WorldWideScience

Sample records for staff completed questionnaires

  1. Workplace bullying in NHS community trust: staff questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quine, L

    1999-01-23

    To determine the prevalence of workplace bullying in an NHS community trust; to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes; and to investigate the relation between support at work and bullying. Questionnaire survey. NHS community trust in the south east of England. Trust employees. Measures included a 20 item inventory of bullying behaviours designed for the study, the job induced stress scale, the hospital anxiety and depression scale, the overall job satisfaction scale, the support at work scale, and the propensity to leave scale. 1100 employees returned questionnaires-a response rate of 70%. 421 (38%) employees reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous year. 460 (42%) had witnessed the bullying of others. When bullying occurred it was most likely to be by a manager. Two thirds of the victims of bullying had tried to take action when the bullying occurred, but most were dissatisfied with the outcome. Staff who had been bullied had significantly lower levels of job satisfaction (mean 10.5 (SD 2. 7) v 12.2 (2.3), Pjob induced stress (mean 22.5 (SD 6.1) v 16.9 (5.8), Pjob (8.5 (2.9) v 7.0 (2.7), Pbullying. Bullying is a serious problem. Setting up systems for supporting staff and for dealing with interpersonal conflict may have benefits for both employers and staff.

  2. Validity of Self Completed Health Questionnaire among Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective of this study is to determine the degree of validity of self completed health questionnaire among oral surgery patient at the Capitol Dental when compared with a structured oral interview. A prospective random selection method was applied using a standardized questionnaire. The cohorts are patients attending ...

  3. Burnout, role conflict, job satisfaction and psychosocial health among Hungarian health care staff: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piko, Bettina F

    2006-03-01

    There is a growing interest in the psychosocial work environment of health care staff since they are at high risk for burnout, role conflict and job dissatisfaction. Burnout, as a type of prolonged response to chronic job-related stressors, has a special significance in health care where staff experience both psychological-emotional and physical stress. Burnout and the other negative aspects of the job of health care staff have major behavioural and health implications. The present study investigated the interrelationships among burnout, role conflict and job satisfaction in a sample of Hungarian health care staff. The study also investigated how these indicators of psychosocial work climate influence respondents' frequency of psychosomatic symptoms. A questionnaire survey (anonymous questionnaires) has been carried out to detect these interrelationships. Two major hospitals in Szeged, Hungary. Questionnaires were distributed to 450 health care staff among whom 55.7% were registered nurses. All together, 201 questionnaires were returned and analyzed, giving a response rate of 44.6%. Questionnaire contained items on work and health-related information (i.e., burnout, job satisfaction, role conflict, and psychosomatic symptoms) and on some basic sociodemographics. Beyond descriptive statistics, correlation and multiple regression analyses were computed. Findings show that emotional exhaustion and depersonalization scores were higher, while scores on personal accomplishment was lower as compared to Canadian, Norwegian or US samples. Burnout, particularly emotional exhaustion (pjob dissatisfaction. Schooling was inversely related to satisfaction with the job (pjob satisfaction was a negative predictor of each type of burnout subscale (pimportance of the role of psychosocial work environment and the interrelationships among burnout, role conflict, job satisfaction and psychosomatic health among Hungarian health care staff.

  4. Exercise in completing design information questionnaire for model research reactor: model description, notes, questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellinger, J.; Ho, T.

    1989-01-01

    The document which defines the inspection measures which the IAEA can deploy at any given nuclear facility is known as the Facility Attachment. For the Agency to negotiate an effective Facility Attachment it must have available certain design information, including the facility's identity, capacity and location; the form, location and flow of nuclear material and the layout of important items of equipment; and a description of the features and procedures relating to nuclear material accountancy, containment and surveillance. In practice such information is solicited in a format, standardized for each facility type, known as the Design Information Questionnaire or the D.I.Q. The nuclear activities used as a model in this course are those of a fictitious country called Pacifica. These nuclear activities bear some resemblance to those at the Australian Atomic Energy Commission's Research Establishment at Lucas Heights. Specifically, Pacifica has a 10 MW heavy water cooled and moderated research reactor using enriched uranium fuel which is very similar to the HIFAR reactor. The reactor and the associated laboratories are described and the Design Information Questionnaire for them is completed. figs., tabs

  5. A questionnaire measuring staff perceptions of Lean adoption in healthcare: development and psychometric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrunner, Monica; Bengtsson, Lars; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Engström, Maria

    2017-03-24

    During the past decade, the concept of Lean has spread rapidly within the healthcare sector, but there is a lack of instruments that can measure staff's perceptions of Lean adoption. Thus, the aim of the present study was to develop a questionnaire measuring Lean in healthcare, based on Liker's description of Lean, by adapting an existing instrument developed for the service sector. A mixed-method design was used. Initially, items from the service sector instrument were categorized according to Liker's 14 principles describing Lean within four domains: philosophy, processes, people and partners and problem-solving. Items were lacking for three of Liker's principles and were therefore developed de novo. Think-aloud interviews were conducted with 12 healthcare staff from different professions to contextualize and examine the face validity of the questionnaire prototype. Thereafter, the adjusted questionnaire's psychometric properties were assessed on the basis of a cross-sectional survey among 386 staff working in primary care. The think-aloud interviews led to adjustments in the questionnaire to better suit a healthcare context, and the number of items was reduced. Confirmatory factor analysis of the adjusted questionnaire showed a generally acceptable correspondence with Liker's description of Lean. Internal consistency, measured using Cronbach's alpha, for the factors in Liker's description of Lean was 0.60 for the factor people and partners, and over 0.70 for the three other factors. Test-retest reliability measured by the intra-class correlation coefficient ranged from 0.77 to 0.88 for the four factors. We designed a questionnaire capturing staff's perceptions of Lean adoption in healthcare on the basis of Liker's description. This Lean in Healthcare Questionnaire (LiHcQ) showed generally acceptable psychometric properties, which supports its usability for measuring Lean adoption in healthcare. We suggest that further research focus on verifying the usability of

  6. Injury surveillance in male professional football; is medical staff reporting complete and accurate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørneboe, J; Flørenes, T W; Bahr, R; Andersen, T E

    2011-10-01

    Since the 2000 season, an injury surveillance system has been established to monitor injury risk and injury patterns in the Norwegian professional football league. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of routine injury registration performed by medical staff in professional football. The team medical staff completed injury registration forms on a monthly basis throughout the 2007 season (January-October). Players were interviewed at the end of the season (October/November) about all injuries that occurred from July through September. Thirteen of fourteen teams, 296 of 310 A-squad players were interviewed. An injury was recorded when a player was unable to take fully part in football training or match the day after injury. A total of 174 injuries were registered, 123 acute injuries and 51 overuse injuries. Of these, 141 were reported by medical staff and 122 by players. Eighty-nine injuries (51%) were registered using both methods, 52 (30%) by medical staff only and 33 (19%) by player interviews only. Prospective injury surveillance by team medical staff in Norwegian male professional football underestimates the incidence of time-loss injuries by at least one-fifth. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. The complete guide to using Google in libraries instruction, administration, and staff productivity

    CERN Document Server

    Smallwood, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Carol Smallwood's The Complete Guide to Using Google in Libraries, Volume 1: Instruction, Administration, and Staff Productivity explores how Google's suite of tools, from Google Docs (now Google Drive), Google Scholar, Hangout, Forms, and others made freely available to the Internet Community, can be used by libraries to expand the role of digital operations in the management of library materials, to communicate with their patrons and collaborators, to exploit the resources on the Web, and many others.

  8. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Novel Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire for Food Service Staff of Aged Care Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M; Hamilton, J; Scupham, R; Matwiejczyk, L; Prichard, I; Farrer, O; Yaxley, A

    2018-01-01

    Food service staff are integral to delivery of quality food in aged care homes yet measurement of their satisfaction is unable to be performed due to an absence of a valid and reliable questionnaire. The aim of this study was to develop and perform psychometric testing for a new Food Service Satisfaction Questionnaire developed in Australia specifically for use by food service staff working in residential aged care homes (Flinders FSSQFSAC). A mixed methods design utilizing both a qualitative (in-depth interviews, focus groups) and a quantitative approach (cross sectional survey) was used. Content validity was determined from focus groups and interviews with food service staff currently working in aged care homes, related questionnaires from the literature and consultation with an expert panel. The questionnaire was tested for construct validity and internal consistency using data from food service staff currently working in aged care homes that responded to an electronic invitation circulated to Australian aged care homes using a national database of email addresses. Construct validity was tested via principle components analysis and internal consistency through Cronbach's alpha. Temporal stability of the questionnaire was determined from food service staff undertaking the Flinders FSSQFSAC on two occasions, two weeks apart, and analysed using Pearson's correlations. Content validity for the Flinders FSSQFSAC was established from a panel of experts and stakeholders. Principle components analysis revealed food service staff satisfaction was represented by 61-items divided into eight domains: job satisfaction (α=0.832), food quality (α=0.871), staff training (α=0.922), consultation (α=0.840), eating environment (α=0.777), reliability (α=0.695), family expectations (α=0.781) and resident relationships (α=0.429), establishing construct validity in all domains, and internal consistency in all (α>0.5) except for "resident relationships" (α=0.429). Test

  9. A multicenter questionnaire investigation of attitudes toward hand hygiene, assessed by the staff in fifteen hospitals in Denmark and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimakoff, J; Kjelsberg, A B; Larsen, S O

    1992-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was carried out anonymously among 2557 health care workers in Denmark and Norway to identify and quantify factors that affect the handwashing behavior of physicians, nurses, and other staff groups who perform direct patient care. For number of daily patient contacts physici...

  10. Timing of patient satisfaction assessment: effect on questionnaire acceptability, completeness of data, reliability and variability of scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brédart, Anne; Razavi, Darius; Robertson, Chris; Brignone, Stefania; Fonzo, Dora; Petit, Jean-Yves; de Haes, J. C. J. M.

    2002-01-01

    The present study compared the performance of a multidimensional patient satisfaction questionnaire according to the timing of questionnaire administration. Comparisons were made in terms of: (a) the completeness and representativeness of the data set (number of missing questionnaires, number

  11. Improving response rates using a monetary incentive for patient completion of questionnaires: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orchard Jo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor response rates to postal questionnaires can introduce bias and reduce the statistical power of a study. To improve response rates in our trial in primary care we tested the effect of introducing an unconditional direct payment of £5 for the completion of postal questionnaires. Methods We recruited patients in general practice with knee problems from sites across the United Kingdom. An evidence-based strategy was used to follow-up patients at twelve months with postal questionnaires. This included an unconditional direct payment of £5 to patients for the completion and return of questionnaires. The first 105 patients did not receive the £5 incentive, but the subsequent 442 patients did. We used logistic regression to analyse the effect of introducing a monetary incentive to increase the response to postal questionnaires. Results The response rate following reminders for the historical controls was 78.1% (82 of 105 compared with 88.0% (389 of 442 for those patients who received the £5 payment (diff = 9.9%, 95% CI 2.3% to 19.1%. Direct payments significantly increased the odds of response (adjusted odds ratio = 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0, P = 0.009 with only 12 of 442 patients declining the payment. The incentive did not save costs to the trial – the extra cost per additional respondent was almost £50. Conclusion The direct payment of £5 significantly increased the completion of postal questionnaires at negligible increase in cost for an adequately powered study.

  12. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-09-02

    It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff's ability to remain working until retirement age has been limited. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the associations between different job and organisational characteristics, job satisfaction, occupational commitment and the self-perceived ability to continue working in the current line of work until the official retirement age. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study included 730 nursing staff members employed in Dutch hospitals, nursing homes, organisations for psychiatric care, homes for the elderly, care organisations for disabled people and home care organisations (mean age: 48; 89% female). Linear and logistic regression analyses and mediation analyses were applied to test hypothesised associations. Reducing work pressure and increasing appreciation by senior management in particular have positive consequences for nursing staff's self-perceived ability to continue working until the official retirement age. The job and organisational characteristics of autonomy, work pressure, supportive leadership, educational opportunities, communication within the organisation and appreciation of nursing staff by senior management together have substantial impact on nursing staff's job satisfaction. Job satisfaction in turn is related to the self-perceived ability to continue working until the retirement age. However, job satisfaction mainly summarises the joint effect of job and organisational characteristics and has no supplementary effect on the self-perceived ability to continue working. Employers should primarily focus on work pressure and the appreciation of nursing staff by senior management in order to retain nursing staff even as they get older.

  13. The reasons for Chinese nursing staff to report adverse events: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su; Li, QiuJie

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the impact of nurses' perception of patient safety culture and adverse event reporting, and demographic factors on adverse event reporting in Chinese hospitals. Accurate and timely adverse event reporting is integral in promoting patient safety and professional learning around the incident. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 919 nurses completed a structured questionnaire composed of two validated instruments measuring nurses' perception of patient safety culture and adverse event reporting. Associations between the variables were examined using multiple linear regression analysis. The positive response rates of five dimensions of the Patient Safety Culture Assessment Scale varied from 47.55% to 80.62%. The accuracy rate of Adverse Event Reporting Perception Scale was 63.16%. Five hundred and thirty-one (58.03%) nurses did not report adverse event in past 12 months. Six variables were found to be associated with nurses' adverse event reporting: total work experience (P = 0.003), overall patient safety culture score (P teamwork climate (P importance or reporting (P = 0.002). The results confirmed that improvements in the patient safety culture and nurses' perception of adverse event reporting were related to an increase in voluntary adverse event reporting. The knowledge of adverse event reporting should be integrated into the patient safety curriculum. Interventions that target a specific domain are necessary to improve the safety culture. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Attitudes of nursing staff towards electronic patient records: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of health care organizations are implementing a system of electronic patient records (EPR). This implies a change in work routines for nursing staff, but it could also be regarded as an opportunity to improve the quality of care. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this paper is

  15. Use of a patient completed iPad questionnaire to improve pre-operative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, M; Hood, A J; Jayne, D G

    2017-02-01

    Developments in healthcare technology could improve patient care and reduce healthcare costs. There is a need to facilitate communication and increase efficiency in surgical pre-assessment clinics. This study aimed to develop an iPad application to deliver an electronic patient questionnaire, and to evaluate its use in the pre-assessment environment. Software was developed, MyOp, for a standard iPad that mirrored the paper-based pre-assessment system, with features designed for ease of patient use and remote data transfer. A case-control study was conducted, comparing use of MyOp with paper-based practice, to evaluate feasibility and patient preference. Patients were offered the use of MyOp or paper-based system. Outcomes measured included time to complete iPad questionnaire, consultation duration, and a patient preference questionnaire. MyOp cost £3500 to develop. 104 individuals participated in the study, 53 MyOp and 51 controls. MyOp reduced the median consultation duration by 5.00 min. A reduction was seen in all subgroups except those aged over 70 or urology patients. Patients preferred to complete the form independently, using a touchpad or computer but expressed concerns about data security. Use of an electronic patient questionnaire reduces consultation time delivering greater efficiency of pre-assessment nurse time. Preconceived ideas about the use of technology in older age groups are likely inaccurate and less of a barrier than previously thought. Electronic pre-assessments could be used routinely to reduce demands on healthcare facilities, improve patient care, and triage patients prior to clinic attendance.

  16. Questionnaire on the awareness of generic drugs among outpatients and medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, S; Kimura, H

    2008-06-01

    Generic drugs are not as widely used in Japan as they are in the West. The objective of this study was to survey the awareness of generic drugs among outpatients and medical staff and propose methods of promoting the use of generic drugs. Our survey showed that 86.7% of respondents were aware of generic drugs. This is a higher awareness rate than that in a survey of other groups conducted last year. One reason to explain this higher awareness is the recent increase in generic drug advertisements both in newspapers and on television. However, a point of note is that generic drug usage has not increased. Our survey also showed that generic drug awareness was differed widely among age groups, as younger respondents were much more aware of generic drugs than older respondents. Still, about 40% of respondents who were aware of generic drugs did not realize that they were less expensive than name-brand drugs ? including 30% of medical staff. In addition to continuing advertisement of generic drugs in the media, medical doctors and pharmacists should also be encouraged to endorse the use of generic drugs. Furthermore a new system allowing for substitution prescriptions started in April 2008 and consequently pharmacists can now play an important role in promoting the use of generic drugs.

  17. Clinical examinations to validate self-completion questionnaires: dermatitis in the UK printing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livesley, E J; Rushton, L; English, J S C; Williams, H C

    2002-07-01

    A self-completion questionnaire sent to 2600 Nottinghamshire members of the Graphical Paper and Media Union elicited a 62% response. Forty one per cent of respondents reported suffering a skin complaint at some time and 11% had a current skin problem on the hand. This paper reports the validation stage of the study. Samples of 45 'cases' of self-reported dermatitis and 60 'controls', who reported they had never suffered a skin complaint, were clinically examined. All 45 self-reported cases were clinically confirmed as dermatitis. Occupationally related irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) was diagnosed in 20 (44%); 26 (58%) complaints were thought to be induced or exacerbated by occupation. Of the controls, 21 (35%) were also diagnosed with a skin complaint, the majority being mild, with an occupational association in 17, the majority (15) being ICD. Sixteen ICD cases were patch tested resulting in positive reactions to colophony, neomycin, nickel and potassium dichromate (2 of each). Two cases of basal cell carcinoma on the face were also identified, of which the participants were unaware. Although there was no false positive self-reporting there was a considerable number of false negatives, demonstrating the importance of clinical validation of questionnaires relating to industrial skin disease. This study has highlighted the need for improvement in skin care provision in the printing industry.

  18. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-12-01

    The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is important to retain existing nursing staff in the healthcare sector to ensure a stable home-care workforce for the future. However, to date there has been little research about the job factors in home care that affect whether staff are considering leaving the healthcare sector. The main purpose of the study was to examine how home-care nursing staff's self-perceived autonomy relates to whether they have considered leaving the healthcare sector and to assess the possible mediating effect of work engagement. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study involved 262 registered nurses and certified nursing assistants employed in Dutch home-care organisations (mean age of 51; 97% female). The respondents were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide group of nursing staff members in various healthcare settings (67% response rate). The questionnaire included validated scales concerning self-perceived autonomy and work engagement and a measure for considering pursuing an occupation outside the healthcare sector. Logistic regression and mediation analyses were conducted to test associations between self-perceived autonomy, work engagement and considering leaving the healthcare sector. Nursing staff members in home care who perceive more autonomy are more engaged in their work and less likely to have considered leaving the healthcare sector. The positive association between self-perceived autonomy and considering leaving, found among nursing staff members regardless of their level of education, is mediated by work engagement. In developing strategies for retaining nursing staff in home care, employers and policy makers should target their efforts at enhancing nursing staff

  19. Academic Staff Perceptions of Factors Underlying Program Completion by Australian Indigenous Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Roianne; Usher, Kim; Foster, Kim; Stewart, Lee

    2014-01-01

    An increase in the number of Indigenous health professionals is one way to help reduce the poor health outcomes of Australia's Indigenous people. However, while Indigenous students are enrolling in Australian tertiary undergraduate nursing courses in increasing numbers, their completion rates remain lower than non-Indigenous students and many…

  20. Nonfunctional Redundant Acts Characterize OCD, Even in OCD-Unrelated Tasks: A Demonstration in Questionnaire Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitai, Maya; Arnon, Nitzan; Shaham, Noa; Gur, Shay; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham; Hermesh, Haggai

    2017-01-01

    Ethological methods used to analyze human obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) rituals demonstrated excess of unnecessary repetitions as well as irrelevant, idiosyncratic acts (additions) compared to normal activity. A question that still remains is whether these well-known repetitions and additions are manifested in behaviors unrelated to the OCD rituals. Our objectives were to: (1) assess whether OCD-related repetitions and additions as found in previous studies also affect the patients' activity of filling out questionnaires and (2) evaluate the specificity of these behaviors to OCD as opposed to other anxiety disorders and healthy controls. Several standardized disorder-specific self-report questionnaires were used in order to assess the patient's psychopathologies. The style of filling-out these questionnaires by OCD and non-OCD anxiety outpatients and normal controls was analyzed. Four categories were used: omissions, repetitions, corrections, and additions. The OCD group scored significantly higher on the number of additions as compared with both the anxiety group and the nonclinical group, and significantly higher on the number of corrections and repetitions as compared with the nonclinical group. The hallmarks of OCD, repetitions and additions, are manifested not only in the patient's rituals and thoughts, but in apparently "neutral" tasks that do not a priori involve the intrusive thoughts, urges, and images typical of obsessive-compulsive behavior. Additions seem to be more specific to OCD than repetitions. These two executive faults impede routine functionality of OCD patients in tasks related and unrelated to their rituals. Our study delineates simple, observable behavioral characteristics that distinguish between OCD and non-OCD anxiety patients as well as healthy individuals. These symptomatic behaviors may offer a clue to personality traits or deficits in executive functions that possibly play a part in the pathophysiology of OCD. Our results are an

  1. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; de Veer, A.J.E.; van der Hoek, L.S.; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff's ability to remain working until retirement age has

  2. Specific Modifications to Contract Policy for Staff Members and Project Associates related to the Human Resources Plan and LHC Completion

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    As agreed at the Committee meetings last December, the Management hereby submits two specific proposals to adjust staff contract policy and a third concerning appointments of Project Associates, following indications given in the Human Resources Plan presented last December. These proposals are limited to changes which are urgently required for the implementation of the HR Plan and the completion of the LHC. Other aspects concerning contract policy, raised by Internal Task Force 4 last year, and in particular the policy and procedures governing the award of indefinite contracts, require more in-depth study on which the Management will report progress on the clarification of these wider policy issues later in the year to TREF. After discussion at TREF in February 2003, the Management hereby submits these proposals for approval by the Finance Committee (paragraph 2.1 below) and by the Council (paragraphs 2.2 and 3.1 below), for entry into force on 1 April 2003.

  3. Construction of a Scale-Questionnaire on the Attitude of the Teaching Staff as Opposed to the Educative Innovation by Means of Techniques of Cooperative Work (CAPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Andrés Traver Martí

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the construction process of a scale-questionnaire is described to measure the attitude of the teaching staff as opposed to the educational innovation by means of techniques of cooperative work (CAPIC.  In order to carry out its design and elaboration we need on the one hand a model of analysis of the attitudes and an instrument of measurement of the same ones capable of guiding its practical dynamics.  The Theory of the Reasoned Action of Fisbhein and Ajzen (1975, 1980 and the summative scales (Likert have fulfilled, in both cases, this paper.

  4. The Validity and Reliability Characteristics of the M-BACK Questionnaire to Assess the Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge of Mental Health Staff Regarding Metabolic Health of Mental Health Service Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Watkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAddressing the burden of poor physical health and the subsequent gap in life expectancy experienced by people with mental illness is a major priority in mental health services. To equip mental health staff with the competence to deliver evidence-based interventions, targeted staff training regarding metabolic health is required. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of staff training regarding metabolic health, we aimed to develop a succinct measure to determine the barriers, attitudes, confidence, and knowledge of health practitioners through the development and test–retest reliability of the Metabolic-Barriers, Attitudes, Confidence, and Knowledge Questionnaire (M-BACK.MethodsThe M-BACK questionnaire was developed to evaluate the impact of specialized training in metabolic health care for mental health nurses. Content of the M-BACK was developed from a literature review and refined by an expert review panel and validated via a piloting process. To determine the test–retest reliability of the M-BACK, 31 nursing students recruited from the University of Notre Dame, Sydney completed the questionnaire on two separate occasions, 7 days apart. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs were calculated for the total score, as well as each of the four domains.ResultsPilot testing was undertaken with a sample of 106 mental health nurses with a mean age 48.2, ranging from 24 to 63 years of age, who participated in six training courses. Questionnaire development resulted in a 16-item instrument, with each item is scored on a five-point Likert scale ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” Test–retest reliability of the M-BACK was completed by 30 of 31 nursing students recruited, ICCs ranged from 0.62 to 0.96.ConclusionThe M-BACK is a reliable measure of the key elements of practitioner perceptions of barriers, and their knowledge, attitudes, and confidence regarding metabolic monitoring in people with mental

  5. The Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI: An observation-based method for pretesting self-completion questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI is a method for pretesting a self-completion questionnaire by first observing actual instances of interaction between the instrument and respondents (the response process before exploring the reasons for this behavior. The TSTI consists of the following three steps: 1. (Respondent-driven observation of response behavior. 2. (Interviewer-driven follow-up probing aimed at remedying gaps in observational data. 3. (Interviewer-driven debriefing aimed at eliciting experiences and opinions. We describe the aims and the techniques of these three steps, and then discuss pilot studies in which we tested the feasibility and the productivity of the TSTI by applying it in testing three rather different types of questionnaires. In the first study, the quality of a set of questions about alcohol consumption was assessed. The TSTI proved to be productive in identifying problems that resulted from a mismatch between the ‘theory’ underlying the questions on the one hand, and features of a respondent’s actual behavior and biography on the other hand. In the second pilot study, Dutch and Norwegian versions of an attitude scale, the 20-item Illegal Aliens Scale, were tested. The TSTI appeared to be productive in identifying problems that resulted from different ‘response strategies’. In the third pilot, a two-year longitudinal study, the TSTI appeared to be an effective method for documenting processes of ‘response shift’ in repeated measurements of health-related Quality of Life (QoL.

  6. The Person Centered approach in Gerontology: New validity evidence of the Staff Assessment Person-directed Care Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes/Objetivos La atención centrada en la persona es un enfoque innovador que busca mejorar la calidad asistencial de los servicios para personas mayores que precisan cuidados. Ante el creciente interés hacia este enfoque es necesario contar con instrumentos de medida que permitan evaluar en qué grado los servicios gerontológicos llevan a cabo una atención centrada en la persona. El objetivo de este trabajo es la adaptación y validación del Staff Assessment Person-directed Care (PDC en población espanola. ˜ Método Se llevó a cabo la traducción y adaptación del PDC al espanol ˜ y se aplicó a una muestra de 1.339 profesionales de atención directa, pertenecientes a 56 residencias para personas mayores. El estudio de las propiedades psicométricas se realizó desde el marco de la Teoría Clásica de los Tests y los modelos de Teoría de Respuesta a los Ítems. Resultados El coeficiente alfa de Cronbach fue de 0,97 y el coeficiente de fiabilidad test-retest de 0,89. La Función de Información indica que la prueba mide de forma precisa para un amplio rango de puntuaciones (valores entre -2 y + 2. La estructura factorial del PDC es esencialmente unidimensional, confirmándose la existencia de dos grandes dimensiones que se articulan a su vez en ocho factores muy correlacionados. En cuanto a la validez predictiva destacan las correlaciones del PDC con el The Person-centered Care Assessment Tool (r= 0,68, con el clima organizacional (r = 0,67 y con los factores del burnout, agotamiento emocional (r= -0,41 y realización personal (r = 0,46. Conclusiones La versión espanola ˜ del PDC confirma los resultados encontrados en otras poblaciones, presentando unas excelentes propiedades psicométricas para su uso en la evaluación de residencias de personas mayores, tanto con fines profesionales como de investigación.

  7. Summary of questionnaires completed by participating countries: for the project on the management of water resources in the Sahel region, using isotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Mari

    2012-07-01

    This presentation was carried out as part of the project on water resources management in the Sahel region, using isotope techniques. It summarizes the two sets of questionnaires made, highlights the basins (aquifers) selected for the Sahel project which are the Lullemen Basin, Taoudeni Basin, Lake Chad Basin and Liptako Gourma. Also, as well as the number of questionnaires completed by the participating countries.

