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Sample records for staff development department

  1. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system.

  2. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Institutionalizing Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawl, William F.

    Three years ago, Golden West College (GWC) decided to make a major commitment to staff development as a means of revitalizing the college. This commitment was evidenced through the creation of the position of Dean of Educational Development, who is responsible solely for serving faculty needs; the Educational Development Center, which houses the…

  4. Staff Development Redesigned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Linda

    1988-01-01

    Contends that staff development, supposedly designed to assist teachers, has instead colluded with forces to continue their colonization. Since teachers are not taking charge of their profession and participating actively in educational change, certain actions must be taken to lighten their nonprofessional workload and to build a professional…

  5. Reduction of doses to staff in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Every, B.

    1982-01-01

    Data relating to the radiation protection of staff working in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Victoria during the period 1977 to 1981 are examined. No member of staff received more than one tenth of the annual whole body dose limit of 5x10 4 μSv. The reduction in the total whole body dose of staff and in the technologist's individual dose is due to relocating the department, using appropriate radiation monitoring equipment, using a staff roster and making staff aware of previous doses

  6. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  7. Staff Development: Cafe Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arns, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    In most cases, memorable learning opportunities are fun, collaborative, and influential. Jennifer Arns, instructional programs director for the Organization for Education Technology and Curriculum, outlines the EdTech Professional Development Cadre, a refreshing and engaging PD approach. (Contains 3 resources.)

  8. Radiation doses to the staff of a nuclear cardiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Koutelou, M.; Theodorakos, A.; Kouzoumi, A.; Kitziri, S.; Tsiblouli, S.; Vardalaki, E.; Kyrozi, E.; Kouttou, S.

    2002-01-01

    The last years, new radiopharmaceuticals are used in a Nuclear Medicine (NM) Department. Nowadays, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a method of routine imaging, a fact that has required increased levels of radioactivity in certain patient examinations. The staff that is more likely to receive the greatest radiation dose in a NM Department is the technologist who deals with performance of patient examination and injection of radioactive material and the nurse who is caring for the patients visiting the Department some of which being totally helpless. The fact that each NM Dept possesses equipment with certain specifications, deals with various kind of patients, has specific design and radiation protection measures which can differ from other NM Depts and uses various examination protocols, makes essential the need to investigate the radiation doses received by each member of the staff, so as to continuously monitor doses and take protective measures if required, control less experienced staff and ensure that radiation dose levels are kept as low as possible at all times. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate radiation dose to the nuclear cardiology department staff by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) placed on the the skin at thyroid and abdominal region as well as evaluating protection measures taken currently in the Dept

  9. A simulation-based training program improves emergency department staff communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lynn A; Warren, Otis; Gardner, Liz; Rojek, Adam; Lindquist, David G

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of Project CLEAR!, a novel simulation-based training program designed to instill Crew Resource Management (CRM) as the communication standard and to create a service-focused environment in the emergency department (ED) by standardizing the patient encounter. A survey-based study compared physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the quality of communication before and after the training program. Surveys were developed to measure ED staff perceptions of the quality of communication between staff members and with patients. Pretraining and posttraining survey results were compared. After the training program, survey scores improved significantly on questions that asked participants to rate the overall communication between staff members and between staff and patients. A simulation-based training program focusing on CRM and standardizing the patient encounter improves communication in the ED, both between staff members and between staff members and patients.

  10. Preceptor development. Use a staff development specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, S; Hoeppner, M

    1994-01-01

    Preceptor orientation is a well identified need. Less often identified is the critical role the staff development specialist plays in the ongoing support and development of preceptors. In this article, the authors explain activities of coaching, facilitating, mentoring, and consulting. These role components are essential in the ongoing development of preceptors. This support also may help retain preceptors.

  11. Staff perspectives of violence in the emergency department: Appeals for consequences, collaboration, and consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renker, Paula; Scribner, Shellie A; Huff, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Violence committed by patients and their families and visitors against Emergency Department staff in the United States is common and detrimental to staff well being, morale, and care practices. Hospitals losses occur due to decreased staff retention, prestige, and patient and visitor satisfaction. The purpose of the baseline survey reported here was to identify and describe staff experiences, concerns, and perceptions related to violence and abuse perpetrated by patients, family, and non-family visitors in a Level 1 emergency department. The survey sample was composed of 41 registered nurses and 10 paramedics. The majority of the participants (84%, n= 41) were female and worked full time (82%, n= 41) on the 7P-7A (49%, n= 25) shift. The cross-sectional mixed-method descriptive design used a survey to measure violence experiences and interviews with key informants. Specific analytical methods included descriptive and inferential statistics and ethnography. The findings are summarized by a model that portrays 1) Contributing factors to the development of violence in the ED, 2) maladaptive reactions to workplace violence of Cynicism, Concern for focus on customer service, and Conflict, and 3) three themes that, depending on their presence or absence, serve as barriers or facilitators to violence: Consistency, Consequences and Collaboration. Interventions developed to minimize violence in the ED must focus on modifiable risk factors and address what is in the department's control including staff education in recognizing escalating anxious or aggressive behavior, policy development and implementation, and environmental changes.

  12. Caring for inpatient boarders in the emergency department: improving safety and patient and staff satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornemann-Shepherd, Melanie; Le-Lazar, Jamie; Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; DeVine, Deborah; McDevitt, Kelly; Paul, Marcee

    2015-01-01

    Hospital capacity constraints lead to large numbers of inpatients being held for extended periods in the emergency department. This creates concerns with safety, quality of care, and dissatisfaction of patients and staff. The aim of this quality-improvement project was to improve satisfaction and processes in which nurses provided care to inpatient boarders held in the emergency department. A quality-improvement project framework that included the use of a questionnaire was used to ascertain employee and patient dissatisfaction and identify opportunities for improvement. A task force was created to develop action plans related to holding and caring for inpatients in the emergency department. A questionnaire was sent to nursing staff in spring 2012, and responses from the questionnaire identified improvements that could be implemented to improve care for inpatient boarders. Situation-background-assessment-recommendation (SBAR) communications and direct observations were also used to identify specific improvements. Post-questionnaire results indicated improved satisfaction for both staff and patients. It was recognized early that the ED inpatient area would benefit from the supervision of an inpatient director, managers, and staff. Outcomes showed that creating an inpatient unit within the emergency department had a positive effect on staff and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 28 CFR 34.107 - Use of Department of Justice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of Department of Justice staff. 34... PROCEDURES Peer Review § 34.107 Use of Department of Justice staff. OJJDP will use qualified OJJDP and other DOJ staff as internal reviewers. Internal reviewers determine applicant compliance with basic program...

  14. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  15. Bringing poetry into staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Ronnie

    2002-01-01

    "Quello che mai fue detto d'alfcuna," words from Dante, "strive to say which was never said by anyone." This is the art of true verbal expression, the essence of poetry. Poet W. H. Auden once wrote that "poetry can open spaces of meaning for the human spirit that is more intimate to other human beings than it is to ourselves" (Auden, 1968). Poetry has many definitions. To some, it is the rhythmic verse they remember from grade school or from Mother Goose. To others, poetry is a verse of meter and measure, of balance and harmony. However, to most individuals, poetry is the ultimate expression of human emotion. Roy (1999) believed that nursing is in need of poetry, in order to evoke the deepest of images, fears, questions, and quests of the human spirit and the nursing profession. This article examines the use of poetry and how it might be incorporated into staff education.

  16. Risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankova-Mileva, I.; Vassileva, J.; Djounova, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we present the risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation compared to those of non-radiation workers. Cataract is the most common degenerative opacity of the crystalline lens developing with aging. Other risk factors for cataract are: infrared and ultraviolet radiation, systemic diseases (diabetes, hypertonic disease), eye diseases (glaucoma, high myopia), drugs (steroids), etc. High risk of developing cataract we find among staff occupationally exposed to radiation during operations - interventional cardiologists and neurosurgeons. This study includes 30 people between 33 and 60 years of age working in neurosurgical department and control group (the same amount and age of people not exposed to radiation in their work). After visual acuity measurement, the lens was examined by retroillumination method (red reflex) and using a bio microscope. The patients were asked for presence of ocular and systemic diseases, eye trauma, drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse and for how many years they work in this department. There was one case with cataract among neurosurgeons. The doctor doesn't have eye or systemic diseases, doesn't take any drugs and is not alcohol or tobacco abuser. In the control group there were two persons with subcapsular cataract but they have diabetes. Radiation is one of the risk factors for cataract. Continuing of this epidemiological survey will provide further knowledge on the potential risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract among neurosurgical staff and will contribute for optimization of radiation protection. (authors)

  17. The Relationship between Organizational Climate and the Organizational Silence of Administrative Staff in Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozveh, Asghar Zamani; Karimi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between organizational climate and the organizational silence of administrative staff in Education Department in Isfahan. The research method was descriptive and correlational-type method. The study population was administrative staff of Education Department in Isfahan during the…

  18. Keeping Up: Personal Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolls, Blanche

    2009-01-01

    Some essential components of "keeping current" with trends and new developments in the school library field for library media specialists includes attending conferences and reading professional literature. Beginning in May 2007, one article on "keeping up" each year has been devoted to summarizing the major themes in conferences and professional…

  19. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  20. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  1. Identifying needs to develop a PBL staff development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Coffin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims to answer the following research questions 1 how can university academic staff be assisted to acquire pedagogical competences for an initiative of the implementation of PBL curriculum? 2 What kinds of support do university academic staff need in order to maintain PBL implementation? Through a combination of a literature review, interviews with 6 PBL experts which emphasize the importance of PBL facilitators, and document analysis of reflection notes from 18 trainees of a PBL workshop, this study will produce a guideline in developing a PBL Academic Staff Development Program for an institute wishes to implement and retain PBL as the education strategy.

  2. Attitudes of Emergency Department Staff towards the Role of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    participation of future Pharm-D graduates in direct patient care in the Saudi health care system. Keywords: Clinical ... errors [3]. According to the findings of the. U.S. Institute of Medicine, ED has the highest ..... human: Building a safer health system. Washington, DC: ... department: A systems approach to minimizing risk.

  3. Cultivating Leadership Development for Support Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Describes an urban school district's focus on leadership development for support staff. The project identified and trained 500 front-line supervisors representing office managers, food service managers, head custodians, and district maintenance supervisors. This paper explains program design, objectives, participants, management support, content,…

  4. Leading Staff Development for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubb, Sara; Earley, Peter

    2009-01-01

    As part of a CfBT Education Trust funded study, we investigated the practical steps school leaders can take to ensure that self-evaluation of school performance led, through the effective staff development, to genuine school improvement. On the journey from self-evaluation to school improvement our research identified what schools did that worked,…

  5. Electronic Reserve--A Staff Development Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robyn

    1997-01-01

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Library's experience in developing an electronic reserve service is offered as a case study. Discussion includes the limited access service, technical components, academic community support, lending staff training, usage, copyright, and future scenarios and solutions. (AEF)

  6. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalianis, K.; Malamitsi, J.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.; Louizi, A.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA-Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with 18 F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of 18 F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse no. 1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse no. 2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist no. 1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist no. 2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists no. 1 and no. 2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have shown that the dose

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalianis, K. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: k.dalianis@hygeia.gr; Malamitsi, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Gogou, L. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Pagou, M. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Efthimiadou, R. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Andreou, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Louizi, A. [Department of Medical Physics Medical School University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Georgiou, E. [Department of Medical Physics Medical School University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2006-12-20

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA-Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with {sup 18}F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse no. 1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse no. 2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist no. 1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist no. 2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists no. 1 and no. 2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have

  8. Survey of Emergency Department staff on disaster preparedness and training for Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddle, Jennica; Tolleson-Rinehart, Sue; Brice, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In the domestic response to the outbreak of Ebola virus disease from 2013 to 2015, many US hospitals developed and implemented specialized training programs to care for patients with Ebola. This research reports on the effects of targeted training on Emergency Department (ED) staff's Ebola-related perceptions and attitudes. One hundred fifty-nine members of the UNC Health Care System ED staff participated in a voluntary cross-sectional, anonymous Web survey administered using a one-time "post then pre" design. Participants responded to questions about risk, roles, willingness to provide care, preparedness, and the contributions of media, training, or time to opinion change using a Likert agree-disagree scale. The authors conducted t test comparisons of Likert responses to pretraining and post-training attitudes about Ebola preparedness. The authors conducted multinomial logistic regression analyses of index scores of change and positivity of responses, controlling for the effects of independent variables. ED staff's opinions supported training; 73 percent felt all workers should receive Ebola education, 60 percent agreed all hospitals should prepare for Ebola, 66 percent felt UNC was better prepared, and 66 percent felt it had done enough to be ready for an Ebola case. Most staff (79 percent) said they had gotten more training for Ebola than for other disease outbreaks; 58 percent had experienced prior epidemics. After training, workers' attitudes were more positive about Ebola preparation including perceived risk of transmission, readiness and ability to manage a patient case, understanding team roles, and trust in both personal protective equipment and the hospital system's preparations (13 measures, p training period (Mean Difference [MD] = 17.45, SD = 9.89) and in the intended positive direction (MD = 15.80, SD = 0.91, p training (p = 0.003). Despite different occupations, mean scores were similar. Staff rated training most important and media least important

  9. Knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among nursing staff of pediatric department: an Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Archana S; Dongara, Ashish R; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2014-03-01

    Neonates receiving care in intensive care units are highly likely to experience pain due to investigations and/or treatments carried out by the health care providers. Neonates are a vulnerable population because they are unable to vocalize their pain. Unaddressed and mismanaged pain can not only affect the child's comfort, but also may alter the development and cognitive abilities of the child in a later part of his/her life. Therefore it is entirely the caregiver's responsibility to accurately assess and manage neonatal pain. We assessed and compared the knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among the nurses posted in the various units of a pediatric department [pediatric ward, pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. An appropriately modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain questionnaire was consensually validated, pretested, and then administered to the nursing staff of the pediatric department at a department at a hospital in Gujarat. Data were entered in Epi-Info and analyzed with the use of SPSS 14.0. The questionnaire was administered to 41 nurses working in the Department of Pediatrics, and the response rate was 97.5%. Mean age of the nurses in the study sample was 25.75 years (SD 5.513). The mean total score of the participants was 8.75 out of 17 (SD 2.549), which was unsatisfactory. The mean correct answer rate was 49.67% among the staff of NICU and 48.67% among the pediatric ward and PICU staff. The attitudes among the nurses were assessed. It was concluded that the nurses lack knowledge and that their attitudes also were hindering pain management. One of the barriers identified by the nurses was that physicians do not prescribe analgesics for managing neonatal pain. So not only the nursing staff, but all of the caregivers involved in neonatal care may be lacking in knowledge and hold perceptions and attitudes that hamper neonatal pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain

  10. Optimization of working conditions of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments. Optimizatsiya uslovij truda meditsinskogo personala radiodiagnosticheskikh otdelenij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, A S [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Gigieny Truda i Professional' nykh Zabolevanij

    1989-01-01

    The study was undertaken to analyze the characteristics of the work of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments during use of {sup 99m}Tc isotope generators. The data on the functional load of physicians and paramedical staff were given along with the description of radiation doses and dose rates at various stages of work. The measures on optimization of labour conditions by means of the appropriate department's design, improvement of the regime of nurses' work and adequate allocation and utilization of medical equipment were developed.

  11. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheshin Arik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n=38 were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n=80 & n=144. Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff’s fear level. Staff’s responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients’ requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff’s response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  12. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    ... individual staff sections in the brigade command post. The program was designed to deliver training to newly formed, inexperienced staffs conducting the staff functions that support the military decision-making process within the execution phase...

  13. Perception of Workforce Skills Needed Among Public Health Professionals in Local Health Departments: Staff Versus Top Executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiali; Leep, Carolyn; Robin, Nathalie; Newman, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    To examine how top executives and staff from local health departments (LHDs) perceive the importance of various types of workforce skills, and to assess the differences in the perception of the importance of these workforce skills between these 2 groups and among LHDs serving different-sized jurisdictions. Data for this study were drawn from the 2014 Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) and the 2015 Forces of Change survey. While PH WINS collected data from LHD staff, the Forces of Change survey was administered to LHD top executives. Ratings of perceived importance of workforce skills from LHD staff and top executives were compared. Overall, LHD workers at all levels believe that core competencies are important for their jobs. The perceived importance of these skills differed somewhat across supervisory level (nonsupervisory staff vs supervisory staff vs top executives). Communication was rated as one of the most important skills by all groups. For top executives, ensuring that programs are managed within budget constraints was the most important skill for their employees. However, this skill was rated much lower among staff. Policy development skills were rated to be of lowest importance by LHD leaders and staff. LHD leaders and staff agree on the relative importance of some competencies, although they also show some clear differences in the relative importance that they place on other competencies. It is essential to strengthen the communication between public health leaders and staff regarding the importance of workforce skills. More investigation is needed to assess whether and how gaps in staff competencies are addressed in the workforce development strategies.

  14. Academic Staff Development and Output in State Universities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data were collected from a sample of 402 academic staff. ... staff development and the productivity of academic staff in terms of research, teaching and community service. ... Keywords: Academic staff development; Performance management; Nigeria ... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL ...

  15. Structured Coaching Programs to Develop Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyess, Susan MacLeod; Sherman, Rose; Opalinski, Andra; Eggenberger, Terry

    2017-08-01

    Health care environments are complex and chaotic, therein challenging patients and professionals to attain satisfaction, well-being, and exceptional outcomes. These chaotic environments increase the stress and burnout of professionals and reduce the likelihood of optimizing success in many dimensions. Coaching is evolving as a professional skill that may influence the optimization of the health care environment. This article reflects on three coaching programs: Gallup Strengths-Based Coaching, Dartmouth Microsystem Coaching, and Health and Wellness Nurse Coaching. Each approach is presented, processes and outcomes are considered, and implications for educators are offered. Continuing education departments may recognize various coaching approaches as opportunities to support staff professionals achieve not only the triple aim, but also the quadruple aim. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(8):373-378. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Morale, stress and coping strategies of staff working in the emergency department: A comparison of two different-sized departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa J; Thom, Ogilvie; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Wallis, Marianne; Johnston, Amy Nb; Carlström, Eric; Mills, Donna; Crilly, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Clinical staff in EDs are subject to a range of stressors. The objective of this study was to describe and compare clinical staff perceptions of their ED's working environment across two different Australian EDs. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, research design that included distribution of three survey tools to clinical staff in two Australian EDs in 2016. Descriptive statistics were reported to characterise workplace stressors, coping styles and the ED environment. These data were compared by hospital and the employee's clinical role (nurse or physician). In total, 146 ED nurses and doctors completed the survey (response rate: 67%). Despite geographical variation, the staff at the two locations had similar demographic profiles in terms of age, sex and years of experience. Staff reported moderate levels of workload and self-realisation but low levels of conflict or nervousness in the workplace. Nurses and physicians reported similar perceptions of the work environment, although nurses reported slightly higher median levels of workload. Staff rated the death or sexual abuse of a child as most stressful, followed by workplace violence and heavy workload. Staff used a large range of coping strategies, and these were similar across both sites. These findings are the first multi-site and multidisciplinary examinations of Australian ED staff perceptions, improving our understanding of staff stressors and coping strategies and highlighting similarities across different EDs. These data support the development and implementation of strategies to improve ED working environments to help ensure professional longevity of ED staff. © 2018 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Health smart cards: differing perceptions of emergency department patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Rosli, Reizal; Taylor, David McD; Knott, Jonathan C; Das, Atandrila; Dent, Andrew W

    2009-02-01

    An analytical, cross-sectional survey of 270 emergency department patients and 92 staff undertaken in three tertiary referral hospital emergency departments was completed to compare the perceptions of patients and staff regarding the use of health smart cards containing patient medical records. The study recorded data on a range of health smart card issues including awareness, privacy, confidentiality, security, advantages and disadvantages, and willingness to use. A significantly higher proportion of staff had heard of the card. The perceived disadvantages reported by patients and staff were, overall, significantly different, with the staff reporting more disadvantages. A significantly higher proportion of patients believed that they should choose what information is on the card and who should have access to the information. Patients were more conservative regarding what information should be included, but staff were more conservative regarding who should have access to the information. Significantly fewer staff believed that patients could reliably handle the cards. Overall, however, the cards were considered acceptable and useful, and their introduction would be supported.

  18. Evaluation of staff cultural awareness before and after attending cultural awareness training in an Australian emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rose; Martin, Catherine; Smith, Tammy

    2014-10-01

    Cultural awareness of emergency department staff is important to ensure delivery of appropriate health care to people from all ethnic groups. Cultural awareness training has been found to increase knowledge about other cultures and is widely used as a means of educating staff, however, debate continues as to the effectiveness of these programs. To determine if an accredited cultural awareness training program affected emergency department staff knowledge, familiarity, attitude of and perception towards Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. One group pre-test and post-test intervention study compared the cultural awareness of 44 emergency department staff towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people before and after training. The cultural awareness training was delivered in six hours over three sessions and was taught by an accredited cultural awareness trainer. The cultural awareness training changed perception but did not affect attitude towards Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in this group. Future strategies to improve staff cultural awareness need to be investigated, developed, implemented and evaluated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors associated with the goal commitment of radiography departments' staff in organizational change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenroos, Eija [Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences, Degree Programme in Radiography and Radiotherapy, Mannerheimintie 172, 00300 Helsinki (Finland)], E-mail: eija.gronroos@metropolia.fi; Pajukari, Arja [MHS, Hus-Roentgen, PL 809, 00029 Hus (Finland)], E-mail: arja.pajukari@hus.fi; Matinheikki-Kokko, Kaija [Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences, Mannerheimintie 172, 00300 Helsinki (Finland)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to examine factors associated with the goal commitment of radiography departments' staff. The associations studied are (1) organizational change, (2) work-related factors, (3) psychosocial work environment, and (4) intention to leave. Method: The follow-up study was performed between 2005 and 2007 in co-operation with 10 radiography departments of two Finnish municipalities. In 2005 the response rate was 60% (n = 97/163) and in 2007 it was 49% (n = 73/150). Results: The goal commitment had dropped during the organizational change from 3.96 in 2005 to 3.60 in 2007 (scale 1-5) (p = 0.001). Best predictors for the goal commitment of radiography departments' staff were having children (OR 4.4) and perceiving functional environment clearly (OR 2.6). Correlation between the goal commitment and intention to leave of the staff was -0.32 (p = 0.01). Conclusion: From the viewpoint of the commitment of the radiography departments' staff, the trend of uniting quite independent health care units into larger entities seems not to be beneficial. This study reveals that commitment to one's work unit is most of all a question of stability and job security. This is a fact the leadership of the radiography departments should take into account, appreciate and support to assure the tenure and productivity of their workforce.

  20. Factors associated with the goal commitment of radiography departments' staff in organizational change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groenroos, Eija; Pajukari, Arja; Matinheikki-Kokko, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to examine factors associated with the goal commitment of radiography departments' staff. The associations studied are (1) organizational change, (2) work-related factors, (3) psychosocial work environment, and (4) intention to leave. Method: The follow-up study was performed between 2005 and 2007 in co-operation with 10 radiography departments of two Finnish municipalities. In 2005 the response rate was 60% (n = 97/163) and in 2007 it was 49% (n = 73/150). Results: The goal commitment had dropped during the organizational change from 3.96 in 2005 to 3.60 in 2007 (scale 1-5) (p = 0.001). Best predictors for the goal commitment of radiography departments' staff were having children (OR 4.4) and perceiving functional environment clearly (OR 2.6). Correlation between the goal commitment and intention to leave of the staff was -0.32 (p = 0.01). Conclusion: From the viewpoint of the commitment of the radiography departments' staff, the trend of uniting quite independent health care units into larger entities seems not to be beneficial. This study reveals that commitment to one's work unit is most of all a question of stability and job security. This is a fact the leadership of the radiography departments should take into account, appreciate and support to assure the tenure and productivity of their workforce.

  1. Emergency Department Staff Beliefs About Self-Harm: A Thematic Framework Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Kate Louise; McNaught, Angela; Tuffin, Keith

    2017-11-03

    To explore the beliefs and attitudes of emergency department staff about self-harm behaviour. Existing studies looking at views regarding self-harm rely solely on the information provided by medical and nursing staff using a questionnaire format. No studies currently consider ancillary staff members' beliefs about self-harm, even though they also work with these patients. A thematic framework analysis of interview transcripts was carried out. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted from December 2015 to February 2016. Fifteen medical, nursing, and ancillary staff members from a large, tertiary emergency department participated. There were 5 major themes identified-causes of self-harm are multifactorial; beliefs about self-harm can change over time; emergency departments should only focus on the physical; self-harm occurs on a spectrum; and the system has failed. The results suggest participants felt ill-prepared and lacking in appropriate training to help patients that self-harm, and furthermore they have little faith in the mental health system. Staff beliefs and attitudes may change over time with exposure to patients who self-harm, possibly becoming more positive in response to a greater understanding of why the self-harm behaviour is occurring.

  2. A qualitative meta-synthesis of emergency department staff experiences of violence and aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Rebecca Angharad; Morris, Lucy; Smith, Ian

    2018-01-08

    Patient and visitor violence or aggression against healthcare workers in the Emergency Department (ED) is a significant issue worldwide. This review synthesises existing qualitative studies exploring the first-hand experiences of staff working in the ED to provide insight into preventing this issue. A meta-ethnographic approach was used to review papers. Four concepts were identified: 'The inevitability of violence and aggression'; 'Staff judgments about why they face violence and aggression'; 'Managing in isolation'; and 'Wounded heroes'. Staff resigned themselves to the inevitability of violence and aggression, doing this due to a perceived lack of support from the organisation. Staff made judgements about the reasons for violent incidents which impacted on how they coped and subsequently tolerated the aggressor. Staff often felt isolated when managing violence and aggression. Key recommendations included: Staff training in understanding violence and aggression and clinical supervision. Violence and aggression in the ED can often be an overwhelming yet inevitable experience for staff. A strong organisational commitment to reducing violence and aggression is imperative. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey

  4. Perspectives of hospital emergency department staff on trauma-informed care for injured children: An Australian and New Zealand analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoysted, Claire; Babl, Franz E; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Landolt, Markus A; Jobson, Laura; Curtis, Sarah; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Lyttle, Mark D; Parri, Niccolò; Stanley, Rachel; Alisic, Eva

    2017-09-01

    To examine Australian and New Zealand emergency department (ED) staff's training, knowledge and confidence regarding trauma-informed care for children after trauma, and barriers to implementation. ED staff's perspectives on trauma-informed care were assessed using a web-based self-report questionnaire. Participants included 468 ED staff (375 nursing and 111 medical staff) from hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, χ 2 tests and multiple regressions. Over 90% of respondents had not received training in trauma-informed care and almost all respondents (94%) wanted training in this area. While knowledge was associated with a respondent's previous training and profession, confidence was associated with the respondent's previous training, experience level and workplace. Dominant barriers to the implementation of trauma-informed care were lack of time and lack of training. There is a need and desire for training and education of Australian and New Zealand ED staff in trauma-informed care. This study demonstrates that experience alone is not sufficient for the development of knowledge of paediatric traumatic stress reactions and trauma-informed care practices. Existing education materials could be adapted for use in the ED and to accommodate the training preferences of Australian and New Zealand ED staff. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Work-related fear and the threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Riitta; Huhtala, Heini; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-10-01

    To describe fear, the threats causing fear and the occurrence of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. The emergency department is a challenging workplace where the staff is often confronted by factors that cause fear. A cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted in 16 hospitals (n = 544). Nurses, practical nurses, orderlies and physicians from those hospitals participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was based on the analysis of interviews of 30 nurses from one university hospital and one central hospital. The results of the interviews were analysed using the inductive content analysis method. The analysis of the survey was performed using statistical methods, such as frequencies, cross-tabulation and principal component analysis. The results showed that nearly all of the emergency department personnel had experienced work-related fear. Generally, the fear had been momentary. According to the survey results, fear was most often caused by medication errors, the resuscitation of a child, a catastrophic accident, urgent or violent situations or patients armed with weapons. Threats that caused fear included insecurity, danger in the work environment, threat of loss of one's health and threat of the consequences of one's mistakes and actions. The staff of emergency departments often encountered factors or situations that caused fear. The main threats causing fear that were raised by the respondents were insecurity and danger in the work environment. The data obtained from this study can be utilised in identifying and describing work-related fear and threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. Based on the information herein, it will be possible to develop methods to prevent situations that cause fear in emergency departments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Staff evaluation of US Department of Energy proposal for monitored retrievable storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    As directed by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the US Department of Energy has prepared a proposal for the US Congress for a facility that can be used for the monitored retrievable storage of spent fuel from commercial users. This report describes the evaluation performed by the staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission of the design concepts for the monitored retrievable storage facility proposed by the Department of Energy. On February 5, 1986 the NRC submitted its principal comments to the Department of Energy in the letter shown on the following pages. 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Lessons for Staff Developers from an Organization Development Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, James A.

    1990-01-01

    A case study of an organization development intervention in a large New York State school district describes to staff developers the complex process of discovering and responding to organizational needs. The discussion focuses on understanding the problem; frameworks for diagnosis and intervention; and implementing the intervention strategy.…

  8. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    .... As a follow-on effort to the previous SGT project, the goal was to refine a brigade-level staff training program to more effectively and efficiently coordinate the activities within and between the...

  9. [Staff Satisfaction within Duty Hour Models: Longitudinal Survey on Suitability and Legal Conformity at a Surgical Maximum Care Department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelotz, C; Koplin, G; Pascher, A; Lohmann, R; Köhler, A; Pratschke, J; Haase, O

    2017-12-01

    Background Between the conflicting requirements of clinic organisation, the European Working Time Directive, patient safety, an increasing lack of junior staff, and competitiveness, the development of ideal duty hour models is vital to ensure maximum quality of care within the legal requirements. To achieve this, it is useful to evaluate the actual effects of duty hour models on staff satisfaction. Materials and Methods After the traditional 24-hour duty shift was given up in a surgical maximum care centre in 2007, an 18-hour duty shift was implemented, followed by a 12-hour shift in 2008, to improve handovers and reduce loss of information. The effects on work organisation, quality of life and salary were analysed in an anonymous survey in 2008. The staff survey was repeated in 2014. Results With a response rate of 95% of questionnaires in 2008 and a 93% response rate in 2014, the 12-hour duty model received negative ratings due to its high duty frequency and subsequent social strain. Also the physical strain and chronic tiredness were rated as most severe in the 12-hour rota. The 18-hour duty shift was the model of choice amongst staff. The 24-hour duty model was rated as the best compromise between the requirements of work organisation and staff satisfaction, and therefore this duty model was adapted accordingly in 2015. Conclusion The essential basis of a surgical department is a duty hour model suited to the requirements of work organisation, the Working Time Directive and the needs of the surgical staff. A 12-hour duty model can be ideal for work organisation, but only if augmented with an adequate number of staff members, the implementation of this model is possible without the frequency of 12-hour shifts being too high associated with strain on surgical staff and a perceived deterioration of quality of life. A staff survey should be performed on a regular basis to assess the actual effects of duty hour models and enable further optimisation. The much

  10. A survey of violence against staff working in the emergency department in ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talas, Melek Serpil; Kocaöz, Semra; Akgüç, Selma

    2011-12-01

    Workplace violence in the emergency department is a significant problem world wide. The aims of this study were to identify the proportion of staff subjected to the types of violence, its sources, factors affecting violence experiences, reporting the incidence and the emotions of the victims after violence. This descriptive study was conducted between March and August 2009 in the the emergency department of six hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Data were collected from 270 staff working in various emergency settings. The instrument was a 36-item questionnaire on types of violence, its sources, feelings, and ways to cope with violent behaviors. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used for data analysis. The results showed 85.2% of participants had been subjected to at least one kind of violence: 41.1% to physical assault, 79.6% to verbal abuse, 55.5% to verbal threats and 15.9% to sexual harassment. Patients' companions (90.9%) were identified as the primary perpetrators of violence. The rates of violence types were highest towards security officers and housekeepers. The most common reactions to violence were sadness and anger. "Did nothing and keeping silent" was the coping method used most commonly by the staff. Participants exposed to physical assaults and verbal threat did not report the incidence of violence to managers were at 43.3% and 65.3% respectively. Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Evaluation of radiation doses received by the staff in nuclear medicine department of Rick

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Naemat Abdalla Mohamed

    2001-01-01

    Environmental monitoring in nuclear medicine rooms at Radiation and Isotopes Center Khartoum RICK were carried out using survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimetry. Staff bodies and hands doses measurements are being conducted using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the radiation received by the staff work in the nuclear medicine department at RICK. Survey meter (RDS-120) and TLD clips of LiF. (Mg.Ti) were used to measure the environment leading of the staff. The associated annual doses have been determined to the staff bodies and hands. It was found that the dose-equivalent rates from bodies and hands of the staff obtained through this work using TLD clips are: nuclear medicine technologist body reading 6.75 mSv per year, physicist body reading 7.89 mSv per year, chemist body reading 6.1 mSv per year, and nurse body reading 8.1 mSv per year. On the other hand the nuclear medicine technologist hands reading 24.19 mSv per year, physicist hands reading 19.15 mSv per year, chemist hands reading 14.616 mSv per year, and nurse hands reading 277.96 mSv per year. All the staff reading in this study agree with the national regulations and international recommendations. It is clear that the dose of nurse hands is the highest one, this is because when they inject the patient with the Tc-99 m they use to spend relatively long time. (Author)

  12. Development of Brigade Staff Tasks for the COBRAS II Brigade Staff Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deter, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    ... and development of simulation-based training for the conventional mounted brigade staff. The work was performed under a project called Combined Arms Operations at Brigade Level, Realistically Achieved Through Simulation (COBRAS).

  13. Psychosocial Care for Injured Children: Worldwide Survey among Hospital Emergency Department Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisic, Eva; Hoysted, Claire; Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Landolt, Markus A; Curtis, Sarah; Kharbanda, Anupam B; Lyttle, Mark D; Parri, Niccolò; Stanley, Rachel; Babl, Franz E

    2016-03-01

    To examine emergency department (ED) staff's knowledge of traumatic stress in children, attitudes toward providing psychosocial care, and confidence in doing so, and also to examine differences in these outcomes according to demographic, professional, and organizational characteristics, and training preferences. We conducted an online survey among staff in ED and equivalent hospital departments, based on the Psychological First Aid and Distress-Emotional Support-Family protocols. Main analyses involved descriptive statistics and multiple regressions. Respondents were 2648 ED staff from 87 countries (62.2% physicians and 37.8% nurses; mean years of experience in emergency care was 9.5 years with an SD of 7.5 years; 25.2% worked in a low- or middle-income country). Of the respondents, 1.2% correctly answered all 7 knowledge questions, with 24.7% providing at least 4 correct answers. Almost all respondents (90.1%) saw all 18 identified aspects of psychosocial care as part of their job. Knowledge and confidence scores were associated with respondent characteristics (eg, years of experience, low/middle vs high-income country), although these explained no more than 11%-18% of the variance. Almost all respondents (93.1%) wished to receive training, predominantly through an interactive website or one-off group training. A small minority (11.1%) had previously received training. More education of ED staff regarding child traumatic stress and psychosocial care appears needed and would be welcomed. Universal education packages that are readily available can be modified for use in the ED. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ready or not: does household preparedness prevent absenteeism among emergency department staff during a disaster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Mary P; Ancock, Benedict; Levis, Joel T; Reyes, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    During major disasters, hospitals experience varied levels of absenteeism among healthcare workers (HCWs) in the immediate response period. Loss of critical hospital personnel, including Emergency Department (ED) staff, during this time can negatively impact a facility's ability to effectively treat large numbers of ill and injured patients. Prior studies have examined factors contributing to HCW ability and willingness to report for duty during a disaster. The purpose of this study was to determine if the degree of readiness of ED personnel, as measured by household preparedness, is associated with predicted likelihood of reporting for duty. Additionally, the authors sought to elucidate other factors associated with absenteeism among ED staff during a disaster. ED staff of five hospitals participated in this survey-based study, answering questions regarding demographic information, past disaster experience, household disaster preparedness (using a novel,15-point scale), and likelihood of reporting to work during various categories of disaster. The primary outcome was personal predicted likelihood of reporting for duty following a disaster. A total of 399 subjects participated in the study. ED staffs were most likely to report for duty in the setting of an earthquake (95 percent) or other natural disaster, followed by an epidemic (90 percent) and were less likely to report for work during a biological, chemical, or a nuclear event (63 percent). Degree of household preparedness was determined to have no association with an ED HCW's predicted likelihood of reporting for duty. Factors associated with predicted absenteeism varied based on type of disaster and included having dependents in the home, female gender, past disaster relief experience, having a spouse or domestic partner, and not owning pets. Having dependents in the home was associated with predicted absenteeism for all disaster types (OR 0.30-0.66). However, when stratified by gender, the presence of

  15. Developing a Mechanism for Assessment of the Mobile Operator Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukovska Liudmyla E.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at determining and substantiating practical recommendations on improving the assessment of staff of mobile operators based on an analysis of the existing theoretical and methodological foundations of formation and implementation of an effective mechanism for staff assessment and the suitability of their application in the competitive conditions. General tendencies in the development of mobile operators have been determined, existing approaches to assessing their staff have been explored. The article substantiates the need for cooperation and exchange of experts among mobile operators on staff assessment issues, using the assessment center technology and the use of an integrated staff assessment based on the points system, which will provide an objective assessment of each employee and will also contribute to the development of staff assessment technology for all telecommunications companies. The organizational and economic foundations for the implementation of these activities and the determination of level of their performance for mobile operators will be purpose of further researches.

  16. Staff Development Strategies for School Library and Media Centres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Selfdesigned questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  17. Staff development strategies for school library media centres: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Self-designed questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  18. Staff survey of organizational structure and process for a Public Health Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J J

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 227 North York Public Health Department (NYPHD) staff provided their perspective on the organizational structure. They perceived that (a) the departmental and divisional organizational structures are effective for program delivery, (b) the Central Resources structure and divisional and departmental reporting structures are moderately effective for program delivery, (c) the decentralized office structure is an advantage for service delivery but less so for administration and intra-division and inter-division communication, (d) the mandatory program structure involves low to moderate interdisciplinary teamwork and moderately impacts service delivery, (e) intra-division and management-staff communication are fair but inter-division and office communication are between poor and fair, (f) education, research, and service are moderately integrated, and (g) the divisional and departmental work atmospheres are a little positive. Management perceived greater participation in program planning, more frequent communication with other divisions, a number of education and research opportunities from various divisions/units, and more management recognition than front line staff did.

  19. Job characteristic perception and intrinsic motivation in medical record department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Bahrami, Soosan; Torki, Sedighe

    2013-01-01

    Human resources are key factors in service organizations like hospitals. Therefore, motivating human recourses to achieve the objectives of an organization is important. Job enrichment is a strategy used to increase job motivation in staffs. The goal of the current study is to determine the relationship between job characteristics and intrinsic motivation in medical record staff in hospitals related to Medical Science University in Isfahan in 2011-2012 academic year. The type of the study is descriptive and corelational of multi variables. The population of the study includes all the medical record staffs of medical record department working in Medical Science hospitals of Isfahan. One hundred twentyseven subjects were selected by conducting a census. In the present study, data collected by using two questionnaires of job characteristics devised by Hackman and Oldeham, and of intrinsic motivation. Content validity was confirmed by experts and its reliability was calculated through coefficient of Cronbach's alpha (r1 = 0.84- r2 = 0.94). The questionnaires completed were entered into SPSS(18) software; furthermore, statistical analysis done descriptively (frequency percent, mean, standard deviation, Pierson correlation coefficient,...) and inferentially (multiple regression, MANOVA, LSD). A significant relationship between job characteristics as well as its elements (skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback) and intrinsic motivation was noticed. (p intrinsic motivation was significant and job feedback had the most impact upon the intrinsic motivation. No significant difference was noticed among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to age, gender, level of education, and the kind of educational degree in hospitals. However, there was a significant difference among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to the unit of service and the years of servicein hospitals. The findings show that all job

  20. Supervision and feedback for junior medical staff in Australian emergency departments: findings from the emergency medicine capacity assessment study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiland Tracey J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical supervision and feedback are important for the development of competency in junior doctors. This study aimed to determine the adequacy of supervision of junior medical staff in Australian emergency departments (EDs and perceived feedback provided. Methods Semi-structured telephone surveys sought quantitative and qualitative data from ED Directors, Directors of Emergency Medicine Training, registrars and interns in 37 representative Australian hospitals; quantitative data were analysed with SPSS 15.0 and qualitative data subjected to content analysis identifying themes. Results Thirty six of 37 hospitals took part. Of 233 potential interviewees, 95 (40.1% granted interviews including 100% (36/36 of ED Directors, and 96.2% (25/26 of eligible DEMTs, 24% (19/81 of advanced trainee/registrars, and 17% (15/90 of interns. Most participants (61% felt the ED was adequately supervised in general and (64.2% that medical staff were adequately supervised. Consultants and registrars were felt to provide most intern supervision, but this varied depending on shift times, with registrars more likely to provide supervision on night shift and at weekends. Senior ED medical staff (64% and junior staff (79% agreed that interns received adequate clinical supervision. Qualitative analysis revealed that good processes were in place to ensure adequate supervision, but that service demands, particularly related to access block and overcrowding, had detrimental effects on both supervision and feedback. Conclusions Consultants appear to provide the majority of supervision of junior medical staff in Australian EDs. Supervision and feedback are generally felt to be adequate, but are threatened by service demands, particularly related to access block and ED overcrowding.

