WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff service awards

  1. 7 CFR 1700.33 - Financial Services Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial Services Staff. 1700.33 Section 1700.33... AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.33 Financial Services Staff. The Financial Services Staff evaluates the financial condition of financially troubled borrowers in order to...

  2. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co...... that staff attitudes toward staff-less libraries, and – more surprising – also toward more staff-intensive practices have been somewhat reluctant and skeptical. The paper also presents leadership initiatives which have proved to handle such resistances constructively. Originality/value – The paper contains...

  3. NPS Student Services Office Bids Farewell to Longtime Staff Member

    OpenAIRE

    Abel, Brian H.

    2017-01-01

    Today@NPS NPS Student Services Administrator Mario Salim, right, shakes hands with colleagues following the presentation of the Department of the Navy Superior Civilian Service Award during NPS President’s Council, Sept. 26 in Herrmann Hall. Salim will soon retire after 16 years of civil service, matched by his 20­year active duty career as a Navy Personnelman.

  4. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  5. 76 FR 25317 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and... applications for new awards for FY 2011 under certain Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for..., Department of Education. ACTION: Correction; Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY...

  6. Staff views on wellbeing for themselves and for service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrank, Beate; Brownell, Tamsin; Riches, Simon; Chevalier, Agnes; Jakaite, Zivile; Larkin, Charley; Lawrence, Vanessa; Slade, Mike

    2015-02-01

    Wellbeing is an important outcome in the context of recovery from mental illness. The views of mental health professionals on wellbeing may influence their approach to supporting recovery. This study aims to explore views held by mental health staff about factors influencing their own wellbeing and that of service users with psychosis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 mental health staff in South London who had worked with people with psychosis. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and comparisons were made between staff views of wellbeing for themselves and service users. Staff participants held similar conceptualisations of wellbeing for themselves and for service users. However, they suggested a differential impact on wellbeing for a number of factors, such as balance, goals and achievement, and work. Staff employed a more deficit-based perspective on wellbeing for service users and a more strengths-based view for themselves. Staff stated a recovery orientation in principle, but struggled to focus on service user strengths in practice. A stronger emphasis in clinical practice on amplifying strengths to foster self-management is indicated, and staff may need support to achieve this emphasis, e.g. through specific interventions and involvement of peer support workers.

  7. Symptoms of burnout among staff of direct service care

    OpenAIRE

    ZICHOVÁ, Eliška

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation was focused on burnout syndrome among the staff of direct service care. The degree of burnout was estimated using Copenhagen Burnout Inventory questionnaire which was completed by the respondents from six Prague homes for seniors. The burnout incidence in this group was 30-45 %, whereas it was only 18-32 % among Czech Army employees who were studied for comparison. The staff of direct service care had significantly higher degree of personal, work-related, client-related and ...

  8. Language services in hospitals: discordance in availability and staff use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschurtz, Brette A; Koss, Richard G; Kupka, Nancy J; Williams, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Despite efforts to advance effective patient-provider communication, many patients' language needs continue to be unmet or inappropriately addressed by healthcare providers (Wielawski 2010; Patek et al. 2009; Wilson-Stronks and Galvez 2007). This study presents a picture of the language resources currently provided by hospitals and those resources practitioners actually use. Questionnaire data were collected from 14 hospitals in Florida's Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Martin counties on availability, staff awareness, and staff use of linguistic resources and services. Inconsistencies were identified between the language tools, services, and resources hospitals provide and those staff use. In addition, a large majority of staff respondents still rely upon someone accompanying the patient for communication with patients who have limited English proficiency, despite evidence that this practice contributes to miscommunication and serious medical errors (Flores et al. 2003; Flores 2005; HHS OMH 2001; Patek et al. 2009). Hospitals that use bilingual staff as interpreters often do not test the competency of these staff, nor do they assess the utilization or effectiveness of the tools and resources they provide. Hospitals can improve the cultural and linguistic care they provide if they (1) address the practice of using ad hoc interpreters, (2) effectively disseminate information to hospital staff regarding how and when to access available resources, and (3) collect patient population data and use it to plan for and evaluate the language services they provide to their patients.

  9. Strategic Decisions & Staff Collaboration Highlight the 2009 Award for Excellence Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J. Thomas; Taylor, Matthew M.; Lewis, Dan; Ertzberger, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    APPA's highest institutional honor, the Award for Excellence (AFE) in Facilities Management, recognizes those educational institutions whose facilities management organizations demonstrate quality in overall operations and effectiveness. Fewer than 40 institutions have received this distinct honor. The Award for Excellence is based on a set of…

  10. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  11. 76 FR 25676 - Applications for New Awards; Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... simulations, games, or other online resources, or the pedagogy may be ``interactive'' in which learning... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Technology and Media Services for Individuals... Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information...

  12. Staff Considerations in Technical Services: The Chameleon Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Constance L.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to cope effectively with technological transitions in library technical services and to plan for successful staff development. The areas discussed include changing job skills, financial planning, ergonomics, innovative partnerships, training, and an emphasis on human resources development. (21 references) (Author/CLB)

  13. Staff development and library services in academic libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, data was collected by means of a questionnaire form one hundred and seventy-one (171) librarians of fifteen (15) academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta ...

  14. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE AND STATUTORY CONFLICT-OF-INTEREST... proposals and awards. (a)(1) Many scientists, engineers, and educators interrupt active research and teaching careers to spend a year or two at NSF and then return to research and teaching, usually at the...

  15. Single-Bid Awards Under the GSA Service Schedules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stott, Bethany

    2004-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the verity of the common perception that single-bid orders are more costly, lower in performance quality, and shorter in pre-award process time than competitively-bid orders...

  16. 76 FR 35949 - Agency Information Collection Activity (Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-20

    ... Collection Activity (Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...: Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application, VA Form 26-0829. OMB Control Number: 2900-0715. Type... servicers to nominate employees for approval as Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR). Servicers SAR's will have...

  17. 77 FR 20355 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Award Amendment Requests and Project Service Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... collection). Affected Public: Current recipients of EDA assistance, to include (1) cities or other political... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Economic Development Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Award Amendment Requests and Project Service Maps AGENCY: Economic Development...

  18. Quality Service Standard of Food and Beverage Service Staff in Hotel

    OpenAIRE

    Thanasit Suksutdhi

    2014-01-01

    This survey research aims to study the standard of service quality of food and beverage service staffs in hotel business by studying the service standard of three sample hotels, Siam Kempinski Hotel Bangkok, Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai, and Banyan Tree Phuket. In order to find the international service standard of food and beverage service, triangular research, i.e. quantitative, qualitative, and survey were employed. In this research, questionnaires and in-depth interview were used for ge...

  19. 76 FR 55404 - Announcement of Funding Awards Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS)-Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... Resident Opportunity and Self- Sufficiency (ROSS)-Service Coordinators, Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2010...-Sufficiency (ROSS)-Service Coordinators Program. This announcement contains the consolidated names and addresses of the award recipients for this year under the ROSS- Service Coordinators Program. FOR FURTHER...

  20. 32 CFR 1605.8 - Staff of Region Headquarters for Selective Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff of Region Headquarters for Selective... SERVICE SYSTEM SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ORGANIZATION Region Administration § 1605.8 Staff of Region..., the staff of each region for Selective Service shall consist of as many officers, either military or...

  1. Service quality improvement of ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittichai Sricharoenpramong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to: 1 evaluate the service quality of the ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport (DMK, 2 compare the ground staff quality service perception of Thai passengers at DMK, and 3 provide guidelines for service quality improvement of the DMK airlines ground staff. A sample size of 400 Thai domestic passengers was accidentally selected at DMK. A questionnaire was used as a research tool for data collection. Five dimensions of service quality were evaluated: reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. It was found that the service quality of ground staff was moderate. The highest dimension of service quality realization was tangibles, followed successively by reliability, assurance, empathy, and responsiveness. The passengers' perception of the ground staff's service quality varied by gender and age group. Guidelines were proposed for the improvement of ground staff service quality at DMK based on the findings. Keywords: airport, ground staff, quality of service

  2. Dose levels in medical staff at hemodynamics services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T. de [FUNDACENTRO - Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]|[Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: airton.almeida@fundacentro.gov.br; Alonso, Thessa C.; Nogueira, Maria do S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br; alonso@cdtn.br; silvata@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    The dose levels received by medical staff during interventional radiology are very high depending on the operational conditions and the patient trunk thickness. Dose levels could reach a factor of 30 for fluoroscopy or cine modes. The ALARA principle, that emphasizes the adoption of techniques and procedures to keep dose levels as low as reasonably achievable, should be followed to minimize the risk of radiation exposure to medical professionals. Dose reduction could be achieved by persuading the medical staff to wear protection devices (lead apron, thyroid protector, eyeglasses and gloves). Additionally, medical staff should also be persuaded that they should not be submitted to very high doses, above the acceptable limits for occupational workers. Dose levels at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, were analysed. Due to the equipment characteristics or the exam type and conditions x-ray machines were used with 70 to 120 kV, 2.5 to 699 mA and 80 to 2880s. Annual individual doses were estimated based on measured doses during a specific exam taking into account the workload. Maximum doses varied from 0.05 to 0.70 mSv per exam. The results projected for one work-year period show that all annual individual doses would be higher than the annual dose limit of 20 mSv/y with only a few values lower than 50 mSv/y. Dose levels measured at medical staff positions during hemodynamic exams showed that if the protective devices are not used professionals could be exposed to dose values higher than annual dose limits. (author)

  3. 48 CFR 19.1406 - Sole source awards to service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. 19.1406 Section 19.1406 Federal Acquisition...-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business Procurement Program 19.1406 Sole source awards to service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. (a) A contracting officer may award contracts to service-disabled...

  4. 48 CFR 18.116 - Service-disabled Veteran-owned Small Business (SDVOSB) sole source awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service-disabled Veteran... Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.116 Service-disabled Veteran-owned Small Business (SDVOSB) sole source awards. Contracts may be awarded to Service-disabled Veteran-owned Small Business (SDVOSB...

  5. 75 FR 31805 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS)-Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-04

    ... Awards for the Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS)--Service Coordinators Program for Fiscal... and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Service Coordinators Program funding for Fiscal Year 2009. This... concerning the FY 2009 Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Service Coordinators Program awards...

  6. Sensors: Views of Staff of a Disability Service Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Wolbring

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensors have become ubiquitous in their reach and scope of application. They are a technological cornerstone for various modes of health surveillance and participatory medicine—such as quantifying oneself; they are also employed to track people with certain as impairments perceived ability differences. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative data of an exploratory, non-generalizable study into the perceptions, attitudes and concerns of staff of a disability service organization, that mostly serve people with intellectual disabilities, towards the use of various types of sensor technologies that might be used by and with their clients. In addition, perspectives of various types of privacy issues linked to sensors, as well data regarding the concept of quantified self were obtained. Our results highlight the need to involve disabled people and their support networks in sensor and quantified-self discourses, in order to prevent undue disadvantages.

  7. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    The 62 staff members who are celebrating 25 years' service at CERN in 2009 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 17 November. ARNAUDON Luca/BE BEL Jean-François/TE BERTINELLI Francesco/TE BLAND Alastair/BE BLOCH Philippe/PH BORCIER Luc/EN BRUNEL Xavier/PH BURKIMSHER Paul/EN CAMPI Domenico/PH CATTAI Ariella/PH DALIN Jean-Michel/EN DANGOISSE Claude/IT DAVIDS Daniel/EN DI MAIO Franck/BE FERRARI Claude/EN FISCHER Klaus/TE FOLLEY Adrian/PH FORMENTI Fabio/TE GATIGNON Laurentius/EN GIACHINO Rossano/BE GONIDEC Allain/PH GRAFSTROM Per/PH HANCOCK Steven/BE HATCH Mark/PH HEMMER Frederic/IT HOURICAN Michael/TE ...

  8. Using family and staff experiences of a botulinum toxin-A service to improve service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K L O; Bau, K; Lewis, J; Aroyan, K R; Botha, B; Botman, A G M; Stewart, K; Waugh, M-C A; Paget, S P

    2017-11-01

    The decision for families to proceed with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) injections for managing childhood conditions involving hypertonia can be complex. Family-centred care is a service model that facilitates supporting families in this decision-making process. Understanding families' experiences of services is critical to developing family-centred care. The aim of this project was therefore to increase understanding of the experiences of families of children attending a BoNT-A service in order to improve the service and its family-centred approach to care. Sixteen staff of a BoNT-A service participated in a patient journey mapping exercise. Nine families of the service participated in in-depth interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data from the staff session and interviews were analysed independently using grounded, hermeneutic thematic analysis. Staff sessions revealed 5 core themes that related to impacting on the family experience. Family interviews revealed 4 core themes, with 7 subthemes and 1 latent theme. Areas of importance identified by families relating to BoNT-A treatment included acknowledgement of individual needs, care coordination, empowerment of families and patients, consistency in service delivery, and the distressing nature of appointment and decision-making. Comparison of the data from the staff patient journey mapping and family interviews suggested that staff have a good but incomplete understanding of the factors important to families, highlighting the need for consumer engagement in establishing family-centred care. The themes identified can guide the provision of family-centred BoNT-A injection clinics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Implementing a 6-day physiotherapy service in rehabilitation: exploring staff perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Erin L; Kuys, Suzanne S; Clarke, Jane; Brauer, Sandra G

    2017-11-20

    Objective Australian weekend rehabilitation therapy provision is increasing. Staff engagement optimises service delivery. The present mixed-methods process evaluation explored staff perceptions regarding implementation of a 6-day physiotherapy service in a private rehabilitation unit. Methods All multidisciplinary staff working in the rehabilitation unit were surveyed regarding barriers, facilitators and perceptions of the effect of a 6-day physiotherapy service on length of stay (LOS) and patient goal attainment at three time points: before and after implementation, as well as after modification of a 6-day physiotherapy service. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Fifty-one staff (50%) responded. Before implementation, all staff identified barriers, the most common being staffing (62%) and patient selection (29%). After implementation, only 30% of staff identified barriers, which differed to those identified before implementation, and included staff rostering and experience (20%), timing of therapy (10%) and increasing the allocation of patients (5%). Over time, staff perceptions changed from being unsure to being positive about the effect of the 6-day service on LOS and patient goal attainment. Conclusion Staff perceived a large number of barriers before implementation of a 6-day rehabilitation service, but these did not eventuate following implementation. Staff perceived improved LOS and patient goal attainment after implementation of a 6-day rehabilitation service incorporating staff feedback. What is known about this topic? Rehabilitation weekend services improve patient quality of life and functional independence while reducing LOS. What does this study add? Staff feedback during implementation and modification of new services is important to address potential barriers and ensure staff satisfaction and support. What are the implications for practitioners? Staff engagement and open communication are important to

  10. Reimagining the Role of Human Services Workers: Staff Experiences of a Social Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy; Kingsley, Bethan C.; Norris, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Despite recognition that social inclusion is a primary goal within the field of human services, people with disabilities continue to live lives of clienthood, marginalisation, and exclusion and human services staff struggle to make social inclusion a priority. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of human services staff about…

  11. 78 FR 51735 - Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement [C.F.D.A. Number: 93.566] Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of awards. SUMMARY: The Office of...

  12. 77 FR 52752 - Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement [C.F.D.A. Number: 93.566] Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Social Services Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of awards. CFDA Number: 93.566...

  13. Elvinger receives Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's Animal Health Award

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Christy

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Francois Elvinger, an associate professor of epidemiology and production management medicine in the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech, recently received the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's annual Animal Health Award.

  14. 76 FR 57014 - Award Fee for Service and End-Item Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... next payment voucher for the amount of such overpayment or refund the difference to the Government, as... evaluation score, the Contractor will either credit the next payment voucher for the amount of such... the Award Fee for Service Contracts clause to allow the contracting officer to withhold fee payments...

  15. 78 FR 27208 - Applications for New Awards; Rehabilitation Services Administration-Centers for Independent Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-09

    ... inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2013. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance... 22304. Telephone, toll free: 1-877-433-7827. FAX: (703) 605-6794. If you use a telecommunications device... submission requirement, you may mail (through the U.S. Postal Service or a commercial carrier) your...

  16. Staff Stress and Burnout in Intellectual Disability Services: Work Stress Theory and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Jason; Hastings, Richard; Noone, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Background: Staff in intellectual disability services can be at risk of stress and burnout at work. Given that staff well-being has implications for the quality of life of the staff themselves and people with intellectual disabilities themselves, this is an important research and practical topic. In this paper, we review work stress theories that…

  17. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The following staff members with 25 years' service in 2003 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 20 November 2003: ALLIOD Patrick/ATGESCHONKE Gunther/AB AYMON Marcel/HRGLASER Maurice/EP BAUDET Serge/TISHUGOT Bernard/AB BENOIT-JEANNIN Brigitte/SPLJOUVE Christian/AT BERRY Peter/HRJULLIARD André/ST BIERI Catherine/STLAFAGE Patrice/ST BLANC Didier/STLAJUST Danièle/DSU BLANC Michel/ITLEGRAND Dominique/AT BOCH Guy/ITLONG Serge/EST BONZANO Roberto/STLYONNET André/EP BURCKHART Doris/EPMALOD-DOGNIN Jean-Pierre/ST BURNS Alan/ABMAURY Stephan/AC BURTIN Gérard/ABMILES John/AT CARENA Wisla/EPMONET René/EST CASTEL André/ESTMULLER André/TIS CLIFF Frank/HRPERREAL Pierre/AT CUCCURU Giovanni/ATPETERSEN Jørgen/EP DAMIANI Michel/ABPETIT Patrick/EP DELUCINGE Evelyne/ATPIERRE Patrice/AB DHOTE Patrick/SPLROUX Jacques/EP FLUCKIGER François/ITSAMYN Dirk/EP FORESTE Antonio/ESTSAVIOZ Jean Jacques/AB FRAIS...

  18. The Effects of Staff Training on Staff Confidence and Challenging Behavior in Services for People with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Andrew; Sturmey, Peter; Oliver, Chris; Cunningham, Joanna; Hayes, Samira; Galvin, Martin; Walshe, Caroline; Cunningham, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    The effects of a 3-day training course in the management of aggressive behavior in services for people with autism spectrum disorders were investigated using a quasi-experimental design. An experimental group received training over a 10-month period and a contrast group, which had received training before this study, did not. Staff training…

  19. Staff Perspectives of Service User Involvement on Two Clinical Psychology Training Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Simon P.; Holttum, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated both negative and positive staff perspectives of service user involvement on two clinical psychology training courses as part of an ongoing process of service evaluation. Ten clinical psychology staff from two training courses were interviewed over the telephone by a current trainee clinical psychologist using a…

  20. Partnership working and improved service delivery: views of staff providing sexual health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, Janette; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Themessl-Huber, Markus; Claveirole, Anne

    2013-07-01

    Successful partnership working has theoretically been linked to improvements in service delivery and is dependent on the strength of the partnership, trust, communication, professional roles and resource sharing. Empirical evidence to confirm the relationships between these factors and improved service provision, however, is lacking. Our aim was to assess the views of staff as to the conditions required for partnership working. This study was a cross-sectional survey of 687 staff offering sexual health education, information or support to young people in the Healthy Respect intervention area in Scotland. Views of each variable were scored and structural equation modelling was used to assess the theoretical model. Responses were received from 284 (41%) staff. Greater strength of partnership was directly associated with increasing the number of referrals. Establishing professional roles between organizations was also associated with increasing the number of referrals. Strength of partnership was indirectly associated with working more effectively with young people and this relationship depended on clear communication, trust, established professional roles and shared resources. Effective partnership working depends on a number of interdependent relationships between organizations, which act synergistically to improve organizational outcomes. Effective partnership working leads to improved service delivery though there is a need for better controlled studies which demonstrate the effect on health outcomes.

  1. Contemporary women's secure psychiatric services in the United Kingdom: A qualitative analysis of staff views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T; Edge, D; Shaw, J; Wilson, H; McNair, L; Mitchell, H; Gutridge, K; Senior, J; Sutton, M; Meacock, R; Abel, K

    2017-11-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Three pilot UK-only Women's Enhanced Medium Secure Services (WEMSS) was opened in 2007 to support women's movement from high secure care and provide a bespoke, women-only service. Evidence suggests that women's secure services are particularly challenging environments to work in and staffing issues (e.g., high turnover) can cause difficulties in establishing a therapeutic environment. Research in this area has focused on the experiences of service users. Studies which have examined staff views have focused on their feelings towards women in their care and the emotional burden of working in women's secure services. No papers have made a direct comparison between staff working in different services. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This is the first study to explore the views and experiences of staff in the three UK WEMSS pilot services and contrast them with staff from women's medium secure services. Drawing upon data from eighteen semi-structured interviews (nine WEMSS, nine non-WEMSS), key themes cover staff perceptions of factors important for women's recovery and their views on operational aspects of services. This study extends our understanding of the experiences of staff working with women in secure care and bears relevance for staff working internationally, as well as in UK services. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The study reveals the importance of induction and training for bank and agency staff working in women's secure services. Further, regular clinical supervision should be mandatory for all staff so they are adequately supported. Introduction Women's Enhanced Medium Secure Services (WEMSS) is bespoke, gender-sensitive services which opened in the UK in 2007 at three pilot sites. This study is the first of its kind to explore the experiences of WEMSS staff, directly comparing them to staff in a standard medium secure service for women. The literature to date has focused on the experiences of

  2. Health services and the treatment of immigrants: data on service use, interpreting services and immigrant staff members in services across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluge, U.; Bogic, M.; Devillé, W.; Greacen, T.; Dauvrin, M.; Dias, S.; Gaddini, A.; Koitzsch Jensen, N.; Ioannidi-Kapolou, E.; Mertaniemi, R.; Puipcinós i Riera, R.; Sandhu, S.; Sarvary, A.; Soares, J.J.F.; Stankunas, M.; Straßmayr, C.; Welbel, M.; Heinz, A.; Priebe, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The number of immigrants using health services has increased across Europe. For assessing and improving the quality of care provided for immigrants, information is required on how many immigrants use services, what interpreting services are provided and whether staff members are from

  3. Health services and the treatment of immigrants: data on service use, interpreting services and immigrant staff members in services across Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluge, U.; Bogic, M.; Devillé, W.; Greacen, T.; Dauvrin, M.; Dias, S.; Gaddini, A.; Koitzsch Jensen, N.; Ioannidi-Kapolou, E.; Mertaniemi, R.; Puipcinos i Riera, R.; Sandhu, S.; Sarvary, A.; Soares, J.J.F.; Stankunas, M.; Straßmayr, C.; Welbel, M.; Heinz, A.; Priebe, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of immigrants using health services has increased across Europe. For assessing and improving the quality of care provided for immigrants, information is required on how many immigrants use services, what interpreting services are provided and whether staff members are from

  4. Addressing Adolescent Depression in Schools: Evaluation of an In-Service Training for School Staff in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an adolescent depression in-service training for school staff in the United States. A total of 252 school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors) completed assessments prior to and following the in-service and a subsample of these staff participated in focus groups following the in-service and three months later.…

  5. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    The 38 staff members who are celebrating 25 years at CERN in 2010 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 21 October. ASBURY David IT HEGARTY Seamus HR BAUDRENGHIEN Philippe BE ISNARD Christian IT BERGSMA Felix PH JONES Robert IT BERNAL Jean-Manuel TE JOUBERJEAN Franck IT BERRIG Olav Ejner BE LAGRANGE Thierry FP BONT Hillebrand GS MARIN Antonio BE BOURGEOIS Nicolas PH MESENGE Pascal EN BOURREL Thierry EN MISSIAEN Dominique   BE ...

  6. Customer service for security staff the "CARES" way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ronald J; Yaross, Dan

    2005-01-01

    When a medical center establishes an institution-wide customer service strategy, how does its Protective Services Department develop a department-specific program which links to the umbrella program. The authors spell out the philosophy, elements and employee interactions of their department's customer service training program.

  7. 48 CFR 819.7007 - Sole source awards to service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. 819.7007 Section 819.7007 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Service... service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns. (a) A contracting officer may award contracts to...

  8. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Service contract for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling. Following a market survey carried out among 34 firms in nine Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2769/SL/LEP) was sent on 13 March 2000 to seven firms and three consortia in five Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received six tenders from three firms and three consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ISS MULTISERVICE (CH), NFI (SE) and ISS GEBÄUDESERVICE (DE), the lowest technically qualified bidder, for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling for a total amount of 990 792 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH-59%, DE-26%, SE-15%.

  9. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  10. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2006

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 34 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2006 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 1st November. BELLEMAN Jeroen / AB BERTOLA Dominique / DSU BOLDI Armand / TS BOLLET André / AT BRANDT Daniel / DSU CACCIOPPOLI Michel /TS CALDERONE Antonino / TS CLARET René /TS COSSEY PUGET Françoise / PH DALEXANDRO Noël / AT DECOMBAZ Michel / TS DELLA NEGRA Michel / PH DINIUS Arend / AB FOSTER David / IT FROMM Christine / DSU GROS Daniel / TS GUDET Denis / TS LEWIS Julian / AB MAPELLI Livio / PH MASSON Albert / TS MOINE Catherine / PH MÜLLER Hans / PH ODIER Patrick / AB PANMAN Jaap / PH POOLE John / AB PROLA-TESSAUR Maureen / AT RAPHOZ Jean-Pierre / IT ROSTANT Jeanne / PH RUGO Erminio / AB VAN HERWIJNEN Eric / PH WERNER Per / PH WILDNER Elena / AT WILKINSON Jonathan / DSU WISZNIOWSKI Thierry / AB

  11. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    The 30 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2015 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 10 December.        Renaud Barillere EN   Edgar Birker  DG   Sergio Calatroni  TE   Paola Catapano  DG   Christophe  Delamare GS   Philippe Farthouat  PH   Roger Forty  PH   Yves Gaillard   TE   Clara Gaspar  PH   Jean-Christophe  Gayde  EN   Hubert   Gerwig PH   Simone  Giani PH   Jean-Pierre Granchelli  EN   Juan Guijarro  IT   Helene Haller  PH   John Harvey  PH   Vincenzo Innocente PH ...

  12. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2012

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    The 27 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2012 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 2 November.   BARRIN Laurence  -  PH BILLEN Ronald  -  BE BOUCHÉ Jean-Marc  -  HR BURKHARDT Helmut  -  BE CARLIER Etienne  -  TE CASS Antony  -  IT CHAN KWOK CHEON Anne Belinda  -  IT CHARRUE Pierre  -  BE COLLIER Paul  -  BE CUENCA PEREZ Antonio  -  GS DE JONGHE Jurgen  -  GS DEFERT Philippe  -  IT ELSENER Konrad  -  PH FROIDEVAUX Daniel  -  PH GRIGGS Christopher  -  PH MATHEYS Jean-Pol  -  HR MEIJERS Franciscus  -  PH MERTENS Volker  -  TE METRAL Gabriel  -  BE NECCA Rene  -  EN PACE Alberto&...

  13. Celebrating staff members with 25 years of service

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The 27 staff members who are celebrating 25 years at CERN in 2011 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 8 November.     Alvarez-Gaume Luis PH   Arruat Michel BE   Bonneau Pierre EN   Bordry Frederick TE   Camporesi Tiziano PH   Chevallay Eric EN   De Rijk Gijsbertus TE   Denuziere Dominique TE   Divia Roberto PH   Esteveny Laure DG   Giguet Jean-Michel BE   Haug Friedrich TE   Herr Werner BE   Jones Peter IT   Jonker Michael TE   Jost Beat PH   Linssen Lucie PH   Mage-Granados Patricia DG   Martinez Yanez Pablo BE   N...

  14. Acceptance of the 2014 Geochemical Society Distinguished Service Award by Carla Koretsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koretsky, Carla

    2015-06-01

    I am deeply touched to have received the Geochemical Society Distinguished Service Award. It was a great surprise when I received the notice that I had been chosen for the award. It has been a tremendous pleasure to work on behalf of student members of the Geochemical Society, Japanese Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemists to organize the student travel grants over the past few years. Certainly, this is not an effort that I undertook on my own. Many, many members of the GS, the JGS and the EAG generously donated their time and expertise to serve as reviewers for the many travel grant applicants we receive each year. Seth Davis, the GS Chief Operating Officer, spent countless hours helping to organize applications, the website, distribution of funds and many other aspects of the competition. Without Seth and the many expert reviewers, we could not run the travel grant program each year and provide this important financial support to allow more students to experience the Goldschmidt Conference. I also enjoyed my time as Geochemical News co-editor, and I should point out that GN during those years was ably co-edited by Johnson Haas. It has been a pleasure to see Elements take off, and GN evolve into a timely source of important announcements and information about cutting-edge science since I stepped down as co-editor. I feel very fortunate to work with so many outstanding colleagues in the global geochemical community, and I am a little embarrassed, and also very grateful, to have been selected for the Geochemical Society Distinguished Service Award. Thank you!

  15. Staff and bed distribution in public sector mental health services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The Eastern Cape Province of South Africa is a resource-limited province with a fragmented mental health service. Objective. To determine the current context of public sector mental health services in terms of staff and bed distribution, and how this corresponds to the population distribution in the province.

  16. Howard Community College 1986 Staff Services Evaluation: Internal Marketing Survey, Spring 1986. Research Report Number 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Susan; Novak, Virginia E.

    As part of an internal marketing effort, a study was conducted at Howard Community College (HCC) to determine employees' evaluation of key educational services provided by the college. All full-time faculty, administrators, and support staff were asked to evaluate 13 areas of service on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) and to identify HCC's…

  17. An optimization modeling approach to awarding large fire support wildfire helicopter contracts from the US Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie A. Snyder; Keith D. Stockmann; Gaylord E. Morris

    2012-01-01

    The US Forest Service used contracted helicopter services as part of its wildfire suppression strategy. An optimization decision-modeling system was developed to assist in the contract selection process. Three contract award selection criteria were considered: cost per pound of delivered water, total contract cost, and quality ratings of the aircraft and vendors....

  18. Staff perspectives on modified therapeutic community services for homeless dually diagnosed clients: an exploratory pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Nadia; Astone-Twerell, Janetta; Hernitche, Ted

    2009-12-01

    The modified therapeutic community (MTC) is one treatment modality developed to meet the needs of the homeless dually diagnosed population. While studies have shown the effectiveness of the MTC, little is known regarding staff perspectives of this modality. Using data from in-depth qualitative interviews, this study examines key staff perspectives on treatment services offered at an MTC in New York for homeless, mentally ill substance abusers. Many staff members indicated that the services provided are innovative, state of the art, and comprehensive as compared to other programs that specifically treat only one need. The most beneficial aspects of the MTC modality noted were the number of social workers available and the introduction of art therapy groups. The MTC modality also fostered increases in communication and collaboration between staff to introduce more specialized clinical groups not outlined in MTC guidelines to better meet the needs of clients.

  19. Staff members with 25 years' service at CERN in 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The 74 staff members who have spent 25 years at CERN in 2005 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 22 November. ADRIAN Gilbert / AB ALLIOD Marie-Noëlle / AB ANTOINET Gérard / SC AUBERT Marc / TS AUQUIER Christian / SC BAIRD Simon / AB BARRAS Suzanne / PH BAUD Richard / AT BELLONI Jean / SC BERTUOL Gilbert / SC BLANC Jean-Luc / AB BONVALLET Guy / SC BOSSUS Patrice / SC BROERE Johannes / AB BRU Yvon / TS BURDAIRON Alain / TS CANARD Philippe / AT CAVALLO Patrice / SC CHARRA Patrick / PH CHATAIGNEAU Marc / SC COLIN Gilles / SC DAHLEN Pierre / AB DE GROOT Johannes / PH DEDOBBELER Bernard / TS DELCAMBRE Jean Pierre / SC DELENCLOS Yves / TS DEROYER Patrick / SC DESBISSONS Christian / SC DRAPER Mick / AB DROUX Pascal / FI DUCASTEL Claude / TS DUMUR Alain / SC FOCKER Gerrit / AB FOFFANO Giuseppe / TS FORRAT Isabelle / IT FREI Marie-José / DSU FRESSARD Michel / TS GAGNIERE Daniel / TS GIUDICI Pierre-Ange / PH GOICOECHEA Bernard / TS GUEHO Alain / TS GUENEHEC François / SC JE...

