evaluation. In experiment 1, a prime-probe paradigm was presented in a pair consisting of a brand name and a product name in three conditions, i.e., in-category extension, similar-category extension, and out-of-category extension. Although the task was unrelated to brand extension evaluation, P2 distinguished out-of-category extensions from similar-category and in-category ones, and N400 distinguished similar-category extensions from in-category ones. In experiment 2, a prime-probe paradigm with a related task was used, in which product names included subcategory and major-category product names. The N400 elicited by subcategory products was more significantly negative than that elicited by major-category products, with no salient difference in P2. We speculated that P2 could reflect the early low-level and similarity-based processing in the first stage, whereas N400 could reflect the late analytic and category-based processing in the second stage.

  13. Three-stage continuous culture system with a self-generated anaerobia to study the regionalized metabolism of the human gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Gervasio, David; Tottey, William; Gaci, Nadia; Alric, Monique; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Peyret, Pierre; Martin, Jean-François; Pujos, Estelle; Sébédio, Jean-Louis; Brugère, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    The technical and ethical difficulties in studying the gut microbiota in vivo warrant the development and improvement of in vitro systems able to simulate and control the physicochemical factors of the gut biology. Moreover, the functional regionalization of this organ implies a model simulating these differences. Here we propose an improved and alternative three-stage continuous bioreactor called 3S-ECSIM (three-stage Environmental Control System for Intestinal Microbiota) to study the human large intestine. Its main feature compared with other in vitro systems is the anaerobic atmosphere originating directly from the microbiota metabolism, leading to different gas ratios of CO2 and H2 in each compartment. Analyses of the metabolic and microbiological profiles (LC-MS and a phylogenetic microarray) show different profiles together with a maintenance of this differentiation between the three compartments, simulating respectively a proximal, a transversal and a distal colon. Moreover, the last reactor presents a high similarity with the initial fecal sample, at the microbiological diversity level. Based on our results, this in-vitro process improvement is a valuable alternative tool to dynamically study the structure and metabolism of gut microbiota, and its response to nutrients, prebiotics, probiotics, drugs or xenobiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Patients report better satisfaction with part-time primary care physicians, despite less continuity of care and access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panattoni, Laura; Stone, Ashley; Chung, Sukyung; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2015-03-01

    The growing number of primary care physicians (PCPs) reducing their clinical work hours has raised concerns about meeting the future demand for services and fulfilling the continuity and access mandates for patient-centered care. However, the patient's experience of care with part-time physicians is relatively unknown, and may be mediated by continuity and access to care outcomes. We aimed to examine the relationships between a physicians' clinical full-time equivalent (FTE), continuity of care, access to care, and patient satisfaction with the physician. We used a multi-level structural equation estimation, with continuity and access modeled as mediators, for a cross-section in 2010. The study included family medicine (n = 104) and internal medicine (n = 101) physicians in a multi-specialty group practice, along with their patient satisfaction survey responses (n = 12,688). Physician level FTE, continuity of care received by patients, continuity of care provided by physician, and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction with the physician score, on a 0-100 % scale, were measured. Access to care was measured as days to the third next-available appointment. Physician FTE was directly associated with better continuity of care received (0.172% per FTE, p continuity of care provided (0.108% per FTE, p care (-0.033 days per FTE, p continuity of care provided was a significant mediator (0.016% per FTE, p continuity and access, but they may provide a better patient experience. Physician workforce planning should consider these care attributes when considering the role of part-time PCPs in practice redesign efforts and initiatives to meet the demand for primary care services.

  15. The experience of childbrith in first-time mothers who received narcotic analgesics during the first stage of labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jantjes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This research has focused on the birthing experience of first-time mothers who received the narcotic analgesic combination of Pethidine and Hydroxyzine during the first stage of labour. A qualitative research methodology was used to collect data. Unstructured interviews were held with first-time mothers to obtain accounts of their experience of childbirth. These narrations were audio-taped while the participants were still being cared for in the postnatal ward of the hospital where delivery took place. Nine interviews were conducted with first-time mothers who gave birth normally vaginally after a normal pregnancy and who received a narcotic analgesic in the first stage of labour. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using Tesch’s method of descriptive analysis (in Creswell, 1994:115.