  8. [Prevalence and incidence studies of voice disorders among teaching staff of La Rioja, Spain. Clinical study: questionnaire, function vocal examination, acoustic analysis and videolaryngostroboscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, J; Pérez, C; Calzada, M; Preciado, P

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was calculate the prevalence and incidence of voice disorders among teaching staff of La Rioja, Spain. We carried out a transversal study of voice disorders in teaching staff of La Rioja (a random sample of 931 of 3113 teachers) and a longitudinal study (we collect the new cases during the 3 years which lasts the study). 527 teachers of random sample took part of study: 332 female (63%) and 195 male (37%). All of teachers fill in a standard questionnaire, ENT and function vocal examination, videolaryngostroboscopy and acoustic analysis with MDVP. The prevalence of voice disorders among La Rioja Teachers was 57%: 20.3% for organic lesions [nodular lesions (14%), polyps (2%), submucous suffusions (1.4%), edema Reinke (1.2%) Sulcus (0.4%), scalp (0.6%), leucoplasia (0.2%) vocal cord paralysis (0.2%)] 8.1% for chronic laryngitis [not specific (2.8%), smoke (3.9%) gastroe-sofageal reflux (2.5%)] and 29% for functional lesions [hyperfunctional dysphonia (7.5%) hypofunctional dysphonia (0.4%) vocal overefforts (18%) hyperplasia false cords (2.8)]. The incidence rate was 4 new cases each 1000 teachers and year. Organic lesions were more prevalent in women (25.4%) than in men (9.5%), but functional lesions and chronic laryngitis were more prevalent in men (36.5% and 13.2%) than in women (24% and 5%).

  9. Reliability and validity of the Lower Limb Function Questionnaire when completed by young adult orthotic and prosthetic device users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke; Thiessen, Danielle; Wright, Virginia; Andrysek, Jan; Rispin, Karen

    2017-04-01

    Purpose The Lower Limb Function Questionnaire (LLFQ) was developed as a self-report assessment of lower-limb functional ability for orthotic and prosthetic (O&P) device users to be suitable for a wide range of conditions, cultures, and ages. The measure aims to address an existing gap in tools for the assessment of functional ability in this population. The purpose of this study is to evaluate LLFQ reliability and validity in a sample of young adult O&P users. Methods Adolescents from a secondary school in Kenya completed the LLFQ twice, 6 d apart, and test-retest reliability was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficients. Validity evaluations involved Timed Up-and-Go, 6-min walk, 6-min obstacle course, and/or spatiotemporal gait assessments. Oxygen consumption was measured during walk tests. Associations between the LLFQ and each measure were evaluated using Pearson correlation coefficients for construct validity. Results LLFQ reliability was acceptable (ICC = 0.79, 95% CIs 0.64-0.89). Construct validity was demonstrated via moderate correlation (r  >  0.60) with obstacle course distance, gait velocity, stride length, and stance/single support/double support percent of gait cycle. Conclusions Both LLFQ reliability and validity were acceptable in the sample of youth in Kenya. Further testing is required to determine applicability in other cultural contexts. Implications for Rehabilitation The LLFQ may be clinically useful across a variety of cultures and conditions to provide feedback on the effectiveness of rehabilitative treatment or assistive devices for youth with lower limb impairments. The LLFQ may enable specific strengths and challenges to lower limb function to be identified to enable planning of well-targeted rehabilitation.

  10. Validation of the self-completed Cambridge-Hopkins questionnaire (CH-RLSq) for ascertainment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard P; Burchell, Brendan J; MacDonald, Ben; Hening, Wayne A; Earley, Christopher J

    2009-12-01

    Epidemiological studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been limited by lack of a well validated patient-completed diagnostic questionnaire that has a high enough specificity to provide a reasonable positive predictive value. Most of the currently used patient completed diagnostic questionnaires have neither been validated nor included items facilitating the differential diagnosis of RLS from conditions producing similar symptoms. The Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CH-RLSq) was developed with several iterations to include items covering the basic diagnostic features of RLS and to provide some basic differential diagnosis. This validation study sought to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the RLS diagnosis based on this questionnaire. The CH-RLSq was completed by 2005 blood donors who were asked to consent to being contacted for a telephone diagnostic interview. A scoring criterion was established for ascertainment of RLS based on the clinical definition of the disorder and the exclusion of "mimic" conditions. A weighted sample (N=185) of all completed questionnaires was selected for expert clinical diagnosis of RLS using the validated Hopkins Telephone Diagnostic Interview (HDTI). The telephone interviewers were blinded to all questionnaire responses. A telephone diagnosis was obtained on 183 of the sample's 185 questionnaires. The questionnaire's normalized sensitivity and specificity were 87.2% and 94.4%, respectively, for RLS compared to not RLS. The positive predictive values in this sample were 85.5%. The Cambridge-Hopkins RLS questionnaire provides a reasonable level of sensitivity and specificity for ascertainment of RLS in population-based studies.

  11. Development of a novel, short, self-completed questionnaire on empowerment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and an analysis of factors affecting patient empowerment

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Yoriko; Iwashita, Sanae; Okada, Akira; Tajiri, Yuji; Nakayama, Hitomi; Kato, Tomoko; Nakao, Motoyuki; Tsuboi, Koji; Breugelmans, Raoul; Ishihara, Yoko

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient empowerment has recently been proposed as an important concept in self-management for effective glycemic control. A concise self-completed questionnaire for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was created to comprehensively evaluate their empowerment on the basis of self-managed dietary/exercise behaviors, psychological impact, and family support. The reliability and validity of this short questionnaire were tested and factors relating to patient empowerment were analyze...

  12. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  13. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Hoek, L.S. van der; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is important to retain existing nursing staff in the healthcare sector to ensure a stable home-care workforce for the future. However, to date there has been little research about the job factors in hom...

  14. Job Satisfaction of Faculty and Staff at the College of Eastern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Jesse F.

    Faculty and staff at the College of Eastern Utah were surveyed in order to ascertain the level of job satisfaction of the college's personnel. Over 90% of the faculty completed a 94-item job satisfaction questionnaire which was based on Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene theory of motivation. College staff completed a slightly modified form of the…

  15. The direction of restructuring of a Korea field epidemiology training program through questionnaire survey among communicable disease response staff in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moo-Sik; Lee, Kwan; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Hong, Jee-Young; Jang, Min Young; Jeon, Byoung-Hak; Cho, Sang Yun; Choi, Sun Ja; Hong, Jeong Ik

    2017-01-01

    We used a survey about the need for an educational training of infectious disease response staff in Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC) and officer in metropolitan cities and provincial government to conduct field epidemiological investigation. The survey was conducted from January 25 to March 15, 2016. A total of 173 participants were selected from four different groups as follows: 27 clinical specialists, 22 Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) officers, 82 KCDC staff, and 42 local health department officials. Results revealed that 83% of KCDC staff and 95% of local health department officials agreed on the need for educational training to strengthen capability of personnel to conduct epidemic research and investigation. The level of their need for training was relatively high, while self-confidence levels of individuals to conduct epidemic research and investigation was low. It was concluded that there was a need to develop training programs to enhance the ability of public health officials, EIS officers, KCDC staff, and local health department personnel to conduct epidemic research and investigation.

  16. Quality of doctoral nursing education in the United Kingdom: exploring the views of doctoral students and staff based on a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Hugh; Keeney, Sinead; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the quality of doctoral education in nursing in the United Kingdom. In recent decades, doctoral education programmes in nursing are increasing worldwide. There are many reasons for this and concerns have been raised regarding the quality of provision in and across countries. To date, the quality of doctoral education on a global level has not been reported in the literature. This United Kingdom study is part of a seven country investigation into the quality of doctoral education in nursing (Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, United Kingdom and United States of America). A quantitative study using a cross-sectional comparative survey design. An online survey was administered to collect the views of doctoral students and staff members on four domains: programme, faculty/staff, resource and evaluation. The study was carried out between 2010-2012. In most cases, staff perceived these more positively than students and the differences in perception were often statistically significant. Interestingly, many students rated the quality of supervision as excellent, whereas no staff member rated supervision this highly. The crucial importance of resources was confirmed in the path analysis of the four Quality of Doctoral Nursing Education domains. This demonstrates that investment in resources is much more cost-effective than investment in the other domains in relation to improving the overall quality of doctoral education in nursing. This study has wide-ranging implications for how the quality of doctoral education is monitored and enhanced. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Hoek, L.S. van der; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is

  18. [Validation of the Polish version of The Authentic Leadership Questionnaire for the of evaluation purpose of nursing management staff in national hospital wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierpińska, Lidia

    2013-09-01

    The Authentic Leadership Questionnaire (ALQ) is a standardized research instrument for the evaluation of individual elements of leader's conduct which contribute to the authentic leadership. The application of this questionnaire in Polish conditions required to carry out the validation process. The aim of the study was to evaluate of validity and reliability of the Polish version of the American research instrument for the needs of evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospitals. The study covered 286 nurses (143 head nurses and 143 of their subordinates) employed in 45 hospitals in Poland. Theoretical validity of the instrument was evaluated using Fisher's transformation (r-Person correlation coefficient), while the criterion validity of the ALQ was evaluated using rho-Spearman correlation coefficient and the BOHIPSZO questionnaire. The reliability of the ALQ was assessed by means of the Cronbach-alpha coefficient. The ALQ questionnaire applied for the evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospital wards shows an acceptable theoretical and criterion validity and reliability (Cronbach-alpha coefficient 0.80). The Polish version of the ALQ is valid and reliable, and may be applied in studies concerning the evaluation of authenticity of leadership of the nursing management in Polish hospital wards.

  19. Screening for developmental delay in preschool-aged children using parent-completed Ages and Stages Questionnaires: additional insights into child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo El Elella, Soheir S; Tawfik, Maha A M; Abo El Fotoh, Wafaa Moustafa M; Barseem, Naglaa Fathy

    2017-10-01

    Developmental delay is a delay in areas of speech, language, motor, social and cognitive development. Because of the negative impact of intellectual and learning disabilities, early identification of children with developmental and behavioral problems using appropriate screening tests is crucial. Utilization of parent-completed Ages and Stages Questionnaires (ASQs) for detecting the developmental delay in preschool age children and clarification of possible associated risk factors. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1012 children aged 24-60 months enrolled from six centers (n=608) and six villages (n=404) located in Menoufia Governorate, Egypt. All children were screened by nine age-based questionnaires in the first stage of assessment. Children whose scores were ≤ cut-off points in one or more of the screened developmental areas were considered to have suspected developmental delay (SDD) and underwent further evaluation in the second stage assessment. Among the 1012 studied children aged 24-60 months, 978 (96.4%) had normal development. SDD had an overall prevalence of 3.4%, with the highest rates of SDD in problem-solving (3%), followed by communication (2.4%), fine motor skills (2.2%) and social-personal domain (1%), with no SDD in gross motor skills. SDD was more commonly observed in boys, with a significant association with both parental education and consanguinity. Problems with learning (32.3%) was the most commonly observed provisional diagnosis, followed by language disorders (29.4%). Children with SDD in more than one area of ASQ skills also had mild to borderline IQ scores. The use of of parent-completed ASQs showed an overall prevalence of developmental delay in children aged 24-60 months of3.4%. Male gender, consanguinity and parental education were identified as risk factors for developmental delay. Family counselling about the child's developmental state is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the

  20. Symptoms of burnout among staff of direct service care

    OpenAIRE

    ZICHOVÁ, Eliška

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation was focused on burnout syndrome among the staff of direct service care. The degree of burnout was estimated using Copenhagen Burnout Inventory questionnaire which was completed by the respondents from six Prague homes for seniors. The burnout incidence in this group was 30-45 %, whereas it was only 18-32 % among Czech Army employees who were studied for comparison. The staff of direct service care had significantly higher degree of personal, work-related, client-related and ...

  1. Authentic leadership and its impact on creativity of nursing staff: A cross sectional questionnaire survey of Indian nurses and their supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nishtha; Dhar, Rajib Lochan; Handa, Subhash Chander

    2016-11-01

    Nurses play a dominant role in the healthcare sector. However, the working condition of nurses in India is far from satisfactory due to a variety of factors. This is further compounded by the lack of respect for nurses and their profession. Therefore, there is a need to examine factors that could mitigate this situation. The objective of this paper is to examine the relationship between authentic leadership and employee creativity, while determining the mediating effect of knowledge sharing behaviour and moderating effect of use of information technology on this association. A questionnaire-based survey was used to collect the data. Macro process (Hayes) was used to examine the mediating role of knowledge sharing behaviour and the moderating role of use of information technology in the relationship between authentic leadership and employee creativity. Data was collected from 43 small- and medium-sized hospitals in the state of Uttarakhand, India. The participants in the present study were 405 nurses and their 81 supervisors from the above hospitals. Results indicate that authentic leadership is positively linked to the creativity of employees. Further, knowledge sharing behaviour is found to mediate the relationship between authentic leadership and employee creativity, while use of information technology acts as a moderator between knowledge sharing behaviour and employee creativity. The findings of this investigation can help healthcare managers understand the importance of knowledge creation and knowledge sharing among healthcare workers. This paper draws attention to the need for hospital administrators to establish an appropriate information technology infrastructure to effectively manage the knowledge pool of the organization. This study also highlights the importance of effective leadership style, namely authentic leadership, in positively influencing employee creativity in healthcare institutions, a service oriented industry. This study contributes to

  2. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, A; Embregts, P; Hendriks, L; Bosman, A

    2016-02-01

    Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an interpersonal model. As in functional analysis, this study tests the influence of client interpersonal behaviour, three types of staff reactions to challenging behaviour, two types of staff psychological resources and staff team climate on four styles of staff interpersonal behaviour. A total of 318 support staff members completed a questionnaire on staff interpersonal behaviour for 44 clients with ID and challenging behaviour, as well as seven questionnaires on client interpersonal behaviour, staff emotions, attributions, self-efficacy, self-reflection, coping styles and team climate. The influence of these seven factors on four staff interpersonal behaviours was examined using multilevel multiple regression analysis. Friendly-warm and dominant client interpersonal behaviour had a significant positive impact on friendly and assertive control staff behaviour, respectively. Also, there was a strong influence of staff negative and positive emotions, as well as their self-efficacy, on most of the staff interpersonal behaviours. Staff self-reflection, insight and avoidance-focused coping style had an impact on some staff interpersonal behaviours. Staff team climate only predicted higher support-seeking staff behaviour. In conducting a functional analysis of staff interpersonal behaviour, the results of this study can be used both as a framework in staff-client interaction training and in clinical practice for treating challenging behaviour. The emphasis in training and practice should not only be on the bidirectional dynamics of control and affiliation between staff and clients, but also - in order of importance - on the impact of staff emotions, self-efficacy, self-reflection and insight

  3. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  4. Sleep Quality among Female Hospital Staff Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Li Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate sleep quality of hospital staff nurses, both by subjective questionnaire and objective measures. Methods. Female staff nurses at a regional teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan were recruited. The Chinese version of the pittsburgh sleep quality index (C-PSQI was used to assess subjective sleep quality, and an electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC technique was used to analyze objective sleep stability. Work stress was assessed using questionnaire on medical worker’s stress. Results. A total of 156 staff nurses completed the study. Among the staff nurses, 75.8% (117 had a PSQI score of ≥5 and 39.8% had an inadequate stable sleep ratio on subjective measures. Nurses with a high school or lower educational degree had a much higher risk of sleep disturbance when compared to nurses with a college or higher level degree. Conclusions. Both subjective and objective measures demonstrated that poor sleep quality is a common health problem among hospital staff nurses. More studies are warranted on this important issue to discover possible factors and therefore to develop a systemic strategy to cope with the problem.

  5. Screening accuracy of the parent-completed Ages and Stages Questionnaires - second edition as a broadband screener for motor problems in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanvuchelen, Marleen; Van Schuerbeeck, Lise; Braeken, Marijke Aka

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders are at risk for motor problems. However, this area is often overlooked in the developmental evaluation in autism diagnostic clinics. An alternative can be to identify children who should receive intensive motor assessment by using a parent-based screener. The aim of this study was to examine whether the Ages and Stages Questionnaires - second edition may be used to identify gross and fine motor problems in children. High-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder (n = 43, 22-54 m) participated in this study. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were calculated by comparing the Ages and Stages Questionnaires - second edition scores to the developmental evaluation of the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale - second edition. The results revealed that both the Ages and Stages Questionnaires - second edition gross and fine motor domain may be used to identify children without motor problems. In contrast, sensitivity analyses revealed the likelihood of under screening motor problems in this population. The Ages and Stages Questionnaires - second edition met only the criteria of a fair to good accuracy to identify poor gross motor (sensitivity = 100%) and below-average fine motor development (sensitivity = 71%) in this sample. Hence, the capacity of the Ages and Stages Questionnaires - second edition to identify motor problems in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder appears to be limited. It is recommended to include a formal standardized motor test in the diagnostic procedure for all children with autism spectrum disorder. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Do staff nurse perceptions of nurse leadership behaviors influence staff nurse job satisfaction? The case of a hospital applying for Magnet® designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Lorraine; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2014-04-01

    Nurse managers leadership behaviors influence the job satisfaction of staff nurses. Transformational leadership is 1 of the 5 components associated with the Magnet Recognition Program®. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between staff nurse perception of nurse manager leadership behavior and staff nurse job satisfaction in a hospital on the Magnet® journey and the influence of nurse manager leadership style on staff nurse job satisfaction. A descriptive, correlational design using a self-report survey with convenience sampling was used for this quantitative research study. Staff nurses completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire 5X Short Form, the Abridged Job Descriptive Index survey, and a demographic questionnaire. Pearson correlations and regression analyses were completed to explore the relationship and influence of nurse manager leadership style on staff nurse job satisfaction. Transformational and transactional leadership styles of nurse managers were positively related to staff nurse overall job satisfaction and satisfaction with opportunity for promotion. Passive-avoidant leadership style of nurse managers was negatively related to staff nurse satisfaction with work, promotion, supervision, and coworker. Satisfaction with nurse manager leadership was a positive influence on overall nurse job satisfaction when separately controlling for the influence of each leadership style. Transformational and transactional leadership styles should be taught and encouraged among nurse managers to positively influence the job satisfaction of staff nurses.

  7. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  8. Managing social difficulties: roles and responsibilities of patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Penny; Bingham, Laura; Taylor, Sally; Hanif, Naheed; Podmore, Emma; Velikova, Galina

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of guidance on assessment and management of psychosocial and supportive-care problems or needs will be successful only if consideration is given to existing skills, experience and expectations of staff and patients. This study examines the roles and responsibilities of staff, patients and families in relation to management of social difficulties and proposes a pathway for response. A qualitative study was performed using staff and patient interviews. Seventeen doctors and 16 nurses were interviewed using patient scenarios and a support service questionnaire. Patients (n = 41) completed a screening questionnaire (the Social Difficulties Inventory) and were interviewed. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to a Framework analysis. Analysis examined (1) actions taken by staff and patients in response to social difficulties, (2) reasons given for action taken and (3) perceptions of staff and patients of who was responsible for taking action. Staff were confident concerning clinically related issues (i.e. mobility) but more hesitant concerning difficulties related to money, work and family concerns. Patients liked to cope with problems on their own where possible, would have liked information or support from staff but were uncertain how to access this. Results led to development of a hierarchy of interventions in response to detected social difficulties. For routine assessment of social difficulties, patients, nurses and doctors will have to work collaboratively, with nurses taking a lead in discussion. For specific clinically related problems doctors would play a more primary role. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The relationship between managerial leadership behaviors and staff nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe perceptions of managerial leadership behaviors associated with staff nurse turnover and to compare nurse manager leadership behaviors as perceived by managers and their staff nurses. Effective leadership styles among nurse managers have been associated with staff nurse job satisfaction and retention. Although both transformational and transactional leadership styles have been described as effective, it is unclear which nurse manager leadership behaviors contribute most to staff nurse retention. This descriptive, correlational study was conducted at a 465-bed community hospital in the northeastern United States. All staff nurses and nurse managers employed in both ambulatory and acute care nursing units were invited to participate in the study. The study sample comprised 79 staff nurses and 10 nurse managers, who completed demographic forms and the 45-item Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which measures 12 dimensions of leadership style. Data were collected from July through September 2003. Active management by exception as perceived by staff nurses was the only managerial leadership style associated with staff nurse turnover (r = .26, p = .03). Compared with the perceptions among their staff nurses, nurse managers consistently perceived that they demonstrated a higher mean frequency of transformational leadership behaviors. The transactional leadership style of active management by exception not only appeared to be a deterrent to staff nurse retention but also reflected leadership perceptions among staff nurses who work evening and night shifts. This study also provides further evidence regarding a trend in which nurse managers and staff nurses do not concur on the frequency of transformational leadership behaviors but do demonstrate agreement on the frequency of transactional leadership behaviors.

  10. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  11. Patient and staff satisfaction with 'day of admission' elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofela, Agbolahan A; Laban, James T; Selway, Richard P

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate patient and staff satisfaction with day of admission surgery in a neurosurgical unit and its effect on theatre start times. Patients were admitted to a Neurosciences admission lounge (NAL) for neurosurgery on the morning of their operation if deemed appropriate by their neurosurgical consultant. All patients in the NAL were asked to complete patient satisfaction questionnaires. Staff members involved in the care of these patients also completed a satisfaction questionnaire. Theatre start times were compared with those whose patients had been admitted prior to the day of surgery. 378 patients admitted on the day of surgery, 16 doctors (5 anaesthetists, 7 neurosurgeons and 4 neuro high dependency unit, HDU doctors) and 5 nurses. Patients completed an anonymised emotional mapping patient satisfaction questionnaire, and short interviews were carried out with staff members. Theatre start times were obtained retrospectively from the theatre database for lists starting with patients admitted on the day of surgery, and lists starting with patients admitted prior to the day of surgery. 83% of patients felt positive on arrival in the NAL and 88% felt positive on being seen by the doctors and nurses prior to surgery. Overall 79% of patients gave positive responses throughout their patient pathway. 90% of staff were positive about day of admission surgery and all staff members were satisfied that there were no negative effects on surgical outcome. Theatre start time was on average 27 minutes earlier in patients admitted on the day of surgery. Neurosurgical patients, appropriately selected, can be admitted on the day of surgery with high staff and patient satisfaction and without delaying theatre start times.

  12. Comparing Patients' Opinions on the Hospital Discharge Process Collected With a Self-Reported Questionnaire Completed Via the Internet or Through a Telephone Survey: An Ancillary Study of the SENTIPAT Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Berengere; Carrat, Fabrice; Hejblum, Gilles

    2015-06-24

    Hospital discharge, a critical stage in the hospital-to-home transition of patient care, is a complex process with potential dysfunctions having an impact on patients' health on their return home. No study has yet reported the feasibility and usefulness of an information system that would directly collect and transmit, via the Internet, volunteer patients' opinions on their satisfaction concerning the organization of hospital discharge. Our primary objective was to compare patients' opinions on the discharge process collected with 2 different methods: self-questionnaire completed on a dedicated website versus a telephone interview. The secondary goal was to estimate patient satisfaction. We created a questionnaire to examine hospital discharge according to 3 dimensions: discharge logistics organization, preplanned posthospital continuity-of-care organization, and patients' impressions at the time of discharge. A satisfaction score (between 0 and 1) for each of those dimensions and an associated total score were calculated. Taking advantage of the randomized SENTIPAT trial that questioned patients recruited at hospital discharge about the evolution of their health after returning home and randomly assigned them to complete a self-questionnaire directly online or during a telephone interview, we conducted an ancillary study comparing satisfaction with the organization of hospital discharge for these 2 patient groups. The questionnaire was proposed to 1141 patients included in the trial who were hospitalized for ≥2 days, among whom 867 eligible patients had access to the Internet at home and were randomized to the Internet or telephone group. Of the 1141 patients included, 755 (66.17%) completed the questionnaire. The response rates for the Internet (39.1%, 168/430) and telephone groups (87.2%, 381/437) differed significantly (PInternet requires patients' active participation and those planning surveys in the domain explored in this study should anticipate a lower

  13. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Medication Errors by Nursing Staff Working in Bushehr Medical Centers during one Year Interval (1385-1386)

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin Zahmatkeshan; Razieh Bagherzadeh; Kamran Mirzaie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Medication errors refer to inappropriate use of drugs, can lead to harmful and serious consequent. Many factors contribute to incidence of these errors. To investigate this factors a descriptive analytic study was done that assess clinical staff medication errors in Bushehr medical centers. Methods: The participants were 400 clinical staff, including nurses, midwives and nurse assistances to complete designed medication errors questionnaire. This questionnaire include 2 parts, par...

  14. Smoking behavior among hospital staff still influences attitudes and counseling on smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, Ingrid; Ladelund, Steen

    2004-01-01

    Smoking among health professionals has been shown to influence smoking-related knowledge and counseling in clinical practice. The evidence regarding smoking as a risk factor has increased in the past decade. The present study was carried out in 2000 and investigated the associations between...... individual smoking behavior among hospital staff and (a). smoking-related knowledge, (b). attitudes toward counseling on smoking, and (c). self-reported smoking-related counseling provided by the staff. The study was based on a survey using self-administered questionnaires given to all hospital staff...... in a large university hospital in Denmark. Altogether, 82% of staff (2561) returned a completed questionnaire. Analyses focused on a subsample consisting of health professionals in the clinical wards (1429). Multivariate analyses were performed in which smoking-related knowledge, attitudes toward smoking...