  20. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Novel Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire for Food Service Staff of Aged Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M; Hamilton, J; Scupham, R; Matwiejczyk, L; Prichard, I; Farrer, O; Yaxley, A

    2018-01-01

    Food service staff are integral to delivery of quality food in aged care homes yet measurement of their satisfaction is unable to be performed due to an absence of a valid and reliable questionnaire. The aim of this study was to develop and perform psychometric testing for a new Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire developed in Australia specifically for use by food service staff working in residential aged care homes (Flinders FSSQFSAC). A mixed methods design utilizing both a qualitative (in-depth interviews, focus groups) and a quantitative approach (cross sectional survey) was used. Content validity was determined from focus groups and interviews with food service staff currently working in aged care homes, related questionnaires from the literature and consultation with an expert panel. The questionnaire was tested for construct validity and internal consistency using data from food service staff currently working in aged care homes that responded to an electronic invitation circulated to Australian aged care homes using a national database of email addresses. Construct validity was tested via principle components analysis and internal consistency through Cronbach's alpha. Temporal stability of the questionnaire was determined from food service staff undertaking the Flinders FSSQFSAC on two occasions, two weeks apart, and analysed using Pearson's correlations. Content validity for the Flinders FSSQFSAC was established from a panel of experts and stakeholders. Principle components analysis revealed food service staff satisfaction was represented by 61-items divided into eight domains: job satisfaction (α=0.832), food quality (α=0.871), staff training (α=0.922), consultation (α=0.840), eating environment (α=0.777), reliability (α=0.695), family expectations (α=0.781) and resident relationships (α=0.429), establishing construct validity in all domains, and internal consistency in all (α>0.5) except for "resident relationships" (α=0.429). Test

  1. Enhancing the well-being of support services staff in higher education: The power of appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurika van Straaten

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A literature search for studies on the well-being of support staff of higher education institutions (HEIs produced very little results. Appreciation was then used to identify elements that might enhance the well-being of a selected HEI’s support staff. Research purpose: The aim was to explore the strengths of a selected HEI that might serve as driving forces for enhancing its support staff’s well-being. Motivation for the study: The lack of research on the well-being of support staff motivated the study. A need was identified to explore driving forces that might enhance their well-being. Research design, approach and method: A literature review guided by theoretical perspectives and theories on staff well-being was conducted. Subsequently, a qualitative action research design involving an Appreciative Inquiry (AI workshop with support staff of an institution was followed. Main findings: The following strengths that might serve as driving forces for enhancing the well-being of the institution’s support services staff were identified: hard-working and dedicated support staff, positive relations among colleagues, a willingness to adapt to change,good remuneration and benefits, job security and a supportive work environment. Appreciative Inquiry was found to be well suited for identifying such strengths, as opposed to methods that focus on identifying problems or weaknesses of an organisation. As a result of this study, the relevant institution might react and build on these identified strengths towards promoting the well-being of its support staff. Practical/managerial implications: Institutions should make an effort to enhance staff well being. The results of the study could also be used to encourage HEIs to use AI to establish optimal staff well-being. Contribution/value add: The study confirmed the power of appreciation to identify the strengths that might serve as driving forces for enhancing the well-being of support staff

  2. Proposal for the award of a contract for software support services for industrial control systems

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for software support services for industrial control systems, including maintenance of existing systems and development of new applications. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ASSYSTEMS (FR) - INBIS (GB), the lowest bidder, for software support services for industrial control systems, including maintenance of existing systems and development of new applications, for a period of three years for a total amount not exceeding 1 281 057 euros (1 998 530 Swiss francs), not subject to revision for the first two years. The rate of exchange used is that stipulated in the tender. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  3. The association between presenteeism and engagement of National Health Service staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admasachew, Lul; Dawson, Jeremy

    2011-04-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated a relationship between staff engagement and health and wellbeing, none has analysed the association with presenteeism in the National Health Service (NHS) context. Our aim is to determine whether there is a relationship between presenteeism and staff engagement. A hierarchical logistic multilevel modelling of cross-sectional data from the NHS staff survey (2009) was conducted. We controlled for a range of demographic and socioeconomic background variables, including ethnic group, gender, age and occupational group. The sample was 156,951 respondents across all 390 English NHS trusts, each providing a random sample of employees. Engagement was measured using three facets: motivation, advocacy and involvement, which were also used in a composite score. There was a low-to-moderate negative correlation between presenteeism and staff engagement: odds ratio 0.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.42-0.43) for overall staff engagement and 0.53 (95% CI 0.52-0.54) for staff advocacy of the trust; 0.53 (95% CI 0.52-0.54) for motivation and 0.50 (95% CI 0.49-0.51) for involvement. Putting pressure on health-care staff to come to work when unwell is associated with poorer staff engagement with their jobs.

  4. Staff members with 25 years’ service at CERN in 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 47 staff members who have spent 25 years within CERN in 2008 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honour on 24 October. Mr.\tAllen\tDavid John\tAB Dr.\tBailey\tRoger\tAB Mr.\tBlas\tAlfred\tAB Mr.\tBobbio\tPiero\tAB Dr.\tBona\tMaurizio\tSC Mr.\tBrachet\tJean-Pierre\tTS Dr.\tBurckhart\tHelfried\tPH Miss\tButtay\tCatherine\tFI Mr.\tCatherall\tRichard\tAB Mr.\tCoin\tAndré-Yvon\tTS Dr.\tCornelis\tKarel\tAB Dr.\tDavenport\tMartyn\tPH Mr.\tDehavay\tClaude\tAB Mr.\tDenblyden\tJean-Loup\tPH Mr.\tDenis\tBernard\tDSU Mr.\tDuret\tMax\tAT Mr.\tEvans\tJohn\tIT Mrs.\tFavrot\tVéronique\tIT Mr.\tFowler\tAntony\tAB Mrs.\tGalmant\tCatherine\tAB Mr.\tGuillaume\tJean-Claude\tTS Mrs.\tJerdelet\tJocelyne\tDSU Dr.\tKostro\tKrzysztof\tAB Mr.\tKuczerowski\tJoseph\tAB Mr.\tLappe\tJean-Pierre\tTS Mrs.\tLaverrière\tCatherine\tSC Mr.\tLeggiero\tLuigi\tTS Mr.\tManglunki\tDjango\tAB Mr.\tMartens\tReinoud\tIT Mr.\tMartinez\tGeorges\tSC Mr.\tMonchalin\tPhilippe\tSC Mr.\tMoret\tPhilippe\tDSU Mr.\tOlesen\tGert\tPH Mr.\tPasinelli\tSergi...

  5. The place of punishment: Variation in the provision of inmate services staff across the punitive turn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Michelle S

    2012-09-01

    Despite the growing literature on the punitive turn, knowledge of how the experience of American imprisonment varied across time and place remain limited. This article begins to fill that gap, providing a more nuanced portrayal of rehabilitation during the punitive turn. To examine how one aspect of the rehabilitative ideal in practice-the provision of staff dedicated to inmate services-varied across time and place over the past 30 years. The article presents statistics on the inmate-to-staff ratios for inmate services staff (including teachers, counselors, doctors, etc.) between the years 1979 and 2005 for all 50 U.S. states. The analyses reveal that, while there was a substantial decline in the services staff ratio during the 1990s and 2000s, this shift across time paled in comparison to variation across place. Northeastern prison systems, for example, maintained higher inmate services staff ratios in 2005 than Southern states in any year. In addition, results suggest state variation is related to differences in prison crowding, inmates' racial composition, and political cultures. The findings suggest the punitive turn was more variegated and partial than is often assumed and highlight the importance of exploring state variation in penal practices.

  6. Implementing cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) in a mental health service: staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dark, Frances; Newman, Ellie; Harris, Meredith; Cairns, Alice; Simpson, Michael; Gore-Jones, Victoria; Whiteford, Harvey; Harvey, Carol; Crompton, David

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the establishment of training in cognitive remediation for psychosis within a community mental health service. Clinical staff working in the community of a mental health service were surveyed to ascertain their interest in cognitive aspects of psychosis and skills training in cognitive remediation (CR). Based on the results of the survey a tiered training programme was established with attendance figures reported for each level of training. Fidelity assessment was conducted on the five CR programmes operating. Of 106 clinical staff working in the community with people diagnosed with a psychotic illness 51 completed the survey (48% response rate). The training needs varied with all 106 staff receiving the fundamental (mandatory) training and 51 staff receiving CR facilitator training. Thirty three percent of staff trained as facilitators were delivering CR. Up skilling the mental health workforce to incorporate an understanding of the cognitive aspects of psychosis into care delivery can be facilitated by a tiered training structure. Fundamental training on the psychosocial aspects of psychosis can act as a platform for focussed CR skills based training. There is also a need for accessible therapy based supervision for staff wishing to develop competencies as CR therapists. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  7. Enhancing Human Capital Development and Service Delivery in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions through Effective Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyeaka Igbokwe-Ibeto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of bureaucratic and human capital theories, an eclectic approach, the study examines the nexus between academic staff recruitment in Nigerian tertiary institutions and human capital development as well as service delivery with specific reference to universities. It is generally agreed that higher education is a sine-qua-non for human capital development and efficient service delivery. Higher education is a prerequisite for the production of highly competent experts, which in turn, contributes to the development of organizations and the economy at large. For these to be achieved, the right content and academic staff  must be in place to perform this varied function.  However, over the years the quality of human capital coming out of Nigerian universities and its impact on service delivery has become a source of concern to employers of labour and all stakeholders. Inferential opinions have traced the problem to the recruitment of incompetent academic staff. To investigate the issues raised, the study relied heavily on primary and secondary data and multi stage sampling was used to select the sample population. The data collected was presented in pie chart and simple percentage. Similarly, in order to test the hypotheses and establish the degree of dependence or independence of the variables under investigation, the chi-square statistical technique was used. The findings of the study revealed among others, that Nigerian universities do not employ merit, qualification and competency in the academic staff recruitment. It also established that there is a significant relationship between merit, qualification and competency based academic staff recruitment and human capital development and service delivery. To enhance human capital development and service delivery in Nigerian universities, the study recommends among others, that an independent body like the National University Commission (NUC should be given the responsibility of

  8. Smoking and its treatment in addiction services: clients' and staff behaviour and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Camilla; Strang, John; Ratschen, Elena; Sutherland, Gay; Finch, Emily; McNeill, Ann

    2014-07-14

    High smoking prevalence has been observed among those misusing other substances. This study aimed to establish smoking behaviours and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment among clients and staff in substance abuse treatment settings. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff and clients in a convenience sample of seven community and residential addiction services in, or with links to, Europe's largest provider of mental health care, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Survey items assessed smoking behaviour, motivation to quit, receipt of and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment. Eighty five percent (n = 163) and 97% (n = 145) response rates of clients and staff were achieved. A high smoking prevalence was observed in clients (88%) and staff (45%); of current smokers, nearly all clients were daily smokers, while 42% of staff were occasional smokers. Despite 79% of clients who smoked expressing a desire to quit and 46% interested in receiving advice, only 15% had been offered support to stop smoking during their current treatment episode with 56% reported never having been offered support. Staff rated smoking treatment significantly less important than treatment of other substances (p < 0.001), and only 29% of staff thought it should be addressed early in a client's primary addiction treatment, compared with 48% of clients. A large unmet clinical need is evident with a widespread failure to deliver smoking cessation interventions to an extraordinarily high prevalence population of smokers in addiction services. This is despite the majority of smokers reporting motivation to quit. Staff smoking and attitudes may be a contributory factor in these findings.

  9. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for software support for industrial controls

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for software support for industrial controls. Following a market survey carried out among 68 firms in twelve Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2711/ST) was sent on 12 April 2000 to nine firms and five consortia in eight Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received seven tenders from two firms and five consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm GTD (ES), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 October 2000, for a total amount not exceeding 4 500 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include an option for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: ES?100%.

  10. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for transport and handling services

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an industrial support contract for transport and handling services. Following a market survey carried out among 49 firms in nine Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2395/ST/Revised) was sent on 7 April 1999 to two firms and six consortia in seven Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received six tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium DELATTRE-LEVIVIER (FR) ? BELLELI (IT) ? SETROVA (PT) the lowest bidder complying with the specification, for an initial period of three years, from 1st May 2000, for a total amount not exceeding 22 000 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 30 April 2003. The contract will include an option for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  11. Consumers and Carers Versus Pharmacy Staff: Do Their Priorities for Australian Pharmacy Services Align?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Sara S; Kelly, Fiona; Sav, Adem; Kendall, Elizabeth; King, Michelle A; Whitty, Jennifer A; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2015-10-01

    Health professionals, including pharmacists, are encouraged to meet the needs of their consumers in an efficient and patient-centred manner. Yet, there is limited information as to what consumers with chronic conditions need from pharmacy as a healthcare destination or how well pharmacy staff understand these needs. The aim of this study was to identify service user priorities for ideal community pharmacy services for consumers with chronic conditions and their carers, and compare these priorities with what pharmacy staff think these groups want. The nominal group technique was undertaken with pharmacist, pharmacy support staff, consumer and carer groups in four Australian regions between December 2012 and April 2013. Participant ideas and priorities for ideal services or care were identified, and contextual insight was obtained by thematic analysis. Twenty-one nominal group sessions are accepted, including 15 consumer and carer, four pharmacist and two pharmacy support staff groups. Pharmacy staff views generally aligned with consumer priorities, such as access, affordability, patient-centred care and continuity and coordinated care, yet diverged with respect to consumer information or education on medication and services. Fundamentally, consumers and carers sought streamlined access to information and medication, in a coordinated, patient-centred approach. Alleviating financial burden was a key consumer priority, with a call for the continuation and extension of medication subsidies. Overall, pharmacy staff had a reasonable understanding of what consumers would prioritise, but further emphasis on the importance, delivery, or both, of consumer information is needed. Greater consideration is needed from policy makers regarding the financial barriers to accessing medication for consumers with chronic conditions.

  12. Information-Seeking and Sharing Behaviors among Fire Service Field Staff Instructors: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Lian J.

    2011-01-01

    Fire service field staff instructors seek and share information and use information sources during their instructional work of teaching, training and curriculum development. This study is the first attempt to study their information-seeking and sharing behaviors, which have not previously been investigated empirically. Twenty-five fire service…

  13. Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of an std/Hiv clinic in Africa – Indications for recovery. RG Cooper ... Data were analysed according to gender, using a two-sample t-test and chi-square tests. Yates' correction was made for continuity of smaller samples. A value of p<0.05 was taken a ...

  14. Food hygiene and safety practices of food service staff in University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The knowledge of food hygiene and safety was poor among the respondents. However, they exhibited a positive attitude towards food safety while their practice was fair. The hospital should institute training programmes for all food service staff to improve their knowledge and practice of food hygiene and safety.

  15. Automation of Cataloging: Effects on Use of Staff, Efficiency, and Service to Patrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Marie

    1988-01-01

    Describes the effects of the automation of cataloging processes at Pennsylvania State University. The discussion covers the reorganization of professional and paraprofessional personnel and job responsibilities, staff reactions to the changes, the impact on cataloging quality and efficiency, and patron satisfaction with the services offered. (15…

  16. Assessing the Impact of In-Service Training on Staff Performance at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In-Service training (INSET) is an important means through which staff are equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to improve overall goals and departmental objectives. The extent to which INSET achieves or impacts on organisational and individual performance is often questioned. Winneba Winneba Campus.

  17. SPRINT: Optimization of Staff Management for Desk Customer Relations Services at Hera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigo, D.; Caremi, C.; Gordini, A.; Bosso, S.; D'Aleo, G.; Beleggia, B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a decision support system for optimizing staff management of desk customer relations services at Hera, a large Italian multiutility company. The system, SPRINT, which is based on state-of-the-art demand forecasting, implements a novel two-phase optimization procedure based

  18. Patients' and staffs' experiences of an automated telephone weather forecasting service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard; O'Hara, Rachel

    2010-04-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have recently been offered severe weather warnings and medication reminders using an automated telephone service and interactive voice recognition technology. Our aim was to explore patients' and health care staffs' perceptions and experiences of the technologies, their contribution to the management of COPD and implementation issues. Qualitative semi-structured telephone interviews were undertaken with 18 patients and six staff from five primary care centres in the Bradford area, England. Interview transcripts were thematically analysed. Patients considered the telephone service was an appropriate way to deliver information but there was some variation in perceived usefulness. Many patients praised the service, valuing reassurance and medication reminders, but others were indifferent and even critical. Criticism tended to reflect scepticism over the reliability of weather forecasts information rather than the automated telephone service itself. There was limited impact on the management strategies of patients apart from some patients ordering medication. Primary care staff considered the service a success but some felt that it lacked participation by hard-to-reach groups (non-English speaking, mild COPD patients). Our concerns about the resource implications of successful implementation were also raised. An automated telephone service was generally acceptable to patients but changes in COPD management were limited, possibly because the patients already had a good understanding of their condition and self-management strategies. Implications for practice include the need for strategies to target hard-to-reach groups which may need more resources.

  19. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelon, Paule; Lesage, Alain; Boyer, Richard; Guay, Stéphane; Bleau, Pierre; Séguin, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada's publicly managed healthcare system. A sample of 948 from among the college's 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall). Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  20. Role of a service corridor in ICU noise control, staff stress, and staff satisfaction: environmental research of an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Downs, Betsy; Farell, Ashley; Cook, Kimberly; Hourihan, Peter; McCreery, Shimby

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of a dedicated service corridor in intensive care unit (ICU) noise control and staff stress and satisfaction. Shared corridors immediately adjacent to patient rooms are generally noisy due to a variety of activities, including service deliveries and pickups. The strategy of providing a dedicated service corridor is thought to reduce noise for patient care, but the extent to which it actually contributes to noise reduction in the patient care environment and in turn improves staff performance has not been previously documented. A before-and-after comparison was conducted in an adult cardiac ICU. The ICU was relocated from a traditional hospital environment to a new addition with a dedicated service corridor. A total of 118 nursing staff participated in the surveys regarding pre-move and post-move environmental comfort, stress, and satisfaction in the previous and new units. Acoustical measures of noise within the new ICU and a control environment of the previous unit were collected during four work days, along with on-site observations of corridor traffic. Independent and paired sample t-tests of survey data showed that the perceived noise level was lower and staff reported less stress and more satisfaction in the new ICU (p noise control and staff stress and satisfaction. Critical care/intensive care, noise, satisfaction, staff, work environment.

  1. Organizational Climate Partially Mediates the Effect of Culture on Work Attitudes and Staff Turnover in Mental Health Services

    OpenAIRE

    Aarons, Gregory A.; Sawitzky, Angelina C.

    2006-01-01

    Staff turnover in mental health service organizations is an ongoing problem with implications for staff morale, productivity, organizational effectiveness, and implementation of innovation. Recent studies in public sector services have examined the impact of organizational culture and climate on work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and, ultimately, staff turnover. However, mediational models of the impact of culture and climate on work attitudes have not been ...

  2. Nursing home staffing requirements and input substitution: effects on housekeeping, food service, and activities staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowblis, John R; Hyer, Kathryn

    2013-08-01

    To study the effect of minimum nurse staffing requirements on the subsequent employment of nursing home support staff. Nursing home data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) System merged with state nurse staffing requirements. Facility-level housekeeping, food service, and activities staff levels are regressed on nurse staffing requirements and other controls using fixed effect panel regression. OSCAR surveys from 1999 to 2004. Increases in state direct care and licensed nurse staffing requirements are associated with decreases in the staffing levels of all types of support staff. Increased nursing home nurse staffing requirements lead to input substitution in the form of reduced support staffing levels. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Perception of the nursing staff about the nurse’s role in the emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayckel da Silva Barreto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to know the perception of the nursing staff about the nurse's role in emergency service. Methods: descriptive study of a qualitative approach. 30 nursing professionals participated and were active in a unit of Emergency. The data were subjected to Content Analysis, thematic modality. Results: the interviewees highlighted as nurses functions, the development of management activities; the leadership and supervision of nursing staff; and the care provided to seriously ill patients. From the perspective of nursing technicians, management activities receive great attention from nurses, rather than direct patient care. However, for nurses, managerial functions and leadership and supervision of staff converge for quality care. Conclusion: the importance of care work of nurses in emergency situations is perceived both by nursing technicians and by nurses. However, perceptions of their role as a manager still show up conflicting.

  4. Staff perception of relative importance of quality dimensions for patients at tertiary public services in oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrashdi, Ismail; Al Qasmi, Ahmed

    2012-09-01

    This research attempted to explore the public healthcare providers understanding the quality dimensions and patient priorities in Oman. It also addresses the issue of risks confronting health professionals in management without "a customer focused" approach. A descriptive study was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire distributed around two tertiary public hospitals. A total of 838 respondents from several specialties and levels of hierarchy participated in the study. The data was analyzed to compare the perception of two groups; the group of junior and frontline staff, as well as of managers and senior staff involved in management. The results showed that 61% of the junior and frontline staff, and 68.3% of the senior staff and managers think that cure or improvement in overall health is the single most important quality dimension in healthcare. Both groups perceive that technical dimensions have greater importance (to patients) over interpersonal aspects such as communication with the exception of dignity and respect. There was no significant difference between the perception of the managers and senior staff vis-à-vis the perception of junior and frontline staff on the importance of technical dimensions and the interpersonal aspects of service quality. Despite the proven contribution of empathy to patient satisfaction, it was ranked by both groups as the least important among the dimensions examined. The findings of this research are therefore informative of the need to implement strategies that deal effectively with such attitudes and create the platform and programs that reinforce the culture of good quality service amongst healthcare providers, managers in particular, and to improve patient satisfaction.

  5. Ten-Year Publication Trajectories of Health Services Research Career Development Award Recipients: Collaboration, Awardee Characteristics, and Productivity Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorson, Max A; Finlay, Andrea K; Cronkite, Ruth C; Bi, Xiaoyu; Hayashi, Ko; Maisel, Natalya C; Amundson, Erin O'Rourke; Weitlauf, Julie C; Litt, Iris F; Owens, Douglas K; Timko, Christine; Cucciare, Michael A; Finney, John W

    2016-03-01

    This study's purpose was to identify distinct publishing trajectories among 442 participants in three prominent mentored health services research career development programs (Veterans Affairs, National Institutes of Health, and Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality) in the 10 years after award receipt and to examine awardee characteristics associated with different trajectories. Curricula vitae (CVs) of researchers receiving awards between 1991 and 2010 were coded for publications, grants, and awardee characteristics. We found that awardees published at constant or increasing rates despite flat or decreasing rates of first-author publications. Senior-author publications rose concurrently with rates of overall publications. Higher overall publication trajectories were associated with receiving more grants, more citations as measured by the h-index, and more authors per article. Lower trajectory groups were older and had a greater proportion of female awardees. Career development awards supported researchers who generally published successfully, but trajectories varied across individual researchers. Researchers' collaborative efforts produced an increasing number of articles, whereas first author articles were written at a more consistent rate. Career development awards in health services research supported the careers of researchers who published at a high rate; future research should further examine reasons for variation in publishing among early career researchers. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. 48 CFR 1852.216-76 - Award Fee for service contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payments exceed the final evaluation score, the Contractor will either credit the next payment voucher for... [insert payment office] will make payment based on [Insert method of authorizing award fee payment, e.g... fee has been paid, the Contracting Officer may direct the withholding of further payment of award fee...

  7. Staff Members with more than 25 years service at CERN in 2001 and 2002

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Staff Members with 25 years service in 2002 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honnor on the 20th November 2002 : Baulet Yves / ST, Bornand Michel / SL, Burdet Georges / ST, Carena Francesco / EP, Chanut Robert / LHC, Chauchaix Bruno / SL, Chevrier François / SL, Chohan Vinod / LHC, Dahlerup-Petersen Knud / LHC, De Gennaro Michele Silvano / IT, De Rujula Alvaro / TH, Dury Jean-Marie / SL, Ferrara Sergio / TH, Fraser Gordon / ETT, Kolly Michel / ST, Korda Gwendoline / DSU, Lager Michel / ST, Michelon Jean-Claude / SL, Montuelle Jean / IT, Naudi Andre John / FI, Seis Irene / IT, Vascotto Alessandro / EP, Vernamonte Donatino / ST, Von Rüden Wolfgang / IT, Vullierme Bruno / LHC. Staff members with 25 years service in 2001 were also invited: Datta-Cockerill Sudeshna / HR, Frost-Ainley Lio / IT, Laurent Moniek / HR, Saban Roberto / AC.

  8. Staff Members with more than 25 years service at CERN in 2001 and 2002

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Staff Members with 25 years service in 2002 were invited by the Director-General to a reception in their honnor on the 20th November 2002 : Baulet Yves / ST Bornand Michel / SL Burdet Georges / ST Carena Francesco / EP Chanut Robert / LHC Chauchaix Bruno / SL Chevrier François / SL Chohan Vinod / LHC Dahlerup-Petersen Knud / LHC De Gennaro Michele Silvano / IT De Rujula Alvaro / TH Dury Jean-Marie / SL Ferrara Sergio / TH Fraser Gordon / ETT Kolly Michel / ST Korda Gwendoline / DSU Lager Michel / ST Michelon Jean-Claude / SL Montuelle Jean / IT Naudi Andre John / FI Seis Irene / IT Vascotto Alessandro / EP Vernamonte Donatino / ST Von Rüden Wolfgang / IT Vullierme Bruno / LHC Staff members with 25 years service in 2001 were also invited: Datta-Cockerill Sudeshna / HR Frost-Ainley Lio / IT Laurent Moniek / HR Saban Roberto / AC

  9. Training of health physics services staff at the Sellafield Works of British Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagg, B.

    This paper describes the qualifications required and the training of health physics non-industrial and industrial staff who provide a radiological protection service to the Sellafield site. The training offered may consist of formal group instruction, programmed learning using written texts, videotape lectures, and on-the-job training by line management. Experience has shown that formal oral and practical instruction to small groups is the most effective form of training when supplemented by on-the-job training

  10. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for computer centre operations

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for Computer Centre operations. Following a market survey carried out among 40 firms in eleven Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2871/IT) was sent on 9 March 2001 to nine firms and one consortium consisting of two firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received three tenders from two firms and one consortium in three Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium DCS (CH) - INTRASOFT (GR), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 October 2001 for a total amount of 2 196 588 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 30 September 2002. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH-55% ; GR-45%.

  11. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Miquelon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada’s publicly managed healthcare system. Methods A sample of 948 from among the college’s 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. Results In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall. Conclusions Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  12. Experiences of providing prosthetic and orthotic services in Sierra Leone--the local staff's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lina; Ahlström, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    In Sierra Leone, West Africa, there are many people with disabilities in need of rehabilitation services after a long civil war. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the experiences of prosthetic and orthotic service delivery in Sierra Leone from the local staff's perspective. Fifteen prosthetic and orthotic technicians working at all the rehabilitation centres providing prosthetic and orthotic services in Sierra Leone were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed and subjected to latent content analysis. One main theme emerged: sense of inability to deliver high-quality prosthetic and orthotic services. This main theme was generated from eight sub-themes: Desire for professional development; appraisals of work satisfaction and norms; patients neglected by family; limited access to the prosthetic and orthotic services available; problems with materials and machines; low public awareness concerning disabilities; marginalisation in society and low priority on the part of government. The findings illustrated traditional beliefs about the causes of disability and that the public's attitude needs to change to include and value people with disabilities. Support from international organisations was considered necessary as well as educating more prosthetic and orthotic staff to a higher level.

  13. Organizational climate partially mediates the effect of culture on work attitudes and staff turnover in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-05-01

    Staff turnover in mental health service organizations is an ongoing problem with implications for staff morale, productivity, organizational effectiveness, and implementation of innovation. Recent studies in public sector services have examined the impact of organizational culture and climate on work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and, ultimately, staff turnover. However, mediational models of the impact of culture and climate on work attitudes have not been examined. The present study examined full and partial mediation models of the effects of culture and climate on work attitudes and the subsequent impact of work attitudes on staff turnover. Multilevel structural equation models supported a partial mediation model in which organizational culture had both direct influence on work attitudes and indirect influence through organizational climate. Work attitudes significantly predicted one-year staff turnover rates. These findings support the contention that both culture and climate impact work attitudes and subsequent staff turnover.

  14. Students’ Perceptions about Role of Faculty and Administrative Staff in Business Education Service Quality Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Arslanagić-Kalajdžić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on dimensions of the perceived service quality measurement for business schools. We propose an adapted SERVQUAL measure of expected and perceived quality, where employees at business schools are split into two groups: faculty and administrative staff, and assessed separately. This measure represents a tool for comparable service quality assessment at business schools. Empirical data were collected among undergraduate students in a developing economy. A total of 282 respondents were used to assess the overall fit of the proposed model and to test the differences between the expectations and the perceptions of service quality in a business school. The results support usability of the proposed adapted SERVQUAL measure. Therefore, the study contributes to the existing literature reporting the findings on service quality in an educational context.

  15. Does local government staff perceive digital communication with citizens as improved service?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Jesper B.; Hertzum, Morten; Schreiber, Trine Louise

    2016-01-01

    Digital communication between government and citizens is pivotal to e-government. The Danish e-government initiative Digital Post aims to digitize all communication between government and citizens. We surveyed local government staff about how Digital Post affects the service delivered to citizens....... As much as 82% of the 448 respondents considered digital communication with citizens using Digital Post a good idea, yet 47% reported concrete incidents in which they perceived a decrease in service with Digital Post. This result shows the importance of distinguishing between the overall service...... relationship and the concrete incidents of which the service consists. We discuss interactions between the relationship level and the incident level of Digital Post on the basis of a content analysis of the respondents’ incident descriptions....

  16. Social appearance anxiety of staff in youth services and sport provincial directorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk YAZICI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the social appearance anxiety of staff in Youth Services and Sport Provincial Directorate. Material and Methods: Totally 300 staff who were working in Youth Services and Sport Provincial Directorates of Malatya, Trabzon and Istanbul had participated to the study. As data collection tools; “Social Appearance Anxiety Scale” which developed by Hart et al. (2008 and modified to Turkish with reliability and validity study by Doğan (2010 and “Personal Data Form” created by the researchers were used. In analyzing the data; descriptive analysis, t-test and one way Anova were used. Results: Social anxiety concerns of personnel has been found to be the low level. After the analysis it was determined that there was a significant difference in age, income, doing sports and city that working according to the staff’s social appearance anxiety. Conclusion: In this context, the studies should be included in studying of staff in other cities.

  17. Factors Affecting Staff Perceptions of Tele-ICU Service in Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Marcia M; Ullrich, Fred; Potter, Andrew J; MacKinney, A Clinton; Kappel, Sarah; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-06-01

    Telemedicine is designed to increase access to specialist care, especially in settings distant from tertiary-care centers. One of the more established telemedicine applications in hospitals is the tele-intensive care unit (tele-ICU). Perceptions of tele-ICU users are not well studied. Thus, we undertook a study focused on assessing staff acceptance at multiple hospitals that had implemented a tele-ICU system. We designed a survey instrument that gathered perceptions on multiple facets of tele-ICU use and administered it to clinical and administrative staff at 28 hospitals that had implemented a tele-ICU system. We also conducted interviews at half of these hospitals to gain a deeper understanding of factors affecting staff perceptions of tele-ICU services. The 145 survey respondents were generally positive about all facets of the service. Analyses found no significant differences in comparisons between critical access and larger hospitals or between clinical and administrative/managerial respondents, although a few differences between providers and nurses emerged. Respondents at hospitals averaging more tele-ICU use and that had implemented it longer were significantly (phospitals retained critical care patients during special circumstances and when the tele-ICU hub could monitor patients to provide relief for local providers and nurses. Tele-ICU can aid rural hospitals, but multiple delivery models are warranted to meet disparate needs.

  18. Investigating patient safety culture across a health system: multilevel modelling of differences associated with service types and staff demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Blanca; Westbrook, Mary T; Dunn, Adam G; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    To use multilevel modelling to compare the patient safety cultures of types of services across a health system and to determine whether differences found can be accounted for by staffs' professions, organizational roles, ages and type of patient care provided. Application of a hierarchical two-level regression model. All services in the South Australian public health system. Approximately half of the health staff (n = 14 054) in the 46 organizations, classified into 18 types of service, which made up the South Australian public health system. Staff completed the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Attitudes regarding Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Job Satisfaction, Stress Recognition, Perception of Management and Working Conditions in participants' workplaces. All SAQ indices showed statistically significant although modest variations according to service type. However, most of these differences were not accounted for by the differences in the demographic composition of services' staff. Most favourable safety attitudes were found in the breast screening, primary/community health services, community nursing and metropolitan non-teaching hospitals. Poorer cultures were reported in the psychiatric hospital, mental health, metropolitan ambulance services and top-level teaching hospitals. Demographic differences in safety attitudes were observed; particularly, clinical, senior managerial, aged care and older staff held more favourable attitudes. Differences in staff attitudes have been demonstrated at a macro-level across the type of health services but for the most part, differences could not be explained by staffing composition.