  1. On-line professional staff development: An evaluation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Linda; Naidu, Som; Jegede, Olugbemiro; Collis, Betty

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports the design, implementation, and evaluation of a teleseminar on instructional design (ID) and computer-mediated communication (CMC) for the purposes of staff development at The University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia. Participation was open to any staff with an

  2. Identification of Domains for Malaysian University Staff Happiness Index Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Sulaiman Md.

    2014-01-01

    Without any doubt happiness among staff in any organization is pertinent to ensure continued growth and development. However, not many studies were carried out to determine the domains that will be able to measure the level of happiness among staff in universities. Thus, the aim of this study is to elicit the domains that explain the overall…

  3. Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a medical staff recruitment system for teaching hospitals in Nigeria. ... Nigeria, were visited and relevant information was collated through personal ... The design and development of the system employs 3-tier web architecture.

  4. International networking and staff development EU-style: Cardiff University's library service and the Erasmus staff mobility scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Härkönen, Sonja

    2010-01-01

    Staff development and international networking have always been highly valued in Cardiff University’s library service. We have a strong staff development programme and pilot new ways of training and motivating our staff, for example through job rotation and shadowing. Increasingly over the last few years, we have developed links with colleagues abroad and have had the pleasure of hosting a variety of international visitors. In response to enquiries for staff training we have recently set up t...

  5. Equivalent doses of ionizing radiation received by medical staff at a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziuk, E.; Kowalczyk, A.; Siekierzynski, M.; Jazwinski, J.; Chas, J.; Janiak, M.K.; Palijczuk, D.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Total annual activity of I-131 used for the treatment of thyroid disorders at the Dept.of Nuclear Medicine, Central Clinical Hospital, Military University School of Medicine, in Warsaw, Poland, equal to 190 GBq; at the same time, total activity of Tc-99m utilized at the same Department for diagnostic purposes reached 1 TBq. As estimated from the radiometer readings, in extreme cases the equivalent at a couple of measurement points at this Department may exceed 200 mSv per year. Thus, in the present study we aimed to assess the potential risk of the exposure of medical personnel of the Department to ionizing radiation. Material and Methods: Polymethacrylate cases each housing four thermoluminescent dosimeters were continuously worn for one year by the nurses and doctors with the dosimeters being replaced by the new ones every three months. In addition, cases containing thermoluminescent dosimeters (three dosimeters per case) were placed in 20 different measurement points across the Department and the monitoring of the doses was carried out continuously for more than six years (from May 1995 to March 2002). Based on the quarterly readings of the dosimeters, equivalent doses were calculated for both the members of the personnel and the measurement space points. Results: The doses registered in the patient rooms ranged 5 to 90 mSv x y -1 , in the application room 10 to 15 mSv x y -1 , in the laboratory rooms 1.5 to 30 mSv x y -1 , and in the waiting room 2 to 6 mSv x y -1 ; no increment above the background level was detected in the nurses' station. Accordingly, the annual doses calculated from the dosimeters worn by the staff ranged 0.2 to 1.1 mSv x y -1 ; these latter findings were confirmed by direct readings from individual film dosimeters additionally worn by the staff members. Conclusion: The obtained results indicate that it is unlikely for the personnel of the monitored Nuclear Medicine Department to receive doses of radiation exceeding 40% of the annual

  6. Staff development and library services in academic libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. ... Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, data was ...

  7. Staff Development and Instructional Improvement: Response to Robbins and Wolfe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1987-01-01

    Critiques the Napa/Vacaville project for being exceptionally well designed yet being ineffective. The key to effective staff development is to find ways of increasing teachers' ability to accept innovations and incorporate them into their teaching repertoires. (MD)

  8. Implementing Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Data Collection in Emergency Departments: Patient and Staff Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Danielle; Kodadek, Lisa; Shields, Ryan; Peterson, Susan; Snyder, Claire; Schneider, Eric; Vail, Laura; Ranjit, Anju; Torain, Maya; Schuur, Jeremiah; Lau, Brandyn; Haider, Adil

    2016-12-01

    To identify patient and provider perspectives concerning collection of sexual orientation and gender identity (SO&GI) information in emergency departments (EDs). Semistructured interviews were conducted during the period of 2014-2015 with a diverse purposive sample of patients across the spectrum of sexual orientation and gender identities (n = 53) and ED nurses, physician assistants, physicians, and registrars (n = 38) in a major metropolitan area. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by multiple coders using constant comparative methods. Patients were willing to provide SO&GI information if collected safely and appropriately, and staff described willingness to collect SO&GI information to inform understanding of health disparities. Key themes across respondents were as follows: What will be done with the data? How will it be collected? Who will collect it? Is the environment conducive to safe disclosure? Confidentiality and potential sensitivity; standardized collection emphasizing population health; nurse intake and/or nonverbal data collection; and environmental cues and cultural competency promoting comfort for sexual and gender minorities emerged as critical considerations for effective implementation. Staff and patients are amenable to SO&GI data collection in EDs, but data quality and patient and provider comfort may be compromised without attention to specific implementation considerations.

  9. Professional Ethics and Organizational Commitment Among the Education Department Staff of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Imani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concepts such as organizational commitment and employees’ and managers’ ethics provide decision-makers and policy makers with potentially useful information which can result in increasing organizational efficiency and effectiveness. This study aimed to explore the relationship between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the staff working in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. The study population consisted of all staff working as educational experts in the education departments of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (N = 65. Data collection instruments used in this study were two standard questionnaires on professional ethics and organizational commitment. SPSS software version 21 was used to analyze the data. Results: According to the results, mean scores obtained for professional ethics and organizational commitment were (91.57± 9.13 (95% CI, 89.23-93.91 and (64.89 ± 10.37 (95% CI, 62.2367.54, respectively. A significant relationship was observed between professional ethics and organizational commitment among the educational experts working in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (correlation coefficient = 0.405 (P = 0.001 (at 95% confidence level. Furthermore, there was a significant relationship between professional ethics and work experience (P = 0.043. The highest level of professional ethics observed was associated with those participants having a work experience of ranging from 6 to 10 years. Individuals with fulltime employment scored the highest in organizational commitment. Conclusion: Educational experts possessed a high level of professional ethics. The finding provides the grounds for promoting organizational commitment, which will lead to higher levels of organizational effectiveness.

  10. Staff Development and Total Quality Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Gerald L.; Norris, Joye H.

    Professional development is an emerging view of faculty development that places teachers in charge of their own professional growth. The emergence of Total Quality Management (TQM) provides a vehicle for designing professional development to meet the needs of individuals and the organizations that employ them. The eight tenets of Deming's theory…

  11. A Survey of Violence Against Staff Working in the Emergency Department in Ankara, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas, RN, PhD

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted.

  12. [Human resources management in a mother and child department: a research study on new nursing and obstetric staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sferrazza, Silvia; Papalia, Monica; Rossi, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    To put "human resources" in the first place in a working context is an ambitious target. The basic idea is the give more value to the human and professional contribution of each individual in order to create an alliance between an organization and the people who work in it. In this context, the nursing coordinator plays a key role in inserting new staff. In this delicate phase, the expectations of new staff may or may not be fulfilled. The aim of the present study is to examine the possible difficulties that may occur during this phase. The study included 175 new staff and 175 nurses, obstetricians and pediatric nurses already at work for a total of 350. Research instruments consisted of two anonymous ad hoc questionnaires, the first issued to new staff at the Mother and Child Department, the second to staff already working in the same department. Results showed a lack of sensitivity towards new staff and a lack of dedicated procedures to help them during this delicate phase which is fundamental for their future career. Key words: newly assumed staff, work insertion, nurses.

  13. Clinical staff nurse leadership: Identifying gaps in competency development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks-Meeks, Sherron

    2018-01-01

    To date, there has been no development of a complete, applicable inventory of clinical staff nurse (CSN) leadership role competencies through a valid and reliable methodology. Further, the CSN has not been invited to engage in the identification, definition, or development of their own leadership competencies. Compare existing leadership competencies to identify and highlight gaps in clinical staff nurse leadership role competency development and validation. Literature review. The CSN has not participated in the development of CSN leadership role competencies, nor have the currently identified CSN leadership role competencies been scientifically validated through research. Finally, CSN leadership role competencies are incomplete and do not reflect the CSN perspective. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy`s Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-08-01

    This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff`s concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation`s first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE`s SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC`s specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE`s program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director`s Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff`s concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE`s program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC`s responsibilities with respect to DOE`s SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mobile Phone Training Platform for the Nursing Staff in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqing; Cheng, Jing; Huang, Sufang

    2018-05-09

    Continuous education is required for nursing staff, but continuous education can be complicated for nurses working shifts, such as those in the emergency department (ED). To explore the effectiveness of the ED Training Platform of Tongji Hospital for conventional continuing education of emergency nurses. The training completion rate and training outcomes were validated. This was a retrospective study of all in-service emergency nurses working at the Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology between August 2016 and August 2017. The training results of the previous year of the same group were used as controls. The platform used was an online system called JikeXuetang ( www.jkxuetang.com/ ), using the WeChat application as a carrier. The training completion rate and pass rate were compared with the control data. Among 124 nurses, the training completion rate increased from training course; 89.7% believed it as an effective tool of learning, and intended to join public courses after completion; and 63.4% nurses expressed the wish to receive push services once or twice weekly for training course. The outcome of emergency nurse training was improved using the mobile training platform. This approach was more feasible and easier for training.

  16. School Library Development and Use by Staff and Students of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated school library development and use by staff and students of secondary schools in the Federal capital territory, Abuja. The overall objective of the study is to examine the state of secondary school library development and its usage, find out if these libraries have achieved the expected level of ...

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff development of the license application review plan for a high-level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.L.; Holonich, J.J.; Lee, M.P.; Delligatti, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has recently started a new initiative to develop the License Application Review Plan (LARP) which the staff will use in its reviews of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) license application (LA) for a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). This paper describes the staff's approach for developing the LARP, the development schedule and current status, the organization and content of the LARP, and the staff's LA review strategy. Therefore, it gives a preview of the draft LARP which will be made available in late 1993. It also describes how the LARP will be used as guidance to the staff in conducting reviews of regulatory and technical issues important to the licensing of a geologic repository. Finally, the benefits to the NRC staff, DOE, and other parties are discussed

  18. staff development of Library Assistants in the Kwame Nkrumah

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    of staff development of Library Assistants in the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and. Technology. ... Only 29% of them had enjoyed study leave with pay, while over ... opportunity to participate in seminars, workshops, Library Association Meetings and Confer- ences. ... ing his career and the forthcoming requirements.

  19. Funding Staff Development for School Improvement and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applewhite, Ann Simpson

    1999-01-01

    When Thornton (Colorado) High School organized for site-based management, the structuring committee understood the importance of providing a professional-development fund for staff members. The school decided to restructure with one central umbrella committee for site-based governance and several subcommittees reporting to the main committee. (MLH)

  20. Staff Development for Rural Middle Schools through Regional Conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, William F.

    1994-01-01

    Isolation, limited access to colleges and universities, and financial constraints restrict staff development opportunities for rural school systems. Recognizing these problems, the Virginia Middle School Association has adopted a regional conference structure that shifts meeting locations throughout seven major areas. The "hot topics"…

  1. Educating Emergency Department Staff on the Identification and Treatment of Human Trafficking Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Steven; Schwien, Michael; LaVallee, Danielle

    2018-05-17

    Hospitalization is one of the few circumstances in which the lives of trafficking victims intersect with the general population. Based on survivor testimonies, the majority of human trafficking victims may receive medical treatment in a hospital's emergency department while in captivity. With evidenced-based training, ED personnel have a better opportunity to screen persons who are being trafficked and intervene on their behalf. This project examined the efficacy of an innovative, evidence-based online training module (HTEmergency.com) created by the project team. Participants completed a pre-survey to determine learning needs and a post-survey to determine the effectiveness of the online education. The learning module contained a PowerPoint presentation, identification and treatment guidelines, and 2 realistic case studies. Data were collected among ED personnel in 2 suburban hospitals located near a northeast metropolitan city. Seventy-five employees participated in the survey and education. Staff completing the education included nurses, physicians, nurse practitioners/physician assistants, registration, and ED technicians. Results indicated that 89% of participants had not received previous human trafficking training. Less than half of the participants stated that they had a comprehensive understanding of human trafficking before the intervention, with an increase to 93% after education. The training module significantly increased confidence in identification (from an average confidence level of 4/10 to 7/10) and treatment (from an average confidence level of 4/10 to 8/10) of human trafficking victims within the emergency department; 96% found the educational module to be useful in their work setting. Participants reported that they are more confident in identifying a possible trafficking victim and are more likely to screen patients for human trafficking after participation in the online training module. The proposed general guideline for care provided ED

  2. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  3. Review article: Staff perception of the emergency department working environment: Integrative review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa; Greenslade, Jaimi; Thom, Ogilvie; Carlstrom, Eric; Wallis, Marianne; Crilly, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Employees in EDs report increasing role overload because of critical staff shortages, budgetary cuts and increased patient numbers and acuity. Such overload could compromise staff satisfaction with their working environment. This integrative review identifies, synthesises and evaluates current research around staff perceptions of the working conditions in EDs. A systematic search of relevant databases, using MeSH descriptors ED/EDs, Emergency room/s, ER/s, or A&E coupled with (and) working environment, working condition/s, staff perception/s, as well as reference chaining was conducted. We identified 31 key studies that were evaluated using the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT). These comprised 24 quantitative‐descriptive studies, four mixed descriptive/comparative (non‐randomised controlled trial) studies and three qualitative studies. Studies included varied widely in quality with MMAT scores ranging from 0% to 100%. A key finding was that perceptions of working environment varied across clinical staff and study location, but that high levels of autonomy and teamwork offset stress around high pressure and high volume workloads. The large range of tools used to assess staff perception of working environment limits the comparability of the studies. A dearth of intervention studies around enhancing working environments in EDs limits the capacity to recommend evidence‐based interventions to improve staff morale. © 2016 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine PMID:26784282

  4. Experience from the development of Point Lepreau's training program for technical support staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, S.; Scott, K.

    2007-01-01

    The Training Department at the Point Lepreau GS has been developing and improving its training for technical support staff. A generic set of objectives are being used as the basis for a systematic approach to training. The program covers general and job specific knowledge and skills using a mix of classroom instruction, mentoring and continuing training seminars. This paper describes experience, success and the challenges in the development, delivery and evaluation of the training program. (author)

  5. NRC staff site characterization analysis of the Department of Energy's Site Characterization Plan, Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This Site Characterization Analysis (SCA) documents the NRC staff's concerns resulting from its review of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Site Characterization Plan (SCP) for the Yucca Mountain site in southern Nevada, which is the candidate site selected for characterization as the nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. DOE's SCP explains how DOE plans to obtain the information necessary to determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for a repository. NRC's specific objections related to the SCP, and major comments and recommendations on the various parts of DOE's program, are presented in SCA Section 2, Director's Comments and Recommendations. Section 3 contains summaries of the NRC staff's concerns for each specific program, and Section 4 contains NRC staff point papers which set forth in greater detail particular staff concerns regarding DOE's program. Appendix A presents NRC staff evaluations of those NRC staff Consultation Draft SCP concerns that NRC considers resolved on the basis of the SCP. This SCA fulfills NRC's responsibilities with respect to DOE's SCP as specified by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and 10 CFR 60.18. 192 refs., 2 tabs

  6. Medical staff organization in nursing homes: scale development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul R; Karuza, Jurgis; Intrator, Orna; Zinn, Jacqueline; Mor, Vincent; Caprio, Thomas; Caprio, Anthony; Dauenhauer, Jason; Lima, Julie

    2009-09-01

    To construct a multidimensional self-report scale to measure nursing home (NH) medical staff organization (NHMSO) dimensions and then pilot the scale using a national survey of medical directors to provide data on its psychometric properties. Instrument development process consisting of the proceedings from the Nursing Home Physician Workforce Conference and focus groups followed by cognitive interviews, which culminated in a survey of a random sample of American Medical Directors Association (AMDA) affiliated medical directors. Analyses were conducted on surveys matched to Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) data from freestanding nonpediatric nursing homes. A total of 202 surveys were available for analysis and comprised the final sample. Dimensions were identified that measured the extent of medical staff organization in nursing homes and included staff composition, appointment process, commitment (physiciancohesion; leadership turnover/capability), departmentalization (physician supervision, autonomy and interdisciplinary involvement), documentation, and informal dynamics. The items developed to measure each dimension were reliable (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.81 to 0.65).Intercorrelations among the scale dimensions provided preliminary evidence of the construct validity of the scale. This report, for the first time ever, defines and validates NH medical staff organization dimensions, a critical first step in determining the relationship between physician practice and the quality of care delivered in the NH.

  7. Integration of Staff Development and Research: Description of the Staff Development Project in Progress for the School Year 1975-1976. Technical Report #62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Gisela E.

    This report from the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP) describes the 1975-76 KEEP staff development program, which was designed to integrate staff development and research. Specific purposes of the program were: (1) to develop the abilities of the teaching staff in teaching, consultation, and research; (2) to conduct pilot research in…

  8. Knowledge of Good Blood Culture Sampling Practice among Healthcare Staffs in An Emergency Department - Are We Getting It Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, K S; Mohd Hashairi, F; Jusoh, A F; Aziz, A A; Nik Hisamuddin, N A R; Siti Asma, H

    2013-08-01

    Although a vital test, blood culture is often plagued with the problem of contamination and false results, especially in a chaotic emergency department setting. The objectives of this pilot study is to find out the level of understanding among healthcare staffs in emergency department, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) regarding good blood culture sampling practice. All healthcare staffs in emergency department, HUSM who consented to this study were given a set of selfadministered anonymous questionnaire to fill. More than half (53.1%) of the 64 participants are emergency medicine residents. Majority of them (75%) have been working in the emergency medicine, HUSM for more than 2 years. More than half of them were able to answer correctly the amount of blood volume needed for culture in adult and pediatric patients. When asked what are the factors required to improve the true yield as well as to reduce the risk of culture contamination, the four commonest answers given were observing proper aseptic technique during blood sampling, donning sterile glove, proper hand scrubbing as well as ensuring the sterility of the equipments. This study suggests that there is a lack of proper knowledge of good blood culture sampling practice among our healthcare staffs in emergency department.

  9. Staff development and employee welfare practices and their effect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Every organization primarily needs committed and dedicated staff that will help the ... are being offered to increase staff competence, efficiencies and performance. ... staff welfare practices and how these affect productivity and performance.

  10. The 'unnecessary' use of emergency departments by older people: findings from hospital data, hospital staff and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Debbie; Law, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Increasing demands are being placed on emergency departments in Australia and there is a view that older Australians are more likely than other age groups to attend for non-urgent conditions. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast administrative data with the views of hospital staff and older people with regard to their presentation at two emergency departments in metropolitan Adelaide and how this aligns with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare definition of 'potentially avoidable general practitioner-type presentations'. The study used three sources of data from two emergency departments: hospital data for the financial year 2010-11 for patients aged 65 years and over and identified as triage category four or five; three focus groups with medical, nursing and allied staff from these two hospitals; and interviews with 58 older people who presented at the two emergency departments over a two-week period. The hospital administrative data provided a very limited insight into why older people attended the emergency department, other than the medical diagnosis. Professional staff identified individual determinants, societal determinants and the health services system as explanations. Older people attended the emergency department for a range of reasons that may not necessarily reflect the opinions of health professionals. For many older people the emergency department was an appropriate place to attend considering their condition, though some presentations could be circumvented with appropriate and increased services in the community. However, as many older people suffer comorbidities, careful consideration needs to be given as to the best possible practices to achieve this.

  11. Examining emergency department communication through a staff-based participatory research method: identifying barriers and solutions to meaningful change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenzie A; Engel, Kirsten G; McCarthy, Danielle M; Buckley, Barbara A; Mercer Kollar, Laura Min; Donlan, Sarah M; Pang, Peter S; Makoul, Gregory; Tanabe, Paula; Gisondi, Michael A; Adams, James G

    2010-12-01

    We test an initiative with the staff-based participatory research (SBPR) method to elicit communication barriers and engage staff in identifying strategies to improve communication within our emergency department (ED). ED staff at an urban hospital with 85,000 ED visits per year participated in a 3.5-hour multidisciplinary workshop. The workshop was offered 6 times and involved: (1) large group discussion to review the importance of communication within the ED and discuss findings from a recent survey of patient perceptions of ED-team communication; (2) small group discussions eliciting staff perceptions of communication barriers and best practices/strategies to address these challenges; and (3) large group discussions sharing and refining emergent themes and suggested strategies. Three coders analyzed summaries from group discussions by using latent content and constant comparative analysis to identify focal themes. A total of 127 staff members, including attending physicians, residents, nurses, ED assistants, and secretaries, participated in the workshop (overall participation rate 59.6%; range 46.7% to 73.3% by staff type). Coders identified a framework of 4 themes describing barriers and proposed interventions: (1) greeting and initial interaction, (2) setting realistic expectations, (3) team communication and respect, and (4) information provision and delivery. The majority of participants (81.4%) reported that their participation would cause them to make changes in their clinical practice. Involving staff in discussing barriers and facilitators to communication within the ED can result in a meaningful process of empowerment, as well as the identification of feasible strategies and solutions at both the individual and system levels. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association between Local Illumination and Visual Fatigue among the Research and Development Staffs of Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Mashkoori

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Work proper lighting means a safe, healthy and comfort conditions for work under a lighting system that includes qualitative and quantitative features. This study aimed to evaluate the surface local lighting of works and eye fatigue among research and development staffs of an automotive industry. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive study in Research and Development Department of an automotive industry in 2015, 126 official staffs were selected randomly. A demographic questionnaire and the Visual Fatigue Questionnaire (Persian Version were used for data gathering. Hagner EC1 Luxmeter was used to measure the local lighting. Data were analyzed by SPSS 20 software, through descriptive statistics. Findings: The lighting in 382 stations (75.8% was improper and less than standard. The minimum and maximum intensity of light was between 22.4lux in station 2 (inventory department and 581lux in station 4 (systems and methods department. The overall intensity in more than 50% units, except the Systems and Methods Department, were less than the standard (300lux. 40.4% of the participants had severe eye fatigue, 28.6% had moderate visual fatigue, 28.6% had low visual fatigue and only 2.4% had no visual fatigue. The average of visual fatigue was 3.50±1.97. Conclusion: The workplace lighting and the eye fatigue of computer users in the Research and Development Department of the studied automotive industry are not in an acceptable condition.

  13. Nostalgia, gamification and staff development – moving staff training away from didactic delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Foster

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that incorporating games into education supports active learning and student participation. With that in mind, we created a staff development session that involved a playful learning activity, in which attendees experienced 90’s nostalgia, whilst working on an important learning and teaching issue.Based on the British game show, The Crystal Maze, The ‘Crys-TEL’ maze required attendees to complete a number of challenges as a group to attempt to ‘solve’ a pressing learning and teaching issue. Using gamification techniques, defined as game design elements in non-game settings, attendees experienced different delivery styles, whilst always working towards the learning and teaching issue they had been asked to consider. In a nod to the original Crystal Maze game show, attendees worked in groups to score points for completing various tasks. The two groups with the most points competed against each other in the final to collect crystals, and ultimately conquer the ‘maze’.This article will describe the journey we took from the initial concept through to the delivery of the session, and our reflections and proposed future developments of the Crys-TEL Maze.

  14. [Peripheral venous catheter use in the emergency department: reducing adverse events in patients and biosafety problems for staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Vecina, Santiago; Mozota Duarte, Julián; Ortega Marcos, Miguel; Gracia Ruiz Navarro, María; Borillo, Vicente; San Juan Gago, Leticia; Roqueta Egea, Fermin; Chanovas Borrás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To test a strategy to reduce the rate of adverse events in patients and safety problems for emergency department staff who insert peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). The strategy consisted of training, implementing a protocol, and introducing safety-engineered PVCs. Prospective, multicenter, observational, preauthorization study in patients requiring PVC placement in an emergency department. The study had 2 phases. The first consisted of training, implementing a protocol for using conventional PVCs, and monitoring practice. The second phase introduced safety-engineered PVC sets. The number of adverse events in patients and threats to safety for staff were compared between the 2 phases. A total of 520 patients were included, 180 in the first phase and 340 in the second. We detected breaches in aseptic technique, failure to maintain a sterile field, and improper management of safety equipment and devices. Some practices improved significantly during the second phase. Eighty-six adverse events occurred in the first phase and 52 (15.4%) in the second; the between-phase difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of postinfusion phlebitis was 50% lower in the second phase. Seven splash injuries and 1 accidental puncture occurred with conventional PVCs in the first phase; 2 splash injuries occurred with the safety-engineered PVCs in the second phase (36% decrease, P = .04). Differences were particularly noticeable for short-term PVC placements (P = .02). Combining training, a protocol, and the use of safety-engineered PVC sets offers an effective strategy for improving patient and staff safety.

  15. Administrative circular No. 2 (Rev. 5) – Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 5) entitled "Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 1 September 2011, is available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department: https://cern.ch/hr-docs/admincirc/admincirc.asp It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 4) entitled "Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members" of September 2009. Department Head Office

  16. Measurements Of Fingers Doses Of Staff Members In Nuclear Medicine Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL LEHYANI, S.H.; SHOUSHA, H.A.; HASSAN, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    For some occupationally radiation exposed groups, the hands are more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation than the rest of the body. The Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority runs an extensive personal dosimetry service in Egypt, but finger doses have not been measured to a wide extent. In this study, the finger doses were measured for five different nuclear medicine staff occupational groups for which heavy irradiation of the hands was suspected. Finger doses were measured for nuclear medicine physicians, technologists, nurses and physicists. The nuclear medicine staff working with the radioactive materials wears two TLD dosimeters during the whole period, which lasted from 1 to 4 weeks. The staff performs their work on a regular basis throughout the month, and means annual doses were calculated for these groups. The doses to the fingers for the 99m Tc technologists and nurses of groups (2) and (3) were observed to be 30.24 ± 14.5 μSv/GBq (mean ± SD) and 30.37 ± 17.5 μSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the fingers for the 131 I technologists in group (5) was estimated to be 126.13 ± 38.2μSv/GBq. Finger doses for the physicians could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly but their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 week. The doses to the fingers of the physicist were 16.3±7.7 μSv/GBq. The maximum average finger dose in this study was found to be 2.8 mSv for the technologists handled therapeutic 131 I (group 5). It could be concluded that the maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y).

  17. Understanding and Managing Staff Development in an Urban School System. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechty, Phillip; And Others

    A study is reported that examined the way staff development functions in schools, the effects of staff development, and the interaction between staff development and other activities and conditions in school systems. The study took place in a large urban school district (in the Southeast) that is heavily committed to and involved in staff…

  18. Factors influencing perceived effectiveness in dealing with self-harming patients in a sample of emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Rachel; Sarma, Kiran M; O'Neill, Meena

    2012-12-01

    Past self-harming behavior is one of the most significant predictors of future suicide. Each year in Ireland there are approximately 11,000 presentations of self-harm to emergency departments (EDs) across the country. This study examines predictors of perceived personal effectiveness in dealing with self-harming patients as reported by ED staff. The predictors are derived from past research and are influenced by Bandura's Social Cognitive Theory. One hundred twenty-five ED medical staff (28 doctors and 97 nurses) from five EDs in the West and South of Ireland completed a questionnaire. Predictor variables included in the design, and informed by past research, included knowledge of self-harm and suicidal behavior and confidence in dealing with incidents of self-harm. Standard multiple regression suggested a statistically significant model fit between the two predictors and the criterion variable, accounting for 24% of total variance. Knowledge and Confidence were significant contributors to perceived personal effectiveness in dealing with self-harming patients. Little is known regarding specific factors that influence perceived effectiveness in dealing with self-harming patients in the ED setting. These findings have implications for psycho-education and training content for staff. The findings suggest that increasing knowledge of self-harm and confidence in dealing with self-harming patients can lead to more positive perceived personal effectiveness in responding to clients' needs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Processes of Curriculum Development in the Department of Graphic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    national skills shortage by developing responsive curricula which will ensure that graduating students are well ... innovative pedagogy which integrates recent technologies into curriculum development and classroom practice. .... developing confidence amongst staff and in facilitating creative and innovative thinking.

  20. Developing the mental health awareness of prison staff in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Elizabeth; Freshwater, Dawn

    2009-10-01

    In 2010, the prison population in England and Wales could reach a high of 91,500, according to a recent population projection. HM Prison Service (U.K.) reports that in 2004 to 2005, there were 33,144 prison officers employed to care for the prisoners in the prison system. This article focuses on the mental health of this prisoner population and the training needs of staff caring for them. It reports the experience of a national project, funded by the Department of Health, in which the project team developed and piloted mental health awareness training for prison officers on the residential units and for staff who work with prisoners and lack a mental health background. Key findings from the posttraining evaluation are highlighted. Participant feedback demonstrates the value placed on this type of training by those working in the prison setting.

  1. Information seeking for making evidence-informed decisions: a social network analysis on the staff of a public health department in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousefi-Nooraie Reza

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social network analysis is an approach to study the interactions and exchange of resources among people. It can help understanding the underlying structural and behavioral complexities that influence the process of capacity building towards evidence-informed decision making. A social network analysis was conducted to understand if and how the staff of a public health department in Ontario turn to peers to get help incorporating research evidence into practice. Methods The staff were invited to respond to an online questionnaire inquiring about information seeking behavior, identification of colleague expertise, and friendship status. Three networks were developed based on the 170 participants. Overall shape, key indices, the most central people and brokers, and their characteristics were identified. Results The network analysis showed a low density and localized information-seeking network. Inter-personal connections were mainly clustered by organizational divisions; and people tended to limit information-seeking connections to a handful of peers in their division. However, recognition of expertise and friendship networks showed more cross-divisional connections. Members of the office of the Medical Officer of Health were located at the heart of the department, bridging across divisions. A small group of professional consultants and middle managers were the most-central staff in the network, also connecting their divisions to the center of the information-seeking network. In each division, there were some locally central staff, mainly practitioners, who connected their neighboring peers; but they were not necessarily connected to other experts or managers. Conclusions The methods of social network analysis were useful in providing a systems approach to understand how knowledge might flow in an organization. The findings of this study can be used to identify early adopters of knowledge translation interventions, forming

  2. Information seeking for making evidence-informed decisions: a social network analysis on the staff of a public health department in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Social network analysis is an approach to study the interactions and exchange of resources among people. It can help understanding the underlying structural and behavioral complexities that influence the process of capacity building towards evidence-informed decision making. A social network analysis was conducted to understand if and how the staff of a public health department in Ontario turn to peers to get help incorporating research evidence into practice. Methods The staff were invited to respond to an online questionnaire inquiring about information seeking behavior, identification of colleague expertise, and friendship status. Three networks were developed based on the 170 participants. Overall shape, key indices, the most central people and brokers, and their characteristics were identified. Results The network analysis showed a low density and localized information-seeking network. Inter-personal connections were mainly clustered by organizational divisions; and people tended to limit information-seeking connections to a handful of peers in their division. However, recognition of expertise and friendship networks showed more cross-divisional connections. Members of the office of the Medical Officer of Health were located at the heart of the department, bridging across divisions. A small group of professional consultants and middle managers were the most-central staff in the network, also connecting their divisions to the center of the information-seeking network. In each division, there were some locally central staff, mainly practitioners, who connected their neighboring peers; but they were not necessarily connected to other experts or managers. Conclusions The methods of social network analysis were useful in providing a systems approach to understand how knowledge might flow in an organization. The findings of this study can be used to identify early adopters of knowledge translation interventions, forming Communities of Practice, and

  3. 38 CFR 21.382 - Training and staff development for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training and staff....382 Training and staff development for personnel providing assistance under Chapter 31. (a) General. VA shall provide a program of ongoing professional training and development for staff of the VR&E...

  4. Staff development and secondary science teachers: Factors that affect voluntary participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Theresa Roebuck

    2000-10-01

    A researcher-designed survey assessed the perceptions of Alabama secondary science public school teachers toward the need for staff development and toward certain staff development strategies and programs. Factors that encouraged or discouraged attendance at voluntary staff development programs and opinions regarding effective and ineffective features of programs were identified. Data were analyzed using descriptive techniques. Percentages and frequencies were noted. Average rankings were computed for the staff development techniques considered most and least effective and for the preferred designs of future staff development offerings. Chi squares were computed to respond to each of the 4 research hypotheses. Narrative discussions and tables were utilized to report the data and provide clarification. This study related demographic information to the research hypotheses. Analysis of the research hypotheses revealed that experienced teachers agree more strongly about the features of staff development programs that they consider effective and about the factors that may affect participation in staff development programs. Analysis of the research questions revealed that secondary science teachers in Alabama agree that staff development is a personal responsibility but that the school systems are responsible for providing staff development opportunities. Teachers believe that staff development is needed annually in both science content and teaching strategies and favor lengthening the school year for staff development. Teachers identified interest level, graduate credit, ability to implement material, scheduling factors, and the reputation of the organizer as the most important factors in determining participation in voluntary staff development programs. Hands-on workshops were identified as the most effective type of voluntary staff development and teachers requested that future staff development experiences include hands-on workshops, networking, curriculum

  5. Magazine Development: Creative Arts Magazines Can Take on More Creativity through Staff Innovation, Desktop Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutsinger, John

    1988-01-01

    Explains how a high school literary magazine staff accessed the journalism department's Apple Macintosh computers to typeset its publication. Provides examples of magazine layouts designed partially or completely by "Pagemaker" software on a Macintosh. (MM)

  6. Developing the digital literacies of academic staff: an institutional approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Newland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work:• Learning and teaching• Research• Communication and collaboration• AdministrationFor each literacy, there is an explanation of what the literacy is, why it is important and how to gain it, with links to resources and training opportunities. After an initial pilot, the DLF website was launched in the summer of 2014. This paper discusses the strategic context and policy development of the DLF, its initial conception and subsequent development based on a pilot phase, feedback and evaluation. It critically analyses two of the ways that engagement with the DLF have been promoted: (1 formal professional development schemes and (2 the use of a ‘School-based’ approach. It examines the successes and challenges of the University of Brighton's scheme and makes some suggestions for subsequent steps including taking a course-level approach.

  7. Perspectives of emergency department staff on the triage of mental health-related presentations: Implications for education, policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdtz, Marie F; Weiland, Tracey J; Jelinek, George A; Mackinlay, Claire; Hill, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    To explore ED staff perceptions of the factors that influence accuracy of triage for people with mental health problems. This qualitative learning needs analysis used a descriptive exploratory design. Participants were Australian emergency nurses and doctors. We used a criterion-based sampling approach. Recruitment was facilitated by the College of Emergency Nursing Australasia and the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine. A semi-structured interview schedule was developed. Telephone interviews were conducted, audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was used to identify factors perceived to affect triage outcomes and to explore strategies to optimise the accuracy of triage assessments. Thirty-six staff participated (16 nurses and 20 doctors). Four major factors were perceived to influence accuracy. These were: environmental factors (physical structure, time pressures, activity levels, and interruptions), policy and education (guidelines, training and resources), staff factors (knowledge, experience, attitudes) and patient factors (police presence, patient behaviour, clinical condition). Differences of opinion were expressed by emergency doctors about the validity of the time to treatment objectives included in the Australasian Triage Scale for mental health presentations, and the utility of the scale to differentiate urgency for psychiatric conditions. Clinical guidelines and training have been developed to support the use of the Australasian Triage Scale. Further evaluation of the application of this scale to assess mental health problems is indicated. Additional work is also required to reduce variance in urgency assignment based on staff knowledge and attitudes about the causes, assessment and early management of psychiatric disorders. © 2012 The Authors. EMA © 2012 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Systematic Management of Change Is the Key to Successful Staff Development. An Initial Study of the Bloomfield Public Schools Staff Development Project. Teacher Essentials, Styles & Strategies (TESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celso, Nicholas; Morris, Harold

    Confronted by a maturing staff, lower teacher turnover rates, declining enrollments, and more sophisticated instructional methods, the Bloomfield (New Jersey) Public School District adopted an ambitious staff development initiative in 1983. This paper describes the planning and implementation strategies used to launch Bloomfield's Teaching…

  9. How can hospitals better protect the privacy of electronic medical records? Perspectives from staff members of health information management departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Ming-Ling; Talley, Paul C; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Kuo, Kuang-Ming

    2017-05-01

    The adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) is expected to better improve overall healthcare quality and to offset the financial pressure of excessive administrative burden. However, safeguarding EMR against potentially hostile security breaches from both inside and outside healthcare facilities has created increased patients' privacy concerns from all sides. The aim of our study was to examine the influencing factors of privacy protection for EMR by healthcare professionals. We used survey methodology to collect questionnaire responses from staff members in health information management departments among nine Taiwanese hospitals active in EMR utilisation. A total of 209 valid responses were collected in 2014. We used partial least squares for analysing the collected data. Perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy and cues to action were found to have a significant association with intention to protect EMR privacy, while perceived susceptibility and perceived severity were not. Based on the findings obtained, we suggest that hospitals should provide continuous ethics awareness training to relevant staff and design more effective strategies for improving the protection of EMR privacy in their charge. Further practical and research implications are also discussed.