  15. Is nurse managers' leadership style related to Japanese staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yoshimi; Fukahori, Hiroki; Sato, Kana; Nishida, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    To determine if nurse managers' leadership style is related to Japanese staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital. In Western countries, nurse managers' transformational leadership style has been found to increase staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital. However, there are few studies examining this relationship in the context of acute care hospitals in Japan. Staff nurses completed measures of their nurse managers' perceived leadership style and factors related to their own affective commitment. The association between affective commitment and perception of leadership style was assessed with multiple logistic regression. Of 736 questionnaires distributed, 579 (78.9%) were returned, and data from 396 (53.8%) fully completed questionnaires were analysed. The intellectual stimulation aspect of transformational leadership positively increased staff nurses' affective commitment (odds ratio: 2.23). Nurse managers' transactional and laissez-faire leadership styles were not related to affective commitment among staff nurses. The intellectual stimulation aspect of transformational leadership may increase the retention of staff nurses through enhanced affective commitment. To increase staff nurses' affective commitment to their hospital, we suggest that hospital administrators equip nurse managers with intellectual stimulation skills. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Paper- or Web-Based Questionnaire Invitations as a Method for Data Collection: Cross-Sectional Comparative Study of Differences in Response Rate, Completeness of Data, and Financial Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Jonas Fynboe; Huibers, Linda; Christensen, Bo; Christensen, Morten Bondo

    2018-01-23

    Paper questionnaires have traditionally been the first choice for data collection in research. However, declining response rates over the past decade have increased the risk of selection bias in cross-sectional studies. The growing use of the Internet offers new ways of collecting data, but trials using Web-based questionnaires have so far seen mixed results. A secure, online digital mailbox (e-Boks) linked to a civil registration number became mandatory for all Danish citizens in 2014 (exemption granted only in extraordinary cases). Approximately 89% of the Danish population have a digital mailbox, which is used for correspondence with public authorities. We aimed to compare response rates, completeness of data, and financial costs for different invitation methods: traditional surface mail and digital mail. We designed a cross-sectional comparative study. An invitation to participate in a survey on help-seeking behavior in out-of-hours care was sent to two groups of randomly selected citizens from age groups 30-39 and 50-59 years and parents to those aged 0-4 years using either traditional surface mail (paper group) or digital mail sent to a secure online mailbox (digital group). Costs per respondent were measured by adding up all costs for handling, dispatch, printing, and work salary and then dividing the total figure by the number of respondents. Data completeness was assessed by comparing the number of missing values between the two methods. Socioeconomic variables (age, gender, family income, education duration, immigrant status, and job status) were compared both between respondents and nonrespondents and within these groups to evaluate the degree of selection bias. A total 3600 citizens were invited in each group; 1303 (36.29%) responded to the digital invitation and 1653 (45.99%) to the paper invitation (difference 9.66%, 95% CI 7.40-11.92). The costs were €1.51 per respondent for the digital group and €15.67 for paper group respondents. Paper

  17. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  18. Screening for depression: integrating training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Gwyneth; Holloway, Edith E; Craig, Graeme; Hepi, Niky; Coad, Samantha; Keeffe, Jill E; Lamoureux, Ecosse L

    2012-12-01

    To describe the integration of depression screening training into the professional development programme for low vision rehabilitation staff and report on staff evaluation of this training. Pre-post intervention study, in a single population of low vision rehabilitation staff. Three hundred and thirty-six staff from Australia's largest low vision rehabilitation organization, Vision Australia. Staff completed the depression screening and referral training as part of a wider professional development programme. A pre-post-training questionnaire was administered to all staff. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to determine differences in self-reported knowledge, confidence, barriers to recognition and management of depression between baseline and post training. One hundred and seventy-two participants completed both questionnaires. Following training, participants reported an increased knowledge of depression, were more likely to respond to depression in their clients and reported to be more confident in managing depression (P training incorporating more active and 'hands-on' sessions are likely to be required. This training is a promising first step in integrating a depression screening tool into low vision rehabilitation practice. Further work is needed to determine the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice and to assess clients' acceptability and outcomes. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  19. Nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in psychiatric in-patient care: Patient and staff experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salberg, Johanna; Folke, Fredrik; Ekselius, Lisa; Öster, Caisa

    2018-02-15

    A promising intervention in mental health in-patient care is behavioural activation (BA). Interventions based on BA can be used by mental health nurses and other staff members. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients' and staff members' experiences of a nursing staff-led behavioural group intervention in mental health in-patient care. The intervention was implemented at three adult acute general mental health in-patient wards in a public hospital setting in Sweden. A self-administrated questionnaire, completed by 84 patients and 34 nurses and nurse assistants, was administered, and nonparametric data analysed using descriptive statistics. Our findings revealed that both patients and nursing staff ranked nursing care and care environment as important aspects in the recovery process. Patients and staff members reported overall positive experiences of the group sessions. Patients with higher frequencies of attendance and patients satisfied with overall care had a more positive attitude towards the intervention. A more positive experience of being a group leader was reported by staff members who had been leading groups more than ten times. The most common impeding factor during implementation, reported by staff members, was a negative attitude to change. Conducive factors were having support from a psychologist and the perception that patients were showing interest. These positive experiences reported by patients and nursing staff, combined with previous research in this field, are taking us one step further in evaluating group sessions based on BA as a meaningful nursing intervention in mental health in-patient care. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  20. Effect of music therapy on oncologic staff bystanders: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Magill, Lucanne

    2009-06-01

    Oncologic work can be satisfying but also stressful, as staff support patients and families through harsh treatment effects, uncertain illness trajectories, and occasional death. Although formal support programs are available, no research on the effects of staff witnessing patients' supportive therapies exists. This research examines staff responses to witnessing patient-focused music therapy (MT) programs in two comprehensive cancer centers. In Study 1, staff were invited to anonymously complete an open-ended questionnaire asking about the relevance of a music therapy program for patients and visitors (what it does; whether it helps). In Study 2, staff were theoretically sampled and interviewed regarding the personal effects of witnessing patient-centered music therapy. Data from each study were comparatively analyzed according to grounded theory procedures. Positive and negative cases were evident and data saturation arguably achieved. In Study 1, 38 staff unexpectedly described personally helpful emotional, cognitive, and team effects and consequent improved patient care. In Study 2, 62 staff described 197 multiple personal benefits and elicited patient care improvements. Respondents were mostly nursing (57) and medical (13) staff. Only three intrusive effects were reported: audibility, initial suspicion, and relaxation causing slowing of work pace. A substantive grounded theory emerged applicable to the two cancer centers: Staff witnessing MT can experience personally helpful emotions, moods, self-awarenesses, and teamwork and thus perceive improved patient care. Intrusive effects are uncommon. Music therapy's benefits for staff are attributed to the presence of live music, the human presence of the music therapist, and the observed positive effects in patients and families. Patient-centered oncologic music therapy in two cancer centers is an incidental supportive care modality for staff, which can reduce their stress and improve work environments and perceived

  1. Closing an open psychiatric ward: organizational change and its effect on staff uncertainty, self-efficacy, and professional functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Semyon; Shor, Razya; Kigli-Shemesh, Ronit; Gun Usishkin, Monica; Kagan, Ilya

    2013-04-01

    Converting an open psychiatric ward to a closed one can be threatening and stressful for the medical and nursing staff involved. This study describes the effects of this change, in particular the before-after correlation among self-efficacy, professional functioning, and uncertainty. Forty-four staff participated, completing pre-/poststructured questionnaires. Uncertainty was higher before the conversion than after the conversion. Professional functioning declined after the conversion. Self-efficacy was positively correlated with pre- and postconversion functioning, but negatively correlated with postconversion uncertainty. It is important to prepare staff for this significant organizational change. Suggestions for prechange interventions are offered. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Secondhand smoke in psychiatric units: patient and staff misperceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Sureda, Xisca; Martínez-Sánchez, Jose M; Fu, Marcela; Saltó, Esteve; Gual, Antoni; Fernández, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    Mental health units have usually been exempted from complete smoke-free policies. The aim of this study was to compare the self-reported level of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) of patients and staff in psychiatric units to objective measures, and examine preference for different types of smoking bans. Cross-sectional survey about ban preferences and self-reported exposure to SHS by means of a self-administered questionnaire administered to patients and staff from 65 inpatient psychiatric units in Catalonia (95.5% of all units). We measured air concentrations of particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5 in µg/m(3)) as a marker of SHS in these units. 600 patients and 575 professionals completed the questionnaire. 78.7% of them were objectively exposed to SHS (PM2.5>10 μm/m(3)) but 56.9% of patients and 33.6% of staff believed they were not exposed at all and 41.6% of patients and 28.4% of staff believed the environment was not at all unhealthy. Nurses had a higher smoking prevalence than psychiatrists (35.8% vs 17.2%; psmoke-free bans. It is particularly noteworthy that less that one-third of mental health staff supported smoke-free units, suggesting an urgent need for further education about the harmful health effects of SHS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. The Importance of School Staff Referrals and Follow-Up in Connecting High School Students to HIV and STD Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N.; Liddon, Nicole; Adkins, Susan Hocevar; Lesesne, Catherine A.; Hebert, Andrew; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Rose, India D.; Morris, Elana

    2017-01-01

    This study examined predictors of having received HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and having been referred by school staff for HIV/STD testing. In 2014, students in seven high schools completed paper-and-pencil questionnaires assessing demographic characteristics, sexual behavior, referrals for HIV/STD testing, and HIV/STD…

  4. School Staff Perceptions of Well-Being and Experience of an Intervention to Promote Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrocks, Louise

    2014-01-01

    An intervention was carried out with primary school staff to promote well-being with weekly sessions of a project which became known as Chill and Chat. Data were gathered via questionnaires completed before and after the project and from three focus groups (before, during and after the intervention), and were analysed using thematic analysis.…

  5. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  6. Nursing leadership practices as perceived by Finnish nursing staff: high ethics, less feedback and rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneh, Victor Okey; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Kvist, Tarja

    2012-03-01

    The purpose was to examine the perceptions of Finnish nursing staff of their nursing leadership and how nurses' background variables are associated with their perceptions. Nursing leadership practices and behaviours influence nursing staff work performances. In Finland, studies examining leadership practices from the perspective of nursing staff are limited. This quantitative, cross-sectional study involved four hospitals in Eastern Finland. A total of 1497 nursing staff completed the structured electronic questionnaire. In general, seven out of 10 nursing staff held positive perceptions about leadership ethics and their professional development. Over one-third of nursing staff were dissatisfied with the nursing process and with their feedback and rewards, while only four out of 10 evaluated their nursing director either in a positive or negative way. There were no significant differences regarding their perceptions when different background variables were taken into account. Nursing leadership needs the opinion of nursing staff in order to help formulate a favourable work environment where they can utilize their full potential and improve nursing care. Nursing staff expect feedback and rewards, involvement in the decision making process, and clear vision from nurse leaders. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Acceptability of motivational interviewing among hemodialysis clinic staff: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronk, Nikole J; Russell, Cynthia L; Knowles, Norma; Matteson, Michelle; Peace, Leanne; Ponferrada, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the acceptability of motivational interviewing among a group of dialysis clinic staff. A non-experimental, posttest-only design was used for this pilot study. Dialysis clinic staff (N = 8) were recruited from a Midwestern non-profit, freestanding hemodialysis clinic. Staff received three three-hour training sessions in motivational interviewing and monthly individual coaching sessions with a motivational interviewing expert for three months. Staff then completed anonymous questionnaires and participated in a focus group discussion. Staff reported liking the motivational interviewing skills they learned and finding them useful; however, staff reported disagreement with statements indicating they used motivational interviewing skills effectively on a regular basis, that their work environments were supportive of motivational interviewing, and that motivational interviewing was consistent with their natural patient care approach. Results indicate that staff are receptive to motivational interviewing skills, and with sufficient training and feedback to enhance confidence, dialysis staff will develop further motivational interviewing competence and comfort for long-term use.

  8. Attachment and coping of dementia care staff: The role of staff attachment style, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Taru-Maija; Cheston, Richard I L; Dallos, Rudi; Smart, Cordet A

    2014-07-01

    Past research suggests that dementia care staff are vulnerable to the development of burnout, which has implications for staff well-being and hence the quality of care for people with dementia. Studying personal vulnerability factors in burnout is important as it can guide staff training and support. Attachment theory suggests that adult attachment styles affect caregiving relationships and individuals' responses to stress, providing a framework for understanding caregivers' styles of coping. This cross-sectional survey study examined relationships between staff attachment styles, geriatric nursing self-efficacy, and approaches to dementia in burnout. Seventy-seven members of dementia care staff working on inpatient wards for older people completed self-report questionnaires. Insecure attachment, lower levels of self-efficacy, and more optimistic attitudes in staff were related to higher levels of burnout. Staff training on the role of attachment in dementia care is recommended. Further research is required to explore mediating factors between adult attachment styles and burnout. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Behaviour Questionnaire

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms signifying a hostile-aggressive dimension, factor 2 an anxious-fearful dimension, and factor 3 emerged as a ... Objective. This paper examines the factor structure of the. Yoruba translation of the Children's Behaviour Questionnaire .... Twitches/mannerisms/tics. Sucks thumb/finger. Bites nails. Often disobedient.

  11. Asthma in a university campus: a survey of students and staff of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhabor, Gregory E; Obaseki, Daniel O; Awopeju, Olayemi F; Ijadunola, Kayode T; Adewole, Olufemi O

    2016-01-01

    Asthma continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. But, its burden among adult populations in university campuses is not well described. Through a multistage cluster sampling of students and staff of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, we obtained a representative sample, each for students and staff. We administered the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) screening questionnaire to all the respondents. A subgroup did a spirometry test and completed a detailed questionnaire. Asthma was considered "possible", if a respondent provided affirmative response to symptoms of "wheezing or whistling", "attack of shortness of breath", "diagnosed attack of asthma" in the last 12 months or "currently taking medicines for asthma". From population of 13,750 students and 1428 staff of the university, we systematically sampled 2750 (20%) students and all the staff. Amongst these, 2372 students and 455 staff completed the screening questionnaire. The mean age (SD) of the responders was 21.9 (3.2) and 46.1 (8.9) for students and staff and most of them were men; 58.6% and 65.9%, respectively. While an estimated 2.6% (95% CI: 1.7-3.5) of students had an asthma attack in the preceding 12 months, 14.5% (95% CI: 12.5-16.5) and 25.2% (95% CI: 22.8-27.7) reported shortness of breath and nocturnal cough, respectively. The staff population reported fewer symptoms. The proportion with "possible asthma" was 18.2% (95% CI: 16.0-20.4) for students and 8.0% (95% CI: 5.4-10.7) for staff. The prevalence of asthma is high among students and staff of Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria.

  12. Diet History Questionnaire: Canadian Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  13. Improving staff perception of a safety climate with crew resource management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L

    2017-06-01

    Communication failure is one of the top root causes in patient safety adverse events. Crew resource management (CRM) is a team building communication process intended to improve patient safety by improving team dynamics. First, to describe implementation of CRM in a Veterans Affair (VA) surgical service. Second, to assess whether staff CRM training is related to improvement in staff perception of a safety climate. Mandatory CRM training was implemented for all surgical service staff at a VA Hospital at 0 and 12 mo. Safety climate questionnaires were completed by operating room staff at a baseline, 6 and 12 mo after the initial CRM training. Participants reported improvement on all 27 points on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo compared with the baseline. At 12 mo, there was sustained improvement in 23 of the 27 areas. This is the first published report about the effect of CRM training on staff perception of a safety climate in a VA surgical service. We demonstrate that CRM training can be successfully implemented widespread in a surgical program. Overall, there was improvement in 100% of areas assessed on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo after CRM training. By 1 y, this improvement was sustained in 23 of 27 areas, with the areas of greatest improvement being the performance of briefings, collaboration between nurses and doctors, valuing nursing input, knowledge about patient safety, and institutional promotion of a patient safety climate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Awareness of biomedical waste management among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in Amritsar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Ramandeep S; Manchanda, Adesh; Singh, Simarpreet; Verma, Nitin; Padda, Sarfaraz

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine awareness of biomedical waste (BMW) management policies and practices among dental professionals and auxiliary staff in a dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar, India, to inform the development of future policies for effective implementation of BMW rules. The study involved 160 staff members at the Amritsar hospital/clinics (80 dentists and 80 auxiliary staff) to whom a questionnaire was distributed regarding policies, practices and awareness relating to BMW. The questionnaire was first piloted. Completed questionnaires were returned anonymously. The resulting data were statistically tested using the chi-square test for differences between the dentists and auxiliary staff. In respect of BMW management policies, there was a highly significant difference in the responses of the dentists, whose answers suggested far greater knowledge than that of the auxiliaries (Pmanagement practices, the dentists were significantly more aware (Pwaste collection in the hospital and the disposal of various items into different colour-coded bags. As for employee education/awareness, there was a significant difference (Pmanagement among dental auxiliary staff in the dental hospital/clinics in Amritsar and a lack of awareness of some aspects among dentists who work in the hospital/clinics. The results provide the hospital authorities with data upon which they can develop a strategy for improving BMW management.

  15. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    in communication and interaction, Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia (SCA) was adapted and implemented in a large neurological department at Rigshospitalet-Glostrup in Copenhagen. Method 152 staff members representing different health professionals were assigned to one of eleven courses during a six...... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... in communication, also showed significant improvements across all staff groups. After the course, more time to spend with patients was perceived as the most important factor to further increase communication success with PWA. Conclusion The results show that interdisciplinary SCA-courses successfully increase...

  16. [Impact of a disaster preparedness training program on health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Cotanda, Cristina; Rebordosa Martínez, Mónica; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, Victoria; Luaces Cubells, Carles

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a disaster preparedness training program in a Paediatric Emergency Department (PED). A quasi-experimental study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire that was distributed to health care providers of a PED in a tertiary paediatric hospital. The questions concerned the disaster plan (DP), including theoretical and practical aspects. Questionnaires were distributed and completed in January 2014 (period 1) and November 2014 (period 2). The disaster training program includes theoretical and practical sessions. A total of 110 questionnaires were collected in period 1, and 80 in period 2. Almost three-quarters (71.3%) of PED staff attended the theoretical sessions, and 43.8% attended the practical sessions. The application of this training program significantly improved knowledge about the DP, but no improvement was observed in the practical questions. PED staff felt more prepared to face a disaster after the training program (15.5% vs. 41.8%, Ptraining program improved some knowledge about the disaster plan, but it has not improved responses in practical situations, which may be due to the low attendance at practical sessions and the time between the training program and the questionnaires. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing obstetric patient experience: a SERVQUAL questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, Francesca; Narayan, Harini

    2013-01-01

    Across health services, there is a drive to respond to patient feedback and to incorporate their views into service improvement. The SERVQUAL method has been used in several clinical settings to quantify whether services meet patient expectations. However, work has been limited in the obstetric population. This paper seeks to address these issues. This study used an adapted SERVQUAL questionnaire to assess a reconfigured antenatal clinic service. The most important care aspects, as rated by patients, were used to construct the SERVQUAL questions. The questionnaire was administered to eligible women in two parts. The first was completed before their first hospital antenatal appointment and the second either at home (a postal-chasing exercise) or while waiting for their next appointment. Only fully completed questionnaires (both parts) were analysed. Service strengths included staff politeness, patient respect and privacy. Areas for improvement included hand cleanliness, women's involvement in decision making and communicating risk. However, the low variability in patient responses makes concrete conclusions difficult and methodological issues complicate evaluating hand cleanliness. The new antenatal clinic service received low negative weighted and un-weighted overall scores. The SERVQUAL measure was developed from patient feedback and used to further improve services. The SERVQUAL-based measure allowed an internal evaluation of patient experience and highlighted areas for improvement. However, without validation, the questionnaire cannot be used as an outcome measure and variation between published SERVQUAL questionnaires makes comparisons difficult. This highlights an important balance in patient evaluation measures--between locally responsive and externally comparable. The SERVQUAL approach allows healthcare teams to evaluate patient experience, while accounting for variation in their expectations and priorities. The study highlights several areas that are

  18. Knowledge about epilepsy by students and staff of a school in Fortaleza-CE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia Maria Mendes Vasconcelos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the knowledge of teachers, students and employees of a school about epilepsy. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional, quantitative study held in a school in Fortaleza - CE. The universe consisted of all students and staff at the school who met the following inclusion criteria: to be a student or employee of the night shift, to be 18 years old or above. Data collection occurred in September 2007, by applying a structured questionnaire. From 69 questionnaires, 50 were completed by students, 11 by teachers and eight by other school employees. We divided the sample into two groups: staff (employees and teachers and students. Results: The results show that 22% of staff believed that one of the forms of epilepsy transmission occurred through saliva. It was found that 98% of staff and 94% of students said that epilepsy is a neurological disorder. Concerning the control of the disease, 94% of students and 78% of staff believed that it occurs by taking the medication daily. Among the respondents, 29% of staff and 22% of students felt that people with epilepsy have difficulty in school learning. It was also observed that most participants scored appropriate procedures to be adopted in the seizure. Conclusion: The research determined gaps in the knowledge about epilepsy in the studied sample.

  19. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  20. Pilot study of Myers Briggs Type Indicator personality profiling in emergency department senior medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Russell; Brown, Terry

    2005-06-01

    To study the viability of using the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) in senior ED medical staff and to examine what trends, if any, in personality types exist within the specialty. A pilot cross-sectional survey was undertaken during which a standard MBTI questionnaire was sent anonymously to a convenience sample of senior ED medical staff in Tasmania and South Australia. Completed surveys after a second mailing were analysed and the results collated. Of 82 senior ED medical staff surveyed, 68 returned completed questionnaires (response rate 83%). The single most common personality group in the cohort was the (Extrovert/Intuitive/Thinking/Judging) ENTJ type exhibited by 12 (17.7%, 95% CI 9.4-28.7%) clinicians in the cohort. This group is present at a rate of 3% in the general population. In terms of individual traits, Introversion was exhibited by 33 (48.5%, 95% CI 36.2-61%), Intuitive traits by 40 (58.8%, 95% CI 46.2-70.6%), Thinking traits by 40 (58.8%, 95% CI 46.2-70.6%) and Judging traits by 53 (77.9%, 95% CI 66.2-87.1%) of our cohort of senior ED medical staff. Our senior ED medical staff cohort suggests notable variations from the general population in terms of their MBTI profiles.

  1. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association's work and help promote and defend the staff's interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  2. Knowledge, attitude and practices of staffs towards Post-exposure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to asses the level of knowledge attitudes and practices of (PEP) against HIV among surgical staffs. 190 questionnaires were sent to staffs in the department of surgery but One twenty nine (68%) was returned. Questionnaires contained items related to awareness of occupational exposure to ...

  3. Translation, Cultural Adaptation, and Validation of Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) and Self-Complete Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) Questionnaires into the Greek Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistaki, Chrysanthi; Lyrakos, George; Drachtidi, Kalliopi; Stamatiou, Georgia; Kitsou, Maria-Chrysanthi; Kostopanagiotou, Georgia

    2016-06-01

    The LANSS and S-LANSS questionnaires represent two widely accepted and validated instruments used to assist the identification of neuropathic pain worldwide. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt, and validate the LANSS and S-LANSS questionnaires into the Greek language. Forward and backward translations of both questionnaires were performed from the English to Greek language. The final versions were assessed by a committee of clinical experts, and they were then pilot-tested in 20 patients with chronic pain. Both questionnaires were validated in 200 patients with chronic pain (100 patients for each questionnaire), using as the "gold standard" the diagnosis of a clinical expert in pain management. Sensitivity and specificity of questionnaires were assessed, as well as the internal consistency (using Cronbach's alpha coefficient) and correlation with the "gold standard" diagnosis (using Pearson correlation coefficient). Sensitivity and specificity of the LANSS questionnaire were calculated to be 82.76% and 95.24%, while for the S-LANSS 86.21% and 95.24%, respectively. Positive predictive value for neuropathic pain was 96% for the LANSS and 96.15% for the S-LANSS. Cronbach's alpha was revealed to be acceptable for both questionnaires (0.65 for LANSS and 0.67 for the S-LANSS), while a significant correlation was observed compared to the "gold standard" diagnosis (rLANSS   = 0.79 και tSLANSS   = 0.77, respectively, P = 0.01). The LANSS and the S-LANSS diagnostic tools have been translated and validated into the Greek language and can be adequately used to assist the identification of neuropathic pain in everyday clinical practice. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Clinical research should be a priority in the NHS - but what do genito-urinary medicine clinic staff think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rosa; Perry, Nicky; Phillips, Alan; Richardson, Daniel; Soni, Suneeta

    2015-02-01

    Clinical research improves patient care and is a government priority. We sought the opinions of genito-urinary medicine clinic staff regarding undertaking research, any barriers they perceived, and methods to optimise study recruitment. Questionnaires were offered to everyone working in the genito-urinary medicine clinic over a one-week period. In addition, four focus groups were held with genito-urinary medicine clinic staff. Forty-three questionnaires were completed. All respondents stated that research was important; however, 14.0% worried that it affected patient care and 16.3% would rather see patients without having to consider research. Doctors were more likely to enjoy discussing studies than other healthcare staff (p = 0.029) and were less likely to think that too many studies were being conducted at one time (p = 0.027). Forty staff attended the focus groups. Time, knowledge of studies, difficulty in broaching the topic of research and patient factors were cited as barriers to recruitment. Suggestions to improve recruitment included: greater multi-disciplinary team involvement; improving staff research knowledge; streamlining the research process; and patient education. Reasons for different attitudes between staff disciplines towards research included different training pathways and incentives to conduct research. The recommendations staff have made to help drive recruitment should be implemented in the genito-urinary medicine clinic. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  5. [Mental health problems among female staff in a provincial maternal and child health hospital: an investigation of 647 individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W J; Xia, J H; Lv, X; Li, L M

    2018-02-20

    Objective: To investigate the current status of depression and anxiety among female staff in a maternal and child health hospital, and to provide a basis for developing related prevention and intervention measures and promoting the mental health of female staff. Methods: The female staff from a provincial maternal and child health hospital completed a psycho-health questionnaire survey on Internet from June to October, 2016. The questionnaires used in the survey consisted of Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) , Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) , and Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) . The distribution features of mental health problems such as depression and anxiety were analyzed according to the results: of the questionnaire survey. Results Of all female staff surveyed, 42.04% showed depression symptoms, 28.90% showed anxiety symptoms, and 26.12% showed comorbid symptoms of depression and anxiety. Moderate or severe depression (anxiety) was mainly distributed among the female staff with comorbid symptoms (90.63% and 97.01%, respectively) . There were significant differences in the distribution of moderate or severe anxiety symptoms between the medical staff and nursing staff (χ(2)= 5.81, P =0.05) and between those with intermediate and junior professional titles (χ(2)=7.99, P =0.018) . As for SCL-90 results, the total score, total average score, and scores on factors of somatization, compulsion, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and anxiety in the female staff with comorbid symptoms, moderate or severe depression, and moderate or severe anxiety were significantly higher than the national norm ( P staff with comorbid symptoms than in the female staff with a single symptom and asymptomatic female staff (both P staff in the maternal and child health hospital, mainly characterized by comorbid symptoms of moderate or severe depression and anxiety. Comorbidity is accompanied by mental health problems such as interpersonal sensitivity, obsessive compulsion

  6. Cancer prevention and health promotion for people with intellectual disabilities: an exploratory study of staff knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, L M; Taggart, L; Cousins, W

    2011-03-01

    As people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are living longer, their chances of developing cancer also increases. However, recognising the early signs and symptoms of cancer in a population with cognitive impairment and communication difficulties poses difficulties for both family carers and professional care staff. Engagement in health promotion and cancer prevention activities is also a challenge; yet, people with ID have an equal right to these important public services as other members of the population. The aim of this study was to examine how care staff engaged in cancer prevention and health promotion activities on behalf of people with ID. This was an exploratory descriptive study using a postal survey design employing a questionnaire. Fifteen residential facilities for adults with ID were targeted within one geographic region of the UK. In total, 40 residential staff completed a questionnaire about their knowledge of the risk and protective factors of stomach, breast, cervical and testicular cancer. Staff then completed questionnaires regarding 90 adults with ID, recording details about body mass index (BMI), lifestyle choices (i.e. smoking, dietary intake), Helicobacter pylori testing, family history of cancer and staff's health promotion and cancer prevention activities with these individuals. The women with ID were reported to have significantly higher BMIs than the men with ID and only two people with ID had been tested for the H. pylori infection: potential risk factors for developing breast and stomach cancer, respectively. The majority of the staff reported that they did not receive training in cancer prevention. Likewise, the majority of the staff reported that they were unaware of the family histories of the people with ID in their care. Reports varied with how staff engaged with people with ID regarding stomach, breast, cervical and testicular cancer health promotion activities and cancer screening opportunities. Findings of this study show

  7. Changes in knowledge and attitudes of hospital environmental services staff: The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Brett G; White, Nicole; Farrington, Alison; Allen, Michelle; Page, Katie; Gardner, Anne; Halton, Kate; Riley, Thomas V; Gericke, Christian A; Paterson, David L; Graves, Nicholas; Hall, Lisa

    2018-03-14

    The Researching Effective Approaches to Cleaning in Hospitals (REACH) study tested a multimodal cleaning intervention in Australian hospitals. This article reports findings from a pre/post questionnaire, embedded into the REACH study, that was administered prior to the implementation of the intervention and at the conclusion of the study. A cross-sectional questionnaire, nested within a stepped-wedge trial, was administered. The REACH intervention was a cleaning bundle comprising 5 interdependent components. The questionnaire explored the knowledge, reported practice, attitudes, roles, and perceived organizational support of environmental services staff members in the hospitals participating in the REACH study. Environmental services staff members in 11 participating hospitals completed 616 pre- and 307 post-test questionnaires (n = 923). Increases in knowledge and practice were seen between the pre-and post-test questionnaires. Minimal changes were observed in attitudes regarding the role of cleaning and in perceived organizational support. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report changes in knowledge, attitudes, and perceived organizational support in environmental services staff members, in the context of a large multicenter clinical trial. In this underexplored group of hospital workers, findings suggest that environmental services staff members have a high level of knowledge related to cleaning practices and understand the importance of their role. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  9. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  10. [Opinions and attitudes of clinical staff on systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullan, A M; Fernández, E; Badia, M; Lorente, F; Malmierca, F; Zapatero, I

    2013-08-01

    Many factors affect the assessment and treatment of pain, among them being the knowledge and attitudes of clinical staff. The goal of this work was to determine the opinions and attitudes of clinical staff from two hospitals on the different aspects of the assessment and treatment of children's pain. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire issued to clinical staff. The questionnaire was given to the professionals, doctors, and nursing staff of the paediatric services of two hospitals, and to an incidental sample of paediatric doctors. Of the 146 questionnaires sent out, 105 were completed. Participants indicated that standardised scales and physiological recordings were the least frequently used methods to assess children's pain. Participants considered that pharmacological techniques for the treatment of pain were used more frequently than non-pharmacological techniques, at all ages. Participants acknowledged being significantly more knowledgeable about pharmacological methods to relieve paediatric pain than about non-pharmacological methods. There is margin for improvement in systems for the assessment and treatment of children's pain as regards the more frequent and standardised use of techniques and standardised tools for the assessment of pain, and the greater administration of non-pharmacological strategies for its treatment. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. CHIEF OF STAFF FINANCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internal Audit, Military. Museums, Documentation. Service, Language. Service, Financial Co-ordination, Chief Pay Mas- ter, Programming and Budget, Electronic Data. Processing and Expenditure Control. Chief of Staff Finance. With effect from 13 February 1978 Chief of Staff. Management Services became Chief of Staff.