  19. Dose levels in medical staff at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil-Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T. de [FUNDACENTRO-Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Rua Guajajaras, no 40, 14o andar, Centro, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, Thessa C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Av. Prof. Antonio Carlos 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, Maria do S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Av. Prof. Antonio Carlos 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)], E-mail: mnogue@edtn.br; Silva, Teogenes A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Av. Prof. Antonio Carlos 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2008-02-15

    Medical staff during interventional radiology could be exposed to radiation conditions that may cause very high dose levels depending on the X-ray machine operational conditions. The dose levels received by medical staff during interventional radiology are very high depending on the operational conditions and the patient trunk thickness. Dose levels could reach a factor of 30 for fluoroscopy or cine modes. The ALARA principle, which emphasizes the adoption of techniques and procedures to keep dose levels as low as reasonably achievable, should be followed to minimize the risk of radiation exposure to medical professionals. Dose reduction could be achieved by persuading the medical staff to wear protection devices (lead apron, thyroid protector, eyeglasses and gloves). Additionally, medical staff should also be persuaded that they should not be submitted to very high doses, above the acceptable limits for occupational workers. Dose levels at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, were analyzed. Due to the equipment characteristics or the exam type and conditions X-ray machines were used with 70-120 kV, 2.5-699 mA and 80-2880 s. Annual individual doses were estimated based on measured doses during a specific exam taking into account the workload. Maximum doses varied from 0.05 to 0.70 mSv per exam. The results projected for one work-year period show that all annual individual doses would be higher than the annual dose limit of 20 mSv/y with only a few values lower than 50 mSv/y. Dose levels measured at medical staff positions during hemodynamic exams showed that if the protective devices are not used professionals could be exposed to dose values higher than annual dose limits.

  20. Impacts of Sustained Institutional Participation in Service-Learning: Perspectives from faculty, staff and administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Vogel

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The movement for greater civic engagement in higher education in the United States has taken hold across the core academic missions of teaching, research and service. One manifestation of this movement has been growing participation in service-learning, a teaching method grounded in community-university partnerships in which students provide services that simultaneously address community-identified concerns and meet key learning objectives. In order to assess the benefits of long-term sustained institutional involvement in service-learning, in 2007–2008 we interviewed 23 faculty members, staff and administrators from 16 academic institutions that had participated in a national demonstration program for service-learning, which ended in 1998. We found that 15 of these institutions had sustained service-learning to some degree and 12 had integrated service-learning into the curriculum, with varying degrees of institutional support. Interview participants described five main impacts of their institutions’ sustained participation in service-learning: 1 increased community engagement and community-engaged scholarship, and increased valuation of both, among participating faculty members; 2 greater capacity for community-university partnerships among academic and community partners; 3 improved community-university relations; 4 diffusion of service-learning and/or principles of community-university partnerships to other departments and schools; and 5 recruitment of students seeking community engagement opportunities. This study provides evidence that sustained institutional participation in service-learning can foster an understanding of the scholarly value of community-engaged teaching and research among participating faculty, and increase community-engaged activities at participating academic institutions. These findings suggest that funding agencies, faculty members and academic administrators can use service-learning as a strategy to foster a

  1. Motivation of staff in the civil service of Ukraine: problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Trokhymivna Honcharuk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The problems and prospects of motivation in the civil service of Ukraine are analyzed in the article. Categorical analysis in the scientific literature the terms “motivated”, “motivation of staff of the Civil Service”, “motivation”, “financial motivation” has been done. The evolution of concepts and theories of motivation based on the needs, interests, motives and incentives is analyzed. The authors propose to take all the best from these concepts and theories to use in today’s development of Ukrainian society. The current state of public servants motivation and its regulatory provision is researched. Domestic and foreign experience motivation of public service motivation is generalized. The possibility of using new technologies of human resource management improvement in the public service is researched, the new provisions of the Law of Ukraine “On Civil Service” dated November 11, 2011 № 4050 on the motivation of civil servants in Ukraine is described.

  2. Pro & con: staff development vs in-service training. In-service education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, L T

    1987-08-01

    In-service education is an institutional activity provided for one reason only: to improve the quality and productivity of the institution. The way an in-service program is carried out may foster the growth and development of the employees and give the individual employee a sense of self-direction, achievement, and even self-actualization. However, this is a by-product. In-service education has a utilitarian purpose and its purpose is clear. It does not need to be packaged under the guise of employee development. Individual growth and development take place within and outside the workplace. Individual initiative should provide the direction, not institutional programming.

  3. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaghari, Mahmud; Saffari, Mohsen; Ebadi, Abbas; Ameryoun, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through 'Walker and Avants strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  4. Empowering education: A new model for in-service training of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHMUD CHAGHARI

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In-service training of nurses plays an indispensable role in improving the quality of inpatient care. Need to enhance the effectiveness of in-service training of nurses is an inevitable requirement. This study attempted to design a new optimal model for in-service training of nurses. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted in two stages during 2015-2016. In the first stage, the Grounded Theory was adopted to explore the process of training 35 participating nurses. The sampling was initially purposeful and then theoretically based on emerging concept. Data were collected through interview, observation and field notes. Moreover, the data were analyzed through Corbin-Strauss method and the data were coded through MAXQDA-10. In the second stage, the findings were employed through Walker and Avant’s strategy for theory construction so as to design an optimal model for in-service training of nursing staff. Results: In the first stage, there were five major themes including unsuccessful mandatory education, empowering education, organizational challenges of education, poor educational management, and educational-occupational resiliency. Empowering education was the core variable derived from the research, based on which a grounded theory was proposed. The new empowering education model was composed of self-directed learning and practical learning. There are several strategies to achieve empowering education, including the fostering of searching skills, clinical performance monitoring, motivational factors, participation in the design and implementation, and problem-solving approach. Conclusion: Empowering education is a new model for in-service training of nurses, which matches the training programs with andragogical needs and desirability of learning among the staff. Owing to its practical nature, the empowering education can facilitate occupational tasks and achieving greater mastery of professional skills among the nurses.

  5. 77 FR 29989 - Applications for New Awards; Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... limited to, school leadership support, professional development support to school staff, and a plan for... benefits to understanding different student learning styles (Grunwald, 2010). Additionally, Perlman and...

  6. Understanding the working relationships between National Health Service clinicians and finance staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Virginia; McCaffry, Rebecca

    2017-03-13

    Purpose The Department of Health and the National Health Service (NHS) Future Focused Finance (FFF) programme promotes effective engagement between clinical and finance staff. Surveys undertaken by the Department of Health between 2013 and 2015 found few NHS Trusts reported high levels of engagement. The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of current working relationships between NHS clinical and finance professionals and how they might be supported to become more effective. Design/methodology/approach Ipsos MORI were commissioned by the NHS FFF programme to undertake an online survey of NHS clinical and finance staff between June and August 2015. Findings The majority of clinicians had a member of a finance team linked to their speciality or directorate. Clinical and finance professionals have a positive view of joint working preferring face-to-face contact. Clinician's confidence in their understanding of finance was generally good and finance staff felt they had a good understanding of clinical issues. Effective working relationships were facilitated by face-to-face contact, a professional relationship, and the availability of clear, well presented finance and activity data. Research limitations/implications Data protection issues limited the accessibility of the survey team to NHS staff resulting in a relatively low-response rate. Other forms of communication, including social media, were utilised to increase access to the survey. Originality/value The FFF programme is a unique programme aimed at making the NHS finance profession fit for the future. The close partnering work stream brings together the finance and clinical perspective to share knowledge, evidence, training, and to develop good practice and engagement.

  7. 32 CFR 705.37 - Public affairs and public service awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense and the Navy to business and civic leaders, scientists and other nongovernment civilians. Other... of the Navy. (B) Be the result of a single outstanding project or program. (C) Have been accomplished... by a command to honor non-Navy civilians. (A) Examples of such awards are “Good Neighbor” or...

  8. Proposal for the award of an industrial service contract for stores operations and relatedlogistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an industrial support contract for stores operations and related logistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ISS (CH) - ISS (ES), for stores operations and related logistics, in-house mail distribution and transport services on the CERN site for a period of three years for a total amount not exceeding 10 312 028 Swiss francs not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  9. Food provision in early childhood education and care services: Exploring how staff determine nutritional adequacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Amanda; Vidgen, Helen; Cleland, Phoebe

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the methods, processes and strategies used by early childhood education and care (ECEC) services when determining the nutritional adequacy of food provided to children in their care. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with directors, educators and cooks at long day care services (LDCS) (n = 12) regarding nutritional adequacy, the use of tools, guidelines and checklists, menu planning and identification and management of unhealthy foods. A qualitative thematic approach was used to identify anticipated and emergent themes. Case-by-case comparisons were then made, and tables and models were created to allow for comparative analysis. LDCS relied on personal knowledge, experience and 'common sense' when determining the nutritional adequacy of the food provided to children. LDCS demonstrated a lack of awareness and use of current regulatory requirements, nutrition guidelines and recommendations, although the services were confident in providing nutrition advice to parents/carers. LDCS staff use personal knowledge and experience over evidence-based nutrition guidelines and recommendations when determining if the food provided to children is nutritionally adequate. ECEC services are recognised as important settings for obesity prevention and the development of lifetime healthy eating habits. This study highlights the complexities and inconsistencies in providing food that is nutritious and appropriate to children in care while highlighting the need to improve the use and accessibility of nutrition guidelines. © 2016 Dietitians Association of Australia.

  10. Descriptive study of stress and satisfaction at work in the Saragossa university services and administration staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucha Lopez Ana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The notion of stress in connection with the work environment became an important topic during the 1970's, when the first studies on the subject were published and the term of work stress was first coined. In 1974, Freudenberger proposed the term burnout to refer to the condition of physical and emotional exhaustion, as well as the associated negative attitudes, resulting from the intense interaction in working with people. The aim of our study is to examine burnout and job satisfaction in Saragossa University Services and Administration Staff (SAS and detect the main factors which could contribute to too much stress, because job stress has emerged as a major psychosocial influence on mental health, associated with burnout. Methods 24 people from the Services and Administration Staff in the University of Saragossa participated in the study. The research was carried out during the implementation of a module on Stress Management organised by the University of Saragossa and commissioned to the Unit for Research in Physical Therapy (University School of Health Sciences from that University. This research is an exploratory research to improve the stress management program. A personal interview was carried out and additionally, participants were given the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Scale of Satisfaction at Work of Warr, Cook & Wall. Results However using small sample this is worth to state that participants present most of them low burnout levels in the burnout scale. Only in one person high exhaustion level was reflected, even though other seven showed mean levels; in the professional self-esteem section, most of them showed high self-esteem, with two cases of low self-esteem and five with mean level. With regard to satisfaction people participating in the study show mean levels in intrinsic as much as in extrinsic factors and general satisfaction. Conclusions Services and Administration Staff from the University of

  11. Descriptive study of stress and satisfaction at work in the Saragossa university services and administration staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricas Moreno, Jose Miguel; Salavera Bordas, Carlos; Lucha Lopez, Ma Orosia; Vidal Peracho, Concepcion; Lucha Lopez, Ana Carmen; Estebanez de Miguel, Elena; Bernues Vazquez, Luis

    2010-04-21

    The notion of stress in connection with the work environment became an important topic during the 1970's, when the first studies on the subject were published and the term of work stress was first coined. In 1974, Freudenberger proposed the term burnout to refer to the condition of physical and emotional exhaustion, as well as the associated negative attitudes, resulting from the intense interaction in working with people. The aim of our study is to examine burnout and job satisfaction in Saragossa University Services and Administration Staff (SAS) and detect the main factors which could contribute to too much stress, because job stress has emerged as a major psychosocial influence on mental health, associated with burnout. 24 people from the Services and Administration Staff in the University of Saragossa participated in the study. The research was carried out during the implementation of a module on Stress Management organised by the University of Saragossa and commissioned to the Unit for Research in Physical Therapy (University School of Health Sciences) from that University. This research is an exploratory research to improve the stress management program. A personal interview was carried out and additionally, participants were given the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Scale of Satisfaction at Work of Warr, Cook & Wall. However using small sample this is worth to state that participants present most of them low burnout levels in the burnout scale. Only in one person high exhaustion level was reflected, even though other seven showed mean levels; in the professional self-esteem section, most of them showed high self-esteem, with two cases of low self-esteem and five with mean level.With regard to satisfaction people participating in the study show mean levels in intrinsic as much as in extrinsic factors and general satisfaction. Services and Administration Staff from the University of Saragossa shows low burnout levels linked with high professional self

  12. Health Centre Staff Are Satisfied with Librarian-Mediated Search Services, Especially When Librarians Follow Up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peace Ossom Williamson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: McKeown, S., Konrad, S.-L., McTavish, J., & Boyce, E. (2017. Evaluation of hospital staff’s perceived quality of librarian-mediated literature searching services. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 105(2, 120-131. http://dx.doi.org/10.5195/jmla.2017.201 Abstract Objective – To determine the effects of the professional designation and communication method on clinical, educational, and research activities and related users’ reported satisfaction with and perceived quality of a librarian-mediated literature searching service. Design – Online survey. Setting – A large teaching hospital in Ontario, Canada. Subjects – 237 health sciences centre staff who were requesting librarian-mediated literature searching over a one-year period. Methods – From February 1, 2014 to January 31, 2015, one-third of the health centre staff members requesting searching services, representing a systematic sample of the user group, were invited to participate in the survey. The survey centred on questioning participants on a critical incident, which, according to the critical incident technique, is an actual event upon which recollections are made, rather than hypothetical situations. In the case of this study, the critical incident was the service they received upon requesting literature searching by a librarian who was blinded concerning the originator of the request. With a 71% response rate, the researchers received 137 responses to the survey by health sciences staff. Participants were asked how many literature searches they had requested in the previous year, the reason they requested the service, how they submitted the request, and whether the librarian followed up for further clarification of their need. They also reported on the relevance of the results and their method of delivery, along with their perceptions of the overall quality of the service. Main Results – The results came from 137 completed surveys, for a 71% response

  13. Acquiring IT Services: Should DOD Use Single or Multiple Award Task Orders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    contribute to the reduced cost. First, SITEC implemented a new IT Governance Model called Information Technology Infrastructure Library ( ITIL ). ITIL ... ITIL , 2007). Since the new model was implemented with the SITEC contract awards, there is no mechanism to separate the cost reductions, or increases...1996 40 U.S.C. § 11101 (1996) . ITIL . (2007). Welcome to the Official ITIL® Website. Retrieved from http://www.itil- officialsite.com/home/home.aspx

  14. Influencing sceptical staff to become supporters of service improvement: a qualitative study of doctors' and managers' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollop, R; Whitby, E; Buchanan, D; Ketley, D

    2004-04-01

    To explore scepticism and resistance towards changes in working practice designed to achieve service improvement. Two principal questions were studied: (1). why some people are sceptical or resistant towards improvement programmes and (2). what influences them to change their minds. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 clinicians and 19 managers who held national and regional roles in two national programmes of service improvement within the NHS involving systematic organisational changes in working practices: the National Booking Programme and the Cancer Services Collaborative (now the Cancer Services Collaborative Improvement Partnership). Scepticism and resistance exist in all staff groups, especially among medical staff. Reasons include personal reluctance to change, misunderstanding of the aims of improvement programmes, and a dislike of the methods by which programmes have been promoted. Sceptical staff can be influenced to become involved in improvement, but this usually takes time. Newly won support may be fragile, requiring ongoing evidence of benefits to be maintained. The support of health service staff, particularly doctors, is crucial to the spread and sustainability of the modernisation agenda. Scepticism and resistance are seen to hamper progress. Leaders of improvement initiatives need to recognise the impact of scepticism and resistance, and to consider ways in which staff can become positively engaged in change.

  15. Prison staff and women prisoner's views on self-harm; their implications for service delivery and development: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenning, Cassandra; Cooper, Jayne; Short, Vicky; Shaw, Jenny; Abel, Kathryn; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2010-10-01

    Rates of self-harm are high among women in prison in the UK. This is the first study to compare the views and attitudes of prison staff and women prisoners and to look at the effects of these attitudes on prisoner/staff relationships. To explore understanding of self-harm among women prisoners, prison officers and health-care staff and how their perceptions might influence service provision and development. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with women prisoners who self-harm and with staff at a women's prison. Data were analysed thematically. Prison officers often attributed motives to self-harm such as 'manipulation' and 'attention-seeking', whereas descriptions by women prisoners, prison governors and health-care staff suggested explanations in affect regulation or self-punishment. Differences between prison officers and other staff working in the prison in their understanding of self-harm by women prisoners may lie in training differences, but there may be other explanations such as self-protection/coping strategies. More training and support for officers may result in improved staff-prisoner relationships and thus, safer service provision. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Comparing hospital staff and patient perceptions of customer service: a pilot study utilizing survey and focus group data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fottler, Myron D; Dickson, Duncan; Ford, Robert C; Bradley, Kenneth; Johnson, Lee

    2006-02-01

    The measurement of patient satisfaction is crucial to enhancing customer service and competitive advantage in the health-care industry. While there are numerous approaches to such measurement, this paper provides a case study which compares and contrasts patient and staff perceptions of customer service using both survey and focus group data. Results indicate that there is a high degree of correlation between staff and patient perceptions of customer service based on both survey and focus group data. However, the staff and patient subgroups also provided complementary information regarding patient perceptions of their service experience. Staff members tended to have more negative perceptions of service attributes than did the patients themselves. The focus group results provide complementary information to survey results in terms of greater detail and more managerially relevant information. While these results are derived from a pilot study, they suggest that diversification of data sources beyond patient surveys may enhance the utility of customer service information. If further research can affirm these findings, they create exciting possibilities for gathering valid, reliable and cost-effective customer service information.

  17. Evaluation of the polytrauma victim by the nursing staff in an emergency service of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Sanceverino Mattos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the actions developed by the nursing staff of a private hospital emergency service in the southern Santa Catarina (SC, related to primary and secondary evaluation of polytrauma victims. Methods: Research of a qualitative approach, the type of case study, performed with twelve nurses. Sample has been characterized as non-probabilistic intentional. Data collection has been performed using the techniques of semi-structured interview and participant observation. Data analysis has been developed using the technique of content analysis. Results: Analysis of nurses’ testimonies and the results of observation have showed that most participants comprehend the importance of adopting the ABCDE rule in primary evaluation - A (Air Way - airway permeability with safe administration of cervical collar; B (Breathing; C (Circulation - search for bleeding and control; D (Disability - neurological evaluation; e E (Exposure - patient’s body exposition seeking missed injuries - and the need of meticulous secondary evaluation of polytrauma victim. However, due to demand of urgency and agility in emergencies of this nature, the rule is not followed in a systematic way. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated the nursing staff’s concern over the following aspects: agility of service; immediate performance of examinations; communication between emergency service professionals; adequate perception of the general condition of the victim; and the reception to victim and family.

  18. The influence of staff training and education on prosthetic and orthotic service quality: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghany, Saeed; Sadeghi-Demneh, Ebrahim; Trinler, Ursula; Onmanee, Pornsuree; Dillon, Michael P; Baker, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Education and training in prosthetics and orthotics typically comply with International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics standards based on three categories of prosthetic and orthotic professionals. This scoping study sought to describe the evidence base available to answer the question, How are prosthetic and orthotic services influenced by the training of staff providing them? Scoping review. A structured search of the peer-reviewed literature catalogued in major electronic databases yielded 3039 papers. Following review of title and abstract, 93 articles were considered relevant. Full-text review reduced this number to 25. Only two articles were identified as providing direct evidence of the effects of training and education on service provision. While both suggested that there was an impact, it is difficult to see how the more specific conclusions of either could be generalised. The other 23 articles provide a useful background to a range of issues including the specification of competencies that training programmes should deliver (3 articles), descriptions of a range of training programmes and the effects of training and education on student knowledge and skills. Although it is considered axiomatic, the service quality is dependent on practitioner education and training. There is insufficient evidence to establish whether levels of training and education in prosthetics and orthotics have an effect on the quality of prosthetic and orthotic services. Clinical relevance There is very little evidence about the effects of training and education of prosthetists and orthotists on service quality. While this is a somewhat negative finding, we feel that it is important to bring this to the attention of the prosthetics and orthotics community.

  19. Creating an Excellent Patient Experience Through Service Education: Content and Methods for Engaging and Motivating Front-Line Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Denise M

    2017-12-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction affect an organization's value-based payments. This new value paradigm calls for a new approach to service education and training for front-line staff. Thoughtfully conceived, department-specific content, infused with patient feedback, value creation, and science of service quality principles, was developed to give front-line staff a deeper understanding of the impact of their performance on patient experience, value creation, and value-based revenue. Feedback from nearly 1500 trainees in 60 educational sessions delivered over 7 years indicates good understanding of the content and appreciation of the targeted approach. On a 5-point scale ranging from 1 (least effective) to 5 (most effective), trainees' ratings of their understanding of service quality concepts and impact on value ranged from 4.7 to 4.9. Verbatim comments showed a positive impact on staff. Employee feedback suggests that value-based service education may be useful in motivating front-line staff, improving service quality, and creating value.

  20. Need assessment of staffs' welfare services at tehran university of medical sciences: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Reza; Mafimoradi, Shiva; Hadi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing the human resources management literature shows an absence of attention given to the employee's benefits. Taking a look at functions of the Tehran University of Medical Sciences' wellbeing services system, it uncovers a gap between employees' real needs and what is delivered to meet their needs. So it requires an improved comprehensive system for delivering wellbeing services (financial, insurance, health care services, educational and training services, etc). Wellbeing need assessment can helps planners to identify vital needs of employee and response to them effectively. Moreover it can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the current services which are delivered. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess wellbeing services of staffs working in TUMS to (1) evaluate the satisfactory rate of services which are delivered, and (2) exploring those wellbeing needs which were not fulfilled by the organization. Being a cross-sectional and analytic-descriptive survey including 98 responding participants, it is conducted by a questionnaire collecting employees' demographic information, their satisfactory rate of the implemented services, and determines unfulfilled wellbeing needs which were not already covered. Results indicated that services related to financial, educational, non-financial, insurance, occupational health and tourism/recreational services were the most satisfactory services successively. 'Staff's unwillingness to receive services' and 'poor announcement' (unawareness on the wellbeing services),' were found to be the most frequent reasons for not receiving the existing wellbeing services. To increase the satisfaction rate and responsiveness to the real needs of the staff, the current delivery system of wellbeing services in the TUMS should be redesigned by defining new wellbeing packages.

  1. Design in mind: eliciting service user and frontline staff perspectives on psychiatric ward design through participatory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csipke, Emese; Papoulias, Constantina; Vitoratou, Silia; Williams, Paul; Rose, Diana; Wykes, Til

    2016-01-01

    Psychiatric ward design may make an important contribution to patient outcomes and well-being. However, research is hampered by an inability to assess its effects robustly. This paper reports on a study which deployed innovative methods to capture service user and staff perceptions of ward design. User generated measures of the impact of ward design were developed and tested on four acute adult wards using participatory methodology. Additionally, inpatients took photographs to illustrate their experience of the space in two wards. Data were compared across wards. Satisfactory reliability indices emerged based on both service user and staff responses. Black and minority ethnic (BME) service users and those with a psychosis spectrum diagnosis have more positive views of the ward layout and fixtures. Staff members have more positive views than service users, while priorities of staff and service users differ. Inpatient photographs prioritise hygiene, privacy and control and address symbolic aspects of the ward environment. Participatory and visual methodologies can provide robust tools for an evaluation of the impact of psychiatric ward design on users.

  2. 77 FR 4821 - Public Health Service Act, Non-competitive Replacement Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Public Health... is September 1, 2011, to August 31, 2012. Authority: Section 330I(d)(2) of the Public Health Service... health care systems in California. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Monica Cowan, Public Health Analyst...

  3. Changes in knowledge and attitudes of hospital environmental services staff: The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brett G; White, Nicole; Farrington, Alison; Allen, Michelle; Page, Katie; Gardner, Anne; Halton, Kate; Riley, Thomas V; Gericke, Christian A; Paterson, David L; Graves, Nicholas; Hall, Lisa

    2018-03-14

    The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study tested a multimodal cleaning intervention in Australian hospitals. This article reports findings from a pre/post questionnaire, embedded into the REACH study, that was administered prior to the implementation of the intervention and at the conclusion of the study. A cross-sectional questionnaire, nested within a stepped-wedge trial, was administered. The REACH intervention was a cleaning bundle comprising 5 interdependent components. The questionnaire explored the knowledge, reported practice, attitudes, roles, and perceived organizational support of environmental services staff members in the hospitals participating in the REACH study. Environmental services staff members in 11 participating hospitals completed 616 pre- and 307 post-test questionnaires (n = 923). Increases in knowledge and practice were seen between the pre-and post-test questionnaires. Minimal changes were observed in attitudes regarding the role of cleaning and in perceived organizational support. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report changes in knowledge, attitudes, and perceived organizational support in environmental services staff members, in the context of a large multicenter clinical trial. In this underexplored group of hospital workers, findings suggest that environmental services staff members have a high level of knowledge related to cleaning practices and understand the importance of their role. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A prospective audit of the impact of additional staff on the care of diabetic patients in a community podiatry service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alexandra; Uppal, Meenakshi; Cunning, Imelda; Buckley, Claire M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the employment of additional podiatry staff on patients with diabetes attending a community-based podiatry service. An audit was conducted to evaluate the intervention of two additional podiatry staff. All patients with diabetes referred to and attending community podiatry services in a specified area in the Republic of Ireland between June 2011 and June 2012 were included. The service was benchmarked against the UK gold standard outlined in the 'Guidelines on prevention & management of foot problems in Type 2 Diabetes' by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). Process of care measures addressed were the number of patients with diabetes receiving treatment and the waiting times of patients with diabetes from referral to initial review. An increase in the number of patients with diabetes receiving treatment was seen in all risk categories (ranging from low risk to the emergency foot). Waiting times for patients with diabetes decreased post-intervention but did not reach the targets outlined in the NICE guidelines. The average time from referral to initial review of patients with an emergency diabetic foot was 37 weeks post-intervention. NICE guidelines recommend that these patients are seen within 24 hours. During the life cycle of this audit, increased numbers of patients were treated and waiting times for patients with diabetes were reduced. An internal re-organisation of the services coincided with the commencement of the additional staff. The improvements observed were due to the effects of a combination of additional staff and service re-organisation. Efficient organisation of services is key to optimal performance. Continued efforts to improve services are required to reach the standards outlined in the NICE guidelines.

  5. A prospective audit of the impact of additional staff on the care of diabetic patients in a community podiatry service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ryan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the employment of additional podiatry staff on patients with diabetes attending a community-based podiatry service. Methods: An audit was conducted to evaluate the intervention of two additional podiatry staff. All patients with diabetes referred to and attending community podiatry services in a specified area in the Republic of Ireland between June 2011 and June 2012 were included. The service was benchmarked against the UK gold standard outlined in the ‘Guidelines on prevention & management of foot problems in Type 2 Diabetes’ by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE. Process of care measures addressed were the number of patients with diabetes receiving treatment and the waiting times of patients with diabetes from referral to initial review. Results: An increase in the number of patients with diabetes receiving treatment was seen in all risk categories (ranging from low risk to the emergency foot. Waiting times for patients with diabetes decreased post-intervention but did not reach the targets outlined in the NICE guidelines. The average time from referral to initial review of patients with an emergency diabetic foot was 37 weeks post-intervention. NICE guidelines recommend that these patients are seen within 24 hours. Discussion: During the life cycle of this audit, increased numbers of patients were treated and waiting times for patients with diabetes were reduced. An internal re-organisation of the services coincided with the commencement of the additional staff. The improvements observed were due to the effects of a combination of additional staff and service re-organisation. Efficient organisation of services is key to optimal performance. Continued efforts to improve services are required to reach the standards outlined in the NICE guidelines.

  6. 76 FR 20637 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... real-world applications of evaluating the effectiveness of early intervention providers, related... are not limited to, psychological services, physical therapy (including therapy provided by personnel...

  7. Staff and bed distribution in public sector mental health services in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Sukeri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Eastern Cape Province of South Africa is a resource-limited province with a fragmented mental health service.  Objective. To determine the current context of public sector mental health services in terms of staff and bed distribution, and how this corresponds to the population distribution in the province. Method. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, an audit questionnaire was submitted to all public sector mental health facilities. Norms and indicators were calculated at provincial and district level. This article investigates staff and bed distribution only. Results. Results demonstrated that within the province, only three of its seven districts have acute beds above the national baseline norm requirement of 13/100 000. The private mental health sector provides approximately double the number of medium- to long-stay beds available in the public sector. Only two regions have staff/population ratios above the baseline norm of 20/100 000. However, there are significant differences in this ratio among specific staff categories. There is an inequitable distribution of resources between the eastern and western regions of the province. When compared with the western regions, the eastern regions have poorer access to mental health facilities, human resources and non-governmental organisations.  Conclusion. Owing to the inequitable distribution of resources, the provincial authorities urgently need to develop an equitable model of service delivery. The province has to address the absence of a reliable mental health information system.

  8. The Protected Addiction: Exploring Staff Beliefs toward Integrating Tobacco Dependence into Substance Abuse Treatment Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teater, Barbra; Hammond, Gretchen Clark

    2009-01-01

    Survey research was used to explore the beliefs of 963 staff members regarding the myths to treating tobacco dependence and the integration of tobacco dependence into substance abuse treatment programs. The staff represented a mixture of residential, outpatient, and prevention-based gender-specific (women only) treatment centers throughout Ohio.…

  9. University Staff Members' Attitudes and Knowledge about Learning Disabilities and Disability Support Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher; Flannery, Brigid K.; Wren, Carol

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examined university staff members' attitudes towards students with learning disabilities (LD) at the postsecondary level. Although prior research has examined university faculty perceptions of students with LD, little is known about staff members' attitudes and perceptions. A survey instrument was administered to approximately…

  10. 78 FR 2971 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... personnel who have the necessary knowledge and skills to assume leadership positions in special education... skills needed by the leadership personnel the applicant proposes to prepare, including knowledge of... Services Leadership Personnel AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department...

  11. 77 FR 16819 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ...) Scholar competencies to be acquired in the program relate to knowledge and skills needed by the leadership... knowledge and skills, will enable the scholars to acquire the competencies needed by leadership personnel... Services Leadership Personnel AGENCY: Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department...

  12. Proposal for the award of a contract for the provision of cooling water treatment services

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for cabling and minor mechanical work on components of CERN accelerators and experiments. Following a market survey carried out among 62 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3214/EST/A) was sent on 1 August 2003 to three firms and two consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders from four consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium AMEC SPIE (FR) - CEGELEC (FR) - AMEC SPIE (NL), the lowest bidder, for cabling and minor mechanical work on components of CERN accelerators and experiments for a total amount not exceeding 1 040 968 euros (1 608 915 Swiss francs), covering an initial period of three years starting on 1 January 2004, not subject to revision. The rate of exchange used is that stipulated in the tender. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium ...

  13. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    7. a) Were you in contact with other IDRC staff (aside from Centre Awards staff) during the. course of your research? Please indicate who you were in contact with and if this contact assisted you in any way. b) Please indicate the names and contact information of individuals from other organizations (departments, institutes, ...

  14. Staff Perception of Relative Importance of Quality Dimensions for Patients atTertiary Public Services in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Alrashdi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This research attempted to explore the public healthcare providers understanding the quality dimensions and patient priorities in Oman. It also addresses the issue of risks confronting health professionals in management without “a customer focused” approach.Methods: A descriptive study was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire distributed around two tertiary public hospitals. A total of 838 respondents from several specialties and levels of hierarchy participated in the study. The data was analyzed to compare the perception of two groups; the group of junior and frontline staff, as well as of managers and senior staff involved in management.Results: The results showed that 61% of the junior and frontline staff, and 68.3% of the senior staff and managers think that cure or improvement in overall health is the single most importantquality dimension in healthcare. Both groups perceive that technical dimensions have greater importance (to patients over interpersonal aspects such as communication with the exception of dignity and respect. There was no significant difference between the perception of the managers and senior staff vis-à-vis the perception of junior and frontline staff on the importance of technical dimensions and the interpersonal aspects of service quality. Despite the proven contribution of empathy to patient satisfaction, it was ranked by both groups as the least important among the dimensions examined.Conclusion: The findings of this research are therefore informative of the need to implement strategies that deal effectively with such attitudes and create the platform and programs that reinforcethe culture of good quality service amongst healthcare providers, managers in particular, and to improve patient satisfaction.

  15. 20 CFR 439.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the SSA or other... administrative requirements. (b) The term award does not include: (1) Technical assistance that provides services...