  10. Pharmacy staff training and development: upside-down thinking in a changing profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, W T; Hughes, T F; Eckel, F M

    1992-04-01

    We suggest that the most fundamental change in staff development that must occur is recognition of the need for a professional belief system as the basis for any pharmaceutical care activity. Values derived from fundamental moral ideals and professional beliefs foster the development of attitudes and behaviors. It would be wrong to suggest or imply that such a change need only occur in postbaccalaureate training. The development of personal and professional value systems in existing primary professional training programs is inadequate--we do not yet do enough to develop people before they enter practice. Nevertheless, to say that this failure of the professional education system precludes us from taking action within professional departments is unwise. The primary skills that must be developed during the next decade involve the ability of the practitioner to competently make informed, patient-specific decisions necessary for effective pharmaceutical care. Such decisions are made not only on the basis of a practitioner's knowledge but on the basis of his or her beliefs and values as well. The practitioner also must be willing to assume responsibility for the consequences of those decisions. The pharmacist who professes to deliver pharmaceutical care can no longer be shielded by assigning to the physician the ultimate responsibility for the patient's drug-therapy outcomes. Facilitating the development of a value system and attitude that enhance the pharmacist's ability to make such decisions must be a principal focus of staff training and development in the coming years.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Beyond triage: the diagnostic accuracy of emergency department nursing staff risk assessment in patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Edward Watts; Khattab, Ahmed; Greaves, Kim

    2016-02-01

    To establish the accuracy of emergency department (ED) nursing staff risk assessment using an established chest pain risk score alone and when incorporated with presentation high-sensitivity troponin testing as part of an accelerated diagnostic protocol (ADP). Prospective observational study comparing nursing and physician risk assessment using the modified Goldman (m-Goldman) score and a predefined ADP, incorporating presentation high-sensitivity troponin. A UK District ED. Consecutive patients, aged ≥18, with suspected cardiac chest pain and non-ischaemic ECG, for whom the treating physician determined serial troponin testing was required. 30-day major adverse cardiac events (MACE). 960 participants were recruited. 912/960 (95.0%) had m-Goldman scores recorded by physicians and 745/960 (77.6%) by nursing staff. The area under the curve of the m-Goldman score in predicting 30-day MACE was 0.647 (95% CI 0.594 to 0.700) for physicians and 0.572 (95% CI 0.510 to 0.634) for nursing staff (p=0.09). When incorporated into an ADP, sensitivity for the rule-out of MACE was 99.2% (95% CI 94.8% to 100%) and 96.7% (90.3% to 99.2%) for physicians and nurses, respectively. One patient in the physician group (0.3%) and three patients (1.1%) in the nursing group were classified as low risk yet had MACE. There was fair agreement in the identification of low-risk patients (kappa 0.31, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.38). The diagnostic accuracy of ED nursing staff risk assessment is similar to that of ED physicians and interobserver reliability between assessor groups is fair. When incorporating high-sensitivity troponin testing, a nurse-led ADP has a miss rate of 1.1% for MACE at 30 days. Controlled Trials Database (ISRCTN no. 21109279). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Developing an emergency department crowding dashboard: A design science approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Niels; Bergs, Jochen; Eerdekens, Dorien; Depaire, Benoît; Verelst, Sandra

    2017-08-30

    As an emergency department (ED) is a complex adaptive system, the analysis of continuously gathered data is valuable to gain insight in the real-time patient flow. To support the analysis and management of ED operations, relevant data should be provided in an intuitive way. Within this context, this paper outlines the development of a dashboard which provides real-time information regarding ED crowding. The research project underlying this paper follows the principles of design science research, which involves the development and study of artifacts which aim to solve a generic problem. To determine the crowding indicators that are desired in the dashboard, a modified Delphi study is used. The dashboard is implemented using the open source Shinydashboard package in R. A dashboard is developed containing the desired crowding indicators, together with general patient flow characteristics. It is demonstrated using a dataset of a Flemish ED and fulfills the requirements which are defined a priori. The developed dashboard provides real-time information on ED crowding. This information enables ED staff to judge whether corrective actions are required in an effort to avoid the adverse effects of ED crowding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A qualitative evaluation of the Scottish Staff and Associate Specialist Development Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Burr, Jacqueline; Johnston, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The continued professional development of staff and associate specialist doctors in the UK was ill served prior to the introduction of the new staff and associate specialist doctor's contract in 2008. The aim of this study was to independently evaluate NHS Education for Scotland's approach to improving professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the staff and associate specialist Professional Development Fund. Semi-structured telephone interviews with key stakeholders, framed by a realistic approach to evaluate what works, for whom and in how and under what circumstances. An inductive and data-driven thematic analysis was carried out and then the realist framework was applied to the data. We interviewed 22 key stakeholders: staff and associate specialist doctors, staff and associate specialist educational advisors, programme architects and clinical directors, between end February and May 2014. The resultant data indicated five broad themes: organisational barriers to continued professional development for staff and associate specialist doctors, the purpose of funding, gains from funding, the need for better communication about the staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund, and the interplay between individual and systems factors. The staff and associate specialist Programme Development Fund has changed the opportunities available to staff and associate specialist doctors in Scotland and, in that sense, has changed the context for this group - or at least those who have realised the opportunities. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The effect of anger management levels and communication skills of Emergency Department staff on being exposed to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz Das, Gozde; Aydin Avci, Ilknur

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of anger management levels and communication skills of emergency department staff on their frequency of being exposed to violence. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey between 11 April and 15 October 2013 by using a questionnaire including descriptive features, anger management scale, and communication skills scale applied to 283 health personnel working in children and adult emergency department clinics. Statistically significant differences were found between the health workers' ages and their anger control levels, marital status and anger-in and anger control levels, working position and anger-in levels, and between anger-in, anger-out and anger control levels based on their level of education. Statistically significant differences were also found between age and communication levels based on the personnel's working position. Statistically significant difference between the anger-in subscale of health personnel based on their state of being exposed to violence was found (78.4% of the health workers had been exposed to violence). In the in-service programs of institutions, there should be trainings conducted about anger management and effective communication techniques so that the health personnel can be aware of their own feelings and express anger in a suitable way

  15. The effect of anger management levels and communication skills of Emergency Department staff on being exposed to violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GozdeYildiz Das

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the effect of anger management levels and communication skills of emergency department staff on their frequency of being exposed to violence. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey between 11 April and 15 October 2013 by using a questionnaire including descriptive features, anger management scale, and communication skills scale applied to 283 health personnel working in children and adult emergency department clinics. Results Statistically significant differences were found between the health workers’ ages and their anger control levels, marital status and anger-in and anger control levels, working position and anger-in levels, and between anger-in, anger-out and anger control levels based on their level of education. Statistically significant differences were also found between age and communication levels based on the personnel’s working position. Statistically significant difference between the anger-in subscale of health personnel based on their state of being exposed to violence was found (78.4% of the health workers had been exposed to violence. Conclusion In the in-service programs of institutions, there should be trainings conducted about anger management and effective communication techniques so that the health personnel can be aware of their own feelings and express anger in a suitable way.

  16. The higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borova T.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical analysis of the higher school teaching staff professional development system creation on the adaptive management principles. It is determined the background and components of the higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management system. It is specified the mechanisms for higher school teaching staff professional development adaptive management: monitoring and coaching. It is shown their place in the higher school teaching staff professional development system on the adaptive management principles. The results of the system efficiency are singled out.

  17. Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 7) - Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 7), entitled "Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members", approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting held on 17 February 2015 is available via the following link: AC No. 2 (Rev.7).   This revised circular cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 6), entitled "Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members" and dated January 2015. The circular was revised in order to implement the amendment to Article R II 1.17 of the Staff Regulations, which introduces the possibility of extending limited-duration (LD) contracts up to a maximum total duration of eight years from the previous duration of five years. The award of indefinite contracts will continue to be subject to the outcome of a competitive process. Department Head Of...

  18. Enhancing Training of Staff of the Agricultural Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. MADUKWE

    Effective Agricultural Extension Service Delivery in Nigeria. Wahab, A. A. 1 ... from Annual Performance Survey (APS) report of NAERLS and NPAFS between ... strengthen the staff's skills, increase productivity and achieve higher organizational .... Production & processing. 2 .... technology and sourcing .... industry used for.

  19. Academic staff competence development as a gap in quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, despite commonplace understanding that quality in university education depends on the quality of the academic staff, universities are paying little attention to the professional competence of the latter. This paper discusses this anomaly with the conclusion that it threatens quality, especially in today's digital era.

  20. Equity development programmes for academic staff at South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current academic staff profile in South African Higher Education reflects much of the skewdness of the past. The central dilemma faced by these institutions is how to achieve an equitable ratio in the short and medium terms. In response to government concerns expressed through the National Plan on Higher Education, ...

  1. Local health department epidemiologic capacity: a stratified cross-sectional assessment describing the quantity, education, training, and perceived competencies of epidemiologic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Kaitlin A; Shafir, Shira C; Shoaf, Kimberley I

    2013-01-01

    Local health departments (LHDs) must have sufficient numbers of staff functioning in an epidemiologic role with proper education, training, and skills to protect the health of communities they serve. This pilot study was designed to describe the composition, training, and competency level of LHD staff and examine the hypothesis that potential disparities exist between LHDs serving different sized populations. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted with directors and epidemiologic staff from a sample of 100 LHDs serving jurisdictions of varied sizes. Questionnaires included inquiries regarding staff composition, education, training, and measures of competency modeled on previously conducted studies by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Number of epidemiologic staff, academic degree distribution, epidemiologic training, and both director and staff confidence in task competencies were calculated for each LHD size strata. Disparities in measurements were observed in LHDs serving different sized populations. LHDs serving small populations reported a smaller average number of epidemiologic staff than those serving larger jurisdictions. As size of population served increased, percentages of staff and directors holding bachelors' and masters' degrees increased, while those holding RN degrees decreased. A higher degree of perceived competency of staff in most task categories was reported in LHDs serving larger populations. LHDs serving smaller populations reported fewer epidemiologic staff, therefore might benefit from additional resources. Differences observed in staff education, training, and competencies suggest that enhanced epidemiologic training might be particularly needed in LHDs serving smaller populations. RESULTS can be used as a baseline for future research aimed at identifying areas where training and personnel resources might be particularly needed to increase the capabilities of LHDs.

  2. . CONDITIONS AND DETERMINANTS OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE MODERN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Fomenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the research findings concerning a complicated process of academic staff formation in the secondary school. The main determinants of the process include the discrepancy between the actual development level of academic staff and the existing requirements of pedagogic society. The author denotes the main motives for academic staff development: moral and financial incentives for professional growth, new educational tasks, unsatisfactory social status of educational institution, etc; and identifies the complex of objective and subjective conditions positively affecting the given process. According to the author, the main priority should be given to the methodological provision of academic staff, integration of their activity, and stimulation of informational, methodical, and organizational channels of school activity. In conclusion, the paper considers the principles of life-long teacher training, corporate cooperation, partnership and solidarity, and discusses the technological structure of academic staff development, based on the competence model of education. 

  3. Student Leadership Development in Australian and New Zealand Secondary Girls' Schools: A Staff Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archard, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study regarding the phenomenon of student leadership development as reported by staff members in girls' schools located in Australia and New Zealand. Electronic survey was used as the method of data collection, facilitating both closed and open-ended responses. Using staff responses, the understanding and type…

  4. Professional development on innovation competence of teaching staff in Ugandan universities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasule, G.W.

    2015-01-01

    Professional Development on Innovation Competence of Teaching Staff in Ugandan Universities

    George Wilson Kasule

    Abstract

    Sufficient university teaching staff with innovation competence is key if universities want to play a significant role

  5. Implementation of the patient-centered medical home in the Veterans Health Administration: associations with patient satisfaction, quality of care, staff burnout, and hospital and emergency department use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karin M; Helfrich, Christian; Sun, Haili; Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Dolan, Emily; Taylor, Leslie; Wong, Edwin; Maynard, Charles; Hernandez, Susan E; Sanders, William; Randall, Ian; Curtis, Idamay; Schectman, Gordon; Stark, Richard; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementing the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model. The Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) initiative aims to improve health outcomes through team-based care, improved access, and care management. To track progress and evaluate outcomes at all VHA primary care clinics, we developed and validated a method to assess PCMH implementation. To create an index that measures the extent of PCMH implementation, describe variation in implementation, and examine the association between the implementation index and key outcomes. We conducted an observational study using data on more than 5.6 million veterans who received care at 913 VHA hospital-based and community-based primary care clinics and 5404 primary care staff from (1) VHA clinical and administrative databases, (2) a national patient survey administered to a weighted random sample of veterans who received outpatient care from June 1 to December 31, 2012, and (3) a survey of all VHA primary care staff in June 2012. Composite scores were constructed for 8 core domains of PACT: access, continuity, care coordination, comprehensiveness, self-management support, patient-centered care and communication, shared decision making, and team-based care. Patient satisfaction, rates of hospitalization and emergency department use, quality of care, and staff burnout. Fifty-three items were included in the PACT Implementation Progress Index (Pi2). Compared with the 87 clinics in the lowest decile of the Pi2, the 77 sites in the top decile exhibited significantly higher patient satisfaction (9.33 vs 7.53; P hospitalization rates for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (4.42 vs 3.68 quarterly admissions for veterans 65 years or older per 1000 patients; P < .001), and lower emergency department use (188 vs 245 visits per 1000 patients; P < .001). The extent of PCMH implementation, as measured by the Pi2, was highly associated with important outcomes for both

  6. Creating motivation, identifying incentives and enablers, and encouraging staff development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Roberts

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivating staff so that they perform at their best is an integral part of running a project. People usually need to work in order to make money. But, although this may be the strongest incentive, it is not the only one.People will enjoy their job and gain satisfaction from doing it well if they know that they are achieving results. If you are running a project you should be making sure that this is happening. The first step is to recruit the right people for the right job, the next step is to clearly define their roles and responsibilities and the third step is to enable them to do the job well. This article focuses on the third step.

  7. Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-03-20

    Mar 20, 2017 ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies & Management 10(2): 262 – 275, 2017. ISSN:1998-0507 ... providing farmers with appropriate innovations on environmental management and protection. ..... Fish wealth solution. African Journal of. Environmental. Science and ... Agricultural Development Project.

  8. The relationship between workplace violence, perceptions of safety, and Professional Quality of Life among emergency department staff members in a Level 1 Trauma Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Darcy; Henry, Melissa

    2018-02-02

    Emergency department staff members are frequently exposed to workplace violence which may have physical, psychological, and workforce related consequences. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between exposure to workplace violence, tolerance to violence, expectations of violence, perceptions of workplace safety, and Professional Quality of Life (compassion satisfaction - CS, burnout - BO, secondary traumatic stress - STS) among emergency department staff members. A cross-sectional design was used to survey all emergency department staff members from a suburban Level 1 Trauma Centre in the western United States. All three dimensions of Professional Quality of Life were associated with exposure to non-physical patient violence including: general threats (CS p = .012, BO p = .001, STS p = .035), name calling (CS p = .041, BO p = .021, STS p = .018), and threats of lawsuit (CS p = .001, BO p = .001, STS p = .02). Tolerance to violence was associated with BO (p = .004) and CS (p = .001); perception of safety was associated with BO (p = .018). Exposure to non-physical workplace violence can significantly impact staff members' compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary traumatic stress. Greater attention should be paid to the effect of non-physical workplace violence. Additionally, addressing tolerance to violence and perceptions of safety in the workplace may impact Professional Quality of Life. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and testing of emergency department patient transfer communication measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals.(1) The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality measurement of interfacility patient transfer communication. Input from existing measures, measurement and health care delivery experts, as well as hospital frontline staff was used to design and modify ED quality measures. Three field tests were conducted to determine the feasibility of data collection and the effectiveness of different training methods and types of partnerships. Measures were evaluated based on their prevalence, ease of data collection, and usefulness for internal and external improvement. It is feasible to collect ED quality measure data. Different data sources, data collection, and data entry methods, training and partners can be used to examine hospital ED quality. There is significant room for improvement in the communication of patient information between health care facilities. Current health care reform efforts highlight the importance of clear communication between organizations held accountable for patient safety and outcomes. The patient transfer communication measures have been tested in a wide range of rural settings and have been vetted nationally. They have been endorsed by the National Quality Forum, are included in the National Quality Measurement Clearinghouse supported by the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ), and are under consideration by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for future payment determinations beginning in calendar year 2013. © 2011 National Rural Health Association.

  10. Fostering Professional Nursing Careers in Hospitals: The Role of Staff Development, Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovie, Margaret D.

    1983-01-01

    Building on the model of professional nursing careers presented in Part 1, the author discusses the aspects of professional maturation and professional mastery, focusing on the vital role of staff development for career advancement. (SK)

  11. PBL as a Tool for Staff Development in the Educational Transformation towards PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Kolmos, Anette; Qvist, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Worldwide, the philosophy of problem based and project based learning (PBL) has been implemented as educational models in diverse practice of teaching and learning. Recent years have witnessed more and more educational transformations towards PBL. Despite the diversity of approaches...... and practices in the process of organizational transformation, staff development remains one of key elements in the transformation process in order to teach staff new PBL practice.. A growing body of literature discussing the role of facilitation in PBL, implementation of PBL at different levels in educational...... practice, PBL online; however, little has been documented on the practice of staff development in PBL, especially through online education in the form of PBL. This paper presents the experiences and reflections of using PBL online as a strategy for staff development based on the practice...

  12. SUPPORTING PRETERM INFANT ATTACHMENT AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Aoife; Reulbach, Udo; Figuerdo, Ricardo; McCarthy, Anthony; McNicholas, Fiona; Molloy, Eleanor Joan

    2016-01-01

    The infant-parent relationship has been shown to be of particular significance to preterm infant socioemotional development. Supporting parents and infants in this process of developing their relationships is an integral part of neonatal intensive care; however, there is limited knowledge of NICU staff perceptions about this aspect of care. To explore NICU staff perceptions about attachment and socioemotional development of preterm infants, experience of training in this area and the emotional impact of their work. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff perceptions of the emotional experiences of parents and the developing parent-infant relationship in an NICU was conducted in a Level III NICU, after pilot testing, revision, and ethical approval. Fifty-seven (68%) of NICU staff responded to the survey. Respondents identified parents' emotional experiences such as "anxiety," "shock," "loss of control," and "lack of feelings of competence as parents" as highly prevalent. Infant cues of "responding to parent's voice" and "quieting-alerting" were ranked most highly; "crying" and "physiological changes" were ranked lowest. Preterm infant medical risk, maternal emotional state, and mental health are perceived to impact most highly on the developing relationship, as compared with infant state or behavior and socioeconomic factors. Fifty-three (93%) respondents felt confident, and 50 (87.8%) felt competent discussing their emotional experiences with parents. Fifty-four (95%) responded that attending to these areas was an integral part of their role; however, staff had seldom received education in this area. Respondents also perceived that specific psychological support for parents was lacking both during and after the infant's discharge. While all staff surveyed perceived the nature of their work to be emotionally stressful, there were differences among NICU staff disciplines and with years of experience in the NICU in terms of their perceptions about education in

  13. FAST scanning in the developing world emergency department ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FAST scanning in the developing world emergency department. ZA Smith, N Postma, D Wood. Abstract. Objectives. To assess the utility of an existing ultrasound machine for the purposes of focused assessment sonography in trauma (FAST) scanning in a developing world emergency department (ED). Design. Prospective ...

  14. How nursing home residents develop relationships with peers and staff: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tonya; Bowers, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Social support and social relationships have been repeatedly identified as essential to nursing home resident quality of life. However, little is known about ways residents develop relationships with peers or staff. This study was conducted to explore the ways resident develop relationships with peers and staff in nursing homes. Fifteen cognitively intact nursing home residents from two facilities were interviewed for this grounded theory study. Sampling, interviewing, and analysis occurred in a cyclical process with results at each stage of the study informing decisions about data collection and analysis in the next. Unstructured interviews and field observations were conducted. Data were analyzed with open, axial, and selective coding. Residents developed relationships with peers and staff largely as an unintended consequence of trying to have a life in the nursing home. Having a life was a two-step process. First, life motivations (Being Self and Creating a Positive Atmosphere) influenced resident preferences for daily activities and interaction goals and subsequently their strategies for achieving and establishing both. Second, the strategies residents used for achieving their required daily activities (Passing Time and Getting Needs Met) and interaction goals then influenced the nature of interaction and the subsequent peer or staff response to these interactions. Residents defined relationships as friendly or unfriendly depending on whether peers or staff responded positively or negatively. There was considerable overlap in the ways peer and staff relationships developed and the results highlight the role of peer and staff responsiveness in relationship development. The results provide possible explanations for the success of interventions in the literature designed to improve staff responsiveness to residents. The results suggest that adapting these kinds of interventions for use with peers may also be successful. The conceptual model also presents a number

  15. Strategy-Based Development of Teacher Educators' ICT Competence through a Co-operative Staff Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonen, Jari; Lattu, Matti; Juuti, Kalle; Meisalo, Veijo

    2006-01-01

    An ICT strategy and an implementation plan for teacher education were created in a co-operative process. Visions and expectations of staff members and students were registered by questionnaires and by making notes during sessions in which the strategy was created. Thereafter, an implementation document, where the staff development programme and…

  16. 2014 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Barbin, Lucie; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Annual Report under Chapter VI ("Settlement of Disputes and Discipline") of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SRR) serves to report cases of submission of requests for review, internal appeals, complaints with the ILOAT, and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  17. 2012 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Schepens, A; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    1013-01-01

    The 2012 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SRR) serves to report cases of submission of requests for review, internal appeals, appeals to the ILOAT, and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  18. 2015 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Lalande, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The 2015 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations serves to report cases of submission of requests for review; internal appeals; complaints before the Administrative Tribunal of the International Labour Organization (ILOAT); and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  19. 2016 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Lalande, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    The 2016 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations serves to report cases of submission of requests for review; internal appeals; complaints before the Administrative Tribunal of the International Labour Organization (ILOAT); and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  20. 2011 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Schepens, A; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SRR) serves to report cases of submission of requests for review, internal appeals, appeals to the ILOAT, and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  1. Books authored/co-authored and edited/co-edited by members of staff of the Department of Medieval/Medieval and Renaissance Archaeology, Aarhus University, 1971-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roesdahl, Else

    2015-01-01

    Chronologically organized list of books authored/co-authored and edited/co-edited by members of staff of the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Archaeology, Aarhus University, 1971-2014......Chronologically organized list of books authored/co-authored and edited/co-edited by members of staff of the Department of Medieval and Renaissance Archaeology, Aarhus University, 1971-2014...

  2. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Kibabii University. Abstract. This study ... Key Words: Climate Change, Regional Circulation Model, PRECIS, Bungoma County ... by different computer models is much.

  3. Sense of competence in dementia care staff (SCIDS) scale: development, reliability, and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Astrid Kristine; Orrell, Martin; Shanahan, Niamh; Spector, Aimee

    2012-07-01

    Sense of competence in dementia care staff (SCIDS) may be associated with more positive attitudes to dementia among care staff and better outcomes for those being cared for. There is a need for a reliable and valid measure of sense of competence specific to dementia care staff. This study describes the development and evaluation of a measure to assess "sense of competence" in dementia care staff and reports on its psychometric properties. The systematic measure development process involved care staff and experts. For item selection and assessment of psychometric properties, a pilot study (N = 37) and a large-scale study (N = 211) with a test-retest reliability (N = 58) sub-study were undertaken. The final measure consists of 17 items across four subscales with acceptable to good internal consistency and moderate to substantial test-retest reliability. As predicted, the measure was positively associated with work experience, job satisfaction, and person-centered approaches to dementia care, giving a first indication for its validity. The SCIDS scale provides a useful and user-friendly means of measuring sense of competence in care staff. It has been developed using a robust process and has adequate psychometric properties. Further exploration of the construct and the scale's validity is warranted. It may be useful to assess the impact of training and perceived abilities and skills in dementia care.

  4. The Design and Development of Staff Wellbeing Initiatives: Staff Stressors, Burnout and Emotional Exhaustion at Children and Young People's Mental Health in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dominiek D; Howe, Deborah

    2015-11-01

    Mental health work presents problems for staff over and above those encountered in other organisations, including other areas of healthcare. Healthcare workers, in particular mental health workers, have poorer job satisfaction and higher job burnout and turnover compared with established norms for other occupational groups. To make sense of why healthcare workers experience high levels of burnout, a strong body of literature points to the emotionally demanding nature of people-work. The negative effects of mental health work on employee health can be mitigated by the provision of appropriate job resources and wellbeing initiatives. As to develop initiatives that appropriately target staff sources of stress and needs, it is important to engage staff in this process. As such, Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH) and headspace Gosford, in Australia, New South Wales (NSW), developed a survey to identify how staff experience and manage the emotional demands of mental health work, what they identify as key stressors and which initiatives they would like to see implemented. Fifty-five staff (response rate of 73 %) completed the survey, and the results suggest that while staff find the work emotionally demanding, they do not appear to be emotionally exhausted and report administrative rather than client issues as their primary concerns. While a strong body of literature identifies the management of emotions in the workplace as a significant cause of stress, organisational stressors such as working in a bureaucratic environment are also important to understanding staff wellbeing.

  5. Staff Development and School Improvement: An Interview with Ernest Boyer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Dennis

    1984-01-01

    The importance of developing teachers' skills and feelings of power and professionalism is stressed in an interview with Ernest Boyer. Other topics of discussion include the establishment of a "teacher excellence fund" and the concept that school improvement is "people improvement." (DF)

  6. Supporting Staff to Develop a Shared Understanding of Science Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampey, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Assessment is not something that stands alone and teachers need support to develop their understanding of both assessment practices and the subject being assessed. Teachers at Shaw Primary School were fortunate to take part in the Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project and, in this article, the outlines how science and assessment can…

  7. Developing an appropriate staff mix for anticoagulation clinics: functional job analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailemariam, Desta A.; Shan, Xiaojun; Chung, Sung H.; Khasawneh, Mohammad T.; Lukesh, William; Park, Angela; Rose, Adam

    2018-05-01

    Anticoagulation clinics (ACCs) are specialty clinics that manage patients with blood clotting problems. Since labor costs usually account for a substantial portion of a healthcare organization's budget, optimizing the number and types of staff required was often the focus, especially for ACCs, where labor-intensive staff-patient interactions occur. A significant portion of tasks performed by clinical pharmacists might be completed by clinical pharmacist technicians, which are less-expensive resources. While nurse staffing models for a hospital inpatient unit are well established, these models are not readily applicable to staffing ACCs. Therefore, the objective of this paper is to develop a framework for determining the right staff mix of clinical pharmacists and clinical pharmacy technicians that increases the efficiency of care delivery process and improves the productivity of ACC staff. A framework is developed and applied to build a semi-automated full-time equivalent (FTE) calculator and compare various staffing scenarios using a simulation model. The FTE calculator provides the right staff mix for a given staff utilization target. Data collected from the ACCs at VA Boston Healthcare System is used to illustrate the FTE calculator and the simulation model. The result of the simulation model can be used by ACC managers to easily determine the number of FTEs of clinical pharmacists and clinical pharmacy technicians required to reach the target utilization and the corresponding staffing cost.

  8. Screening for depression: integrating training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Holloway, Edith E; Craig, Graeme; Hepi, Niky; Coad, Samantha; Keeffe, Jill E; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2012-12-01

    To describe the integration of depression screening training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff and report on staff evaluation of this training. Pre-post intervention study, in a single population of low vision rehabilitation staff. Three hundred and thirty-six staff from Australia's largest low vision rehabilitation organization, Vision Australia. Staff completed the depression screening and referral training as part of a wider professional development programme. A pre-post-training questionnaire was administered to all staff. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to determine differences in self-reported knowledge, confidence, barriers to recognition and management of depression between baseline and post training. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed both questionnaires. Following training, participants reported an increased knowledge of depression, were more likely to respond to depression in their clients and reported to be more confident in managing depression (P training incorporating more active and 'hands-on' sessions are likely to be required. This training is a promising first step in integrating a depression screening tool into low vision rehabilitation practice. Further work is needed to determine the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice and to assess clients' acceptability and outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  9. 76 FR 5799 - Notice of Commissioners and Staff Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Induction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Induction Ceremony January 26, 2011. The Federal Energy... Commission staff may attend the following event: FERC Leadership Development Program Induction Ceremony: 888... welcome 16 employees selected for the 2011 Leadership Development Program. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary...

  10. Developing an instrument to assess information technology staff motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Belfo, Fernando Paulo; Sousa, Rui Dinis

    2011-01-01

    Motivation is a key factor that influences individual effort, which, in turn, affects individual and organizational performance. Nevertheless, motivation at work depends on the organizational rewards and incentives, according to individual goals. This paper reports on the development of an instrument designed to measure the motivation of Information Technology people at their workplace. Psychology theories and work addressing intrinsic and extrinsic motivation have been studied. Some motivati...

  11. Wildfire risk reduction in the United States: Leadership staff perceptions of local fire department roles and responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel S. Madsen; Hylton J. G. Haynes; Sarah M. McCaffrey

    2018-01-01

    As wildland fires have had increasing negative impacts on a range of human values, in many parts of the United States (U.S.) and around the world, collaborative risk reduction efforts among agencies, homeowners, and fire departments are needed to improve wildfire safety and mitigate risk. Using interview data from 46 senior officers from local fire departments around...

  12. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The general development of the Department of Reacctor Technology at Risoe during 1981 is presented, ant the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included. (author)

  13. Department of energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. List of staff, publications and computer programs are included. (author)

  14. Capacity, commitment, and culture: The 3 Cs of staff development in a learning organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Michael; Gamble, Kelley

    2015-09-01

    If an agency desires changes in practice and a consistent approach to services, psychiatric rehabilitation staff development requires more than a single session of training. This column describes one agency's approach to a comprehensive staff training and development program, designed to enhance the 3 Cs of capacity, commitment, and culture. The program described has been in place, with frequent adjustments, for over 20 years, and the experiences of the authors and their colleagues form the primary source for the paper. Staff development requires an ongoing investment--competency-based training, supervision congruent with the service vision and mission, accountability through performance evaluation, and opportunities for growth. We have a firm belief that our employees learn to treat others, in part, from how they are treated by our agency leadership. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  16. Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, Revised December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is a discretionary research and development tool critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the laboratory. It is also a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, within the overall mission of the Department of Energy and Brookhaven National Laboratory. This report summarizes research which was funded by this program during fiscal year 1993. The research fell in a number of broad technical and scientific categories: new directions for energy technologies; global change; radiation therapies and imaging; genetic studies; new directions for the development and utilization of BNL facilities; miscellaneous projects. Two million dollars in funding supported 28 projects which were spread throughout all BNL scientific departments.

  17. Helping Spanish SMEs Staff to Develop Their Competence in Writing Business Letters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foz-Gil, Carmen; Gonzalez-Pueyo, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a website tool aimed at helping Spanish small and medium enterprises (SMEs) staff to write their commercial correspondence in English. It describes the steps involved in the tool system design process, making an emphasis on the methodological criteria and rational that guided us to develop the site. In…

  18. Professional development of teaching staff for the international higher education environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Els; van der Poel, Marcel H.

    The professional development of teaching staff in relation to the internationalisation of higher education institutions has not received the attention that it deserves from managers in higher education. This requires an HRM policy that explicitly addresses the issue of competence development of

  19. VTAE Equity Staff Development Workshops and Services--Phase II. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, Lorayne; Nelson, Orville

    The Phase II Equity Staff Development project was revised in response to a need to develop an equity strategic planning model with a vision statement, goals, and objectives. The Equity Strategic Planning Model was presented to administrators of Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education (VTAE) colleges for their use in district strategic…

  20. Moving NSDC's Staff Development Standards into Practice: Innovation Configurations. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Staff Development Council, 2003

    2003-01-01

    NSDC's groundbreaking work in developing standards for staff development has now been joined by an equally important book that spells out exactly how those standards would look if they were being implemented by school districts. An Innovation Configuration map is a device that identifies and describes the major components of a new practice--in…

  1. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-01-13

    Jan 13, 2016 ... component was developed as the backend with a front end developed using VB. ... The system proved that with user oriented GIS system it is possible to develop tools that can ..... as the graphical user interface (GUI) where.

  2. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  3. Enhancing Human Capital Development and Service Delivery in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions through Effective Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyeaka Igbokwe-Ibeto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of bureaucratic and human capital theories, an eclectic approach, the study examines the nexus between academic staff recruitment in Nigerian tertiary institutions and human capital development as well as service delivery with specific reference to universities. It is generally agreed that higher education is a sine-qua-non for human capital development and efficient service delivery. Higher education is a prerequisite for the production of highly competent experts, which in turn, contributes to the development of organizations and the economy at large. For these to be achieved, the right content and academic staff  must be in place to perform this varied function.  However, over the years the quality of human capital coming out of Nigerian universities and its impact on service delivery has become a source of concern to employers of labour and all stakeholders. Inferential opinions have traced the problem to the recruitment of incompetent academic staff. To investigate the issues raised, the study relied heavily on primary and secondary data and multi stage sampling was used to select the sample population. The data collected was presented in pie chart and simple percentage. Similarly, in order to test the hypotheses and establish the degree of dependence or independence of the variables under investigation, the chi-square statistical technique was used. The findings of the study revealed among others, that Nigerian universities do not employ merit, qualification and competency in the academic staff recruitment. It also established that there is a significant relationship between merit, qualification and competency based academic staff recruitment and human capital development and service delivery. To enhance human capital development and service delivery in Nigerian universities, the study recommends among others, that an independent body like the National University Commission (NUC should be given the responsibility of

  4. Arts-based palliative care training, education and staff development: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Benjamin Mark; Williams, Sion; Burton, Christopher R; Williams, Lynne

    2018-02-01

    The experience of art offers an emerging field in healthcare staff development, much of which is appropriate to the practice of palliative care. The workings of aesthetic learning interventions such as interactive theatre in relation to palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes are widely uncharted. To investigate the use of aesthetic learning interventions used in palliative and end-of-life care staff development programmes. Scoping review. Published literature from 1997 to 2015, MEDLINE, CINAHL and Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, key journals and citation tracking. The review included 138 studies containing 60 types of art. Studies explored palliative care scenarios from a safe distance. Learning from art as experience involved the amalgamation of action, emotion and meaning. Art forms were used to transport healthcare professionals into an aesthetic learning experience that could be reflected in the lived experience of healthcare practice. The proposed learning included the development of practical and technical skills; empathy and compassion; awareness of self; awareness of others and the wider narrative of illness; and personal development. Aesthetic learning interventions might be helpful in the delivery of palliative care staff development programmes by offering another dimension to the learning experience. As researchers continue to find solutions to understanding the efficacy of such interventions, we argue that evaluating the contextual factors, including the interplay between the experience of the programme and its impact on the healthcare professional, will help identify how the programmes work and thus how they can contribute to improvements in palliative care.

  5. Integration of Higher Education and Endogenous Development in Staff, Students and Curricula Development Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mwadiwa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher education in most developing countries, particularly on the African continent, suffers a major contradiction, where even though the populations in nearly all African countries are of mixed cultural backgrounds, the university curriculum content encompasses, predominantly, the modern western view. Accordingly efforts and experiences for staff, student and curriculum development incorporating research, teaching and learning capacities focus, primarily, on modern concepts, approaches and methodologies. Thus most development initiatives are consequently looking to modern western view to motivate individuals who have come to associate modern western schooling and school-type programmes with success and the non-modern western world views with failure (Rustemeyer 2011:15. Arguably, modern western view pervades nearly every aspect of daily lives of traditional societies dwelling in rural communities whilst being increasingly influenced by inevitable factors of universal marketplace economically. This article challenges the University of Technology to become more passionately initiative in supporting the essence of ‘endogenous development (ED meaning development originating from within through encouraging and promoting networking with rural Community-based Traditional Institutions. The international Comparing and Supporting Endogenous Development (COMPAS Network describes endogenous development as an empowering process of the community, in which cultural awakening, creation of unity and participatory action are essential elements (COMPAS 2006:9. The significant aspect of the endogenous development approach is the willingness of development experts to implant their work and effort in the worldviews of the Traditional Institutions even though the professionals may not fully understand or agree with the worldviews of the respective Traditional Institutions.

  6. The impact of educational interventions on attitudes of emergency department staff towards patients with substance-related presentations: a quantitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Miriam; Clarke, Diana E; Pereira, Asha; Boyce-Gaudreau, Krystal; Waldman, Celeste; Demczuk, Lisa; Legare, Carol

    2017-08-01

    Visits to emergency departments for substance use/abuse are common worldwide. However, emergency department health care providers perceive substance-using patients as a challenging group to manage which can lead to negative attitudes. Providing education or experience-based exercises may impact positively on behaviors towards this patient population. Whether staff attitudes are similarly impacted by knowledge acquired through educational interventions remains unknown. To synthesize available evidence on the relationship between new knowledge gained through substance use educational interventions and emergency department health care providers' attitudes towards patients with substance-related presentations. Health care providers working in urban and rural emergency departments of healthcare facilities worldwide providing care to adult patients with substance-related presentations. Quantitative papers examining the impact of substance use educational interventions on health care providers' attitudes towards substance using patients. Experimental and non-experimental study designs. Emergency department staff attitudes towards patients presenting with substance use/abuse. A three-step search strategy was conducted in August 2015 with a search update in March 2017. Studies published since 1995 in English, French or Spanish were considered for inclusion. Two reviewers assessed studies for methodological quality using critical appraisal checklists from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Reviewers agreed on JBI-MAStARI methodological criteria a study must meet in order to be included in the review (e.g. appropriate use of statistical analysis). The data extraction instrument from JBI-MAStARI was used. As statistical pooling of the data was not possible, the findings are presented in narrative form. A total of 900 articles were identified as relevant for this review. Following abstract and full text

  7. The SOLS TICE Project: Satellite Television and Audioconferencing in Continuing Professional Development for LIS Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Alun; Priestley, John

    1992-01-01

    Describes SOLS TICE, the Satellite On-Line Searching Interactive Conferencing Experiment, conducted at the University of Plymouth (United Kingdom) to meet the training needs of staff in the library and information science (LIS) sector. Continuing professional development is discussed, instructional effectiveness and cost effectiveness are…

  8. Eden Institute: Using Health Games for ASD Student and Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Moderator Bill; McCool, Participants Thomas; Gasdia, Dominique; Sharp, Tim; Breeman, Lisa; Parikh, Nish; Taub, Bob; Finkler, Nina

    2013-02-01

    Eden Autism Services is a leading-edge resource for children and adults suffering from more severe effects of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The strategic use of games in the development of students, staff, teachers, parents, friends, and employers has advanced the quality of life of Eden's students and, consequently, their relationships, productivity, and happiness.

  9. Study of the Impact of Certified Staff Perception of Digital Citizenship upon Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmeade, Lisa Ann

    2016-01-01

    This record of study examines the relationship between certified staff personnel perception of digital citizenship and the impact upon professional development. Quantitative and qualitative data was used to examine responses to teacher familiarity with the concept of digital citizenship and status of teaching digital citizenship culminating with…

  10. An Innovative Approach to Pulic School Staff Development. A Collaborative Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Richard J.; Schuttenberg, Ernest M.

    This paper describes the planning and implementation of a Staff Development Program for teachers and administrators in the 22 school systems served by MEC (Merrimack Education Center). This program, which provided in-service learning experiences for educational practitioners, is discussed following an introductory statement. Information concerning…

  11. Professional Development for Sessional Staff in Higher Education: A Review of Current Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitch, Danielle; Mahoney, Paige; Macfarlane, Susie

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an integrated review of evidence published in the past decade around professional development for sessional staff in higher education. Using the Integrating Theory, Evidence and Action method, the review analysed recent evidence using the three principles of the Benchmarking Leadership and Advancement of…

  12. Problems in Staff and Educational Development Leadership: Solving, Framing, and Avoiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Paul; Wilson, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of interviews using critical incident technique with a sample of leaders in staff and educational development in higher education institutions reveals a limited use of classical problem-solving approaches. However, many leaders are able to articulate ways in which they frame problems. Framing has to do with goals, which may be complex,…

  13. Professional development status of teaching staff in a Ugandan public university

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasule, George Wilson; Wesselink, Renate; Mulder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine general professional development activities perceived to be important in enhancing university teaching staff’s job performance, and the extent to which teaching staff participate in these activities in Uganda. Data were collected through semi-structured

  14. Outsourcing Academic Development in Higher Education: Staff Perceptions of an International Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kerry; Hughes, Kate; Stephens, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education support services are being outsourced. Our case study was of a program from a global, USA-based, non-profit organisation. From in-depth interviews, we investigated staff perceptions of academic development workshops and the efficacy of outsourcing to a transnational tertiary-support program. We found that…

  15. Factors associated with staff development processes and the creation of innovative science courses in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Jeanelle Bland

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine factors associated with staff development processes and the creation of innovative science courses by higher education faculty who have participated in a model staff development project. The staff development program was designed for college faculty interested in creating interdisciplinary, constructivist-based science, mathematics, or engineering courses designed for non-majors. The program includes workshops on incorporating constructivist pedagogy, alternative assessment, and technology into interdisciplinary courses. Staff development interventions used in the program include grant opportunities, distribution of resource materials, and peer mentoring. University teams attending the workshops are comprised of faculty from the sciences, mathematics, or engineering, as well as education, and administration. A purposeful and convenient sample of three university teams were subjects for this qualitative study. Each team had attended a NASA Opportunities for Visionary Academics (NOVA) workshop, received funding for course development, and offered innovative courses. Five questions were addressed in this study: (a) What methods were used by faculty teams in planning the courses? (b) What changes occurred in existing science courses? (c) What factors affected the team collaboration process? (d) What personal characteristics of faculty members were important in successful course development? and (e) What barriers existed for faculty in the course development process? Data was collected at each site through individual faculty interviews (N = 11), student focus group interviews (N = 15), and classroom observations. Secondary data included original funding proposals. The NOVA staff development model incorporated effective K--12 interventions with higher education interventions. Analysis of data revealed that there were four factors of staff development processes that were most beneficial. First, the team collaborative processes

  16. On Thursday 14 September 2006, members of CERN Management welcomed recently-recruited staff members and fellows at the trimester session of the Induction Programme (photographed here with Enrico CHIAVERI, Department HR).