  12. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The Staff Association will shortly be renewing the mandate of half of the Staff Council. This is an opportunity for you to become more directly involved in the Staff Association’s work and help promote and defend the staff’s interests and, more broadly, those of the Organization itself.

  13. Post-Cruise Questionnaire - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Post-Cruise Questionnaire is a mandatory post trip legal document that observers fill out after every trip they have completed.

  14. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  15. Pediatric first aid knowledge and attitudes among staff in the preschools of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Jiang, Fan; Jin, Xingming; Qiu, Yulan; Shen, Xiaoming

    2012-08-14

    Unintentional injury remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children worldwide. The aims of this study were to assess a baseline level of first aid knowledge and overall attitudes regarding first aid among staff members in Shanghai preschools. A cross-sectional study was carried out among the staff members at selected preschools. A stratified random sampling method was first used to identify suitable subjects. Data were obtained using a multiple-choice questionnaire. A standardized collection of demographics was performed and participants were given the aforementioned questionnaire to indicate knowledge of and attitudes toward first aid. 1067 subjects completed the questionnaire. None of the surveyed employees answered all questions correctly; only 39 individuals (3.7%) achieved passing scores. The relative number of correct answers to specific questions ranged from 16.5% to 90.2%. In particular, subjects lacked knowledge regarding first aid for convulsive seizures (only 16.5% answered correctly), chemical injuries to the eye (23%), inhaled poison (27.6%), and choking and coughing (30.1%). A multiple linear regression analysis showed scores were significantly higher among staff members with more education, those who had received first aid training before or were already healthcare providers, younger employees, and staff members from rural districts. Most employees agreed that giving first aid was helpful; the vast majority felt that it was important and useful for them to learn pediatric first aid. The level of first-aid knowledge among preschool staffs in Shanghai was low. There is an urgent need to educate staff members regarding first aid practices and the various risk factors relating to specific injuries.

  16. QUESTIONNAIRE 5YR 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    CERN must remain the centre of excellence that it has been for the last sixty years. Therefore, the Organization must continue to be able to attract, motivate and retain the best specialists coming from all the Member States. This is why, every five years, on the occasion of a five-yearly review, our employment conditions are compared with bodies having similar activities.In order to prepare the next five-yearly review, the topics of which will be decided by the CERN Council in June 2014, the Staff Association has drawn up a questionnaire that gives you the opportunity to tell us what you think about your current employment conditions. You can also indicate how you wish to see them evolve, and to help you we present some proposals for improvement on which you can give your opinion. Above all, do not hesitate, by using the comments’ fields available in the questionnaire, to formulate your own suggestions in all areas of your conditions of employment that are of interest to you. Your replies will hel...

  17. [Attitudes and practices towards seasonal influenza vaccination amongst French hospital staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurette, Max; Pinzelli, Pierre; Yordanov Sandev, Aleksandar; Nock, Francis

    2017-04-27

    This survey intends to describe the attitudes towards vaccination amongst the hospital staff in the region of Castres, in the south-west of France, and their influenza vaccination coverage. A questionnaire was attached to all pay slips in March 2014 and 471 questionnaires were completed (return rate: 22.4%). Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage rate was similar to that reported in other French surveys. Paramedical personnel were less commonly immunized against influenza compared to medical personnel and age was the major factor associated with vaccination. Three quarters of the non-immunized hospital personnel did not wish to be vaccinated against influenza. Nearly 50% of respondents believed that healthcare personnel do not have to be role models regarding vaccination. The arguments considered most compelling in favour of vaccination are protection of the family, then patient protection and finally protection of other staff members. A demand for accurate scientific information was expressed by respondents, preferably delivered at their workplace.

  18. Use of mobile phones by medical staff at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Barbados: evidence for both benefit and harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, J; Carter, A O; Campbell, M H; Gibbons, N; Powlett, C; Moseley, H; Lewis, D; Carter, T

    2008-10-01

    All members of medical staff, including students, were asked to participate in a self-administered questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and care. Participants' phones were cultured for micro-organisms. Healthcare professionals working in close proximity to sensitive equipment were surveyed concerning adverse events associated with mobile phones. Telephone operators were asked to monitor time elapsed as they attempted to contact medical staff by various methods. Of 266 medical staff and students at the time of the study, 116 completed questionnaires (response rate=44%). Almost all (98%) used mobile phones: 67% used their mobile phones for hospital-related matters; 47% reported using their phone while attending patients. Only 3% reported washing their hands after use and 53% reported never cleaning their phone. In total, 101 mobile phones were cultured for micro-organisms; 45% were culture-positive and 15% grew Gram-negative pathogens. The survey of staff working in close proximity to sensitive equipment revealed only one report of minor interference with life-saving equipment. Telephone operators were able to contact medical staff within 2 min most easily by mobile phone. Mobile phones were used widely by staff and were considered by most participants as a more efficient means of communication. However, microbial contamination is a risk associated with the infrequent cleaning of phones. Hospitals should develop policies to address the hygiene of mobile phones.

  19. An analysis of knowledge and attitudes of hospice staff towards organ and tissue donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wale, J; Arthur, A; Faull, C

    2014-03-01

    Only a minority of hospice patients eligible to donate tissue and organs choose to do so. Hospice care staff play a key role in discussions about donation, but their willingness to engage in these discussions and their understanding of issues around tissue and organ donation is poorly understood. To (i) identify factors associated with the wish of hospice doctors, nurses and healthcare assistants to donate their own organs after death; (ii) survey the experience of discussing the subject with patients; (iii) determine staff members' knowledge of organ and tissue donation and (iv) identify factors associated with knowledge of organ and tissue donation. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of hospice care staff. 76 of the 94 care staff of one large UK hospice completed and returned the questionnaire. Staff wishing to donate their organs after death (43/76 56.6%) were more likely to be doctors or nurses than healthcare assistants (p=0.011) and more likely to have discussed organ or tissue donation with their family (pdonation with patients had more years' experience (p=0.045) and had similarly discussed donation with their own family (p=0.039). Those with greater knowledge were more likely to have discussed organ or tissue donation with a patient (p=0.042). A reluctance to instigate discussions about organ and tissue donation may prevent palliative patients and their families being allowed the opportunity to donate. Suboptimal knowledge among hospice staff suggests the need for greater liaison between hospice staff, and the organ and tissue donation teams.

  20. Exploring nursing staff's attitudes and use of music for older people with dementia in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Wen-Li; Chang, Shu-Min; Smith, Graeme D

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to explore nursing staff's attitudes and use of music for older people with dementia in long-term care facilities. Music has shown positive outcomes in managing behavioural symptoms of older people with dementia. Older people living in long-term care facilities often do not have access to trained music therapists. Nursing staff provide the majority of direct care for institutionalised older people with dementia, therefore, will be the most appropriate personnel to learn and implement music therapy for those with dementia. To date, no studies have explored nursing staff's attitudes and use of music for those with dementia. A cross-sectional research design was used. A convenience sample of 285 nursing staff caring for those with dementia in long-term care facilities in Taiwan were recruited. Participants received a self-administered questionnaire consisted of items exploring nursing staff's attitude and use of music for those with dementia. A total of 214 participants completed the questionnaires, giving a response rate of 75·1%. Most nursing staff held positive attitudes towards use of music for older people with dementia (mean=84·89, range 23-115), but only 30·6% (n=66) had used music for those with dementia in practice. The majority perceived that they had limited knowledge and skills about use of music (72·9%). Over half of the participants reported that they lacked resources and time to implement music therapy in practice. Nursing staff need more formal training to use music for those with dementia. Nursing staff can be the suitable personnel to learn easily and implement music therapy as a part of routine activity programmes for those with dementia. Appropriately trained nursing staff in long-term care facilities who use music therapy may help improve the mental health of older people with dementia. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Reasons for high retention in pediatric clinical trials: comparison of participant and staff responses in the Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Lynette; Schoenfeld, Elinor; Thomas, Jennifer; Baldwin, Catherine; McLeod, Jennifer; Smith, Justin; Owens, Robert; Hyman, Leslie

    2005-01-01

    The Correction of Myopia Evaluation Trial (COMET), a randomized, multicenter clinical trial of myopia progression in children, had an exceptionally high retention rate of 98.5% (462/469) at three years of follow-up. The present investigation was designed to evaluate and compare the reasons for COMET's high retention rate according to participating families and clinical center staff. Families (n = 411) and staff (n = 35) completed a confidential 19-item questionnaire by indicating families' levels of preference for each item, and rating its importance in keeping families in the study. The questionnaire evaluated study features in four categories: staff characteristics, operational aspects, specific study elements, and incentives. Results showed that most families viewed the study very favorably. Features that appealed to 90% or more families and promoted continued study participation included staff attributes such as friendliness, responsiveness and encouragement, and aspects pertaining to standard of care such as completeness of eye exam, quality of eye care and free eyeglasses. Compared to families, staff tended to underestimate the importance of the following features for retention: seeing the same staff at each visit, appointment reminders, center location, newsletters, commitment to the study, being part of a nationwide study, length of the study, association with a college of optometry, completeness of eye exam, and eye drops (p staff responses also revealed less preferred components of the study protocol (e.g., eye drops), to which families might have been reluctant to respond unfavorably. Our findings highlight the importance of intangible factors such as staff attributes and participants' study commitment in maintaining high retention rates, and the usefulness of surveying both families and staff.

  2. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING STAFF AND PARTICIPANT TRAINING (SOP-2.27)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP describes the method to train project staff and participants to collect various field samples and questionnaire data for the study. The training plan consists of two separate components: project staff training and participant training. Before project activities begin,...

  3. Stroke Research Staff's Experiences of Seeking Consent from People with Communication Difficulties: Results of a National Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayes, Mark J; Palmer, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    The process of obtaining informed consent from people with communication difficulties is challenging. An online survey was conducted to explore the experiences of stroke research staff in seeking consent from this population. To identify how stroke research staff seek consent from people with communication difficulties, potential barriers to effective practice, and ways to improve practice. All research staff working for the National Institute for Health Research Stroke Research Network in England were invited to complete an online questionnaire. Data were collected anonymously between March and June 2013. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and qualitative data were coded using thematic analysis. Seventy-five research staff responded, corresponding to a response rate of 10%. There were 97% who had sought consent from people with communication difficulties and 52% did this regularly; 65% had received training in consenting this population. Most staff were aware of appropriate methods for supporting communication needs, but only 18% regularly used accessible information and 35% regularly used augmentative communication techniques. Lack of specific training and lack of access to ethically approved materials were suggested barriers to using these methods. Respondents indicated that people with impaired communication may be excluded from the consent process because they are not eligible for inclusion in studies or because assent is obtained from third parties. For research staff to work more effectively with this population, study protocols need to be more inclusive of people with communication difficulties, and staff need better access to ethically approved, accessible communication resources and appropriate training.

  4. An Implementation Model of Teaching Evaluation Questionnaire System Based on Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yung Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The teaching evaluation questionnaire in the university has been an essential routine. The administrative staff of academic affairs shall obey the rules, fairness, and valid principles within the period of finishing teaching evaluation questionnaire. To ensure the accuracy and timeliness of the large number of questionnaires, it makes the administrative staff of academic affairs face the challenge and pressure if the students are too many. Program potency low or bad often came from the development staff being familiar with bad program development idea; the bad designs of system program in itself causes the factor proportion to occupy more higher, because the similar application program mode of writing is, respectively, different. However, the exploiter may find the method of the little consumption of system resources to complete the similar work task. We develop the software service of cloud platform and the educational administration personnel operates process in the software service of cloud platform. The cloud platform reduces the system wait and calculation time of questionnaire, improves and simplifies system operation flow, and promotes 10 times of program efficiencies as well as solving the load overweight problem of potency bottleneck.

  5. Evaluation of the 'Ladder to the Moon, Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme' staff training: Two quasi-experimental case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Azucena; Wenborn, Jennifer; Swinson, Tom; Orrell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the CCSEP on care home staff in two care settings for older people in one nursing home and one residential home. Care homes provide personal care and accommodation for older people. The English Dementia Strategy aims to improve the quality of service provision for people with dementia. This includes specific mention of improving the quality of life in care homes and as such includes objectives related to developing the workforce knowledge and skills. The Ladder to the Moon Culture Change Studio Engagement Programme (CCSEP) is a staff training approach based on the Positive Psychology framework that uses theatre- and film-based activities. This study used a wait-list controlled design. However, the data analysis plan was amended to reflect difficulties in data collection, and a quasi-experimental case study approach was consequently utilised. Outcome measures for staff attitudes and beliefs were as follows: Sense of Competence in Dementia Care Staff; Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire; Job Satisfaction Index; Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory; and Scale of Positive and Negative Experience. The Quality of Interaction Schedule (QUIS) was used to observe changes in staff-resident interaction. Fifty staff in two care homes completed the questionnaires and forty-one undertook formal CCSEP training. In Home A (nursing home), there was no significant change in any of the measures. In Home B (residential home), the QUIS showed an increase in positive interactions post intervention; a significant increase in the Building Relationship subscale of Sense of Competence; and a significant increase in staff sense of hopefulness towards people with dementia. The Brief Learning Transfer System Inventory showed a significant decrease post-intervention. The intervention did not significantly affect the happiness or job satisfaction of care home staff. The results of this study provide tentative evidence about the efficacy of this staff training

  6. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  7. [Evaluation of new technologies by residents and staff in an institutional setting. Findings of the BETAGT project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, K; Oswald, F; Wahl, H-W; Heusel, C; Antfang, P; Becker, C

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the substudy that was conducted as part of the project "Bewertung neuer Technologien durch Bewohner und Personal im Altenzentrum Grafenau der Paul Wilhelm von Keppler-Stiftung und Prüfung des Transfers ins häusliche Wohnen" (BETAGT) was to have residents and staff members in nursing homes with limited technological equipment complete a questionnaire about their life-long technological experiences and their general technological attitude. Furthermore, specific technological devices and systems were evaluated in terms of their potential with respect to safety, privacy, or help in decreasing burden. Data were collected using a newly developed brief questionnaire. A total of 84 residents and 109 staff members sampled from 11 different institutions were asked about their life-long technology experiences, general attitudes towards technology as well as attitudes towards specific technological devices. Residents' opinions were assessed via brief structured interviews; a structured questionnaire was given to the staff members to complete. The technological devices to be evaluated were introduced via pictured descriptions. Residents and staff members showed a positive attitude towards technology. With regard to the potential of new technologies, residents and staff members expect different effects on several dimensions of quality of life. Both groups rated the potential of the dimension of safety to be highest. Contrary to widely held opinion, older adults living in institutions do not, in general, seem to be too critical about new technology. From the staff members' point of view, modern technology can be integrated into daily care routines of a nursing home, but the potentials of new technologies are considered in a very differential manner.

  8. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  9. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  10. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minas, Harry; Zamzam, Ruzanna; Midin, Marhani; Cohen, Alex

    2011-05-14

    The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356) gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298). Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented through survey method is required to support these conclusions.

  11. Attitudes of Malaysian general hospital staff towards patients with mental illness and diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midin Marhani

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The context of the study is the increased assessment and treatment of persons with mental illness in general hospital settings by general health staff, as the move away from mental hospitals gathers pace in low and middle income countries. The purpose of the study was to examine whether general attitudes of hospital staff towards persons with mental illness, and extent of mental health training and clinical experience, are associated with different attitudes and behaviours towards a patient with mental illness than towards a patients with a general health problem - diabetes. Methods General hospital health professionals in Malaysia were randomly allocated one of two vignettes, one describing a patient with mental illness and the other a patient with diabetes, and invited to complete a questionnaire examining attitudes and health care practices in relation to the case. The questionnaires completed by respondents included questions on demographics, training in mental health, exposure in clinical practice to people with mental illness, attitudes and expected health care behaviour towards the patient in the vignette, and a general questionnaire exploring negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Questionnaires with complete responses were received from 654 study participants. Results Stigmatising attitudes towards persons with mental illness were common. Those responding to the mental illness vignette (N = 356 gave significantly lower ratings on care and support and higher ratings on avoidance and negative stereotype expectations compared with those responding the diabetes vignette (N = 298. Conclusions Results support the view that, in the Malaysian setting, patients with mental illness may receive differential care from general hospital staff and that general stigmatising attitudes among professionals may influence their care practices. More direct measurement of clinician behaviours than able to be implemented

  12. Exploring The Benefits Of Staff Retention Strategies And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study empirically explores the benefits of staff retention strategies for organizational performance. To achieve the objectives of the study, 120 copies of questionnaires were administered to respondents and structured interview carried out with members of staff of the Nigerian Breweries Plc located at Abebe village, ...

  13. staff development of Library Assistants in the Kwame Nkrumah

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. The study utilized the questionnaire instrument to collect and analyze data to determine the state of staff development of Library Assistants in the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and. Technology. All Library Assistants were taken through staff orientation and on the job training. They also received ...

  14. Staff Development Strategies for School Library and Media Centres ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Selfdesigned questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  15. Staff knowledge, attitudes and practices in public sector primary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The questionnaire was administered in a 40-minute private interview to the principal diabetic club staff members identified by the sister-in-charge of the day hospital concerned. Staff members of all the Cape Town day hospitals worked under the authority of the previous Cape Provincial. Administration (day hospitals in black ...

  16. Staff development strategies for school library media centres: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff development is a sine-qua non to the provision of efficient library services at any level. The study sets to investigate staff development strategies in school libraries and Information centres in Owerri, Imo State Nigeria. Self-designed questionnaires were used in eliciting data for the study. Ten schools were used with 10 ...

  17. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Barbara-Beate

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices

  18. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelon, Paule; Lesage, Alain; Boyer, Richard; Guay, Stéphane; Bleau, Pierre; Séguin, Monique

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada's publicly managed healthcare system. A sample of 948 from among the college's 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall). Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  19. Dangers faced by emergency staff: experience in urban centers in southern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülalp, Betül; Karcioğlu, Ozgür; Köseoğlu, Zikret; Sari, Azade

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and characteristics of aggression, threat and physical violence directed towards the staff in emergency departments. A questionnaire was completed by the emergency staff. The individualized data collected included the pattern and incidence of violence, sex, age, profession, and years of experience of the emergency staff, and the behavioral characteristics of the assailants, together with outcome of incidents. Data regarding incidences occurring between May 1-31, 2006 were abstracted. A total of 109 staff were evaluated. There was a statistically significant relationship between aggression and profession (p=0.000), but no relation was determined with sex, age or years of experience (p values 0.464, 0.692, and 0.298, respectively). The relationship of incidences of threat with sex, age, profession, and experience was insignificant (p values 0.311, 0.278, 0.326, 0.994, respectively). On the other hand, significant relationships were identified between physical assault and sex, age, profession, and experience (p values 0.042, 0.000, 0.000, 0.011). Violence directed towards the emergency staff is common. Aggression occurs towards the emergency physician distinctively. Otherwise, there is no significant relationship between aggression or threat and personal characteristics. However, male sex, > or =31 years of age, being an emergency physician, and having worked for longer than five years in the emergency department are the risk factors for physical violence.

  20. Training and Practices of Cannabis Dispensary Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Nancy A; Kieschnick, Dustin; Sottile, James E; Babson, Kimberly A; Vandrey, Ryan; Bonn-Miller, Marcel O

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The proliferation of cannabis dispensaries within the United States has emerged from patient demand for the legalization of cannabis as an alternative treatment for a number of conditions and symptoms. Unfortunately, nothing is known about the practices of dispensary staff with respect to recommendation of cannabis strains/concentrations for specific patient ailments. To address this limitation, the present study assessed the training and practices of cannabis dispensary staff. Materials and Methods: Medical and nonmedical dispensary staff ( n =55) were recruited via e-mail and social media to complete an online survey assessing their demographic characteristics, dispensary features, patient characteristics, formal training, and cannabis recommendation practices. Results: Fifty-five percent of dispensary staff reported some formal training for their position, with 20% reporting medical/scientific training. A majority (94%) indicated that they provide specific cannabis advice to patients. In terms of strains, dispensary staff trended toward recommendations of Indica for anxiety, chronic pain, insomnia, nightmares, and Tourette's syndrome. They were more likely to recommend Indica and hybrid plants for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/trauma and muscle spasms. In contrast, staff were less likely to recommend Indica for depression; hybrid strains were most often recommended for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In terms of cannabinoid concentrations, dispensary staff were most likely to recommend a 1:1 ratio of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC):cannabidiol (CBD) for patients suffering from anxiety, Crohn's disease, hepatitis C, and PTSD/trauma, while patients seeking appetite stimulation were most likely to be recommended THC. Staff recommended high CBD for arthritis and Alzheimer's disease and a high CBD or 1:1 ratio for ALS, epilepsy, and muscle spasms. Conclusions: Although many dispensary staff are making recommendations consistent with

  1. Factors associated with the practice of nursing staff sharing information about patients' nutritional status with their colleagues in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Y; Tamaura, Y; Akamatsu, R; Sakai, M; Fujiwara, K

    2018-01-01

    Nursing staff have an important role in patients' nutritional care. The aim of this study was to demonstrate how the practice of sharing a patient's nutritional status with colleagues was affected by the nursing staff's attitude, knowledge and their priority to provide nutritional care. The participants were 492 nursing staff. We obtained participants' demographic data, the practice of sharing patients' nutritional information and information about participants' knowledge, attitude and priority of providing nutritional care by the questionnaire. We performed partial correlation analyses and linear regression analyses to describe the relationship between the total scores of the practice of sharing patients' nutritional information based on their knowledge, attitude and priority to provide nutritional care. Among the 492 participants, 396 nursing staff (80.5%) completed the questionnaire and were included in analyses. Mean±s.d. of total score of the 396 participants was 8.4±3.1. Nursing staff shared information when they had a high nutritional knowledge (r=0.36, Pnutritional care practice was not significantly associated with the practice of sharing information. Knowledge and attitude were independently associated with the practice of sharing patients' nutrition information with colleagues, regardless of their priority to provide nutritional care. An effective approach should be taken to improve the practice of providing nutritional care practice.

  2. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Nature Contact Questionnaire: a measure of healthy workplace exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo-Wight, Erin; Chen, W William; Dodd, Virginia; Weiler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Understanding and promoting healthy workplaces is an important and growing area of interest in occupational health. Nature contact is a central component to the study of and promotion of healthy places. Previous findings suggest that nature contact influences health via stress appraisal process. Currently, there are no known comprehensive valid and reliable measures of nature contact, which presents obstacles to research and worksite health promotion. This study was designed to develop and test an instrument to measure nature contact at work, entitled the Nature Contact Questionnaire (NCQ), 16-item self-reported checklist to measure actual exposure. A sample of 503 (30% response rate) office staff completed the questionnaire. Office staff were sent an email with a link to the electronic survey twice, two weeks apart. Content and construct validity (KMO=0.68), internal consistency (Alpha=0.64), and test-retest reliability (r=0.85, pnature contact, which allows research to compare forms of nature contact to best inform practice and design of healthy places.

  4. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  5. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  6. Investigating staff knowledge of safeguarding and pressure ulcers in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, K; Kaye, V; McCormick, K; Stephenson, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether nursing/care home staff regard pressure ulceration as a safeguarding issue; and to explore reporting mechanisms for pressure ulcers (PUs) in nursing/care homes. Within one clinical commissioning group, 65 staff members from 50 homes completed a questionnaire assessing their experiences of avoidable and unavoidable PUs, grading systems, and systems in place for referral to safeguarding teams. Understanding of safeguarding was assessed in depth by interviews with 11 staff members. Staff observed an average of 2.72 PUs in their workplaces over the previous 12 months, judging 45.6% to be avoidable. Only a minority of respondents reported knowledge of a grading system (mostly the EPUAP/NPUAP system). Most respondents would refer PUs to the safeguarding team: the existence of a grading system, or guidance, appeared to increase that likelihood. Safeguarding was considered a priority in most homes; interviewees were familiar with the term safeguarding, but some confusion over its meaning was apparent. Quality of written documentation and verbal communication received before residents returned from hospital was highlighted. However, respondents expressed concern over lack of information regarding skin integrity. Most staff had received education regarding ulcer prevention or wound management during training, but none reported post-registration training or formal education programmes; reliance was placed on advice of district nurses or tissue viability specialists. Staff within nursing/care homes understand the fundamentals of managing skin integrity and the importance of reporting skin damage; however, national education programmes are needed to develop knowledge and skills to promote patient health-related quality of life, and to reduce the health-care costs of pressure damage. Further research to investigate understanding, knowledge and skills of nursing/care home staff concerning pressure ulcer development and safeguarding will become increasingly

  7. Survey of staff and family members of patients in Bulgarian hospices on the concept of "good death".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova-Yankulovska, Silviya; ten Have, Henk

    2015-03-01

    The concept of a "good death" has been intensely discussed over the past decades. The objective of this study is to investigate this concept among staff and patients' relatives in 29 Bulgarian hospices and 5 palliative care units. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 190 members of staff and 216 patients' relatives. Death without pain and suffering and death in one's sleep were leading concepts in both the groups. Staff preferred death in the presence of relatives, while relatives preferred fast and sudden death. Although we were able to define the common concept of a good death as painless and sudden death in one's sleep, death is unique phenomenon and good palliative care should be based on communication with patients about their idea of a good death.