  16. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for operation of the hostels, apartments and ancillary premises

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for operation of the hostels, apartments and ancillary premises run by the CERN Housing Service. Following a market survey carried out among 32 firms in ten Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2404/AS/Rev.) was sent on 5 April 2000 to one firm and three consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from the firm and the three consortia. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium VIENNA INTERNATIONAL HOTEL MANAGEMENT (AT) - SEREG (CH), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of five years, to enter into force on 1 January 2001, for a total amount of 6 871 850 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 31 December 2001. The contract will include an option for two one-year extensions beyond the initial five-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH-60%, AT-...

  17. Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS): a proof of concept and evaluation feasibility study of staff training to improve service engagement by people with personality difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M; Jinks, M; McMurran, M

    2015-09-01

    One third of people diagnosed with PD do not complete treatment and non-completion is associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Equipping staff to be better able to engage this client group is important, and web-based, self-directed learning is a potentially cost-effective way to train staff. This study examined the implementation of a web-based training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) in three types of service. Completion rates were 94.4% in community health services; 92.3% in prison offender health services; and 46.5% in probation services. Staff found the content of REMS acceptable and useful. This study demonstrated that staff in NHS and criminal justice settings can complete REMS, but staff in probation services are challenged by time pressures and limited computer access. Staff at probation sites were less familiar with PD issues compared with the NHS staff. A web-based staff training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) was developed to promote the engagement of people with personality difficulties in treatment. This 'proof of concept' study examined the REMS implementation process, its acceptability and the feasibility of using service data for future evaluation. Staff in six services working with people diagnosed with personality disorder or undiagnosed people with personality difficulties were eligible to participate: two community health services, two prison offender health services and two probation services. Of 92 eligible staff, 74 were available to undertake REMS. These staff completed knowledge and acceptability surveys and rated service user engagement with treatment. The proportion of treatment sessions attended by service users was collected for a 30-week period. REMS completion rates were community - 94.4%, prison - 92.3% and probation - 46.5%. Three quarters of participants rated REMS as 7 out of 10 or higher. All teams were able to provide service data for the study period

  18. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  19. Pitfalls, perils and payments: service user, carers and teaching staff perceptions of the barriers to involvement in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Shaun; Griffiths, Jane; Horne, Maria; Keeley, Philip

    2012-10-01

    There is an impetus to involve service users and carers in the education of nurses and a general consensus in the literature about the benefits that this brings to all involved. Whilst these benefits are well rehearsed in the literature there is little written about the potential barriers to service user and carer involvement in nurse education. The objective of this study was to investigate service users, carers and staff views on the potential barriers to becoming engaged in nurse education. A qualitative study using focus group discussions (FGD) was used to canvas the views of service users, carers and teaching staff. A large school of nursing in the North West of England. 38 service users and carers recruited from the North West of England and 23 nursing and midwifery teachers and lecturers. Focus group discussions were employed as the main data collection method. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Six themes occurred in the data as being negatively associated with potential and actual involvement: not knowing the context of the group, lack of preparation of the group, not being supported, not being allowed to be real, not receiving feedback, not being paid appropriately. The process of involvement is not without difficulties. These data show that some consideration needs to be given to the potential barriers to involvement if the engagement of service users and carers is to be effective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 77 FR 32952 - Applications for New Awards: Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ... directly assists a child with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology... and their families use AT devices and services. The barriers are the inadequacy or lack of: (1...., & Wilcox, M.J. (2008). Adaptation Interventions to Promote Participation in Natural Settings. Infants...

  1. 77 FR 36264 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information... LEA (a) that serves not fewer than 10,000 children from families with incomes below the poverty line... incomes below the poverty line. \\6\\ For the purpose of this priority, ``high-need children with...

  2. 77 FR 27747 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for... further disadvantaged and at risk of educational failure because they: (1) Are living in poverty, (2) are... collaborate with appropriate partners, including-- (i) High-need LEAs; \\5\\ high-poverty schools; \\6\\ low...

  3. 78 FR 2962 - Applications for New Awards; Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... Education. ACTION: Notice. Overview Information: Personnel Development to Improve Services and Results for... disadvantaged and at risk of educational failure because they: (1) Are living in poverty, (2) are far below..., including-- (i) High-need LEAs; \\5\\ high-poverty schools; \\6\\ low-performing schools including persistently...

  4. Staff members' negotiation of power in client engagement: analysis of practice within an Australian aged care service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-04-01

    With increasing focus on client control and active client roles in aged care service provision, client engagement is highlighted as fundamental to contemporary care practice. Client engagement itself, however, is complex and is impacted by a range of issues including the relationships and power dynamics inherent in the care context. These dynamics do not simply reflect the roles that are available to or taken up by clients; just as important are the roles and positions that staff of aged care services are offered, and take up, in client engagement. This paper presents the findings of a study that explored client engagement practice within a large Australian service provider. Analysis of interview and focus group discussions addressed the ways in which staff were positioned - by both themselves and by clients - in terms of the roles that they hold within engagement practice and the power relations inherent within these. Analysis of power from the dominant policy perspective of choice and control, and the alternative perspective of an ethic of care suggests that power relations within the care context are dynamic, complex and involve on-going negotiation and regulation by clients and staff members in aged care. The use of these two contrasting perspectives reveals a more dynamic and complex understanding of power in care practice than dominant uni-dimensional approaches to critique suggest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A qualitative investigation into nurses' perceptions of factors influencing staff injuries sustained during physical interventions employed in response to service user violence within one secure learning disability service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Andrew; Smith, Debra; Johnson, Paula

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to examine learning disability nurses' perceptions of incidents involving physical intervention, particularly factors contributing to injuries sustained by this group. This article reports on a qualitative study undertaken within one secure NHS Trust to respond to concerns about staff injuries sustained during physical interventions to prevent incidents of service user violence from escalating out of control. The context of the study relates to increasing debate about the most effective approaches to incidents of violence and agression. A qualitative research design was utilized for the study. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 20 participants, two from each of the 10 incidents involving staff injury sustained during physical intervention. Four themes were produced by the analysis, the first, knowledge and understanding, contextualized the other three, which related to the physical intervention techniques employed, the interpretation of the incident and the impact on staff. Service user violence consistently poses nurses with the challenge of balancing the need to respond in order to maintain the safety of everyone whilst simultaneous supporting and caring for people with complex needs. This study highlights the need for further exploration of the contributory factors to the escalation of potentially violent situations. Services may have good systems in place for responding to and managing service user violence but appear less effective in understanding the reasons for and developing strategies to prevent violence occurring. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for maintenance of fire and gas detection and evacuation alarm systems

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for maintenance of fire and gas detection and evacuation alarm systems. Following a market survey carried out among 48 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2818/ST) was sent on 15 December 2000 to four firms and three consortia, each consisting of two firms, in five Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from one firm and three consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium SCHRACK SECONET (AT) - SOTEB (FR), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 October 2001 for an amount not exceeding 5 800 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: AT-50%, FR-50%.

  7. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for the operation and maintenance of liquid helium cryogenic plants

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for the operation and maintenance of liquid helium cryogenic plants. Following a market survey carried out among 54 firms in twelve Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2719/LHC) was sent on 18 August 2000 to two firms and four consortia, two consisting of two firms and two consisting of three firms, in five Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from one firm and three consortia, in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium AIR LIQUIDE (FR) - LINDE KRYOTECHNIK (CH) - SERCO (DE), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of four years from 17 July 2001 for a total amount of 19 804 400 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 16 July 2005. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial four-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudi...

  8. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for installation and removal of cables for CERN accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for installation and removal of cables for CERN accelerators. Following a market survey carried out among 128 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2760/ST) was sent on 2 June 2000 to eight firms and six consortia, four consisting of two firms, one consisting of three firms and one of four firms, in nine Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from one firm and six consortia, in nine Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium FABRICOM (BE) - AMSE (FR), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 July 2001 for a total amount of 18 000 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: PL-40%, FR-35%, BE-2...

  9. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for civil engineering superstructure and internal construction building work

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for civil engineering superstructure and internal construction building work. Following a market survey carried out among 112 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2546/ST/Rev.) was sent on 12 April 2001 to eleven consortia, four consisting of four firms, three consisting of three firms and four consisting of two firms, in seven Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from eight consortia in six Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium SPIE CITRA SUD-EST(FR)-ANTIRUST TECHNOLOGY (GR), the lowest bidder, for an initial period of three years from 1 January 2002 for an amount not exceeding 15 375 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this ...

  10. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT FOR STAFF INVOLVED IN INSTITUTIONS FROM TERTIARY HEALTH CARE: HEALTH SERVICES AND LABOR WELFARE MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Irene, Arboleda Posada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the conditions of human development according to labor welfare and satisfaction with healthcare services from staff employed with an indefinite term contract before January 1997 in health institutions of tertiary care in the city of Medellin (Colombia. It was performed a cross-sectional study designed to measure these components of human development through surveys applied on the staff with the described conditions, without any difference of academic, socioeconomic status or type of position. It was included a population of 1622 persons from five institutions, with a final sample of 242.Among the key findings is highlighted the high degree of staff satisfaction related to received in healthcare services for both, the worker and their beneficiaries; as well as the supply of medicines and diagnostic aids; besides the satisfaction with the work performed in the company and the feeling of being useful and important to it, they find out it is difficult to have promotions by merit and recognition for their work. As factors to strengthen in these institutions are the establishing clear policies for promotion and recognition.

  11. Evaluating the opinions of staff and health care service provision of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Zimbabwe has an incidence of STD/HIV infection and measures are needed to explore the efficiency of clinics in providing adequate patient care. To explore the views or opinions of the currently employed staff of an STD/HIV clinic, and suggest a means for improvement thereof. Methods: A current position ...

  12. Inputs and outcomes: what do staff in services for people with intellectual disabilities perceive they bring to and receive from their work-based relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disley, Philip; Hatton, Chris; Dagnan, Dave

    2012-12-01

    A number of studies involving staff working in services for people with intellectual disabilities have utilised equity theory as a theoretical framework. According to this theory, people evaluate social relationships through the comparison of inputs and outcomes, respectively, with what a person brings to and receives from a relationship. Little is known about what constitute inputs and outcomes for staff working in services for people with intellectual disabilities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 staff to find out what constitute inputs and outcomes for staff who work with people with intellectual disabilities. The interviews were conducted in the first half of 2008 in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed using template analysis. A wide range of inputs and outcomes was identified by staff, which were grouped under high-level themes relating to relationships with their employers, their co-workers and the service users. The utility of the findings, in terms of informing future research, is discussed.

  13. Barriers to the use of the library service amongst clinical staff in an acute hospital setting: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gaynor; Preston, Hugh

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on research into the reasons why clinical staff in an acute hospital may be reluctant to use library services. The research was conducted by Gaynor Thomas at the Prince Philip Hospital in Llanelli in Wales as part of the dissertation she completed for an MSc in Economics. She graduated in July 2014 from Aberystwyth University and has co-written the article with Hugh Preston, her dissertation supervisor. The article summarises the key findings from the interviews undertaken as part of the research process and lists the resulting recommendations. Gaynor also highlights the initiatives which have been put in place with the express aim of removing barriers to use and encouraging clinical staff to make the most of the library which is, she argues, a time-saving resource. AM. © 2016 Health Libraries Group.

  14. A novel system for providing compatible blood to patients during surgery: "self-service" electronic blood banking by nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, G; Chiu, D S; Chung, A S; Wong, H F; Chan, M W; Lui, Y K; Choy, F M; Chan, J C; Chan, A H; Lam, S T; Fan, T C

    1996-04-01

    A good blood bank must be able to provide compatible blood units promptly to operating room patients with minimal wastage. A "self-service" by nursing staff blood banking system that is safe, efficient, and well-accepted has been developed. Specific blood units are no longer assigned to surgical patients who have a negative pretransfusion antibody screen, irrespective of the type of surgery. A computer-generated list of the serial numbers of all group-identical blood units currently in the blood bank inventory is provided for each patient. The units themselves are not labeled with a patient's name. The group O list will be provided for group O patients, the group A list for group A patients, and so forth. Should the patient require transfusion during surgery, the operating room nurses go to the refrigerator, remove any group-identical unit, and check the serial number of the unit against the serial numbers on the patient's list. If the serial number is on that list, the blood bank will accept responsibility for compatibility. The system was implemented in 1995. Since implementation, a total of 2154 patients have undergone operations at this hospital. Thirty-two patients received more than 10 units of red cells each. There were no transfusion errors. The crossmatch-to-transfusion ratio was reduced from 1.67 to 1.12. Turnaround time for supplying additional or urgent units to patients in operating room was shortened from 33 to 2.5 minutes. There was no incidence of a blood unit's serial number not being on the list. Work by nurses and technical staff was reduced by nearly 50 percent. The "self-service" (by nursing staff) blood banking system described is safe and efficient. It saves staff time and can be easily set up.

  15. Commentary: The Wright Ross Salk Award: Worker Bees and Benefits to the Hive: Service Contributions to the Profession and Society of Pediatric Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael C

    2016-11-01

    This article reflects on service contributions upon receiving the 2016 Society of Pediatric Psychology Wright Ross Salk Distinguished Service Award. As the title implies, worker bees make service contributions for the overall benefit of the hive and colony. So too, the scientific discipline, clinical profession, and the Society of Pediatric Psychology need the service contributions of multiple individuals to survive and thrive. Many people have made professional contributions to benefit the field and its organizational home; many more worker bees will volunteer in the future to fill important service roles and sustain the hive. The article discusses lessons learned about service. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. 76 FR 51998 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Service Coordinators in Multifamily Housing Fiscal Year 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... amounts of the awards made available by HUD. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Aretha Williams, Acting...: $97,097 State: Arizona Recipient: FSL Christopher Properties, Inc. Property Name: Kingman Heights...

  17. Case study - Implementing a plagiarism detection service: ways of working with staff and students

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Judy

    2012-01-01

    The session will outline how Turnitin was introduced to the University of Kent in 2006 and then implemented over the following academic year, including recent follow-up developments. The University Guidelines on Using Turnitin will be discussed, along with the use of specific Academic Integrity resources to support the use of Turnitin. There will be information about how staff are using Turnitin; how it has been received by students; the impact on reported instances of plagiarism (in specific...

  18. Research culture and capacity in community health services: results of a structured survey of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Emma L; Comino, Elizabeth J

    2017-05-01

    Developing research capacity is recognised as an important endeavour. However, little is known about the current research culture, capacity and supports for staff working in community-based health settings. A structured survey of Division of Community Health staff was conducted using the research capacity tool. The survey was disseminated by email and in paper format. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. In total, 109 usable responses were received, giving a response rate of 26%. Respondents were predominately nurses (n=71, 65.7%), with ~50% reporting post-graduate vocational qualifications. The highest levels of skills or organisational success were in using evidence to plan, promote and guide clinical practice. Most participants were unsure of organisational and team level skills and success at generating research. Few reported recent experience in research-generating activities. Barriers to undertaking research included lack of skills, time and access to external support and funding. Lack of skills and success in accessing external funding and resources to protect research time or to 'buy-in' technical expertise appeared to exacerbate these barriers. Community health staff have limited capacity to generate research with current levels of skill, funding and time. Strategies to increase research capacity should be informed by knowledge of clinicians' research experience and interests, and target development of skills to generate research. Resources and funding are needed at the organisational and team levels to overcome the significant barriers to research generation reported.

  19. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  20. Closing Remarks and Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, M.; Van der Meer, K.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-01-01

    M. Whitaker: On behalf of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, we are grateful for the opportunity to support this symposium. The number of symposium events-presentations, posters, technical demonstrations, panel discussions, and receptions - has been completely overwhelming and truly impressive. My compliments to the IAEA organization staff for a spectacular event. I have gained a much better appreciation for why these are only once every four years. This symposium has provided an important opportunity to reengage with friends and colleagues from around the globe to discuss international safeguards topics. The theme this year is very appropriate. So much of our work relies upon people. Together we work to develop the strategies that ensure that international safeguards are effectively implemented to provide the world the assurances that they expect from us. Thank you for this opportunity to share in the organization and execution of this symposium. K. Van der Meer: It is my pleasure to give the last poster awards. We have had two award ceremonies already this week on Wednesday and Thursday to recognize the best posters in those sessions. Today it will be two parts. First we will give the award for the best posters for this morning's sessions, and then we have four special awards: Gold, Silver, Bronze and the New Generation Symposium Award. These are the awards for the best posters for the whole week. The New Generation Symposium Award is for recognition of a younger participant and the prize is also for a younger participant. The full list of award winners is available under the symposium website. The IAEA recognizes the generous donations by INMM and ESARDA of the following prizes given as awards for the best posters: · Best e-poster advertisement per session: free subscription to the ESARDA Bulletin; · Best e-poster per session: free membership in INMM; · Best poster of the week ''Bronze'': free registration for the 8th INMM

  1. Service quality expectations and perceptions of staff and customers at travel agencies, Gauteng

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.B.A. In recent years South African travel industry has been facing ferocious competition. The competitive business environment has driven managers to consider the performance of their organizations in order to increase market share, or in other words, improve the quality of service as the ultimate weapon for achieving high performance. The delivery of service quality to customers requires a congruence in the perceptions of the customers and the providers of service. The aim of this resea...

  2. Exploring views about mindfulness groups for voice-hearing from the perspective of service users and staff: A Q-methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morera, Tirma; Bucci, Sandra; Randal, Chloe; Barrett, Moya; Pratt, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Despite prevailing beliefs about the potential benefits and harmfulness of mindfulness for people who hear voices, there is a paucity of research into staff and service user views. Q-methodology was used to explore views about mindfulness groups for voice-hearers. Opportunistic sampling of mental healthcare staff (N = 14) and service users with psychosis (N = 17). Both samples were analysed using principle components factor analysis to identify the range of attitudes held by staff and service users. Staff participants were particularly knowledgeable and interested in mindfulness. A single staff consensus factor was found suggesting mindfulness is helpful, and not harmful for mental health, but uncertainty surrounded its usefulness for voice-hearers. Service users held four distinct attitudes: (i) mindfulness helps to calm a racing mind; (ii) mindfulness helps to manage stress; (iii) mindfulness improves well-being, and does not alter the brain, reality beliefs, or cause madness; and (iv) mindfulness helps with managing thoughts, fostering acceptance, and is acceptable when delivered in a group format. Staff viewed mindfulness groups for psychosis as helpful, not harmful, but were uncertain about their utility. Consistent with previous research, service users viewed mindfulness groups as useful to promote well-being and reduce distress for individuals experiencing psychosis.

  3. A randomised controlled trial of an active telephone-based recruitment strategy to increase childcare-service staff attendance at a physical activity and nutrition training workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoong, Sze Lin; Wolfenden, Luke; Finch, Meghan; Williams, Amanda; Dodds, Pennie; Gillham, Karen; Wyse, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Centre-based childcare services represent a promising setting to target the prevention of excessive weight gain in preschool-aged children. Staff training is a key component of multi-strategy interventions to improve implementation of effective physical activity and nutrition promoting practices for obesity prevention in childcare services. This randomised controlled trial aimed to examine whether an active telephone-based strategy to invite childcare-service staff to attend a training workshop was effective in increasing the proportion of services with staff attending training, compared with a passive strategy. Services were randomised to an active telephone-based or a passive-recruitment strategy. Those in the active arm received an email invitation and one to three follow-up phone calls, whereas services in the passive arm were informed of the availability of training only via newsletters. The proportion of services with staff attending the training workshop was compared between the two arms. One hundred and twenty-eight services were included in this study. A significantly larger proportion (52%) of services in the active arm compared with those in the passive-strategy arm (3.1%) attended training (d.f.=1, χ2=34.3; Pstaff attending training. Further strategies to improve staff attendance at training need to be identified and implemented. SO WHAT?: Active-recruitment strategies including follow-up telephone calls should be utilised to invite staff to participate in training, in order to maximise the use of training as an implementation strategy for obesity prevention in childcare services.

  4. 76 FR 20822 - Proposed Information Collection (Servicer's Staff Appraisal Reviewer (SAR) Application) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Appraisal Reviewer (SAR). Servicers SAR's will have the authority to review real estate appraisals and to issue liquidation notices of value on behalf of VA. VA will also use the data collected to track the...

  5. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  6. Update Dosimetry Service internal staff Tecnatom; Actualizacion del servicio de dosimetria personal interna de TECNATOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo, B.; Marchena, P.; Alonso, A.; Navarro, E.; Serrano, E.

    2010-07-01

    The beginning of decommissioning of nuclear facilities and other industrial national context conditions have been a very significant increase in the need for such services, which have been almost overwhelmed by the demand. To provide a solution to this situation, Tecnatom decided to run as a new internal dosimetry service indirect measures to complement its renowned capabilities of direct measures. To perform this task, Tecnatom has signed a collaboration agreement with the Laboratory of Radiochemistry of Geocisa, all with the objective of characterizing contamination by alpha emitters or beta different analytical techniques.

  7. Access to and use of NHS Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS): the views of children, young people, parents and PALS staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, J; Sloper, P; Clarke, S

    2008-03-01

    The English National Health Service Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS) was set up to provide patients and their relatives with a way of obtaining information or expressing concerns about their health care. This study examined children's, young people's and parents' access to and use of PALS, and how this could be improved. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to obtain the views of children, young people, parents and PALS staff, on the inclusiveness of the service. These methods included discussion groups and interviews with 30 young people and 16 parents; a postal survey of PALS users, to which 171 (21%) parents responded; and telephone interviews with 14 PALS staff. The data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative methods, and the views of participants on key topics were examined. Children and young people were found to be low users of PALS, but thought that the service was potentially useful. They and parents and PALS staff all highlighted ways in which access to and use of the service could be improved. Participants' views on the following topics are reported: awareness of PALS existence and role; access to and use of PALS; effectiveness of and satisfaction with PALS; and training of staff. and recommendations Patient Advice and Liaison Service has not been designed and developed in ways that are fully inclusive of children, young people and parents. Based on their views and experiences, and the suggestions of PALS staff, the authors recommend that access to and use of the service could be improved, increasing awareness of PALS, facilitating access to and use of the service, providing training for PALS staff on dealing with young people and their issues, and developing links between PALS and other organizations that deal with young people and parents.

  8. K-12 School Food Service Staff Training Interventions: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Lacy; Shanks, Carmen Byker

    2015-01-01

    Background: School food service professionals are vital to implementing national nutrition standards in school meal programs. Appropriate and effective training for these professionals may be one key to producing healthful meals that students are excited to eat and also meet United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutrient guidelines. A…

  9. Mental Health Services to State Corrections Inmates. Staff Brief 86-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Jane R.

    This report was written for the Advisory Committee on Mentally Ill Inmates of the Wisconsin State Legislative Council's Special Committee on Mental Health Issues. It describes mental health services to inmates of Wisconsin's state prisons. Part I describes the organization of state level responsibilities for corrections, including the state…

  10. Training degree assessment of staff producing parenteral nutrition in Pharmacy Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Mª Romero Jiménez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of expertise of Pharmacy personnel in the manufacturing of total parenteral nutrition. Material and methods: An on-line survey including 17 questions concerning key aspects of TPN manufacturing was designed. Survey monkey software was used to create the survey and to analize its results. Results: 135 answers were received. 95% of the participant Pharmacy services had written standard manufacturing procedures. 67% answered that phosphate salts should be the first electrolite to be additioned into the total parenteral nutrition and 34% affirmed that validation of the aseptic manufacturing technique was not performed. As far as personnel training was concerned, 19% of respondents had not received any specific training, although 99% considered it would be necessary to receive it. Conclusions: The polled personell has an acceptable level of expertise but adequate training courses are still necessary and should be promoted from Pharmacy services

  11. The effect of a local change team intervention on staff attitudes towards HIV service delivery in correctional settings: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visher, Christy A; Hiller, Matthew; Belenko, Steven; Pankow, Jennifer; Dembo, Richard; Frisman, Linda K; Pearson, Frank S; Swan, Holly; Wiley, Tisha R A

    2014-10-01

    The National Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies research program conducted cluster randomized trials to test an organizational process improvement strategy for implementing evidence-based improvements in HIV services for preventing, detecting, and/or treating HIV for individuals under correctional supervision. Nine research centers conducted cluster randomized trials in which one correctional facility used a modified Network for Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) change team approach to implementing improved HIV services and the other facility used their own approach to implement the improved HIV services. This paper examines whether the intervention increased the perceived value of HIV services among staff of correctional and community HIV organizations. Baseline and follow-up measures of the perceived acceptability, feasibility, and organizational support for implementing HIV service improvements were collected from correctional, medical, and community HIV treatment staff. Results indicated that the perceived acceptability and feasibility of implementing HIV services improved among staff in the facilities using the modified NIATx change team approach as compared to staff in the comparison facilities.

  12. Report test scores assessment of the functioning of dosimetry service staff of the CNLV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Tovar M, V.M.

    2002-12-01

    The ININ realized the evaluation of the service of personal dosimetry in the CNLV, in the categories: IV. (Photons of high energy of 137 CS) and the VA. (Particles beta of 90 Sr/ 90 Y); in the category IV the test was satisfactory, however in the chart 1 has an underestimation a the American Standard HP over the value true conventional of a 9%; for this irregularity it is recommended to revise the procedures of evaluation of the process and the determination of the chart 1 of the HP. In the category VA, the test is also satisfactory, however the results contrasted with the chart 2 and the HP, the values were overestimated in 29% of the true conventional value, and for that problem is recommended to revise the evaluation procedures in contrast with the values determined by the standard HP. (Author)

  13. Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, K.M.

    1983-07-01

    The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

  14. The critical role of supervision in retaining staff in obstetric services: a three country study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilish McAuliffe

    Full Text Available Millennium Development Goal (MDG 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential

  15. The Critical Role of Supervision in Retaining Staff in Obstetric Services: A Three Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Eilish; Daly, Michael; Kamwendo, Francis; Masanja, Honorati; Sidat, Mohsin; de Pinho, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 5 commits us to reducing maternal mortality rates by three quarters and MDG 4 commits us to reducing child mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015. In order to reach these goals, greater access to basic emergency obstetric care (EmOC) as well as comprehensive EmOC which includes safe Caesarean section, is needed.. The limited capacity of health systems to meet demand for obstetric services has led several countries to utilize mid-level cadres as a substitute to more extensively trained and more internationally mobile healthcare workers. Although this does provide greater capacity for service delivery, concern about the performance and motivation of these workers is emerging. We propose that poor leadership characterized by inadequate and unstructured supervision underlies much of the dissatisfaction and turnover that has been shown to exist amongst these mid-level healthcare workers and indeed health workers more generally. To investigate this, we conducted a large-scale survey of 1,561 mid-level cadre healthcare workers (health workers trained for shorter periods to perform specific tasks e.g. clinical officers) delivering obstetric care in Malawi, Tanzania, and Mozambique. Participants indicated the primary supervision method used in their facility and we assessed their job satisfaction and intentions to leave their current workplace. In all three countries we found robust evidence indicating that a formal supervision process predicted high levels of job satisfaction and low intentions to leave. We find no evidence that facility level factors modify the link between supervisory methods and key outcomes. We interpret this evidence as strongly supporting the need to strengthen leadership and implement a framework and mechanism for systematic supportive supervision. This will promote better job satisfaction and improve the retention and performance of obstetric care workers, something which has the potential to improve

  16. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  17. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Hero Award

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-07

    This podcast is a lecture given by William H. Foege, MD, MPH when he was honored October 7, 2009 as the 2009 CDC Foundation Hero Award Recipient.  Created: 10/7/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/22/2009.

  19. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  20. End-of-Life Care and Dying: Issues Raised by Staff Supporting Older People with Intellectual Disability in Community Living Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Michele; Stancliffe, Roger J.; Balandin, Susan; Howarth, Glennys; Dew, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore the current status of end-of-life care and dying of people with intellectual disability based on the experiences of staff in community living services. Materials and Methods: Focus groups and individual interviews were conducted, guided by grounded theory methodology. Results: The current status of…

  1. "Being There": The Experiences of Staff in Dealing with Matters of Dying and Death in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research on staffed housing for people with intellectual disability has identified the challenges in achieving positive quality of life outcomes. However, a less well considered dimension of such services is that they are places of living and dying. This paper looks at the experiences of staff in dealing with issues of death and dying.…

  2. Multifunction system service students and staff of higher education institutions by the example of ENGECON based on solutions IT -Card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakova Ekaterina Yurevna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the creation of multifunctional system service students and staff of universities based on smart card using the concept of electronic "purse." Experience of other countries with a similar solution shows that the system allows the university to significantly reduce maintenance costs of its activities and at the same time improve the quality of services provided. Also in this paper present my vision of the problem and its solution in our university - ENGECON.

  3. Comparison of veterinary health services expectations and perceptions between oncologic pet owners, non-oncologic pet owners and veterinary staff using the SERVQUAL methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregório, Hugo; Santos, Patricia; Pires, Isabel; Prada, Justina; Queiroga, Felisbina Luísa

    2016-11-01

    Client satisfaction gained great importance in health care as a measurement of service quality. One of the most popular methods to evaluate client satisfaction is the SERVQUAL inquiry which measures service quality by evaluating client expectations and services towards a service in five dimensions: Tangibles, Empathy, Assurance, Reliability and Responsiveness. In order to evaluate if owners of pets with cancer constitute a distinctive group from the general pet owner population and if these differences were perceived by the hospital staff we applied a SERVQUAL questionnaire to 51 owners of pet with cancer, 68 owners from the general pet population and 14 staff members. Owners of oncologic pets had different expectations of an ideal service granting importance to Assurance questions (6.75 vs 6.5, p= 0.045) while showing unmet needs in Reliability and Empathy dimensions. Veterinarians failed to understand these specificities and over evaluated characteristics of Tangible dimension (6.75 vs 6.25, p=0.027). Owners of pet with cancer seem to constitute a specific subpopulation with special needs and veterinary staff should invest resources towards Assurance instead of privileging tangible aspects of veterinary services. By aligning professionals expectations with those of pet owners veterinarians can achieve better client satisfaction, improved compliance and stronger doctor-owner relationships.

  4. 1987 NRSSC Exemplary Program Awards Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Rural and Small Schools, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Identifies ten recipients of exemplary program awards and describes each program. Award categories include educational technology, cross-cultural services, preserve/inservice training, special education, family/school/community partnerships, innovative and creative programs, secondary curriculum and instruction, at-risk services, elementary…

  5. Albatross awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Albatross Award was presented by the American Miscellaneous Society to Sir George Deacon at the Joint Oceanographic Assembly held in Halifax in August 1982. The presentation speech by Warren Wooster and acceptance speech by Sir George Deacon follow.I have been asked by the governing board of the American Miscellaneous Society to present the Albatross Award this evening. But I hasten to point out that the Board is certainly mythical, and there is even some doubt about the existence of the Society. We know that the American Miscellaneous Society, AMSOC, has had several important committees—the committee to greet visitors from outer space and the committee to teach animals their Latin names, for example—but we know little of their success. On the other hand, the triumphs of AMSOC's Project MOHOLE are al ready inscribed in history.

  6. An audit of acute oncology services: patient experiences of admission procedures and staff utilisation of a new telephone triage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Lorraine; Holch, Patricia; Kenyon, Lucille; Hector, Ceri; Kozlowska, Krystina; Kenny, Anne Marie; Ziegler, Lucy; Velikova, Galina

    2016-12-01

    In 2010, St. James Institute of Oncology (Leeds, UK) created a new acute oncology service (AOS) consisting of a new admissions unit with a nurse-led telephone triage (TT) system. This audit cycle (March 2011 and June 2013) evaluated patient experiences of the reconfigured AOS and staff use of the TT system. Patient views were elicited via a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The TT forms were analysed descriptively evaluating completion and data quality, reported symptoms and their severity and advice given (including admission rates). Patients (n = 40) reported high satisfaction with the new AOS. However, 56 % of patients delayed 2 days or more before contacting the unit. In 2011, 26 % of all the admitted patients were triaged via the TT system; 133 TT forms were completed. In June 2013, 49 % of the admitted patients were triaged; 264 forms were completed. The most commonly reported symptoms on the TT forms were pain, pyrexia/rigors/infection, diarrhoea, vomiting and dyspnoea. Half of the patients using the TT system were admitted (52 % in 2011, 49 % in 2013). Our audit provided evidence of successful implementation of the TT system with the number of TT forms doubling from 2011 to 2013. The new AOS was endorsed by patients, with the majority satisfied with the care they received.