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    On Thursday 14 September 2006, members of CERN Management welcomed recently-recruited staff members and fellows at the trimester session of the Induction Programme (photographed here with Enrico CHIAVERI, Department HR).

  17. Perceptions Regarding Importance and Skill at Policy Development Among Public Health Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Brian C; Leider, Jonathon P; Sellers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Policy development is recognized as a core function of public health and a core competency in formal public health education. However, relatively little is known nationally about worker perceptions and competencies related to policy development in the governmental public health workforce. To characterize perceived importance and presence or absence of competency gaps related to policy development. As part of the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS), a nationally representative stratified sample of permanently employed state health agency (SHA) central office staff was created. Descriptive and inferential analyses examined correlates of perceived importance and competency gaps related to policy development. Permanently employed central office employees of SHAs. Analyses focus on 2 self-reported measures of perceived importance and ability related to policy development skills, as well as awareness and perceptions regarding Health in All Policies (HiAP). Seventy-two percent of SHA central office staff (95% confidence interval, 71-73) indicated "influencing policy development" was somewhat or very important to their day-to-day work. Among that group, 35% (95% confidence interval, 34-36) reported that they were unable to perform this or they considered themselves to be a beginner at this skill. Approximately three-fourths of staff indicated "understanding the relationship between a new policy and many types of public health problems" was somewhat or very important, and 30% of those who did said they were unable to perform this skill or were a beginner at it. Nationally, one-half of staff have not heard of HiAP. Among those who have, 86% indicated it was somewhat or very important to public health, and 41% reported they would like to see more emphasis on HiAP. Workforce development, both formal education and on-the-job training, may benefit from placing a greater emphasis on the development of policy skills. HiAP is an important approach to policy

  18. Helping spanish SMEs staff to develop their competence in writing business letters

    OpenAIRE

    Foz Gil, Carmen; González Pueyo, María Isabel

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a website tool aimed at helping Spanish small and medium enterprises (SMEs) staff to write their commercial correspondence in English. It describes the steps involved in the tool system design process, making an emphasis on the methodological criteria and rational that guided us to develop the site. In order to obtain the material, a corpus of commercial correspondence written in English was collected and later analysed, applying a genre-based approach...

  19. A staff shortage in Canada?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, P.

    1995-01-01

    Attrition of experienced staff, falling student enrolments and closure of university courses are symptoms of the contraction of the Canadian nuclear industry over the last two decades. It is not alone. A study carried out by Human Resources Development Canada, a government department, to forecast the demand for qualified nuclear staff in Canada over the next 15 years has reached similar conclusions to an OECD/NEA study of its members' future personnel requirements. (author)

  20. Library Assessment and Quality Assurance - Creating a Staff-Driven and User-Focused Development Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Carlsson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – Gothenburg University Library has implemented a process with the goal to combine quality assurance and strategic planning activities. The process has bottom-up and top-down features designed to generate strong staff-involvement and long-term strategic stability. Methods – In 2008 the library started implementing a system in which each library team should state a number of improvement activities for the upcoming year. In order to focus the efforts, the system has gradually been improved by closely coupling a number of assessment activities, such as surveys and statistics, and connecting the activities to the long-term strategic plan of the library. Results – The activities of the library are now more systematically guided by both library staff and users. The system has resulted in increased understanding within different staff groups of changing external and internal demands, as well as the need for continuous change to library activities. Conclusion – Library assessment and external intelligence are important for tracking and improving library activities. Quality assurance and strategic planning are intricate parts in sustainable development of better and more effective services. The process becomes more effective when staff-driven and built upon systematic knowledge of present activities and users.

  1. What's So Hard about Staff Development? A Study in Face-to-Face Interaction. Occasional Paper No. 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anang, Arlene; Florio-Ruane, Susan

    Staff development carried out within a conference format is multidimensional, ambiguous, potentially face-threatening, and complex. It is dependent upon the interactional work that takes place during face-to-face negotiations. The skills and knowledge of the staff developer cannot be shared with a teacher in a vacuum, but are dependent upon the…

  2. Advancing the IS Curricula: The Identification of Important Communication Skills Needed by IS Staff during Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth A.; Luse, Donna W.

    2004-01-01

    Although research indicates communication is important among information systems (IS) staff, users, and managers to ensure successful development projects, the ineffective communication skills of IS staff are often cited as a possible cause of failed IS projects. To develop effective systems, communication between IS users and systems developers…

  3. Exploring staff willingness to attend work during a disaster: a study of nurses employed in four Australian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Paul; Cusack, Lynette; Ranse, Jamie; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie; Kako, Mayumi; Woodman, Richard J; Mitchell, Belinda; Bahnisch, Laura; Hammad, Karen

    2013-08-01

    Much of the literature about emergency nurses willingness to work during disasters has been from a non-Australian perspective. Despite the many recent disasters, little is known of Australian nurse's willingness to participate in disaster response. This paper presents findings from a study that explored nurses willingness to attend work during a disaster and the factors that influenced this decision. Data were collected consecutively using a combination of focus group and interview methods. Participants in this study, registered nurses from emergency departments, were recruited through convenience sampling from four hospitals in Australia. Participant narrative was electronically recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The participants for both the focus groups and interviews compromised a mix of ages, genders and years of experience as emergency nurses from across four jurisdictions within Australia. Three major themes that influenced willingness emerged with a number of subthemes. Theme one reflected the uncertainty of the situation such as the type of disaster. The second theme surrounded the preparedness of the workplace, emergency nurse and colleagues, and the third theme considered personal and professional choice based on home and work circumstances and responsibilities. The decision to attend work or not during a disaster, includes a number of complex personal, work-related and professional factors that can change, depending on the type of disaster, preparedness of the work environment and the emergency nurses' personal responsibilities at that time. Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Department of Energy: Nuclear S&T workforce development programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, Michelle; Bala, Marsha; Beierschmitt, Kelly; Steele, Carolyn; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Bruozas, Meridith A.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories use their expertise in nuclear science and technology (S&T) to support a robust national nuclear S&T enterprise from the ground up. Traditional academic programs do not provide all the elements necessary to develop this expertise, so the DOE has initiated a number of supplemental programs to develop and support the nuclear S&T workforce pipeline. This document catalogs existing workforce development programs that are supported by a number of DOE offices (such as the Offices of Nuclear Energy, Science, Energy Efficiency, and Environmental Management), and by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Naval Reactor Program. Workforce development programs in nuclear S&T administered through the Department of Homeland Security, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Defense are also included. The information about these programs, which is cataloged below, is drawn from the program websites. Some programs, such as the Minority Serving Institutes Partnership Programs (MSIPPs) are available through more than one DOE office, so they appear in more than one section of this document.

  5. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX, K.J.

    2006-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

  6. Maximizing competence through professional development: increasing disability knowledge among One-Stop Career Center staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Allison Cohen; Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Boeltzig, Heike; Hamner, Doris; Fesko, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (USA) mandates that partners in the One-Stop Career Center system be prepared to serve a diverse customer base. Effective service delivery depends in part on a focus on human resources and professional development. This article presents innovative strategies for One-Stop Career Center staff training related to serving customers with disabilities. Findings from case study research conducted in several One-Stops across the country revealed that staff struggled with both knowledge and attitudes around disability issues. To address these concerns, local leaders developed practices that provided opportunities to gain practical skills and put acquired knowledge to use. These included a formalized curriculum focused on disability issues; informal support and consultation from a disability specialist; and exposure and learning through internships for students with disabilities. Implications are offered to stimulate thinking and creativity in local One-Stops regarding the most effective ways to facilitate staff learning and, in turn, improve services for customers with disabilities.

  7. Future and Changing Roles of Staff in Distance Education: A Study to Identify Training and Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The roles of distance education teaching staff are changing, necessitating role clarity and the development of appropriate competency frameworks. This article investigates the perceptions of the teaching and research staff at the University of South Africa, regarding the current and future roles of distance educators, their own competencies in…

  8. The Association between Attitude towards the Implementation of Staff Development Training and the Practice of Knowledge Sharing among Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassim, Abd. Latif; Raman, Arumugam; Don, Yahya; Daud, Yaakob; Omar, Mohd Sofian

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to identify the association of teachers' attitude towards the implementation of Staff Development Training with Knowledge Sharing Practices among the lecturers of the Teacher Training Institution (TTI). In addition, this study was also to examine the differences in attitudes towards the implementation of Staff Development…

  9. Using Computer-Based Continuing Professional Education of Training Staff to Develop Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooraksa, Nanta

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a career development program for staff involved in providing training for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Thailand. Most of these staff were professional vocational teachers in schools. The program uses information communication technology (ICT), and its main objective is to teach Moodle software as a tool for…

  10. Motivational orientations of urban- and rural-based RNs: implications for staff development educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, M L; Clark, D W; Stuppy, D J

    1995-01-01

    Part of professional development is influencing RNs to return for an undergraduate degree, a challenge for the staff development educator. Expanding on earlier research using Boshier's Educational Participation Scale to reveal motivational orientations, the authors queried 5 groups of RNs who were enrolled in BSN education between 1990 and 1992 (N = 235) and living in rural and urban areas of Texas. There were no significant differences of overall motivational orientations, yet RN students living in rural areas scored higher in professional knowledge (P = 0.03) whereas urban-based RN students scored higher in compliance with authority (P = 0.02). Specific marketing and educational strategies are discussed.

  11. Addressing Dual Patient and Staff Safety Through A Team-Based Standardized Patient Simulation for Agitation Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ambrose H; Auerbach, Marc A; Ruppel, Halley; Crispino, Lauren J; Rosenberg, Alana; Iennaco, Joanne D; Vaca, Federico E

    2018-06-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) have seen harm rise for both patients and health workers from an increasing rate of agitation events. Team effectiveness during care of this population is particularly challenging because fear of physical harm leads to competing interests. Simulation is frequently employed to improve teamwork in medical resuscitations but has not yet been reported to address team-based behavioral emergency care. As part of a larger investigation of agitated patient care, we designed this secondary study to examine the impact of an interprofessional standardized patient simulation for ED agitation management. We used a mixed-methods approach with emergency medicine resident and attending physicians, Physician Assistants (PAs) and Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs), ED nurses, technicians, and security officers at two hospital sites. After a simulated agitated patient encounter, we conducted uniprofessional and interprofessional focus groups. We undertook structured thematic analysis using a grounded theory approach. Quantitative data consisted of responses to the KidSIM Questionnaire addressing teamwork and simulation-based learning attitudes before and after each session. We reached data saturation with 57 participants. KidSIM scores revealed significant improvements in attitudes toward relevance of simulation, opportunities for interprofessional education, and situation awareness, as well as four of six questions for roles/responsibilities. Two broad themes emerged from the focus groups: (1) a team-based agitated patient simulation addressed dual safety of staff and patients simultaneously and (2) the experience fostered interprofessional discovery and cooperation in agitation management. A team-based simulated agitated patient encounter highlighted the need to consider the dual safety of staff and patients while facilitating interprofessional dialog and learning. Our findings suggest that simulation may be effective to enhance teamwork in

  12. Share and share alike: encouraging the reuse of academic resources through the Scottish electronic Staff Development Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna M. Campbell

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The Scottish electronic Staff Development Library (http://www.sesdl.scotcit.acuk is an ongoing collaborative project involving the Universities of Edinburgh, Paisley and Strathclyde which has been funded by SHEFC as part of their current ScotCIT Programme (http:llwww.scotcit.ac.uk. This project is being developed in response to the increasing demand for flexible, high-quality staff development materials.

  13. Perceptions of Nongovernmental Organization (NGO Staff about Water Privatization in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis A. Adams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Almost a billion people globally lack access to potable water. In the early 1990’s, attempts to improve potable water access in the global south included a massive push for water services privatization, often involving the transfer of public water services to private companies. Critics of water privatization claim it rarely improves access to water, and in most cases, unfairly affect poor people. Proponents on the other hand argue that it is necessary for efficient management and capital investment in the water sector. Although development NGOs play an important role in developing country water provision, hardly any studies have sought to understand their perceptions about the potential role of water privatization towards improving access to potable water in developing countries. We interviewed the key staff among 28 international and national NGO staff about water privatization, its opportunities and constraints. Their perceptions were mixed. While most criticized water privatization as increasing water costs to the poor, some noted that privatization is necessary for improving water access through increased capital investment. We present the findings and discuss larger implications for water policies and reforms in developing countries.

  14. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. The impact of an intensive yearlong staff development program on science teachers' perceptions of pedagogical change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueni, Joneen A. Stone

    The purpose of this study was to increase the understanding of how teachers perceive their implementation of pedagogical change during and after their involvement in a yearlong staff development project in the Rice Model Lab (RML). The following questions were used to guide the inquiry: (1) How do participants of the RML describe their involvement with pedagogical change? (2) How do participants of the RML perceive their ability to handle a different pedagogical approach to classroom instruction? (3) How do participants describe their usage of different pedagogical approaches once they leave the RML and return to their own classrooms? The RML is a joint venture between Rice University and the Houston Independent School District. Annually, eight middle school science teachers spend a year's sabbatical in the RML engaged in learning about educational research and pedagogy. The teachers have opportunities to prepare and teach lessons to one class using their new knowledge and skills. Operational for seven years, the RML was chosen as the context and provided the fifteen participants. Participants chosen included previous and current RML program members with varying amounts of teaching experience. This inquiry was an ethnographic study in which the participants responded to open-ended questions about their experiences with pedagogical change. Data, collected during the 1997--1998 school year, included formal and informal interviews; portfolio and reflective journal entries; and observations of group interactions during meetings, social events, workshops, and activities at the RML. The collected data were analyzed by the qualitative procedures of unitization and constant comparative methods to reveal categories of similarity. The categories of collaboration, learner-centered instruction, grounding in classroom practice, feelings of stress, time, support, and increased content knowledge emerged from the analysis of unitized data. The emergent categories interlocked with

  16. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.; Lucerna, J.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development

  17. Innovative environmental monitoring technologists developed by the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelant, D.; Purdy, C.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is required to characterize approximately 3,700 contaminated sites, 1.5 million barrels of stored waste, 385,000 m 3 of high-level radioactive waste in tanks, and between 1,700 and 7,000 facilities before site remediation, waste treatment, and facility deactivation and decontamination (D and D) operations commence. Specifically, characterization technologies are being developed to address five major problem areas: mixed waste treatment, facility D and D, mapping and treatment of contaminant plumes in soil and groundwater, landfill stabilization, retrieval and remediation, and retrieval and treatment of high-level radioactive waste from underground storage tanks. DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD) within the Office of Environmental Management is entirely focused on projects to address these five areas

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Wind Turbine Development Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliore, P.G.; Calvert, S.D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of wind-turbine development activities in the Unites States and relates those activities to market conditions and projections. Several factors are responsible for a surge in wind energy development in the United States, including a federal production tax credit, ''green power'' marketing, and improving cost and reliability. More development is likely, as approximately 363 GW of new capacity will be needed by 2020 to meet growing demand and replace retiring units. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is helping two companies develop next-generation turbines intended to generate electricity for $0.025/kWh or less. We expect to achieve this objective through a combination of improved engineering methods and configuration advancements. This should ensure that wind power will compete effectively against advanced combined-cycle plants having projected generating costs of $0.031/kWh in 2005. To address the market for small and intermediate-size wind turbines, DOE is assisting five companies in their attempts to develop new turbines having low capital cost and high reliability. Additional information regarding U.S. wind energy programs is available on the internet site www.nrel.gov/wind/. E-mail addresses for the turbine manufacturers are found in the Acknowledgements

  19. Research and Development in a Department of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.; Sheekey, Arthur

    1979-01-01

    This outline of the organizational structure for the new department of education lists propositions to guide the reorganization of educational research and innovation activities and discusses the potential functions of several new department offices. (RLV)

  20. Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 6) – Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members (1 January 2015)

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 6) entitled "Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 27 November 2014 is available on the Human Resources Department website. It cancels and replaces Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 5) entitled "Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members" of September 2011. This circular was revised in order to improve the effectiveness of the career transition measures, in particular by expanding the scope of the programme to include also career transition within the Organization and by placing emphasis on career orientation and job search. Administrative Circular No. 2 will be further revised next year with the adoption of the new contract policy, subject to approval of the relevant amendments by all competent bodies. ...

  1. Use of a virtual learning environment for training in maxillofacial emergencies: impact on the knowledge and attitudes of staff in accident and emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elledge, Ross; McAleer, Sean; Thakar, Meera; Begum, Fathema; Singhota, Sanjeet; Grew, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Many graduates will take up junior roles in accident and emergency (A&E) departments to which a large proportion of patients present with facial injuries caused by interpersonal violence. However, it is widely recognised that undergraduates and postgraduates have few opportunities for training in oral and maxillofacial surgery. We aimed to assess the impact of a specifically designed maxillofacial emergencies virtual learning environment (VLE) on the knowledge and confidence of junior doctors in two A&E departments. They were given free access to the VLE for one month, and were asked to complete multiple choice questions and to rate their confidence to deal with 10 common situations on visual analogue scales (VAS) at baseline and one month after training. A total of 29 doctors agreed to pilot the website, 21 (72%) completed both sets of questions, and 18 (62%) completed both VAS assessments. The mean (SD) multiple choice score improved from 10 (2.52) to 13 (3.56) out of a maximum of 20 (p=0.004) and the mean (SD) VAS improved from 29.2 (19.2) mm to 45.7 (16.6) mm out of a maximum of 100 mm (p=0.007). This was a small pilot study with limited numbers, but it showed improvements in the knowledge of maxillofacial emergencies and in confidence, although the latter remained low. Further work is needed to examine how these brief educational interventions affect the attitudes of frontline staff to maxillofacial emergencies. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Staff Development as a Means of Enhancing the Enterprise Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zajtzeva Lyudmila O.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at substantiating the importance of continuous development of staff as a means of enhancing the competitiveness of enterprise. A study on the current experience and issues of dissemination of the standard for HR management at the enterprises in Ukraine and abroad has been provided. The role of HR management in the system of competitive factors has been defined. The staff development strategies that are dependent on analysis of the internal environment and the personnel forecast of enterprise have been outlined. The need to apply both material and moral motivation to employees has been determined. The necessity to match the external conditions and the objectives of enterprise with the methods of labor incentives has been substantiated. Features of employee incentive on the basis of wage have been disclosed. There is a need to assess the quantitative and qualitative results of each employee’s individual work through the additional salaries, including in the form of various fringes, increments, lump sum remunerations, which are of a compensatory nature and allow for a significant individualization.

  3. Development of Intention to Stay Model for Temporary Nursing Staff in RS UNAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ike Nesdia Rahmawati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intention to stay of nurses is important to reduce turnover rate and to improve the stability of hospital. Quality of nursing work life (QNWL has been found to influence intention to stay. However, reliable information of this effect is limited. The purpose of this study was to develop the model of intention to stay for temporary nursing staff in RS UNAIR. Method: Anexplanative cross-sectional survey design was used in this study. Data were collected by using questionnaire among 32 nurses working at different units in this hospital through simple random sampling and analyzed by partial least square (PLS. Result: QNWL affected job satisfaction but did not affect commitment. Commitment was significantly affected by job satisfaction. There was effect of job satisfaction on intention to stay. Commitment also significantly affected intention to stay Discussion: QNWL is a predictor of intention to stay trough job satisfaction and commitment. It is recommended that more focused interventions on QNWL, job satisfaction, and commitment developments may improve intention to stay. Recruitment of non-nursing staff to carry out billing and administrative tasks is urgently needed. Suggestions for further research is to analyze the effect of empowerment, remuneration, and career ladder on nurses’ intention to stay. Keywords: intention to stay, quality of nursing work life, job satisfaction, commitment.

  4. Principles for Developing Benchmark Criteria for Staff Training in Responsible Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Stefan; Banzer, Raphaela; Gruenerbl, Agnes; Malischnig, Doris; Griffiths, Mark D; Haring, Christian

    2017-03-01

    One approach to minimizing the negative consequences of excessive gambling is staff training to reduce the rate of the development of new cases of harm or disorder within their customers. The primary goal of the present study was to assess suitable benchmark criteria for the training of gambling employees at casinos and lottery retailers. The study utilised the Delphi Method, a survey with one qualitative and two quantitative phases. A total of 21 invited international experts in the responsible gambling field participated in all three phases. A total of 75 performance indicators were outlined and assigned to six categories: (1) criteria of content, (2) modelling, (3) qualification of trainer, (4) framework conditions, (5) sustainability and (6) statistical indicators. Nine of the 75 indicators were rated as very important by 90 % or more of the experts. Unanimous support for importance was given to indicators such as (1) comprehensibility and (2) concrete action-guidance for handling with problem gamblers, Additionally, the study examined the implementation of benchmarking, when it should be conducted, and who should be responsible. Results indicated that benchmarking should be conducted every 1-2 years regularly and that one institution should be clearly defined and primarily responsible for benchmarking. The results of the present study provide the basis for developing a benchmarking for staff training in responsible gambling.

  5. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  6. [Are therapeutics decisions homogeneous in multidisciplinary onco-urology staff meeting? Comparison of therapeutic options taken in four departments from Paris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audenet, F; Lejay, V; Mejean, A; De La Taille, A; Abbou, C-C; Lebret, T; Botto, H; Bitker, M-O; Roupret, M

    2012-06-01

    One of the priorities of the "Plan against the Cancer" in France is to ensure the discussion of all cancer cases in a multidisciplinary meeting staff (RCP). The multidisciplinary collaboration is proposed to guarantee a discussion between specialists in every cases, particularly in complex cases. The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic decision taken in four RCP in Paris Île-de-France academic centres for three identical cases. Three cases of urological oncology (prostate cancer [PCa], renal cell carcinoma [RCC] and bladder tumour) were selected by a single urologist, not involved in further discussion. These cases were blindly presented in four academic urology department from Paris: Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Mondor Hospital, the Georges-Pompidou European Hospital and Foch Hospital. The four centres met the criteria of quality of RCP in terms of multidisciplinarity, frequency and standardization. The therapeutic suggestions were similar in the RCC cases, there were differences in the surgical approaches and preoperative work-up in the PCa case and, lastly, the proposals were different for the bladder cancer case. The decisions relies on clinical data and preoperative work-up but also on the experience and habits of the centre of excellence. For complex cases that does not fit with current guidelines, the panel discussion can lead to different therapeutic options from a centre to another and is largely influenced by the local organisation of the RCP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Cultural Values and Job Performance of the Promotional Staff of the Department of Education, Lanao Del Sur and Marawi City, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansano M Ampog

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The study mainly determined whether Filipino cultural values influenced the job performance of the promotional staff of the different divisions of the Department of Education in the province of Lanao Del Sur and Marawi City in the Philippines. The data gathered were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s product-moment coefficient of correlation and t-test for correlation. Results revealed that most of the respondents were females, 31-40 years old, married, Muslims, Maranaos, permanently hired by DepEd, had master’s degrees, had been in the service for 16 years and above, and earned between P20,000.00-P24,999.00 per month, the cultural values of utang-na-loob (dept of gratitude, balikatan or bayanihan (unity or oneness, pakikitungo (smooth interpersonal relations, galang (respect, pagbabahala, pakikisama or pakikipagkapwa (concern for one another, tapang or tibay ng loob (bravery or endurance, amor propio or delicadeza (sense of propriety and awa or malasakit (sympathy were practiced by the respondents while their performance level was found to be very satisfactory. The test results revealed that only three socio-economic variables namely; age, sex, and length of service had significant relationship with job performance, tested at 0.05 level of significance. Moreover, seven out of the nine cultural values had significant relationships to the promotional staff’s job performance. Only amorpropio and awa or malasakit had no significant relationships to the respondents’ job performance.

  8. Helping spanish SMEs staff to develop their competence in writing business letters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel González-Pueyo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the development of a website tool aimed at helping Spanish small and medium enterprises (SMEs staff to write their commercial correspondence in English. It describes the steps involved in the tool system design process, making an emphasis on the methodological criteria and rational that guided us to develop the site. In order to obtain the material, a corpus of commercial correspondence written in English was collected and later analysed, applying a genre-based approach as established by Bhatia (1993 and Swales (1990. The findings provided the move structure and strategies of each type of letter as well as the lexico-grammatical realizations of each move which later would be standardised and presented to be used systematically in the composition of letters with the same communicative purpose. This work illustrates how a genre-based approach can successfully be applied to ESP materials development.

  9. Improvement critical care patient safety: using nursing staff development strategies, at Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuni, Enas M; Bayoumi, Magda M

    2015-01-13

    Intensive care units (ICUs) provide lifesaving care for the critically ill patients and are associated with significant risks. Moreover complexity of care within ICUs requires that the health care professionals exhibit a trans-disciplinary level of competency to improve patient safety. This study aimed at using staff development strategies through implementing patient safety educational program that may minimize the medical errors and improve patient outcome in hospital. The study was carried out using a quasi experimental design. The settings included the intensive care units at General Mohail Hospital and National Mohail Hospital, King Khalid University, Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted from March to June 2012. A convenience sample of all prevalent nurses at three shifts in the aforementioned settings during the study period was recruited. The program was implemented on 50 staff nurses in different ICUs. Their age ranged between 25-40 years. Statistically significant relation was revealed between safety climate and job satisfaction among nurses in the study sample (p=0.001). The years of experiences in ICU ranged between one year 11 (16.4) to 10 years 20 (29.8), most of them (68%) were working in variable shift, while 32% were day shift only. Improvements were observed in safety climate, teamwork climate, and nurse turnover rates on ICUs after implementing a safety program. On the heels of this improvement; nurses' total knowledge, skills and attitude were enhanced regarding patient safety dimensions. Continuous educational program for ICUs nursing staff through organized in-service training is needed to increase their knowledge and skills about the importance of improving patient safety measure. Emphasizing on effective collaborative system also will improve patient safety measures in ICUS.

  10. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  11. Minutes from Department of Energy/Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program research and development technology needs assessment review meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    On November 1--2, 1988, representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Operations Offices, DOE contractors, and the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program met in Salt Lake City, Utah, to select and prioritize candidate waste problems in need of research and development. The information gained will be used in planning for future research and development tasks and in restructuring current research activities to address the priority needs. All Operations Offices were represented by DOE staff and by contractor delegates from the area. This document summarizes the results of the meeting and lists the priority waste problems established

  12. Development and evaluation of the INSPIRE measure of staff support for personal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie; Leamy, Mary; Bird, Victoria; Le Boutillier, Clair; Norton, Sam; Pesola, Francesca; Slade, Mike

    2015-05-01

    No individualised standardised measure of staff support for mental health recovery exists. To develop and evaluate a measure of staff support for recovery. initial draft of measure based on systematic review of recovery processes; consultation (n = 61); and piloting (n = 20). Psychometric evaluation: three rounds of data collection from mental health service users (n = 92). INSPIRE has two sub-scales. The 20-item Support sub-scale has convergent validity (0.60) and adequate sensitivity to change. Exploratory factor analysis (variance 71.4-85.1 %, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin 0.65-0.78) and internal consistency (range 0.82-0.85) indicate each recovery domain is adequately assessed. The 7-item Relationship sub-scale has convergent validity 0.69, test-retest reliability 0.75, internal consistency 0.89, a one-factor solution (variance 70.5 %, KMO 0.84) and adequate sensitivity to change. A 5-item Brief INSPIRE was also evaluated. INSPIRE and Brief INSPIRE demonstrate adequate psychometric properties, and can be recommended for research and clinical use.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT METHODS OF EFFECTIVENESS OF INNOVATIVE STAFF ACTIVITY MOTIVATIONAL MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriia Honchar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the science work is to develop methods to assess the innovative activity of the personnel that will provide motivation for employees to be active in the direction of research and introduction of internal reserves for its improvement. Methods. In the study were used: system method and methods of logical analysis – to justify theoretical and practical recommendations on the development of conceptual bases of the formation of the motivational mechanism of personnel management, economic-mathematical modelling and forecasting methods – to assess the influence of motivation factors on the level of labour activity of the personnel. Results. In the work the notion “motivation”, considering the innovative changes of the modern economy, is clarified. In order to foster innovative activity in the enterprise it is proposed to improve organizational structure by controlling the center of innovation activity management, which includes economic, technical and social division. Proposed an establishment of the project teams under the terms of accounting costs, which contributes to more active workers’ involvement in the formation of innovative development plans. The main points that determine their effectiveness are: growth of volumes of output, diminution of expenses of materials and energy resources, timeliness and relevance to the product market, improvement of the quality of work performed. A profit, derived by project teams, is recommended to distribute on: increment of the payroll, innovative development, stimulation and motivation fund. The research of the activity of the enterprises showed that one of the effective methods to stimulate staff is a motivational system based on the use of KPI. Bonuses for the implemented project, which are adjusted to the output of the basic stage, or KPI project as a whole, fixed bonuses as a percentage of the profits, and bonuses in stages of the project are the forms of motivation of project teams

  14. United States Department of Energy solar receiver technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, P. C.; Diver, R. B.; Chavez, J. M.

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Sandia National Laboratories, has been conducting a Solar Thermal Receiver Technology Development Program, which maintains a balance between analytical modeling, bench and small scale testing, and experimentation conducted at scales representative of commercially-sized equipment. Central receiver activities emphasize molten salt-based systems on large scales and volumetric devices in the modeling and small scale testing. These receivers are expected to be utilized in solar power plants rated between 100 and 200 MW. Distributed receiver research focuses on liquid metal refluxing devices. These are intended to mate parabolic dish concentrators with Stirling cycle engines in the 5 to 25 kW(sub e) power range. The effort in the area of volumetric receivers is less intensive and highly cooperative in nature. A ceramic foam absorber of Sandia design was successfully tested on the 200 kW(sub t) test bed at Plataforma Solar during 1989. Material integrity during the approximately 90-test series was excellent. Significant progress has been made with parabolic dish concentrator-mounted receivers using liquid metals (sodium or a potassium/sodium mixture) as heat transport media. Sandia has successfully solar-tested a pool boiling reflux receiver sized to power a 25 kW Stirling engine. Boiling stability and transient operation were both excellent. This document describes these activities in detail and will outline plans for future development.

  15. The Department of Energy's safeguards and security technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.D.; Pocratsky, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The US DOE has had a program that develops technologies to protect sensitive nuclear weapons facilities for more than thirty years. The mission of the program is overwhelmingly diverse, as it must be to protect an array of assets such as nuclear weapons, special nuclear material in various forms, components of nuclear weapons, and classified nuclear weapons design information. Considering that the nuclear weapons complex consists of dozens of facilities that are scattered all over the US, the technology development mission is very challenging. Complicating matters further is the ever uncertain future of the DOE. Some examples of dramatic Departmental mission changes that directly impact their security technology development program are given. A few development efforts are highlighted as examples of efforts currently being sponsored. They are: automated sensor testing devices to help reduce the requirement for personnel to enter vaults containing highly radioactive nuclear materials; a vehicle inspection portal to screen vehicles for hidden passengers, nuclear material, explosives, and other contraband; non-lead and short-range ammunition as an environmentally safe alternative to lead ammunition; a complex-wide visitor access control system to allow all DOE employees to travel to all sites with a commonly recognized credential; automated nuclear material monitoring technologies to provide assurance that material in storage has not been tampered with; laser radar as a potential solution to early warning deficiencies throughout the Department; performance testing standards for many security products to include an automated and consistent standard for assessing the quality of video; low temperature pyrotechnic smoke as a possible adversary delay mechanism; modular vaults to provide temporary protection for nuclear material during D and D activities, and a protection approach for restricted passage areas such as the volume above a tiled ceiling or within a crawl space

  16. Development of Leadership Skills in Community College Department Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Jocelyn Eager

    2011-01-01

    The role of a community college department chairperson is not well defined and the job is often perceived as more of a burden than an honor. Faculty come to the position frequently by "default" and without a ready set of management and leadership skills. The matter is of concern since chairs influence academic department strategy, culture, and…

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  18. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report to the Department of Energy, December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogeka, G.J.; Searing, J.M.

    1997-12-01

    New ideas and opportunities fostering the advancement of technology are occurring at an ever increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develops new fundable R and D projects and programs if BNL is to carry out its primary mission and support the basic Department of Energy activities. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums

  20. Using an intervention mapping framework to develop an online mental health continuing education program for pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Fowler, Jane; Hattingh, Laetitia

    2013-01-01

    Current mental health policy in Australia recognizes that ongoing mental health workforce development is crucial to mental health care reform. Community pharmacy staff are well placed to assist people with mental illness living in the community; however, staff require the knowledge and skills to do this competently and effectively. This article presents the systematic planning and development process and content of an education and training program for community pharmacy staff, using a program planning approach called intervention mapping. The intervention mapping framework was used to guide development of an online continuing education program. Interviews with mental health consumers and carers (n = 285) and key stakeholders (n = 15), and a survey of pharmacy staff (n = 504) informed the needs assessment. Program objectives were identified specifying required attitudes, knowledge, skills, and confidence. These objectives were aligned with an education technique and delivery strategy. This was followed by development of an education program and comprehensive evaluation plan. The program was piloted face to face with 24 participants and then translated into an online program comprising eight 30-minute modules for pharmacists, 4 of which were also used for support staff. The evaluation plan provided for online participants (n ≅ 500) to be randomized into intervention (immediate access) or control groups (delayed training access). It included pre- and posttraining questionnaires and a reflective learning questionnaire for pharmacy staff and telephone interviews post pharmacy visit for consumers and carers. An online education program was developed to address mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and skills required by pharmacy staff to work effectively with mental health consumers and carers. Intervention mapping provides a systematic and rigorous approach that can be used to develop a quality continuing education program for the health workforce

  1. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  2. U.S. Department of Energy & Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advanced Fuel Cycle Research & Development Seminar Series FY 2007 & 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    In fiscal year 2007, the Advanced Burner Reactor project initiated an educational seminar series for the Department of Energy (DOE) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel on various aspects of fast reactor fuel cycle closure technologies. This important work was initiated to inform DOE and NRC personnel on initial details of sodium-cooled fast reactor, separations, waste form, and safeguard technologies being considered for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Research and Development program, and to learn the important lesson from the licensing process for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant that educating the NRC staff early in the regulatory process is very important and critical to a project success.

  3. Staff Development as an Imperative Avenue in Ensuring Quality: The Experience of Adama University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilfashewa Seyoum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All endeavors were devoted to investigate the views and feelings of stakeholders on the implementation of teachers’ professional development and its contribution to sustain academic programs quality at Adama University. A case study that constitutes qualitative and quantitative method was employed. In an attempt to achieve the objectives of the study, evidences were collected from students, staff members, professional development program coordinators, and management bodies. The data-collecting instruments for obtaining relevant information were questionnaires, interview, observation, and document analysis. The finding in relation to this study uncovers the fact that though continuous professional development has been perceived as the most useful avenue of teachers continuous and lifelong learning, for the most part, it is relegated to adhoc committees or interested group or institutional units in the system of university education/training. Moreover, the absence of PDP in the university organizational structure, clear mission and vision, defined and well-articulated policy, strategic plan, representatives in university senate meetings, adequate resources, well-identified and -preserved training facilities, and unit library were circumstances that in one way or another negatively affected the provision of effective professional development programs/trainings that may have adverse effect in the deliberation of quality education/training in Adama University.

  4. Developing an Education Intervention for Staff Supporting Persons with an Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; McCarron, Mary; Connaire, Kevin; McCallion, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Generally, staff working in settings that provide care for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) have not received specific education with respect to extended care for terminal illnesses or late-stage dementia. Equally, staff working in specialist palliative care often are not familiar with the unique issues of supporting persons with…

  5. Medical staff involvement in nursing homes: development of a conceptual model and research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Renée; Rosenthal, Marsha; Wetle, Terrie; Tyler, Denise; Clark, Melissa; Intrator, Orna

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, physicians' assistants) involvement in nursing homes (NH) is limited by professional guidelines, government policies, regulations, and reimbursements, creating bureaucratic burden. The conceptual NH Medical Staff Involvement Model, based on our mixed-methods research, applies the Donabedian "structure-process-outcomes" framework to the NH, identifying measures for a coordinated research agenda. Quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews conducted with medical directors, administrators and directors of nursing, other experts, residents and family members and Minimum Data Set, the Online Certification and Reporting System and Medicare Part B claims data related to NH structure, process, and outcomes were analyzed. NH control of medical staff, or structure, affects medical staff involvement in care processes and is associated with better outcomes (e.g., symptom management, appropriate transitions, satisfaction). The model identifies measures clarifying the impact of NH medical staff involvement on care processes and resident outcomes and has strong potential to inform regulatory policies.

  6. Research Staff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis Associate Lab Director-Bio research to accomplish the objectives of the Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office, and to serve as a spokesperson for the bioenergy research effort at NREL, both internally and externally. This

  7. Development and Evaluation of a Train-the-Trainer Workshop for Hong Kong Community Social Service Agency Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qianling; Stewart, Sunita M; Wan, Alice; Leung, Charles Sai-Cheong; Lai, Agnes Y; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia Siu-Chee

    2017-01-01

    Capacity building approaches are useful in large-scale community-based health promotion interventions. However, models to guide and evaluate capacity building among social service agency staff in community settings are rare in the literature. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a 1-day (7 h) train-the-trainer (TTT) workshop for the "Enhancing Family Well-Being Project". The workshop aimed at equipping staff from different community agencies with the knowledge and skills to design, implement, and evaluate positive psychology-based interventions for their clients in Sham Shui Po, an over-crowded and low-income district in Hong Kong. The current TTT extended and improved on our previous successful model by adding research and evaluation methods (including the Logic Model, process evaluation, and randomized controlled trial), which are important to plan and evaluate the community interventions. Evaluation of the TTT was guided by the Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness (IMTEE), with quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were collected from pretraining (T1), post-training (T2), and 6-month (T3) and 12-month (T4) follow-up surveys. Qualitative data were collected from four focus groups of agency staff after the intervention. Ninety-three staff from 30 community agencies attended the training, and 90 completed the baseline survey. Eighty-eight, 63, and 57 staff performed the evaluations at T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Agency staff were satisfied with the TTT. Immediate enhancement of knowledge, self-efficacy, and positive attitudes toward the training content was found at T2 (Cohen's d ranged from 0.24 to 1.22, all p  agency staff, and delivered to 1,586 participants. The agency staff indicated their intention to utilize the skills they had learned for other interventions (score ≥4 out of 6) and to share these skills with their colleagues. Qualitative feedbacks from 23 agency staff supported the

  8. Reaching new heights: development of the emergency department nurse practitioner fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Jane R; Silvestri, Antonette; Lopez, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    With nationwide resident shortages and decreasing resident shifts, and legislation decreasing resident work hours, the nurse practitioners (NPs) have been called upon to expand their scope of practice to encompass patients with immediate and critical conditions and to perform quick procedures. Most pediatric NP (PNP) programs do not have formal training for NP students to work in a pediatric emergency department (ED). Senior ED NPs in collaboration with an NP educator developed a comprehensive clinical program to prepare a general PNP student to practice in an ED. The fellowship committee, met with 3 local university PNP program directors. The fellowship program targeted highly motivated individuals with an interest in working in a pediatric ED at the completion of their program as recruits for the position. Based on positive feedback, there has been overwhelming support and acceptance from the ED attending physicians, the NPs in the specialty clinics, as well as the ED staff regarding the new NP fellowship role. The NP fellow experienced less stress transitioning from student to NP. The development of the fellowship program is a step forward in the future training of NPs. The structured fellowship will hopefully facilitate a seamless transition from student to NP.