  8. Investigating patient safety culture across a health system: multilevel modelling of differences associated with service types and staff demographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Blanca; Westbrook, Mary T; Dunn, Adam G; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2012-08-01

    To use multilevel modelling to compare the patient safety cultures of types of services across a health system and to determine whether differences found can be accounted for by staffs' professions, organizational roles, ages and type of patient care provided. Application of a hierarchical two-level regression model. All services in the South Australian public health system. Approximately half of the health staff (n = 14 054) in the 46 organizations, classified into 18 types of service, which made up the South Australian public health system. Staff completed the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. Attitudes regarding Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Job Satisfaction, Stress Recognition, Perception of Management and Working Conditions in participants' workplaces. All SAQ indices showed statistically significant although modest variations according to service type. However, most of these differences were not accounted for by the differences in the demographic composition of services' staff. Most favourable safety attitudes were found in the breast screening, primary/community health services, community nursing and metropolitan non-teaching hospitals. Poorer cultures were reported in the psychiatric hospital, mental health, metropolitan ambulance services and top-level teaching hospitals. Demographic differences in safety attitudes were observed; particularly, clinical, senior managerial, aged care and older staff held more favourable attitudes. Differences in staff attitudes have been demonstrated at a macro-level across the type of health services but for the most part, differences could not be explained by staffing composition.

  9. The impact of bullying on health care administration staff: reduced commitment beyond the influences of negative affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Parris, Melissa; Steane, Peter; Noblet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Investigations of workplace bullying in health care settings have tended to focus on nurses or other clinical staff. However, the organizational and power structures enabling bullying in health care are present for all employees, including administrative staff. : The purpose of this study was to specifically focus on health care administration staff and examine the prevalence and consequences of workplace bullying in this occupational group. A cross-sectional study was conducted based on questionnaire data from health care administration staff who work across facilities within a medium to large health care organization in Australia. The questionnaire included measures of bullying, negative affectivity (NA), job satisfaction, organizational commitment, well-being, and psychological distress. The three hypotheses of the study were that (a) workplace bullying will be linked to negative employee outcomes, (b) individual differences on demographic factors will have an impact on these outcomes, and (c) individual differences in NA will be a significant covariate in the analyses. The hypotheses were tested using t tests and analyses of covariances. A total of 150 health care administration staff completed the questionnaire (76% response rate). Significant main effects were found for workplace bullying, with lower organizational commitment and well-being with the effect on commitment remaining over and above NA. Main effects were found for age on job satisfaction and for employment type on psychological distress. A significant interaction between bullying and employment type for psychological distress was also observed. Negative affectivity was a significant covariate for all analyses of covariance. The applications of these results include the need to consider the occupations receiving attention in health care to include administration employees, that bullying is present across health care occupations, and that some employees, particularly part-time staff, may need to be

  10. Opinion and knowledge among hospital medical staff regarding diagnosis of diabetes and proper usage of a specific test tube for glucose analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Dayan, Y; Bogaiov, A; Boaz, M; Landau, Z; Wainstein, J

    2014-02-01

    Accuracy of blood sugar values, as examined by glucose analysis, has significant importance on the diagnosis of diabetes and follow up of diabetes treatment. Usage of a designated test tube significantly improves the accuracy of measurement. Knowledge of the medical staff is a major determinant in the current usage of such a technology. The aim of the study was to assess the level of knowledge exhibited by medical staff in the diabetes field and specifically for the usage of a designated tube to test blood glucose level. A prospective study. The staff of the internal and surgical departments and outpatient clinics at the Wolfson Medical Center completed a questionnaire that assessed the level of knowledge about the designated glucose test tube, other randomly used test tubes, the parameters that influence the blood glucose values in a non-designated tube and the diagnosis of diabetes. A number of 160 questionnaires (50% from internal departments, 36% from surgical departments and 14% from outpatient clinics) were analysed. The majority of the staff members (65%) knew that diabetes is diagnosed by glucose levels in blood. Of the 35% that did not know, 91% were nurses. The majority (75%) knew that diabetes is diagnosed during fasting conditions; however, most of the staff indicated that 12 h is needed. Only 25% knew of the designated test tube, and most of the staff indicated that a regular chemistry tube was the tube of choice for them. The staff exhibited poor level of knowledge regarding the parameters that influence the quality of the test. Staff members are not aware of the various aspects of diabetes diagnosis and the designated test tube for glucose measurements, and most of them use a tube that gives inaccurate measurements, therefore there is an urgent need to improve diabetes knowledge among staff members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Measuring general hospital staff attitudes towards people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Frank; Wigram, Tony; Balakumar, Thanusha

    People with learning disabilities often experience health inequalities and barriers to healthcare services as a result of poor communication and discriminatory attitudes. We developed an educational package for healthcare staff as well as an attitude questionnaire to measure the impact of this training; the questionnaire is called the Attitudes of Secondary Healthcare Personnel Toward People with Severe Learning Disabilities (ASH-LD). This article describes the process of designing and piloting the ASH-LD questionnaire, and how it will be used to measure the effect of the planned training on staff attitudes.

  12. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarmach, Arkadiusz; Piskunowicz, Maciej; Świętoń, Dominik; Muc, Adam; Mockałło, Gabor; Dzierżanowski, Jarosław; Szurowska, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  13. Internal marketing strategy: Focusing on staff orientation in health care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. De Jager

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to determine the levels of satisfaction in respect of pre identified internal marketing-related variables in a large provincial hospital in South Africa. Problem investigated: Low job satisfaction is often cited as a major cause of high turnover among health care providers worldwide. Likewise the Public Health Care Industry in South Africa is facing complex employee retention issues. In determining the reasons for high turnover an interest in evaluating employee satisfaction among health care providers has increased. Measuring components of job satisfaction will assist not only the health care organisations' management to understand hospital culture, but also to compile an effective internal marketing plan and strategy. Design/Methodology/Approach: A staff satisfaction survey was conducted amongst staff members at a provincial hospital in the Tshwane region, South Africa. Attitudes of staff on pre-identified staff satisfaction variables were assessed. These variables were employed to implement an internal marketing strategy. A list of variables was formulated after an extensive literature study had been conducted. A total of 416 staff members voluntarily completed a self-administered questionnaire. A five-point Likert type scale was used to measure the levels of satisfaction on staff-related issues, with a view to addressing issues in the internal marketing strategy. Findings : It was evident that the management principles currently employed by the management team were a cause for concern among staff members. Based on the analysis that identified the satisfaction variables best it was clear that management should take immediate steps to address the following issues : • Clarification of hospital goals \\ objectives; • Understanding the goals of the respective departments; • The functioning of the Human resource department; • Functioning of the overall hospital management; and Implications: This paper

  14. Staff and Client Perspectives on the Journey Mapping Online Evaluation Tool in a Drug Court Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crunkilton, Dhira D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess staff and client perspectives on the Internet-based Journey Mapping program evaluation tool. A drug court program was chosen for a case study research design. Six staff and 10 clients participated in interviews and observations, and also responded to a questionnaire. A staff survey provided additional data.…

  15. Adverse Effects of Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Staff in Shiraz in 2014, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Hashemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Influenza vaccination is one of the most important ways to prevent influenza acquisition in healthcare staff. This study was conducted to determine the cumulative incidence rate of side effects associated with influenza vaccination among healthcare staff in some of the hospitals in Shiraz. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on the staff of a number of hospitals in Shiraz who received influenza vaccine in 1392. Instrument in this study was a researcher-developed questionnaire about common side effects that was collected up to 10 days after the vaccination. Incidence of side effects was reported with 95% confidence interval. The data were analyzed by chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and univariate logistic regression. Results: From the 450 vaccinated staff, 424 (94.23% completed the questionnaire. 53.8% of vaccine recipients were female and 46.2% male. The mean age of the participants was 34.94 years.  Up to 10 days after vaccination, cumulative incidence rate of side effects following vaccination was obtained 21.7% for common cold-like symptoms, 71.2% for muscle pain, 16.5% for pain where the shot was given, 15.3% for fever, 14.4% for runny nose, 12.3% for severe headache, 9% for severe coughing, 0.9% for diarrhea, and 1.7% for abdominal pain (1.7%. No severe side effects such as acute allergic reactions and Guillain-Barré syndrome were reported. Conclusion: The reported incidence rate of side effects in this study, high risk of acquiring disease among health care staff, and their role in controlling influenza epidemics represent the necessity of influenza vaccination in this occupational population.

  16. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Danny H.; Elwood, Robert H. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC and A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC and A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC and A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC and A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC and A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A

  17. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  18. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  19. Utility of the theory of planned behavior to predict nursing staff blood pressure monitoring behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joan M; Cook, Paul F; Ingram, Jennifer C

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate constructs from the theory of planned behavior (TPB, Ajzen 2002) - attitudes, sense of control, subjective norms and intentions - as predictors of accuracy in blood pressure monitoring. Despite numerous initiatives aimed at teaching blood pressure measurement techniques, many healthcare providers measure blood pressures incorrectly. Descriptive, cohort design. Medical assistants and licensed practical nurses were asked to complete a questionnaire on TPB variables. These nursing staff's patients had their blood pressures measured and completed a survey about techniques used to measure their blood pressure. We correlated nursing staff's responses on the TBP questionnaire with their intention to measure an accurate blood pressure and with the difference between their actual blood pressure measurement and a second measurement taken by a researcher immediately after the clinic visit. Patients' perceptions of MAs' and LPNs' blood pressure measurement techniques were examined descriptively. Perceived control and social norm predicted intention to measure an accurate blood pressure, with a negative relationship between knowledge and intention. Consistent with the TPB, intention was the only significant predictor of blood pressure measurement accuracy. Theory of planned behavior constructs predicted the healthcare providers' intention to measure blood pressure accurately and intention predicted the actual accuracy of systolic blood pressure measurement. However, participants' knowledge about blood pressure measurement had an unexpected negative relationship with their intentions. These findings have important implications for nursing education departments and organisations which traditionally invest significant time and effort in annual competency training focused on knowledge enhancement by staff. This study suggests that a better strategy might involve efforts to enhance providers' intention to change, particularly by changing social norms or increasing

  20. Mandatory communication skills training for cancer and palliative care staff: does one size fit all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mary; Payne, Sheila; O'Brien, Terri

    2011-12-01

    There is increasing recognition of the importance of good communication between healthcare professionals and patients facing cancer or end of life. In England, a new national 3-day training programme called 'Connected' has been developed and is now mandatory for all cancer and palliative care professionals. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of staff in one region to undertaking this training. A survey questionnaire was developed through a series of discussions with experts and semi-structured interviews with five healthcare professionals. The questionnaire was distributed to 200 cancer and palliative care staff; 109 were completed and returned. There were significant differences between doctors' and nurses' attitudes to communication skills training, with doctors demonstrating more negative attitudes. More nurses than doctors felt that communication skills training should be mandatory for cancer and palliative care professionals (p ≤ 0.001), whilst more doctors felt that these staff should already be skilled communicators and not require further training (p ≤ 0.001). Nurses also self-rated their communication skills more highly than doctors. The current 'one size fits all' approach being taken nationally to advanced communication skills training does not meet the training preferences of all healthcare professionals, and it is recommended that tailoring courses to individuals' needs should be considered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  2. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  3. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  4. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  5. Translation, adaptation and validation of the "Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability (CUPID) Questionnaire" for use in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Andrea Lepos; Baptista, Patricia Campos Pavan; Felli, Vanda Elisa Andres; Coggon, David

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptation and testing of the Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability Questionnaire for use in Portuguese. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of judges, and then piloting of the pre-final version. This was performed in a sample of 40 nursing staff from the Hospital at the University of São Paulo. Adjustments were made after review of the translations by the committee of judges (CVI ≤ 80%). The pilot study was used to test whether questions could be satisfactorily understood and completed (≥ 85% of subjects). The Brazilian version of the Questionnaire is an adequate instrument for the ascertainment of occupational activities, psychosocial aspects of work, musculoskeletal symptoms and associated disabilities in nursing staff.

  6. Predictors of organizational commitment among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2005-04-01

    This study examines the role of organizational culture, job satisfaction, and sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of organizational commitment among staff in assisted living. It is particularly important to examine organizational commitment, because of its close links to staff turnover. Data were collected from 317 staff members in 61 facilities, using self-administered questionnaires. The facilities were selected from licensed assisted living programs and were stratified into small, traditional, and new-model homes. Staff questionnaires were distributed by a researcher during 1-day visits to each facility. Organizational commitment was measured by the extent of staff identification, involvement, and loyalty to the organization. Organizational culture, job satisfaction, and education were strong predictors of commitment, together explaining 58% of the total variance in the dependent variable. Higher levels of organizational commitment were associated with more favorable staff perceptions of organizational culture and greater job satisfaction. In addition, more educated staff members tended to report higher levels of organizational commitment. Other than education, sociodemographic characteristics failed to account for a significant amount of variance in organizational commitment. Because job satisfaction and organizational culture were strong predictors of commitment, interventions aimed at increasing job satisfaction and creating an organizational culture that values and respects staff members could be most effective in producing higher levels of organizational commitment.

  7. Using quality measures for quality improvement: the perspective of hospital staff.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgar Aghaei Hashjin

    Full Text Available RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: This study examines the perspectives of a range of key hospital staff on the use, importance, scientific background, availability of data, feasibility of data collection, cost benefit aspects and availability of professional personnel for measurement of quality indicators among Iranian hospitals. The study aims to facilitate the use of quality indicators to improve quality of care in hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was conducted over the period 2009 to 2010. Staff at Iranian hospitals completed a self-administered questionnaire eliciting their views on organizational, clinical process, and outcome (clinical effectiveness, patient safety and patient centeredness indicators. POPULATION STUDIED: 93 hospital frontline staff including hospital/nursing managers, medical doctors, nurses, and quality improvement/medical records officers in 48 general and specialized hospitals in Iran. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On average, only 69% of respondents reported using quality indicators in practice at their affiliated hospitals. Respondents varied significantly in their reported use of organizational, clinical process and outcome quality indicators. Overall, clinical process and effectiveness indicators were reported to be least used. The reported use of indicators corresponded with their perceived level of importance. Quality indicators were reported to be used among clinical staff significantly more than among managerial staff. In total, 74% of the respondents reported to use obligatory indicators, while this was 68% for voluntary indicators (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: There is a general awareness of the importance and usability of quality indicators among hospital staff in Iran, but their use is currently mostly directed towards external accountability purposes. To increase the formative use of quality indicators, creation of a common culture and feeling of shared ownership, alongside an increased uptake of clinical process and

  8. Leadership styles of nurse managers and registered sickness absence among their nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, Jolanda A H; Roelen, Corné A M; van Zweeden, Nely F; Jongsma, Dianne; van der Klink, Jac J L; Groothoff, Johan W

    2011-01-01

    Sickness absence leads to understaffing and interferes with nursing efficiency and quality. It has been reported in literature that managerial leadership is associated with self-reported sickness absence in the working population. This study investigated the relationship between managerial leadership and sickness absence in health care by associating nurse managers' leadership styles with registered sickness absence among their nursing staff. The cross-sectional study included 699 nurses working in six wards (staff range = 91-140 employees) of a Dutch somatic hospital employing a total of 1,153 persons. The nurse managers heading the wards were asked to complete the Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description questionnaire for situational leadership. The Leadership Effectiveness and Adaptability Description scores were linked to employer-registered nursing staff sickness absence. High relationship-high task behavior (odds ratio [OR] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.65-0.85) and high relationship-low task behavior (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.14 -0.98) were inversely related to the number of short (one to seven consecutive days) episodes of sickness absence among the staff. Low relationship-high task styles (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.14-5.22) as well as low relationship-low task styles (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.26-4.71) were positively associated with the number of short episodes of sickness absence. However, the leadership styles only explained 10% of the variance in short episodes of sickness absence. Leadership styles are associated with registered sickness absence. The nursing staff of relationship-oriented nurse managers has fewer short episodes of sickness absence than the staff of task-oriented managers. Training nurse managers in relational leadership styles may reduce understaffing and improve nursing efficiency and quality.

  9. Experiences of Australian School Staff in Addressing Student Cannabis Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J.; Norberg, Melissa M.; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug by Australian secondary school students yet there is scant research investigating school staff responses to student cannabis use. As such, this study surveyed 1,692 school staff who attended "Generation Next" seminars throughout Australia. The self-complete survey identified that the…

  10. Staff management, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hitoshi; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Capouet, M.; Depaus, C.; Berckmans, A.

    2014-01-01

    Staff management/training and knowledge management are organisational issues that are particularly sensitive in long-term projects stretching over decades like the development and operation of a geological repository. The IAEA has already issued several publications that deal with this issue (IAEA, 2006, 2008). Organisational aspects were also discussed in the framework of a topical session organised by the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) at its annual meeting in 2009 and were regarded as a topic deserving future attention (NEA, 2009a). More recently, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) identified organisational, mission and behavioural features as attributes of confidence and trust (NEA, 2013). They also identified that aspects such as structural learning capacity, high levels of skill and competence in relevant areas, specific management plan, good operating records, transparency and consistency are associated with confidence building in a safety case. These aspects are considerably related to staff training/management and knowledge management. The IGSC has initiated a proposal of study dedicated to staff training/management and knowledge management with the objective to highlight how these recent concerns and the requirements issued by the IAEA are concretely implemented in the national programmes. The goal of this study is to acknowledge the differences of views and needs for staff management and knowledge management at different stages of individual programmes and between implementer and regulator. As a starting point to this study, the JAEA and ONDRAF/NIRAS prepared a draft questionnaire in order to succinctly capture processes and tools that the national organisations have implemented to meet the requirements and address the issues set out in the field of staff and knowledge management. For the purpose of this study, a questionnaire is now under development, which will be presented on the occasion of this symposium with guidance based on a

  11. Assessing the Efficacy of a Student Expectations Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article uses Rasch analysis to explore the efficacy of a questionnaire designed to assist university teaching staff in identifying those Level 4 students most in need of mathematics support. The students were all taking a mathematics module as part of their first year Computing curriculum, and the questionnaire explores the students' previous…

  12. Diet History Questionnaire II and Canadian Diet History Questionnaire II: Coding Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    A questionnaire data file is an ASCII text file containing data from completed Diet History Questionnaires. If using paper forms, this file can be created by a scanner or a data entry system. If using DHQ*Web, the questionnaire data file is created automatically.

  13. The MPC and A Questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Danny H.; Elwood, Robert H. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire is the instrument used for recording performance data on the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) system at a nuclear facility. The performance information provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the MPC and A system. The goal for the questionnaire is to provide an accurate representation of the performance of the MPC and A system as it currently exists in the facility. Performance grades for all basic MPC and A functions should realistically reflect the actual level of performance at the time the survey is conducted. The questionnaire was developed after testing and benchmarking the material control and accountability (MC and A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) in the United States. The benchmarking exercise at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) proved extremely valuable for improving the content and quality of the early versions of the questionnaire. Members of the INL benchmark team identified many areas of the questionnaire where questions should be clarified and areas where additional questions should be incorporated. The questionnaire addresses all elements of the MC and A system. Specific parts pertain to the foundation for the facility's overall MPC and A system, and other parts pertain to the specific functions of the operational MPC and A system. The questionnaire includes performance metrics for each of the basic functions or tasks performed in the operational MPC and A system. All of those basic functions or tasks are represented as basic events in the MPC and A fault tree. Performance metrics are to be used during completion of the questionnaire to report what is actually being done in relation to what should be done in the performance of MPC and A functions.

  14. E-assessment and an e-training program among elderly care staff lacking formal competence: results of a mixed-methods intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Annika; Engström, Maria

    2015-05-06

    Among staff working in elderly care, a considerable proportion lack formal competence for their work. Lack of formal competence, in turn, has been linked to higher staff ratings of stress symptoms, sleep disturbances and workload. 1) To describe the strengths and weaknesses of an e-assessment and subsequent e-training program used among elderly care staff who lack formal competence and 2) to study the effects of an e-training program on staff members' working life (quality of care and psychological and structural empowerment) and well-being (job satisfaction and psychosomatic health). The hypothesis was that staff who had completed the e-assessment and the e-training program would rate greater improvements in working life and well-being than would staff who had only participated in the e-assessments. An intervention study with a mixed-methods approach using quantitative (2010-2011) and qualitative data (2011) was conducted in Swedish elderly care. Participants included a total of 41 staff members. To describe the strengths and weaknesses of the e-assessment and the e-training program, qualitative data were gathered using semi-structured interviews together with a study-specific questionnaire. To study the effects of the intervention, quantitative data were collected using questionnaires on: job satisfaction, psychosomatic health, psychological empowerment, structural empowerment and quality of care in an intervention and a comparison group. Staff who completed the e-assessments and the e-training program primarily experienced strengths associated with this approach. The results were also in line with our hypotheses: Staff who completed the e-assessment and the e-training program rated improvements in their working life and well-being. Use of the e-assessments and e-training program employed in the present study could be one way to support elderly care staff who lack formal education by increasing their competence; increased competence, in turn, could improve their

  15. The staff show their profound attachment to SLS

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The results of the poll on the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) have now been analyzed and are published in this edition and on our web site. You were 1194 to reply to the questionnaire (approximately 50% of all staff members). The distribution of the replies according to certain variables (sex, age, career path, etc.) in the sample corresponds to the one observed for the overall staff population. This indicates that the sample is representative.

  16. Accuracy of the Smoking Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sponsiello-Wang Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The smoking questionnaire (SQ, a multidimensional questionnaire covering the major dimensions of cigarette smoking, was developed to address the heterogeneity in the assessment of smoking exposure. It consists of eight questions and can be completed within a few minutes. Test-retest reliability of the SQ and concurrent validity with the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS 2011 questionnaire were examined in a clinical study conducted in adult US current menthol cigarette smokers. The SQ and the BRFSS were self-administrated twice before and after randomization with a 6-day interval. The inter-temporal analyses included current smokers aged 22 to 66 years who completed the SQ at both timepoints. The percent agreement of items and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the comparisons between the two timepoints and between the SQ and the BRFSS questionnaire. To evaluate the feasibility of the SQ and to capture subjects’ opinions about the SQ, a meta-questionnaire was administrated. High test-retest reliability levels (percent agreement of > 70 to 100% between the two timepoints were found for SQ smoking behavior items, in particular for items related to current smoking status, 100-cigarettes lifetime, regular smoking, age of initiation and preferred brand. Moderate (55% agreement to high test-retest reliability (84% agreement was found for daily consumption of manufactured cigarettes. The comparison between the SQ and the BRFSS 2011 showed a high concurrent validity (98 to 100% agreement. The SQ was completed on average in 3 to 4 min and was assessed as easy to use. The findings demonstrate that the SQ is reliable in smokers and a practical tool to assess smoking exposure in clinical studies.

  17. NICU consultants and support staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newborn intensive care unit - consultants and support staff; Neonatal intensive care unit - consultants and support staff ... a baby's nipple-feeding readiness and oral-motor skills. Speech therapists will also help with feeding skills ...

  18. [Improving nursing staff accuracy in administering chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Ying; Chu, Yun-Li; Chiou, Yen-Gan; Chiang, Ming-Chu

    2009-12-01

    As most anticancer drugs are cytotoxic, their safe and error-free application is important. We analyzed data from the hematology-oncology ward chemotherapy checklist dated January 13th through February 3rd, 2007 and found accuracy rates for chemotherapy drug usage as low as 68.4%. Possible causes identified for this poor result include incomplete chemotherapy standards protocols, lack of chemotherapy quality control, and insufficient chemotherapy knowledge amongst nursing staff. This project aimed to improve the accuracy of nursing staff in administering chemotherapy and to raise nursing staff knowledge regarding chemotherapy. Our strategies for improvement included completing a chemotherapy standards protocol, establishing a chemotherapy quality-control monitoring system, augmenting chemotherapy training and adding appropriate equipment and staff reminders. After strategies were implemented, accuracy in chemotherapy administration rose to 96.7%. Related knowledge amongst nursing staff also improved from an initial 77.5% to 89.2%. Implementing the recommended measures achieved a significant improvement in the accuracy and quality of chemotherapy administered by nursing personnel.

  19. Job characteristic perception and intrinsic motivation in medical record department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isfahani, Sakineh Saghaeiannejad; Bahrami, Soosan; Torki, Sedighe

    2013-01-01

    Human resources are key factors in service organizations like hospitals. Therefore, motivating human recourses to achieve the objectives of an organization is important. Job enrichment is a strategy used to increase job motivation in staffs. The goal of the current study is to determine the relationship between job characteristics and intrinsic motivation in medical record staff in hospitals related to Medical Science University in Isfahan in 2011-2012 academic year. The type of the study is descriptive and corelational of multi variables. The population of the study includes all the medical record staffs of medical record department working in Medical Science hospitals of Isfahan. One hundred twentyseven subjects were selected by conducting a census. In the present study, data collected by using two questionnaires of job characteristics devised by Hackman and Oldeham, and of intrinsic motivation. Content validity was confirmed by experts and its reliability was calculated through coefficient of Cronbach's alpha (r1 = 0.84- r2 = 0.94). The questionnaires completed were entered into SPSS(18) software; furthermore, statistical analysis done descriptively (frequency percent, mean, standard deviation, Pierson correlation coefficient,...) and inferentially (multiple regression, MANOVA, LSD). A significant relationship between job characteristics as well as its elements (skill variety, task identity, task significance, autonomy and feedback) and intrinsic motivation was noticed. (p motivation was significant and job feedback had the most impact upon the intrinsic motivation. No significant difference was noticed among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to age, gender, level of education, and the kind of educational degree in hospitals. However, there was a significant difference among the mean amounts of job characteristic perception according to the unit of service and the years of servicein hospitals. The findings show that all job

  20. Evaluation of a multiple-encounter in situ simulation for orientation of staff to a new paediatric emergency service: a single-group pretest/post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Michelle; Kinnear, Frances B; Fulbrook, Paul

    2017-10-01

    To assess the utility of a multiple-encounter in-situ (MEIS) simulation as an orientation tool for multidisciplinary staff prior to opening a new paediatric emergency service. A single-group pretest/post-test study was conducted. During the MEIS simulation, multidisciplinary staff with participant or observer roles managed eight children (mannequins) who attended triage with their parent/guardians (clinical facilitators) for a range of emergency presentations (structured scenarios designed to represent the expected range of presentations plus test various clinical pathways/systems). Participants were debriefed to explore clinical, systems and crisis-resource management issues. Participants also completed a pre-intervention and post-intervention questionnaire comprising statements about role confidence and orientation adequacy. Pre-test and post-test results were analysed using t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Eighty-nine staff participated in the MEIS simulation, with the majority completing the pre-simulation and post-simulation questionnaire. There was a significant improvement in post-intervention versus pre-intervention Likert scores for role confidence and orientation adequacy (p=0.001 and simulation was of utility in orientation of staff, at least with respect to self-reported role confidence and orientation adequacy. Its effectiveness in practice or compared with other orientation techniques was not assessed, but it did identify several flaws in planned systems allowing remediation prior to opening.

  1. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  2. The impact of ED nurse manager leadership style on staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction in academic health center hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, Glenn H

    2008-10-01

    Nurse managers with effective leadership skills are an essential component to the solution for ending the nursing shortage. Empirical studies of existing ED nurse manager leadership styles and their impact on key nurse management outcomes such as staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction have not been performed. The specific aims of this study were to determine what types of leadership styles were used by ED nurse managers in academic health center hospitals and examine their influence on staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction. ED nurse managers were asked to complete the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and a 10-item researcher defined nurse manager role and practice demographics survey. Completed surveys (15 managers and 30 staff nurses) representing 15 out of 98 possible U.S. academic health centers were obtained. Fisher's exact test with 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze the data. The sample percentage of managers who exhibited Transformational leadership styles and demographic findings of nurse manager age, total years experience and length of time in current position matched current reports in the literature. A trend of lower staff nurse turnover with Transformational leadership style compared to non-Trasformational leadership styles was identified. However, the type of leadership style did not appear to have an effect on patient satisfaction. The ED is an ever-changing, highly regulated, critical-care environment. Effective ED nurse manager leadership strategies are vital to maintaining the standards of professional emergency nursing practice to create an environment that can produce management outcomes of decreased staff nurse turnover, thereby enhancing staff nurse retention and potentially impacting patient satisfaction.