  7. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  8. CSAIO – a progressive tool at the service of staff associations of international organizations and European agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Every year in autumn, a two-day CSAIO (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations) conference is organized for staff associations of international organizations based mainly in Europe, as well as European agencies. Creation, objectives and progress CSAIO, created by the staff associations of CERN and OECD in 2000, invites about 30 staff associations to share their experiences and ideas to better identify the expectations and aspirations of a personnel evolving at the heart of international and European organizations. Over time, the preparation of the conference has evolved to better accommodate the requests of the staff representatives coming from different horizons. For two years, there has been an initiative to institutionalize the informal follow-up, during the first half-day of the conference, of themes discussed the previous year. This follow-up allows participants to share their experience on the implementation and impacts of certain propositions as reflected in their organizations ...

  9. Clinical staff perceptions of palliative care-related quality of care, service access, education and training needs and delivery confidence in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Rosemary; Gott, Merryn; Raphael, Deborah; O'Callaghan, Anne; Robinson, Jackie; Boyd, Michal; Laking, George; Manson, Leigh; Snow, Barry

    2014-12-01

    Central to appropriate palliative care management in hospital settings is ensuring an adequately trained workforce. In order to achieve optimum palliative care delivery, it is first necessary to create a baseline understanding of the level of palliative care education and support needs among all clinical staff (not just palliative care specialists) within the acute hospital setting. The objectives of the study were to explore clinical staff: perceptions concerning the quality of palliative care delivery and support service accessibility, previous experience and education in palliative care delivery, perceptions of their own need for formal palliative care education, confidence in palliative care delivery and the impact of formal palliative care training on perceived confidence. A purposive sample of clinical staff members (598) in a 710-bed hospital were surveyed regarding their experiences of palliative care delivery and their education needs. On average, the clinical staff rated the quality of care provided to people who die in the hospital as 'good' (x̄=4.17, SD=0.91). Respondents also reported that 19.3% of their time was spent caring for end-of-life patients. However, only 19% of the 598 respondents reported having received formal palliative care training. In contrast, 73.7% answered that they would like formal training. Perceived confidence in palliative care delivery was significantly greater for those clinical staff with formal palliative care training. Formal training in palliative care increases clinical staff perceptions of confidence, which evidence suggests impacts on the quality of palliative care provided to patients. The results of the study should be used to shape the design and delivery of palliative care education programmes within the acute hospital setting to successfully meet the needs of all clinical staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Contract policy for CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Public information meeting on Monday 28 September 2009 at 10.00 a.m. With effect from 1 August 2009, new provisions regarding staff employment contract policy have entered into force. These provisions are set out in: The Staff Rules and Regulations and Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 4). Further details are available in: Frequently Asked Questions. The new provisions are outlined below: Limited-duration contracts From 1 August 2009, limited-duration contracts will be awarded for a maximum period of five years (instead of four years previously) and no extensions beyond five years will be granted. Contracts for periods shorter than five years can be exceptionally awarded, e.g. for a project whose mission or financial resources are time-limited. Indefinite contracts : award procedure A number of changes have been introduced regarding the procedure for the award of indefinite contracts. From now on, posts leading to the award of an indefinite contract will be opened at le...

  11. Prime Contract Awards by Service Category and Federal Supply Classification, Fiscal Years 1990, 1989, 1988 and 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Services 1,420 1,097 472 207 0510 Neurology Serv ;es 87 36 160 149 Q512 Optometry Services 91 61 109 105 Q513 Orthopedic Services 971 715 318 1,140 0514...Sup & Eq 1,949,833 1,974,959 2.360,038 3.021,559 71 Furniture 220,459 235,414 210,236 277,392 72 Household & Coml Furnishings & Appliances 41,874 48,143...19,147 24,023 TOTAL Furniture 220,459 235,414 210.236 277,392 Household & Coml Furnishings & Appliances 7210 Household Furnishings 21,521 30,593

  12. Proposal for the Award of Two Contracts for the Technical Services for Work on Components of CERN Particle Accelerators and High Energy Physics Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments. Following a market survey carried out among 73 firms in fourteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-3156/SPL) was sent on 4 November 2002 to three consortia in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from the three consortia. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: 1) the consortium SERCO FACILITIES MANAGEMENT (NL) - GERARD PERRIER INDUSTRIE (FR) - INEO ALPES (FR), the lowest bidder, for approximately 55% of the technical services for work on components of CERN particle accelerators and high energy physics experiments, for an initial period of five years and for a total amount not exceeding 37 435 270 euros (54 902 500 Swiss francs), subject to revision for inflation from 1 January 2005. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial five-...

  13. Supporting public involvement in research design and grant development: a case study of a public involvement award scheme managed by a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Design Service (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Jonathan D; Twiddy, Maureen; Baird, Wendy; Birks, Yvonne; Clarke, Clare; Beever, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    It is good practice for the public to be involved in developing health research. Resources should be available for researchers to fund the involvement of the public in the development of their grants. To describe a funding award scheme to support public involvement in grant development, managed by an NIHR Research Design Service (RDS). Case examples of how the award contributed to successful grant applications and findings from a recent evaluation of the scheme are presented. A case study of resource provision to support public involvement activities in one region of England. University and NHS-based researchers, and members of the public. Between 2009 and 2012, the RDS approved 45 public involvement funding awards (totalling nearly £19,000). These awards contributed to 27 submitted applications at the time of writing, of which 11 were successful (totalling over £7.5 million). The evaluation revealed difficulties encountered by some researchers when involving the public in grant development, which led to suggestions about how the scheme could be improved. This award scheme represents an efficient method of providing researchers with resources to involve the public in grant development and would appear to represent good value for money. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of a multiple-encounter in situ simulation for orientation of staff to a new paediatric emergency service: a single-group pretest/post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Michelle; Kinnear, Frances B; Fulbrook, Paul

    2017-10-01

    To assess the utility of a multiple-encounter in-situ (MEIS) simulation as an orientation tool for multidisciplinary staff prior to opening a new paediatric emergency service. A single-group pretest/post-test study was conducted. During the MEIS simulation, multidisciplinary staff with participant or observer roles managed eight children (mannequins) who attended triage with their parent/guardians (clinical facilitators) for a range of emergency presentations (structured scenarios designed to represent the expected range of presentations plus test various clinical pathways/systems). Participants were debriefed to explore clinical, systems and crisis-resource management issues. Participants also completed a pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaire comprising statements about role confidence and orientation adequacy. Pre-test and post-test results were analysed using t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Eighty-nine staff participated in the MEIS simulation, with the majority completing the pre-simulation and post-simulation questionnaire. There was a significant improvement in post-intervention versus pre-intervention Likert scores for role confidence and orientation adequacy (p=0.001 and simulation was of utility in orientation of staff, at least with respect to self-reported role confidence and orientation adequacy. Its effectiveness in practice or compared with other orientation techniques was not assessed, but it did identify several flaws in planned systems allowing remediation prior to opening.

  15. End of life care for people with dementia: The views of health professionals, social care service managers and frontline staff on key requirements for good practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Philip Lee

    Full Text Available Evidence consistently shows that people with advanced dementia experience suboptimal end of life care compared to those with cancer; with increased hospitalisation, inadequate pain control and fewer palliative care interventions. Understanding the views of those service managers and frontline staff who organise and provide care is crucial in order to develop better end of life care for people with dementia.Qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted from 2013 to 2015 with 33 service managers and 54 staff involved in frontline care, including doctors, nurses, nursing and care home managers, service development leads, senior managers/directors, care assistants and senior care assistants/team leads. All were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Participants represented a diverse range of service types and occupation. Transcripts were subject to coding and thematic analysis in data meetings. Analysis of the data led to the development of seven key themes: Recognising end of life (EOL and tools to support end of life care (EOLC, Communicating with families about EOL, Collaborative working, Continuity of care, Ensuring comfort at EOL, Supporting families, Developing and supporting staff. Each is discussed in detail and comprise individual and collective views on approaches to good end of life care for people with dementia.The significant challenges of providing good end of life care for people with dementia requires that different forms of expertise should be recognised and used; including the skills and knowledge of care assistants. Successfully engaging with people with dementia and family members and helping them to recognise the dying trajectory requires a supportive integration of emotional and technical expertise. The study strengthens the existing evidence base in this area and will be used with a related set of studies (on the views of other stakeholders and observations and interviews conducted in four services to develop an

  16. 28 CFR 523.16 - Lump sum awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.16 Lump sum awards. Any staff member may recommend to the Warden the approval of an inmate for a lump sum award of extra good time. Such recommendations...

  17. Community-based post-stroke service provision and challenges: a national survey of managers and inter-disciplinary healthcare staff in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hickey Anne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of stroke-related disability typically becomes most apparent after patient discharge to the community. As part of the Irish National Audit of Stroke Care (INASC, a national survey of community-based allied health professionals and public health nurses was conducted. The aim was to document the challenges to service availability for patients with stroke in the community and to identify priorities for service improvement. Methods The study was a cross-sectional tailored interview survey with key managerial and service delivery staff. As comprehensive listings of community-based health professionals involved in stroke care were not available, a cascade approach to information gathering was adopted. Representative regional managers for services incorporating stroke care (N = 7 and disciplinary allied health professional and public health nurse managers (N = 25 were interviewed (94% response rate. Results Results indicated a lack of formal, structured community-based services for stroke, with no designated clinical posts for stroke care across disciplines nationally. There was significant regional variation in availability of allied health professionals. Considerable inequity was identified in patient access to stroke services, with greater access, where available, for older patients (≥ 65 years. The absence of a stroke strategy and stroke prevalence statistics were identified as significant impediments to service planning, alongside organisational barriers limiting the recruitment of additional allied health professional staff, and lack of sharing of discipline-specific information on patients. Conclusions This study highlighted major gaps in the provision of inter-disciplinary team community-based services for people with stroke in one country. Where services existed, they were generic in nature, rarely inter-disciplinary in function and deficient in input from salient disciplines. Challenges to optimal care

  18. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for electrical installation work and maintenance of lighting and low-voltage distribution

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Services contract for electrical installation work and maintenance of lighting and low-voltage distribution. Following a market survey carried out among 127 firms in fifteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2754/ST) was sent on 2 June 2000 to three firms and four consortia, each consisting of two firms, in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received tenders from two firms and two consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium SPIE TRINDEL(FR) ? CONTROLMATIC (DE), the lowest bidder complying with the specified requirements, for an initial period of three years from 1 July 2001 for a total amount of 41 705 497 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 31 December 2003. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period for a total amount of 27 803 664 Swiss francs, for which CERN will seek approval by the Finance ...

  19. Path modeling of knowledge, attitude and practice toward palliative care consultation service among Taiwanese nursing staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Shih, Hsiu-Ling; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2017-08-17

    The Taiwanese government has promoted palliative care consultation services (PCCS) to support terminally ill patients in acute ward settings to receive palliative care since 2005. Such an intervention can enhance the quality of life and dignity of terminally ill patients. However, research focusing on the relationship between the knowledge, attitude and practice of a PCCS using path modelling in nursing staff is limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of path modeling on the knowledge, attitude and practice toward PCCS in Taiwanese nursing staff. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study design using convenience sampling. Data collected included demographics, knowledge, attitude and practice as measured by the PCCS inventory (KAP-PCCSI). Two hundred and eighty-four nursing staff from a medical center in northern Taiwan participated in the study in 2013. We performed descriptive statistics, regression analysis, and path modeling using SPSS 19.0 and set p knowledge, attitude, and practice toward PCCS among nurses was the frequency of contact with PCCS. In addition, higher level of knowledge toward PCCS was associated with working in haematology and oncology wards, and participation in education related to palliative care. A more positive attitude toward PCCS was associated with working in a haematology and oncology ward, and experience of friends or relatives dying. Higher level of practice toward PCCS was associated with nurses who participated in education related to palliative care. In the path modeling, we found that holders of a master's degree indirectly positive affected practice toward PCCS. Possession of a bachelor degree or above, being single, working within a haematology and oncology ward, and frequency of contact with PCCS positively affected practice toward PCCS. Based on this study, it is proposed that consultation with PCCS has a positive impact on the care of terminally ill patients. Encouragement of staff to

  20. 45 CFR 2527.10 - What is the amount of an education award?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... education award? (a) Full-time term of service. Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this section, the education award for a full-time term of service in an approved AmeriCorps position of at least 1,700 hours... service. Except as provided in paragraph (g), the education award for a part-time term of service in an...

  1. Perspectives of cardiac care unit nursing staff about developing hospice services in iran for terminally ill cardiovascular patients: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Azami-Aghdash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was conducted aiming to determine the points of view of cardiac care units′ nursing staff about designing and providing Hospice services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in the final stages of life. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study, the perspectives of 16 Cardiac Care Unit (CCU nurses selected purposefully among hospitals of Tabriz-Iran University of Medical Sciences were investigated using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed in content analysis method. Results: 33 themes were finally extracted. Some nurses were for and some were against designing and providing Hospice services in Iran. The main reasons identified for supporting this plan included: Possibility of designing and providing these services consistent with high ethical values of Iranian society; approval of authorities due to increasing the load of chronic diseases and aged population; need of families due to the problems in taking care of patients and life concerns; better pain relief and respectful death; decrease of costs as a result of lower usage of diagnostic-therapeutic services, less use of expensive facilities and drugs, and better usage of hospital beds. Conclusion: Growing load of chronic diseases has made the need for Hospice as a necessary issue in Iran. In order to provide these services, studying the viewpoints of health service providers is inevitable. Therefore using and applying the results of this study in planning and policy making about designing and providing these services in Iran for cardiovascular patients in their final stages of lives could be helpful.

  2. Investigating the factors that affect the communication of death-related bad news to people with intellectual disabilities by staff in residential and supported living services: An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, I; Rose, T

    2017-08-01

    Most staff working in intellectual disability services will be confronted with people with intellectual disabilities who need support around death, dying and bereavement. Previous studies suggest that intellectual disability staff tend to protect clients from knowing about death and avoid communication about death. The aims of this study were to gain further insight into the individual, organisational and contextual factors that affect the communication of death-related bad news to people with intellectual disabilities by intellectual disability staff and to develop guidelines for services to enable appropriate communication with clients about death and dying. Semi-structured interviews were held with 20 social care staff working in intellectual disability residential or supported living services in London, who had supported a client affected by death-related bad news in the past 6 months. Staff found supporting people with intellectual disabilities around death and dying extremely difficult and tended to avoid communication about death. The following factors had a particularly strong influence on staff practice around communicating death-related bad news: fear and distress around death; life and work experience; and organisational culture. Staff attitudes to death communication had a stronger influence than their client's level of cognitive or communicative abilities. Managers were important role models. Service managers should ensure not only that all their staff receive training in death, loss and communication but also that staff are enabled to reflect on their practice, through emotional support, supervision and team discussions. Future work should focus on the development and testing of strategies to enable intellectual disability staff to support their clients in the areas of dying, death and bereavement. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. An Investigation of Youth Participation in an Irish Youth Mental Health Service: Staff and Young People’s Perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, James

    2014-01-01

    Youth participation is widely recognised as essential to the design and delivery of youth mental health services (Coates & Howe, 2014). Despite this there is limited literature available on youth participation in these services (Monson & Thurley, 2011). This study aimed to develop an enhanced understanding about youth participation in Headstrong, The National Centre for Youth Mental Health and it’s programme of service delivery Jigsaw. A mixed methods approach, using focus groups and question...

  4. "I just feel comfortable out here, there's something about the place": staff and client perceptions of a remote Australian Aboriginal drug and alcohol rehabilitation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Alice; Allan, Julaine; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Breen, Courtney

    2017-12-06

    The need for effective, culturally safe residential rehabilitation services for Aboriginal people is widely acknowledged, however the combination of treatment components that is optimally effective, is not well defined. Most existing Aboriginal residential rehabilitation research has focused on describing client characteristics, and largely ignored the impact of treatment and service factors, such as the nature and quality of therapeutic components and relationships with staff. This qualitative study was undertaken as part of a three-year mixed methods community-based participatory research (CBPR) project that aimed to empirically describe a remote Aboriginal drug and alcohol rehabilitation service. Researchers utilised purposive sampling to conduct 21 in-depth, semi-structured interviews. The interviews used a 'research yarning' approach, a form of culturally appropriate conversation that is relaxed and narrative-based. The interview transcripts were thematically coded using iterative categorization. The emerging themes were then analysed from an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, focusing on how participants' lived experiences before and during their admission to the service shaped their perceptions of the program. A total of 12 clients (mean age 35 years, SD 9.07, 91% Aboriginal) and 9 staff (2 female, 7 male, mean age 48 years, SD 8.54, 67% Aboriginal) were interviewed. Five themes about specific program components were identified in the interview data: healing through culture and country; emotional safety and relationships; strengthening life skills; improved wellbeing; and perceived areas for improvement. This research found that Aboriginal drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation is not just about length of time in treatment, but also about the culture, activities and relationships that are part of the treatment process. This study highlights that cultural elements were highly valued by both clients and staff of a remote Aboriginal residential

  5. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  6. 76 FR 30369 - Announcement of the Award of a Replacement Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ... the Award of a Replacement Grant AGENCY: Office of Community Services (OCS), ACF, DHHS. ACTION: Announcement of the award of a replacement grant from the Office of Community Services to Humboldt State... Services (OCS), announces the award of a replacement grant under the Strengthening Communities Fund (SCF...

  7. The challenge of change in acute mental health services: measuring staff perceptions of barriers to change and their relationship to job status and satisfaction using a new measure (VOCALISE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laker, Caroline; Callard, Felicity; Flach, Clare; Williams, Paul; Sayer, Jane; Wykes, Til

    2014-02-20

    Health services are subject to frequent changes, yet there has been insufficient research to address how staff working within these services perceive the climate for implementation. Staff perceptions, particularly of barriers to change, may affect successful implementation and the resultant quality of care. This study measures staff perceptions of barriers to change in acute mental healthcare. We identify whether occupational status and job satisfaction are related to these perceptions, as this might indicate a target for intervention that could aid successful implementation. As there were no available instruments capturing staff perceptions of barriers to change, we created a new measure (VOCALISE) to assess this construct. All nursing staff from acute in-patient settings in one large London mental health trust were eligible. Using a participatory method, a nurse researcher interviewed 32 staff to explore perceptions of barriers to change. This generated a measure through thematic analyses and staff feedback (N = 6). Psychometric testing was undertaken according to standard guidelines for measure development (N = 40, 42, 275). Random effects models were used to explore the associations between VOCALISE, occupational status, and job satisfaction (N = 125). VOCALISE was easy to understand and complete, and showed acceptable reliability and validity. The factor analysis revealed three underlying constructs: 'confidence,' 'de-motivation' and 'powerlessness.' Staff with negative perceptions of barriers to change held more junior positions, and had poorer job satisfaction. Qualitatively, nursing assistants expressed a greater sense of organisational unfairness in response to change. VOCALISE can be used to explore staff perceptions of implementation climate and to assess how staff attitudes shape the successful outcomes of planned changes. Negative perceptions were linked with poor job satisfaction and to those occupying more junior roles, indicating a

  8. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  9. The John Muir Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Graham

    2002-01-01

    The John Muir Award was established in the United Kingdom to respond to minimal environmental awareness, especially among youth. The Award has three levels of effort; all involve discovering a wild place, exploring its wildness, helping to conserve it, and sharing the experience with a wider audience. There is an effort to establish the award in…

  10. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  11. 78 FR 12830 - Voluntary Service National Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... Voluntary Service Office and field staff; to provide educational opportunities geared towards improving... Centered-Care, and Homelessness. The James H. Parke Memorial Scholarship recipient will be honored at the... the Year awards. No time will be allocated at this meeting for receiving oral presentations from the...

  12. Awarding Teaching Excellence: "What Is It Supposed to Achieve?" Teacher Perceptions of Student-Led Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madriaga, Manuel; Morley, Krystle

    2016-01-01

    Although there is lack of agreement as to what constitutes teaching excellence, there remains a steady effort to make an intangible, ambiguous, multifaceted concept incarnate in the form of "student-led" teaching awards schemes within higher education institutions. What teaching staff say about such schemes have largely been ignored.…

  13. Detainees, staff, and health care services in immigration detention centres: a descriptive comparison of detention systems in Sweden and in the Benelux countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soorej J. Puthoopparambil

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immigration detention has been shown to negatively affect the health and well-being of detainees. The aim of the study was to describe and compare policies and practices that could affect the health and well-being of immigrant detainees in the Benelux countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg to those in Sweden. Design: This was a case study. Data were collected in two phases using a questionnaire developed particularly for this study. In the first phase, authorities in the Benelux countries responded to the questionnaire via email. During the second phase, a research team visited detention centres in the Benelux countries to observe and further explore, strengthening findings through triangulation. Data on Swedish detention centres were collected in previous studies. Results: Compared to the Benelux countries, Sweden has limited health care provision available in the detention centres. Swedish detention centres did not have mental health care professionals working at the centres and had fewer restrictions within the centres with regard to access to mobile phone, internet, and various recreational activities. Compared to Sweden, the detention centres in the Benelux countries have more staff categories providing services to the detainees that are provided with relevant and timely on-the-job training. All the countries, except Belgium, provide subsistence allowances to detainees. Conclusion: Despite the Common European Asylum System framework, differences exist among the four European Union member states in providing services to immigrant detainees. This study highlights these differences, thereby providing a window on how these diverse approaches may serve as a learning tool for improving services offered to immigrant detainees. In Sweden, the health care available to detainees and training and recruitment of staff should be improved, while the Benelux countries should strive to reduce restrictions within detention centres.

  14. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  15. Developing leadership interventions for black and minority ethnic staff: A case study of the National Health Service (NHS) in the U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, V S; Abel, P; Esmail, A

    2009-01-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is the largest employer in the U.K. but, despite decades of equal opportunities legislation, its senior management workforce does not reflect the diversity of either the wider NHS workforce or the U.K. population. The aim of the paper is to consider the range of management interventions available to organisations like the NHS to deliver change in the area of promotion of Black and minority ethnic staff. Intervention programmes in a range of public and private organisations are reviewed and the nature of barriers to promotion and the range of interventions to overcome these are explored. The paper uses the paradigm of institutional racism to examine the ways in which the NHS discriminates against certain sections of its workforce. The methods used include a literature review combined with key stakeholder interviews. A comparative dimension which involved a review of research on leadership initiatives in the U.S.A. was also undertaken. The literature review found that there were a range of initiatives which could be implemented by public organisations such as the NHS to increase the presence of Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) staff in senior management positions. Most of these interventions were largely focused on the individual. Much more progress on institutional or organisational change needed to be made before the NHS could be perceived as a model employer in this area. The literature review also indicated that there is little published research on such initiatives within other European Union countries. The paper is targeted at both policy makers and human resource officers responsible for equality and diversity issues within large organisations, who have a remit to improve the career pathways of staff. The analysis provided offers a set of critical tools and interventions that have not hitherto been well examined in the U.K. context.

  16. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  17. 48 CFR 339.7002 - Notice of intended award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of intended award. 339.7002 Section 339.7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SPECIAL... Blanket Purchase Agreements for Independent Risk Analysis Services 339.7002 Notice of intended award. The...

  18. The Mutations Occurred after the Implementation of Bologna’s System in the Romanian Educational Services. Analysis Realized on the Didactic Staff of the Faculty of Economic Science and Business Administration, Iasi

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Mihaela Nicolau,

    2010-01-01

    In the present stage of development of Romanian society, several changes and challengeshave emerged in what concerns educational services, and staff management started to focus more andmore on developing its resources – the didactic staff. “The consequences are clear: the trainingprograms will not be aimed only at pedagogical, didactic or technical development. Besidesimproving their didactic performance, teachers will have to become better colleagues, good teammembers and, if possible, even ...

  19. Influence of Service and Product Quality towards Customer Satisfaction: A Case Study at the Staff Cafeteria in the Hotel Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dayang Nailul Munna Abang Abdullah; Francine Rozario

    2009-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to identify attributes that influence customer satisfaction and determine their relationships with customer satisfaction. The variables included in this research are place/ambience, food quality and service quality as independent variables and customer satisfaction as the dependent variable. A survey questionnaire which consisted of three parts to measure demographic factors, independent variables, and dependent variables was constru...

  20. Characteristics of patients who are violent to staff and towards other people from a community mental health service in South East England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, H; Luty, J; Trathen, B

    2007-12-01

    Professionals working in the public sector in the UK report widespread violence towards staff working in areas such as health care, social services and education. This study compares the characteristics of patients with and without a history of violence in a large sample of patients attending a community mental health service in South East England. The data were taken from a study of comorbidity and cannabis use in a mental health trust covering a semi-rural population of 250,000 people in Harlow and the surrounding area of South East England. Key workers were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaires from the Comorbidity of Substance Misuse and Mental illness in Community Mental Health and Substance Misuse Services study. Rates of violence against health workers were more than 20 times higher among those patients with a history of violence (23.6% vs. 1%, P<0.001). Alcohol and drug use was more frequent in those who were violent. Prevalence of comorbidity, schizophrenia and personality disorders was high. Key workers' estimates suggested that there was no difference in aggression, engagement or adherence to care plan among those with a history of violence.

  1. 42 CFR 52d.6 - Grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grant awards. 52d.6 Section 52d.6 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE CLINICAL... cancer biology, epidemiology, detection, diagnosis, prevention, treatment and control; (ii) To interest...

  2. THE ORGANIZATION OF SERVICES OF ORIENTATION TO THE TEACHING STAFF AND THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE EDUCATIONAL QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odalia Llerena Companioni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the recurrent topics in the current polemics regarding the educational quality in the institutions of superior education, has to do with the faculty's list whose educational professionalization is a broadly grateful necessity that demands to all educational system to assist the formation and its professors' permanent upgrade efficiently so that they are able to face the challenges and innovations that take place in the university mark.  In this work he/she is carried out a proposal that it considers a new meaning of the services of orientation psychopedagogical from a bigger premeditation in their to work toward the faculty's orientation, that which transforms him into a valid alternative because it considers the contribution of resources, methodologies, technical, strategies and activities to the pedagogic professional development of the professors contributing to the improvement of the institutional educational quality.

  3. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  4. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  5. The effect of quality circles on job satisfaction and quality of work-life of staff in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Karampourian, Arezou; Beiranvand, Shoorangiz; Pournia, Yadollah

    2013-10-01

    Quality circles, as a participatory management technique, offer one alternative for dealing with frustration and discontent of today's workers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of implementation of quality circles on nurses' quality of work-life and job satisfaction. In this study, two emergency medical services (EMS) of Hamedan province were selected and randomly assigned as the experimental and control groups. After the experimental group was trained and quality circles were established in this group, the levels of quality of work-life and job satisfaction were measured in the two groups. Then, the statistical analyses were performed using t-test. After the intervention, the results showed significant differences between the scores of motivational factors (p=0.001), the total scores of job satisfaction (p=0.003), and the scores of some quality of work life (QWL) conceptual categories including the use and development of capacities (p=0.008), the total space of life (p=0.003), and the total scores of QWL (p=0.031) in the experimental group compared to those in the control group. This study confirms the effectiveness of quality circles in improving quality of work-life and job satisfaction of nurses working in EMS, and offers their application as a management method that can be used by EMS managers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. What stops hospital clinical staff from following protocols? An analysis of the incidence and factors behind the failure of bedside clinical staff to activate the rapid response system in a multi-campus Australian metropolitan healthcare service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Bill; Marshall, Stuart; Buist, Michael David; Finnigan, Monica; Kitto, Simon; Hore, Tonina; Sturgess, Tamica; Wilson, Stuart; Ramsay, Wayne

    2012-07-01

    To explore the causes of failure to activate the rapid response system (RRS). The organisation has a recognised incidence of staff failing to act when confronted with a deteriorating patient and leading to adverse outcomes. A multi-method study using the following: a point prevalence survey to determine the incidence of abnormal simple bedside observations and activation of the rapid response team by clinical staff; a prospective audit of all patients experiencing a cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission or death over an 8-week period; structured interviews of staff to explore cognitive and sociocultural barriers to activating the RRS. Southern Health is a comprehensive healthcare network with 570 adult in-patient beds across four metropolitan teaching hospitals in the south-eastern sector of Melbourne. Frequency of physiological instability and outcomes within the in-patient hospital population. Qualitative data from staff interviews were thematically coded. The incidence of physiological instability in the acute adult population was 4.04%. Nearly half of these patients (42%) did not receive an appropriate clinical response from the staff, despite most (69.2%) recognising their patient met physiological criteria for activating the RRS, and being 'quite', or 'very' concerned about their patient (75.8%). Structured interviews with 91 staff members identified predominantly sociocultural reasons for failure to activate the RRS. Despite an organisational commitment to the RRS, clinical staff act on local cultural rules within the clinical environment that are usually not explicit. Better understanding of these informal rules may lead to more appropriate activation of the RRS.

  7. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-05-01

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its National Partner awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  8. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  9. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  10. Awards aplenty in Krakow

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN will be well represented this year at the award ceremony organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) in Krakow. The Gargamelle Collaboration is being awarded the High Energy and Particle Physics prize, while Maurizio Pierini shares the Young Physicist Prize. Both Mick Storr and Andrzej Siemko will be awarded the Medal of the Polish Commission of National Education.This year’s EPS-High Energy and Particle Physics Prize is being awarded to the Gargamelle Collaboration for the discovery of the weak neutral current. Gargamelle’s large bubble chamber is now displayed in the Microcosm garden at CERN in commemoration of the discovery that led to the acceptance of the electroweak theory and the award of the Noble prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg in 1979. On 3 September 1973 the collaboration published two papers in the same issue of Physics Letters, one on neutral currents involving electrons, the other on neutral current interactions with hadrons (protons and neut...

  11. Pension Fund award

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund won the Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) 2013 Gold Award in the Medium Real-Estate Investor category. IPE is the leading European publication on the subject of pensions. The awards were judged by a panel of 22 members, which included leading European investment consultants and pension fund executives.     Théodore Economou (left), the CERN Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer, receives the IPE 2013 Gold Award.   The award recognised the “fresh thinking” behind the CERN Pension Fund’s updated real-estate strategy, which has brought it “focus” on “high-quality assets and diversification.” The jury also noted the Fund’s “streamlined and cost-efficient” management, and noted that CERN is “running a tight ship”. While the awards are given by a European institution, they have a worldwide scope, and winners in ot...

  12. Improving implementation of evidence-based practice in mental health service delivery: protocol for a cluster randomised quasi-experimental investigation of staff-focused values interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Virginia; Oades, Lindsay G; Deane, Frank P; Crowe, Trevor P; Ciarrochi, Joseph; Andresen, Retta

    2013-07-02

    There is growing acceptance that optimal service provision for individuals with severe and recurrent mental illness requires a complementary focus on medical recovery (i.e., symptom management and general functioning) and personal recovery (i.e., having a 'life worth living'). Despite significant research attention and policy-level support, the translation of this vision of healthcare into changed workplace practice continues to elude. Over the past decade, evidence-based training interventions that seek to enhance the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff working in the mental health field have been implemented as a primary redress strategy. However, a large body of multi-disciplinary research indicates disappointing rates of training transfer. There is an absence of empirical research that investigates the importance of worker-motivation in the uptake of desired workplace change initiatives. 'Autonomy' is acknowledged as important to human effectiveness and as a correlate of workplace variables like productivity, and wellbeing. To our knowledge, there have been no studies that investigate purposeful and structured use of values-based interventions to facilitate increased autonomy as a means of promoting enhanced implementation of workplace change. This study involves 200 mental health workers across 22 worksites within five community-managed organisations in three Australian states. It involves cluster-randomisation of participants within organisation, by work site, to the experimental (values) condition, or the control (implementation). Both conditions receive two days of training focusing on an evidence-based framework of mental health service delivery. The experimental group receives a third day of values-focused intervention and 12 months of values-focused coaching. Well-validated self-report measures are used to explore variables related to values concordance, autonomy, and self-reported implementation success. Audits of work files and staff work samples

  13. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  14. 5 CFR 930.206 - Performance rating and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance rating and awards. 930.206 Section 930.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Judge Program § 930.206 Performance rating and awards. (a) An agency may not rate the job performance of...