  9. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  10. Facilitating the development of a shared purpose in a university department: the first stage towards developing a culture of shared governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McGowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and context: The structure of higher education departments tends to be hierarchical or, at the other extreme, characterised as ‘a galaxy of individual stars’ (Handy, 1993 p 190. Ours was no exception. However, changes in the way nursing education was provided, internal growth and development followed by a period of austerity, presented our school with an unprecedented opportunity. We found ourselves in a position where we had the possibility to change. Aims: The aim of the paper is to share our reflections on the process and outcomes to date of a culture change project in a university department. The purpose of this opening part of the project was to enable creative and collegial opportunities to work together. Conclusions: An inclusive culture can make a difference to peoples’ lives and reflect the underpinning principles of person-centred practice. This project has enabled us to define our shared purpose, clarify our values, make commitments and set standards. Overall, though it has allowed us to see each other as people who have emerged from behind a faceless organisational structure. Implications for practice: The values of inclusiveness, integrity and professionalism are important for a shared understanding and effective collaborative functioning within university departments internationally, especially those that espouse person-centredness Staff teams can be structured around professional and personal development needs but these also provide a direct link to both departmental and organisational purposes aligned to education Managerial support, staff participation and an experienced facilitator are vital for successful cultural change. Our project has been UK based but we believe these experiences to be transferable and of interest to university departments elsewhere that aspire to create cultures that enable staff, and therefore students and the wider community, to flourish

  11. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.; Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K.

    2015-09-01

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  12. An A BWR demonstration simulator for training and developing technical staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, J. [Toshiba America Nuclear Energy, Charlotte, North Carolina (United States); Yonezawa, H.; Aoyagi, Y.; Kataoka, K., E-mail: jim.powers@toshiba.com [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    The US-Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (A BWR), certified by the US NRC, is a third generation, evolutionary boiling water reactor design which is the reference for the South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP3-4) Combined License Application (Cola). Nuclear Innovation North America (Nina) is the License Applicant for this new build project, and Toshiba is the selected primary technology contractor. Toshiba has developed a Demonstration Simulator of the A BWR control room that provides a realistic experience for training and education on BWR principles and operations fundamentals. The Demonstration Simulator is located in the Toshiba America Nuclear Energy (Tane) office in Charlotte, North Carolina and is composed of standard office computer equipment set up in a specific arrangement that is representative of the layout of an A BWR control room. The Demonstration Simulator is not intended for licensed operator training, but can provide a framework for encouraging entry level technically oriented nuclear workers to enter the operations field; strengthening the linkage between university energy field curricula and real-life application of theory; and, improving understanding of integrated plant operations for developing station technical staff. This paper describes the A BWR Demonstration Simulator and its applications for training and educating future nuclear workers. (Author)

  13. Structural Development of Health Resort Staff in the Republic of Crimea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Yuryevna Tsekhla

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the research is the laws and mechanisms of development of employment in various sectors of the labor market of the Republic of Crimea. The article investigates the regional staffing structure in the development of economic activities of the Republic of Crimea, in particular, the health resort institution to identify priorities for the implementation of employment policies in the region. The main hypothesis of the study: a mismatch of basic parameters of transformation of the labor market in the Republic of Crimea and the educational system produces dysfunctionality of their interaction, causes conflict between the needs and requirements of the labor market and the training level, particularly in the health resort institution, as well as dysfunctionality of formal qualifications of graduates. The methodological basis of the research is a systematic approach to the study of the labor market in the Republic of Crimea and the utilization of statistical methods for analyzing the labor market. In the study, the dynamics of socio-economic development of the Crimean region was analyzed. The labor market conditions in the Crimean region were investigated, which revealed the main causes of imbalances in the labor market development. The analysis of the training of medical students in institutions of higher education was held. Groups of factors affecting the staffing structure in the region were determined. Analysis of the causes of the labor market imbalances in Crimea showed that the existing imbalance was caused by both objective and subjective reasons. Priority lines in employment policy in the health resort institution have been proposed. Their implementation will help to stabilize the situation with the medical staff, including the health resort institution; to improve human resources personnel, capable to provide a high level of service to recreants; to promote problem solving in the development of the Republic of Crimea in the

  14. Participation of a preschooler with visual impairments on the playground: effects of musical adaptations and staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, P; Wolery PhD, M

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adaptations of a playground, and subsequently staff development, on the participation of a 3-year-old boy with congenital blindness. A single-subject design with three conditions (baseline, adaptations of the playground, and staff development) was used. The playground adaptation involved adding musical stations in strategic locations on the playground and connecting them with a "path" that provided auditory feedback. The staff training involved the music therapist providing individualized instruction to the staff who supervised the child. The child's participation was measured in terms of social interaction with peers or adults, play and engagement with materials, movement on the playground, and stereotypic behaviors. The playground adaptation resulted in no changes in the child's social interactions with peers or adults, increases in engagement, no change in movement on the playground, and a decrease in stereotypic responses. Staff training resulted in increased but variable interactions with adults and peers, in additional increases in engagement, less movement, and similar levels of stereotypic behavior. The findings suggest that musical adaptations of physical environments may he helpful but not sufficient for promoting desired outcomes.

  15. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Novel Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire for Food Service Staff of Aged Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M; Hamilton, J; Scupham, R; Matwiejczyk, L; Prichard, I; Farrer, O; Yaxley, A

    2018-01-01

    Food service staff are integral to delivery of quality food in aged care homes yet measurement of their satisfaction is unable to be performed due to an absence of a valid and reliable questionnaire. The aim of this study was to develop and perform psychometric testing for a new Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire developed in Australia specifically for use by food service staff working in residential aged care homes (Flinders FSSQFSAC). A mixed methods design utilizing both a qualitative (in-depth interviews, focus groups) and a quantitative approach (cross sectional survey) was used. Content validity was determined from focus groups and interviews with food service staff currently working in aged care homes, related questionnaires from the literature and consultation with an expert panel. The questionnaire was tested for construct validity and internal consistency using data from food service staff currently working in aged care homes that responded to an electronic invitation circulated to Australian aged care homes using a national database of email addresses. Construct validity was tested via principle components analysis and internal consistency through Cronbach's alpha. Temporal stability of the questionnaire was determined from food service staff undertaking the Flinders FSSQFSAC on two occasions, two weeks apart, and analysed using Pearson's correlations. Content validity for the Flinders FSSQFSAC was established from a panel of experts and stakeholders. Principle components analysis revealed food service staff satisfaction was represented by 61-items divided into eight domains: job satisfaction (α=0.832), food quality (α=0.871), staff training (α=0.922), consultation (α=0.840), eating environment (α=0.777), reliability (α=0.695), family expectations (α=0.781) and resident relationships (α=0.429), establishing construct validity in all domains, and internal consistency in all (α>0.5) except for "resident relationships" (α=0.429). Test

  16. Final Report on the Development of the Long Beach Fire Department Company Officer Orientation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupe, Marvin L.; And Others

    The Long Beach Fire Department (California), developed a program to foster and improve the development of future fire department managers who are promoted from within the department. A 10-day orientation program was developed. The competency-based program featured a mix of management-leadership training (the nature of leadership, personnel…

  17. Developing an holistic assessment protocol on a hospice inpatient ward: staff engagement and my role as a practice development facilitator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lansdell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2014 I received the Richard Tompkins Nurse Development Scholarship, granted through the Foundation of Nursing Studies and including attendance at a five-day International Practice Development Collaborative practice development school, followed by a year’s mentorship. The scholarship aims to foster the delivery of person-centred care, which I hoped to achieve by enhancing holistic nursing assessment on a hospice inpatient ward. Aims: This article is a critical reflection on my learning through the scholarship, specifically related to staff engagement and my role as a practice development facilitator. Conclusions: While the project has not yet reached its conclusion, the learning has been invaluable. I have deepened my understanding of the need for collaboration, inclusion and participation to foster engagement and cultural change. More fundamentally, understanding how different aspects of my role enable change has proved both challenging and constructive, resulting in greater self-awareness and confidence. I remain committed to refining holistic nursing assessment to allow a greater degree of person-centred care in the hospice. Implications for practice: Practice development combines a variety of approaches to realise a shared vision; collaboration, inclusion and participation are central to fostering engagement Balancing different elements of a role (for instance, leader-manager-facilitator has the potential to be confusing and contradictory; awareness of how these elements interrelate promotes effectiveness when introducing change Individuals in a practice development role must ensure they have good sources of support

  18. Development and Pilot Testing of a Food Safety Curriculum for Managers and Staff of Residential Childcare Institutions (RCCIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivarnik, Lori F.; Patnoad, Martha S.; Nyachuba, David; McLandsborough, Lynne; Couto, Stephen; Hagan, Elsina E.; Breau, Marti

    2013-01-01

    Food safety training materials, targeted for residential childcare institution (RCCI) staff of facilities of 20 residents or less, were developed, piloted, and evaluated. The goal was to assist in the implementation of a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP)-based food safety plan as required by Food and Nutrition Service/United States…

  19. Academic Benefits of Transitional Bilingual Education: A Literary Review, Staff Development, and Guidebook for Elementary Administrators and Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Jean Ann; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides a literature review, staff development information, and a guidebook for elementary administrators and educators that explains the academic benefits of Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) for prekindergarten through fifth grade students. TBE allows limited English speaking students to learn a second language while being…

  20. A survey on social networks to determine requirements for Learning Networks for professional development of university staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Francis; Berlanga, Adriana; Fetter, Sibren; Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Van Bruggen, Jan; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Brouns, F., Berlanga, A. J., Fetter, S., Bitter-Rijpkema, M. E., Van Bruggen, J. M., & Sloep, P. B. (2011). A survey on social networks to determine requirements for Learning Networks for professional development of university staff. International Journal of Web Based Communities, 7(3), 298-311.

  1. Literacy-Related Play Activities and Preschool Staffs' Strategies to Support Children's Concept Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norling, Martina; Lillvist, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates language-promoting strategies and support of concept development displayed by preschool staffs' when interacting with preschool children in literacy-related play activities. The data analysed consisted of 39 minutes of video, selected systematically from a total of 11 hours of video material from six Swedish preschool…

  2. Does Staff Development in Cognitively Guided Instructional Theory Change Middle School Teachers' Mental Models about Teaching and Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Judith R.

    This practicum was designed to increase middle-level teaching teams' understanding of cognitively guided instructional strategies or brain-based learning theories and to promote the incorporation of these strategies into the teaching of cross-curriculum thematic units. Twelve staff development modules based on a new perspective of learning which…

  3. A comparative evaluation of the process of developing and implementing an emergency department HIV testing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiser Sheri

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2006 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC HIV testing guidelines recommend screening for HIV infection in all healthcare settings, including the emergency department (ED. In urban areas with a high background prevalence of HIV, the ED has become an increasingly important site for identifying HIV infection. However, this public health policy has been operationalized using different models. We sought to describe the development and implementation of HIV testing programs in three EDs, assess factors shaping the adoption and evolution of specific program elements, and identify barriers and facilitators to testing. Methods We performed a qualitative evaluation using in-depth interviews with fifteen 'key informants' involved in the development and implementation of HIV testing in three urban EDs serving sizable racial/ethnic minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Testing program HIV prevalence ranged from 0.4% to 3.0%. Results Three testing models were identified, reflecting differences in the use of existing ED staff to offer and perform the test and disclose results. Factors influencing the adoption of a particular model included: whether program developers were ED providers, HIV providers, or both; whether programs took a targeted or non-targeted approach to patient selection; and the extent to which linkage to care was viewed as the responsibility of the ED. A common barrier was discomfort among ED providers about disclosing a positive HIV test result. Common facilitators were a commitment to underserved populations, the perception that testing was an opportunity to re-engage previously HIV-infected patients in care, and the support and resources offered by the medical setting for HIV-infected patients. Conclusions ED HIV testing is occurring under a range of models that emerge from local realities and are tailored to institutional strengths to optimize implementation and overcome provider

  4. Interest of the Department of Energy in production and development of short-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy has developed production of potentially useful radionuclides for applications in medicine. The Department's financial commitment and the short-lived radionuclide production program, with emphasis on iodine-123, is discussed

  5. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2004-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  6. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology

  7. Developing a structured education reminiscence-based programme for staff in long-stay care facilities in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Adeline; O'Shea, Eamon; Casey, Dympna; Murphy, Kathy; Dempsey, Laura; Smyth, Siobhan; Hunter, Andrew; Murphy, Edel; Devane, Declan; Jordan, Fionnuala

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the steps used in developing and piloting a structured education programme - the Structured Education Reminiscence-based Programme for Staff (SERPS). The programme aimed to prepare nurses and care assistants to use reminiscence when caring for people with dementia living in long-term care. Reminiscence involves facilitating people to talk or think about their past. Structured education programmes are used widely as interventions in randomised controlled trials. However, the process of developing a structured education programme has received little attention relative to that given to evaluating the effectiveness of such programmes. This paper makes explicit the steps followed to develop the SERPS, thereby making a contribution to the methodology of designing and implementing effective structured education programmes. The approach to designing the SERPS was informed by the Van Meijel et al. (2004) model (Journal of Advanced Nursing 48, 84): (1) problem definition, (2) accumulation of building blocks for intervention design, (3) intervention design and (4) intervention validation. Grounded theory was used (1) to generate data to shape the 'building blocks' for the SERPS and (2) to explore residents, family and staff's experience of using/receiving reminiscence. Analysis of the pilot data indicated that the programme met its objective of preparing staff to use reminiscence with residents with dementia. Staff were positive both about the SERPS and the use of reminiscence with residents with dementia. This paper outlines a systematic approach to developing and validating a structured education programme. Participation in a structured education programme is more positive for staff if they are expected to actively implement what they have learnt. Ongoing support during the delivery of the programme is important for successful implementation. The incorporation of client and professional experience in the design phase is a key strength of this approach

  8. Occupational stress among Thai emergency department nurses : Development and validation of an instrument for measuring stressors in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Yuwanich, Nuttapol

    2017-01-01

    Working at an emergency department has some characteristics, which may generate stress. In this thesis, the stressors for emergency nurses were evaluated and an instrument was developed for measuring their impact. In order to gain a deeper understanding regarding the occupational stress among emergency nurses, a descriptive qualitative design with semi-structured interviews were used in two studies (I, II), one at a private and the other at a public hospital in Thailand. Three main categories...

  9. An investigation of low ergonomics risk awareness, among staffs at early product development phase in Malaysia automotive industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Fazilah Abdul; Razali, Noraini; Najmiyah Jaafar, Nur

    2016-02-01

    Currently there are many automotive companies still unable to effectively prevent consequences of poor ergonomics in their manufacturing processes. This study purpose is to determine the surrounding factors that influence low ergonomics risk awareness among staffs at early product development phase in Malaysia automotive industry. In this study there are four variables, low ergonomic risk awareness, inappropriate method and tools, tight development schedule and lack of management support. The survey data were gathered from 245 respondents of local automotive companies in Malaysia. The data was analysed through multiple regression and moderated regression using the IBM SPSS software. Study results revealed that low ergonomic risk awareness has influenced by inappropriate method and tool, and tight development schedule. There were positive linear relationships between low ergonomic risk awareness and inappropriate method and tools, and tight development schedule. The more inappropriate method and tools applied; the lower their ergonomic risk awareness. The more tight development schedule is the lower ergonomic risk awareness. The relationship between low ergonomic risk awareness and inappropriate method and tools depends on staff's age, and education level. Furthermore the relationship between low ergonomic risk awareness and tight development schedule depends on staff's working experience and number of project involvement. The main contribution of this paper was identified the number of factors of low ergonomics risk awareness and offers better understanding on ergonomics among researchers and automotive manufacturer's employees during product development process.

  10. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer. A.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  11. Is It Bullying or Sexual Harassment? Knowledge, Attitudes, and Professional Development Experiences of Middle School Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaraman, Linda; Jones, Ashleigh E.; Stein, Nan; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study fills a gap in the literature by examining how school staff members view bullying and sexual harassment and their role in preventing both. Given recent legislation, increasingly more attention is paid to bully prevention; however, student-on-student sexual harassment is less addressed. Methods: Four focus groups were…

  12. Alabama Department of Transportation : research and development 2011 peer exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Research and development are key to safe and efficient transportation systems in our country. They have played a vital role in the advancements that have led to our current transportation system. Federal regulation (23 CRF 420 Subpart B) establishes ...

  13. Agile Software Development in the Department of Defense Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    traditional project/program life cycle (i.e., waterfall ). In the traditional model , security requirements are not evaluated until development is...2015), which may better facilitate adoption of Agile software development in the DoD. Several models are provided for software-dominant and software...the DoD has historically used a traditional, waterfall approach for acquiring systems and services), and oversight requirements that are

  14. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  15. Role of Department Heads in Academic Development: A Leader-Member Exchange and Organizational Resource Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Andre Leonard; du Plessis, Yvonne; Nkomo, Stella

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role of leadership in the development of academic talent in higher education from a social exchange and organizational support perspective. Drawing from a sample of academic staff at a large South African university, the study investigates the extent to which a quality leader-member exchange relationship versus a formal…

  16. Department of Neurosurgery, Madurai Medical College and the development of neurosurgery in South Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruppathy, Subbiah; Manimaran, Ramiah; Niban, Gopalakrishnan M; Muthukumar, Natarajan

    2018-01-01

    The development of neurosurgery in South Tamil Nadu can be traced to the Department of Neurosurgery, Madurai Medical College and Government Rajaji Hospital, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India. The hospital was established in the year 1940 and Madurai Medical College was started in 1954. Prof. M. Natarajan founded this department in September, 1963. This department has a Neurosurgery Residency Program that is 50 years old. The establishment of this department and its growth to its present stature is documented here.

  17. Using life cycle assessment in design for environment education of product development staff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauhiainen, H. [Vaisala Oyj, Helsinki (Finland); Kaipainen, J.; Ristolainen, E.; Valkama, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Electronics, Tampere (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The environmental information of the whole life cycle of a product is needed in design for environment (DfE). Therefore, LCA results are possible starting points for the DfE, but the results need to be summarized for a company staff in DfE education. The reliability of results must be taken into consideration, particularly when going into the details of a product. Those issues were examined when the manufacturing phase of the product of Vaisala company was assessed using two different LCA software tools and inventory databases. Differences between the methods and data had an influence on differences of the results. Comparing of those differences helped to show the main reliability issues of LCA for the staff. It was found out that as a background the LCA results were sufficient, whereas LCA based design rules needed further simplification of the results. In that connection, reliability issues and increased subjectivity must be emphasized. (orig.)

  18. A Staff Development Program Designed To Reach the Partnership School's Goals: Cooperative Learning Strategies, Coaching Sessions and a Narrowed Academic Performance Gap among Student Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kathy; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a staff-development program at Vivian Field Junior High School in Carrollton, Texas. The school is a member of the Texas Partnership School Initiative, which was created to give schools latitude in raising student achievement. The goal of the staff-development program was to identify gains in…

  19. Assessing the Impact of a Program Designed to Develop Sustainability Leadership amongst Staff Members in Higher Education Institutes: A Case Study from a Community of Practice Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaher, Iris; Avissar, Ilana

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the impact of a sustainability leadership development program (SLDP) designed to develop staff members as leaders who encourage sustainability practices within institutions of higher education (IHE). Using the framework of community of practice (CoP), we explored the program's contribution by interviewing 16 staff members who…

  20. Use of Community Readiness Model to Develop and Evaluate a Pilot Culinary Training Program for School Nutrition Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Deana A; Blevins, Priscilla; Carl, Lillian; Brown, Barbara; Betts, Nancy M; Poe, Tiffany

    2018-02-01

    Use the Community Readiness Model (CRM) to develop and evaluate a contextually appropriate pilot culinary training program for school nutrition staff members. Mixed methods to guide intervention development. Six school districts in rural and urban areas of a southwestern state. School nutrition staff (n = 36; female; 20 years' experience). Pre- and post-training assessments used the CRM. Findings from the pre-assessment were used to develop the pilot culinary training intervention. Readiness to integrate new food preparation methods into existing practices. The researchers used t and Wilcoxon tests to compare overall readiness and dimension scores (P ≤ .05). Thematic analysis was used to identify themes from the discussion component of the assessments. Overall readiness increased from vague awareness to preparation (P = .02). Improved dimensions were knowledge of efforts (P = .004), leadership (P = .05), and knowledge of issues (P = .04). Themes included barriers, leadership, and motivation. The CRM was useful for developing and evaluating a contextually appropriate and effective culinary training program for school nutrition staff. Future efforts should address the provision of additional resources such as on-site chefs, small equipment grants, and engaging school stakeholders. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of the VOICES/VOCES sexually transmitted disease/human immunodeficiency virus prevention intervention when administered by health department staff: does it work in the "real world"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Mary Spink; O'Donnell, Lydia; Doval, Alexi San; Schillinger, Julia; Blank, Susan; Ortiz-Rios, Elizabeth; Garcia, Trinidad; O'Donnell, Carl R

    2011-02-01

    Prevention providers wonder whether benefits achieved in the original, researcher-led, efficacy trials of interventions are replicated when the intervention is delivered in real-world settings by their agency's staff. A replication study was conducted at 2 public sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics (New York City and San Juan, PR). Using a controlled trial design, intervention (VOICES/VOCES) and comparison conditions (regular clinic services) were assigned in alternating 4-week blocks. Trained agency staff delivered the intervention. Effectiveness was assessed for incident STDs, redemption of coupons for condoms at neighborhood location after the visit, and improved knowledge and attitudes about STDs and condoms. A total of 3365 patients were recruited, completed the protocol, and followed through STD surveillance systems for an average of 17 months. Of 397 with an incident infection, 226 (13.4%) were among those enrolled during comparison blocks; 171 were among those in the intervention condition (10.2%). Controlling for site and gender, participants enrolled during intervention blocks were significantly less likely to have an incident STD reported to the surveillance system (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.96). Intervention block participants scored higher on scales of STD knowledge (4.89 vs. 3.87, P VOCES redeemed condoms (P < 0.05). Positive effects were more consistent in New York, which may be related to fidelity of implementation. A packaged human immunodeficiency virus prevention intervention can be delivered by agencies, with benefits similar to those achieved in the research setting.

  2. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT FOR STAFF INVOLVED IN INSTITUTIONS FROM TERTIARY HEALTH CARE: HEALTH SERVICES AND LABOR WELFARE MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA, 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Irene, Arboleda Posada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the conditions of human development according to labor welfare and satisfaction with healthcare services from staff employed with an indefinite term contract before January 1997 in health institutions of tertiary care in the city of Medellin (Colombia. It was performed a cross-sectional study designed to measure these components of human development through surveys applied on the staff with the described conditions, without any difference of academic, socioeconomic status or type of position. It was included a population of 1622 persons from five institutions, with a final sample of 242.Among the key findings is highlighted the high degree of staff satisfaction related to received in healthcare services for both, the worker and their beneficiaries; as well as the supply of medicines and diagnostic aids; besides the satisfaction with the work performed in the company and the feeling of being useful and important to it, they find out it is difficult to have promotions by merit and recognition for their work. As factors to strengthen in these institutions are the establishing clear policies for promotion and recognition.

  3. Technology Infusion Within Part-Time Professional Development Programmes for Academic Staff and Industry Practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    McAvinia, Dr. Claire; McDonnell, Dr. Claire; Donnelly, Dr. Roisin

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the experiences of programme co-ordinators and includes findings from a two year (2013-15) evaluation pilot study on a key communication technology – audio feedback – conducted across three accredited part-time programmes for a blend of academic staff (faculty) in higher education and eLearning industry practitioners. Key to our decision making with regards to which tools to infuse in our programmes is our aim to help the educators who participate on our programmes to ma...

  4. 78 FR 42532 - Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity With the Department of Homeland Security for the Development of a Foot-and-Mouth Disease 3ABC ELISA Diagnostic Kit; Correction AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, Plum Island Animal Disease Center...

  5. Developing a Staff Physical Activity Program at Your School: Implementing the Lesser-Used Component of the CSPAP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Katherine; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore staff physical activity programs in the school setting, describe a viable option for a staff walking program in an elementary school, and determine elementary school staff members' participation and perceptions in one such program. Previous research has shown that placing a focus on staff involvement and…

  6. Functional behavioral analysis and social scripting for the older patient with schizophrenia: a staff development program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwick, Laura; Smith, Charlene; Mick, Diane

    2014-11-01

    Executive functioning is the ability to plan, strategize, organize, and focus on details. Impaired executive functioning plays a significant role in behavior disturbances. Lack of inhibition, impaired abstract reasoning, thought perseverance, rigidity in routine, and lack of insight disrupt social skills and daily life. Autism and schizophrenia present some similar behaviors, including impaired executive functioning, often resulting in pharmacological management as many healthcare professionals receive limited training in executive functioning. Non-pharmacological tools used in autism for behavior management include functional behavioral analysis and social scripting, which help to identify causes of behavior and teach more appropriate behavioral responses. Described here is an educational program for healthcare workers in a long-term care skilled nursing facility, to help them understand the basis for behaviors in individuals with impaired executive function, to use these same tools for behavioral modification techniques, and to help patients learn more appropriate social skills. Program evaluation suggested the educational program was successful in increasing the staff's knowledge and comfort level in addressing the behavioral issues that arise with this population and staff also reported less use of medication as first-line treatment for behavioral issues.

  7. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: National Accrediting Commission Of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences (NACCAS) is a national accreditor whose scope of recognition is for the accreditation throughout the United States of postsecondary schools and departments of cosmetology arts and sciences and massage therapy. The agency accredits approximately 1,300 institutions offering…

  8. Planning/Budgeting/Evaluation Manual. An Operation Manual for Staff Members Concerning the Implementation of the Planning/Budgeting/Evaluation Cycle Within the Missouri State Department of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Education, Jefferson City.

    This manual identifies and systematizes the sequence of events necessary for the State Department of Education to effectively plan, implement, and evaluate its varied programs. The report (1) describes the cycle, (2) outlines the flow of events, (3) delineates offices responsible for each event, and (4) discusses overlapping phases of event cycles…

  9. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility.

  10. The practical application of ICRP recommendations regarding dose-equivalent limits for workers to staff in diagnostic X-ray departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, J.R.; Beaver, P.F.; Dennis, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Members of hospital staff who work in the X-ray room with patients, wear lead aprons to protect their bodies. These aprons greatly reduce the radiation dose rate at the surface of the body underneath the apron, but do not give any protection to parts of the body not covered by the apron, especially the head, neck, arms and legs. The ICRP's system of dose limitation for non-uniform irradiation of the body has been applied to exposure of this kind and a simple formula has been derived that permits the calculation of a good approximation to the effective dose-equivalent, using two dosemeters. One dosemeter is worn at chest or waist level under the apron to monitor the dose-equivalent received by protected organs while the other is worn on the collar or forehead to monitor the head and neck. Evidence based on published data is presented that suggests that in work of this nature, contrary to earlier opinion, the limiting factor is the dose equivalent received by the organs of the head and neck. The implications of this conclusion for routine personal monitoring are discussed. (H.K.)

  11. ٍEffective factors on the Incidence of medication errors from the nursing staff perspective in various department of Fasa Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Bizhani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available  Background and Objective: The incidence of medical errors is deemed one of the unavoidable cases of serious threats to the health and safety of patients. This study aimed to determine the factors influencing medication errors from the perspective of the nursing staff. Materials and Methods: This descriptive -analytic study recruited 80 nurses working in various wards in Fasa Hospital. The nurses were selected via the availability sampling method, and their perspective on factors affecting medication errors was gathered using a questionnaire designed for this study. The data were analyzed with SPSS-15 software.   Results: The most important causes of medication errors were work fatigue, low nurse-to-patient ratio, long working hours, high density of work in units, and doing other tasks. Other variables such as age and gender as well as factors effective on the incidence of medication errors are mentioned in the full text. Conclusion: From the nurses’ standpoint, workload and the patient-to-nurse ratio were the most significant factors leading to medication errors.

  12. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  13. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  14. Development of a waste management protocol based on assessment of knowledge and practice of healthcare personnel in surgical departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Gehan M A; Shazly, Mona M; Sherief, Wafaa I

    2009-01-01

    Good healthcare waste management in a hospital depends on a dedicated waste management team, good administration, careful planning, sound organization, underpinning legislation, adequate financing, and full participation by trained staff. Hence, waste management protocols must be convenient and sensible. To assess the knowledge and practice related to waste management among doctors, nurses, and housekeepers in the surgical departments at Al-Mansoura University Hospital, and to design and validate a waste management protocol for the health team in these settings. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the eight surgical departments at Al-Mansoura University Hospital. All health care personnel and their assistants were included: 38 doctors, 106 nurses, and 56 housekeepers. Two groups of jury were included for experts' opinions validation of the developed protocol, one from academia (30 members) and the other from service providers (30 members). Data were collected using a self-administered knowledge questionnaire for nurses and doctors, and an interview questionnaire for housekeepers. Observation checklists were used for assessment of performance. The researchers developed the first draft of the waste management protocol according to the results of the analysis of the data collected in the assessment phase. Then, the protocol was presented to the jury group for validation, and then was implemented. Only 27.4% of the nurses, 32.1% of the housekeepers, and 36.8% of the doctors had satisfactory knowledge. Concerning practice, 18.9% of the nurses, 7.1% of the housekeepers, and none of the doctors had adequate practice. Nurses' knowledge score had a statistically significant weak positive correlation with the attendance of training courses (r=0.23, pwaste management. The knowledge among nurses is positively affected by attendance of training programs. Based on the findings, a protocol for healthcare waste management was developed and validated. It is recommended to

  15. Problems and Countermeasures of Hospital Infection Management of Medi-cal Staff in the Department of Stomatology%口腔科医护人员医院感染管理存在的问题及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春梅; 王馨

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the problems and countermeasures of hospital infection management of medical staff in the department of stomatology. Methods 218 cases of medical staff in the department of stomatology from January 2014 to March 2016 were selected as the research objects, and the self-made nursing survey table was adopted and the survey con-tent was the hospital infection management problems in the medical staff in the department of stomatology, and the nursing countermeasures were put forward pointedly. Results Apparatus cleaning and soaking, disinfectant replacement time, disin-fectant concentration, disinfectant soaking after washing hands, drying hands with antisepsis paper after washing, washing hands with sanitizer, nursing operation with latex gloves, nursing operation wearing protective clothing, wearing mask and hat, disinfection by the autoclaving method, treatment table with one-time preservative film protection, cleaning the desk with disinfectant solution containing chlorine and mopping the floor had problems of varying degrees. Conclusion Intensify-ing prevention awareness of hospital infection management of medical staff in the department of stomatology and enhancing major knowledge and quality monitoring train contribute to improving the hospital infection management quality of medical staff in the department of stomatology.%目的:探讨口腔科医护人员医院感染管理存在的问题及对策。方法选取2014年1月—2016年3月期间口腔科医护人员218名作为研究对象,采用自制护理调查内容为口腔科医护人员医院感染管理问题,并针对性提出护理对策。结果器械清洗与浸泡,消毒液更换时间正常,消毒液浓度达标,洗手后消毒液浸泡,洗手后消毒纸巾擦干,洗手用洗手液,护理操作戴乳胶手套,护理操作穿防护衣,戴口罩、帽子,消毒用高压灭菌法,治疗台有用一次性保鲜膜保护,采用含氯消毒液擦桌子、拖

  16. Development of the Workplace Health Savings Calculator: a practical tool to measure economic impact from reduced absenteeism and staff turnover in workplace health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Siyan; Campbell, Sharon; Sanderson, Kristy; Cazaly, Carl; Venn, Alison; Owen, Carole; Palmer, Andrew J

    2015-09-18

    Workplace health promotion is focussed on improving the health and wellbeing of workers. Although quantifiable effectiveness and economic evidence is variable, workplace health promotion is recognised by both government and business stakeholders as potentially beneficial for worker health and economic advantage. Despite the current debate on whether conclusive positive outcomes exist, governments are investing, and business engagement is necessary for value to be realised. Practical tools are needed to assist decision makers in developing the business case for workplace health promotion programs. Our primary objective was to develop an evidence-based, simple and easy-to-use resource (calculator) for Australian employers interested in workplace health investment figures. Three phases were undertaken to develop the calculator. First, evidence from a literature review located appropriate effectiveness measures. Second, a review of employer-facilitated programs aimed at improving the health and wellbeing of employees was utilised to identify change estimates surrounding these measures, and third, currently available online evaluation tools and models were investigated. We present a simple web-based calculator for use by employers who wish to estimate potential annual savings associated with implementing a successful workplace health promotion program. The calculator uses effectiveness measures (absenteeism and staff turnover rates) and change estimates sourced from 55 case studies to generate the annual savings an employer may potentially gain. Australian wage statistics were used to calculate replacement costs due to staff turnover. The calculator was named the Workplace Health Savings Calculator and adapted and reproduced on the Healthy Workers web portal by the Australian Commonwealth Government Department of Health and Ageing. The Workplace Health Savings Calculator is a simple online business tool that aims to engage employers and to assist participation

  17. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Aarkrog, A.; Brodersen, K. [and others

    1998-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1997. The department`s research and development activities were organized in four research programmes: Reactor Safety, Radiation protection, Radioecology, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au) 11 tabs., 39 ills.; 74 refs.

  18. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E

    1999-04-01

    The report present a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1998. The department`s research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: `Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety` and `Radioecology and Tracer Studies`. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lsits of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au)

  19. Collectively Improving Our Teaching: Attempting Biology Department-Wide Professional Development in Scientific Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Melinda T.; Trujillo, Gloriana; Seidel, Shannon B.; Harrison, Colin D.; Farrar, Katherine M.; Benton, Hilary P.; Blair, J. R.; Boyer, Katharyn E.; Breckler, Jennifer L.; Burrus, Laura W.; Byrd, Dana T.; Caporale, Natalia; Carpenter, Edward J.; Chan, Yee-Hung M.; Chen, Joseph C.; Chen, Lily; Chen, Linda H.; Chu, Diana S.; Cochlan, William P.; Crook, Robyn J.; Crow, Karen D.; de la Torre, José R.; Denetclaw, Wilfred F.; Dowdy, Lynne M.; Franklin, Darleen; Fuse, Megumi; Goldman, Michael A.; Govindan, Brinda; Green, Michael; Harris, Holly E.; He, Zheng-Hui; Ingalls, Stephen B.; Ingmire, Peter; Johnson, Amber R. B.; Knight, Jonathan D.; LeBuhn, Gretchen; Light, Terrye L.; Low, Candace; Lund, Lance; Márquez-Magaña, Leticia M.; Miller-Sims, Vanessa C.; Moffatt, Christopher A.; Murdock, Heather; Nusse, Gloria L.; Parker, V. Thomas; Pasion, Sally G.; Patterson, Robert; Pennings, Pleuni S.; Ramirez, Julio C.; Ramirez, Robert M.; Riggs, Blake; Rohlfs, Rori V.; Romeo, Joseph M.; Rothman, Barry S.; Roy, Scott W.; Russo-Tait, Tatiane; Sehgal, Ravinder N. M.; Simonin, Kevin A.; Spicer, Greg S.; Stillman, Jonathon H.; Swei, Andrea; Timpe, Leslie C.; Vredenburg, Vance T.; Weinstein, Steven L.; Zink, Andrew G.; Kelley, Loretta A.; Domingo, Carmen R.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2018-01-01

    Many efforts to improve science teaching in higher education focus on a few faculty members at an institution at a time, with limited published evidence on attempts to engage faculty across entire departments. We created a long-term, department-wide collaborative professional development program, Biology Faculty Explorations in Scientific Teaching…

  20. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fifth Chief of Staff Division, namely Finance, is the end result of ... 1946 was able to report in 1948 that there had ... the same time however, the Secretary referred ... mended that because 'the existing dual arrange- ... tigate the division of functions in the Department. ... randum discussing the different arguments sur-.

  1. Modern Challenges and Perspectives in Development of Academic Staff in Higher Schools and Peculiarities of Military Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neno Hristov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Current paper presents a book review made by Colonel Assoc. Prof. Neno Hristov, D.Sc. on the monograph “Modern challenges and perspectives in development of academic staff in higher schools and peculiarities of military education system” – an edition of Innovations and Sustainability Academy – Bulgaria authored by Corresponding Member of the Russian Academy of Natural History Prof. Dr. Eng. Venelin Terziev and Colonel Assoc. Prof. Dr. Eng. Georgi Georgiev from Vasil Levski National Military University – Veliko Tarnovo.

  2. Developing strategic systems supporting communities of practice in the Georgia Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This study is designed to explore strategies through which the Georgia Department of : Transportation (GDOT) can develop communities of practice to help employees facilitate critical : exchanges of knowledge, support organizational learning, and ulti...

  3. Measuring How the Head of Department Measures Up: Development of an Evaluation Framework for the Head of Department Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Chad

    2011-01-01

    The head of department position has been an integral role in the organisational structure of colleges and universities for over a hundred years. Recently, many institutions of higher education have called on department heads to provide advancing quality management and leadership to academic units in response to an increasingly complex and…

  4. Peer exchange May 3-5, 2016 : Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities : research development & technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Peer Exchange Team identified actions Alaska should consider to : improve effectiveness of the research program: : 1. Conduct Research Strategic Visioning Workshop with Staff and Research : Advisory Board in Fall, 2016 : 2. Develop a T...

  5. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...... depends on the actual stand allocation but also on the number of zones and the layout of these. A mathematical model of the problem is proposed, which integrates the stand allocation and the staff scheduling. A heuristic solution method is developed and applied on a real case from British Airways, London...

  6. New staff contract policy

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  7. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risø National Laboratory during 1998. The department undertakes research within Energy Systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, IndustrialSafety and Reliability, Man/Machine Interac....../Machine Interaction, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members....

  8. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.; Olsson, C. (eds.)

    2004-04-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2003. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and list of staff members. (au)

  9. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N J; Jensen, E; Larsen, H; Skipper, S [eds.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2001. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  10. Systems Analysis Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risø National Laboratory during 2003. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning – UNEP Centre, Safety,Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology...... Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and list of staff members....

  11. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Progress Report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Loevborg, Leif [eds.

    2000-03-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1999. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning-UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  12. Systems Analysis department. Annual progress report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Petersen, Kurt E

    1998-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The department is undertaking research within Energy systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 110 refs.

  13. Systems Analysis Department. Annual progress report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H; Olsson, C; Petersen, K E [eds.

    1997-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1996. The department is undertaking research within Simulation and Optimisation of Energy Systems, Energy and Environment in Developing Countries - UNEP Centre, Integrated Environmental and Risk Management and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 131 refs.

  14. System Analysis Department. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N J; Jensen, E; Larsen, H; Skipper, S [eds.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2001. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  15. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N J; Jensen, E; Larsen, H; Olsson, C

    2001-05-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2000. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  16. Systems Analysis Department annual progress report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Loevborg, Leif [eds.

    1999-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1998. The department undertakes research within Energy Systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability, Man/Machine Interaction and Technology Scenarios. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 111 refs.

  17. Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department, Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribal Green Building Code Summit Presentation by Kayenta Township Building & Safety Department showing how they established the building department, developed a code adoption and enforcement process, and hired staff to carry out the work.

  18. Interventional radiology in cardiov ascular division of radiology department S.N.U hospital{sub s}taff roles and departmental management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Chul; Cheung, Hwan [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-11-15

    As the angiography in the field of radiological sciences is being increasingly diversified in its techniques, clinical applications of interventional radiology are rapidly increasing not only for its usefulness in simple diagnosis but for its capabilities of affording, by means of radiological surveillance, biological data such as those concerning tissues which are even substitutionary or supplementary to treatment of diseases. During the last 5 years from July 1980 to 1984 such applications in the cardiovascular division showed a trend of radical increase and thus emerging as a new domain of radiological medicine which has vast influence on diagnosis and treatment. The present treatise presents the results of research performed on the following: 1) Need for close coordination among physicians, radiologists, and nurses in the radiology department. 2) Need for prior explanation to the patient of the procedure to be followed to relieve his anxiety. 3) Checking of the angiographic equipment and selection of technical factors. 4) Proper management of manpower including medical radiologists and assistant radiologists. 5) Sterilization of auxiliary equipment required for surgical operation. 6) Selection of a catheter and control of clinical materials such as contrast agents. 7) Supplementary arrangements for speedy performance of clinical services.