  16. Association of timing of initiation of breastmilk expression on milk volume and timing of lactogenesis stage II among mothers of very low-birth-weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Leslie A; Sullivan, Sandra; Krueger, Charlene; Mueller, Martina

    2015-03-01

    Feeding breastmilk to premature infants decreases morbidity but is often limited owing to an insufficient milk supply and delayed attainment of lactogenesis stage II. Early initiation of milk expression following delivery has been shown to increase milk production in mothers of very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. Although recommendations for milk expression in this population include initiation within 6 hours following delivery, little evidence exists to support these guidelines. This study compared milk volume and timing of lactogenesis stage II in mothers of VLBW infants who initiated milk expression within 6 hours following delivery versus those who initiated expression after 6 hours. Forty mothers of VLBW infants were grouped according to when they initiated milk expression following delivery. Group I began milk expression within 6 hours, and Group II began expression after 6 hours. Milk volume was measured daily for the first 7 days and on Days 21 and 42. Timing of lactogenesis stage II was determined through mothers' perceptions of sudden breast fullness. Group I produced more breastmilk during the initial expression session and on Days 6, 7, and 42. No difference in timing of lactogenesis stage II was observed. When mothers who began milk expression prior to 1 hour following delivery were removed from analysis, benefits of milk expression within 6 hours were no longer apparent. Initiation of milk expression within 6 hours following delivery may not improve lactation success in mothers of VLBW infants unless initiated within the first hour.

  17. In My Own Time: Tuition Fees, Class Time and Student Effort in Non-Formal (Or Continuing) Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolli, Thomas; Johnes, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    We develop and empirically test a model which examines the impact of changes in class time and tuition fees on student effort in the form of private study. The data come from the European Union's Adult Education Survey, conducted over the period 2005-2008. We find, in line with theoretical predictions, that the time students devote to private…

  18. Time series analysis of continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar wind measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, Mikael; Mikkelsen, Torben; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra simultaneou......The influence of spatial volume averaging of a focused 1.55 mu m continuous-wave coherent Doppler Lidar on observed wind turbulence measured in the atmospheric surface layer over homogeneous terrain is described and analysed. Comparison of Lidar-measured turbulent spectra with spectra...

  19. Event Triggered Reinforcement Learning Approach for Unknown Nonlinear Continuous Time System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-06

    unknown system functions . Assume that f(x(t)) + g(x(t))u(t) is Lipschitz continuous on a set Ω ⊆ Rn, and f(0) = 0, g(0) = 0. In order to save resources...feedback controller γ(x̂j), which maps the sampled state onto a control vector. Assume that γ(x̂j) is a Lipschitz continuous function . The obtained...Currently, the event- triggered control methods are based on the accurate system function or model [6], [7]. In many cases, the complete knowledge of

  20. Generating Li–Yorke chaos in a stable continuous-time T–S fuzzy model via time-delay feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu-Ye, Sun; Hua-Guang, Zhang; Yan, Zhao

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the chaotification problem of a stable continuous-time T–S fuzzy system. A simple nonlinear state time-delay feedback controller is designed by parallel distributed compensation technique. Then, the asymptotically approximate relationship between the controlled continuous-time T–S fuzzy system with time-delay and a discrete-time T–S fuzzy system is established. Based on the discrete-time T–S fuzzy system, it proves that the chaos in the discrete-time T–S fuzzy system satisfies the Li–Yorke definition by choosing appropriate controller parameters via the revised Marotto theorem. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed chaotic anticontrol method is verified by a practical example. (general)