  15. The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Graduate radiographers' expectations for role development - The potential impact of misalignment of expectation and valence on staff retention and service provision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Keren [Department of Radiography, School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: williamsonk2@cardiff.ac.uk; Mundy, Lynn A. [Department of Radiography, School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role development expectations of graduate radiographers with a view to predicting the potential impact of a misalignment of these expectations and valence on service delivery and staff retention. A final year cohort of radiography students completed a questionnaire designed to explore topics associated with role development opportunities. Method: Structured questionnaires, in the Likert scale format, utilised 20 attitude questions constructed to elicit information in relation to 3 main themes of investigation; expectation, valence and knowledge. Results: All participants (n = 37) stated an expectation for role development opportunities with 97.3% (n = 36) indicating that these expectations would be realised within 5 years of graduation and 75.7% (n = 28) within 2 years of graduation. A significant correlation between expectation for role development and job satisfaction was seen (p < 0.05). 81.1% (n = 30) of participants stated turnover intentions in order to meet their expectations. Conclusion: There is an expectation for role development opportunities for new graduates with a valence noted of the intrinsic reward of meeting these expectations. Expectation and valence are seen to be intrinsically linked with job satisfaction suggesting that misalignment of these would have a potentially negative impact on motivation and retention of the future radiography workforce demonstrating a positive correlation with withdrawal behaviours, including turnover intentions. In a relatively small professional group such as radiography the phenomenon of group cohesion may be strong suggesting that withdrawal behaviours may manifest as 'resignation in post', impacting on the quality of care and service provision for patients.

  17. Graduate radiographers' expectations for role development - The potential impact of misalignment of expectation and valence on staff retention and service provision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, Keren; Mundy, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the role development expectations of graduate radiographers with a view to predicting the potential impact of a misalignment of these expectations and valence on service delivery and staff retention. A final year cohort of radiography students completed a questionnaire designed to explore topics associated with role development opportunities. Method: Structured questionnaires, in the Likert scale format, utilised 20 attitude questions constructed to elicit information in relation to 3 main themes of investigation; expectation, valence and knowledge. Results: All participants (n = 37) stated an expectation for role development opportunities with 97.3% (n = 36) indicating that these expectations would be realised within 5 years of graduation and 75.7% (n = 28) within 2 years of graduation. A significant correlation between expectation for role development and job satisfaction was seen (p < 0.05). 81.1% (n = 30) of participants stated turnover intentions in order to meet their expectations. Conclusion: There is an expectation for role development opportunities for new graduates with a valence noted of the intrinsic reward of meeting these expectations. Expectation and valence are seen to be intrinsically linked with job satisfaction suggesting that misalignment of these would have a potentially negative impact on motivation and retention of the future radiography workforce demonstrating a positive correlation with withdrawal behaviours, including turnover intentions. In a relatively small professional group such as radiography the phenomenon of group cohesion may be strong suggesting that withdrawal behaviours may manifest as 'resignation in post', impacting on the quality of care and service provision for patients.

  18. NCI at Frederick Employees Receive Awards at the Spring Research Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI and Frederick National Laboratory staff members were among those honored at the Spring Research Festival Awards Ceremony on May 28. The ceremony was the culmination of the festival, which was sponsored by the National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR), May 4–7. Maj. Gen. Brian Lein, commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC), presented the awards.

  19. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  20. Impact of practice leadership management style on staff experience in services for people with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour: A further examination and partial replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Roy; McGill, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Practice leadership (PL) style of frontline management has been shown to be associated with better experiences for staff working with people who may exhibit challenging behaviours (Deveau & McGill, 2014). This study aimed to examine additional staff experience factors with a different, larger sample and to partially replicate the findings of (Deveau & McGill, 2014). This study was a survey of staff self-reported data collected as part of a larger study. Information was collected on PL and staff experiences of: stress, turnover, job satisfaction and positive work experiences. The results broadly supported Deveau and McGill (2014) and demonstrated an association between PL and greater job satisfaction and positive experiences for staff. Results on staff turnover were inconsistent. The positive impact of PL on staff experience was further supported by this study. Suggestions are made for further research. These findings suggest further research is needed to examine the potential of interventions in frontline management/leadership practice to improve staff experience of working in challenging environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  2. CPD Allocations and Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The CPD Allocation and Award database provides filterable on-screen and exportable reports on select programs, such as the Community Development Block Grant Program,...

  3. FY11 Coc Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the renewal homeless assistance projects being awarded by HUD under the 2011 Continuum of Care (CoC) competitive grants process. Approximately...

  4. 2015 Gulf Guardian Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  5. 40 CFR 791.37 - The award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The award. 791.37 Section 791.37 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED... address or to its attorney, or by personal service. ...

  6. Tectonics wins AAP Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU's newest journal, Tectonics, won the 1983 award for excellence in journal design and production given by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. (AAP), in the eighth annual professional and scholarly publishing awards competition. Edited by John F. Dewey, the bimonthly journal is a joint publication of AGU and the European Geophysical Society. Paul E. Tapponnier is the European editor and B.C. Burchfiel is the North American editor. The journal is now in its third year of publication.

  7. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  8. Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, & Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    This infographic shows the National Cancer Institute general timeline progression through Grant Application Development, Submission, Review, and Award Infographic. In the first month, Applicant prepares and submits Grant Application to Grants.gov in response to FOA. In month two, The Center for Scientific Review (CSR) assigns applications that fall under the category of R01s, etc. to a Scientific Review Group (SRG) or the CSR assigns applications that fall under the category of Program Projects and Center Grants to NCI Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). Months four through five: First-level review by Scientific Review Group (SRG) for Scientific Merit: SRG assigns Impact Scores. Month five Summary Sstatements are prepared and are available to NCI Program staff and applicants. Month six, second-level review by National Cancer Advisory board (NCAB) for NCI Funding determination begins. NCAB makes recommendation to NCI Director, NCI develops funding plan, Applications selected for Funding, “Paylists” forwarded to Office of Grant Administration (OGA). Month ten, Award Negotiations and Issuance: Award issued, Award received by Institution, and Investigator begins work. www.cancer.gov Icons made by Freepik from http://www.flaticon.com is licensed by CC BY3.0

  9. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  10. 2016 Federal Green Challenge Award Winners in the Southeast Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016 FGC award winners in the Southeast are: the Department of Human Services’ U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Southeast Regional Office and Department of Energy’s East Tennessee Technology Park.

  11. 77 FR 59932 - Single Source Award; Exception to Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... Competition AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice of Exception to Competition--Single Source Award to Texas Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) East--University of Texas...

  12. An induction pack for care home staff (transitions): for front-line staff of care homes An induction pack for care home staff (transitions): for front-line staff of care homes Alan Chapman Jim Kilgour , and Margaret Williamson Dementia Services Development Trust and University of Stirling 145 pp £35 1 85769 178 4 1857691784 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    This pack has been compiled by three members of the Dementia Service Development Centre based at Stirling University. It was tested by a local care home in Lanarkshire and is divided by colour-coding into four parts - a good descriptive introduction, the main part, which is the individual study, the answers to the exercise questions, and a resource booklet. The pack is easy to read and understand, and the exercises are, for the most part, common sense. Some prospective students may, however, feel slightly patronised by this particular form of study.

  13. Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a ventilation and air conditioning system for the ECN3 experimental area and the TCC8 and GHN300 service tunnels and for the dismantling of the existing system

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the design, supply, installation and commissioning of a ventilation and air conditioning system for the ECN3 experimental area and the TCC8 and GHN300 service tunnels and for the dismantling of the existing system

  14. CONTROVERSIES AND PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS REGARDING THE AWARD OF CONTRACTS FOR THE DELEGATION OF THE MANAGEMENT OF ADMINISTRATION SERVICES OF THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE DOMAIN OF THE TERRITORIAL ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Bilan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the teething troubles met by local public authorities when organizing and applying tender proceedings for the award of delegation contracts for the management of the administration services of public and private domain of the territorial administrative units in view of the Law no. 51/2006 regarding the public community utility services and aims to provide practical solutions for interpreting and applying conflicting provisions of the regulations in force. In order to support the local public authorities in their activity this study offers solutions for some legal issues as establishing the applicable law and the hierarchy of the regulations in force for organizing the tenders, determining the legal form of the delegation contract, identification of the applicable rules for selection criteria and for evaluation of the bidders` offers as well as identifying the review procedures available for bidders. The research methodology is based on both the deductive method comprising theoretical documentation, analysis and synthesis of the concerned legal issues and on the comparative method as this study provides practical answers consistent with the national legal system based on the European Commission`s Recommendations on the services of general interest.

  15. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  16. Outsourced design services lessons learned from LHC civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, T

    2003-01-01

    In April 1996 CERN awarded three contracts for the provision of civil engineering design and site supervision services associated with the LHC Project. These three contracts with an average value at signature of 12MCHF were placed using the “two envelope” award system. Eight firms from six member states were integrated into three Joint Ventures. For Projects prior to the LHC, CERN would have carried out the design and supervision using in-house staff. The change to out-sourced services represented a major step for CERN. After seven years, the contracts are now coming to their conclusion. This paper aims to discuss the reasons why these contracts were originally implemented, the lessons than have been learnt over the last seven years and conclusions on how CERN could approach the need for civil engineering design services in the future.

  17. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...

  18. Award Winning Science Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showalter, Victor M.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    This is a collection of reports of student award winning science projects that have appeared in "The Science Teacher." Grade levels 7-12 are represented with projects categorized as follows: biology, chemistry and physics, earth-space science, and miscellaneous. In each section the abstracts are arranged in order of increasing complexity…

  19. Research Award: Networked Economies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    Aug 6, 2015 ... have completed a master's or doctoral degree at a recognized university. These awards may be part of an academic requirement. • Your proposed research must focus on a developing country. The research awardee should have the following qualifications: • Master's degree in social sciences, media ...

  20. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  1. FAQs for Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    Visit the Grants page for details on the positions offered by IDRC's programs. 9) How do you select Research Awardees? You can find out more about the Research Awards evaluation process in the Call for Application and Checklist documents under the Grants Web page. 10) Can someone at IDRC review my research ...

  2. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  3. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2009-01-01

    On the occasion of the international woman day, on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” by the Italian President for her “scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project”.

  4. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  5. The Effects of Evaluating Video Examples of Staffs' Own versus Others' Performance on Discrete-Trial Training Skills in a Human Service Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Larry; Gallinat, Julianne

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted evaluating the use of feedback in staff training in organizational settings. Central to this literature has been the use of a variety of forms of feedback, including videotaped feedback. A distinction is outlined between video modeling and a variety of possible video feedback procedures. Previous studies have…

  6. Academic Staff Development and Output in State Universities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings were that significant relationship exists between staff development and the productivity of academic staff in terms of research, teaching and community service. Therefore, the study concluded that in-service training and attendance of conferences and workshops influence the output of academic staff.

  7. AllotmentDecnService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The AllotmentDecnService is a service supporting operations to access/update data related to (Compensation and Pension) Awards. This service also supports business...

  8. Adam M. Reid: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Adam M. Reid, who received this award "for his community service, in which he has integrated the highest standards of professional psychological clinical practice and science." Adam's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  10. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  11. Designing and implementing a state quality award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, E. N.

    1993-02-01

    To remain competitive in today's global economy, businesses need to ensure customer satisfaction by offering high-quality products and services. Governors and state governments can play a critical role in ensuring the economic health of the business in their state by encouraging the adoption of quality practices and recognizing successful efforts by firms to improve quality and productivity. The manual is intended to help state government officials and other individuals implement a state quality award program.

  12. 77 FR 20122 - Proposed Collection of Information: Voucher for Payment of Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Proposed Collection of Information: Voucher for Payment... Financial Management Service solicits comments concerning the form ``Voucher for Payment of Awards.'' DATES... of information described below: Title: Voucher for Payment of Awards. OMB Number: 1510-0037. Form...

  13. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, presenting Fabiola Gianotti with her award on 7 March.On the occasion of International Woman’s Day on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded "Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana" by the Italian President for her "scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project". Gianotti received the honorary title also for "her contribution to the prestige of the Italian scientific community in the field of nuclear physics." Further reading (in Italian only): http://www.quirinale.it/Comunicati/Comunicato.asp?id=38192 An article about the beginning of Gianotti’s term of office as ATLAS spokesperson is available from the latest issue of the CERN Courier: http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/38709

  14. Langley Medal awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Robert Thomas Jones, senior scientist at the Ames Research Center, Mountain View, Calif., was awarded the distinguished Langley Medal by the Smithsonian Institution for his ‘extensive contributions in theoretical aerodynamics, particularly with regard to development of the swept wing, supersonic area rule and, more recently, the oblique wing.’ Jones is an internationally acclaimed expert on aerodynamics, optics, and biomechanics as well as an applied mathematician, astronomer, inventor, author, and violin maker.The Langley award has been given to just 16 recipients since it was established 73 years ago. Past recipients include Wilbur and Orville Wright, Charles Lindbergh, and Richard Byrd. Named for Samuel Pierpont Langley, aeronautical pioneer and third secretary of the Smithsonian, the medal honors ‘especially meritorious investigations in the field of aerospace science.’

  15. Anger management for people with mild to moderate learning disabilities: Study protocol for a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a manualized intervention delivered by day-service staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttall Jacqueline

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is the treatment of choice for common mental health problems, but this approach has only recently been adapted for people with learning disabilities, and there is a limited evidence base for the use of CBT with this client group. Anger treatment is the one area where there exists a reasonable number of small controlled trials. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of a manualized 12-week CBT intervention for anger. The intervention will be delivered by staff working in the day services that the participants attend, following training to act as 'lay therapists' by a Clinical Psychologist, who will also provide supervision. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre cluster randomized controlled trial of a group intervention versus a 'support as usual' waiting-list control group, with randomization at the level of the group. Outcomes will be assessed at the end of the intervention and again 6-months later. After completion of the 6-month follow-up assessments, the intervention will also be delivered to the waiting-list groups. The study will include a range of anger/aggression and mental health measures, some of which will be completed by service users and also by their day service key-workers and by home carers. Qualitative data will be collected to assess the impact of the intervention on participants, lay therapists, and services, and the study will also include a service-utilization cost and consequences analysis. Discussion This will be the first trial to investigate formally how effectively staff working in services providing day activities for people with learning disabilities are able to use a therapy manual to deliver a CBT based anger management intervention, following brief training by a Clinical Psychologist. The demonstration that service staff can successfully deliver anger management to people with learning disabilities, by widening the pool of potential therapists, would have

  16. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  17. Multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service and Initial assessment of BDS-3 (G Division Outstanding ECS Award Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maaorong; Li, Xin; Zhang, Xiuaohong; Wu, Mingkui; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2017-04-01

    The rapid development of multi-constellation GNSSs (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, e.g., BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS, GPS) and the IGS (International GNSS Service) Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) bring great opportunities and challenges for real-time precise positioning service. In this contribution, we present a GPS+GLONASS+BeiDou+Galileo four-system model to fully exploit the observations of all these four navigation satellite systems for real-time precise orbit determination, clock estimation and positioning. Meanwhile, an efficient multi-GNSS real-time precise positioning service system is designed and demonstrated by using the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) data streams including stations all over the world. The addition of the BeiDou, Galileo and GLONASS systems to the standard GPS-only processing, reduces the convergence time almost by 70%, while the positioning accuracy is improved by about 25%. The successful launch of five new-generation satellites of the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS-3) marks a significant step in expanding BeiDou into a navigation system with global coverage. We present an initial characterization and performance assessment for these new-generation BeiDou-3 satellites and their signals. The characteristics of the B1C, B1I, B2a, B2b and B3I signals are evaluated in terms of observed carrier-to-noise density ratio, pseudorange multipath and noise, triple-frequency carrier phase ionosphere-free and geometry-free combination, and double-differenced carrier phase and code residuals. With respect to BeiDou-2 satellites, the analysis of code multipath shows that the elevation-dependent code biases, which have been previously identified to exist in the code observations of BeiDou-2 satellites, seem to be not obvious for all the available signals of new-generation BeiDou-3 satellites. This will significantly benefit precise applications that resolve wide-lane ambiguity based on Melbourne

  18. 77 FR 58404 - Announcing the Award of Two Urgent Single-Source Grants To Support Unaccompanied Alien Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ...] Announcing the Award of Two Urgent Single-Source Grants To Support Unaccompanied Alien Children Program...) announces the award of two urgent single-source grants from the Unaccompanied Alien Children's Program to... providing services under the Unaccompanied Alien Children's program. Award Grantee organization Location...

  19. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  20. 12 CFR 263.106 - Measure of awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... issues in the proceeding; and (5) Such other factors as may bear on the value of the services provided. (c) Awards for studies. The reasonable cost of any study, analysis, test, project, or similar matter... exceed the prevailing rate payable for similar services, and the study or other matter was necessary...

  1. 12 CFR 308.175 - Measure of awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... issues in the proceeding; and (5) Such other factors as may bear on the value of the services provided. (c) Awards for studies. The reasonable cost of any study, analysis, test, project, or similar matter... exceed the prevailing rate payable for similar services, and the study or other matter was necessary for...

  2. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  3. 1993 architectural design awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    The 10th annual architectural design awards sponsored by Contemporary Long Term Care salute nursing homes and retirement communities that combine a flair for innovative living environments with a sensitivity to the needs of aging residents. These facilities represent the very best in elderly housing that prolongs independence while enhancing efficient operation. The 1993 winners are: King Health Center, U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home, Washington, DC; The Terrace of Los Gatos, Los Gatos, CA; Walker Elder Suites, Edina, MN; The Jefferson, Ballston, VA; The Forum at Rancho San Antonio, Cupertino, CA.

  4. Award for Steve Myers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Last Thursday Steve Myers, Leader of the Accelerator and Beams Division, received one of the UK Institute of Physics awards. He is the recipient of the 2003 Duddel Medal and Prize for his contributions to the development of major charged-particle accelerator projects at CERN. As head of the commissioning group for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, says the citation, his contributions have had «a direct impact on the results from LEP, which have reached a precision and extent far beyond expectation and are key in defining the Standard Model of particle physics».

  5. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  6. Table Summarizing Awards Supported by Fellowships and Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Liliane Castets-Poupart

    developing country university. Support is for doctoral research awards, full study degrees, post-doc fellowships, internships and sabbaticals in sub-Saharan. Africa, Asia and Latin. America and the Caribbean. Variable. Managed by various developing country institutions. Variable. Fellowships · http://www.idrc.ca/awards.

  7. Cooptation of Peer Support Staff: Quantitative Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Alberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective In 2007, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS sent a letter to state Medicaid directors outlining requirements for implementing peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS as a Medicaid-funded service. Since then, 30 states have implemented these services. Although the literature describing implementation of P-BRSS has identified the cooptation of peer support staff (PSS as a barrier to the effective provision of P-BRSS, the evidence for it remains anecdotal. This study attempts to determine if the context of employment in either a treatment organization or peer organization affected cooptation. Methods We conducted a survey of PSS in the fall of 2013. In all, 92 of the 181 respondents were working as PSS at the time, 53 in treatment organizations. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if the context of employment had an effect on the cooptation of peer staff. Results Peer staff working in treatment organizations reported that they were supervised by treatment staff and participated in employment-related training to improve their skills at providing treatment services more frequently than their counterparts in peer organizations. Peer staff working in treatment organizations also participated in training and education to prepare for employment as treatment professionals more frequently than peer staff working in peer organizations. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Peer staff members working in treatment organizations are subject to processes of acculturation into professional cultures that peer staff working in peer organizations are not. Effective implementation of P-BRSS should include specific efforts to minimize the cooptation of peer staff.

  8. Geneva University honours two CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann Steve Myers On 8 June, two CERN staff members will receive Geneva University's highest distinction. On the proposal of the University's particle physicists, Steve Myers and Albert Hoffmann, who orchestrated LEP commissioning and operation and were instrumental in its success, will awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa. The ceremony, interspersed with musical interludes, will be followed by a formal reception and is open to all. The Uni Dufour car park will be free to members of the public attending the ceremony. 8 June 2001 at 10.00 a.m. Uni Dufour, Auditoire Piaget 24, rue Général Dufour, Geneva.

  9. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  10. Challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment services for American Indian and Alaska native communities: perspectives of staff from 18 treatment centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Substance abuse continues to exact a significant toll, despite promising advancements in treatment, and American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities remain disproportionately impacted. Understanding the challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment to AI/AN communities could ultimately result in more effective treatment interventions, but no multi-site studies have examined this important issue. Methods This qualitative study examined the challenges of providing substance abuse treatment services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities. We conducted key informant interviews and focus groups at 18 substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Seventy-six service participants (21 individuals in clinical administrative positions and 55 front-line clinicians) participated in the project. Interview transcripts were coded to identify key themes. Results We found that the challenges of bringing effective substance abuse treatment to AI/AN communities fell into three broad categories: challenges associated with providing clinical services, those associated with the infrastructure of treatment settings, and those associated with the greater service/treatment system. These sets of challenges interact to form a highly complex set of conditions for the delivery of these services. Conclusions Our findings suggest that substance abuse treatment services for AI/AN communities require more integrated, individualized, comprehensive, and longer-term approaches to care. Our three categories of challenges provide a useful framework for eliciting challenges to providing quality substance abuse treatment in other substance abuse treatment settings. PMID:24938281

  11. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC Doctoral Research Awards. Name: Research Topic: Institution(s) of Affiliation: Supervisor: Program of Study in: Duration of Award: From: ... Please give the title of the thesis or dissertation you are preparing. 4. If any paper or book resulting from your work during tenure is to be published, please indicate by whom and ...

  12. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

  13. Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before a grant can be awarded and accepted, several pre-award activities must happen to formalize the partnership. Ensuring compliance with federal laws, a review of costs and a negotiation of the appropriate funding level must all happen in order to rece

  14. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  15. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  16. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section 1602.5....5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective Service System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff. ...

  17. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Alex Ince-Cushman, John deGrassie, Lars-Goran Eriksson, Yoshiteru Sakamoto, Andrea Scarabosio and Yuri Podpaly, as well as the other coauthors. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to Earl Marmar, Martin Greenwald and Miklos Porkolab at MIT for continued support of this work, as well as to the entire C-Mod team. This award was made possible due to the insight of Mitsuru Kikuchi and the support of the IAEA through Werner Burkhart, and I am truly grateful to both of them. Many thanks as well to the outstanding staff at Nuclear Fusion. It is a distinct honor to be included in the group of previous winners: Tim Luce, Clemente Angioni, Todd Evans and Steve Sabbagh. It is also a great honor to be considered alongside the 2010 nominees: Phil Snyder, Sibylle Guenter, Maiko Yoshida, Hajime Urano, Fulvio Zonca, Erik Garcia, Costanza Maggi, Hartmut Zohm, Thierry Loarer and Bruce Lipschultz. Finally, I would like to thank the readers of Nuclear Fusion for the many citations. John Rice 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award winner Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA

  18. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  19. Award for Lise Meitner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    It is a matter of history that the work in the 1930's of Lise Meitner, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann played a great part in pointing the way to exploiting the possibilities of fission. One of the most interesting occasions the Agency has known came in 1963 when Lise Meitner paid a visit to talk about her life as a scientist, thus returning to the city where she had started her university career in 1901. Her account of a career which had brought her into contact with scientists such as Einstein, Planck, Rutherford, Bohr and many others took her listeners back to the birth of the atomic age. A photograph is shown taken at Dr. Meitner's home in Cambridge, UK, when she received the Enrico Fermi award for 1966, shared with Hahn and Strassmann

  20. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  1. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  2. "So Often They Do Not Get Recruited": Exploring Service User and Staff Perspectives on Participation in Learning Disability Research and the Barriers That Inhibit It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Bradley; Tomlins, Rose; Bancroft, Ann; Ogi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The importance of making research participation accessible for people with learning disabilities is emphasised in government and NHS research strategies. This evaluation explored the realities of this goal from the perceptions of people with learning disabilities and clinicians within an NHS learning disability service. People with learning…

  3. Prestigious award for SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    SOHO spacecraft artist's impression hi-res Size hi-res: 451 Kb Credits: ESA SOHO spacecraft SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. SOHO's science ranges from the Sun's hot interior, through its visible surface and stormy atmosphere, and out to distant regions where the wind from the Sun battles with a breeze of atoms coming from among the stars. The award recognises both the outstanding achievements in designing, building and operating the mission, as well as the science it has performed. It is a tribute to a team that has contributed to one of the most successful space missions in history. The International Academy of Astronautics presents this award in recognition of extraordinary performance and achievement by teams of scientists, engineers and managers in the field of astronautics. This honour has been awarded only twice before - to the Russian Mir Space Station Team and the US Space Shuttle Team. Now the SOHO team joins this select group. The citation of the award for the SOHO team reads: "To the team of scientists, engineers and managers for the development and operation of a world-class mission leading to substantial advancements in understanding the Sun and the solar-terrestrial relationship." SOHO has an impressive and unique list of achievements. For instance, it produced the first ever images of the turbulent outer shell of the Sun and of the structure below sunspots. It gave the most precise measurements of the solar temperature structure, the interior rotation and the gas flows inside the Sun. It measured the acceleration of the fast and slow solar winds and discovered new solar phenomena, such as solar tornadoes. It revolutionised our ability to forecast space weather, and helped our understanding of the impact of solar variability on Earth's climate. During eight years of operation, the team has had to face several heart-stopping moments, but with extraordinary team spirit, skill and competence, they turned these

  4. In Brief: Awards for best geoscience publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Four Earth science publications were honored by the Geoscience Information Society (GSIS) at its meeting held in conjunction with the 2007 meeting of the Geological Society of America. The four-volume Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, published by Elsevier in 2007, received the Mary B. Ansari Best Reference Work Award as an outstanding reference work in the field of geoscience information published during the previous 3 years. Lura E. Joseph, associate professor of administration and geology librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, received the GSIS Best Paper Award for her article, ``Image and figure quality: A study of Elsevier's Earth and Planetary Sciences electronic journal back file package,'' published in the September-December 2006 issue of Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services. The Best Guidebook Award recognized two books: Geology of the Chama Basin, published by the New Mexico Geological Society in 2005, and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Centennial Field Guides, published by the Geological Society of America in 2006. For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.geoinfo.org.

  5. TERRITORIAL DISPARITIES REGARDING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HEALTH SERVICE PROVIDERS IN ROMANIA AFTER JOINING THE EUROPEAN UNION STUDY CASE: MEDICAL STAFF WITH TERTIARY LEVEL OF EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babucea Ana-Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In Romania 90ˈs, there was a relatively low level of regional disparities compared with western economies in all fields, but inequalities have emerged and widened rapidly because only certain areas, especially urban areas have benefited from inflows of capital and specialized human resources. Currently, Romania has a low level of development between EU countries, five of the eight NUTS 2 regions being the most underdeveloped in Europe. The aim of this research is a comparative analysis of developments and trends manifested in the public health system in terms of distribution of health services providers at the regional level in Romania. For the analysis of regional disparities, the research seeks to highlight a comprehensive image of the level and dynamics of the Romania territorial inequalities regarding the personnel with tertiary education, which includes physicians, dentists, and pharmaceutical chemists, as professional providers of the health services. Were took into account statistical indicators that describe the distribution of such as healthcare providers, at level of the eight Romanian NUTS2 regions, highlighting inequalities in access to health services for the population. We used available data, accessed from National Institute of Statistics of Romania, regarding Romania, and itˊs eight regions. We appeal also to statistical publications at the national and European level, other data analysis, and experts' opinions expressed in recent articles in the field. In order to identify the factors that can reduce the disparities, and ensure the equity for disadvantaged population, in terms of ensuring the health system of medical services in parallel with a homogeneous distribution of resources and services in this area, we apply specific statistics for territorial analysis and comparisons.

  6. A service model for delivering care closer to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Joanna; Taylor, Charlotte Elizabeth; Bunyan, Paul; White, Philippa Mary; Thomas, Siân Myra; Upton, Dominic

    2011-04-01

    Upton Surgery (Worcestershire) has developed a flexible and responsive service model that facilitates multi-agency support for adult patients with complex care needs experiencing an acute health crisis. The purpose of this service is to provide appropriate interventions that avoid unnecessary hospital admissions or, alternatively, provide support to facilitate early discharge from secondary care. Key aspects of this service are the collaborative and proactive identification of patients at risk, rapid creation and deployment of a reactive multi-agency team and follow-up of patients with an appropriate long-term care plan. A small team of dedicated staff (the Complex Care Team) are pivotal to coordinating and delivering this service. Key skills are sophisticated leadership and project management skills, and these have been used sensitively to challenge some traditional roles and boundaries in the interests of providing effective, holistic care for the patient.This is a practical example of early implementation of the principles underlying the Department of Health's (DH) recent Best Practice Guidance, 'Delivering Care Closer to Home' (DH, July 2008) and may provide useful learning points for other general practice surgeries considering implementing similar models. This integrated case management approach has had enthusiastic endorsement from patients and carers. In addition to the enhanced quality of care and experience for the patient, this approach has delivered value for money. Secondary care costs have been reduced by preventing admissions and also by reducing excess bed-days. The savings achieved have justified the ongoing commitment to the service and the staff employed in the Complex Care Team. The success of this service model has been endorsed recently by the 'Customer Care' award by 'Management in Practice'. The Surgery was also awarded the 'Practice of the Year' award for this and a number of other customer-focussed projects.

  7. 48 CFR 3009.171-7 - Contract award approval procedures for contractors with felony convictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... felony no longer calls into question the individual or business concern's integrity or business ethics... individual or business concern's integrity or business ethics and that an award would be consistent with the... request to permit award of a contract for FPS guard services to a business concern owned, controlled, or...

  8. 78 FR 49756 - Notification of a Cooperative Agreement Award to the World Health Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ...: Notification of a sole source Cooperative Agreement Award to the World Health Organization for a grant titled... World Health Organization (WHO) as soon as possible, and any confirmed smallpox case would generate an... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Notification of a Cooperative Agreement Award to the World...

  9. 75 FR 48691 - Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for the World Health Organization (WHO) To Continue...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Agreement Award for the World Health Organization (WHO) To Continue Development of Sustainable Influenza... countries worldwide via a cooperative agreement with the World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO has proven... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for the World...

  10. 42 CFR 51d.9 - What other conditions apply to these awards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES § 51d.9 What other conditions apply to these awards? Award funding made under this authority is to be supplemental in nature. Consistent with the... health and/or substance abuse service needs of the impacted community. ...

  11. 76 FR 51381 - Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter Care Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement Supplemental Awards to Seven Unaccompanied Alien Shelter... Resettlement announces the award of single-source expansion supplement grants to seven Unaccompanied Alien... supplement grants to seven unaccompanied alien shelter care providers for a total of $5,016,218. The...

  12. APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology: Luz Maria Garcini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. The 2016 award winners is Luz Maria Garcini, whose commitment to the health and mental health of those recently immigrated has led to research and service that "have greatly benefited the lives of undocumented individuals in the border area of southern California." Garcini's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Building Our Futures, Sustaining Communities: Civic Partnerships, Participatory Democracy, and Academic Practice: A Conversation with the Recipients of the 2006 Ernest Lynton Faculty Award for Professional Service and Academic Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Glynda; Lupton, Julia Reinhard; O'Donnell, Katherine; Saltmarsh, John

    2007-01-01

    John Saltmarsh, Director of the New England Resource Center for Higher Education (NERCHE), interviewed the three 2006 recipients of NERCHE's Ernest A. Lynton Award for the Scholarship of Engagement about their lives as engaged scholars and the implications of their work for the civic and global contexts for education, and for institutional change.

  14. 32 CFR 22.610 - Award instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award instruments. 22.610 Section 22.610 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS DoD GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS-AWARD AND ADMINISTRATION Award § 22.610 Award instruments. (a) Each...

  15. Call for Applications IDRC Research Awards 2016

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2015-08-06

    Call for Applications. IDRC Research Awards 2016. Deadline: August 6, 2015. The award. IDRC offers these awards to graduate-level Canadians, permanent residents of Canada, and citizens of developing countries. Research award recipients will undertake a one-year paid program of research on the topic they have ...

  16. Runaway and Homeless Youth Grants: Improvements Needed in the Grant Award Process. Report to Congressional Committees. GAO-10-335

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kay E.

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awards grants to provide shelter and services to runaway and homeless youth through the Basic Center, Transitional Living and Street Outreach Programs. In response to a mandate for a review of the grant award process for these programs in the Reconnecting Homeless Youth Act of 2008 (Pub. L. No.…

  17. 2002 Institute of Physics awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The IOP Rutherford Medal and prize was awarded to P Dornan, W Venus and D Plane for their major contributions to the detectors and leadership of the LEP, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI experiments (4 paragraphs).

  18. Institute of Physics Awards 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The IOP Physics Awards for 2002 include: Prof. M Lockwood, Univ. Southhampton and Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Chree Medal and Prize; Dr. S Myers, CERN, Duddell Medal and Prize; Dr S Langridge, Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Vernon Boys Medal and Prize.

  19. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  1. Materials Best Paper Award 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Tabrizian

    2015-01-01

    Materials has established an annual award for the best article and for the best review published in Materials in order to acknowledge the outstanding contributions of our authors in the area of materials science and engineering.[...