  19. 'Out of hours' adult CT head interpretation by senior emergency department staff following an intensive teaching session: a prospective blinded pilot study of 405 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Karim; Mandel, Laura; Jamal, Leila; Gilani, Shamim

    2014-06-01

    Cranial CT is the gold standard for the investigation of intracranial emergencies. The aim of this pilot study was to audit whether senior emergency physicians were able to report CT head scans accurately and reliably having attended structured teaching. Senior emergency physicians attended a 3 h teaching session. Following this, they independently reported adult CT head scans between 22:00 and 08:00 using a pro forma. CT head examinations performed in this 'out of hours' period were formally reported by a consultant radiologist on the following morning. Data were collected in a blinded fashion over an 8-month period. 405 adult CT head examinations were performed. 360 pro formas were available for analysis, and the rest were excluded either because a consultant radiologist had been rung to discuss the results (five patients) or because the pro forma was not completed (40 patients). Concordance between consultant radiologists and emergency physicians was found in 339 (94%) of the cases (κ coefficient 0.78). None of the discordant cases was managed inappropriately or had an adverse clinical outcome. All cases of extradural, subdural and subarachnoid haemorrhage were detected by emergency physicians. In conclusion, we feel that this model can be employed as a safe and long-term alternative provided that the radiology department are committed to providing ongoing teaching and that a database is maintained to highlight problem areas. Emergency physicians need to remember that the clinical status of the patient must never be ignored, irrespective of their CT head findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Academic Library Department Experience Fosters the Development of Leadership Skills Relevant to Academic Library Directorship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M. Muellenbach

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Harris-Keith, Colleen S. (2015. The Relationship Between Academic Library Department Experience and Perceptions of Leadership Skill Development Relevant to Academic Library Directorship. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 41(3, 246-263. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2015.03.017 Objective – This study sought to identify if the perception of library leadership skill and quality development is equal across departmental experience, and what are the leadership skills and qualities most commonly perceived to be used in each department. Design – Quantitative online survey instrument. Setting – Master’s colleges and universities from 728 institutions in the United States of America, as classified by the Carnegie Foundation. Subjects – 666 academic library directors. Methods – Selected participants, representing academic library administrative leadership, were contacted by email a maximum of four times and were invited to complete an online survey instrument composed of six sections. The first three sections contained the purpose and confidentiality statements, demographic information, and data on the past five positions held by respondents prior to their current directorship. The next two sections each had 25 statements on a 5-point Likert scale, to collect data on perceived leadership skills and qualities exercised by respondents in their most recent three positions. The final section had four open-ended questions to help explain the academic library directors’ responses and provide context for the ratings in previous sections of the instrument. Main results – A total of 296 responses were received, for a 40.66% response rate, which was representative of the institution type demographics, including private non-profit, public, and private for-profit. The first research question asked: is the perception of library leadership skill and quality development equal across departmental experience? The data used for this question

  1. Development intention of support staff in an academic organization in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Albert; Schaap, Harmen; van Dellen, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate which psychological determinants relate to the intention to participate in development activities Psychological determinants such as attitude toward development activities, self-efficacy, job satisfaction, organizational commitment and management

  2. 77 FR 26537 - Notice of Commissioners and Staff Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Graduation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... Attendance at FERC Leadership Development Program Graduation/Induction Ceremony The Federal Energy Regulatory... may attend the following event: FERC Leadership Development Program Graduation/Induction Ceremony: 888... and welcome 17 employees selected for the 2012 Leadership Development Program and graduate 15...

  3. Lighting the way to the future: An anthology of improvements, developments, and research by NSLS staff and collaborators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning phase of a scientific facility, it is essential to invent, adapt and improve new technologies so that the specification and performance of the facility is upgraded over it's lifetime. It is equally important that staff keep their expertise and research interests at the cutting edge and contribute, based on their unique experience, to the present and next generation of experiments at existing facilities and to the specification and R and D on which the next generation of facilities will be based. A synchrotron radiation facility such as the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory supports a very wide range of science which is dependent on the breadth of the electromagnetic spectrum which is generated. Scientists from many disciplines use radiation from the far infra-red (λ = 12 mm, Energy = 0.1 meV) through to extreme gamma rays (λ = 4 fm, Energy = 300 MeV). All aspects of the facility need continual improvement, development and research including the source itself, the optics of beamlines, experimental concepts and the performance of detectors. This collection of papers shows the scope of past work by NSLS staff and their collaborators, serves as a reminder of their achievements and as an indicator of the range, quality and quantity of work which is required to maintain a scientific user facility at the cutting edge

  4. Integrating palliative care within acute stroke services: developing a programme theory of patient and family needs, preferences and staff perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burton Christopher R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Palliative care should be integrated early into the care trajectories of people with life threatening illness such as stroke. However published guidance focuses primarily on the end of life, and there is a gap in the evidence about how the palliative care needs of acute stroke patients and families should be addressed. Synthesising data across a programme of related studies, this paper presents an explanatory framework for the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. Methods Data from a survey (n=191 of patient-reported palliative care needs and interviews (n=53 exploring experiences with patients and family members were explored in group interviews with 29 staff from 3 United Kingdom stroke services. A realist approach to theory building was used, constructed around the mechanisms that characterise integration, their impacts, and mediating, contextual influences. Results The framework includes two cognitive mechanisms (the legitimacy of palliative care and individual capacity, and behavioural mechanisms (engaging with family; the timing of intervention; working with complexity; and the recognition of dying through which staff integrate palliative and stroke care. A range of clinical (whether patients are being ‘actively treated’, and prognostic uncertainty and service (leadership, specialty status and neurological focus factors appear to influence how palliative care needs are attended to. Conclusions Our framework is the first, empirical explanation of the integration of palliative and acute stroke care. The specification in the framework of factors that mediate integration can inform service development to improve the outcomes and experiences of patients and families.

  5. Characteristic and Competency Measurement Instrument Development for Maintenance Staff of Mechanical Expertise with SECI Method: A Case of Manufacturing Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatmavidya, P. A.; Soesanto, R. P.; Kurniawati, A.; Andrawina, L.

    2018-03-01

    Human resource is an important factor for a company to gain competitiveness, therefore competencies of each individual in a company is a basic characteristic that is taken into account. The increasing employee’s competency will affect directly to the company's performance. The purpose of this research is to improve the quality of human resources of maintenance staff in manufacturing company by designing competency measurement instrument that aims to assess the competency of employees. The focus of this research is the mechanical expertise of maintenance staff. SECI method is used in this research for managing knowledge that is held by senior employees regarding employee competence of mechanical expertise. The SECI method converts the knowledge of a person's tacit knowledge into an explicit knowledge so that the knowledge can be used by others. The knowledge that is gathered from SECI method is converted into a list of competence and break down into the detailed competency. Based on the results of this research, it is known that 11 general competencies, 17 distinctive competencies, 20 indicators, and 20 item list for assessing the competencies are developed. From the result of competency breakdown, the five-level instrument of measurement is designed which can assist in assessing employee’s competency for mechanical expertise.

  6. Development of double dosimetry algorithm for assessment of effective dose to staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young

    2011-02-01

    Medical staff involving interventional radiology(IR) procedures are significantly exposed to the scatter radiation because they stand in close proximity to the patient. Since modern IR techniques are often very complicated and require extended operation time, doses to IR workers tend to increase considerably. In general, the personal dose equivalent at 10 mm depth, H p (10), read from one dosimeter worn on the trunk of a radiation worker is assumed to be a good estimate of the effective dose and compared to the dose limits for regulatory compliance. This assumption is based on the exposure conditions that the radiation field is broad and rather homogeneous. However, IR workers usually wear protective clothing like lead aprons and thyroid shield which allow part of the body being exposed to much higher doses. To solve this problem, i.e. to adequately estimate the effective doses of IR workers, use of double dosimeters, one under the apron and one over the apron where unshielded part of the body exposed, was recommended. Several algorithms on the interpretation of the two dosimeter readings have been proposed. However, the dosimeter weighting factors applied to the algorithm differ significantly, which quests a question on the reliability of the algorithm. Moreover, there are some changes in the process of calculating the effective dose in the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP): changes in the radiation weighting factors, tissue weighting factors and the computational reference phantoms. Therefore, this study attempts to set a new algorithm for interpreting two dosimeter readings to provide a proper estimate of the effective dose for IR workers, incorporating those changes in definition of effective dose. The effective doses were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations for various practical conditions based on the vogel reference phantom and the new tissue weighting factors. A quasi-effective dose, which is

  7. Development of double dosimetry algorithm for assessment of effective dose to staff in interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young

    2011-02-15

    Medical staff involving interventional radiology(IR) procedures are significantly exposed to the scatter radiation because they stand in close proximity to the patient. Since modern IR techniques are often very complicated and require extended operation time, doses to IR workers tend to increase considerably. In general, the personal dose equivalent at 10 mm depth, H{sub p}(10), read from one dosimeter worn on the trunk of a radiation worker is assumed to be a good estimate of the effective dose and compared to the dose limits for regulatory compliance. This assumption is based on the exposure conditions that the radiation field is broad and rather homogeneous. However, IR workers usually wear protective clothing like lead aprons and thyroid shield which allow part of the body being exposed to much higher doses. To solve this problem, i.e. to adequately estimate the effective doses of IR workers, use of double dosimeters, one under the apron and one over the apron where unshielded part of the body exposed, was recommended. Several algorithms on the interpretation of the two dosimeter readings have been proposed. However, the dosimeter weighting factors applied to the algorithm differ significantly, which quests a question on the reliability of the algorithm. Moreover, there are some changes in the process of calculating the effective dose in the 2007 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP): changes in the radiation weighting factors, tissue weighting factors and the computational reference phantoms. Therefore, this study attempts to set a new algorithm for interpreting two dosimeter readings to provide a proper estimate of the effective dose for IR workers, incorporating those changes in definition of effective dose. The effective doses were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations for various practical conditions based on the vogel reference phantom and the new tissue weighting factors. A quasi-effective dose, which is

  8. Developing Measures of Job Performance for Support Staff in Housing Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Chris; Wigham, Sarah; Craig, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Background: There is an absence of research concerning the assessment of housing support worker job performance, particularly in the development of job performance measures that reflect the priorities of people with intellectual disabilities and their families. Method: A worker-oriented job analysis method was used to develop four short job…

  9. Staff Development Through the Implementation of Two Innovative Learning/Teaching Modes. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokov, Peter; And Others

    The final report describes the generally successful development and use of two new instructional models for adult basic education (ABE): a peer instruction model and an instructional system for consumer decision making. Section 1 examines the two year application of the peer instruction model, first developed for the military, in various adult…

  10. Public service impacts of geothermal development: cumulative impacts study of the Geysers KGRA. Final staff report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, K.M.

    1983-07-01

    The number of workers currently involved in the various aspects of geothermal development in the Geysers are identified. Using two different development scenarios, projections are made for the number of power plants needed to reach the electrical generation capacity of the steam resource in the Geysers. The report also projects the cumulative number of workers needed to develop the steam field and to construct, operate, and maintain these power plants. Although the number of construction workers fluctuates, most are not likely to become new, permanent residents of the KGRA counties. The administrative and public service costs of geothermal development to local jurisdications are examined, and these costs are compared to geothermal revenues accruing to the local governments. Revenues do not cover the immediate fiscal needs resulting from increases in local road maintenance and school enrollment attributable to geothermal development. Several mitigation options are discussed and a framework presented for calculating mitigation costs for school and road impacts.

  11. Developing Mobile Clinical Decision Support for Nursing Home Staff Assessment of Urinary Tract Infection using Goal-Directed Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Wallace; Drake, Cynthia; Mack, David; Reeder, Blaine; Trautner, Barbara; Wald, Heidi

    2017-06-20

    Unique characteristics of nursing homes (NHs) contribute to high rates of inappropriate antibiotic use for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), a benign condition. A mobile clinical decision support system (CDSS) may support NH staff in differentiating urinary tract infections (UTI) from ASB and reducing antibiotic days. We used Goal-Directed Design to: 1) Characterize information needs for UTI identification and management in NHs; 2) Develop UTI Decide, a mobile CDSS prototype informed by personas and scenarios of use constructed from Aim 1 findings; 3) Evaluate the UTI Decide prototype with NH staff. Focus groups were conducted with providers and nurses in NHs in Denver, Colorado (n= 24). Qualitative descriptive analysis was applied to focus group transcripts to identify information needs and themes related to mobile clinical decision support for UTI identification and management. Personas representing typical end users were developed; typical clinical context scenarios were constructed using information needs as goals. Usability testing was performed using cognitive walk-throughs and a think-aloud protocol. Four information needs were identified including guidance regarding resident assessment; communication with providers; care planning; and urine culture interpretation. Design of a web-based application incorporating a published decision support algorithm for evidence-based UTI diagnoses proceeded with a focus on nursing information needs during resident assessment and communication with providers. Certified nursing assistant (CNA) and registered nurse (RN) personas were constructed in 4 context scenarios with associated key path scenarios. After field testing, a high fidelity prototype of UTI Decide was completed and evaluated by potential end users. Design recommendations and content recommendations were elicited. Goal-Directed Design informed the development of a mobile CDSS supporting participant-identified information needs for UTI assessment and communication

  12. Plan for Developing a Materials Performance Database for the Texas Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    The materials used within the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) are undergoing a period of change. The purpose of this report is to develop the information necessary to develop (for TxDOT) a method or a database for monitoring the performanc...

  13. Perceptions of Library Staff Regarding Challenges of Developing Digital Libraries: The Case of an Iranian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadeh, Faranak; Isfandyari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The present research aims to identify the difficulties and obstacles for developing digital libraries in the seven regional branches of Islamic Azad University (IAU), Iran, and to study the status of librarians' skills and education programmes at these institutions. Design/methodology/approach: The 40 individuals working in the regional…

  14. Project Excel: A Model for an Individually Focused Staff Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minix, Nancy A.; Pearce, Winston Thomas

    A description is given of the development and implementation of an inservice program, "Project Excel," which was designed in accordance with andragogical theory. This theory is based upon four major assumptions: (1) as people grow, they become increasingly self-directed; (2) as people grow, a reservoir of experiences which provide a…

  15. Research training for teaching staff as a catalyst for professional and institutional development : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crispin, Darla; Stolte, Tine; Bisschop Boele, Evert

    2015-01-01

    When an institution wishes to develop a Masters programme that combines relevance to the profession with preparation for possible 3rd cycle study, there are many things to consider: curriculum design and content, facilities, stakeholder opinion, assessment, likely student intake, etc. But at least

  16. Technology Staff-Development and Support Programs: Applying Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Gerald D.; Pownell, David

    1998-01-01

    Presents Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs (physiological, safety, belonging, esteem, self-actualization) as a model for developing technology training and support for teachers, identifies basic technology-related needs that must be met before higher levels of technology integration can be achieved, and offers seven implications to help…

  17. DREAMer-Ally Competency and Self-Efficacy: Developing Higher Education Staff and Measuring Lasting Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Jesus; Cadenas, German

    2017-01-01

    DREAMzone is an educational intervention designed to increase higher education professionals' competency and self-efficacy for working with undocumented students. Grounded in social learning theory, we developed the DREAMer-ally instrument to investigate the effects of DREAMzone on DREAMer-ally competency and self-efficacy. Findings support the…

  18. Training for Social Development Staff at the World Bank, Volume 1. Main Report

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel R. Gross; Matthew LeDuc

    2010-01-01

    The social development family is facing a major challenge given the significant increase in lending made by the Bank in the last five years. Lending overall has more than doubled between FY05 and FY09; investment lending has increased by 82 percent and infrastructure lending by 125 percent. In this report, International Evaluation Group (IEG) suggests that the World Bank's safeguard policies ...

  19. Training for Social Development Staff at the World Bank, Volume 2. Annexes

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Daniel R.; LeDuc, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The social development family is facing a major challenge given the significant increase in lending made by the Bank in the last five years. Lending overall has more than doubled between FY05 and FY09; investment lending has increased by 82 percent and infrastructure lending by 125 percent. In this report, International Evaluation Group (IEG) suggests that the World Bank's safeguard policies ...

  20. Political and Pedagogical Dimensions in Holocaust Education: Teacher Seminars and Staff Development in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balodimas-Bartolomei, Angelyn

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines Holocaust education and professional teacher development in Greece. It briefly reviews the history of Greek Jewry and the stance and significance of Holocaust education within the Greek education system from historical, political, and pedagogical dimensions. The study also compares various approaches, themes, and…

  1. Effects of Staff Training and Development on Professional Abilities of University Teachers in Distance Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahinshah Babar; Chishti, Saeed-ul-Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Quality education may be termed as the primary way that leads to development of nations and can play an exclusive role in maintaining the standards of education. It is understood that using conventional teaching methods, desired products cannot be achieved; making the need for modern approaches to be evolved for sound qualitative work. The target…

  2. Internal Whole-School Evaluation in South Africa: The Influence of Holistic Staff Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Neelan; Grobler, Bennie; Mestry, Raj

    2016-01-01

    The Holistic Equilibrium Theory of Organizational Development was used to gain an in-depth understanding of the influence of holistic staff capacity on conducting effective internal whole-school evaluation (IWSE) within the Gauteng Department of Education's public secondary schools. In the context of South African education, the staff of each…

  3. The US Department of Defense Hemorrhage and Resuscitation Research and Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri, Anthony E; Dubick, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Data from recent conflicts demonstrate the continuing need for research and development focusing on hemorrhage control, fluid resuscitation, blood products, transfusion, and pathophysiologic responses to traumatic hemorrhage. The US Department of Defense Hemorrhage and Resuscitation Research and Development Program brings together US Department of Defense efforts and is coordinated with efforts of our other federal government, industry, international, and university-based partners. Military medical research has led to advances in both military and civilian trauma care. A sustained effort will be required to continue to advance the care of severely injured trauma patients.

  4. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    2001-08-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department was responsible for the tasks 'Applied Health Physics and Emergency Preparedness', 'Dosimetry', 'Environmental Monitoring', and Irradiation and Isotope Services'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  5. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  6. INFLUENCE OF WORKING ENVIRONMENT ON SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH THE HEALTH PROTECTION OF THE ENTERPRISE STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya V. Karpovich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the processes of health protection at modern industrial enterprises. Occupational health of workers is considered in the article as an important component of the sustainable development of the enterprise. The process of health protection is described in the study not only as a social component, but also as a process relating to all areas of sustainable development. The article attempts to show the place of ‘health-protection subsystem’ as part of an integrated system of industrial enterprises’ sustainable development. Four independent spheres of health protection programs implementation were pointed out at the level of enterprise – professional environment, the quality of workplace, involvement of employees in the process of health protection, involvement of the enterprise in the processes of health protection. The article emphasizes the interrelationship of biological and economic characteristics of human life and society in the formation of health protection processes. Programs for sustainable development taking into account the management of health protection should include two sets of activities: corrective and special ones. Tools used in health management programs aimed at expanding the choices of healthier behavior and altering the character of individual preferences in behavior within the framework of the formation of health tastes and preferences are defined. The authors present the results of the analysis of occupational diseases on the example of the three companies of the Perm region (Saranovskaya shakhta ‘Rudnaya’ OJSC, Motovilikhinskie zavody PJSC and Proton-PM PJSC. The results allowed to offer a list of universal and special arrangements for the implementation of health protection control programs within the mentioned industrial enterprises.

  7. The "Decolonial Turn": What Does It Mean for Academic Staff Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo-Anne Vorster

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly evident that the discourse of transformation that has shaped the democratising of higher education institutions over the first two decades of the democratic dispensation in South Africa has now run its course. Over the past few years, and particularly during the tumultuous student protests of 2015 and 2016, students and some academics have been calling for the decolonisation of university structures and cultures, including curricula. Using concepts from Margaret Archer’s social realism we consider the failure of the discourse of transformation  to lead to real change and examine a constellation of new discourses related to the decolonisation of universities that have emerged in South Africa recently. Furthermore, we critique the discourses that have underpinned our own practices as academic developers over the past two decades and then explore the implications of what could be termed a “decolonial turn” for academic developers and by implication for the academics with whom they work.

  8. Staff Views of the Importance of Relationships for Knowledge Development: Is Training by Specialists a Waste of Money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Jill; Goldbart, Juliet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The provision of skilled support is dependent on staff knowledge and understanding (Beadle-Brown J., Beecham J., Mansell J., Baumker T., Leigh J., Whelton R. & Richardson L, unpublished data). Influencing staff knowledge and understanding is an important component of interventions. Materials and Methods: Fourteen individual…

  9. The Empirical Assessment of English for Specific Business Purpose (ESBP) among Export Development Bank of Iran (EDBI) Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzen, Ahmad; Hashemi, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The present study has been conducted with the purpose of exploring the relationship between EDBI staff's General English proficiency and their technical English Writing as well as the way each ESBP and GE courses affect their writing skill. The kind of the study is quasi-experimental with pre-test and post-test, being conducted among EDBI staff in…

  10. Annual report 1987 Materials Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Review of the activities performed by the Materials Department of the National Atomica Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic during the year 1987. The Department provides services and assistance in all matters related to metallography and special techniques, corrosion and materials' transport, transport phenomena, casting and solidification, damage by radiation, thermomechanical treatments, mechanical properties, fatigue and fracture, multinational project of research and development in materials, VII course on metallurgy and technology of materials. Likewise, information on the Materials Department's staff, its publications, projects and agreements, seminars, courses and conferences during 1987 is included [es

  11. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the institution's Inmate Organization Manager (IO...

  12. Managing between science and industrie: An historical analysis of the Philips Research and Development Department's management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, F.K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose This paper seeks to deal with the history of Research and Development (R&D) management. It takes the history of the R&D Department of the Royal Philips Electronics of The Netherlands as an example to unravel the dynamics behind industrial R&D management. Designomethodologyoapproach This

  13. New types of organizational structures of accounting departments and their development

    OpenAIRE

    Шигун, Марія Михайлівна

    2015-01-01

    Development directions of new types of organizational structures of accounting departments, emergence of which has been caused by present-day conditions of keeping economics relationships, have been researched, as well as peculiarity of complex hierarchical and adaptive structures has been disclosed.

  14. Minutes from Department of Energy/Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program, research and development technology needs assessment review meeting for FY 1990, September 1989, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    On September 20--21, 1989, representatives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters, DOE Operations Offices, DOE contractors, and the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program met in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to select and prioritize candidate waste problems in need of research and development. The information gained will be used in planning for future research and development tasks and in restructuring current research activities to address the priority needs. Consistent with the ongoing reevaluation of DOE's plans for environmental restoration and waste management, an attempt was made to relate the needs developed in this meeting to the needs expressed in the draft Applied Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation Plan. Operations Offices were represented either by DOE staff or by contractor delegates from the area. This document summarizes the results of the meeting and lists the priority waste problems established.

  15. Pharmacy technician self-efficacies: Insight to aid future education, staff development, and workforce planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desselle, Shane P; Hoh, Ryan; Holmes, Erin R; Gill, Amanpreet; Zamora, Lemuel

    2017-07-15

    The roles of pharmacy technicians are increasingly prominent given pharmacy's transition to patient-centered activities and evolving scopes of practice in many U.S. states and throughout the world. The aims of this study were to assess U.S. pharmacy technicians' self-efficacies for and attitudes toward performing current and emerging roles in hospital and in community pharmacy and to identify factors related to pharmacy technician self-efficacies in these roles. A total of 5000 pharmacy technicians from 8 U.S. states were sent an electronic survey eliciting data on current involvement, self-efficacies, and attitudes for practicing in an expansive list of practice activities. The 8 states from which the sample was drawn were selected from a stratified randomized procedure using U.S. Census Bureau geographically defined regions. Pre-notification and response reminders were employed. Data were analyzed descriptively and with univariate, inferential tests, as appropriate, to determine associations with commitment, practice environment, experience level, and other variables. Of the 612 participants who responded, 494 were currently working as a technician and not enrolled in a PharmD program of study. Participants reported various activities in which they were highly engaged. Overall, attitudes toward performing most of the activities and self-efficacies were quite favorable, even for those activities in which technicians were currently less involved. There were some notable differences between technicians practicing in community versus hospital settings. Years of experience, profession commitment, and advanced employee ranking were associated with higher levels of self-efficacy, overall. This initial examination of pharmacy technician self-efficacies identified areas that along with other factors could help employers with further expanding technician practice activities and vocational institutions with considerations for education and development of these key members

  16. Improving the application of a practice guideline for the assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior by training the full staff of psychiatric departments via an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, Derek P; de Groot, Marieke H; de Keijser, Jos; Verwey, Bastiaan; Mokkenstorm, Jan; Twisk, Jos W R; van Duijn, Erik; van Hemert, Albert M; Verlinde, Lia; Spijker, Jan; van Luijn, Bert; Vink, Jan; Kerkhof, Ad J F M

    2013-01-09

    In 2012, in The Netherlands a multidisciplinary practice guideline for the assessment and treatment of suicidal behavior was issued. The release of guidelines often fails to change professional behavior due to multiple barriers. Structured implementation may improve adherence to guidelines. This article describes the design of a study measuring the effect of an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program aiming at the training of the full staff of departments in the application of the guideline. We hypothesize that both professionals and departments will benefit from the program. In a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial, 43 psychiatric departments spread over 10 regional mental health institutions throughout The Netherlands will be clustered in pairs with respect to the most prevalent diagnostic category of patients and average duration of treatment. Pair members are randomly allocated to either the experimental or the control condition. In the experimental condition, the full staff of departments, that is, all registered nurses, psychologists, physicians and psychiatrists (n = 532, 21 departments) will be trained in the application of the guideline, in a one-day small interactive group Train-the-Trainer program. The program is supported by a 60-minute e-learning module with video vignettes of suicidal patients and additional instruction. In the control condition (22 departments, 404 professionals), the guideline shall be disseminated in the traditional way: through manuals, books, conferences, internet, reviews and so on. The effectiveness of the program will be assessed at the level of both health care professionals and departments. We aim to demonstrate the effect of training of the full staff of departments with an e-learning supported Train-the-Trainer program in the application of a new clinical guideline. Strengths of the study are the natural setting, the training of full staff, the random allocation to the conditions, the large scale of the

  17. Academic Library Department Experience Fosters the Development of Leadership Skills Relevant to Academic Library Directorship

    OpenAIRE

    Joanne M. Muellenbach

    2017-01-01

    A Review of: Harris-Keith, Colleen S. (2015). The Relationship Between Academic Library Department Experience and Perceptions of Leadership Skill Development Relevant to Academic Library Directorship. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 41(3), 246-263. doi:10.1016/j.acalib.2015.03.017 Objective – This study sought to identify if the perception of library leadership skill and quality development is equal across departmental experience, and what are the leadership skills and qualities...

  18. Investigation of School-Based Staff Development Programs as a Means to Promote International Cooperation in Curriculum Improvement Through Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    This study explores the feasibility of utilizing school-focused staff development programs in promoting international cooperation through transferability and/or adaptation of relevant aspects of this type of inservice education by foreign countries. The objective of this presentation is to develop interest in ways in which teachers in various…

  19. Career development resource: educational leadership in a department of surgery: vice chairs for education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, Hilary; Boehler, Margaret; DaRosa, Debra; Dunnington, Gary L

    2012-07-01

    The growing appreciation of the need to adopt an evidence-based approach to teaching and assessment has led to a demand for faculty who are well versed in best practices in education. Surgeons with interest and expertise in instruction, curriculum development, educational research, and evaluation can have an important impact on the educational mission of a department of surgery. The increased fervor for accountability in education together with the challenges imposed by accreditation agencies and hospitals has made educational leadership responsibilities more time consuming and complex. In response to this, an increasing number of department chairs created Vice Chair for Education positions to support clerkship and program directors and ensure the department's education mission statement is fulfilled. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. SWOT analysis: The analytical method in the process of planning and its application in the development of orthopaedic hospital department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić Zorica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. SWOT analysis is a managerial tool used to evaluate internal and external environment through strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Objective. The aim was to demonstrate the application of the SWOT analysis on the example of the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery 'Banjica' in Belgrade. Methods. Qualitative research was conducted during December 2008 at the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery 'Banjica' by applying the focus group technique. Participants were members of the medical staff and patients. In the first phase of the focus group brainstorming was applied to collect the factors of internal and external environment, and to identify strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, respectively. In the second phase the nominal group technique was applied in order to reduce the list of factors. The factors were assessed according to their influence on the Department. Factors ranked by the three point Likert scale from 3 (highest impact to 1 (lowest impact. Results. The most important strengths of the Department are competent and skilled staff, high quality of services, average hospital bed utilization, the Department providing the educational basis of the School of Medicine, satisfied patients, pleasant setting, and additional working hours. The weaknesses are: poor spatial organization, personnel unmotivated to refresh knowledge, lack of specifically trained personnel, inadequate sanitary facilities, and uncovered services by the Insurance Fund, long average hospital stay, and low economic status of patients. The opportunities are: legislative regulations, formed paediatric traumatology service at the City level, good regional position of the Institute, and extension of referral areas. The threats are: absent Department autonomy in the personnel policy of the Institute, competitions within

  1. [SWOT analysis: the analytical method in the process of planning and its application in the development of orthopaedic hospital department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzić, Zorica; Vukasinović, Zoran; Bjegović-Mikanović, Vesna; Jovanović, Vesna; Janicić, Radmila

    2010-01-01

    SWOT analysis is a managerial tool used to evaluate internal and external environment through strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The aim was to demonstrate the application of the SWOT analysis on the example of the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade. Qualitative research was conducted during December 2008 at the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" by applying the focus group technique. Participants were members of the medical staff and patients. In the first phase of the focus group brainstorming was applied to collect the factors of internal and external environment, and to identify strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, respectively. In the second phase the nominal group technique was applied in order to reduce the list of factors. The factors were assessed according to their influence on the Department. Factors ranked by the three point Likert scale from 3 (highest impact) to 1 (lowest impact). The most important strengths of the Department are competent and skilled staff, high quality of services, average hospital bed utilization, the Department providing the educational basis of the School of Medicine, satisfied patients, pleasant setting, and additional working hours. The weaknesses are: poor spatial organization, personnel unmotivated to refresh knowledge, lack of specifically trained personnel, inadequate sanitary facilities, and uncovered services by the Insurance Fund, long average hospital stay, and low economic status of patients. The opportunities are: legislative regulations, formed paediatric traumatology service at the City level, good regional position of the Institute, and extension of referral areas. The threats are: absent Department autonomy in the personnel policy of the Institute, competitions within the Institute, impossibility to increase the Department

  2. Empirical Study on the Feasibility of UniSZA’s Staff Cash Waqf and its Possible Impact on Human Development in Terengganu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuff Jelili Amuda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for human development especially for the less privileged Muslims in the state due to financial constraints, unemployment, insufficient and inadequate financial support. The study discussed and analyzed the structured interviews conducted on factors influencing UniSZA’s staff cash waqf and its possible impact on the socio-economic development of Terengganu. The total number of 150 respondents participated in the first instrumental validation section where 150 questionnaires were distributed and collected. 150 questionnaires were distributed between February and June 2015 to the UniSZA’s staff such as lecturer, senior, and junior staff in the university. The instrument was divided into four sections. Firstly, the respondent’s profile, (15 items. Secondly, factors influencing UniSZA’s staff cash waqf contribution (15 items. Thirdly, promoting economic and human development (15 items. Fourthly, the importance to the society’s development (15 items. The content validity of the questionnaire would be evaluated by the researchers to improve the questionnaire. The participants were selected from lecturers, administrative staff, and students to discover the breadth and extent of the needs for UniZSA’s staff cash waqf contribution to the state. Waqf provides human relief, dignity, financial support, and social needs to reduce poverty in the society. The research is based on the hypothesis that UniSZA’s staff cash waqf can have a positive social and economic impact in Terengganu. The objective of this study is to examine the viability of a UniSZA staff cash waqf and how cash waqf can be utilized to develop Terengganu economically and socially for the interest of the needy Muslims in Terengganu. The study applies the quantitative and qualitative methods throughout the discussion and analysis. Human development includes the creation of employment, micro-finance, transaction, farming, soft loans, and other lawful lucrative

  3. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  4. Emergency department case management: the dyad team of nurse case manager and social worker improve discharge planning and patient and staff satisfaction while decreasing inappropriate admissions and costs: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Darlene P; Herrick, Charlotte A

    2002-01-01

    A model of emergency department (ED) case management consisting of a social worker and a nurse case manager can prevent inappropriate admissions, improve discharge planning, decrease cost, and enhance patient satisfaction. The individual and combined roles of the dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager are discussed. A literature review includes how a case management dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager in the ED can decrease utilization of the ED for nonemergent visits, promote the use of community resources, and improve discharge planning to avoid excessive costs. The importance of the dyad team working with the interdisciplinary team in the ED, the primary care physician (PCP), and other community health care providers in order to provide a holistic approach to care is addressed. A discussion about the improvement of both patient and staff satisfaction demonstrates the results of case management strategies that support and advocate for patients to receive quality, cost-effective care across the health care continuum, while decreasing the use of the ED for nonemergent care.

  5. Laboratory directed research and development: Annual report to the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, Brookhaven must continuously foster the development of new ideas and technologies, promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and develop new fundable R and D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments are described in this report. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums.

  6. Department Involvement in Instructional Materials Development for ODL Study at the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanyanyiwa, Vincent Itai; Mutambanengwe, Betty

    2015-01-01

    The teaching and designing of modules at Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) is the principal responsibility of a single body of teaching staff, although some authors and content reviewers could be sourced from elsewhere if they are not available in ZOU. This survey, through a case study, examines the involvement of lecturers and staff in the…

  7. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL POWERS OF SPECIAL COUNSEL § 600.5 Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the...

  8. Factors that influence the development of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction in emergency department nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Stacie; Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Maughan, Dale; Heaston, Sondra

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout in emergency department nurses throughout the United States and (b) to examine which demographic and work-related components affect the development of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout in this nursing specialty. This was a nonexperimental, descriptive, and predictive study using a self-administered survey. Survey packets including a demographic questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life Scale version 5 (ProQOL 5) were mailed to 1,000 selected emergency nurses throughout the United States. The ProQOL 5 scale was used to measure the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among emergency department nurses. Multiple regression using stepwise solution was employed to determine which variables of demographics and work-related characteristics predicted the prevalence of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout. The α level was set at .05 for statistical significance. The results revealed overall low to average levels of compassion fatigue and burnout and generally average to high levels of compassion satisfaction among this group of emergency department nurses. The low level of manager support was a significant predictor of higher levels of burnout and compassion fatigue among emergency department nurses, while a high level of manager support contributed to a higher level of compassion satisfaction. The results may serve to help distinguish elements in emergency department nurses' work and life that are related to compassion satisfaction and may identify factors associated with higher levels of compassion fatigue and burnout. Improving recognition and awareness of compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout among emergency department nurses may prevent emotional exhaustion and help identify interventions that will help nurses remain empathetic and

  9. Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

    1996-01-01

    This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies

  10. US Department of Energy Three Mile Island research and development program. 1985 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.R.

    1986-04-01

    In 1985, the US Department of Energy's Three Mile Island Research and Development Program at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and other supporting laboratories, concentrated on three major areas: fuel and waste handling and disposition, accident evaluation, and reactor evaluation. While the general technology being developed is of direct benefit to the recovery operations at TMI-2, this technology will be of generic benefit to the entire nuclear power industry. Others engaged in research and development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and regulation of nuclear plants will have access to this technology to enhance plant safety and reliability

  11. Impact of the organisational culture on primary care staff members' intention to engage in research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena; Baigi, Amir; Palm, Lars; Fridlund, Bengt; Björkelund, Cecilia; Hedberg, Berith

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how organisational culture influences the intentions of primary care staff members (PCSM) to engage in research and development (R&D). The participants (n=30) were PCSM employed in a care centre in south-western Sweden. The study had an observational design with an ethnographic approach. The data were collected by means of observations, interviews and analysis of documents. The results revealed the perceptions of PCSM in two domains, research and clinical practice, both of which existed at three different cultural levels: visible (structures and policy), semi-visible (norms and values) and invisible (taken-for-granted attitudes). It is difficult to conduct a purely objective ethnographic study because the investigation is controlled by its context. However, it is necessary to highlight and discuss the invisible level to improve understanding of negative attitudes and preconceptions related to the implementation of R&D in the clinical setting. By highlighting the invisible level of culture, the management of an organisation has the opportunity to initiate discussion of issues related to concealed norms and values as well as attitudes towards new thinking and change in the primary health context. This paper is one of the very few studies to investigate the influence of organisational culture on the intentions of PCSM to engage in R&D.

  12. Department of Defense Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT and E): Appropriations Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-13

    Research Projects Agency website, accessed December 5, 2016, http://www.darpa.mil/about-us/mission. Appropriations Structure of Defense RDT&E...funding streams. Among the many other factors that may affect the effectiveness of the performance of RDT&E are: organizational structures and...Department of Defense Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E): Appropriations Structure John F. Sargent Jr. Specialist in

  13. Development of RadRob15, A Robot for Detecting Radioactive Contamination in Nuclear Medicine Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafe A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Accidental or intentional release of radioactive materials into the living or working environment may cause radioactive contamination. In nuclear medicine departments, radioactive contamination is usually due to radionuclides which emit high energy gamma photons and particles. These radionuclides have a broad range of energies and penetration capabilities. Rapid detection of radioactive contamination is very important for efficient removing of the contamination without spreading the radionuclides. A quick scan of the contaminated area helps health physicists locate the contaminated area and assess the level of activity. Studies performed in IR Iran shows that in some nuclear medicine departments, areas with relatively high levels of activity can be found. The highest contamination level was detected in corridors which are usually used by patients. To monitor radioactive contamination in nuclear medicine departments, RadRob15, a contamination detecting robot was developed in the Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC. The motor vehicle scanner and the gas radiation detector are the main components of this robot. The detection limit of this robot has enabled it to detect low levels of radioactive contamination. Our preliminary tests show that RadRob15 can be easily used in nuclear medicine departments as a device for quick surveys which identifies the presence or absence of radioactive contamination.

  14. How primary health care staff working in rural and remote areas access skill development and expertise to support health promotion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Kathryn A; Judd, Jenni; Wapau, Hylda; Nichols, Nina; Watt, Kerrianne; Devine, Sue

    2018-05-01

    Health promotion is a key component of comprehensive primary health care. Health promotion approaches complement healthcare management by enabling individuals to increase control over their health. Many primary healthcare staff have a role to play in health promotion practice, but their ability to integrate health promotion into practice is influenced by their previous training and experience. For primary healthcare staff working in rural and remote locations, access to professional development can be limited by what is locally available and prohibitive in terms of cost for travel and accommodation. This study provides insight into how staff at a large north Queensland Aboriginal community controlled health service access skill development and health promotion expertise to support their work. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted. Small group and individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (n=9). A purposive sampling method was used to recruit participants from a number of primary healthcare teams that were more likely to be involved in health promotion work. Both on-the-ground staff and managers were interviewed. All participants were asked how they access skill development and expertise in health promotion practice and what approaches they prefer for ongoing health promotion support. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. All participants valued access to skill development, advice and support that would assist their health promotion practice. Skill development and expertise in health promotion was accessed from a variety of sources: conferences, workshops, mentoring or shared learning from internal and external colleagues, and access to online information and resources. With limited funds and limited access to professional development locally, participants fostered external and internal organisational relationships to seek in-kind advice and support. Irrespective of

  15. An Analysis of the Relationship between the Organizational Culture and the Performance of Staff Work Groups in Schools and the Development of an Explanatory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Chris; Connolly, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the concept of organizational culture and the relationship between the organizational culture and the performance of staff work groups in schools. The article draws upon a study of 12 schools in Wales, UK, which despite being in disadvantaged settings have high levels of pupil attainment. A model is developed linking the…

  16. Impact of In-Service Training and Staff Development on Workers' Job Performance and Optimal Productivity in Public Secondary Schools in Osun State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejoh, Johnson; Faniran, Victoria Loveth

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of in-service training and staff development on workers' job performance and optimal productivity in public secondary schools in Osun State, Nigeria. The study used the ex-post-facto research design. Three research questions and three hypotheses were generated and tested using questionnaire items adapted from…

  17. Staff Perceptions of Professional Development and Empowerment as Long-Term Leadership Tasks of School Principals in South African Schools: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Eldridge; Muller, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the perceptions of school staff of professional development and empowerment as part of the long-term leadership task of principals. The long-term leadership model was used as a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the perceptions of 118 teachers and education managers in approximately 100 schools throughout…

  18. Development of a functional, internet-accessible department of surgery outcomes database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, William L; Lincourt, Amy E; Gersin, Keith; Kercher, Kent; Iannitti, David; Kuwada, Tim; Lyons, Cynthia; Sing, Ronald F; Hadzikadic, Mirsad; Heniford, B Todd; Rucho, Susan

    2008-06-01

    The need for surgical outcomes data is increasing due to pressure from insurance companies, patients, and the need for surgeons to keep their own "report card". Current data management systems are limited by inability to stratify outcomes based on patients, surgeons, and differences in surgical technique. Surgeons along with research and informatics personnel from an academic, hospital-based Department of Surgery and a state university's Department of Information Technology formed a partnership to develop a dynamic, internet-based, clinical data warehouse. A five-component model was used: data dictionary development, web application creation, participating center education and management, statistics applications, and data interpretation. A data dictionary was developed from a list of data elements to address needs of research, quality assurance, industry, and centers of excellence. A user-friendly web interface was developed with menu-driven check boxes, multiple electronic data entry points, direct downloads from hospital billing information, and web-based patient portals. Data were collected on a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant server with a secure firewall. Protected health information was de-identified. Data management strategies included automated auditing, on-site training, a trouble-shooting hotline, and Institutional Review Board oversight. Real-time, daily, monthly, and quarterly data reports were generated. Fifty-eight publications and 109 abstracts have been generated from the database during its development and implementation. Seven national academic departments now use the database to track patient outcomes. The development of a robust surgical outcomes database requires a combination of clinical, informatics, and research expertise. Benefits of surgeon involvement in outcomes research include: tracking individual performance, patient safety, surgical research, legal defense, and the ability to provide accurate information

  19. ED staff and clinicians learn essential human relations skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Smile training for the emergency department? An increasingly popular customer service training program for physicians and staff in the emergency department teaches how to improve personal interactions with patients. Without focusing on how patients are treated beyond their medical ailments, course developers warn, hospitals may be alienating patients who might decide not to pay their hospital bill or might take their business elsewhere in the future.