  3. 'All singing, all dancing': staff views on the integration of family planning and genitourinary medicine in Lothian, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Martin; Chen, Eric Zhong; Gebbie, Ailsa E; Fernando, Imali; Milne, Dona; Cochrane, Rosemary

    2014-10-01

    UK policy documents advocate integrated approaches to sexual health service provision to ensure that everyone can access high-quality treatment. However, there is relatively little evidence to demonstrate any resultant benefits. The family planning and genitourinary medicine services in Lothian have been fully integrated and most care is now delivered from a purpose-built sexual health centre. We wished to study the views of staff on integrated sexual and reproductive care. Staff completed anonymous questionnaires before and after integration, looking at four main aspects: the patient pathway, specific patient groups, their own professional status, and their working environment. The surveys used a mixture of five-point Likert-type scales and open-ended questions. Over 50% of staff completed the surveys on each occasion. Six months after the new building opened, staff attitudes about the integrated service were mixed. Staff reported more stress and less opportunity for specialisation but there was no change in their sense of professional status or development. There were concerns about how well the integrated service met the needs of specific patient groups, notably women. These concerns co-existed with a verdict that overall service quality was no worse following integration. Staff views should form an important part of service redesign and integration projects. Although the results from the Lothian surveys suggest a perceived worsening of some aspects of the service, further evaluation is needed to unpick the different problems that have appeared under the catch-all term of 'integration'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-16

    The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  5. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  6. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways. PMID:21679430

  7. Impact of a person-centred dementia care training programme on hospital staff attitudes, role efficacy and perceptions of caring for people with dementia: A repeated measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, C A; Smith, S J; Crossland, J; Robins, J

    2016-01-01

    People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds. However, the quality of care delivered to this patient group is of national concern. Staff working in acute hospitals report lack of knowledge, skills and confidence in caring for people with dementia. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to supporting acute hospital staff to deliver more person-centred care. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a specialist training programme for acute hospital staff regarding improving attitudes, satisfaction and feelings of caring efficacy, in provision of care to people with dementia. A repeated measures design, with measures completed immediately prior to commencing training (T1), after completion of Foundation level training (T2: 4-6 weeks post-baseline), and following Intermediate level training (T3: 3-4 months post-baseline). One NHS Trust in the North of England, UK. 40 acute hospital staff working in clinical roles, the majority of whom (90%) were nurses. All participants received the 3.5 day Person-centred Care Training for Acute Hospitals (PCTAH) programme, comprised of two levels, Foundation (0.5 day) and Intermediate (3 days), delivered over a 3-4 months period. Staff demographics and previous exposure to dementia training were collected via a questionnaire. Staff attitudes were measured using the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire (ADQ), satisfaction in caring for people with dementia was captured using the Staff Experiences of Working with Demented Residents questionnaire (SEWDR) and perceived caring efficacy was measured using the Caring Efficacy Scale (CES). The training programme was effective in producing a significant positive change on all three outcome measures following intermediate training compared to baseline. A significant positive effect was found on the ADQ between baseline and after completion of Foundation level training, but not for either of the other measures. Training acute hospital staff in

  8. Extended operating times are more efficient, save money and maintain a high staff and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, Jonathan Blair Thomas; French, Rachel; Gilliam, Andrew Douglas

    2018-01-01

    Current public sector austerity measures necessitate efficiency savings throughout the NHS. Performance targets have resulted in activity being performed in the private sector, waiting list initiative lists and requests for staff to work overtime. This has resulted in staff fatigue and additional agency costs. Adoption of extended operating theatre times (0800-1800 hours) may improve productivity and efficiency, with potentially significant financial savings; however, implementation may adversely affect staff morale and patient compliance. A pilot period of four months of extended operating times (4.5 hour sessions) was completed and included all theatre surgical specialties. Outcome measures included: the number of cases completed, late starts, early finishes, cancelled operations, theatre overruns, preoperative assessment and 18-week targets. The outcomes were then compared to pre-existing normal working day operating lists (0900-1700). Theatre staff, patient and surgical trainee satisfaction with the system were also considered by use of an anonymous questionnaire. The study showed that in-session utilisation time was unchanged by extended operating hours 88.7% (vs 89.2%). The service was rated as 'good' or 'excellent' by 87.5% of patients. Over £345,000 was saved by reducing premium payments. Savings of £225,000 were made by reducing privately outsourced operation and a further £63,000 by reviewing staff hours. Day case procedures increased from 2.8 to 3.2 cases/day with extended operating. There was no significant increase in late starts (5.1% vs 6.8%) or cancellation rates (0.75% vs 1.02%). Theatre over-runs reduced from 5% to 3.4%. The 18 weeks target for surgery was achieved in 93.7% of cases (vs 88.3%). The number of elective procedures increased from 4.1 to 4.89 cases/day. Only 13.33% of trainees (n = 33) surveyed felt that extended operating had a negative impact on training. The study concludes that extended operating increased productivity from

  9. The influence of staff nurse perception of leadership style on satisfaction with leadership: a cross-sectional survey of pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Diane Randall; Richard, David C S; Robinson, Patricia; Celano, Patricia; Hallaron, Jeanie

    2012-09-01

    There is evidence that transformational leadership style promotes nursing excellence. Differences in how supervisees and supervisors perceive the supervisor's leadership style may also be related to satisfaction with leadership. Research demonstrates that satisfaction with leadership is a critical element in the retention of nurses. To evaluate staff nurse and nurse leader perceptions of leadership style. 16 supervisors and 179 supervisees completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and a demographic survey. Data were analyzed using parametric statistical techniques. Although staff perceived leaders as employing largely transformative leadership strategies, differences existed in leader-staff congruence in interpretation of leadership style and as related to the role of the leader. Differences in interpretation of leadership style between supervisors and supervisees were associated with diminished satisfaction with leadership. In addition, those serving in a direct operational role (assistant nurse manager) were viewed as less transformative than leaders who maintained broader administrative responsibilities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  11. Development of a questionnaire for assessing the childbirth experience (QACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carquillat, Pierre; Vendittelli, Françoise; Perneger, Thomas; Guittier, Marie-Julia

    2017-08-30

    Due to its potential impact on women's psychological health, assessing perceptions of their childbirth experience is important. The aim of this study was to develop a multidimensional self-reporting questionnaire to evaluate the childbirth experience. Factors influencing the childbirth experience were identified from a literature review and the results of a previous qualitative study. A total of 25 items were combined from existing instruments or were created de novo. A draft version was pilot tested for face validity with 30 women and submitted for evaluation of its construct validity to 477 primiparous women at one-month post-partum. The recruitment took place in two obstetric clinics from Swiss and French university hospitals. To evaluate the content validity, we compared item responses to general childbirth experience assessments on a numeric, 0 to 10 rating scale. We dichotomized two group assessment scores: "0 to 7" and "8 to 10". We performed an exploratory factor analysis to identify underlying dimensions. In total, 291 women completed the questionnaire (response rate = 61%). The responses to 22 items were statistically significant between the 0 to 7 and 8 to 10 groups for the general childbirth experience assessments. An exploratory factor analysis yielded four sub-scales, which were labelled "relationship with staff" (4 items), "emotional status" (3 items), "first moments with the new born," (3 items) and "feelings at one month postpartum" (3 items). All 4 scales had satisfactory internal consistency levels (alpha coefficients from 0.70 to 0.85). The full 25-item version can be used to analyse each item by itself, and the short 4-dimension version can be scored to summarize the general assessment of the childbirth experience. The Questionnaire for Assessing the Childbirth Experience (QACE) could be useful as a screening instrument to identify women with negative childbirth experiences. It can be used as both a research instrument in its short version

  12. An exploration of the experience, confidence and attitudes of staff to the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Karen

    2010-09-01

    Research suggests that shortcomings exist in the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities. This mixed-methods study aimed to describe the experience, confidence and attitudes of staff to the provision of palliative care to people with intellectual disabilities. The sample was drawn from the population of one Health Service Executive area in Ireland. Staff from intellectual disability and palliative care services completed surveys and participated in focus group discussions. Three hundred and eighty-nine questionnaires were distributed and 16 focus groups were held. Fifty-nine per cent of palliative care staff and 67% of intellectual disability services staff had cared for someone with intellectual disability who had died but level of experience was low. Both palliative care and intellectual disability services staff lacked confidence in their ability to provide palliative care. Staff were challenged by perceived \\'differences\\' and \\'difficulties\\' in the provision of care. They endorsed a partnership approach to care but focus group discussions revealed that a shared desire to cooperate was insufficient to guarantee effective collaboration.

  13. Mental Health Service Utilization among Students and Staff in 18 Months Following Dawson College Shooting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Miquelon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate service utilization by students and staff in the 18 months following the September 13, 2006, shooting at Dawson College, Montreal, as well as the determinants of this utilization within the context of Canada’s publicly managed healthcare system. Methods A sample of 948 from among the college’s 10,091 students and staff agreed to complete an adapted computer or web-based standardized questionnaire drawn from the Statistics Canada 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey cycle 1.2 on mental health and well-being. Results In the 18 months following the shooting, there was a greater incidence and prevalence not only of PTSD, but also of other anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse. Staff and students were as likely to consult a health professional when presenting a mental or substance use disorder, with females more likely to do so than males. Results also indicated that there was relatively high internet use for mental health reasons by students and staff (14% overall. Conclusions Following a major crisis event causing potential mass trauma, even in a society characterized by easy access to public, school and health services and when the population involved is generally well educated, the acceptability of consulting health professionals for mental health or substance use problems represents a barrier. However, safe internet access is one way male and female students and staff can access information and support and it may be useful to further exploit the possibilities afforded by web-based interviews in anonymous environments.

  14. Job satisfaction survey among health centers staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnazi, Hossein; Daniali, Seyede Shahrbanoo; Sharifirad, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the importance of health care organizations with significant responsibility for prevention and care, assessment of job satisfaction among health care staff is essential. Quality of health services will be decreased provided they are not satisfied. This study was a cross-sectional analysis of health care staff in Khomeinishahr (centers, buildings, and networks) If they had at least 6 months work experience, they could enter the study. Data included a two-part questionnaire with a standardized questionnaire, demographic variables, and Smith job descriptive index, which is a questionnaire with six domains. Reliability was obtained for each domain and its validity was reported 0.93. The results showed an overall satisfaction score averages 43.55 ± 12.8 (from 100). Job satisfaction score was not significantly different between the sexes. However, within the current attitude toward job satisfaction, men scores was better than women (P = 0.001). Highest score in job satisfaction was related to relationships with colleagues and lowest score was related to the income, benefits, and job promotion. The more the years of work, the less the job satisfaction was. The attitude toward the current job had a direct relationship with income (P = 0.01). There was a significant inverse relationship between educational level and job satisfaction in domains promotion, income, and benefits (P = 0.01). The staff with higher education levels was less satisfied with income and job promotion qualification. Managers should focus on job qualification to increase job satisfaction and improve the quality of work.

  15. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-11-28

    Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service's safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity service and to explore potential influences on service safety. The study was undertaken within a new low risk metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia with a staffing profile comprising midwives (including students), neonatal nurses, specialist obstetricians, junior medical staff and clerical staff. In depth open-ended interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire were conducted with 23 staff involved in the delivery of perinatal care, including doctors, midwives, nurses, nursing and midwifery students, and clerical staff. Data were analyzed using naturalistic interpretive inquiry to identify emergent themes. Staff unanimously reported that there were robust systems and processes in place to maintain safety and quality. Three major themes were apparent: (1) clinical governance, (2) dominance of midwives, (3) inter-professional relationships. Overall, there was a strong sense that, at least in this midwifery-led service, midwives had the greatest opportunity to be an influence, both positively and negatively, on the safe delivery of perinatal care. The importance of understanding team dynamics, particularly mutual respect, trust and staff cohesion, were identified as key issues for potential future service improvement. Senior staff, particularly midwives and neonatal nurses, play central roles in shaping team behaviors and attitudes that may affect the safety and quality of service delivery. We suggest that strategies targeting senior staff to enhance their performance in

  16. Communicating with School Staff About Sexual Identity, Health and Safety: An Exploratory Study of the Experiences and Preferences of Black and Latino Teen Young Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesesne, Catherine A; Rasberry, Catherine N; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H; Morris, Elana; Robin, Leah

    2015-09-01

    This exploratory study examined the experiences of black and Latino teen young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and their preferences for communication with school staff about matters related to sexual orientation. Participants for this study were recruited in three urban centers in the United States and by multiple community-based organizations serving black and Latino YMSM. Eligible youth were male, black and Latino, ages 13–19, enrolled in 90 days of school in the previous 18 months, and reported attraction to or sexual behavior with other males, or identified as gay or bisexual. Participants completed web-based questionnaires (n=415) and/or in-depth interviews (n=32). Questionnaire participants reported willingness to talk to at least one school staff member about: safety, dating and relationships, and feeling attracted to other guys (63.4%, 58.4%, and 55.9%, respectively). About one-third of the sample reported they would not talk with any school staff about these topics. Exploratory analyses revealed youth who experienced feeling unsafe at school and who had higher levels of trust in the information provided by school staff were more likely to be willing to talk with school staff about safety issues, dating, or same sex attraction (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.80 and AOR=4.85, respectively). Interview participants reported being most willing to talk to staff who were able and willing to help them, who would keep discussions confidential, and who expressed genuine care. Preferences for confiding in school staff perceived to be lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) and having similar racial/ethnic background were also noted. Findings suggest school staff can serve as points of contact for reaching YMSM and professional development and interventions can be tailored to reach YMSM and connect them to services they need. Additional research is needed to understand how to increase YMSM comfort talking with school staff about sexual health or sexual

  17. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  18. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  19. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  20. The Teamwork Study: enhancing the role of non-GP staff in chronic disease management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D A; Taggart, J; Jayasinghe, U W; Proudfoot, J; Crookes, P; Beilby, J; Powell-Davis, G; Wilson, L A; Harris, M F

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence for a team-based approach in the management of chronic disease in primary health care. However, the standard of care is variable, probably reflecting the limited organisational capacity of health services to provide the necessary structured and organised care for this group of patients. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a structured intervention involving non-GP staff in GP practices on the quality of care for patients with diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A cluster randomised trial was undertaken across 60 GP practices. The intervention was implemented in 30 practices with staff and patients interviewed at baseline and at 12-15 months follow up. The change in team roles was evaluated using a questionnaire completed by practice staff. The quality of care was evaluated using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care questionnaire. We found that although the team roles of staff improved in the intervention practices and there were significant differences between practices, there was no significant difference between those in the intervention and control groups in patient-assessed quality of care after adjusting for baseline-level score and covariates at the 12-month follow up. Practice team roles were not significantly associated with change in Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care scores. Patients with multiple conditions were more likely to assess their quality of care to be better. Thus, although previous research has shown a cross-sectional association between team work and quality of care, we were unable to replicate these findings in the present study. These results may be indicative of insufficient time for organisational change to result in improved patient-assessed quality of care, or because non-GP staff roles were not sufficiently focussed on the aspects of care assessed. The findings provide important information for researchers when designing similar studies.

  1. Impact of school staff health on work productivity in secondary schools in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alker, Heather J; Wang, Monica L; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C

    2015-06-01

    Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school employees. Employees of secondary schools in Massachusetts (N = 630) participated in a longitudinal weight gain prevention intervention study. Assessment completed at baseline, 1-year and 2-year follow-up included survey assessments of health risk factors as well as measurements for height, weight, and body mass index (BMI). The survey also included a depression inventory and Work Limitations Questionnaire. Data analysis included multivariate mixed effect models to identify productivity differences in relation to BMI, depressive symptoms, and smoking in this population stratified by position type (teacher and other school staff). The sample included 361 teachers and 269 other school staff. Obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking were significantly associated with work productivity, including workdays missed because of health concerns (absenteeism) and decreases in on-the-job productivity because of health concerns (presenteeism). Three common health conditions, namely obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking, adversely affect the productivity of high school employees. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  2. Feasibility testing of smart tablet questionnaires compared to paper questionnaires in an amputee rehabilitation clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Michael; Janzen, Shannon; Earl, Eric; Deathe, Barry; Viana, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    Capturing the variability that exists among patients attending an amputee clinic using standardized paper-based questionnaires is time-consuming and may not be practical for routine clinical use. Electronic questionnaires are a potential solution; however, the benefits are dependent on the feasibility and acceptance of this mode of data collection among patients. To determine the feasibility and patient preference/comfort in using a tablet-based questionnaire for data collection in an outpatient amputee rehabilitation clinic compared to a traditional paper-based questionnaire. Observational study. In all, 48 patients with major extremity amputations completed both tablet and paper questionnaires related to their amputation and prosthetic use. Both trials were timed; patients then completed a semi-structured questionnaire about their experience. In all, 20.5% of patients needed hands-on assistance completing the paper questionnaire compared to 20.8% for the tablet. The majority of participants (52.1%) indicated a preference for the tablet questionnaire; 64.6% of patients felt the tablet collected a more complete and accurate representation of their status and needs. In all, 70.8% of participants described themselves as comfortable using the tablet. Despite comorbidities, patients with amputations demonstrated excellent acceptance of the electronic tablet-based questionnaire. Tablet questionnaires have significant potential advantages over paper questionnaires and should be further explored. Clinical relevance A custom electronic questionnaire was found to be beneficial for routine clinic use and was well received by patients in an amputee rehabilitation clinic. Development of such questionnaires can provide an efficient mechanism to collect meaningful data that can be used for individual patient care and program quality improvement initiatives.

  3. The latest on the recent HR staff survey

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The data collected in the framework of the staff survey sent out by the Human Resources (HR) Department in March this year are currently being analysed. The first results concern the response rate and the breakdown of participants. 1328 staff members replied to the questionnaire, representing a response rate of close to 60%. Marie-Luce Falipou, who is in charge of the project within the HR Department, is evidently satisfied with the result: "The high response rate shows that the staff appreciated HR’s efforts to sound out their opinions and felt concerned by the subjects covered in the questionnaire". All the data are now being processed by the team led by Philippe Sarnin, Director of the Social Psychology Department at the University of Lyon2. "The number of responses submitted during the 15 days the form was available on line was very satisfactory. This is a vital factor in ensuring that we are able to build up an accurate pictu...

  4. Loss, Responsibility, Blame? Staff Discourses of Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, Lesley; Deane, Janis

    2012-01-01

    Student plagiarism and difficulties with writing have been widely investigated in the literature, but there has been less research on staff perspectives. A Joint Information Services Committee (JISC)-funded questionnaire (n = 80) and focus group study investigated the views of lecturers, librarians and study advisors at a UK post-92 university,…

  5. Use of university libraries by academic staff of Nigerian universities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study employed descriptive survey research method to sample 318 respondents from a population of 326 academic staff. Questionnaire was used for data collections and descriptive statistics using IBM SPSS Statistics 2.0 in computing the statistical table to determine its frequencies and percentages. The findings of this ...

  6. Delegation and Staff Commitment in the School of Finance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between Delegation of Authority and Staff Commitment in the School of Finance and Banking in Kigali Rwanda. A cross-sectional survey design was used with the target sample size of 97 out of 130 parent population. The total number of questionnaires that were ...

  7. Staff development and library services in academic libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined staff development and library services in academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta States. Descriptive survey research design was used for this study, data was collected by means of a questionnaire form one hundred and seventy-one (171) librarians of fifteen (15) academic libraries in Bayelsa and Delta ...

  8. A questionnaire comparison of two alarm systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Steven G.

    1997-11-01

    A questionnaire was developed, based on guidelines for alarm system design given in NUREG/CR-6105. The intentions were both to develop a subjective instrument for rating the effectiveness of alarm systems and to learn lessons on alarm system design from a comparison of two systems. The questionnaire was administered to reactor operations staff at two locations with different alarm systems embedded in a simulation of the same underlying PWR power plant: Loviisa NPP and Halden Man-Machine Laboratory. The questionnaire, considered as a measuring instrument, had good to high reliability and moderate to good content validity. The questionnaire is considered suitable for further use in the shortened form resulting from this study. Further work is also recommended. The degree of reliability and validity also lend a degree of validation to the NUREG guidelines. The questionnaire was able to show differences between ratings of the two alarm systems. The Loviisa system showed more consistency with other control room features and was better at drawing the operators' attention to important alarms. Both systems were not rated particularly well on alarm prioritisation and spurious alarms. The Halden system was better at showing naturally occurring relationships between alarms. Some of these differences may have been due to the subjects' greater familiarity with the Loviisa alarm system. The results nevertheless show that the questionnaire can measure subjective responses to alarm systems. (author)

  9. Beliefs of Turkish female teaching staff regarding mammography scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Ayla Bayik; Ardahan, Melek; Sesli, Esra

    2010-01-01

    To our knowledge, there has hitherto been no research to determine the beliefs of female teaching staff, who are highly educated and form a special risk group regarding breast cancer, towards mammography scanning in Turkey. Definitive research was planned to determine the beliefs of the female teaching staff working in a university. Data were collected by researchers via face-to-face interview using a sociodemographic questionnaire and " Health Belief Model ". The point average of the teaching staff in the mammography benefits sub-scale is 19.6 ± 3.87, their average item score is 3.91. The point average of the teaching staff in the mammography obstacles sub-scale is 21.17 ± 6.87, their average item score is 1.92. They agree on the benefits of the mammography, but they do not agree on the obstacles to mammography.

  10. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisling, Diamond; David, Curran

    2016-01-01

    Setting Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twelve ambulance bases within one Trust locality in NI (N = 107). Primary and secondary outcome measures The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1972, 1978), Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS, Bride, 2004) and an assessment of need questionnaire were completed and explored using mixed method analysis. Results Results showed elevated levels of psychological distress within each profession except ambulance service clinical support officers (CSOs). Elevated levels of secondary trauma symptomatology were also found; the highest were within some nursing grades and junior doctors. Decreased enjoyment in job over time was significantly associated with higher scores. Analysis of qualitative data identified sources of stress to include low morale. A total of 65% of participants thought that work related stressors had negatively affected their mental health. Participants explored what they felt could decrease psychological distress including improved resources and psychoeducation. Conclusion There were elevated levels of distress and secondary traumatic stress within this population as well as an expressed level of need, on both systemic and support levels. PMID:27601762

  11. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta, Yolanda; García, Mirian; Heras, Elena; López-Herce, Jesús; Fernández, Sarah N; Mencía, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females): 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p  = 0.004) between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers) and relationships or social life (22.6%). In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  12. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Puerta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females: 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p = 0.004 between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers and relationships or social life (22.6%. In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  13. Factors Effecting Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dağdeviren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this paper, we aimed to investigate the job satisfaction levels of all the academic staff in Trakya University, along with their socioeconomic features.Material and Methods: We used a questionnaire including the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Frequency tables, cross tabulations, Pearson Chi-square, Exact Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s Multiple Comparison and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID tests were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of 560 participants was 33.86±7.33 years, of whom 47% (n=263 were female and 53% (n=297 male. Of the participants, the mean levels were 63.06±10.96 for general, 44.79±7.49 for intrinsic, and 18.27±4.64 for extrinsic job satisfaction. 85.4% of the academic staff (n=478 had a moderate level of satisfaction, whereas 14.6% (n=82 had a higher level. There was a significant relationship between income and job satisfaction levels. With the CHAID analysis, it was determined that job satisfaction had a relationship with age, educational status, total years of service and years of service in the current department. Conclusion: Job satisfaction can reflect the general emotional status of employees. It has a greater importance for the jobs that can affect the extraoccupational lives directly and require constant devotion. Employers should take some measures to increase job satisfaction in order to improve efficiency.

  14. Language services in hospitals: discordance in availability and staff use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschurtz, Brette A; Koss, Richard G; Kupka, Nancy J; Williams, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Despite efforts to advance effective patient-provider communication, many patients' language needs continue to be unmet or inappropriately addressed by healthcare providers (Wielawski 2010; Patek et al. 2009; Wilson-Stronks and Galvez 2007). This study presents a picture of the language resources currently provided by hospitals and those resources practitioners actually use. Questionnaire data were collected from 14 hospitals in Florida's Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Martin counties on availability, staff awareness, and staff use of linguistic resources and services. Inconsistencies were identified between the language tools, services, and resources hospitals provide and those staff use. In addition, a large majority of staff respondents still rely upon someone accompanying the patient for communication with patients who have limited English proficiency, despite evidence that this practice contributes to miscommunication and serious medical errors (Flores et al. 2003; Flores 2005; HHS OMH 2001; Patek et al. 2009). Hospitals that use bilingual staff as interpreters often do not test the competency of these staff, nor do they assess the utilization or effectiveness of the tools and resources they provide. Hospitals can improve the cultural and linguistic care they provide if they (1) address the practice of using ad hoc interpreters, (2) effectively disseminate information to hospital staff regarding how and when to access available resources, and (3) collect patient population data and use it to plan for and evaluate the language services they provide to their patients.

  15. Culture, organization, and management in intensive care: construction and validation of a multidimensional questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, Etienne; Dervaux, Benoît; Retbi, Aurélia; Aegerter, Philippe; Boumendil, Ariane; Jars-Guincestre, Marie Claude; Tenaillon, Alain; Guidet, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and validate a questionnaire designed to assess the culture, organization, and management of intensive care units. This is a prospective multicenter study. The study was conducted in 26 intensive care units located in Paris. All personnel were asked to complete the questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed in 2 steps: (1) development of a theoretical framework based on organizational theory and (2) testing of the reliability and validity of a comprehensive set of measures. The internal consistency of the items composing each scale was tested by using the Cronbach alpha. Convergent, and discriminant validity was assessed by factor analysis with varimax rotation. The overall completion rate was 74% with 1000 respondents (750 nurses, 26 head nurses, 168 physicians, and 56 medical secretaries). Starting with a 220-item questionnaire, we constructed a short version-conserving metrological characteristics with good reliability and validity. The short questionnaire, entitled Culture, Organization, and Management in Intensive Care, consists of 106 items distributed in 9 dimensions and 22 scales: culture (n = 3), coordination and adaptation to uncertainty (n = 3), communication (n = 3), problem solving and conflict management (n = 2), organizational learning and organizational change (n = 2), skills developed in a patient-caregiver relationship (n = 1), subjective unit performance (n = 3), burnout (n = 3), and job satisfaction and intention to quit (n = 2). All the scales showed good-to-high reliability, with Cronbach alpha scores higher than .7 (with the exception of coordination [.6]). Team satisfaction-oriented culture is positively correlated with good managerial practices and individual well-being. The Culture, Organization, and Management in Intensive Care questionnaire enables staff and managers to assess the organizational performance of their intensive care unit.

  16. Staff Definitions of Challenging Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgie, Sarah; Hastings, Richard P.