  1. Assessment of the theoretical basis of the Rule of Additivity for the nucleation incubation time during continuous cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.T.; Lowe, T.C.; Asaro, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    The rule of additivity was first proposed by Scheil and Steinberg for predicting the incubation time for nucleation of solid phases during continuous-cooling phase transformations, and has since been widely used for both the nucleation incubation and the entire process of phase transformation. While having been successfully used to calculate the transformed volume fraction during continuous cooling in many steel alloy systems, there is experimental evidence that shows rule of additivity to be invalid for describing the incubation time for nucleation. Attempts to prove the validity of the rule of additivity for the incubation time have not met with much success, and much confusion still exists about its applicability to the incubation time. This article investigates the additivity of the consumption of the incubation time for nucleation during continuous cooling through an analysis based upon classical nucleation theory. It is rigorously demonstrated that the rule of additivity is invalid for the incubation time for nucleation. However, in practice, the relative error caused by using the rule of additivity could be very small in many cases due to the resolution limit of current experimental techniques. The present theory provides an explanation for the failure of the rule of additivity in predicting the incubation time for nucleation during continuous cooling. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  2. Real time continuous oxygen concentration monitoring system during malaxation for the production of Virgin Olive Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiello, G.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the mechanical extraction process of Virgin Olive Oil (VOO some important physical phenomena and enzymatic transformations occur which influence the quality of the final product. The control of process parameters is crucial to ensure the quality of VOO, therefore process monitoring and control is a fundamental requirement in the modern VOO processing industry. The present work proposes an innovative Real-Time Monitoring System (RTMS aimed at continuously measuring the oxygen concentration during the malaxation process in order to establish a correlation with the quality of the final product obtained. This monitoring system is based on an oxygen concentration sensor directly connected to the malaxation chamber and a data acquisition system to analyze and store the measured values in a process database. The experimental results obtained show that the use of oxygen during malaxation improves some qualitative parameters of VOO such as free fatty acids and total polyphenols while others (peroxide values and spectrophotometric indexes worsen. These results are similar to those obtained by employing nitrogen, which is the traditional technique to avoid the wellknown oxidation processes studied by several researchers, thus demonstrating that the presence of oxygen during the malaxation process can have beneficial effects on the quality of VOO when its concentration is properly controlled.

    Durante el proceso de extracción mecánica del aceite de oliva virgen ocurren importantes fenómenos físicos y transformaciones enzimáticas que influyen en la calidad del producto final. El control de los parámetros del proceso es crucial para garantizar la calidad del aceite de oliva virgen, por tanto la monitorización y el control del proceso son requisitos fundamentales en el moderno tratamiento industrial del aceite de oliva virgen. El presente trabajo propone un sistema de monitorización innovador en tiempo real dirigido a medir continuamente

  3. Space time frequency (STF) code tensor for the characterization of the epileptic preictal stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direito, Bruno; Teixeira, César; Ribeiro, Bernardete; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Dourado, António

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the ability of multiway models to characterize the epileptic preictal period. The understanding of the characteristics of the period prior to the seizure onset is a decisive step towards the development of seizure prediction frameworks. Multiway models of EEG segments already demonstrated that hidden structures may be unveiled using tensor decomposition techniques. We propose a novel approach using a multiway model, Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC), to identify spatial, temporal and spectral signatures of the preictal period. The results obtained, from a dataset of 4 patients, with a total of 30 seizures, suggest that a common structure may be involved in seizure generation. Furthermore, the spatial signature may be related to the ictal onset region and that determined frequency sub-bands may be more relevant in preictal stages.

  4. The control, at the design stage, of risks related to buildings management over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Martani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper an apparatus of tools and methods is presented to evaluate, at the design stage, the risks over a set of objectives through buildings lifetime. To this purpose a tool is first presented to relate technological requirements of each technical elements to the pertinent maintenance interventions. Then a process is also proposed to estimate the risks on user requirements runningMonte Carlo simulations. The risk management process proposed in the present work aims to support designers and promoters in making predictions on the outcomes of long, not standardized, multivariable dependent processes – as the building process is – in order to indicate the attitude of a designed building to meet a framework of important objectives through its lifetime.

  5. Observation of the retinal arteriovenous circulation time of patients with different stages of diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe whether differences exist in the retinal arteriovenous circulation time of the patients with diabetic retinopathy and exploring whether there is any correlation between the injured degree of retinal vessel and the microcirculation time. METHODS: The study was conducted from the March 2016 to the March 2017 in order to analyze the clinical data on 60 eyes of 60 patients who were diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy by Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical University.According to the result, patients were divided into mild and moderate nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRgroup, severe NPDR group and proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDRgroup with 20 eyes respectively. Then we recorded the retinal arterial developing time of the three groups, namely arm-to-retinal circulation time(A1,retinal arterial branch filling time(A2, retinal venous branch laminar flow time(V1, retinal venous branch filling time(V2. RESULTS: The findings showed that there was no statistical difference among 3 groups in the retinal arterial passage time(A2-A1(F=1.642, P=0.157. Retinal capillary passage time(V1-A2, retinal vein passage time(V2-V1, retinal artery and vein passage time(V2-A1were compared between the three groups, the difference was statistically significant(F=5.794, 5.180, 5.564, P=0.007, 0.009, 0.008. The PDR group was significantly longer than the mild moderate and severe NPDR group, and the severe NPDR group was significantly longer than the mild and moderate NPDR group. CONCLUSION: The duration of DR is longer, the degree is more severely. The destruction of retinal capillaries is more serious, the time of retinal microcirculation is longer.