  20. Preparing radiology staff to meet service goals: a training model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardone, E B; Stepanovich, P H; West, V T

    1994-01-01

    This article describes a model used to train radiology staff in customer service relations at a large southeastern medical center. Information about the needs of the radiology department and staff was acquired through quantitative and qualitative assessments. The primary goal of the training was twofold: 1) to develop employee awareness of customer expectations and 2) to develop problem-solving skills to respond to customer service related issues. Instructional methods compatible with adult learning were used and training results were assessed. Positive changes in employee attitudes and behaviors are described and recommendations for training development and implementation are discussed.

  1. Developing relationships between care staff and people with dementia through Music Therapy and Dance Movement Therapy: A preliminary phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhuish, Ruth; Beuzeboc, Catherine; Guzmán, Azucena

    2017-04-01

    Background There is an increasing focus on providing effective psychosocial interventions to improve quality of life in dementia care. This study aims to explore the attitudes and perceptions of staff who participated regularly in Music Therapy (MT) and Dance Movement Therapy (DMT) groups for residents with dementia in a nursing home. Method In-depth interviews were conducted with seven members of care home staff. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results A representation modelling the impact of MT and DMT in a nursing care home. Three main themes were identified. 1) Discovering residents' skills and feelings; 2) Learning from the therapists to change approaches to care practice with subthemes: time, space and pace, choice, following the residents' lead; 3) Connection between staff and residents. Conclusion The model indicated that both interventions performed in parallel helped staff to discover residents' skills and feelings. Although it is a small sample size, this study strongly suggests that MT and DMT can have a positive influence in helping care staff to provide a meaningful care environment.

  2. 76 FR 72048 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development of Permanent Housing in Grand Island, NE AGENCY: Department of... property is located. This project meets this requirement. Approved: November 14, 2011. Eric K. Shinseki...

  3. A Strategic Knowledge Map for the Research and Development Department in a Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a corporate resource, being grounds for initiating activities, which is important in a dynamic economy. The difficulties related to obtaining tacit knowledge, related primarily to experience and observation of the knowledge employee (Mendryk, 2011, encourage the companies to use tools supporting knowledge management and location. This article attempts at designing a dedicated, strategic knowledge map for a research and development department in a manufacturing company. Based on the reference works, the detailed characteristics of specific sources of knowledge in a manufacturing company and tools supporting the process of converting the tacit knowledge into explicit one, for example, the knowledge maps, were devised. Then, a strategic knowledge map model was designed for the research and development department (hereinafter abbreviated as SKM – R&D in the manufacturing company, comprising the following components: (1 fields of knowledge, (2 internal and external processes in the R&D department, and (3 sources of knowledge. Then, a practical implementation of the SKM – R&D model was presented.

  4. Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Jacobsen, U.; Oelgaard, P.L. [eds.

    1996-03-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Department of Nuclear Safety Research and Nuclear Facilities in 1995. The department`s research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff`s participation in national and international committees. (au) 5 tabs., 21 ills.

  5. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  6. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing a New Context for Leadership Development in the Los Angeles Fire Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    881322782?accountid=12702. 79 Susan Imel, Teaching Adults: Is It Different? Myths and Realities (Columbus, OH: ERIC Publishers, 1995), 3. 80 Ibid., 4...rough looking and “fire- eating ” male fire service leaders are over, and the future of fire service leadership really lies in the ability of the...SOCIALIZATION CONFLICT Inputs As groups develop they display The degree to wl1ich members Process by which members become Healthy con-petition becomes conf5ct

  8. GP and staff evaluation of the maturity matrix as a tool to assess and improve organisational development in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loegstrup, Louise; Edwards, Adrian; Waldorff, Frans Boch

    2009-01-01

    one questionnaire. At participant level, 144 returned the questionnaire: 82 GPs; 62 staff. A total of 93 gave positive statements on satisfaction with MM, 16 stated initial expectations were not met, 79 would recommend MM to colleagues. Differences between GPs and staff were only statistically...... significant regarding "increased insight into organisation of work after participation in the MM project". There was a tendency that GPs were more positive and likely to give an opinion. A total of 22 planned how to meet the goals set at the first MM meeting and 18 felt that they achieved them. In 24 out...

  9. Developing a Personal-Learning-Portfolio (PLP) for 1st year students at Department of Psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna Thit; Beck Hansen, Nina; Andersen, Mette Elmose

    Abstract title: Developing a Personal-Learning-Portfolio (PLP) for 1st year students at Department of Psychology Learning outcome of activity: B01 is the first module of the education in Psychology at University of Southern Denmark (SDU). The aim of B01 is to give the students a ‘map...... different strategies: first the overall framework of the PLP is discussed and second we conduct cognitive interviews evaluating the comprehensibility and relevance of the questions posed in the PLP. The PLP is then adapted based on the comments from the students. The development and initial testing...... be an inspiration to others who wish to develop and implements PLPs. Second, we will show the format of our particular Personal-Learning-Portfolio together with reflections on why it was developed in such a way. This includes the students’ opinions about the PLP and the results of the cognitive interviews....

  10. Development of treatment technologies of the processing of U.S. Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Berry, J.B.; Coyle, G.J. Jr.; Lurk, P.; Wolf, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Waste contaminated with chemically hazardous and radioactive species is defined as mixed waste. Significant technology development has been conducted for separate treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste, but technology development addressing mixed-waste treatment has been limited. In response to the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to mixed-waste technology development, the Office of Technology Development of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The program is identifying and evaluating treatment technologies to treat present and estimated future mixed wastes at DOE sites. The status of the technical initiatives in chemical/physical treatment, waste destruction/stabilization technology, off-gas treatment, and final waste form production/assessment is described in this paper

  11. Improving communication between staff and disabled children in hospital wards: testing the feasibility of a training intervention developed through intervention mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumm, Rebecca; Thomas, Eleanor; Lloyd, Claire; Hambly, Helen; Tomlinson, Richard; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a novel parent-inspired training intervention for hospital ward staff to improve communication with disabled children when inpatients. Training content and delivery strategies were informed by the iterative process of Intervention Mapping and developed in collaboration with parents of disabled children. UK University Hospital children's ward. 80 medical, nursing, allied health professionals, clerical and housekeeping staff on a children's ward. Themes identified in previous qualitative research formed the basis of the training. Learning objectives included prioritising communication, cultivating empathy, improving knowledge and developing confidence. Participant feedback was used to refine content and delivery. Intervention documentation adheres to the Template for Intervention Description and Replication checklist. Highlighting mandated National Health Service policies and involving the hospital Patient and Carer Experience Group facilitated management support for the training. Eighty staff participated in one of four 1-hour sessions. A paediatric registrar and nurse delivered sessions to mixed groups of staff. General feedback was very positive. The intervention, fully documented in a manual, includes videos of parent carers discussing hospital experiences, interactive tasks, small group discussion, personal reflection and intention planning. Generic and local resources were provided. It was feasible to deliver this new communication training to hospital ward staff and it was positively received. Early feedback was encouraging and indicates a commitment to behaviour change. Further piloting is required to establish the transferability of the intervention to other hospitals, followed by consideration of downstream markers to evaluate the effects on disabled children's inpatient experience. Organisational and cultural change is required to support individual behaviour change.

  12. Public meetings in the departments

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    During our recent information meetings, we discussed four topics: the new Saved Leave Scheme (LTSLS); the new developments concerning pensions; the MARS Advancement and Promotion scheme and its 2012 budget; the recently updated Administrative and Operation Circulars. These meetings were attended by a large number of staff members and were a great opportunity for the Staff Association to engage in direct dialogue with the staff in the various departments. The vast majority of questions or comments were on the LTSLS and on the possibility to save leave, which is to be taken at the end of a career.  A few comments were also made on MARS, a system many considered to be not very motivating and that takes up a lot of resources for minimal positive results. Thanks and encouragement After the presentation on Pensions, on behalf of the Staff Association we thanked Dorothée Duret, who for personal reasons had to resign from the Pension Fund Governing Board (PFGB) and from the Staff Council...

  13. Teacher Performance Evaluation Plan: A Personalized Approach to Supervision, Staff Development, and Evaluation. An Implementation Guide. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jeanne; And Others

    This guide provides assistance to New Mexico school districts in implementing a state-sponsored teacher performance evaluation plan (Provision III of the New Mexico Staff Accountability Plan, adopted by the State Board of Education). This plan involves five basic procedures: (1) determine specific definitions of the six essential teaching…

  14. Police, Design, Plan and Manage: Developing a Framework for Integrating Staff Roles and Institutional Policies into a Plagiarism Prevention Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher; White, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    When student plagiarism occurs, academic interest and institutional policy generally assume the fault rests with the student. This paper questions this assumption. We claim that plagiarism is a shared responsibility and a complex phenomenon that requires an ongoing calibration of the relative skills and experiences of students and staff in…

  15. Employee Assistance Programs in Higher Education. Alcohol, Mental Health and Professional Development Programming for Faculty and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoreson, Richard W., Ed.; Hosokawa, Elizabeth P., Ed.

    The promotion of employee assistance programs (EAP) in higher education is considered in 24 chapters, with an emphasis on enhancing resources and the academic environment for faculty and staff. Seven topical areas are addressed: history of EAP; characteristics of higher education; alcoholism and other risks in the academic life-style; EAP models…

  16. Faculty Hiring and Development at BYU: Perspectives of a Recent Hire and Department Chair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, R. Steven

    2002-04-01

    I will present a personal perspective on the transition from an industrial to an academic physicist. For those planning on a similar transition, I will mention several things that were helpful in preparing myself, marketing myself, and adapting to an academic setting. For instance, a significant difference between academic and industrial physics is the responsibility of classroom teaching. Several things that proved particularly useful in improving my own teaching were mentoring teaching partnerships, student evaluations, help in the tenure and promotion process, and programs available from our Faculty Center. From my current perspective as a department chair, I will further discuss mentoring practices I have found helpful with other new faculty. These include such things as inviting mentors to participate with new faculty in development workshops and providing financial and other recognition for participation as a mentor. In addition to developing professional skills, I have found that good mentoring is particularly critical in encouraging new faculty to adapt to departmental culture. Finally, I will discuss ideas I have found helpful in successfully recruiting new faculty. This involves researching, identifying, and actively recruiting faculty we think will build our department. For us, it has not been sufficient to passively rely on responses from applicants to advertisements and word-of-mouth inquiries. Through careful hiring and effective mentoring, we have developed an excellent record of having our faculty being successful in the tenure process.

  17. Career development needs of vice chairs for education in departments of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfey, Hilary; Boehler, Margaret; Darosa, Debra; Dunnington, Gary L

    2012-01-01

    To identify the career development needs Vice Chair for Education in Surgery Departments (VCESDs). In all, 33 VCESDs were invited to complete an online survey to identify the scope of duties, scholarly activity, job satisfaction, and career development needs. A total of 29/33 (88%) VCESDs responded. Time constraints were the most frequent impediment for MDs vs. PhDs (p teacher programs (1 ± 0), and program performance evaluation systems (1.33 ± 0.76) for PhDs. The skills deemed to be of greatest importance were ability to communicate effectively (1.27 ± 0.55), resolve personnel conflicts (1.32 ± 0.57), and introduce change (1.41 ± 0.59). PhDs revealed a greater need to learn strategies for dealing with disruptive faculty (1.0 ± 0 vs 2.15 ± 0.87). This information will inform the future career development of VCESDs and will assist Department Chairs who wish to recruit and retain VCESDs. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. National Institute of Radiological Sciences. 2. Department of technical support and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae

    2005-01-01

    The Department has two Sections of Technical Service and Development, and of Laboratory Animal Development and Management, of which works are described in this paper. The former section works for planning and coordination, maintenance, management and operation of collaborative experimental facilities and equipments; maintenance, management and operation of radiation generating equipments involving accelerators; and maintenance, management and operation of specified experimental equipments (Radon Building). The recent topic is the introduction of a neutron accelerator system for biological effect experiment, neutron exposure accelerator system for biological effect experiment (NASBEE), and of a single particle irradiation system to cell, single particle irradiation system to cell (SPICE), the equipment for micro-beam (2 μm accuracy) for cell irradiation. The latter section works for production, maintenance and supply of experimental animals; maintenance, management and operation of facilities for experimental animals and plants; hygienic management of experimental animals; and research, development and application of new technology concerning experimental animals. The recent topic is the construction of buildings providing areas for SPF mice and rats in order to study the low dose radiation effect and for monkeys, to study the molecular imaging. The intellectual fundamentals of the Department are to be open to the public and be used collaboratively in principle. (S.I.)

  19. Low-level waste research and development activities of the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barainca, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the technical activities of the Department of Energy's Defense and Nuclear Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Programs (LLWPs). Although each Program was established with a different purpose, the technologies developed and demonstrated by each are transferable for use in both the commercial and DOE sectors. This paper presents an overview of the technical activities being pursued through both the Defense and Nuclear Energy LLWP's. These technologies have been placed in the following categories; Criteria and Standards, Systems Analysis, Information and Technology Transfer, Waste Treatment and Wast Form, Improved Near Surface Disposal, Greater Confinement Disposal, Corrective Measures, and Monitoring

  20. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-01-01

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility

  1. Development of radiological profiles for U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, B.D.; Meshkov, N.K.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological profiles have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory for low-level mixed wastes (LLMWs) that are under the management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). These profiles have been used in the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS) to support the analysis of environmental and health risks associated with the various waste management strategies. The radiological characterization of DOE LLMWs is generally inadequate and has made it difficult to develop a site- and waste-stream-dependent radiological profile for LLMWs. On the basis of the operational history of the DOE sites, a simple model was developed to generate site-dependent and waste-stream-independent radiological profiles for LLMWs. This paper briefly discusses the assumptions used in this model and the uncertainties in the results

  2. Wind Energy Department. Annual progress report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, S.; Hauge Madsen, P. (eds.)

    2002-10-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2001. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2001 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  3. Wind Energy Department. Annual progress report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skrumsager, B.; Larsen, S.; Hauge Madsen, P.

    2002-10-01

    The report describes the work of the Wind Energy Department at Risoe National Laboratory in 2001. The research of the department aims to develop new opportunities in the exploitation of wind energy and to map and alleviate atmospheric aspects of environmental problems. The expertise of the department is utilised in commercial activities such as wind turbine testing and certification, training programmes, courses and consultancy services to industry, authorities and Danish and international organisations on wind energy and atmospheric environmental impact. A summary of the department's activities in 2001 is shown, including lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au)

  4. Developing a national computerised absence monitoring and management system to reduce nursing student attrition: evaluation of staff and student perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Kay; McCallum, Jacqueline; Murray, John; Scott, Janine; Strachan, Evelyn; Yates, Lynda; Wright, Marty

    2014-05-01

    Reducing avoidable nursing student attrition is an international challenge. A pattern of falling attendance is recognised as a frequent precursor to withdrawal from nursing programmes. To address concerns regarding nursing student attrition, the Scottish Government implemented a pilot project for a centralised Computerised Absence Management and Monitoring System (CAMMS). The CAMMS adopted an 'assertive outreach' approach, contacting students every two weeks via colour coded letters to tell them whether their attendance was 'excellent', 'good, but potentially causing concern'; or 'warning; attendance concerns/contact academic staff for support'. This article reports key findings from an evaluation of CAMMS. To explore the perceived impact of CAMMS on student support and attrition, from the perspectives of academic and administrative staff and students. Mixed methods evaluation design. Three large geographically dispersed Schools of Nursing in Scotland. 83 students; 20 academic staff; and 3 lead administrators. On-line cohort survey of academic staff and students; structured interviews with lead administrators. Findings reflected a spectrum of negative and positive views of CAMMS. Students who are attending regularly seem pleased that their commitment is recognised. Lecturers who teach larger groups report greater difficulty getting to know students individually and acknowledge the benefit of identifying potential attendance concerns at an early stage. Conversely, some students who received a 'warning' letter were frequently annoyed or irritated, rather than feeling supported. Increased staff workload resulted in negative perceptions and a consequent reluctance to use CAMMS. However, students who were causing concern reported subsequent improvement in attendance. CAMMS has the potential to identify 'at-risk' students at an early stage; however, the system should have flexibility to tailor automatically generated letters in response to individual circumstances, to

  5. U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, mixed-waste treatment research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    Both chemically hazardous and radioactive species contaminate mixed waste. Historically, technology has been developed to treat either hazardous or radioactive waste. Technology specifically designed to produce a low-risk final waste form for mixed low-level waste has not been developed, demonstrated, or tested. Site-specific solutions to management of mixed waste have been initiated; however, site-specific programs result in duplication of technology development effort between various sites. There is a clear need for technology designed to meet the unique requirements for mixed-waste processing and a system-wide integrated strategy for developing technology and managing mixed waste. This paper discusses the US Department of Energy (DOE) approach to addressing these unique requirements through a national technology development effort

  6. Staff preparedness for providing palliative and end-of-life care in long-term care homes: Instrument development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Helen Yl; Chun, Gloria Km; Man, C W; Leung, Edward Mf

    2018-05-01

    Although much attention has been on integrating the palliative care approach into services of long-term care homes for older people living with frailty and progressive diseases, little is known about the staff preparedness for these new initiatives. The present study aimed to develop and test the psychometric properties of an instrument for measuring care home staff preparedness in providing palliative and end-of-life care. A 16-item instrument, covering perceived knowledge, skill and psychological readiness, was developed. A total of 247 staff members of different ranks from four care homes participated in the study. Exploratory factor analysis using the principal component analysis extraction method with varimax rotation was carried out for initial validation. Known group comparison was carried out to examine its discriminant validity. Reliability of the instrument was assessed based on test-retest reliability of a subsample of 20 participants and the Cronbach's alpha of the items. Exploratory factor analysis showed that the instrument yielded a three-factor solution, which cumulatively accounted for 68.5% of the total variance. Three subscales, namely, willingness, capability and resilience, showed high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. It also showed good discriminant validity between staff members of professional and non-professional groups. This is a brief, valid and reliable scale for measuring care home staff preparedness for providing palliative and end-of-life care. It can be used to identify their concerns and training needs in providing palliative and end-of-life care, and as an outcome measure to evaluate the effects of interventional studies for capacity building in this regard. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 745-749. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  9. IMPACT OF TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT ON BUSINESS EFFICIENCY IN THE FOOD AND BEVERAGE DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodan Ivanovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological development has a great significance in the hospitality industry, specifically in the food and beverage department, and particularly in the differentiation of supply and price leadership. Technological development through the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century led to a revolution in many fields, like communication, computer sciences to the monitoring of operations and better organization. The use of modern technological solutions affects the workforce, but it must be taken into account that the devices and equipment cannot compensate for the skills, knowledge, expertise and creativity of employees, so use of such devices and equipment decreases the need for unskilled and semiskilled workers. Innovations in the food and beverage department are important for competitive differentiation, but also innovations in the hospitality industry are always at risk as they can easily be copied and imitated, which leads the company to further innovation and improvement of services. Standardization of the working procedures, handling the groceries, binds the usage of technological solutions that allow standardization during the work, which regulates the number of employees needed, energy consumption, lower waste, with increased hygiene and cleanliness of the working process and greater effectiveness and cost efficiency for the company itself.

  10. US Department of Energy mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal focus area technical baseline development process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, J.A.; Gombert, D.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) created the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet its commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Mixed wastes include both mixed low-level waste (MLLW) and mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste. The goal of the MWFA is to develop mixed waste treatment systems to the point of implementation by the Environmental Management (EM) customer. To accomplish this goal, the MWFA is utilizing a three step process. First, the treatment system technology deficiencies were identified and categorized. Second, these identified needs were prioritized. This resulted in a list of technical deficiencies that will be used to develop a technical baseline. The third step, the Technical Baseline Development Process, is currently ongoing. When finalized, the technical baseline will integrate the requirements associated with the identified needs into the planned and ongoing environmental research and technology development activities supported by the MWFA. Completion of this three-step process will result in a comprehensive technology development program that addresses customer identified and prioritized needs. The MWFA technical baseline will be a cost-effective, technically-defensible tool for addressing and resolving DOE's mixed waste problems

  11. Development of chemical profiles for U.S. Department of Energy low-level mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Wilkins, B.D.; Meshkov, N.K.; Dolak, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Chemical and radiological profiles of waste streams from US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed wastes (LLMWs) have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to provide technical support information for evaluating waste management alternatives in the Office of Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EM PEIS). The chemical profiles were developed for LLMW generated from both Waste Management (WM) operations and from Environmental Restoration (ER) activities at DOE facilities. Information summarized in the 1994 DOE Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Automated Remedial Assessment Methodology (ARAM), and associated PNL supporting data on ER secondary waste streams that will be treated in WM treatment facilities were used as the sources for developing chemical profiles. The methodology for developing the LLMW chemical profiles is discussed, and the chemical profiles developed from data for contact-handled (CH) non-alpha LLMW are presented in this paper. The hazardous chemical composition of remote-handled (RH) LLMW and alpha LLMW follow the chemical profiles developed for CH non-alpha LLMW

  12. Development of educational programs for environmental restoration/waste management at two Department of Energy sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.J.; Toth, W.J.; Smith, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    Availability of appropriately educated personnel is perhaps the greatest obstacle faced by the nation in addressing its waste management and environmental restoration activities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the DOE Grand Junction, Colorado, Projects Office (GJPO) have developed two educational degree programs that respond to the human resource needs of the environmental restoration/waste management effort in ways that reflect the programmatic and cultural diversity at the two sites. The INEL has worked with the University of Idaho and Idaho States University to develop a set of master's degree programs focusing on waste management and environmental restoration. GJPO has developed an associate degree program and is developing a baccalaureate program in environmental restoration with Mesa State College. The development of these two programs was coordinated through the INEL University Relations Committee. They were conceived as parts of an overall effort to provide the human resources for environmental restoration and waste management. The background, need, and development of these two programs are presented, as well as information on associated industry parternships, employee scholarship programs, and plans for integration and articulation of curricula. 3 refs

  13. Development of Animal Physiology Practical Guidance Oriented Guided Inquiry for Student of Biology Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Z. A. Z.; Sumarmin, R.; Violita, V.

    2018-04-01

    The guides used for practicing animal physiology need to be revised and adapted to the lecture material. This is because in the subject of Animal Physiology. The guidance of animal physiology practitioners is still conventional with prescription model instructions and is so simple that it is necessary to develop a practical guide that can lead to the development of scientific work. One of which is through practice guided inquiry guided practicum guide. This study aims to describe the process development of the practical guidance and reveal the validity, practicality, and effectiveness Guidance Physiology Animals guided inquiry inferior to the subject of Animal Physiology for students Biology Department State University of Padang. This type of research is development research. This development research uses the Plomp model. Stages performed are problem identification and analysis stage, prototype development and prototyping stage, and assessment phase. Data analysis using descriptive analysis. The instrument of data collection using validation and practical questionnaires, competence and affective field of competence observation and psychomotor and cognitive domain competence test. The result of this research shows that guidance of Inquiry Guided Initiative Guided Physiology with 3.23 valid category, practicality by lecturer with value 3.30 practical category, student with value 3.37 practical criterion. Affective effectiveness test with 93,00% criterion is very effective, psychomotor aspect 89,50% with very effective criteria and cognitive domain with value of 67, pass criterion. The conclusion of this research is Guided Inquiry Student Guided Protoxial Guidance For Students stated valid, practical and effective.

  14. US Department of Energy Environmental Cleanup Technology Development program: Business and research opportunities guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is charged with overseeing a multi-billion dollar environmental cleanup effort. EM leads an aggressive national research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program to provide environmental restoration and waste management technologies to DOE sites, and to manage DOE-generated waste. DOE is firmly committed to working with industry to effectuate this cleanup effort. We recognize that private industry, university, and other research and development programs are valuable sources of technology innovation. The primary purpose of this document is to provide you with information on potential business opportunities in the following technical program areas: Remediation of High-Level Waste Tanks; Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal of Mixed Waste; Migration of Contaminants; Containment of Existing Landfills; Decommissioning and Final Disposition, and Robotics.

  15. Software development agreement between CERN and the Indian Department of Atomic Energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The development and prototyping work for the LHC computing facility is being organised as a project that includes many scientific institutes and industrial partners, coordinated by CERN. The project is nicknamed LCG (after LHC Computing Grid). Addendum No. 1 to the Protocol dated 24/09/02 to the 1991 co-operation agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India defines the collaboration between CERN and DAE on software development for the LCG Prototype Project. Signing the addendum are G. Govindrajan (left), Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation Group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India and Dr. Hans Hoffmann, CERN Director for Technology Transfer and for Scientific Computing.

  16. Software development agreement between CERN and the Indian Department of Atomic Energy

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The development and prototyping work for the LHC computing facility is being organised as a project that includes many scientific institutes and industrial partners, coordinated by CERN. The project is nicknamed LCG (after LHC Computing Grid). Addendum No. 1 to the Protocol dated 24/09/02 to the 1991 co-operation agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India defines the collaboration between CERN and DAE on software development for the LCG Prototype Project. Photo 01: Signing the addendum are G. Govindrajan (left), Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation Group at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India and Dr. Hans Hoffmann, CERN Director for Technology Transfer and for Scientific Computing. Looking on are Christoph Eck (far left), resource manager of the LCG Project and Les Robertson, LCG Project Leader. Photo 02: (left to right) Christoph Eck, resource manager of the LCG Project; G. Govindrajan, Director of the Electronics and Instrumentation G...

  17. US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, mixed-waste treatment research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Backus, P.M.; Conley, T.B.; Coyle, G.J.; Lurk, P.W.; Wolf, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste is contaminated with both chemically hazardous and radioactive species. The DOE is responsible for regulating radioactive species while the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for regulating hazardous species. Dual regulations establish treatment standards and therefore affect the treatment technologies used to process mixed waste. This duality is reflected in technology development initiatives. Significant technology development has been conducted for either radioactive or hazardous waste, but limited technology development, specifically addressing mixed waste treatment issues, has been completed. Technology has not been designed, developed, demonstrated, or tested to produce a low-risk final waste form that increases the probability that the final waste form will be disposed

  18. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  19. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S.

    2009-11-05

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5

  20. United States Department Of Energy Office Of Environmental Management Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Office of Waste Processing identifies and reduces engineering and technical risks and uncertainties of the waste processing programs and projects of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management (EM) mission through the timely development of solutions to technical issues. The risks, and actions taken to mitigate those risks, are determined through technology readiness assessments, program reviews, technology information exchanges, external technical reviews, technical assistance, and targeted technology development and deployment. The Office of Waste Processing works with other DOE Headquarters offices and project and field organizations to proactively evaluate technical needs, identify multi-site solutions, and improve the technology and engineering associated with project and contract management. Participants in this program are empowered with the authority, resources, and training to implement their defined priorities, roles, and responsibilities. The Office of Waste Processing Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Environmental Management Engineering and Technology Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstration that will lead to a reduction of technical risks and uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The MYPP summarizes the program areas and the scope of activities within each program area proposed for the next five years to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. Waste Processing Program activities within the Roadmap and the MYPP are described in these seven program areas: (1) Improved Waste Storage Technology; (2) Reliable and Efficient Waste Retrieval Technologies; (3) Enhanced Tank Closure Processes; (4) Next-Generation Pretreatment Solutions; (5

  1. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOX,K.J.

    2000-12-31

    The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and I exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, ,projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2000. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2000 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2001. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2000 was $6 million. The.actual allocation totaled $5.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer

  2. Applied hydrogen storage research and development: A perspective from the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Malley, Kathleen; Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie; Ahn, Channing C.; Stetson, Ned T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Overview of U.S. DOE-supported hydrogen storage technology development efforts. • Physical and materials-based strategy for developing hydrogen storage systems. • Materials requirements for automotive storage systems. • Key R&D developments. - Abstract: To enable the wide-spread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technology Office, maintains a comprehensive portfolio of R&D activities to develop advanced hydrogen storage technologies. The primary focus of the Hydrogen Storage Program is development of technologies to meet the challenging onboard storage requirements for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) to meet vehicle performance that consumers have come to expect. Performance targets have also been established for materials handling equipment (e.g., forklifts) and low-power, portable fuel cell applications. With the imminent release of commercial FCEVs by automobile manufacturers in regional markets, a dual strategy is being pursued to (a) lower the cost and improve performance of high-pressure compressed hydrogen storage systems while (b) continuing efforts on advanced storage technologies that have potential to surpass the performance of ambient compressed hydrogen storage

  3. Development of treatment technologies for the processing of US Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backus, P.M.; Berry, J.B.; Coyle, G.J.; Lurk, P.W.; Wolf, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Waste contaminated with chemically hazardous and radioactive species is defined as mixed waste. Significant technology development has been conducted for separate treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste, but technology development addressing mixed-waste treatment has been limited. Management of mixed waste requires treatment which must meet the standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency for the specific hazardous constituents while also providing adequate control of the radionuclides. Technology has not been developed, demonstrated, or tested to produce a low-risk final waste form specifically for mixed waste. Throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, mixed waste is a problem because definitive treatment standards have not been established and few disposal facilities are available. Treatment capability and capacity are also limited. Site-specific solutions to the management of mixed waste have been initiated; however, site-specific programs result in duplication of technology development between various sites. Significant progress is being made in developing technology for mixed waste under the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The status of the technical initiatives in chemical/physical treatment, destruction/stabilization technology, off-gas treatment, and final waste form production/assessment is described in this paper

  4. Applied hydrogen storage research and development: A perspective from the U.S. Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Malley, Kathleen [SRA International, Inc., Fairfax, VA 22033 (United States); Ordaz, Grace; Adams, Jesse; Randolph, Katie [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Ahn, Channing C. [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stetson, Ned T., E-mail: Ned.Stetson@ee.doe.gov [U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave., SW, EE-3F, Washington, DC 20585 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Overview of U.S. DOE-supported hydrogen storage technology development efforts. • Physical and materials-based strategy for developing hydrogen storage systems. • Materials requirements for automotive storage systems. • Key R&D developments. - Abstract: To enable the wide-spread commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies, the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technology Office, maintains a comprehensive portfolio of R&D activities to develop advanced hydrogen storage technologies. The primary focus of the Hydrogen Storage Program is development of technologies to meet the challenging onboard storage requirements for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) to meet vehicle performance that consumers have come to expect. Performance targets have also been established for materials handling equipment (e.g., forklifts) and low-power, portable fuel cell applications. With the imminent release of commercial FCEVs by automobile manufacturers in regional markets, a dual strategy is being pursued to (a) lower the cost and improve performance of high-pressure compressed hydrogen storage systems while (b) continuing efforts on advanced storage technologies that have potential to surpass the performance of ambient compressed hydrogen storage.

  5. Department of energy technology annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1987-02-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1986 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  6. Department of Energy Technology. Annual progress report 1 Jan - 31 Dec 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1988-03-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1987 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications and included. 13 ills., 24 refs. (author)

  7. Department of Energy Technology annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1986-02-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1985 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  8. Department of energy technology. Annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1983 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  9. Department of Energy Technology annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheelsen, B.; List, F.

    1985-02-01

    The general development of the Department of Technology at Risoe during 1984 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff and publications are included. (author)

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF INTEGRATED ELECTROCHEMISTRY TEACHING MATERIAL BASED CONTEXTUAL FOR VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL IN MACHINE ENGINEERING DEPARTEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Widodo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry teaching at Vocational High School which tends to be theoretical and not directly connected to vocational lesson has caused students to have low interest, low motivation, and low achievement. The problem is becoming more complex due to limited time allotment and limited teaching materials. One of the efforts to solve the problem is by providing the relevant teaching material using contextual learning approach. The aims of this Research and Development (R&D research are: (1 to produce an appropriate chemistry teaching material on electrochemistry integrated with skill program subjects using Contextual approach for Vocational High School students of Machinery Engineering Department; (2 to know the feasibility of development result of teaching material. The development of the teaching material uses the 4D developmental model from Thiagarajan et al consisting of four phases namely Define, Design, Develop, and Desiminate. The dominate phase was not done. The scores of evaluation of the feasibility or the appropriateness of the product from the content expert are 88.75% (very feasible for the teachers’ book and 91.25% (very feasible for the students’ book. The expert on media gave 89.25% (very feasible for the teachers’ book and 89.9% (very feasible for the students’ book. The result of readability test shows that the teachers’ book is feasible (83.81% and the students’ book is very feasible (93.61%.

  11. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department. Annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E. [eds.

    2000-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1999. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Management Plant, and the educational reactor DR 1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  12. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjær, A.; Jensen, Per Hedemann

    2000-01-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1999. The department´s research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: "Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety" and"Radioecology and Tracer Studies". The nuclear...... facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Management Plant, and the educational reactor DR 1. Lists of staff and publications are includedtogether with a summary of the staff´s participation in national and international committees....

  13. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    2000-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1999. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Management Plant, and the educational reactor DR 1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  14. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities department annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Floto, H.; Heydorn, K.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1997-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1996. The Department's research and development activities are organized in three research programmes: Radiation Protection, Reactor Safety, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the Research Reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the Educational Reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au) 2 tabs., 28 ills

  15. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Aarkrog, A.; Brodersen, K.

    1998-04-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1997. The department's research and development activities were organized in four research programmes: Reactor Safety, Radiation protection, Radioecology, and Radioanalytical Chemistry. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment Plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lists of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  16. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Brodersen, K.; Damkjaer, A.; Hedemann Jensen, P.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E.

    1999-04-01

    The report present a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department in 1998. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. The nuclear facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR3, the Isotope Laboratory, the Waste Treatment plant, and the educational reactor DR1. Lsits of staff and publications are included together with a summary of the staff's participation in national and international committees. (au)

  17. Metallurgy Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The activities of the Metallurgy Department at Risø during 1981 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: General Materials Research, Technology and Materials Development, Fuel Elements. Furthermore, a survey is given of the department's participation in international collaboration...

  18. Intelligent Processing Equipment Research and Development Programs of the Department of Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The intelligence processing equipment (IPE) research and development (R&D) programs of the Department of Commerce are carried out within the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This institute has had work in support of industrial productivity as part of its mission since its founding in 1901. With the advent of factory automation these efforts have increasingly turned to R&D in IPE. The Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory (MEL) of NIST devotes a major fraction of its efforts to this end while other elements within the organization, notably the Material Science and Engineering Laboratory, have smaller but significant programs. An inventory of all such programs at NIST and a representative selection of projects that at least demonstrate the scope of the efforts are presented.

  19. Developing necessary and sufficient sets of environmental, safety, and health standards at the Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.B.; Troy, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to protect its workers, the public, and the environment. To do this, we must understand our work and its potential hazards and tailor our protection to those hazards. Until now, the DOE has regulated environmental, safety, and health aspects of our work through orders and, more recently, through rules. However, it has become apparent that our current approach suffers from several disadvantages. Most notably, it has been difficult to craft orders that recognize and deal effectively with the wide diversity in our work; this can lead to inappropriate requirements and can even compromise safety. Also, the current approach does not easily incorporate the benefits of experience; our practices can become obsolete or ineffectual. This report describes efforts of DOE towards the development of an integrated standards program as the basis for ensuring the protection of workers, public and the environment

  20. Checklist for Staff Technology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1997-01-01

    Presents a planning checklist for staff technology training. Includes forming a committee and developing proposals, contacting pertinent people, handling publicity, sending invitations, distributing schedules/registration information, arranging for equipment, purchasing prizes, conducting preliminary checks on equipment and software, ordering…

  1. Department of Energy Technology. Annual Progress Report 1 January - 31 December 1982

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risø during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risø during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  2. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  3. 29 CFR 511.7 - Committee staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee staff. 511.7 Section 511.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.7 Committee staff. Each industry committee will be furnished a lawyer, to...

  4. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training. The...

  5. 76 FR 72046 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development of Space for Community Services and Parking in Memphis, TN AGENCY... property is located. This project meets this requirement. Approved: November 14, 2011. Eric K. Shinseki...

  6. 76 FR 66996 - Notice of Development of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Notice of Development of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration's Five-Year Research and Evaluation Strategic Plan for 2010-2015; Request for Public Comment AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor...

  7. Curriculum leadership in action : A tale of four community college Heads of Department leading a curriculum development project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, N.M.; Voogt, J.M.; Pieters, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    College Heads of Department (HoDs) are increasingly expected to perform more curriculum-leadership tasks, maintaining and advancing the department curriculum, especially in developing countries. However, in practice, HoDs are reported to pay little attention to this aspect of their job due to

  8. Curriculum Leadership in Action: A Tale of Four Community College Heads of Department Leading a Curriculum-Development Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albashiry, Nabeel; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Julius Marie

    2016-01-01

    College Heads of Department (HoDs) are increasingly expected to perform more curriculum-leadership tasks, maintaining and advancing the department curriculum, especially in developing countries. However, in practice, HoDs are reported to pay little attention to this aspect of their job due to

  9. Development of balanced key performance indicators for emergency departments strategic dashboards following analytic hierarchical process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdari, Reza; Ghazisaeedi, Marjan; Mirzaee, Mahboobeh; Farzi, Jebrail; Goodini, Azadeh

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic reporting tools, such as dashboards, should be developed to measure emergency department (ED) performance. However, choosing an effective balanced set of performance measures and key performance indicators (KPIs) is a main challenge to accomplish this. The aim of this study was to develop a balanced set of KPIs for use in ED strategic dashboards following an analytic hierarchical process. The study was carried out in 2 phases: constructing ED performance measures based on balanced scorecard perspectives and incorporating them into analytic hierarchical process framework to select the final KPIs. The respondents placed most importance on ED internal processes perspective especially on measures related to timeliness and accessibility of care in ED. Some measures from financial, customer, and learning and growth perspectives were also selected as other top KPIs. Measures of care effectiveness and care safety were placed as the next priorities too. The respondents placed least importance on disease-/condition-specific "time to" measures. The methodology can be presented as a reference model for development of KPIs in various performance related areas based on a consistent and fair approach. Dashboards that are designed based on such a balanced set of KPIs will help to establish comprehensive performance measurements and fair benchmarks and comparisons.