    2002-01-01

    Fifty staff working with adults with mental retardation rated potentially challenging behaviors in terms of: (1) whether they thought the behaviors were challenging, and (2) whether the behaviors should be the focus of intervention. Results found that staff were less likely to identify as challenging those behaviors having negative effects on…

  17. The forgotten workforce: clerical and administrative staff within British Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Kay

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines the employment conditions for clerical and administrative staff within the British Higher Education Sector. For this analysis a national questionnaire was distributed and 747 responses were returned and analysed. In order to further enrich the qualitative research data, 30 interviews were also conducted, mainly with clerical and secretarial staff but also with management staff who had progressed from clerical grades.\\ud \\ud The main focus of the research was to examine in...

  18. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  19. Training Initiatives for Skills Acquisition in Icts by Academic Staff of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study sought to assess training initiatives for skills acquisition in ICTs by academic staff of the University of Calabar. A descriptive survey design and the random sampling procedure were used to administer 150 copies of a validated questionnaire to academic staff of the university. Of these, 90 usable copies ...

  20. A note on some behavioral aspects of radiation protection staff working in hospitals around Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to collect information concerning radiation protection staff working in hospitals in and around Delhi. The information included the organization of the department, the status and involvement of the radiation protection staff and their performance and job satisfaction. Answers received from departments of Radiotherapy, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine were used to assess the relationship between involvement, performance and job satisfaction. (author)

  1. Service quality improvement of ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sittichai Sricharoenpramong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to: 1 evaluate the service quality of the ground staff at Don Mueang International Airport (DMK, 2 compare the ground staff quality service perception of Thai passengers at DMK, and 3 provide guidelines for service quality improvement of the DMK airlines ground staff. A sample size of 400 Thai domestic passengers was accidentally selected at DMK. A questionnaire was used as a research tool for data collection. Five dimensions of service quality were evaluated: reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy, and tangibles. It was found that the service quality of ground staff was moderate. The highest dimension of service quality realization was tangibles, followed successively by reliability, assurance, empathy, and responsiveness. The passengers' perception of the ground staff's service quality varied by gender and age group. Guidelines were proposed for the improvement of ground staff service quality at DMK based on the findings. Keywords: airport, ground staff, quality of service

  2. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  3. Development of the school organisational health questionnaire: a measure for assessing teacher morale and school organisational climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P M; Wearing, A J; Conn, M; Carter, N L; Dingle, R K

    2000-06-01

    A growing body of empirical evidence suggests that organisational factors are more important than classroom specific issues in determining teacher morale. Accordingly, it is necessary to have available measures that accurately assess morale, as well as the organisational factors that are likely to underpin the experience of morale. Three studies were conducted with the aim of developing a psychometrically sound questionnaire that could be used to assess teacher morale and various dimensions of school organisational climate. A total of 1,520 teachers from 18 primary and 26 secondary schools in the Australian state of Victoria agreed to participate in three separate studies (N = 615, 342 and 563 in Studies 1, 2 and 3, respectively) that were used to develop the questionnaire. The demographic profile of the teachers was similar to that found in the Department as a whole. All teaching staff in the participating schools were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire as part of the evaluation of an organisational development programme. A series of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to establish the questionnaire's factor structure, and correlation analyses were used to examine the questionnaire's convergent and discriminant validity. The three studies resulted in the 54-item School Organisational Health Questionnaire that measures teacher morale and 11 separate dimensions of school organisational climate: appraisal and recognition, curriculum coordination, effective discipline policy, excessive work demands, goal congruence, participative decision-making, professional growth, professional interaction, role clarity, student orientation, and supportive leadership.

  4. Physical Activity Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostencka Alicja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of the study was to determine the weekly energy expenditure measuring MET/min/week based on data collected through the Canada Fitness Survey (CFS, according to the classification used in the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, and to verify the adopted method to assess the level of physical activity in students of physical education.

  5. Penn State Worry Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise; Caspersen, Ida Dyhr

    2013-01-01

    and valid assessment tools are essential to identify at-risk children. The present study investigates (i) the factor structure of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C) using a large Danish community sample (N¿=¿933), and (ii) its treatment sensitivity in clinically anxious children (N...

  6. Questionnaire typography and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first.

  7. Preanalytical errors in primary healthcare: a questionnaire study of information search procedures, test request management and test tube labelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Johan; Brulin, Christine; Grankvist, Kjell; Wallin, Olof

    2009-01-01

    Most errors in laboratory medicine occur in the preanalytical phase and are the result of human mistakes. This study investigated information search procedures, test request management and test tube labelling in primary healthcare compared to the same procedures amongst clinical laboratory staff. A questionnaire was completed by 317 venous blood sampling staff in 70 primary healthcare centres and in two clinical laboratories (response rate = 94%). Correct procedures were not always followed. Only 60% of the primary healthcare staff reported that they always sought information in the updated, online laboratory manual. Only 12% reported that they always labelled the test tubes prior to drawing blood samples. No major differences between primary healthcare centres and clinical laboratories were found, except for test tube labelling, whereby the laboratory staff reported better practices. Re-education and access to documented routines were not clearly associated with better practices. The preanalytical procedure in the surveyed primary healthcare centres was associated with a risk of errors which could affect patient safety. To improve patient safety in laboratory testing, all healthcare providers should survey their preanalytical procedures and improve the total testing process with a systems perspective.

  8. 32 CFR 270.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 270.5 Section 270.5 National Defense... Staff. (a) The Commission will have a support staff, which will include staff members sufficient to expeditiously and efficiently process the applications for payments under this part. All members of the staff...

  9. Computer Literacy among University Academic Staff: The Case of IIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Majid

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the nature and extent of computing skills of International Islamic University Malaysia (IIUM faculty members. A questionnaire was used to elicit information regarding computer literacy from a sample of 114 faculty members. The study shows that the level of computer literacy among IIUM faculty members is quite low: most of them have been using computers for word processing only. Other computer applications are being used by a limited number of academic staff. Irrespective of the existing level of computer literacy, almost all academic staff showed interest in attending computer courses.

  10. Staff numbers: from words to action!

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    2006 is a decisive year for the definition of needs for human resources and long-term budget for the Organization. The LHC is officially programmed for 31 August 2007; the Director-General has to draw up a â€ワLong-term Plan” (LTP) by the end of the year. This projected programme will specify the needs for staff fron now until 2010 and beyond, in particular in the framework of the completion and running of this unique machine.

  11. A questionnaire survey on forensic odontology: Are we really aware?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Ankita; Rehani, Shweta; Mathias, Yulia; Kardam, Priyanka; Nagpal, Ruchi; Kumari, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    The role of a dentist is not only to examine and treat the oral diseases but also to assist the legal authorities by means of its branch-forensic odontology. Through forensic odontology, a dentist plays a very important role in crime investigation of any type. To analyze the knowledge, awareness, and interest of forensic odontology among the dental teaching staff who are working in the dental colleges within the Delhi NCR. A questionnaire of 12 questions (both open-ended and close-ended) was prepared and the survey was conducted with 200 dental teaching staff. A sufficient knowledge but poor awareness and interest among the dental teaching staff was observed. The study highlighted that although dental teaching staff themselves have sound knowledge regarding forensic odontology, their awareness and interest need to be upgraded on a regular basis. The success of acquiring such extensive knowledge would be valid if better job opportunities in these fields would be increased.

  12. Staff happiness and work satisfaction in a tertiary psychiatric centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Y; Swartz, M; Sirkis, S; Mirecki, I; Barak, Y

    2013-09-01

    Mental health professionals are at a high risk of burnout. Positive psychology outcomes of staff in acute in-patient psychiatric wards are poorly researched and unclear. To quantify the satisfaction with life and work-life satisfaction of mental health staff at a large university-affiliated tertiary psychiatric centre. We utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and the Work-Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (WLSQ). Two hundred and nine out of 450 staff members (46%) participated; mean age 48.2 + 9.9 years; 63% were male. On average the participants had been practising their speciality for 21.1 + 9.8 years (range: 2-48). The mean total SWLS scores differed significantly between professions (P happiness were reported by psychologists and social workers, followed by the administrative staff, the psychiatrists and finally the nursing staff. Staff scored the highest for work as a 'calling' followed by work as a 'career' and the lowest rating for work as a 'job'. The mean total WLSQ score differed between professions, (P happiness may contribute to increase in moral and counter burnout.

  13. Rational-Emotive Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Susan G.; Forman, Bruce D.

    1980-01-01

    The application of Rational-Emotive Therapy principles and techniques in in-service education for school personnel is discussed. Teacher and counselor participation in a staff development program is described. (Author)

  14. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  15. Vaccination against influenza at a European pediatric cancer center: immunization rates and attitudes among staff, patients, and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettke, Aleksandra; Jocham, Sophie; Wiener, Andreas; Löcken, Andreas; Groenefeld, Judith; Ahlmann, Martina; Groll, Andreas H

    2017-12-01

    Influenza is an important cause of infectious morbidity in pediatric cancer patients. We conducted a single-center survey to explore adherence and attitudes towards the recommended annual influenza vaccination. Self-administered, standardized questionnaires were distributed to 143 staff members and 264 families. Items analyzed included demographic data, knowledge about influenza, history of prior influenza infections and vaccinations, routes of information and education, and attitudes towards the recommended influenza. Variables associated with vaccination were explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred six staff members with patient contact and 139 primary caretakers completed the questionnaire. Fifty-nine percent of staff members and 60% of the caretakers provided correct answers to all four knowledge questions; 32 and 54% reported a history of prior influenza, and 61 and 47% had received at least one influenza vaccination in the past. Vaccination rates for the previous season were 47, 34, 30, 25, and 29% in staff members, primary caretakers, their partners, diseased children, and their siblings, respectively. Main motivations (>75% in ≥ 1 cohort) for vaccination were prevention of influenza disease and concerns to transmit it to others (77-100%) and reasons for not being immunized concerns of adverse effects and use of alternative protection (33-83%). Variables significantly associated with vaccination by multivariate analysis included receipt of influenza vaccinations in the past (OR 2.2-20.5), recommendations by health care providers (OR 4.8-45.5), a lower level of education (caretakers; OR 2.2), and younger age (children; OR 0.9). The results of this survey indicate insufficient vaccination rates and provide potential approaches for improved vaccination strategies in the setting of pediatric cancer care.

  16. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC's Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff's current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff's uses of PRA

  17. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  18. [The night shift: a risk factor for health and quality of life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet-Porqueras, Ricard; Moliné-Pallarés, Alícia; Olona-Cabases, Montserrat; Gil-Mateu, Elsa; Bonet-Notario, Patricia; Les-Morell, Ester; Iza-Maiza, Montserrat; Bonet-Porqueras, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    To study shift-related differences (day shift vs. night shift) in health and quality of life in nursing staff in hospitals in the Catalan public health system. We performed a cross-sectional multicenter study in a sample of 476 nursing staff in the wards and special services of five Catalan public hospitals working for at least 6 consecutive months on the day shift or night shift. The nurses completed a validated, self-administered questionnaire on quality of life (M. Ruiz and E. Baca) and another questionnaire on health-related aspects such as sleep, working conditions, and demographic variables. Nurses working on the night shift showed a higher prevalence of appetite disturbance (45.2% vs 34.4%; p=0.01) and varicose veins (46.6% vs 36.4%; p=0.008). Sleeping disorders were also more frequent on the night shift, including insomnia and sleep fragmentation, with no differences in those who slept during the day (22.3%vs 33.7% ) or night (17.6% vs 30%) with respect to the day shift (12.2% vs 22.6%). Multivariate analysis of the results of the quality of life questionnaire revealed the night shift to be associated with the dimensions of social support (OR: 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01-3.01), physical/psychological well-being (OR: 1.04; 95% CI, 1.004-1.07) and leisure time (OR: 1.07; 95% CI, 1.003-1.1), although the overall score was similar. The night shift is associated a higher incidence of varicose veins, appetite disturbance and sleep disorders, as well as alterations related to social support, leisure time, and physical and physiological well-being.

  19. Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staff Knowledge, Adherence to Infection Control Recommendations and Seroconversion Rates in Hemodialysis Centers in Khartoum. ... Adherence of staff members to infection control recommendations was evaluated by direct observation. Results: ... A structured training program for HD staff members is urgently required.

  20. Food frequency questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2015. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. [Multiprofessional family-system training programme in psychiatry--effects on team cooperation and staff strain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwack, Julika; Schweitzer, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    How does the interdisciplinary cooperation of psychiatric staff members change after a multiprofessional family systems training programme? Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 49 staff members. Quantitative questionnaires were used to assess burnout (Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI) and team climate (Team-Klima-Inventar, TKI). The multiprofessional training intensifies interdisciplinary cooperation. It results in an increased appreciation of the nurses involved and in a redistribution of therapeutic tasks between nurses, psychologists and physicians. Staff burnout decreased during the research period, while task orientation and participative security within teams increased. The multiprofessional family systems training appears suitable to improve quality of patient care and interdisciplinary cooperation and to reduce staff burnout.

  2. Questionnaire 5YR 2013 - Thank you

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    One thousand four hundred and sixty-three of you, i.e., some 58 % of staff members (or clearly more if we take account of staff absent during the month of October), responded to our questionnaire on the upcoming Five-yearly review. This is a great success, because the response rate is significantly higher than in 2003 or 2008, when only about 50 % replied. After having checked the representativeness of the replies with regard to certain key variables, the detailed analysis of the results has now started. At public meetings scheduled for the second week of February 2014, we plan to share with you the information that your delegates have distilled from the answers to the questionnaire. On that occasion you will be able to give your feedback. Your active participation in these meetings will allow us to consolidate the demands we will propose in the consultation process with Management for inclusion in the list of topics to be addressed by the Director-General. Indeed, the Director-General must provide a menu o...

  3. Implications of staff 'churn' for nurse managers, staff, and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Roche, Michael; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Catling-Paull, Christine

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the term "churn" is used not only because of the degree of change to staffing, but also because some of the reasons for staff movement are not classified as voluntary turnover. The difficulties for the nurse managing a unit with the degree of "churn" should not be under-estimated. Changes to skill mix and the proportions of full-time, agency, and temporary staff present challenges in providing clinical leadership, scheduling staff, performance management, and supervision. Perhaps more importantly, it is likely that there is an impact on the continuity of care provided in the absence of continuity of staffing. A greater understanding of the human and financial costs and consequences, and a willingness to change established practices at the institutional and ward level, are needed.

  4. Workplace incivility and productivity losses among direct care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Scott; Gates, Donna

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine incivility experienced by direct health care staff in their workplaces. The sample (N = 184) was 91% female and 77% White, with 71% of the participants having earned an associate degree or above and 81% being registered nurses. The Work Limitations Questionnaire and the Incivility in Healthcare Survey were distributed to all direct care staff at a major metropolitan hospital (22% response rate). Correlations were found between workplace incivility from direct supervisors and productivity (r = 0.284, p = .000) and workplace incivility from patients and productivity (r = 0.204, p = .006). Incivility from physicians, incivility from other direct care staff, and general environmental incivility were not shown to be significantly related to productivity. Demographics were not related to levels of workplace incivility. Workplace incivility from patients and management appears to have a greater impact on employees' productivity than workplace incivility from other sources.

  5. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  6. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trang, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  7. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  8. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! After verification by the Electoral Commission, all candidates for the elections to the Staff Council have been registered. It is now up to you, members of the Staff Association, to vote for the candidate(s) of your choice. We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. We are using an electronic voting system; all you need to do is click the link below and follow the instructions on the screen. https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017 The deadline for voting is Monday, 13 November at midday (12 pm). Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The ...

  9. Coping patterns in special school staff: demographic and organizational factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Dudenhöffer, S; Claus, M; Kimbel, R; Letzel, S; Rose, D-M

    2016-03-01

    Teachers' mental health is commonly discussed in organizational health studies, but studies in special schools are rare. Work-related coping and experience patterns (WCEPs) have been shown to be associated with mental health and intentions to leave. The influence of organizational factors on coping patterns has not been examined. To assess the distribution of WCEPs in special school staff and to identify potential influencing factors. We surveyed a sample of teachers and educational staff in 13 German special schools using the WCEP questionnaire and COPSOQ (Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire). Of 245 teachers and 417 educational staff contacted, 114 teachers (47%) and 252 educational staff (60%) responded, an overall response rate of 55% (366/662). Coping patterns of special school staff were classified as unambitious (30%), excessively ambitious (7%), resigned (17%), healthy-ambitious (12%) or unclassifiable (34%). Furthermore we found several significant relations with demographic and organizational factors. For example, the resigned pattern is associated with age [Exp(B) 1.12; 95% CI 1.05-1.19], emotional demands [Exp(B) 1.07; 95% CI 1.01-1.12], work-family conflict [Exp(B) 1.07; 95% CI 1.03-1.10] and bullying [Exp(B) 1.04; 95% CI 1.00-1.08]. Since emotional and social factors are associated with risky (excessively ambitious or resigned) and unambitious coping patterns in special school teachers and educational staff, interventions should focus on them. Further research could explore causal relations and observe the development of coping styles over time. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Understanding staff perceptions about Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae control efforts in Chicago long-term acute care hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Rosie D; Moore, Nicholas M; Weiner, Shayna B; Sikka, Monica; Lin, Michael Y; Weinstein, Robert A; Hayden, Mary K; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L

    2014-04-01

    To identify differences in organizational culture and better understand motivators to implementation of a bundle intervention to control Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (KPC). Mixed-methods study. Four long-term acute care hospitals (LTACHs) in Chicago. LTACH staff across 3 strata of employees (administration, midlevel management, and frontline clinical workers). Qualitative interviews or focus groups and completion of a quantitative questionnaire. Eighty employees (frontline, 72.5%; midlevel, 17.5%; administration, 10%) completed surveys and participated in qualitative discussions in August 2012. Although 82.3% of respondents felt that quality improvement was a priority at their LTACH, there were statistically significant differences in organizational culture between staff strata, with administrative-level having higher organizational culture scores (ie, more favorable responses) than midlevel or frontline staff. When asked to rank the success of the KPC control program, mean response was 8.0 (95% confidence interval, 7.6-8.5), indicating a high level of agreement with the perception that the program was a success. Patient safety and personal safety were reported most often as personal motivators for intervention adherence. The most convergent theme related to prevention across groups was that proper hand hygiene is vital to prevention of KPC transmission. Despite differences in organizational culture across 3 strata of LTACH employees, the high degree of convergence in motivation, understanding, and beliefs related to implementation of a KPC control bundle suggests that all levels of staff may be able to align perspectives when faced with a key infection control problem and quality improvement initiative.

  11. Addressing Adolescent Depression in Schools: Evaluation of an In-Service Training for School Staff in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carmen R.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an adolescent depression in-service training for school staff in the United States. A total of 252 school staff (e.g., teachers, principals, counselors) completed assessments prior to and following the in-service and a subsample of these staff participated in focus groups following the in-service and three months later.…

  12. Physiotherapy departments in Australian tertiary hospitals regularly participate in and disseminate research results despite a lack of allocated staff: a prospective cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Hough, Janet; Wang, Yi Tian; Hough, Catherine R; Southby, Alesha; Snowdon, David A; Sturgess, Tamica; Haines, Terry P

    2015-03-01

    To establish the level of research activity in physiotherapy departments of Australian tertiary hospitals. Prospective cross-sectional survey. Physiotherapy managers from 37 principal referral hospitals and specialist women's and children's hospitals as identified from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2011). A purpose-designed predominantly open-response questionnaire investigating site demographics, research activity and research support was developed, piloted and administered. Thirty-seven surveys were completed (54% response rate). Median [IQR] respondent equivalent full-time staffing was 23.8 (19-39). Respondents represented a median [IQR] 6.5 (3-20) publication output in the past 2 years. Twelve respondents (32%) reported that staff had completed a doctorate in the past 5 years and 49% of respondents reported no staff had completed higher degrees. A total of 71 grants had been received and 73% of respondents indicated they had no allocated staffing for research activity. The most common indicators of research culture were organization-led research dissemination events and research training (i.e. manager attending research events and celebrating research achievements). This is the first study to report on research activity in hospital-based Australian physiotherapy departments. Few sites allocate staff to conduct or support research. Despite this, physiotherapy departments regularly publish and present research results. Future studies could investigate how hospital-based physiotherapy departments can optimize research culture and output.

  13. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  14. 2017 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! We hope that you will be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council! By doing so, you can support and encourage the women and men, who will represent you over the next two years. The voting takes place from 23 October to 13 November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2017. Elections Timetable Monday 13 November, at noon Closing date for voting Tuesday 21 November and Tuesday 5 December Publication of the results in Echo Monday 27 and Tuesday 28 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 5 December (afternoon) First meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November and 5 December. Candidates for the 2017 Elections

  15. Emergency and Disaster Preparedness of School Transportation Staff and School Buses in the United States: Compliance With Recommendations for School Transportation Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Weber, Christopher; Brady, Jodi; Ho, Susana

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the compliance of school transportation staff and school buses with recommendations for the safe transportation of children to and from school and school-related activities. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to school transportation staff represented by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters during the 2013-2014 academic year. Analysis was performed on 558 completed questionnaires (13% usable response rate). Responders had previous training in first aid (89%), basic life support (28%), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (52%). Seventy-eight percent of school buses in our sample had restraint devices and 87% had seat belt cutters. Responders reported the immediate availability of the following on their bus: communication devices (81%), first aid kits (97%), fire extinguishers (89%), automated external defibrillators (1%), and epinephrine autoinjectors (2%). Thirty percent of responders have had no previous training in the management of emergencies such as trouble breathing, severe allergic reaction, seizures, cardiac arrest or unresponsiveness, and head, neck, or extremity trauma. Thirteen percent of responders are unfamiliar with or have had no previous training on protocols regarding emergency shelters and community evacuation plans in the event of a disaster. Variability exists in the compliance of school transportation staff and school buses with recommendations for the safe transportation of children. Areas for improvement were identified, such as educating school transportation staff in the recognition and initial management of pediatric emergencies, ensuring the presence of restraint devices, increasing the immediate availability of certain emergency medications and equipment, and familiarizing school transportation staff with designated emergency shelters and community evacuation plans.

  16. Staff Development for School Improvement: An Illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelfelt, Roy A., Ed.

    This document contains 11 papers on school staff development: (1) "The Staff Development for School Improvement Program" (Winifred I. Warnat); (2) "A Teacher's View of a Staff Development Project" (Lynn Kleiman); (3) "Staff Development from the Principal's Perspective" (Dixie Hibner); (4) "Stepping-Stones to Success" (Barbara A. Skone); (5)…

  17. 22 CFR 902.3 - Board staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Board staff. 902.3 Section 902.3 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD ORGANIZATION § 902.3 Board staff. The chairperson shall select the Board's executive secretary and other staff provided for in the Act. The executive secretary and staff...

  18. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff. 8.05... staff. (a) Each exchange shall establish an adequate enforcement staff which shall be authorized by the... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not...

  19. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Speaking Up About Patient Safety Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Aline; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Schwappach, David D L

    2017-08-28

    Speaking up about safety concerns by staff is important to prevent medical errors. Knowledge about healthcare workers' speaking up behaviors and perceived speaking up climate is useful for healthcare organizations (HCOs) to identify areas for improvement. The aim of this study was to develop a short questionnaire allowing HCOs to assess different aspects of speaking up among healthcare staff. Healthcare workers (n = 523) from 2 Swiss hospitals completed a questionnaire covering various aspects of speak up-related behaviors and climate. Psychometric testing included descriptive statistics, correlations, reliabilities (Cronbach α), principal component analysis, and t tests for assessing differences in hierarchical groups. Principal component analysis confirmed the structure of 3 speaking up behavior-related scales, that is, frequency of perceived concerns (concern scale, α = 0.73), withholding voice (silence scale, α = 0.76), and speaking up (speak up scale, α = 0.85). Concerning speak up climate, principal component analysis revealed 3 scales (psychological safety, α = 0.84; encouraging environment, α = 0.74; resignation, α = 0.73). The final survey instrument also included items covering speaking up barriers and a vignette to assess simulated behavior. A higher hierarchical level was mostly associated with a more positive speak up-related behavior and climate. Patient safety concerns, speaking up, and withholding voice were frequently reported. With this questionnaire, we present a tool to systematically assess and evaluate important aspects of speaking up in HCOs. This allows for identifying areas for improvement, and because it is a short survey, to monitor changes in speaking up-for example, before and after an improvement project.

  20. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vocht, Frank [University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol (United Kingdom); Batistatou, Evridiki [University of Manchester, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Moelter, Anna [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel [Utrecht University, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Tongeren, Martie [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Centre for Human Exposure Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Crozier, Stuart [University of Queensland, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia); Gowland, Penny [University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Physics, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective symptoms and work practices, and wore a magnetic field dosimeter during one to three randomly selected working days. Incidence of MRI-related symptoms was obtained for all shifts and prevalence of MRI-related and reference symptoms was associated to explanatory factors using ordinal regression. Incident symptoms related to working with MRI were reported in 4 % of shifts. Prevalence of MRI-related, but not reference symptoms were associated with number of hours per week working with MRI, shift length, and stress, but not with magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 T) or measured magnetic field exposure. Reporting of prevalent symptoms was associated with longer duration of working in MRI departments, but not with measured field strength of exposure. Other factors related to organisation and stress seem to contribute to increased reporting of MRI-related symptoms. (orig.)

  1. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vocht, Frank; Batistatou, Evridiki; Moelter, Anna; Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel; Van Tongeren, Martie; Crozier, Stuart; Gowland, Penny; Keevil, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective symptoms and work practices, and wore a magnetic field dosimeter during one to three randomly selected working days. Incidence of MRI-related symptoms was obtained for all shifts and prevalence of MRI-related and reference symptoms was associated to explanatory factors using ordinal regression. Incident symptoms related to working with MRI were reported in 4 % of shifts. Prevalence of MRI-related, but not reference symptoms were associated with number of hours per week working with MRI, shift length, and stress, but not with magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 T) or measured magnetic field exposure. Reporting of prevalent symptoms was associated with longer duration of working in MRI departments, but not with measured field strength of exposure. Other factors related to organisation and stress seem to contribute to increased reporting of MRI-related symptoms. (orig.)