  6. Uterine cervix cancer treatment at Radiumhemmet: 90 years' experience. Time trends of age, stage, and histopathology distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kristina; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Pettersson, B Folke

    2014-04-01

    Since the introduction of screening programs for cervical cancer (CC) the incidence has decreased and CC is discovered at an earlier stage. The purpose of this study was to analyze time trends in age, stage, and histopathology over a 90-year period and to our knowledge this is the largest single institutional series in the literature of invasive cervical carcinoma (CC) cases. This is a retrospective study comprising 18,472 women treated for CC from 1914 until 2004 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The material is part of the international CC statistics published since 1937 in the League of Nations' Annual Reports, and since 1958 under the patronage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). During the 90-year study period, the annual number of cases treated increased to over 400 up until 1965, after which there was a gradual drop to less than 100 cases in 2004. A pronounced shift toward earlier stages at diagnosis was noted. The mean age at diagnosis increased in all stages, predominantly in advanced stages. A reduction in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases and a sixfold increase in the proportion of adenocarcinoma (AC) cases were observed. The mean age at diagnosis for squamous and AC cases shifted after 1970, when the SCC cases ultimately became 3 years older than the AC cases in contrast to around 1950 when they were 3 years younger than the AC cases. The changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology during this 90-year period are probably associated with: improved social conditions and increased access to health care, the introduction of screening programs for CC in the 1960s, and a change in the risk factors for CC (changed sexual behavior, introduction of contraceptive pills, and changed smoking habits). © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Finite Time Fault Tolerant Control for Robot Manipulators Using Time Delay Estimation and Continuous Nonsingular Fast Terminal Sliding Mode Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Mien; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Ren, Hongliang

    2016-04-28

    In this paper, a novel finite time fault tolerant control (FTC) is proposed for uncertain robot manipulators with actuator faults. First, a finite time passive FTC (PFTC) based on a robust nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode control (NFTSMC) is investigated. Be analyzed for addressing the disadvantages of the PFTC, an AFTC are then investigated by combining NFTSMC with a simple fault diagnosis scheme. In this scheme, an online fault estimation algorithm based on time delay estimation (TDE) is proposed to approximate actuator faults. The estimated fault information is used to detect, isolate, and accommodate the effect of the faults in the system. Then, a robust AFTC law is established by combining the obtained fault information and a robust NFTSMC. Finally, a high-order sliding mode (HOSM) control based on super-twisting algorithm is employed to eliminate the chattering. In comparison to the PFTC and other state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed AFTC scheme possess several advantages such as high precision, strong robustness, no singularity, less chattering, and fast finite-time convergence due to the combined NFTSMC and HOSM control, and requires no prior knowledge of the fault due to TDE-based fault estimation. Finally, simulation results are obtained to verify the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  8. Analysis of transtheoretical model of health behavioral changes in a nutrition intervention study--a continuous time Markov chain model with Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junsheng; Chan, Wenyaw; Tsai, Chu-Lin; Xiong, Momiao; Tilley, Barbara C