  2. Plascore receives awards from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Plascore recently was awarded two honors from CERN, European High Energy Physics Lab, for its involvement in the manufacture of Thermoplastic Honeycomb panels for their large superconducting super collider (1/2 page).

  3. 2015 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  4. 2017 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  5. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  6. Outstanding student paper awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hydrology Section presented five outstanding student paper awards at the 1999 Spring Meeting in Boston, Massachusetts, last June.Maneesha Joshi presented a poster titled “Estimation of the Extent and Duration of Melt on the Greenland Ice Sheet using an Edge Detection Technique on Passive Microwave Data.” She received her B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay in 1991, and a M.S. in environmental engineering from State University of New York, Buffalo in 1994. Maneesha expects to complete her Ph.D. in civil engineering (remote sensing) in September 1999, under the supervision of Carolyn Merry (Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering & Geodetic Science), Ken Jezek, and John Bolzan (Byrd Polar Research Center) at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Her thesis focuses on estimating the extent of melt, melt season, and duration, and absorbed radiation on the Greenland ice sheet from passive microwave and SAR data. Maneesha's other interests include image processing, issues related to global climate change, and photogrammetry.

  7. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  8. 7 CFR 3400.20 - Grantee review prior to award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... scientific peer review conducted in accordance with § 3400.21. For education and extension projects, such... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grantee review prior to award. 3400.20 Section 3400..., EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL RESEARCH GRANTS PROGRAM Peer and Merit...

  9. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2011: Technology All-Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    Out of a total of 393 entries for the 2011 Campus Technology Innovators award, 10 winners rose to the top in six categories: (1) Leadership, Governance, and Policy; (2) Teaching and Learning; (3) Student Systems and Services; (4) Administrative Systems; (5) IT Infrastructure and Systems; and (6) Education Futurists. These innovative IT leaders…

  10. 28 CFR 94.24 - Determination of award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....24 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Coverage § 94.24 Determination of award. After review of each application, the Director shall determine the eligibility of the victim or representative and the amount, if...

  11. 31 CFR 250.4 - Payment on awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment on awards. 250.4 Section 250.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE... relationship to the incompetent; (2) The name and address of the person having care and custody of the...

  12. 45 CFR 402.30 - Basis of awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis of awards. 402.30 Section 402.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES STATE LEGALIZATION IMPACT ASSISTANCE GRANTS...

  13. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  14. Long-Term Effectiveness of Two Educational Methods on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice Toward Palliative Care Consultation Services Among Nursing Staff: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hsueh-Hsing; Wu, Li-Fen; Hung, Yu-Chun; Chu, Chi-Ming; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2018-05-01

    This experimental study investigated long-term effectiveness of two educational methods on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) about palliative care consultation services (PCCS) among nurses, recruited from a medical center located in Northern Taiwan in 2015, using a stratified cluster sampling method, with 88 participants in multimedia (experimental) and 92 in traditional paper education (control) group. Data were collected using KAP-PCCS questionnaire before education, immediately after, and 3rd and 6th month after education. Results showed that both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI significantly increased immediately after, and at the 3rd month after education for the experimental group; the K-PCCSI remained significantly higher for the experimental group at the 6th month. The highest increase in scores for both K-PCCSI and P-PCCSI was observed at the 3rd month. There was no significant change in A-PCCS in both groups after follow-up periods, when compared before education. Therefore, using multimedia every 3 months to continue strengthening their knowledge may increase the referrals of terminal patients to PCCS.

  15. The Validity and Reliability Characteristics of the M-BACK Questionnaire to Assess the Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge of Mental Health Staff Regarding Metabolic Health of Mental Health Service Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Watkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAddressing the burden of poor physical health and the subsequent gap in life expectancy experienced by people with mental illness is a major priority in mental health services. To equip mental health staff with the competence to deliver evidence-based interventions, targeted staff training regarding metabolic health is required. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of staff training regarding metabolic health, we aimed to develop a succinct measure to determine the barriers, attitudes, confidence, and knowledge of health practitioners through the development and test–retest reliability of the Metabolic-Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge Questionnaire (M-BACK.MethodsThe M-BACK questionnaire was developed to evaluate the impact of specialized training in metabolic health care for mental health nurses. Content of the M-BACK was developed from a literature review and refined by an expert review panel and validated via a piloting process. To determine the test–retest reliability of the M-BACK, 31 nursing students recruited from the University of Notre Dame, Sydney completed the questionnaire on two separate occasions, 7 days apart. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs were calculated for the total score, as well as each of the four domains.ResultsPilot testing was undertaken with a sample of 106 mental health nurses with a mean age 48.2, ranging from 24 to 63 years of age, who participated in six training courses. Questionnaire development resulted in a 16-item instrument, with each item is scored on a five-point Likert scale ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” Test–retest reliability of the M-BACK was completed by 30 of 31 nursing students recruited, ICCs ranged from 0.62 to 0.96.ConclusionThe M-BACK is a reliable measure of the key elements of practitioner perceptions of barriers, and their knowledge, attitudes, and confidence regarding metabolic monitoring in people with mental

  16. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  17. Job satisfaction and turnover intentions among health care staff providing services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naburi, Helga; Mujinja, Phares; Kilewo, Charles; Orsini, Nicola; Bärnighausen, Till; Manji, Karim; Biberfeld, Gunnel; Sando, David; Geldsetzer, Pascal; Chalamila, Guerino; Ekström, Anna Mia

    2017-09-06

    Option B+ for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV (i.e., lifelong antiretroviral treatment for all pregnant and breastfeeding mothers living with HIV) was initiated in Tanzania in 2013. While there is evidence that this policy has benefits for the health of the mother and the child, Option B+ may also increase the workload for health care providers in resource-constrained settings, possibly leading to job dissatisfaction and unwanted workforce turnover. From March to April 2014, a questionnaire asking about job satisfaction and turnover intentions was administered to all nurses at 36 public-sector health facilities offering antenatal and PMTCT services in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with job dissatisfaction and intention to quit one's job. Slightly over half (54%, 114/213) of the providers were dissatisfied with their current job, and 35% (74/213) intended to leave their job. Most of the providers were dissatisfied with low salaries and high workload, but satisfied with workplace harmony and being able to follow their moral values. The odds of reporting to be globally dissatisfied with one's job were high if the provider was dissatisfied with salary (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.6, 95% CI 1.2-26.8), availability of protective gear (aOR 4.0, 95% CI 1.5-10.6), job description (aOR 4.3, 95% CI 1.2-14.7), and working hours (aOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-7.6). Perceiving clients to prefer PMTCT Option B+ reduced job dissatisfaction (aOR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1-0.8). The following factors were associated with providers' intention to leave their current job: job stability dissatisfaction (aOR 3.7, 95% CI 1.3-10.5), not being recognized by one's superior (aOR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6), and poor feedback on the overall unit performance (aOR 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.8). Job dissatisfaction and turnover intentions are comparatively high among nurses in Dar es Salaam's public-sector maternal care

  18. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  19. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  20. Does gender bias influence awards given by societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; Asher, Pranoti; Farrington, John; Fine, Rana; Leinen, Margaret S.; LeBoy, Phoebe

    2011-11-01

    AGU is a participant in a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project called Advancing Ways of Awarding Recognition in Disciplinary Societies (AWARDS), which seeks to examine whether gender bias affects selection of recipients of society awards. AGU is interested in learning why there is a higher proportion of female recipients of service and education awards over the past 2 decades. Combined with a lower rate of receipt of research awards, these results suggest that implicit (subconscious) bias in favor of male candidates still influences awardee selection. Six other professional societies (American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, American Society of Anesthesiologists, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Neuroscience, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) are participating in the project. Volunteers from each participant society attended an Association for Women in Science (AWIS)-sponsored workshop in May 2010 to examine data and review literature on best practices for fair selection of society awardees. A draft proposal for implementing these practices will be brought before the AGU Council and the Honors and Recognition Committee at their upcoming meetings.

  1. 42 CFR 62.14 - What are the special provisions relating to recipients of awards under the PH/NHSC scholarship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... recipients of awards under the PH/NHSC scholarship training program who will also receive awards under the scholarship program? 62.14 Section 62.14 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE CORPS SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN REPAYMENT...

  2. School Climate Improvement Action Guide for Noninstructional Staff. School Climate Improvement Resource Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Safe Supportive Learning Environments, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Improving school climate takes time and commitment from a variety of people in a variety of roles. This document outlines key action steps that noninstructional staff--including guidance counselors, social workers, school psychologists, office staff, bus drivers, maintenance and facility staff, and food service staff--can take to support school…

  3. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  4. Horton Grantee gets AAG Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey McDonnell, an assistant professor of forest hydrology at Utah State University, Logan, received the J. Warren Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers for his doctoral dissertation, “The Age, Origin and Pathway of Subsurface Stormflow in a Steep Humid Headwater Catchment.” In 1987, McDonnell was awarded AGU's Horton Research Grant for his thesis proposal.McDonnell received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His dissertation was supervised by I. F. Owens, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury and A. J. Pearce, New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

  5. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

  6. Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2011-09-12

    Research Award: Innovation for Inclusive Development program. Deadline: September 12, 2011. Note that all applications must be sent electronically. IDRC offers Research Awards annually to Canadians, permanent residents of. Canada, and citizens of developing countries pursuing master's or doctoral studies.

  7. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  8. Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award, 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Gordon F. Kirkbright bursary award is a prestigious annual award that enables a promising student/non-tenured young scientist of any nation to attend a recognised scientific meeting or visit a place of learning.

  9. Education in geriatric medicine for community hospital staff.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hanlon, Shane

    2010-12-01

    Community hospitals provide many services for older people. They are mainly managed by nursing staff, with some specialist input. Little is known about education provided in these facilities. Most education in geriatric medicine is provided in hospitals, despite most elderly care being provided in the community. The authors surveyed senior nursing staff in Irish community hospitals to examine this area in more detail. Staff in all 18hospitals in the Health Service Executive (South) area were invited to participate. The response rate was 100%. Sixteen of the 18 respondents (89%) felt staff did not have enough education in geriatric medicine. Just over half of hospitals had regular staff education sessions in the area, with a minority of sessions led by a geriatrician, and none by GPs. Geriatrician visits were valued, but were requested only every 1-3 months. Staff identified challenging behaviour and dementia care as the areas that posed most difficulty.

  10. 75 FR 30842 - Statutorily Mandated Single Source Award Program Name: National Indian Health Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... consistently provided education and outreach to Tribal leadership regarding the potential impact of Health Care... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Statutorily Mandated Single Source Award Program Name: National Indian Health Board AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. Radiation dose received by TAMVEC neutron therapy staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smathers, J.B.; Graves, R.G.; Sandel, P.S.; Almond, P.R.; Otte, V.A.; Grant, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Based on over 5 years of experience in fast neutron radiotherapy, the activation radiation source origins and magnitudes are discussed and the staff radiation exposures reviewed. Source magnitudes were determined using ionization chamber survey instruments and staff doses by commercial TLD and film badge service reports. It is concluded that while staff doses exceed those obtained in conventional therapy, the levels received are well within published guidelines for occupational exposure. (author)

  12. Homeland Security Master's Degrees Awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Twenty-nine professionals who work in the homeland security field were awarded master’s degrees March 25 at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. The...

  13. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or ... governance, education, entrepreneurship, as well as collaborative models for participation and organization. ... What role do collaborative technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovation and change?

  14. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp 5-5. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/08/0005-0005. Author Affiliations.

  15. Two awards for Herwig Schopper

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper has received two prestigious awards, from UNESCO and from the American Institute of Physics. Herwig Schopper receives the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal from Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. Without any great fanfare, Herwig Schopper has just received two major awards. UNESCO awarded him the Albert Einstein Gold Medal in Paris on 15 April, while on 2 May in Denver the American Institute of Physics (AIP) presented him with the Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics (together with a USD 10 000 prize). Both awards were in recognition of Herwig Schopper's pivotal role in the construction of international scientific cooperation. Today President of the SESAME Council - the International Centre for Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (see Bulletin No. 26/2003) - Herwig Schopper was Director-General of CERN from 1981 to 1988. President of the European Physical Society from 1994 to 1996, he wa...

  16. Materials Best Paper Award 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ophelia Han; Maryam Tabrizian

    2013-01-01

    Materials is instituting an annual award to recognize the outstanding papers in the area of materials science and engineering published in Materials. We are pleased to announce the first “Materials Best Paper Award” for 2013. Nominations were selected by the Section Editor-in-Chiefs and Editorial Board members of Materials from all papers published in 2009.

  17. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  18. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  19. Impact on Learning Award, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Planning and Management, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents the 1998 winners of Impact on Learning Awards, recognition given to K-12 public schools that have solved real-world problems with design, engineering, and technology solutions. Categories represented include auditoriums, cafeterias, classrooms, commons areas, early-childhood learning centers, libraries, lobbies, and science and computer…

  20. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Development announces the award of a cooperative agreement with the Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) in Washington, DC, to work with ACF programs on hunger and obesity issues for young children. An award in the... Children and Families (ACF) announces the award of a cooperative agreement to the Congressional Hunger...

  1. 46 CFR 502.409 - Arbitration awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration awards. 502.409 Section 502.409 Shipping... Alternative Dispute Resolution § 502.409 Arbitration awards. (a)(1) The award in an arbitration proceeding... arbitration proceeding may not serve as an estoppel in any other proceeding for any issue that was resolved in...

  2. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. 76 FR 78300 - Announcement of Funding Awards for Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for HUD's Fiscal Year...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... MODIFICATION AND MORTGAGE SCAMS ASSISTANCE Amount Awarded: $23,075.36 HOME REPAIR SERVICES OF KENT COUNTY 1100... ASSISTANCE Amount Awarded: $16,863.54 PUTNAM COUNTY HOUSING CORPORATION 11 Seminary Hill Road Carmel, NY... RIVERS, INC 12025 Courthouse Cir. New Kent, VA 23124-2242 Grant Type: MORTGAGE MODIFICATION AND MORTGAGE...

  4. 78 FR 49757 - Notification of an Expansion to the Cooperative Agreement Award to the World Health Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ... Award to the World Health Organization AGENCY: Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority... requires notification to World Health Organization (WHO) as soon as possible, and any confirmed smallpox... Services (HHS). ACTION: Notification of an expansion to the Cooperative Agreement Award to the World Health...

  5. 78 FR 51736 - Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Targeted Assistance Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement [C.F.D.A. Number: 93.584] Notice of FY 2013 Refugee Targeted Assistance Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of awards. SUMMARY: The...

  6. 77 FR 53893 - Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Targeted Assistance Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement [C.F.D.A. Number 93.584] Notice of FY 2012 Refugee Targeted Assistance Formula Awards to States and Wilson/Fish Alternative Project Grantees AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notice of awards. SUMMARY: The...

  7. 20 CFR 670.320 - What are the requirements for award of contracts and payments to Federal agencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for award of contracts and payments to Federal agencies? 670.320 Section 670.320 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND... Funding and Selection of Service Providers § 670.320 What are the requirements for award of contracts and...

  8. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  9. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  10. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  11. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Faculty/Staff

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- faculty/staff dataset contains individual level information from a sample of faculty and staff on GLS funded campuses. These data include faculty...

  12. A Survey of Violence Against Staff Working in the Emergency Department in Ankara, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas, RN, PhD

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted.

  13. Practical Staff Management Techniques for Distance Education Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Toccara D.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the author's enrollment in the SuccessfUL Supervisor Series course. As a new distance education library coordinator the author sought out formal supervisor training to address staff misconduct and establish staff training initiatives for distance library service needs. Structured as a case study, the author discusses how…

  14. School Climate for Gay and Lesbian Students and Staff Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1994-01-01

    In high schools, a conspiracy of silence shrouds the sexual orientation issue. Although the social atmosphere is vaguely supportive, fear and the realities of life cause most gays and lesbians to keep their sexual identities hidden. Homophobia can be addressed through staff development, support staff and services, inclusion of homosexual issues in…

  15. Staff Development Strategies for School Library and Media Centres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Selfdesigned questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  16. Staff development strategies for school library media centres: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Self-designed questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  17. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  18. Lonnie R. Snowden Jr.: Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy is given to a psychologist who has made a distinguished empirical and/or theoretical contribution to research in public policy, either through a single extraordinary achievement or a lifetime of work. The 2014 recipient of this award is Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. "Over the past several decades, Lonnie R. Snowden Jr. has systematically built a research agenda on the financing and organization of mental health services that has driven much of our current health policy reform efforts." Snowden Jr.'s award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Rebeccah A. Bernard: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. This year there are joint recipients of the award, Allie Abrahamson and Rebeccah A. Bernard. Their vision, creativity, courage, and dedication led them to create the Human Rights Forum at Chestnut Hill College to promote human rights education, awareness, and community service opportunities for doctoral students. Rebeccah A. Bernard's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Allie Abrahamson: APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The APA/APAGS Award for Distinguished Graduate Student in Professional Psychology is awarded on an annual basis by the APA Board of Professional Affairs (BPA) and the American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (APAGS) to a graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding practice and application of psychology. A qualified candidate must demonstrate exemplary performance in working with an underserved population in an applied setting or have developed an innovative method for delivering health services to an underserved population. This year there are joint recipients of the award, Allie Abrahamson and Rebeccah A. Bernard. Their vision, creativity, courage, and dedication led them to create the Human Rights Forum at Chestnut Hill College to promote human rights education, awareness, and community service opportunities for doctoral students. Allie Abrahamson's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Proposal for the award of an industrial services contract for the operation and maintenance of the CERN electrical network and the inspection and supervision of the electrical installation work

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract, without competitive tendering, for the supply of two cabling machines for the production of superconducting cable for the LHC main magnets. These cables are of two different types, hereafter referred as Cable 1 and Cable 2. For the reasons set out in this document, the Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with SETIC (FR) for the supply of two cabling machines, for a total amount not exceeding 3 200 000 euros (4 948 800 Swiss francs), not subject to revision. The rate of exchange which has been used is that stipulated in the tender. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: FR - 100%.

  2. Medal of Honor Award Process Review: U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer Nominee (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    regarding the FOB firefight, because the award nomination packet submitted on his behalfsufficed for the SS or Distinguished Service Cross, but needed ...administratively eligible to receive the recommended award in accordance with AR 600-8-22 and that all administrative information is conect ...leader who did a phenomenal job, that there was something more that [the nominee] needed to have done in order to, in my mind, to make a recommendation

  3. NCI at Frederick Team Receives 2014 HHS Green Champions Award | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A team of NCI and Leidos Biomedical Research employees at NCI at Frederick received the Energy and Fleet Management Award, one of the 2014 Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Green Champions Awards, for comparing the costs and energy usage of two -80°C freezer technologies. This was the first scientific study to be jointly conducted by Leidos Biomedical Research’s Applied and Developmental Research Directorate (ADRD) and Facilities Maintenance and Engineering Directorate (FME).  

  4. New awards for CERN science

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this week, the European Physical Society (EPS) announced its High Energy and Particle Physics prizes for 2013, and I’m pleased to say that the LHC featured highly. With all that has been happening in the last few years, that’s perhaps not too surprising, but these awards nevertheless constitute a great honour for our community.   The High Energy and Particle Physics Prize went to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations “for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism”, and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni and Tejinder Virdee “for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments”. Among the other awards, the Young Experimental Physicist Prize went to Diego Martinez Santos “for his outstanding contributions to the trigger and commissioning of the LHCb experiment, and the analyses leading to first evidence for the rare decay B0s→ ...

  5. John Cherry wins Horton Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, Robert W.; Cherry, John

    The recipient of the 1985 Robert T. Horton Award is John Cherry. As John's colleague and friend for the past 12 years, it is a great privilege and honor for me to have been asked to prepare the citation for this award.John received his bachelor's degree in geological engineering from the University of Saskatchewan and his M.S., also in geological engineering, from the University of California at Berkeley. After earning his Ph.D. in geology at the University of Illinois, John spent 1 year in postdoctoral study at the University of Bordeaux, France, before returning to Canada in 1967 as an assistant professor of geology at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg. John joined the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Waterloo as an associate professor in 1971. At Waterloo he is currently a full professor and Director of the Institute for Groundwater Research.

  6. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  7. The Development of the George B. Pegram Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, Myron S.

    1997-11-01

    The George B. Pegram Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Physics was developed by a representative group of SESAPS members over a period of eight years with outstanding contributions as follows: Jesse Beams, APS President, with the advice of Mark Zemansky, AAPT, chose George B. Pegram as the honoree, in view of his excellent teaching career at Columbia University, his graduation from Trinity College--now Duke University, his long period of service as Treasurer of APS, and his active support of the special training program at ORAU; Earle Plyler with the assistance of Edward Burke, Jr., prepared the selection criteria for the recipients of the award; Walter Gordy coordinated the APS approval and initiated the financing of the program; Howard Carr raised the first funds and prepared the initial certificates; William G. Pollard joined the committee and completed the early funding, while preparing the formal certificate and medal; Dr. Vernet Eaton, AAPT President, stimulated the program when he urged the nomination of SESAPS members for the Oersted Award. After his lectures at the 1955 Gainesville meeting, Wendell Holladay instructed the committee to report its recommendations at the next SESAPS meeting. In 1969 SESAPS approved the George B. Pegram Award.

  8. 76 FR 40713 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Technology and Media Services for Individuals With Disabilities Program AGENCY: Department of Education. ACTION... awards for FY 2011 under the Technology and Media Services for Individuals with Disabilities Program...

  9. 1986 James B. Macelwane Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Peter J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    I can think of few things more pleasurable than introducing a young scientist whose research has enhanced his visibility to such an extent that his or her image is clearly distinguishable from among the large number of young scientists publishing excellent research these days.Normally, the recipient of a young scientist award is in a state approaching shock, with mixed feelings of pride and humility and appreciation for all those who guided him or her on the way. For Ed Stolper, however, the situation is different, and he is sitting here quite calmly. Although he is only 33 years old, his image shines brightly enough that it has received attention previously—He was awarded the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society in 1985, and he shared the Newcomb Cleveland Prize in 1985 with Sally Rigden and Tom Ahrens for the best 1984 paper in Science. Today it is the Macelwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and there are still several tomorrows before his age disqualifies him as a young scientist, making it necessary for him to start getting down to serious, mature research.

  10. 42 CFR 62.8 - What does an individual have to do in return for the scholarship program award?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the scholarship program award? 62.8 Section 62.8 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE CORPS SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program § 62.8 What does an...

  11. Training to raise staff awareness about safeguarding children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jane

    2015-04-01

    To improve outcomes for children and young people health organisations are required to train all staff in children's safeguarding. This creates difficulties for large complex organisations where most staff provide services to the adult population. Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust is a large acute and community trust that had difficulties in engaging staff in children's safeguarding training. Compliance rates for clinical staff who were trained in children's safeguarding were low and needed to be addressed. This article sets out why safeguarding training is important for all staff and how the trust achieved staff engagement and improved compliance rates. To evaluate, maintain and develop safeguarding knowledge, understanding, skills, attitude and behaviour further resources are planned to allow access to learning resources in a variety of formats.

  12. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  13. Female Physicians Are Underrepresented in Recognition Awards from the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Julie K; Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Blauwet, Cheri A; Zafonte, Ross D; Mazwi, Nicole L; Slocum, Chloe S; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Tenforde, Adam S

    2017-10-01

    Medical specialty societies are important resources for physicians in advancing their careers. There is a gap in the literature regarding gender disparities within these societies. This study assesses one area where disparities may exist: recognition awards. To determine whether female physicians are underrepresented among recognition award recipients by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (AAPM&R). Surveillance study. A published online list of national award recipients from the AAPM&R was analyzed. Forty-eight years of data were included, as the list contained all major recognition award recipients from 1968 to 2015. All awards that were given exclusively to physicians were included. There were eight award categories listed online; seven met this criterion, with a total of 264 individual awards presented. One award category was excluded because it focused on distinguished public service and included both physician and nonphysician (eg, public official) recipients. Awards that were not published online were also excluded. Total awards given to female versus male physicians from 1968 to 2015, with awards given over the past decade (2006-2015) assessed independently. Lectureships were also analyzed as a set. For awards given to groups of physician recipients, analysis included gender composition of the group (eg, male only versus female only versus mixed-gender physician groups). To assess the proportion of female versus male physiatrists over time, physician gender and specialty data from 3 sources were used: the American Medical Association (AMA), the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and the AAPM&R. Over the past 48 years, the AAPM&R presented 264 recognition awards to physicians. Award recipients were overwhelmingly male (n = 222; 84.1%). Females received 15.9% (n = 42) of the total awards, although there was an upward trend in female physician recipients to 26.8% (n = 26) from 2006 to 2015. Lectureships were given to 8

  14. staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in south african public sector mental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    occupational therapists 0.01, occupational therapy assistants. 0.01, social workers 0.01, community health workers 0.00, psychologists 0.00, intern psychologists 0.00, psychiatrists. 0.00, psychiatric registrars O.Dl, and medical officers 0.00. The ratio of ambulatory psychiatric service staff to daily patient visits (DPV) for the ...

  15. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    on behalf of ESO: Drs Preben Grosbøl, Michele Péron, Peter Quinn (Head of the ESO Data Management Division) and David Silva. Traditionally, ground based astronomical observatories have been used as facilities where scientists apply for observing time, eventually travel to the remote sites where telescopes are located, carry out their observations by themselves and finally take their data back to their home institutes to do the final scientific analysis. As observatories become more complex and located in ever more remote locations (to reduce light pollution), this operational concept (coupled with the weather lottery effect [1]) becomes less and less effective. In particular, the lack of data re-use has been increasingly seen as scientifically unproductive. Such thoughts guided the design and implementation of the ESO Data Flow System (DFS). The DFS allows both traditional on-site observing as well as service observing, where data is collected by observatory staff on behalf of the ESO user community based on user submitted descriptions and requirements [2]. In either case, the data is captured by DFS and saved in the ESO science archive [3]. After a one-year proprietary period during which the original investigators have private access to their data, researchers can access the data for their own use. ESO was the first ground-based observatory to implement these operational concepts and tools within a complete system. It was also the first ground-based observatory to build and maintain such an extensive science archive that does not only contain observational data, but also auxiliary information describing the operation process. In both areas, ESO remains the world-leader in end-to-end observatory operations on the ground. "The result of our strategy has been a significant increase in the scientific productivity of the ESO user community", said Peter Quinn, Head of ESO's Data Management and Operations Division, responsible for DFS. "As measured by the number of

  16. 77 FR 57567 - Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for World Health Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... notification to World Health Organization (WHO) as soon as possible, and any confirmed smallpox case would... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Single Source Cooperative Agreement Award for World Health Organization AGENCY: Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and...

  17. 10 years of Elsevier/JQSRT awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, José; Bernath, Peter F.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2017-10-01

    The Elsevier award program administered by the Editorial Board of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) was conceived in June of 2006 at the 9th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially the program included three annual Elsevier/JQSRT awards for exceptional early-career scientists working in the main research fields covered by JQSRT: quantitative spectroscopy, radiative transfer, and electromagnetic scattering. In June of 2010 at the 12th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in Helsinki, Finland, it was decided to expand the award program to include three biennial Elsevier awards intended to celebrate fundamental life-time achievements of internationally recognized leaders in the same research fields. Finally, in 2013 the Elsevier award program was augmented to include a fourth annual early-career award in the category of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing.

  18. $200,000 Grants Awarded to CCR Researchers for HIV/AIDS Studies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer Earlier this year, the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) awarded two, two-year grants of $200,000 each to Anu Puri, Ph.D., and Robert Blumenthal, Ph.D., both of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Nanobiology Program, and to Eric Freed, Ph.D., of the HIV Drug Resistance Program, for their research on potential new treatments for HIV.

  19. Consolidating staff augmentation contracts improves teamwork and reduces costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, J.; Sibilla, L.; Gregovich, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power plants have traditionally used multiple contracting firms to provide temporary staff augmentation personnel primarily because of two perceptions: (1) managers believe they have greater access to a higher quality, readily available pool of applicants. (2) using multiple contractors inherently keeps costs down as a result of several competitors submitting resumes for the same position. This paper provides information, based on the experiences of a leading nuclear power plant, that disproves these perceptions. It explains why consolidating several contracts for professional and technical classifications (excluding craft labor and refueling personnel) and competitively bidding and awarding the contract to a single contracting firm promotes teamwork and reduces costs

  20. Staff Acquisition -- Agencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Job vacancy and organizational information from customer agencies sufficient to provide requested services: examining, strategic staffing, recruitment and branding,...

  1. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  2. Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award), which publicly recognizes organizations that achieve publicly-set aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

  3. Notification: Evaluation of EPA's Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and Use of Data from the Award Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY18-0003, January 9, 2018. The OIG plans to begin preliminary research to evaluate the agency's Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and how the agency uses the data from the award nominations.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  5. Daily Public Assistance Grants Award Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Daily activity of Public Assistance Grant Awards, including FEMA Region, State, Disaster Declaration Number, Event description, Mission Assigned agency, Assistance...

  6. Parimad suhtekorraldusteod konkursil Baltic PR Awards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2012-01-01

    Balti riikide suhtekorraldusliidud koostöös Rahvusvahelise Avalike Suhete Assotsiatsiooniga (IPRA) korraldavad 2001. aastast iga aasta kommunikatsioonijuhtimisalast auhinnakonkurssi Baltic PR Awards

  7. Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations for their comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories and aggressive emissions reduction goals.

  8. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  9. Gedeon Dagan wins Horton Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Shlomo; Dagan, Gedeon

    One of the most challenging problems of groundwater hydrology is the effect that spatial variations in the properties of geologic materials have on fluid flow and solute transport through the subsurface. In recent years, there has been a general recognition among hydrologists that such spatial variations are best described by treating the hydrologic properties of these materials as random processes. The effect of spatial variability on the movement of fluids and solutes through the subsurface is then governed by stochastic differential equations. Much of what we currently know about the stochastic nature of this movement is due to the pioneering work of Gedeon Dagan, this year's recipient of the Robert E. Horton Award.

  10. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  11. Why some awards are more effective signals of quality than others : A study of movie awards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemser, G.; Leenders, M.A.A.M.; Wijnberg, N.M.

    In this article, the authors develop and empirically test a conceptual framework that predicts which types of awards have the biggest impact on the competitive performance of the award winners. The empirical setting is an industry where awards proliferate, namely, the U. S. motion picture industry.

  12. The STTI Practice-Academe Innovative Collaboration Award: honoring innovation, partnership, and excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschling, Jane Marie; Erickson, Jeanette Ives

    2010-09-01

    To describe the benefits and barriers associated with practice-academe partnerships and introduce Sigma Theta Tau International's (STTI's) Practice-Academe Innovative Collaboration Award and the 2009 award recipients. In 2008, STTI created the CNO-Dean Advisory Council and charged it with reviewing the state of practice-academe collaborations and developing strategies for optimizing how chief nursing officers (CNOs) and deans work together to advance the profession and discipline of nursing. The Council, in turn, developed the Practice-Academe Innovative Collaboration Award to encourage collaboration across sectors, recognize innovative collaborative efforts, and spotlight best practices. A call for award submissions resulted in 24 applications from around the globe. An award winner and seven initiatives receiving honorable mentions were selected. The winning initiatives reflect innovative academe-service partnerships that advance evidence-based practice, nursing education, nursing research, and patient care. The proposals were distinguished by their collaborators' shared vision and unity of purpose, ability to leverage strengths and resources, and willingness to recognize opportunities and take risks. By partnering with one another, nurses in academe and in service settings can directly impact nursing education and practice, often effecting changes and achieving outcomes that are more extensive and powerful than could be achieved by working alone. The award-winning initiatives represent best practices for bridging the practice-academe divide and can serve as guides for nurse leaders in both settings.

  13. The Hammer Award is presented to KSC and 45th Space Wing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    KSC's Director of Public Affairs Joe Gordon (left) applauds as Ed Gormel and Chris Fairey are named recipients of the Hammer Award at a special presentation in the IMAX 2 Theater in the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Presenting the award is Morley Winograd (at the podium), director of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. The Hammer Award is Vice President Al Gore's special recognition of teams of federal employees who have made significant contributions in support of the principles of the National Partnership for Reinventing Government. This Hammer Award acknowledges the accomplishments of a joint NASA and Air Force team that established the Joint Base Operations and Support Contract (J-BOSC) Source Evaluation Board (SEB). Gormel and Fairey are co-chairs of the SEB. The team developed and implemented the acquisition strategy for establishing a single set of base operations and support service requirements for KSC, Cape Canaveral Air Station and Patrick Air Force Base.