  10. Development and demonstration of treatment technologies for the processing of US Department of Energy mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Bloom, G.A.; Kuchynka, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Mixed waste is defined as waste contaminated with chemically hazardous (governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) and radioactive species [governed by US Department of Energy (DOE) orders]. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is responding to the need for DOE mixed waste treatment technologies that meet these dual regulatory requirements. MWIP is developing emerging and innovative treatment technologies to determine process feasibility. Technology demonstrations will be used to determine whether processes are superior to existing technologies in reducing risk, minimizing life-cycle cost, and improving process performance. The Program also provides a forum for stakeholder and customer involvement in the technology development process. MWIP is composed of six technical areas that support a mixed-waste treatment system: (1) systems analysis, (2) materials handling, (3) chemical/physical separation, (4) waste destruction and stabilization, (5) off-gas treatment, and (6) final waste form stabilization. The status of the technical initiatives and the current research, development, and demonstration in each of these areas is described in this paper

  11. Development of the Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences MEDL-CMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, G. B.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015 the Virginia Tech Department of Geosciences took a leading role in increasing the level of support for Geoscience instructors by investing in the development of the Geosciences Modeling and Educational Demonstrations Laboratory Curriculum Materials Center (MEDL-CMC). The MEDL-CMC is an innovative curriculum materials center designed to foster new collaborative teaching and learning environments by providing hands-on physical models combined with education technology for instructors and outreach coordinators. The mission of the MEDL-CMC is to provide advanced curriculum material resources for the purpose of increasing and sustaining high impact instructional capacity in STEM education for both formal and informal learning environments. This presentation describes the development methods being used to implement the MEDL-CMC. Major development methods include: (1) adopting a project management system to support collaborations with stakeholders, (2) using a diversified funding approach to achieve financial sustainability and the ability to evolve with the educational needs of the community, and (3) establishing a broad collection of systems-based physical analog models and data collection tools to support integrated sciences such as the geosciences. Discussion will focus on how these methods are used for achieving organizational capacity in the MEDL-CMC and on their intended role in reducing instructor workload in planning both classroom activities and research grant broader impacts.

  12. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2012. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR, Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Yoji; Ishii, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Uno, Yuki; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Ishizaki, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Taichi; Nagahori, Kazuhisa; Odauchi, Shouji; Maruo, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor), Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2013. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (4) Safety administration for department of research reactor and tandem accelerator, (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on laws and regulations concerning atomic energy, number of staff members dispatched to Fukushima for the technical assistance, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  13. The patient safety culture as perceived by staff at two different emergency departments before and after introducing a flow-oriented working model with team triage and lean principles: a repeated cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burström, Lena; Letterstål, Anna; Engström, Marie-Louise; Berglund, Anders; Enlund, Mats

    2014-07-09

    Patient safety is of the utmost importance in health care. The patient safety culture in an institution has great impact on patient safety. To enhance patient safety and to design strategies to reduce medical injuries, there is a current focus on measuring the patient safety culture. The aim of the present study was to describe the patient safety culture in an ED at two different hospitals before and after a Quality improvement (QI) project that was aimed to enhance patient safety. A repeated cross-sectional design, using the Hospital Survey On Patient Safety Culture questionnaire before and after a quality improvement project in two emergency departments at a county hospital and a university hospital. The questionnaire was developed to obtain a better understanding of the patient safety culture of an entire hospital or of specific departments. The Swedish version has 51 questions and 15 dimensions. At the county hospital, a difference between baseline and follow-up was observed in three dimensions. For two of these dimensions, Team-work within hospital and Communication openness, a higher score was measured at the follow-up. At the university hospital, a higher score was measured at follow-up for the two dimensions Team-work across hospital units and Team-work within hospital. The result showed changes in the self-estimated patient safety culture, mainly regarding team-work and communication openness. Most of the improvements at follow-up were seen by physicians, and mainly at the county hospital.

  14. Developing an Assessment, Monitoring, and Evaluation Framework for U.S. Department of Defense Security Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Eileen  Cronin. They and their OSD and Joint Staff colleagues pro- vided important insights throughout our research. We also recognize the invaluable...independent review of EUCOM’s planning documents. The gray arrows indicate how elements of higher planning strata drive lower elements. The green arrows...activities and events, based on our indepen- dent review of PACOM’s planning documents. The gray arrows indi- 14 Interview with PACOM headquarters official

  15. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASTE PROCESSING ANNUAL TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S

    2008-08-12

    The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) Roadmap, U.S. Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management Engineering & Technology Roadmap (Roadmap), defines the Department's intent to reduce the technical risk and uncertainty in its cleanup programs. The unique nature of many of the remaining facilities will require a strong and responsive engineering and technology program to improve worker and public safety, and reduce costs and environmental impacts while completing the cleanup program. The technical risks and uncertainties associated with cleanup program were identified through: (1) project risk assessments, (2) programmatic external technical reviews and technology readiness assessments, and (3) direct site input. In order to address these needs, the technical risks and uncertainties were compiled and divided into the program areas of: Waste Processing, Groundwater and Soil Remediation, and Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D). Strategic initiatives were then developed within each program area to address the technical risks and uncertainties in that program area. These strategic initiatives were subsequently incorporated into the Roadmap, where they form the strategic framework of the EM Engineering & Technology Program. The EM-21 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) supports the goals and objectives of the Roadmap by providing direction for technology enhancement, development, and demonstrations that will lead to a reduction of technical uncertainties in EM waste processing activities. The current MYPP summarizes the strategic initiatives and the scope of the activities within each initiative that are proposed for the next five years (FY2008-2012) to improve safety and reduce costs and environmental impacts associated with waste processing; authorized budget levels will impact how much of the scope of activities can be executed, on a year-to-year basis. As a result of the importance of reducing technical risk and uncertainty in the EM Waste

  16. Human resource development strategies adopted by the Department of Atomic Energy, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    In view of the knowledge intensive nature of the nuclear technology and the state of hi-tech industrial infrastructure in India, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been designed to have a composite character. It is a large institution and has been pursuing activities starting from basic research to technology development. At BARC, we have also put in place a very effective human resource development programme and this programme is run by faculty drawn from within the organization. As a result, BARC has attributes of an institute, a research laboratory and also an industrial organization. The composite character is confined not only to BARC but also extends to the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) as a whole. Simultaneous with research centres, we have been setting up industrial units. The fountainhead of success of the atomic energy programme in India is the fact that both the research centres, which generate knowledge and the industrial units, which generate wealth from the knowledge, are under one umbrella and that is the DAE working under the policy framework laid by the Atomic Energy Commission. The two sets of institutions maintain an organic linkage permitting seamless interaction and facilitating technology transfer without any cumbersome formalities. The common policy framework followed by all the institutions enables the department to follow an integrated approach towards human resource development and this further strengthens the linkages between the institutions. This has enabled the country to be self-reliant in all aspects of nuclear fuel cycle, starting with prospecting and mining of uranium and ending with the back-end of the fuel cycle, which involves reprocessing of the spent fuel and nuclear waste management. Most of the R and D work, which led to realization of this capability, was done or initiated at BARC at Trombay. Some of the activities have now been taken over by other research centers: IGCAR at Kalpakkam for fast reactors, Centre for

  17. United States Department Of Energy Office Of Environmental Management Technology Development Report Fiscal Year 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, S.

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  18. [A development and evaluation of nursing KMS using QFD in outpatient departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Na; Yun, Eun Kyoung

    2014-02-01

    This study was done to develop and implement the Nursing KMS (knowledge management system) in order to improve knowledge sharing and creation among clinical nurses in outpatient departments. This study was a methodological research using the 'System Development Life Cycle': consisting of planning, analyzing, design, implementation, and evaluation. Quality Function Deployment (QFD) was applied to establish nurse requirements and to identify important design requirements. Participants were 32 nurses and for evaluation data were collected pre and post intervention at K Hospital in Seoul, a tertiary hospital with over 1,000 beds. The Nursing KMS was built using a Linux-based operating system, Oracle DBMS, and Java 1.6 web programming tools. The system was implemented as a sub-system of the hospital information system. There was statistically significant differences in the sharing of knowledge but creating of knowledge was no statistically meaningful difference observed. In terms of satisfaction with the system, system efficiency ranked first followed by system convenience, information suitability and information usefulness. The results indicate that the use of Nursing KMS increases nurses' knowledge sharing and can contribute to increased quality of nursing knowledge and provide more opportunities for nurses to gain expertise from knowledge shared among nurses.

  19. Fossil Energy Research and Development Program of the U. S. Department of Energy, FY 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focuses energy Research and Development efforts on new and promising ways to provide for our future energy needs. This document focuses on DOE's programs and projects related to the nation's Fossil Energy resources: coal, oil, natural gas and oil shale. Fossil Energy programs have grown rapidly from about $58 million in FY 1973 to the $802 million requested for FY 1979. As those programs have matured, there have been significant shifts in emphasis. For example, by FY 1979, gasification technologies will have matured sufficiently to enter the demonstration phase. Then we will have to make critical decisions as to which candidate processes to pursue and to encourage industry's active participation as early as possible. We will present the rationale for those changes and others at the beginning of each section describing a particular grouping of similar projects, e.g., coal liquefaction. We will then discuss each project and present its current status along with past and future milestones. Emphasis is on projects with early payoff potential, particularly the direct utilization of coal. However, this near-term emphasis will not overshadow the need for a stong technological base for development of longer-term promising technologies and the need for a strong environmental concern.

  20. Research and development needs in the Department of Energy. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In April 1980, the Deputy Secretary requested that the Board participate in the Department's review of the technology base component of DOE's R and D programs and that the Board address the following broad concerns: (1) The adequacy of the research underpinning for technology development programs; (2) Possible gaps or duplications of effort; (3) The balance among research performers (universities, laboratories, industry); (4) Significant R and D opportunities that DOE's programs may be missing. The Board offered the following recommendations to the Secretary: (1) Place greater research emphasis on environmental and health issues to ensure the success of the national synfuels program. (2) Provide more research in energy use and productivity projects. (3) Increase the level of effort in basic research. (4) Place higher priority for high-level radioactive waste disposal R and D. (5) Evaluate the various energy technology options on a common comparison basis to clearly identify the costs, benefits and risks of each option. (6) Develop more effective DOE procurement practices. Additional recommendations were directed to the Under Secretary and Assistant Secretaries of Energy reviewing specific issues in conservation, fossil, nuclear and solar energy, resource applications, environment, and energy research

  1. Resolving environmental issues in energy development: roles for the Department of Energy and its field offices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellickson, P.L.; Merrow, E.W.

    1979-01-01

    This study asks what the Department of Energy (DOE) might do to resolve environmental conflicts that arise during the implementation of energy projects or programs. We define implementation as efforts to establish an energy facility at a specific site. The environmental concerns surrounding implementation serve as touchstones of the relevance and feasibility of national energy policies. We have analyzed geothermal development in California and oil shale development in Colorado and Utah and addressed the following questions: By what processes are energy and environmental tradeoffs made. In what circumstances can DOE participation in these processes lead to a more satisfactory outcome. What options does DOE have for resolving environmetal issues and how can it choose the best option. How can DOE establish an effective working relationship with both the governmental and private groups affected by the siting and operation of energy projects. The government's most effective role in resolving environmental conflicts and uncertainties is to improve communications among the concerned parties. This role requires flexibility and evenhandedness from the government as well as an understanding of the local conditions and a commitment to appropriate local solutions. Involving local sources at every stage of the environmental impact analysis will reduce the probability of conflicts and make those that do arise more easily resolvable.

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-BASED TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Sarma V. Pisupati; Chunshan Song; Ronald S. Wasco; Ronald T. Wincek; Xiaochun Xu; Alan W. Scaroni; Richard Hogg; Subhash Chander; M. Thaddeus Ityokumbul; Mark S. Klima; Peter T. Luckie; Adam Rose; Richard L. Gordon; Jeffrey Lazo; A. Michael Schaal

    2004-01-30

    The third phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for US Department of Defense (DOD) facilities was completed. The objectives of the project were to: decrease DOD's dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase III activities were focused on evaluating deeply-cleaned coals as fuels for industrial boilers and investigating emissions control strategies for providing ultra-low emissions when firing coal-based fuels. This was addressed by performing coal beneficiation and preparation studies, and bench- to demonstration-scale emissions reduction studies. In addition, economic studies were conducted focused on determining cost and market penetration, selection of incentives, and regional economic impacts of coal-based technologies.

  3. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, S.

    2010-10-22

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  4. Developing test for experimental study: the effectiveness of hedwig strategy in english education department universitas brawijaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devinta Puspita Ratri

    2017-04-01

    Having a big number of students in content subject of a language class is a challenge for teacher since it is quite difficult to accommodate students’ critical thinking and active participation at the same time. Therefore, Hedwig strategy is aimed to give room for students to explore themselves and get involved in the materials delivered in the class. Furthermore, by having group and regroup to deliver message in Hedwig strategy, students are forced to be active participated in classroom activities. The idea of Hedwig strategy is inspired by Jigsaw and Think-Pair-Share which have existed before. To know whether Hedwig strategy is effectively applied in content subject in large language class, it is proposed to do quasi experimental study with one class as an experimental group and one class as a control group. The experimental group is treated by using Hedwig strategy. Prior to the experimental study, it is performed research and development to develop the test for pre-test and post-test. For that reason, the research problem is what test is valid and reliable for an experimental study on the effectiveness of Hedwig strategy for the 4th semester students in Language Teaching Methodology class in English Education Department Universitas Brawijaya. This research reports half of the whole plan where the researchers developed test for pre-test and posttest to measure students’ improvement in understanding Language Teaching Methodology. In short, the test developed in this study will be used to carry out experimental study as pre-test and post-test

  5. Impact of Internally Developed Electronic Prescription on Prescribing Errors at Discharge from the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitti, Eveline; Tamim, Hani; Bakhti, Rinad; Zebian, Dina; Mufarrij, Afif

    2017-08-01

    Medication errors are common, with studies reporting at least one error per patient encounter. At hospital discharge, medication errors vary from 15%-38%. However, studies assessing the effect of an internally developed electronic (E)-prescription system at discharge from an emergency department (ED) are comparatively minimal. Additionally, commercially available electronic solutions are cost-prohibitive in many resource-limited settings. We assessed the impact of introducing an internally developed, low-cost E-prescription system, with a list of commonly prescribed medications, on prescription error rates at discharge from the ED, compared to handwritten prescriptions. We conducted a pre- and post-intervention study comparing error rates in a randomly selected sample of discharge prescriptions (handwritten versus electronic) five months pre and four months post the introduction of the E-prescription. The internally developed, E-prescription system included a list of 166 commonly prescribed medications with the generic name, strength, dose, frequency and duration. We included a total of 2,883 prescriptions in this study: 1,475 in the pre-intervention phase were handwritten (HW) and 1,408 in the post-intervention phase were electronic. We calculated rates of 14 different errors and compared them between the pre- and post-intervention period. Overall, E-prescriptions included fewer prescription errors as compared to HW-prescriptions. Specifically, E-prescriptions reduced missing dose (11.3% to 4.3%, p prescriptions, however, were associated with a significant increase in duplication errors, specifically with home medication (1.7% to 3%, p=0.02). A basic, internally developed E-prescription system, featuring commonly used medications, effectively reduced medication errors in a low-resource setting where the costs of sophisticated commercial electronic solutions are prohibitive.

  6. The efficacy of staff training on improving internal customer satisfaction in a rural health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, R; Turner, R

    1995-09-01

    The NSW Health Department is 3 years into its customer satisfaction initiative. North West Health Service, one of the largest rural health districts, was among the first centres to embrace the customer satisfaction philosophy starting with compulsory training of all staff. This paper reports on changes in staff morale (internal satisfaction) as a result of that training. The data suggest that training per se has had minimal effect and argues for management development, particularly regarding leadership, rather than fiscal skills.

  7. Nuclear Safety Research Department annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Nonboel, E

    2001-08-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Nuclear Safety Research Department in 2000. The department's research and development activities were organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Protection and Reactor Safety' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department was responsible for the tasks 'Applied Health Physics and Emergency Preparedness', 'Dosimetry', 'Environmental Monitoring', and Irradiation and Isotope Services'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  8. A Theoretical Model for Designing an In-House Community College Department Chair Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkis, Jocelyn Eager

    2013-01-01

    Academic department chairs serve as front-line managers and leaders who perform a wide variety of tasks. These tasks may include mundane chores, such as ordering office supplies, or important ones, such as changing the department culture to one that embraces assessment. Too often, however, individuals take on the chair position with little to no…

  9. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2011. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Kawamata, Satoshi; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Kabumoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takemi; Tamura, Itaru; Kawasaki, Sayuri; Sataka, Masao

    2013-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012. The activities were categorized into six service/development fields: (1) Recovery from the Great East Japan Earthquake, (2) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (3) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (4) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (5) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator, (6) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, number of staff members dispatched to Fukushima for the technical assistance, commendation, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  10. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  11. Development of an Easy-to-Use Tool for the Assessment of Emergency Department Physical Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Majidi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Physical design of the emergency department (ED has an important effect on its role and function. To date, no guidelines have been introduced to set the standards for the construction of EDs in Iran. In this study we aim to devise an easy-to-use tool based on the available literature and expert opinion for the quick and effective assessment of EDs in regards to their physical design. For this purpose, based on current literature on emergency design, a comprehensive checklist was developed.  Then, this checklist was analyzed by a panel consisting of heads of three major EDs and contradicting items were decided. Overall 178 crude items were derived from available literature. The Items were categorized in to three major domains of Physical space, Equipment, and Accessibility. The final checklist approved by the panel consisted of 163 items categorized into six domains. Each item was phrased as a “Yes or No” question for ease of analysis, meaning that the criterion is either met or not. 

  12. Development of a waste minimization plan for the Department of Energy's Naval petroleum reserve No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falconer, K.L.; Lane, T.C.

    1991-01-01

    A Waste Minimization Program Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) was prepared in response to DOE Order 5400.1, open-quotes General Environmental Protection Program close-quote The NPR-3 Waste Minimization Program Plan encompasses all ongoing operations at the Naval Petroleum Reserve and is consistent with the principles set forth in the mission statement for NPR-3. The mission of the NPR-3 is to apply project management, engineering and scientific capabilities to produce oil and gas from subsurface zones at the maximum efficiency rate for the United States Government. NPR-3 generates more than 60 discrete waste streams, many of significant volume. Most of these waste streams are categorized as wastes from the exploration, development and production of oil and gas and, as such, are exempt from Subtitle C of RCRA as indicated in the regulatory determination published in the Federal Register on July 6, 1988. However, because so many of these waste streams contain hazardous substances and because of an increasingly more restrictive regulatory environment, in 1990 an overall effort was made to characterize all waste streams produced and institute the best waste management practice economically practical to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste generated

  13. Development of simulated tank wastes for the US Department of Energy's Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmore, M.R.; Colton, N.G.; Jones, E.O.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (USTID) is to identify and evaluate technologies that may be used to characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of hazardous and radioactive wastes contained in tanks on US Department of Energy sites. Simulated wastes are an essential component of the evaluation process because they provide controlled samples for technology assessment, and minimize costs and risks involved when working with radioactive wastes. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed a recipe to simulate Hanford single-shell tank, (SST) waste. The recipe is derived from existing process recipes, and elemental concentrations are based on characterization data from 18 SSTs. In this procedure, salt cake and metal oxide/hydroxide sludge are prepared individually, and mixed together at varying ratios depending on the specific tank, waste to be simulated or the test being conducted. Elemental and physical properties of the stimulant are comparable with analyzed tank samples, and chemical speciation in the simulant is being improved as speciation data for actual wastes become available. The nonradioactive chemical waste simulant described here is useful for testing technologies on a small scale

  14. Next HR Department Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

      Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to the next public meeting organized by HR Department, which will take place on Monday 25 June at 14:30, for the first time in the Globe (in front of the Reception). The agenda will comprise of: ·         the recent staff member survey results ·         the Diversity at CERN ·         the Learning and Development Policy The first topic concerns, more specifically, staff members. All presentations will be made in English, however, we are pleased to inform you that a simultaneous interpretation in French is foreseen. Should you not be able to attend the meeting, it can also be followed via Webcast and the recording will be made available on Indico. Finally, subject to a favourable weather, refreshments...

  15. 76 FR 71439 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ...) Real Property for the Development of a Permanent Housing Facility in Vancouver, WA AGENCY: Department..., develop, construct, manage, maintain and operate the EUL development. As consideration for the lease, the... to eligible Veterans in the geographic service- delivery area within which the property is located...

  16. 76 FR 67023 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...) Real Property for the Development of a Senior Housing Facility in Kerrville, TX AGENCY: Department of..., develop, construct, manage, maintain and operate the EUL development. As consideration for the lease, the... to eligible Veterans in the geographic service- delivery area within which the property is located...

  17. 76 FR 67021 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ...) Real Property for the Development of an Assisted Living Facility in Newington, CT AGENCY: Department of..., design, develop, construct, manage, maintain and operate the EUL development. As consideration for the... the property is located. This project meets this requirement. Approved: October 21, 2011. Eric K...

  18. 76 FR 72045 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ...) Real Property for the Development of Permanent Housing in Augusta, GA AGENCY: Department of Veterans... lessee will be required to finance, design, develop, construct, maintain and operate the EUL development... property is located. This project meets this requirement. Approved: November 14, 2011. Eric K. Shinseki...

  19. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Leonel E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler St, EC2100, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  20. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagos, Leonel E.

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  1. Development of emergency department load relief area--gauging benefits in empirical terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Farrukh; Lee, Young Hoon; Kim, Seung Ho; Park, In Cheol

    2012-12-01

    The primary goal of this investigation was to develop a simulation model to evaluate the various internal and external factors affecting patient flow and crowding in the emergency department (ED). In addition, a few recommendations are proposed to reconfigure the patient flow to improve ED capacity while maintaining service quality. In this research, we present a simulation study conducted in the ED at the "S Hospital" located in Seoul. Based on patient flow data and process analysis, a simulation model of patient throughput in the ED has been developed. We evaluated simulations of diverting the specific patient load in the light of our proposed recommendations to a separately managed area named as the ED load relief area (ED-LRA) and analyzing potential effects on overall length of stay (LOS) and waiting time (WT). What-if analyses have been proposed to identify key issues and investigate the improvements as per our proposed recommendations. The simulation results suggest that specific patient load diversion is needed to ensure desired outcomes. With the diversion of specific patient load to ED-LRA, there is a reduction of 40.60% in mean LOS and 42.5% in WT with improved resource utilization. As a result, opening of an ED-LRA is justified. Real-world systems are often too intricate for analytical models and often too expensive to trial with directly. Simulation models allow the modeling of this intricacy and enable experimentation to make inferences about how the actual system might perform. Our simulation study modeled that diverting the specific patient load to ED-LRA produced an improvement in overall ED's LOS and WT.

  2. Practical solutions for staff recruitment & retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hoek, N

    2001-01-01

    There are three essential topics for radiology managers to consider in light of persistent staffing shortages: support of the profession and educational programs, perks as recruitment tools and incentives as retention tools. Some activities that can help support departments and educational programs for radiologic technologists are job shadowing, training for volunteer services, advanced placement for school applicants, sponsoring an educational program or clinical training site, creating a positive work environment and supporting outreach projects geared to local high schools. Traditional perks used in recruitment efforts have included relocation assistance, travel and lodging expenses during the interview process, loan repayment, scholarships and sign-on bonuses. Some common incentives for retaining employees are tuition reimbursement, cross training, availability of educational resources, continuing education opportunities, professional development and incremental increases in salary. There are many other tools that can be used, such as career ladders, creating an environment conducive to teamwork or a more personal atmosphere and showcasing talents of various staff members. There is much overlap among these suggestions in support of the profession and educational programs, recruitment and retention of qualified staff radiologic technologists. Radiology managers can and should be creative in developing different programs to build loyalty and commitment to a radiology department.

  3. Model development of production management unit to enhance entrepreneurship attitude of vocational school students from fashion department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaryani, Sri

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a model of production management unit to enhance entrepreneurship attitude of vocational school students from fashion department. This study concerns in developing students' entrepreneurship attitude in management which includes planning, organizing, applying and evaluation. The study uses Research and Development (R & D) approach with three main steps; preliminary study, development step, and product validation. Research subject was vocational school teachers from fashion department in Semarang, Salatiga and Demak. This study yields a development model of production management unit that could enhance vocational school students' entrepreneurship attitude in fashion department. The result shows that research subjects have understood about of production management unit in Vocational School (SMK).

  4. [History lived, history told: Psychiatrists' perspectives on the development of the department of Psychiatry of the University of Montreal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younsi, Ouanessa

    2015-01-01

    We have interviewed psychiatrists from different generations at the Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal to discern the history lived and told by those who have made (and still make) the history of the Department. The goal of this approach was to grasp the past in order to enlighten the future of the Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal. Thirteen psychiatrists of the department have been interviewed about their perspective on the history of the Département de psychiatrie de l'Université de Montréal. Interviews have identified an issue in the communication of history among the Department. Indeed, most of the younger psychiatrists were not aware of some of the main events and figures which were part of the development of the Department. The older psychiatrists mention Dr Camille Laurin as an important figure of the Department's early stages. Psychotherapy, education and clinical practice appear as key aspects of the Department's history. Many aspects of the Department's history appear unknown to the younger psychiatrists. A course on History of Psychiatry, including the Department's history, would be a great addition to the psychiatry residency program.

  5. Development of strategic enterprise architecture design for the Ohio Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In order for the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) to successfully carry out its mission, it is essential to : appropriately incorporate and utilize technology. Information management systems are vital to maintaining the states : transporta...

  6. Inventive activity of the Department of Protein Structure and Function of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry of NAS of Ukraine. Part I. Development of the diagnostic methods for detection of hemostasis disorders and characterization of certain blood coagulation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Danilova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The practical aspects of inventive activity of the Department of Protein Structure and Function of the Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NAS of Ukraine are highlighted in this article. Through years of fundamental and applied researches of blood coagulation system proteins, initiated by luminaries of the world biochemistry O. V. Palladin and V. O. Belitser, the Department staff have developed a considerable number of methods, techniques and tests for the assessment of the state of the hemostasis system, which were approved in many clinics. In the first part of this work the authors describe the development of the diagnostic methods for identifying the homeostasis system disorders in detail, as well as characterize certain coagulation factors.

  7. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  8. Transition of Care Practices from Emergency Department to Inpatient: Survey Data and Development of Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangil Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the current scope of handoff education and practice among resident physicians in academic centers and to propose a standardized handoff algorithm for the transition of care from the emergency department (ED to an inpatient setting. This was a cross-sectional survey targeted at the program directors, associate or assistant program directors, and faculty members of emergency medicine (EM residency programs in the United States (U.S.. The web-based survey was distributed to potential subjects through a listserv. A panel of experts used a modified Delphi approach to develop a standardized algorithm for ED to inpatient handoff. 121 of 172 programs responded to the survey for an overall response rate of 70.3%. Our survey showed that most EM programs in the U.S. have some form of handoff training, and the majority of them occur either during orientation or in the clinical setting. The handoff structure from ED to inpatient is not well standardized, and in those places with a formalized handoff system, over 70% of residents do not uniformly follow it. Approximately half of responding programs felt that their current handoff system was safe and effective. About half of the programs did not formally assess the handoff proficiency of trainees. Handoffs most commonly take place over the phone, though respondents disagree about the ideal place for a handoff to occur, with nearly equivalent responses between programs favoring the bedside over the phone or faceto-face on a computer. Approximately two-thirds of responding programs reported that their residents were competent in performing ED to inpatient handoffs. Based on this survey and on the review of the literature, we developed a five-step algorithm for the transition of care from the ED to the inpatient setting. Our results identified the current trends of education and practice in transitions of care, from the ED to the inpatient setting in U.S. academic medical centers. An algorithm

  9. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Nataliya N. Kretova; Natalya N. Mitina

    2017-01-01

    The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relatio...

  10. Efficiency assessment models of higher education institution staff activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Dyusekeyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates the necessity of improvement of university staff incentive system under the conditions of competition in the field of higher education, the necessity to develop a separate model for the evaluation of the effectiveness of the department heads. The authors analysed the methods for assessing production function of units. The advantage of the application of the methods to assess the effectiveness of border economic structures in the field of higher education is shown. The choice of the data envelopment analysis method to solve the problem has proved. The model for evaluating of university departments activity on the basis of the DEAmethodology has developed. On the basis of operating in Russia, Kazakhstan and other countries universities staff pay systems the structure of the criteria system for university staff activity evaluation has been designed. For clarification and specification of the departments activity efficiency criteria a strategic map has been developed that allowed us to determine the input and output parameters of the model. DEA-methodology using takes into account a large number of input and output parameters, increases the assessment objectivity by excluding experts, receives interim data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the evaluated object.

  11. 76 FR 72047 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ...) Real Property for the Development of Permanent Housing in Walla Walla, WA AGENCY: Department of... housing development. The lessee will also be required to provide preference and priority placement for... property is located. This project meets this requirement. Approved: November 14, 2011. Eric K. Shinseki...

  12. 76 FR 71443 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ...) Real Property for the Development of a Permanent Housing Facility in Menlo Park, CA AGENCY: Department..., construct, manage, maintain and operate the EUL development. As consideration for the lease, the lessee will... to eligible Veterans in the geographic service- delivery area within which the property is located...

  13. 76 FR 71440 - Enhanced-Use Lease (EUL) of Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Real Property for the Development...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ...) Real Property for the Development of a Permanent Housing Facility in Spokane, WA AGENCY: Department of..., manage, maintain and operate the EUL development as a permanent housing facility; provide preference and... area within which the property is located. This project meets this requirement. Approved: November 10...

  14. A description of a staff development program: Preparing the elementary school classroom teacher to lead environmental field trips and to use an integrated subject approach to environmental education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egana, John Joseph

    in the FTS staff development plan that could be generalized to all staff development programs. I applied the "stages of concern" from the "Concerns Based Adoption Model"(CBAM) and found FTS to be a participantcentered plan. In addition FTS set demonstrable goals that were understood and desirable for all participants. Finally FTS offered teachers opportunities to adopt leadership roles in their own staff development program.

  15. Developing a Proposed Strategy for the Universities of Saudi Arabia to Meet Educational Changes and Challenges from the Perspective of the Teaching Staff at the Colleges of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim Alscati

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a proposed strategy at th Universities of Saudi Arabia to meet the educational changes and challenges in the light of the perspectives of the teaching staff at the colleges of education. The study sample consisted of all teaching staff members in the colleges of education in Saudi universities, which were (731. The study used survey analytical developmental method, represented by the construction of the questionnaire so as to design the proposed strategy of all stages. Statistical means, standard deviations, as well as the equation Cronbach alpha coefficient to find out the internal consistency were used. The results showed that the teaching staff’s estimations  of the manifestations of change in the Saudi community  were moderate (3.66, whereas their estimations of the challenges facing Saudi universities were high (3.72. In light of these findings, the study proposed a strategy for the Saudi universities to address the educational changes and challenges.  The mission of the strategy is centered around supporting members of the knowledge community and developing their leadership skills so as to be able to face educational changes. The vision of the strategy is to make universities the milestones for promising future.

  16. Research Staff | Wind | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Learn more about the expertise and technical skills of the wind power research team and staff at NREL. Name Position Email Phone Anstedt, Sheri Professional III-Writer/Editor /Web Content Sheri.Anstedt@nrel.gov 303-275-3255 Baker, Donald Research Technician V-Electrical

  17. CBE Faculty and Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Us Research Staff Edward Arens Fred Bauman Gail Brager Darryl Dickerhoff Ali Ghahramani Partners Facilities Graduate Programs Visiting Scholar Program Careers CBE Faculty and Staff CBE is an performance of buildings. The core research group for CBE includes faculty and research staff members

  18. Developing participatory research in radiology: the use of a graffiti wall, cameras and a video box in a Scottish radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathers, Sandra A.; Anderson, Helen; McDonald, Sheila; Chesson, Rosemary A.

    2010-01-01

    Participatory research is increasingly advocated for use in health and health services research and has been defined as a 'process of producing new knowledge by systematic enquiry, with the collaboration of those being studied'. The underlying philosophy of participatory research is that those recruited to studies are acknowledged as experts who are 'empowered to truly participate and have their voices heard'. Research methods should enable children to express themselves. This has led to the development of creative approaches of working with children that offer alternatives to, for instance, the structured questioning of children by researchers either through questionnaires or interviews. To examine the feasibility and potential of developing participatory methods in imaging research. We employed three innovative methods of data collection sequentially, namely the provision of: 1) a graffiti wall; 2) cameras, and 3) a video box for children's use. While the graffiti wall was open to all who attended the department, for the other two methods children were allocated to each 'arm' consecutively until our target of 20 children for each was met. The study demonstrated that it was feasible to use all three methods of data collection within the context of a busy radiology department. We encountered no complaints from staff, patients or parents. Children were willing to participate but we did not collect data to establish if they enjoyed the activities, were pleased to have the opportunity to make comments or whether anxieties about their treatment inhibited their participation. The data yield was disappointing. In particular, children's contributions to the graffiti wall were limited, but did reflect the nature of graffiti, and there may have been some 'copycat' comments. Although data analysis was relatively straightforward, given the nature of the data (short comments and simple drawings), the process proved to be extremely time-consuming. This was despite the modest

  19. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  20. Metallurgy Department publications 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder Pedersen, A.; Bilde-Soerensen, J.B.

    1989-08-01

    A presentation (including abstracts) of scientific and technical publications and lectures by the staff of the Metallurgy Department during 1988 is given. The list comprises journal papers, conference papers, reports, lectures and poster presentations in the following catagories: Publications, Lectures and Poster Presentations. (author)

  1. Metallurgy Department publications 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsewell, A.

    1990-08-01

    All publiclations by the staff of the Metallurgy Department during 1989 are listed. This list is divided into three sections as follows: Publications (journal and conference papers, reports); Lectures (public lecture presentations) and Posters (poster presentations at conferences and symposia). Abstracts are included. (author)

  2. Department of Defense International Space Cooperation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Commands’ regional exercise programs fully integrate appropriate allies’ and partners’ space operations. d. In close coordination with USSTRA TCOM...partners to develop basic operational capabilities through advanced and integrated training programs to grow a sophisticated coalition space cadre. b...1-2600 "’l. ., 5 Lui/ !.Y. 4’/ ,_ , MEMORANDUM FOR SECRETARIES OF THE MILITARY DEPARTMENTS CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF UNDER SECRET

  3. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  4. Development of engineering identity in the engineering curriculum in Dutch higher education : an explorative study from the teaching staff perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehing, A.J.M.; Baartman, L.K.J.; Jochems, W.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    How do engineering students develop a professional identity during the course of the curriculum? What are the development mechanisms and important conditions? In an exploratory study among teachers the authors tried to find out whether the development of engineering identity can be understood by

  5. Communication and Work Development as a Change Management Tool in the In-flight Customer Service Department : Case Finnair

    OpenAIRE

    Hölttä, Katri

    2011-01-01

    The challenges and changes in the air transport sector have increased the need for radical changes also in the airlines organizations. Finnair has chosen to be a quality airline to focus on operations into customer-orientation and delivering improved customer experience to its customers. The objective of this thesis is to find development suggestions to the In-flight customer service department how to develop communication and work development to be used as a change management tool. The study...

  6. Department o

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-10-31

    Oct 31, 2016 ... Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. 2 ... Geospatial techniques were used for this study; data from primary and secondary source ... development, for instance, Nigeria cities .... (road network, road medians and water ..... Countries: A Case Study of Nigeria.

  7. Síndrome de Burnout em trabalhadores de enfermagem de um pronto socorro de hospital universitário Síndrome de Burnout en trabajadores de enfermería del servicio de emergencia de un hospital universitario Burnout Syndrome among nursing staff from an emergency department of a hniversity hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Albieri Jodas

    2009-01-01

    necesario desarrollar estrategias de reorganización del proceso de trabajo disminuyendo fuentes de estrés.OBJECTIVE: To identify the factors associated with the signs and symptoms of burnout among nursing staff from an emergency department of a university hospital. METHODS: The study used a quantitative descriptive design. The sample comprised of 61 nursing staff. A self-administered structured questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory were used to collect the data. Data were analyzed with EpiInfo 2004. RESULTS: Among the sample of the study, 8.2% of female participants had burnout. However, a great number (54.1% had high risk for burnout. Only 37.7% of participants had a low risk for burnout. Factors associated with burnout include the lack of knowledge and motivation for professional development. CONCLUSION: The organization and work dynamics of the emergency department led to workload and tension, which suggested the need to develop strategies for the re-organization of the work dynamics to decrease the sources of stress.

  8. Examining Regionalization Efforts to Develop Lessons Learned and Consideration for Department of Defense Medical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-23

    outsourcing effects of military maintenance depots. They found maintenance depots were not working at full capacity and in some cases privatizing the...need to look at the impact of the consolidated departments and if a common goal can be achieved. Funding differences can also affect regionalization...therefore be out of service until fixed. Mitchell & Pasch [5] added that there could be a customer service impact consolidating local facilities into

  9. Pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury; the influence of risk factors present in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H W Wietske; Schoonhoven, L Lisette; Schuurmans, M Marieke J; Leenen, L Luke P H

    2017-01-01

    To explore the influence of risk factors present at Emergency Department admission on pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury, admitted to the hospital for evaluation and treatment of acute traumatic injuries. Prospective cohort study setting level one trauma center in the Netherlands participants adult trauma patients transported to the Emergency Department on a backboard, with extrication collar and headblocks and admitted to the hospital for treatment or evaluation of their injuries. Between January and December 2013, 254 trauma patients were included. The following dependent variables were collected: Age, Skin color and Body Mass Index, and Time in Emergency Department, Injury Severity Score, Mean Arterial Pressure, hemoglobin level, Glasgow Coma Score, and admission ward after Emergency Department. Pressure ulcer development during admission was associated with a higher age (p 0.00, OR 1.05) and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p 0.00, OR 1.21) and higher Injury Severity Scores (p 0.03, OR 1.05). Extra nutrition decreases the probability of PU development during admission (p 0.04, OR 0.20). Pressure ulcer development within the first 48h of admission was positively associated with a higher age (p 0.01, OR 1.03) and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p 0.01, OR 1.16). The proportion of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and Medium Care Unit was higher in patients with pressure ulcers. The pressure ulcer risk during admission is high in patients with an increased age, lower Glasgow Coma Scale and higher Injury Severity Score in the Emergency Department. Pressure ulcer risk should be assessed in the Emergency Department to apply preventive interventions in time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  11. The role of marketing accountability at the marketing and research and development departments' integration and the new product success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acar, O.A.; Karaosmanoglu, E.; Nijssen, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Marketing accountability is accepted as an important issue in various studies due to the current business working atmosphere, in which proof of contribution is demanded. At the same time, the integration between Marketing and Research&Development (R&D) departments is stated as crucial for

  12. Pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury; the influence of risk factors present in the Emergency Department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, H. W (Wietske); Schoonhoven, Lisette; Schuurmans, M. (Marieke) J; Leenen, L. (Luke) P H

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore the influence of risk factors present at Emergency Department admission on pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury, admitted to the hospital for evaluation and treatment of acute traumatic injuries. Design Prospective cohort study setting

  13. Fielding a Division Staff in the Modern Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Team CGSC Command and General Staff College CSA Chief of Staff of the Army DART Domestic All-Hazards Response Team EOD Explosive Ordnance Disposal...located at Fort Leavenworth. Conclusion This paper reviewed the current purpose, size, training, and structure of division staffs in the active duty...Response Team ( DART ), both supported by the National Guard division headquarters. Coordinated with the Department of Defense and Department of State

  14. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  15. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  16. Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataraja, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design

  17. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  19. Estresse da equipe de enfermagem do corpo de bombeiros no Atendimento Pré-Hospitalar Móvel El estrés del equipo de enfermería del cuerpo de bomberos en atención pre-hospitalaria móvil Stress at the nursing staff from the fire department in a mobile pre-hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richiére dos Santos Pereira Salvador

    2013-06-01

    profesionales.The research has as subject, the study of the stress at work on a nursing staff from the Fire Department in the pre - hospital care, and aims to identify what are the stressors in the work of professionals who are part of the nursing staff of APH Mobile from the Fire Department; analyze the impact of stress on the health of these professionals. The study characterized itself as qualitative descriptive - exploratory, involving 10 professionals. Data collection was conducted through interviews recorded electronically, using a semi-structured instrument. After transcription of the interviews, the similar aspects and differences found were grouped into analyze categories. It was confirmed that these professionals are subjected to constant stress, having modified their lifestyle habits, with health impact. It is suggested that the identified problems are studied in order to develop strategies in order to generate better working conditions for these professionals.

  20. Department of Veterans Affairs, Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Volume 30, Number 2, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Centre, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7LD UK; Department Of Clinical Biochemistry , John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, OX3 9DU UK; I.R.C. Biomedical...PhD, PEng, Dept. of Kinesiology , University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3GI, Canada FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT 35. The Control of Genu Recurvatum by... Kinesiology , University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, P, et al., J Trauma 33(5):728-736, 1992. N2L 3GI, Canada Contact: Pierre Maurette, MD, Dept. d’anesthesie