    2015-11-30

    Continuous time Markov chain (CTMC) models are often used to study the progression of chronic diseases in medical research but rarely applied to studies of the process of behavioral change. In studies of interventions to modify behaviors, a widely used psychosocial model is based on the transtheoretical model that often has more than three states (representing stages of change) and conceptually permits all possible instantaneous transitions. Very little attention is given to the study of the relationships between a CTMC model and associated covariates under the framework of transtheoretical model. We developed a Bayesian approach to evaluate the covariate effects on a CTMC model through a log-linear regression link. A simulation study of this approach showed that model parameters were accurately and precisely estimated. We analyzed an existing data set on stages of change in dietary intake from the Next Step Trial using the proposed method and the generalized multinomial logit model. We found that the generalized multinomial logit model was not suitable for these data because it ignores the unbalanced data structure and temporal correlation between successive measurements. Our analysis not only confirms that the nutrition intervention was effective but also provides information on how the intervention affected the transitions among the stages of change. We found that, compared with the control group, subjects in the intervention group, on average, spent substantively less time in the precontemplation stage and were more/less likely to move from an unhealthy/healthy state to a healthy/unhealthy state. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Uterine cervix cancer treatment at Radiumhemmet: 90 years′ experience. Time trends of age, stage, and histopathology distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, Kristina; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Pettersson, B Folke

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of screening programs for cervical cancer (CC) the incidence has decreased and CC is discovered at an earlier stage. The purpose of this study was to analyze time trends in age, stage, and histopathology over a 90-year period and to our knowledge this is the largest single institutional series in the literature of invasive cervical carcinoma (CC) cases. This is a retrospective study comprising 18,472 women treated for CC from 1914 until 2004 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The material is part of the international CC statistics published since 1937 in the League of Nations' Annual Reports, and since 1958 under the patronage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). During the 90-year study period, the annual number of cases treated increased to over 400 up until 1965, after which there was a gradual drop to less than 100 cases in 2004. A pronounced shift toward earlier stages at diagnosis was noted. The mean age at diagnosis increased in all stages, predominantly in advanced stages. A reduction in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases and a sixfold increase in the proportion of adenocarcinoma (AC) cases were observed. The mean age at diagnosis for squamous and AC cases shifted after 1970, when the SCC cases ultimately became 3 years older than the AC cases in contrast to around 1950 when they were 3 years younger than the AC cases. The changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology during this 90-year period are probably associated with: improved social conditions and increased access to health care, the introduction of screening programs for CC in the 1960s, and a change in the risk factors for CC (changed sexual behavior, introduction of contraceptive pills, and changed smoking habits). This is a study on changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology in a large series of cervical cancer treated in Sweden during a 90-year period. It also includes an historical review about the development

  10. Uterine cervix cancer treatment at Radiumhemmet: 90 years′ experience. Time trends of age, stage, and histopathology distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kristina; Hellström, Ann-Cathrin; Pettersson, B Folke

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of screening programs for cervical cancer (CC) the incidence has decreased and CC is discovered at an earlier stage. The purpose of this study was to analyze time trends in age, stage, and histopathology over a 90-year period and to our knowledge this is the largest single institutional series in the literature of invasive cervical carcinoma (CC) cases. This is a retrospective study comprising 18,472 women treated for CC from 1914 until 2004 at Radiumhemmet, Stockholm. The material is part of the international CC statistics published since 1937 in the League of Nations' Annual Reports, and since 1958 under the patronage of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). During the 90-year study period, the annual number of cases treated increased to over 400 up until 1965, after which there was a gradual drop to less than 100 cases in 2004. A pronounced shift toward earlier stages at diagnosis was noted. The mean age at diagnosis increased in all stages, predominantly in advanced stages. A reduction in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases and a sixfold increase in the proportion of adenocarcinoma (AC) cases were observed. The mean age at diagnosis for squamous and AC cases shifted after 1970, when the SCC cases ultimately became 3 years older than the AC cases in contrast to around 1950 when they were 3 years younger than the AC cases. The changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology during this 90-year period are probably associated with: improved social conditions and increased access to health care, the introduction of screening programs for CC in the 1960s, and a change in the risk factors for CC (changed sexual behavior, introduction of contraceptive pills, and changed smoking habits). This is a study on changes in the distribution by age, stage, and histopathology in a large series of cervical cancer treated in Sweden during a 90-year period. It also includes an historical review about the development of

  11. Simulation from endpoint-conditioned, continuous-time Markov chains on a finite state space, with applications to molecular evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobolth, Asger; Stone, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of serially-sampled data often begin with the assumption that the observations represent discrete samples from a latent continuous-time stochastic process. The continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) is one such generative model whose popularity extends to a variety of disciplines ranging from...... computational finance to human genetics and genomics. A common theme among these diverse applications is the need to simulate sample paths of a CTMC conditional on realized data that is discretely observed. Here we present a general solution to this sampling problem when the CTMC is defined on a discrete...