  14. Mapping Staff Competencies for Information Literacy Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Corrall

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Information literacy (IL is a key strategic objective for academic libraries. Many academic librarians are involved in designing, developing and delivering IL programmes, using both classroom teaching and e-learning methods. IL has also become a priority at institutional level and some universities and colleges have formal policies and strategies to integrate and embed IL in the curriculum. IL interventions also happen informally at enquiry points and reference desks, when queries offer ‘teachable moments’ for library staff to help students develop information skills and understanding while solving their information problems. Research shows that such instruction features strongly in both face-to-face and virtual reference transactions, but few IL policies and strategies cover this frontline personalised IL support. Similarly, most discussion of staff training and development for IL education has centred on the teaching roles and pedagogical knowledge of professional librarians, with limited discussion of the competencies needed for frontline interventions by paraprofessionals or assistants. This workshop promotes an inclusive holistic model of IL education and library workforce development. It will investigate the skills and knowledge needed by frontline staff to contribute effectively to the IL mission of academic libraries. It will focus on the learning support needed by students from different educational, social, ethnic and cultural backgrounds, with particular reference to postgraduate students, as a group typifying this diversity. The facilitator will review IL interventions and library staff competencies discussed in the literature. Participants will discuss typical queries or problems presented by different categories of postgraduate students and then identify the skills, knowledge and understanding required by frontline staff to provide an appropriate service response. The skillsets identified will be compared with those of teaching

  15. Staff/population ratios in South African public sector mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To document existing staff/population ratios per 100 000 population in South African public sector mental health services. Design. Cross-sectional survey. ... The staff/population ratios per 100 000 population for selected personnel categories (with the interprovincial ranges in brackets) were as follows: total nursing staff 15.6 ...

  16. A crèche for CERN staff The Staff Association project

    CERN Document Server

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the Staff Association has supported the demand for the creation of a crèche for the children of CERN staff. Several studies have been carried out without leading to a concrete plan. The fact that the CERN population is getting younger and the shortage of local facilities have led to a more urgent demand for this type of social service over the past few years. Furthermore, the Equal Opportunities Panel had already recommended that crèche places be made available.

  17. The Customer Service Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Chip R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ways to embed customer service learning and customer loyalty including making customers think, examining every aspect of customers' service encounters with staff, providing follow-up, making learning fun, and involving customers in your business. (JOW)

  18. Staff Training in Autism: The One-Eyed Wo/Man….

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenburger, Karola; McKerr, Lyn; Jordan, Julie-Ann; Keenan, Mickey

    2016-07-16

    Having well-trained staff is key to ensuring good quality autism services, especially since people affected with autism generally tend to have higher support needs than other populations in terms of daily living, as well as their mental and physical health. Poorly-trained staff can have detrimental effects on service provision and staff morale and can lead to staff burn-out, as well as increased service user anxiety and stress. This paper reports on a survey with health, social care, and education staff who work within the statutory autism services sector in the UK that explored their knowledge and training with regards to autism. Interview data obtained from staff and service users offer qualitative illustrations of survey findings. Overall, the findings expose an acute lack of autism-specific training that has detrimental impacts. At best, this training was based on brief and very basic awareness raising rather than on in-depth understanding of issues related to autism or skills for evidence-based practice. Service users were concerned with the effects that the lack of staff training had on the services they received. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy routes to achieving quality staff training based on international best practice. The focus is on improving the quality of life and mental health for services users and staff, as well as making potentially significant cost-savings for governments.

  19. Staff Training in Autism: The One-Eyed Wo/Man…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karola Dillenburger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Having well-trained staff is key to ensuring good quality autism services, especially since people affected with autism generally tend to have higher support needs than other populations in terms of daily living, as well as their mental and physical health. Poorly-trained staff can have detrimental effects on service provision and staff morale and can lead to staff burn-out, as well as increased service user anxiety and stress. This paper reports on a survey with health, social care, and education staff who work within the statutory autism services sector in the UK that explored their knowledge and training with regards to autism. Interview data obtained from staff and service users offer qualitative illustrations of survey findings. Overall, the findings expose an acute lack of autism-specific training that has detrimental impacts. At best, this training was based on brief and very basic awareness raising rather than on in-depth understanding of issues related to autism or skills for evidence-based practice. Service users were concerned with the effects that the lack of staff training had on the services they received. The paper concludes with a discussion of policy routes to achieving quality staff training based on international best practice. The focus is on improving the quality of life and mental health for services users and staff, as well as making potentially significant cost-savings for governments.

  20. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  1. MilitaryPayDecnService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Supports operations to access/update data related to (Compensation and Pension) Awards. This service will also support business processes such as reading military...

  2. NOTE receives the prestigious ALICE Industrial Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "NOTE Lund has been given the ALICE Industrial Award due to good co-operation, great capacity for innovation and high quality of work, as a PCB manufacturer in the CERN project ALICE. Only a small number of awards have so far been conferred to a select number of companies."

  3. 46 CFR Sec. 6 - Awarding of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Awarding of work. Sec. 6 Section 6 Shipping MARITIME... of work. (a) Those portions of all bids reflecting the total aggregate cost of the work involved shall be opened publicly. The work shall be awarded to the contractor submitting the lowest qualified...

  4. 1966 Architectural Awards. Buildings With Fallout Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Civil Defense (DOD), Washington, DC.

    Award winning designs are presented demonstrating that economical dual-use shelter space can be incorporated in the designs of new buildings without sacrifice of either function or aesthetic values. The eight award winning designs are discussed, and graphic illustration is provided of the nature of dual-use shelter, which contributes to…

  5. Research award: Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's ...

  6. Judicial Review of Labor Arbitration Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Reynolds C.

    The review of grievance arbitration awards in public education constitutes the topic of this second chapter in a book on school law. A discussion of landmark cases outside of education underscores the general principles that have motivated courts to undertake review of arbitration awards. Supreme Court decisions in three cases known as the…

  7. Research Award: Communications Division Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... program, media, web and social media strategies, as well as other outreach programs. As a Communications Research Award recipient, you will undertake a one-year program of research on the topic you submitted when competing for the award. Your proposals should address one or more aspects of ...

  8. Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security Program

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2014-08-06

    Research Award: Agriculture and Food Security. Program. Deadline: August 6, 2014. Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance ...

  9. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Świętoń, Dominik; Muc, Adam; Mockałło, Gabor; Dzierżanowski, Jarosław; Szurowska, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  10. The administrative staff recruitment and selection in Romanian public higher education institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Luminita Mihaela Strajeri

    2009-01-01

    Administrative staff, it will be argued, is essential to the activity of higher education. Adminis-trative staff make up about 44% of the Romanian public higher education workforce, working directly with students and providing services that allow schools to function. There is a major shortfall in the effort and attention now being devoted to the administrative staff of all kinds, despite the workload and importance of this staff. The paper looks at some of the challenges facing higher educati...

  11. 42 CFR 66.110 - Service, payback, and recovery requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service, payback, and recovery requirements. 66.110..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE AWARDS Direct Awards § 66.110 Service, payback, and recovery...) for each month of support received, up to a maximum of twelve months. Such period shall be served in...

  12. 42 CFR 62.4 - To whom will scholarship program awards be available in addition to those individuals pursuing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false To whom will scholarship program awards be... HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE CORPS SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program § 62.4 To whom will scholarship program...

  13. We won a National award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meciarova, A.; Cicova, V.

    2011-01-01

    On the occasion of the 43 rd conference for water management in the industry results of the 3 rd competition were announced for the National Business Award for Environment in the Slovak Republic 2011 organized by the Association of Industrial Ecology in Slovakia (ASPEK). The first prize in the category 'product; went to the hands of Slovenske elektrarne representatives for providing the energy self-sufficiency of Tery Chalet, High Tatras, all year round with installing photovoltaic system. 'We have a complex programme of five energies through which we support culture, sports, humanity, education and environmental protection. Hence we try to support constant sustainability of biodiversity,' underlined Alena Meciarova, Manager of Environment at Slovenske elektrarne. (author)

  14. Towards culturally competent health care: language use of bilingual staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; Noble, C; Matthews, C; Aguilar, N

    1998-01-01

    The presence of diverse language skills within health staff provides opportunities to better meet the needs of a multicultural population. A cross-sectional survey of all staff within the South Western Sydney Area Health Service was undertaken to compare language skills with population needs and examine the context of language use. Thirty-one per cent of staff (n = 964) were bilingual or multilingual, with the predominant languages spoken being Tagalog (Filipino), Cantonese, Hindi, Spanish, Vietnamese and Italian. Thirty-seven per cent of bilingual staff used their language skills at least weekly, predominantly in situations of simple conversation and giving directions. Bilingual staff are a valuable resource for the organisation and the presence of a similar overall proportion of bilingual and bicultural staff may engender tolerance and adaptability in providing care to a diverse population. However, supply does not directly match community demand. This mismatch will continue unless recruitment is focused towards identified language groups. The high proportion of staff who rarely used their language skills (37%) may be due to lack of opportunity or limited need, and suggests that further research needs to examine service models that locate bilingual workers close to client need. This study takes a crucial first step towards realising equitable and culturally appropriate care utilising the principles of productive diversity.

  15. Staff Planning at the National Library of the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick Langbroek

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Koninklijke Bibliotheek in the Netherlands has developed a Strategic Staff Planning Programme to deal with the challenges of an ageing workforce, succession issues for management and specialised positions, and short-term budget cuts in combination with expected long-term staff shortages. This article describes the reasons for the Programme, steps taken to develop it, and preliminary results. The programme includes a Trainee Programme, a Management Trainee Programme, Individual Career Counselling and a Career Service Centre.

  16. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  17. Airport Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tommy

    Modern airports are centers of transportation that service a large number of aircraft and passengers every day. To facilitate this large volume of transportation, airports are subject to many logistical and decision problems that must continuously be solved to make sure each flight and passenger ...

  18. A "Coach Approach" to Staff Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macmillan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The speed of change is challenging libraries to redevelop themselves in ways we have never seen before. Rising costs and changing customer expectations are forcing staff to continuously learn new skills, adapt to new technologies and work more closely in collaboration with others in response to this unpredictable environment. At the same time library leaders need to communicate regularly with staff and to motivate them to dialogue with each other about the value of the library service that they provide to the community. A creative approach to building flexibility, resilience and staff engagement has become essential for survival. Coaching is a creative, innovative and effective communications tool that is now considered to be one of the most important ways to encourage employees to continue to learn and develop. Its greatest impact is in building leadership and staff engagement. Communicating with “a coach approach” or coaching mindset is a powerful way for library leaders to connect with others where the flow and exchange is positive and there is a mutual benefit of contribution and collaboration, expanded knowledge and innovation. The basics of fostering “a coach approach” with library staff requires an understanding of the importance of “reframing” one’s personal attitudes and perspectives, appreciating the art of focused listening and the impact of positive acknowledgement, learning to ask the right questions and formulating action plans for continued success. It is a learned skill that requires a commitment to practice but is one that will ultimately demonstrate positive results.

  19. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  20. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows : as from 1 July 2002 Article R IV 1.41 - Method of adjustment of the amount of subsistence indemnity (page 53) as from 1 January 2003 Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2002/2003, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2002 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2003, are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  1. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2005 : Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2004/2005, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2004 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2005, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  2. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2006: The modifications are listed below: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme - reorganization of the Fellowship Programme - modification of the Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions - new definition of disability and associated benefits - revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board - bringing together the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification# 16) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular ...

  3. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1st January 1996 are modified as follows as of 1st July 2006: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme-reorganisation of the Fellowship Programme-modification of Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions-new definition of disability and associated benefits-revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board-bringing together of the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification No.16) are available from Departmental secretariats. In addition, the Staff Rules and Regulations can be consulted on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 2)-July 2006 Protection of members o...

  4. ANALISIS PERBANDINGAN PENGHARGAAN KUALITAS MALCOLM BALDRIGE NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD DENGAN EUROPEAN QUALITY AWARD (MBNQA vs EQA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Bakhtiar Amalia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Persaingan bisnis global saat ini makin ketat. Dengan adanya Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA dan juga European Quality Award (EQA diharapkan mampu mendorong dan memotivasi perusahaan-perusahaan, baik yang sudah sukses maupun yang sedang berkembang, untuk selalu meningkatkan mutu dan kinerja, serta sebagai kunci daya saing. Dalam makalah ini, kita akan membahas penghargaan kualitas mengenai tujuan, manfaat dan perkembangan, dan trend saat ini, terutama untuk MBNQA dan EQM (European Quality Model. Kita akan membandingkan antara MBNQA dan EQM melalui pengertian, latar belakang, metode-metode, dan kriteria-kriteria, serta aplikasinya, sehingga dapat kita lakukan analisa perbandingan untuk keduanya. Kata Kunci  : Penghargaan Kualitas, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA   Emulation of global business in this time more and more to tighten. With existence of Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA as well as European Quality Award (EQA expected can push and motivate companies, both for have successful and also which is expanding, to always increase the quality and performance, and also as competitiveness key. In this paper, we will discuss about national quality award concerning target, benefit, growth, and trend in this time, especially MBNQA and EQM (European Quality Model. We will compare between MBNQA and EQM through congeniality, background, method, and criterions, and also its application,  so that earn us to analyse comparison to both of its. Keyword        : Quality Award, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA

  5. Hygiene Knowledge of Food Staff in Catering Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hülya Yardımcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study, designed as a cross-sectional study, was carried out to determine the hygiene knowledge of the staff (N = 317 employed in kitchen and service departments of catering firms in Ankara. It was found that the mean scores of the staff with regard to personal hygiene, food hygiene, and kitchen and equipment hygiene were 10.7 ± 1.6, 19.8 ± 4.0, and 13.6 ± 2.0, respectively. Male staff achieved higher mean scores in personal hygiene knowledge test compared with female staff (p < .01. The staff receiving a hygiene training were determined to have higher mean scores in terms of hygiene knowledge tests compared with those who have not received, and the production staff had higher knowledge as to hygiene than the other groups (p < .01. The mean scores for hygiene knowledge tests were found to be increasing with age. Hygiene knowledge scores of the staff were quite lower than what must be taken. For that reason, periodical training programs should be organized to increase the awareness of the staff about hygiene.

  6. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  7. Performance Appraisal System Impact on University Academic Staff Job Satisfaction and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndambakuwa, Yustina; Mufunda, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe (UZ) introduced a performance appraisal system (PAS) designed to improve performance indicators across the board in Public Service including academic/faculty staff at the University of Zimbabwe as part of a nation wide strategy. The Public service is a body responsible for all civil workers including academic staff,…

  8. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  9. Staff perceptions of quality of care: an observational study of the NHS Staff Survey in hospitals in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinder, Richard J; Greaves, Felix E; Aylin, Paul P; Jarman, Brian; Bottle, Alex

    2013-07-01

    There is some evidence to suggest that higher job satisfaction among healthcare staff in specific settings may be linked to improved patient outcomes. This study aimed to assess the potential of staff satisfaction to be used as an indicator of institutional performance across all acute National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England. Using staff responses from the NHS Staff Survey 2009, and correlating these with hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMR), correlation analyses were conducted at institutional level with further analyses of staff subgroups. Over 60 000 respondents from 147 NHS trusts were included in the analysis. There was a weak negative correlation with HSMR where staff agreed that patient care was their trust's top priority (Kendall τ = -0.22, psatisfaction with the quality of care delivered by oneself and institutional HSMR. In the context of the continued debate about the relationship of HSMR to hospital performance, these findings of a weak correlation between staff satisfaction and HSMR are intriguing and warrant further investigation. Such measures in the future have the advantage of being intuitive for lay and specialist audiences alike, and may be useful in facilitating patient choice. Whether higher staff satisfaction drives quality or merely reflects it remains unclear.

  10. Managing the training process: contracting for training services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The need for using consultants and contracting for training services should be based on one or more of these three major reasons: the need to expand capability on a crash basis, the need for specialized expertise, and the need for objectivity, and independence. When the need for using a consultant exists, the training manager must first define the scope of work or services the consultant is to provide and how the consultant will interface with the training staff. The next step will be to develop a Request for Proposal which involves management, training staff, and contract services organizations. The critical parts of an RFP are scope and schedule. Consideration would be given to determining which consultant organizations should receive the RFP, and specifying who is on the bidders list. The third step will consist of evaluating the proposals and awarding the work. This step needs to be objective, defendable, and repeatable. The final phase will be the performance of the work. The activities included are project initiation, monitoring contractor performance, and formal conclusion

  11. 12 CFR 1806.204 - Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards. 1806... OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.204 Applications for Bank Enterprise... Enterprise Awards in accordance with this section and the applicable NOFA. After receipt of an application...

  12. recognition and enforcement of foreign arbitral awards in civil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    Thus, award-creditors may need to move across borders looking for a forum within which ... award-creditor in a foreign arbitral award may seek only for its recognition or its recognition and enforcement.5 The purpose of ..... electionis), the award may face the risk of being set aside. The Ethiopian courts may examine that the ...

  13. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Beyere, Christopher B; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Mwini-Nyaledzigbor, Prudence P

    2017-01-01

    The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals) are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana. This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution. Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas. There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards.

  14. Perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana: Implications for health sector staff internal migration control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kaba Alhassan

    Full Text Available The population of Ghana is increasingly becoming urbanized with about 70% of the estimated 27 million people living in urban and peri-urban areas. Nonetheless, eight out of the ten regions in Ghana remain predominantly rural where only 32% of the national health sector workforce works. Moreover, the rural-urban disparities in the density of health tutors (staff responsible for pre-service training of health professionals are enormous. This paper explores perceived needs of health tutors in rural and urban health training institutions in Ghana.This is a descriptive qualitative study conducted in the Greater Accra and Northern regions of Ghana. The Study used the deductive thematic and sub-thematic analysis approaches. Five health training institutions were randomly sampled, and 72 tutors engaged in separate focus group discussions with an average size of 14 participants per group in each training institution.Perceived rural-urban disparities among health tutors were found in the payment of extra duty allowances; school infrastructure including libraries and internet connectivity; staff accommodation; and opportunities for scholarships and higher education. Health tutors in rural areas generally expressed more frustration with these work conditions than those in urban areas.There is the need to initiate and sustain work incentives that promote motivation of rural health tutors to control ongoing rural-urban migration of qualified staff. It is recommended the following incentives be prioritized to promote retention of qualified health tutors in rural health training schools: payment of research, book and rural allowances; early promotion of rural staff; prioritizing rural tutors for scholarships, and introduction of national best health tutor awards.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Professor Michael J. Krische, developed selective C-C bond-forming hydrogenation without organometallic reagents, eliminating hazardous reagents and hazardous waste.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Professor Robin D. Rogers, used ionic liquids to dissolve and process cellulose from wood, cloth, or paper to make new biorenewable or biocompatible materials.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Prof Richard P. Wool of the University of Delaware, created high-performance materials using vegetable oils, feathers, and flax. Can be used as adhesives, composites, foams, and circuit boards.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Professor Chirik, discovered a class of catalysts used to produce silicones for consumer goods without using hard-to-mine platinum (less mining, reduces costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste).

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, developed surfactants that allow carbon dioxide to be a solvent for chemical manufacturing, replacing hazardous chemical solvents.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Professor Galen J. Suppes, developed a process to convert waste glycerin from biodiesel production into propylene glycol to replace ethylene glycol in antifreeze.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, designed a novel, second-generation surfactant called TPGS-750-M. It is a designer surfactant composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Professor Terry Collins, developed a series of TAML oxidant activators that work with hydrogen peroxide to replace chlorine bleaches for paper making and laundry.

  3. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Professor Mark Holtzapple, developed methods to convert waste biomass (e.g., sewage sludge, agricultural wastes), into animal feed, industrial chemicals, or fuels.

  4. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Professor Richard A. Gross, developed a transesterification to make polyol-containing polyesters using lipase, replacing heavy metal catalysts and hazardous solvents.

  5. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winners, Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, developed halogen-free, catalytic C-H activation/borylation to make aryl and heteroaryl boronic esters.

  6. Connecticut Environmental Chapter Awarded EPA Education Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Audubon Society has been awarded a $91,000 Environmental Education Grant by the US Environmental Protection Agency to support its work in addressing a range of topics in classrooms to support schoolyard habitats.

  7. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  8. Global pest management program wins international award

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment.

  9. ALICE gives its first thesis awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    For the first time the ALICE collaboration has given two of its doctoral students awards for their outstanding theses. Winners Christian Holm Christensen and Zaida Conesa del Valle holding their awards.On 29 October the ALICE collaboration honoured two students for their outstanding theses at a ceremony held at CERN. The two awards, one of which was given for a physics thesis and the other for a technical thesis, went to Zaida Conesa Del Valle (Laboratoire de physique subatomique et des technologies associées) and Christian Holm Christensen (Niels Bohr Institute) respectively. "It is very gratifying to see that the collaboration appreciates our work," said Zaida Conesa del Valle, winner of the physics award for her thesis: Performance of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Weak Boson Production and Measurement in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC. "I also feel specially thankful to all the people who worked with me," she added. "It was pl...

  10. Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations that are are at the leading edge of managing greenhouse gas emissions in their organizational supply chains.

  11. 48 CFR 922.608-5 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITION Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act 922.608-5 Award. The... Office in which the contractors place of business is located. Regional Office locations are specified at...

  12. 5 CFR 451.104 - Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... efficiency, economy, or other improvement of Government operations or achieves a significant reduction in... and is not basic pay for any purpose. (c) An award is subject to applicable tax rules, such as...

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Professor Chi-Huey Wong, developed reactions with enzymes and safer solvents that can replace traditional reactions done with toxic metals and hazardous solvents.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Professor Chao-Jun Li, uses metal catalysts in water to carry out chemical reactions that used to need both an oxygen-free atmosphere and hazardous organic solvents.

  16. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the data structures to be implemented to provide the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD); a Computer System for the in-cave Bertha waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations in A59. (Author)

  17. The BINP receives its Golden Hadron award

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday, 14 September, the LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, handed over a Golden Hadron award to Alexander Skrinsky of Russia's Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The prize is awarded in recognition of exceptional performances by suppliers and this year prizes were awarded to two firms, Cockerill-Sambre (Belgium) and Wah-Chang (United States), and to the Budker Institute, which was unable to receive the award at the same time as the two other recipients (see Bulletin No 34/2002, of 19 August 2002). The Russian institute has been rewarded for the particularly high-quality production of 360 dipole magnets and 185 quadrupole magnets for the LHC proton beam transfer lines.

  18. 42 CFR 59a.15 - Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.15 Awards. (a) General. The Secretary, with the advice of the... medical library. The Secretary, in determining the priority assigned an applicant, must consider: (1) The...

  19. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  20. And the winners were... Innovation Awards

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The winners of the 2003 Economist innovation awards included Tim Berners-Lee for the WWW and Dr. Damadian for his suggestion that NMR could be used as a medical detection device for cancer (1/2 page).

  1. Lack of Training and a Self-Service Environment Leaves Staff and Users Uncertain About Health Information in a Public Library Setting. A Review of: Harris, R., Henwood, F., Marshall, A., & Burdett, S. (2010. “I'm not sure if that's what their job is." Consumer health information and emerging "healthwork" roles in the public library. Reference and User Services Quarterly, 49(3, 239-252.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Kelly

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To explore the role and expectations of patrons and staff about the role of a public library in enabling citizens’ “health information work.” This involves helping citizens take responsibility for their own health care by finding and using health information.Design – Case study.Setting – A single, UK public library with a self-service delivery model based in a city centre in the spring of 2006. Self-service also applies to reference services and is designed to “empower users to locate and use information on their own.”Subjects – 202 library visitors who came to the library specifically to find health information completed a questionnaire, 15 of these visitors were later interviewed; 19 library staff (10 librarians, 6 library officers and 3 senior managers.Methods – Mixed quantitative and qualitative methods. A print questionnaire was administered to adult library users (age 18 and over. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen randomly selected library users who completed the questionnaire, sixteen library staff who worked directly with library users, and with three librarians in senior management positions in the library. Descriptive statistics were calculated from the questionnaire, recorded interviews were transcribed, and the text analyzed to identify recurring themes.Main Results – While all respondents came to the library to seek health information results from the questionnaire found that half (50% of respondents came to the library to look for information on a specific health problem; 37% of respondents had tried finding information elsewhere before coming to the library; 40% usually searched the Internet when they needed health information or advice although only 32% reported trusting the Internet somewhat or completely; 67% intended to borrow books; only 4% indicated that they had planned to ask library staff for help; and 59% reported finding what they were looking for by themselves

  2. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  3. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  4. 75 FR 47540 - Extension of the Award Period for Certain Minority Business Enterprise Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ...] Extension of the Award Period for Certain Minority Business Enterprise Centers AGENCY: Minority Business... periods for those Minority Business Enterprise Centers (MBECs) identified in this notice. This action is... enterprises, and further incorporates an entrepreneurial approach to the delivery of client services. This...

  5. 48 CFR 536.570-4 - Basis of award-construction contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis of award-construction contract. 536.570-4 Section 536.570-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses...

  6. Nexan receives two CMS Awards of the Year 2002 for its work in superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Nexans has received one Crystal and one Gold CMS award for its contribution to the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector project. The CMS detector is designed to study the fundamental constituents of matter. The prizes recompense the excellent quality of Nexans' service in the supply of the necessary low-temperature superconducting cables sheathed in extruded aluminium.

  7. 77 FR 187 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Transition to the System for Award Management (SAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ..., 18, 25, 26, and 52 RIN 9000-AM14 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Transition to the System for Award Management (SAM) AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National... final rule amending the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) to update certain definitions and clauses...

  8. 77 FR 66449 - Applications for New Awards; National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... awards for fiscal year (FY) 2013. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84.133A-6. DATES... telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call, toll free: 1-877-576-7734. You can... requirement, you may mail (through the U.S. Postal Service or a commercial carrier) your application to the...

  9. 78 FR 4838 - Applications for New Awards; Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2013. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) Number: 84... 22304. Telephone, toll free: 1-877-433-7827. FAX: (703) 605-6794. If you use a telecommunications device... (through the U.S. Postal Service or a commercial carrier) your application to the Department. You must mail...

  10. LHC suppliers win Golden Hadron awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    In a ceremony on 30 July, three of the 200 suppliers for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented with Golden Hadron awards. It is the third year that the awards have been presented to suppliers, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. This year the three companies are all involved in the supplies for the LHC's main magnet system.

  11. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper sets out the requirements for AWARD (the A59 Waste Repackaging Database); a computer-based system to record LLW sorting and repacking information from the North Cave Line in A59. A solution will be developed on the basis of this document. AWARD will record and store details entered from waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations. This document will be used as the basis of the development of the host computer system. (Author)

  12. HIV Stigma in Prisons and Jails: Results from a Staff Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenko, Steven; Dembo, Richard; Copenhaver, Michael; Hiller, Matthew; Swan, Holly; Albizu Garcia, Carmen; O'Connell, Daniel; Oser, Carrie; Pearson, Frank; Pankow, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    With numerous HIV service gaps in prisons and jails, there has been little research on HIV stigma attitudes among correctional staff. Such attitudes may undermine HIV services for inmates at risk of or infected with HIV. This HIV stigma attitudes survey among 218 correctional staff in 32 US facilities (1) provides an overview of staff's stigma attitudes, (2) reports psychometric analyses of domains in Earnshaw and Chaudoir's HIV Stigma Framework (HSF), and (3) explores differences in stigma attitudes among different staff types. Overall, correctional and medical staff expressed non stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS, but perceived that stigma and discrimination exist in others. Factor analyses revealed a three factor structure capturing two mechanisms of the HSF (prejudice, discrimination). Few factor score differences were found by staff type or setting. Implications for correctional HIV services and future research on HIV stigma attitudes are discussed.

  13. Dosimetry Service

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Cern Staff and Users can now consult their dose records for an individual or an organizational unit with HRT. Please see more information on our web page: http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry Dosimetry Service is open every morning from 8.30 - 12.00. Closed in the afternoons. We would like to remind you that dosimeters cannot be sent to customers by internal mail. Short-term dosimeters (VCT's) must always be returned to the Service after the use and must not be left on the racks in the experimental areas or in the secretariats. Dosimetry Service Tel. 7 2155 Dosimetry.service@cern.ch http://cern.ch/rp-dosimetry

  14. Pre-Award Administrators Are from Pluto: Post-Award Administrators Are from Saturn, Or Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Mary T.

    2000-01-01

    An experienced research administrator who has worked in both pre-award and post-award administrative roles offers her perspectives of both sides and suggests that a smooth relationship between pre-award and post-award research administrators is critical to the conduct of research. (DB)

  15. Unity is strength: staff college and the British officer corps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony

    2009-03-01

    Utilizing Bourdieu's concept of the habitus, Keith Macdonald has recently examined the elite social origins of the British officer corps. His analysis is valid as far at it goes but it ignores the professional practices of British officers. This article examines Britain's Joint Services Command and Staff College to assess the unification of the three services around common forms of military practice. It argues that while the new staff college has been effective in disseminating new forms of professional expertise among British officers, various practices have been institutionalized which actively undermine the unity of the officer corps.

  16. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  17. Prison staff and the health promoting prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixey, Rachael; Woodall, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss some of the obstacles to implementing policy and strategy related to health promoting prisons. It focuses on the role of prison officers and raises issues concerning their conditions of service, training and organisational culture in a situation where the prison system faces security issues, overcrowding and high levels of ill health among prisoners. This paper emerged as a result of significant overlapping themes between two separate studies conducted by the authors. The paper draws on the authors' qualitative data from these studies. The findings demonstrate the ambiguities and tensions in changing organisational cultures and among prison staff. Alongside the qualitative data, the paper draws on theory regarding policy implementation at the micro-level to show how staff can block or speed up that implementation. Prison officers are an essential part of health promoting prisons, but have been relatively ignored in the discussion of how to create healthier prisons. The contribution that prison staff make to creating health promoting prisons has been under-explored, yet pertinent theory can show how they can be more effectively involved in making changes in organisational culture.

  18. Examining Faculty Awards for Gender Equity and Evolving Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbuhl, Stephanie; Bristol, Mirar N.; Ashfaq, Hera; Scott, Patricia; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Cappola, Anne R.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Awards given to medical school faculty are one important mechanism for recognizing what is valued in academic medicine. There have been concerns expressed about the gender distribution of awards, and there is also a growing appreciation for the evolving accomplishments and talents that define academic excellence in the 21st century and that should be considered worthy of award recognition. OBJECTIVE Examine faculty awards at our institution for gender equity and evolving values. METHODS Recipient data were collected on awards from 1996 to 2007 inclusively at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (SOM). Descriptions of each award also were collected. The female-to-male ratio of award recipients over the time span was reviewed for changes and trends. The title and text of each award announcement were reviewed to determine if the award represented a traditional or a newer concept of excellence in academic medicine. MAIN RESULTS There were 21 annual awards given to a total of 59 clinical award recipients, 60 research award recipients, and 154 teaching award recipients. Women received 28% of research awards, 29% of teaching awards and 10% of clinical awards. Gender distribution of total awards was similar to that of SOM full-time faculty except in the clinical awards category. Only one award reflected a shift in the culture of individual achievement to one of collaboration and team performance. CONCLUSION Examining both the recipients and content of awards is important to assure they reflect the current composition of diverse faculty and the evolving ideals of leadership and excellence in academic medicine. PMID:19727968

  19. Managing social difficulties: roles and responsibilities of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Penny; Bingham, Laura; Taylor, Sally; Hanif, Naheed; Podmore, Emma; Velikova, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of guidance on assessment and management of psychosocial and supportive-care problems or needs will be successful only if consideration is given to existing skills, experience and expectations of staff and patients. This study examines the roles and responsibilities of staff, patients and families in relation to management of social difficulties and proposes a pathway for response. A qualitative study was performed using staff and patient interviews. Seventeen doctors and 16 nurses were interviewed using patient scenarios and a support service questionnaire. Patients (n = 41) completed a screening questionnaire (the Social Difficulties Inventory) and were interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to a Framework analysis. Analysis examined (1) actions taken by staff and patients in response to social difficulties, (2) reasons given for action taken and (3) perceptions of staff and patients of who was responsible for taking action. Staff were confident concerning clinically related issues (i.e. mobility) but more hesitant concerning difficulties related to money, work and family concerns. Patients liked to cope with problems on their own where possible, would have liked information or support from staff but were uncertain how to access this. Results led to development of a hierarchy of interventions in response to detected social difficulties. For routine assessment of social difficulties, patients, nurses and doctors will have to work collaboratively, with nurses taking a lead in discussion. For specific clinically related problems doctors would play a more primary role. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.