  12. Maintenance based Bevacizumab versus complete stop or continuous therapy after induction therapy in first line treatment of stage IV colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Emiliano; Rudnas, Britt; Santelmo, Carlotta; Drudi, Fabrizio; Gianni, Lorenzo; Nicoletti, Stefania V L; Ridolfi, Claudio; Tassinari, Davide

    2016-08-01

    In stage IV colorectal cancer, bevacizumab-based maintenance therapy, complete stop therapy and continuous therapy are considered all possible approaches after first line induction chemotherapy. However, there are no clear data about which approach is preferable. All randomized phase III trials comparing bevacizumab-based maintenance therapy (MB) with complete stop therapy (ST) or with continuous therapy (CT) were considered eligible and included into the analysis. Primary endpoint was the Time to failure strategies (TFS). Secondary endpoints were Overall Survival (OS) and Progression free survival (PFS). Meta-analysis was performed in line with the PRISMA statement. 1892 patients of five trials were included into the analysis. A significant improvement in TFS (HR 0.79; CI 95% 0.7-0.9 p=0.0005) and PFS (HR 0.56; CI 95% 0.44-0.71 p<0.00001) were observed in favour of MB versus ST. A trend, but not statistically significant, in favour of MB versus ST was also observed for OS (HR 0.88; CI 95% 0.77-1.01, p=0.08). Comparing maintenance therapy versus continuous therapy no statistically differences were observed in the outcomes evaluated (OS 12 months OR 1.1 p=0.62, OS 24 months OR 1 p=1, OS 36 months OR 0.54 p=0.3, TFS 12 months OR 0.76 p=0.65). Our meta-analysis suggests that use of MB approach increases TFS, PFS compared to ST. Although without observing any statistically advantage, it should be highlighted that MB versus ST showed a trend in favour of MB. We observed no difference between MB and CT. MB should be considered the standard regimen in patients with stage IV colorectal cancer after first line induction therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Technical note: Stage and water width measurement of a mountain stream using a simple time-lapse camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Leduc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing applied to river monitoring adds complementary information useful for understanding the system behaviour. In this paper, we present a method for visual stage gauging and water surface width measurement using a ground-based time-lapse camera and a fully automatic image analysis algorithm for flow monitoring at a river cross section of a steep, bouldery channel. The remote stage measurement was coupled with a water level logger (pressure transducer on site and shows that the image-based method gives a reliable estimate of the water height variation and daily flow record when validated against the pressure transducer (R = 0.91. From the remotely sensed pictures, we also extracted the water width and show that it is possible to correlate water surface width and stage. The images also provide valuable ancillary information for interpreting and understanding flow hydraulics and site weather conditions. This image-based gauging method is a reliable, informative and inexpensive alternative or adjunct to conventional stage measurement especially for remote sites.

  14. Technical note: Stage and water width measurement of a mountain stream using a simple time-lapse camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Pauline; Ashmore, Peter; Sjogren, Darren

    2018-01-01

    Remote sensing applied to river monitoring adds complementary information useful for understanding the system behaviour. In this paper, we present a method for visual stage gauging and water surface width measurement using a ground-based time-lapse camera and a fully automatic image analysis algorithm for flow monitoring at a river cross section of a steep, bouldery channel. The remote stage measurement was coupled with a water level logger (pressure transducer) on site and shows that the image-based method gives a reliable estimate of the water height variation and daily flow record when validated against the pressure transducer (R = 0.91). From the remotely sensed pictures, we also extracted the water width and show that it is possible to correlate water surface width and stage. The images also provide valuable ancillary information for interpreting and understanding flow hydraulics and site weather conditions. This image-based gauging method is a reliable, informative and inexpensive alternative or adjunct to conventional stage measurement especially for remote sites.

  15. Audio Facilitates the Perception of Cinematic Continuity by First-Time Viewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildirar, Sermin; Levin, Daniel T; Schwan, Stephan; Smith, Tim J

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies concluded that first-time film viewers often had difficulty integrating shots into a coherent representation of the depicted events in the absence of a familiar action through the film cuts or a salient eye-gazing of a character in the film. In this study, we investigated whether diegetic sound (i.e., sound that seems to originate from the depicted cinematic space) could effectively bridge shots for first-time viewers. Across a range of films, both dialog, and salient environmental sound (e.g., barking dogs) helped first-time viewers connect shots. However, sound was not always successful in supporting first-time viewers' interpretations. While experienced viewers were able to understand less-familiar linking sounds and environments, first-time viewers found this difficult. Overall, a range of diegetic sounds helped first-time viewers understand spatiotemporal relations between shots, but these viewers still had difficulty integrating views of unfamiliar environments.

  16. Time lagged ordinal partition networks for capturing dynamics of continuous dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Michael; Small, Michael; Stemler, Thomas; Iu, Herbert Ho-Ching

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a generalised version of the recently proposed ordinal partition time series to network transformation algorithm. Firstly we introduce a fixed time lag for the elements of each partition that is selected using techniques from traditional time delay embedding. The resulting partitions define regions in the embedding phase space that are mapped to nodes in the network space. Edges are allocated between nodes based on temporal succession thus creating a Markov chain representation...

  17. Fronts with continuous waiting-time distributions: theory and application to virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, J; Pérez, J; Ubeda, E; García, F J

    2006-02-01

    We generalize to arbitrary waiting-time distributions some results which were previously derived for discrete distributions. We show that for any two waiting-time distributions with the same mean delay time, that with higher dispersion will lead to a faster front. Experimental data on the speed of virus infections in a plaque are correctly explained by the theoretical predictions using a Gaussian delay-time distribution, which is more realistic for this system than the Dirac delta distribution considered previously [J. Fort and V. Méndez, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 178101 (2002)].

  18. How to connect time-lapse recorded trajectories of motile microorganisms with dynamical models in continuous time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Li, Liang; Gradinaru, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    We provide a tool for data-driven modeling of motility, data being time-lapse recorded trajectories. Several mathematical properties of a model to be found can be gleaned from appropriate model-independent experimental statistics, if one understands how such statistics are distorted by the finite...... of these effects that are valid for any reasonable model for persistent random motion. Our findings are illustrated with experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations....

  19. Early stage breast cancer detection by means of time-domain ultra-wide band sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoon, T. F.; Abdullah, M. Z.

    2011-11-01

    The interest in the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) impulses for medical imaging, particularly early stage breast cancer detection, is driven by safety advantage, super resolution capability, significant dielectric contrast between tumours and their surrounding tissues, patient convenience and low operating costs. However, inversion algorithms leading to recovery of the dielectric profile are complex in their nature, and vulnerable to noisy experimental conditions and environment. In this paper, we present a simplified yet robust gradient-based iterative image reconstruction technique to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem. The calculation is based on the Polak-Ribière's approach while the Broyden's formula is used to update the gradient in an iterative scheme. To validate this approach, both numerical and experimental results are presented. Animal derived biological targets in the form of chicken skin, beef and salted butter are used to construct an experimental breast phantom, while vegetable oil is used as a background media. UWB transceivers in the form of biconical antennas contour the breast forming a full view scanning geometry at a frequency range of 0-5 GHz. Results indicate the feasibility of experimental detection of millimetre scaled targets.

  20. Early stage breast cancer detection by means of time-domain ultra-wide band sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanoon, T F; Abdullah, M Z

    2011-01-01

    The interest in the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) impulses for medical imaging, particularly early stage breast cancer detection, is driven by safety advantage, super resolution capability, significant dielectric contrast between tumours and their surrounding tissues, patient convenience and low operating costs. However, inversion algorithms leading to recovery of the dielectric profile are complex in their nature, and vulnerable to noisy experimental conditions and environment. In this paper, we present a simplified yet robust gradient-based iterative image reconstruction technique to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem. The calculation is based on the Polak–Ribière's approach while the Broyden's formula is used to update the gradient in an iterative scheme. To validate this approach, both numerical and experimental results are presented. Animal derived biological targets in the form of chicken skin, beef and salted butter are used to construct an experimental breast phantom, while vegetable oil is used as a background media. UWB transceivers in the form of biconical antennas contour the breast forming a full view scanning geometry at a frequency range of 0–5 GHz. Results indicate the feasibility of experimental detection of millimetre scaled targets