  2. Workplace violence against medical staff in healthcare facilities in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, M; Morris, E; Sobers-Grannum, N

    2016-10-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests increasing workplace violence against healthcare workers in the Caribbean, but the prevalence is largely undocumented. To determine the prevalence of workplace violence reported by medical staff at primary care clinics in Barbados. A study utilizing a modified version of the standard World Health Organization Workplace Violence Questionnaire, designed to assess the incidence, types and features of workplace violence. All nursing and physician staff on duty at the island's eight primary care clinics during the study period were invited to participate. Of the 102 respondents (72% response rate), 63% of nursing and physician staff at the polyclinics in Barbados reported at least one episode of violence in the past year. The majority reported being exposed to verbal abuse (60%) and 19% reported being exposed to bullying. Seven percent of the staff reported incidents of sexual harassment, 3% physical violence and another 3% reported racial harassment. Patients emerged as the main perpetrators of violence (64%). Logistic regression showed statistically significant associations between gender and workplace violence. Females and nurses were more predisposed to experience violent incidents than males and physicians. Over a half of medical staff surveyed reported experiencing some type of violence in the past year, female gender being a significant predictor of abuse. Adequate documentation and implementing clear policies and violence prevention programmes in health institutions are crucial steps towards addressing this issue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Staff Rules and Regulations – Modification No. 4 to the 11th edition

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Please note that the following pages of the Staff Rules and Regulations have been modified as of 1 January 2010: Monthly basic salaries of staff members (Annex R A 5): amendment of page 71.   Stipends of fellows (Annex R A 6): amendment of page 72. The complete electronic version of the Staff Rules and Regulations is accessible on the HR Department intranet site. Tel. 78003

  4. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheshin Arik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients’ angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n=38 were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n=80 & n=144. Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff’s fear level. Staff’s responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients’ requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff’s response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  5. A study into the effectiveness of a postural care training programme aimed at improving knowledge, understanding and confidence in parents and school staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotham, S; Hamilton-West, K E; Hutton, E; King, A; Abbott, N

    2017-09-01

    Parents and school staff lack knowledge and confidence when providing postural care to physically disabled children. This can act as a barrier to the successful implementation of therapy. To address this problem, we developed a novel training programme to improve knowledge and confidence in providing postural care and evaluate the impact of the training programme in parents and school staff. The postural care training programme included three elements: a 2-h interactive workshop facilitated by physiotherapists and occupational therapists, a follow-up home/school visit and a follow-up telephone call. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was utilized to evaluate the impact and includes subscales assessing knowledge and understanding, concerns and confidence in providing postural care. The Understanding, Knowledge and Confidence in Providing Postural Care for Children with Disabilities questionnaire was completed at baseline and 6 weeks later. The training programme was delivered to N = 75 parents and school staff. Of these, N = 65 completed both baseline and follow-up measures and were used in the data analysis. Participants and therapists were also invited to provide further feedback on the overall training programme via interviews and focus groups. Paired samples t-tests were used to determine statistically significant differences between baseline and follow-up scores for each of the three subscales. Mean levels of understanding and knowledge and confidence improved (P confidence in parents and school staff that care for children with significant physical postural care impairments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Training programs for staff at local Infectious Disease Surveillance Centers: the needs and usefulness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Kamiya, Nobuyuki; Yahata, Yuichiro; Ozeki, Yukie; Kishimoto, Tsuyoshi; Nadaoka, Yoko; Nakanishi, Yoshiko; Yoshimura, Takesumi; Shimada, Tomoe; Tada, Yuki; Shirabe, Komei; Kozawa, Kunihisa

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the need for and usefulness of training programs for Local Infectious Disease Surveillance Center (LIDSC) staff. A structured questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the needs and usefulness of training programs. The subjects of the survey were participants of a workshop held after an annual conference for the LIDSC staff. Data on demographic information, the necessity of training programs for LIDSC staff, the themes and contents of the training program, self-assessment of knowledge on epidemiology and statistics were covered by the questionnaire. A total of 55 local government officials responded to the questionnaire (response rate: 100%). Among these, 95% of participants believed that the training program for the LIDSC staff was necessary. Basic statistical analysis (85%), descriptive epidemiology (65%), outline of epidemiology (60%), interpretation of surveillance data (65%), background and objectives of national infectious disease surveillance in Japan (60%), methods of field epidemiology (60%), and methods of analysis data (51%) were selected by over half of the respondents as suitable themes for training programs. A total of 34 LIDSC staff answered the self-assessment question on knowledge of epidemiology. A majority of respondents selected "a little" or "none" for all questions about knowledge. Only a few respondents had received education in epidemiology. The results of this study indicate that LIDSC staff have basic demands for fundamental and specialized education to improve their work. Considering the current situation regarding the capacity of LIDSC staff, these training programs should be started immediately.

  7. The role of the psychiatrist: job satisfaction of medical directors and staff psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, J; Stueve, A; McQuistion, H L

    2001-12-01

    In a previous survey of Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowship alumni, medical directors reported experiencing higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. To further this inquiry, the authors conducted an expanded survey among the membership of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (AACP). We mailed a questionnaire to all AACP members. Respondents categorized their positions as staff psychiatrist, program medical director or agency medical director, and rated their overall job satisfaction. The form also included a number of demographic and job characteristic items. Of 479 questionnaires mailed, a total of 286 individuals returned questionnaires (61%-12 forms were undeliverable). As in our previous survey, medical directors experience significantly higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. Program and agency medical directors do not differ significantly. In addition, job satisfaction is strongly and negatively correlated with age for staff psychiatrists but not for medical directors. This survey strengthens the previously reported advantage medical directors have over staff psychiatrists regarding job satisfaction. The finding that job satisfaction decreases with increasing age of staff psychiatrists but not medical directors is particularly interesting, suggesting that staff psychiatrist positions may come to be regarded as "dead-end" over time. Psychiatrists are advised to seek promotions to program medical director positions early in their careers, since these positions are far more available, and provide equal job satisfaction, compared to agency medical director positions.

  8. The Completion of SPEAR 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hettel, R.

    2005-04-11

    On December 15, 2003, 8 1/2 months after the last electrons circulated in the old SPEAR2 storage ring and 5 days after the beginning of commissioning, the first electrons were accumulated in the completely new SPEAR 3 ring. By January 22, the first 100-mA beam was stored, preparing the path for delivering beam to users in early March of this year. The rapid installation and commissioning are a testimony to the SPEAR 3 project staff and collaborators who have built an excellent machine and equipped it with powerful and accessible machine modeling and control programs. The final year of component fabrication, the 7-month installation period, and present-day SPEAR 3 operation are described.

  9. The Eating and Appraisal Due to Emotions and Stress (EADES) Questionnaire: development and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozier, Amy D; Kendrick, Olivia W; Knol, Linda L; Leeper, James D; Perko, Mike; Burnham, Joy

    2007-04-01

    To develop and validate the Eating and Appraisal Due to Emotions and Stress (EADES) Questionnaire that was created to measure how one uses food to cope with stress and emotions. Data were collected from a cross-sectional study using the EADES Questionnaire. Convenience sample (response rate 22%) from a southeastern public university, including staff and faculty (n=854) with ages ranging from 18 to 83 years and a mean body mass index of 27.3+/-6.4. Exploratory factor analysis was completed on 54 items that were originally meant to describe constructs from the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping. Reliability of scales was estimated using Cronbach's alpha. Total sum scores were given to each factor. Pearson correlation coefficients assessed linear associations between factors. Three factors accounting for 43.5% of the variance were retained with a total Cronbach's alpha=.949. The factors did not represent the theoretical constructs from the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping as anticipated. A new model was created, including Emotion- and Stress-Related Eating, Appraisal of Resources and Ability to Cope, Appraisal of Outside Stressors and Influences with Cronbach's alpha being .949, .869, and .652, respectively. These factors were significantly correlated with one another. The EADES model provides a viable conceptual model to help explain variables that may contribute to overeating, whereas the EADES Questionnaire provides a measurement tool for evaluating these variables that have not traditionally been explored in weight management efforts.

  10. The difficulties of interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Miyako; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a multifactorial disease and its nature means that interprofessional teamwork is essential for its treatment. However, in general, interprofessional teamwork has certain problems that impede its function. To clarify these problems in relation to diabetes care, a questionnaire survey was conducted. The participants who were involved in diabetes-related educational seminars, and medical personnel who were engaged in diabetes care from the National Center for Global Health and Medicine, were asked to complete the questionnaire about perceptions of, and satisfaction with, interprofessional teamwork across multiple health care providers, who were actually involved in diabetes care. From 456 people who were asked to take the questionnaire, 275 people answered. The percentages of the respondents according to profession who considered multidisciplinary teamwork sufficient were as follows: physicians, 20.5%; nurses, 12.7%; registered dietitians, 29.6%; pharmacists, 21.9%; physiotherapists, 18.2%; and clinical laboratory technicians 15.4%. Insufficient interprofessional communication and inconsistency in motivation levels among staff were frequently cited as causes of insufficient teamwork. All professions considered interprofessional meetings or conferences necessary and essential for teamwork. The survey revealed that interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care is currently insufficient. Continuous efforts to change each profession's perceptions about interprofessional teamwork and efforts to improve the quality of interprofessional meetings are necessary.

  11. The difficulties of interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care: a questionnaire survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Miyako; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a multifactorial disease and its nature means that interprofessional teamwork is essential for its treatment. However, in general, interprofessional teamwork has certain problems that impede its function. To clarify these problems in relation to diabetes care, a questionnaire survey was conducted. Methods The participants who were involved in diabetes-related educational seminars, and medical personnel who were engaged in diabetes care from the National Center for Global Health and Medicine, were asked to complete the questionnaire about perceptions of, and satisfaction with, interprofessional teamwork across multiple health care providers, who were actually involved in diabetes care. Results From 456 people who were asked to take the questionnaire, 275 people answered. The percentages of the respondents according to profession who considered multidisciplinary teamwork sufficient were as follows: physicians, 20.5%; nurses, 12.7%; registered dietitians, 29.6%; pharmacists, 21.9%; physiotherapists, 18.2%; and clinical laboratory technicians 15.4%. Insufficient interprofessional communication and inconsistency in motivation levels among staff were frequently cited as causes of insufficient teamwork. All professions considered interprofessional meetings or conferences necessary and essential for teamwork. Conclusion The survey revealed that interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care is currently insufficient. Continuous efforts to change each profession’s perceptions about interprofessional teamwork and efforts to improve the quality of interprofessional meetings are necessary. PMID:25120370

  12. A Study of the Concurrent Validity between the Boxall Profile and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Couture

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to establish the level of concurrent validity between the Boxall Profile, a diagnostic instrument used by teachers and teaching assistants in nurture groups, and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, a widely used screening instrument in the fields of education, mental health and social work. 202 children and adolescents attending nurture groups in England, aged 3-14 years, participated in the study. . These consisted of142 boys and 60 girls and came from 25 schools in 8 LEAs. School staff completed the Boxall Profile and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for all pupils. . The results show a high degree of concordance between the two instruments, with both measures appearing to identify similar behavioural characteristics in the same children. Scores in specific domains of the Boxall Profile are shown to predict performance on particular sub-scales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. These preliminary findings support the validity claims of the Boxall Profile, indicating that it is a reliable tool for both diagnostic and research purposes.

  13. Situational leadership styles, staff nurse job characteristics related to job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaraprasong, Bhusita; Potjanasitt, Sureporn; Pattaraarchachai, Junya; Meennuch, Chavalit

    2012-06-01

    To analyze the relationships between the situational leadership styles, staff nurse job characteristic with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army The cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 128 head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army. Data were collected by mailed questionnaires. A total of 117 completed questionnaires (91.4%) were received for analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. It was found that situational leadership styles were not correlated with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses. Staff nurse job characteristics had a low level of positive correlation with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses at 0.05 level of significance (r = 0.202 and 0.189 respectively). The hospital administrators should formulate policy to improve working system, human resource management and formulate policies and strategies based on situational leadership. In addition, they should improve the characteristics of staff nurse job by using surveys to obtain job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

  14. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  15. Agency Directionality and Staff Individuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, James C.; And Others

    Psychologists who choose work as members of counseling agencies are likely to experience some dissonance between what their individual interests and skills would have them do professionally and what they are asked to do as a staff member of the agency. Conversely, as a component of a larger institution or community, an agency's very existence may…

  16. Creativity in nursing staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, K A; Korte, P D

    1990-01-01

    The use of creative teaching techniques in nursing staff development generates enthusiasm for learning in both the learner and the educator. We report the process used to develop alternative teaching approaches and examples of these programs. A cost analysis of a traditional versus an innovative program is provided. Advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are reviewed.

  17. Validation of the Danish language Injustice Experience Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Peter; Schultz, Rikke; Smith, Anne Agerskov

    2017-01-01

    The Injustice Experience Questionnaire has shown promising ability to predict problematic rehabilitation in pain conditions, especially concerning work status. A Danish language version of the Injustice Experience Questionnaire was developed and completed by 358 patients with long-lasting pain....../somatoform symptoms. These patients also completed questionnaires concerning sociodemographics, anxiety and depression, subjective well-being, and overall physical and mental functioning. Our results showed satisfactory interpretability and face validity, and high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .90......). The original one-factor structure was confirmed, but subscales should be interpreted cautiously. The Danish version of the Injustice Experience Questionnaire is found to be valid and reliable....

  18. Validation of the Danish language Injustice Experience Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Cour, Peter; Smith, Anne Agerskov; Schultz, Rikke

    2017-06-01

    The Injustice Experience Questionnaire has shown promising ability to predict problematic rehabilitation in pain conditions, especially concerning work status. A Danish language version of the Injustice Experience Questionnaire was developed and completed by 358 patients with long-lasting pain/somatoform symptoms. These patients also completed questionnaires concerning sociodemographics, anxiety and depression, subjective well-being, and overall physical and mental functioning. Our results showed satisfactory interpretability and face validity, and high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = .90). The original one-factor structure was confirmed, but subscales should be interpreted cautiously. The Danish version of the Injustice Experience Questionnaire is found to be valid and reliable.

  19. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  20. Equal Opportunities Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The initiative to promote Equal Opportunities at CERN started in 1993. The first Equal Opportunities Officer was appointed in 1996 followed by the creation of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel in 1998. Initially the concern was mainly the fair treatment of women in the work-place. Today the emphasis has evolved to ensuring that diversity is used to increase creativity and productivity in the work-place. In order to ensure that all aspects of Equal Opportunities and Diversity are covered, CERN’s Equal Opportunities team has prepared a survey to obtain your input. Your answers are confidential and will only be used for generating statistics. The questionnaire is on-line and can be accessed via: https://espace.cern.ch/EOQ. We hope that you will take a few minutes of your time to give your input and would be grateful if you could reply before 15/10/07. For further information about Equal Opportunities at CERN see: http://cern.ch/equal-opportunities The Equal Opportuni...

  1. Equal Opportunities Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The initiative to promote Equal Opportunities at CERN started in 1993. The first Equal Opportunities Officer was appointed in 1996, which was followed by the creation of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel in 1998. Initially the concern was mainly the fair treatment of women in the work-place. Today the emphasis has evolved to ensuring that diversity is used to increase creativity and productivity in the work-place. In order to ensure that all aspects of Equal Opportunities and Diversity are covered, CERN’s Equal Opportunities team has prepared a survey to obtain your input. Your answers are confidential and will only be used for generating statistics. The questionnaire is on-line and can be accessed via: https://espace.cern.ch/EOQ. We hope that you will take a few minutes of your time to give your input and would be grateful if you could reply before 15/10/07. For further information about Equal Opportunities at CERN see: http://cern.ch/equal-opportunities The Equa...

  2. Clinical staff nurse leadership: Identifying gaps in competency development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks-Meeks, Sherron

    2018-01-01

    To date, there has been no development of a complete, applicable inventory of clinical staff nurse (CSN) leadership role competencies through a valid and reliable methodology. Further, the CSN has not been invited to engage in the identification, definition, or development of their own leadership competencies. Compare existing leadership competencies to identify and highlight gaps in clinical staff nurse leadership role competency development and validation. Literature review. The CSN has not participated in the development of CSN leadership role competencies, nor have the currently identified CSN leadership role competencies been scientifically validated through research. Finally, CSN leadership role competencies are incomplete and do not reflect the CSN perspective. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Provision of Support for Psychological Distress by University Staff, and Receptiveness to Mental Health Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margrove, K. L.; Gustowska, M.; Grove, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern over the number of university students and university staff who require psychological support; however, little is known about the impact of this on higher education (HE) staff. University employees (n = 91) from two UK universities completed an anonymous survey which explored their experience of providing support for…

  4. Staff Attitudes towards Sexuality in Relation to Gender of People with Intellectual Disability: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rhea; Gore, Nick; McCarthy, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Background: Research has found staff attitudes regarding the sexuality of people with intellectual disability (ID) to be negative but influenced by several factors. The current study aimed to examine whether gender of people with ID affects such attitudes. Method: Semistructured interviews were completed with 10 staff members and analysed using…

  5. An Assessment Scale of ECB: Perspectives from the Faculty and Staff of Technical Colleges in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Hui

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and staff in Taiwanese technical colleges are required to perform school self-evaluations. Most members of technical colleges come from postsecondary schools and are thus unfamiliar with school self-evaluation procedures. An effective school self-evaluation involves a complete ECB, making it necessary to build faculty and staff evaluation…

  6. Prevalence of workplace abuse and sexual harassment among female faculty and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jaimee; Patel, Sonya; Gelaye, Bizu; Goshu, Miruts; Worku, Alemayehu; Williams, Michelle A; Berhane, Yemane

    2009-01-01

    To determine the one year prevalence of workplace abuse and sexual harassment and to determine the extent of their associations with symptoms of depression. A total of 387 female faculty and staff from colleges in Awassa, Ethiopia completed a self-administered questionnaire which collected information about relationships, mood and feelings, thoughts and satisfaction concerning the workplace, and experiences with sexual harassment. Symptoms of depression were evaluated using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Logistic regression procedures were employed to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The 12 mo prevalence of either workplace abuse or sexual harassment was 86.3%; with 39.5% reporting workplace abuse only, 4.1% of them reporting sexual harassment only, and 42.6% reporting experiences of both sexual harassment and workplace abuse. Overall, the mean depression score for this cohort was 3.7 (standard deviation 4.2, range 0-19), and 9.3% of the cohort were identified as having moderate or moderately severe depression. The proportion of participants with depression were statistically significantly elevated in relation to reported experience of workplace abuse and sexual harassment (p=0.001). Compared with women reporting no experience with workplace abuse or sexual harassment, those who reported experiencing both workplace abuse and sexual harassment had an 8.00 fold increased risk of depression (OR=8.00, 95% CI:1.05-60.85). Inferences from this analysis are limited by our relatively small sample size as reflected by the wide 95% CI. Workplace abuse and sexual harassment are highly prevalent, and are positively correlated with symptoms of depression among college female faculty and staff in Awassa, Ethiopia. Future policies should include a combination of education, health, and public policy initiatives that clearly outline the problem and consequences of workplace abuse and sexual harassment in educational settings.

  7. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  8. Validation Study for the Brief Measure of Quality of Life and Quality of Care: A Questionnaire for the National Random Sampling Hospital Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Megumi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kurihara, Miho; Sato, Kazuki; Morita, Tatsuya; Kato, Masashi; Miyashita, Mitsunori

    2017-08-01

    To monitor quality of life (QOL) for patients with cancer in a large population-based survey, we developed a short QOL and quality-of-care (QOC) questionnaire. To determine the validity and reliability of this new questionnaire for evaluating QOL in patients with cancer. Outpatients and inpatients at National Cancer Center Hospital East were administered a questionnaire, including the following items-the short QOL and QOC questionnaire (physical distress, pain, emotional distress, walk burden, and need for help with self-care; perceived general health status; and satisfaction with medical care and treatment by doctor, communication with doctor, support by health-care staff other than doctor, care for physical symptoms such as pain, and psychological care), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), the Cancer Care Evaluation Scale (CCES) for patients, and demographic and medical data. We then readministered the short QOL and QOC questionnaire. In total, 329 outpatients and 239 inpatients completed the survey (response rates: 80% and 90%, respectively). Total Cronbach α for the short QOL and QOC questionnaire was 0.83 for outpatients and 0.82 for inpatients. Items of the questionnaire correlated with cancer-specific measurements, FACT-G, and CCES. Intraclass correlation coefficients for all items of the questionnaire were 0.79 and 0.89 in each setting. Items of QOL and QOC did not correlate with each other. The validity and reliability of the short QOL and QOC questionnaire appear sufficient. This questionnaire enables continuous monitoring of patient QOL in large population-based surveys.

  9. Investigation of the Relationship between Physical Activity Level and Healthy Life-Style Behaviors of Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Mutlu; Ozkan, Ali; Kul, Murat; Bozkus, Taner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship of physical activity (PA) level and healthy life-style behaviors in academic staff in Bartin University, Turkey. The short form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire was administered for the determination of physical activity level of academic staff. Their PA levels were…

  10. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  11. Is overseas volunteering beneficial to the NHS? The analysis of volunteers' responses to a feedback questionnaire following experiences in low-income and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Daniel; Le, Grace; Pandit, Hemant; Lavy, Chris

    2017-10-16

    Locally requested and planned overseas volunteering in low-income and middle-income countries by National Health Service (NHS) staff can have benefits for the host or receiving nation, but its impact on the professional development of NHS staff is not proven. The Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) and Leadership Framework (LF) are two tools used by employers as a measure of individuals' development. We have used dimensions from both tools as a method of evaluating the benefit to NHS doctors who volunteer overseas. 88 NHS volunteers participating with local colleagues in Primary Trauma Care and orthopaedic surgical training courses in sub-Saharan Africa were asked to complete an online self-assessment questionnaire 6 months following their return to the UK. The survey consisted of questions based on qualities outlined in both the KSF and LF. 85 completed responses to the questionnaire were received. In every KSF domain assessed, the majority of volunteers agreed that their overseas volunteering experience improved their practice within the NHS. Self-assessed pre-course and post-course scores evaluating the LF also saw a universal increase, notably in the 'working with others' domain. There is a growing body of literature outlining the positive impact of overseas volunteering on NHS staff. Despite increasing evidence that such experiences can develop volunteers' essential skills, individuals often find it difficult to gain support of their employers. Our study, in line with the current literature, shows that overseas volunteering by NHS staff can provide an opportunity to enhance professional and personal development. Skills gained from volunteering within international links match many of the qualities outlined in both KSF and LF, directly contributing to volunteers' continued professional development. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  12. Is overseas volunteering beneficial to the NHS? The analysis of volunteers’ responses to a feedback questionnaire following experiences in low-income and middle-income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Daniel; Le, Grace; Pandit, Hemant; Lavy, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Locally requested and planned overseas volunteering in low-income and middle-income countries by National Health Service (NHS) staff can have benefits for the host or receiving nation, but its impact on the professional development of NHS staff is not proven. The Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) and Leadership Framework (LF) are two tools used by employers as a measure of individuals' development. We have used dimensions from both tools as a method of evaluating the benefit to NHS doctors who volunteer overseas. Methods 88 NHS volunteers participating with local colleagues in Primary Trauma Care and orthopaedic surgical training courses in sub-Saharan Africa were asked to complete an online self-assessment questionnaire 6 months following their return to the UK. The survey consisted of questions based on qualities outlined in both the KSF and LF. Results 85 completed responses to the questionnaire were received. In every KSF domain assessed, the majority of volunteers agreed that their overseas volunteering experience improved their practice within the NHS. Self-assessed pre-course and post-course scores evaluating the LF also saw a universal increase, notably in the ‘working with others’ domain. Discussion There is a growing body of literature outlining the positive impact of overseas volunteering on NHS staff. Despite increasing evidence that such experiences can develop volunteers’ essential skills, individuals often find it difficult to gain support of their employers. Our study, in line with the current literature, shows that overseas volunteering by NHS staff can provide an opportunity to enhance professional and personal development. Skills gained from volunteering within international links match many of the qualities outlined in both KSF and LF, directly contributing to volunteers’ continued professional development. PMID:29042388

  13. Nursing staff and nursing students' emotions towards homosexual patients and their wish to refrain from nursing, if the option existed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röndahl, Gerd; Innala, Sune; Carlsson, Marianne

    2004-03-01

    Studies have reported that homosexual patients fear they will not receive adequate care if they openly show their sexual orientation, for example, when introducing their partner. The aims of this study were to investigate the emotions of nursing staff and nursing students, and possible relations to cultural background and gender, towards homosexual patients; whether nursing staff and nursing students would choose to refrain from nursing homosexual patients, if the option existed; and, if so, how they express their wish to refrain from nursing this group of patients. All participants received verbal and written information before the study started. Returning a completed questionnaire indicated a participant's tacit consent. Approval was obtained from the heads of departments and persons in charge of nursing and nursing assistant programmes. The study had a descriptive, comparative design, and an Affect Adjective Checklist (AAC) and specially designed Nursing Behaviour Questionnaire (NBQ) were used. The participants included nurses and assistant nurses from an infectious disease clinic, and students enrolled in a university nursing programme and upper secondary assistant nurses' training, all in central Sweden. The findings showed that both professional nursing staff (response rate 67%, n = 57), and students (response rate 62%, n = 165), expressed emotions of homophobic anger, homophobic guilt and delight. Groups with a cultural background other than Swedish expressed more homophobia. No gender differences were indicated for homophobic emotions. In the professional group, 36% would refrain from nursing for homosexual patients if given the option. The corresponding figure for the students was 9%. The limitations were that the sample was small and not randomly selected, and as participation was anonymous no follow-up could be done. It was concluded that the emotional factors of homosexual anger and homosexual guilt might be of value in helping to explain and predict

  14. Towards mobile staff members management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  15. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  16. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approximate identity for B, bounded in A. In addition, a necessary condition for the weak complete continuity of A is ... continuous elements of a Banach algebra A and symmetric abstract Segal algebras B with respect to A, in the case ..... [13] Hewitt E and Ross K A, Abstract harmonic analysis, 2nd edn. I, II (1970) (New York,.

  17. Staff Rules and Regulations – modification No. 5 to the 11th edition

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Please note that, following decisions taken at the December 2010 Council session, the following pages of the Staff Rules and Regulations have been modified as of 1 January 2011: Monthly basic salaries of Staff Members (Annex R A 5): amendment of page 71. Stipends of Fellows (Annex R A 6): amendment of page 72. The electronic version of this modification and also the complete Staff Rules and Regulations are available on the HR Department intranet site: Staff Rules and Regulations Paper copies are available from the HR-DI Secretariat upon request (Tel. 78003). Department Head Office

  18. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  19. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  20. Health enhancing behaviors of teachers and other school staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Woynarowska-Sołdan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Any activity undertaken for the purpose of health enhancing behavior is an important element of taking care of one's health. The aim of this paper was to analyze the frequency of health enhancing behaviors and avoiding health-risk behaviors among teachers and other school staff by gender and age. Material and Methods: The sample consisted of 750 teachers and 259 individuals of non-teaching staff of 22 health promoting schools. A questionnaire that included Positive Health Behaviors Scale for Adults and questions on avoiding risk behaviors were used as a research tool. Results: Of the 32 analyzed health enhancing (positive behaviors, only 11 were undertaken by teachers and 10 by non-teaching staff at a desirable frequency (always or almost always in a group of more than 50% of respondents. Almost one third of health enhancing behaviors were undertaken with this frequency by less than 20% of respondents. The highest deficits concerned physical activity, nutrition and mental health-related behaviors, and the lowest concerned safety. Deficits in all positive health behaviors were smaller in teachers than in non-teaching staff, in women than in men and in older than in younger teachers. The majority of respondents, mostly teachers, irrespective of gender and age did not undertake risk behaviors. Conclusions: There was a lot of deficits in the healthy lifestyle of teachers and other school workers what is alarming from the point of view of school workers' health, their tasks and their role in shaping positive health behavior in children and adolescents. There is a great need for taking actions to improve the situation, such as the development of health promotion programs addressed to teachers and other school staff, including issues concerning healthy lifestyles in teacher's pre- and in-service training, counselling in the area of healthy lifestyle in preventive health care of school staff. Med Pr 2013;64(5:659–670

  1. Questionnaire use among nordic neuropsychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeland, Jens; Norup, Anne; Persson, Bengt A.

    2017-01-01

    , or are diagnostic tools. The study showed an average use of 8.4 questionnaires (SD 6.4), with a range from 4.5 in Finland to 11 in Norway. Emotional symptoms were most frequently assessed, closely followed by questionnaires of cognition. There was a very low usage rate of personality measures, even though...... the ecological validity of questionnaires. Thus, many neuropsychologists have advocated more use of questionnaires, but it is not known whether professional practice has changed. Until recently, personality instruments were the only widespread questionnaires in frequent use among neuropsychologists. We studied...... the inventory use of 702 Nordic neuropsychologists. The most used questionnaires are listed, and differences between countries are analyzed. In addition, the questionnaires are grouped with regard to whether they map cognition, behavior not observable during consultations, emotional symptoms, personality...

  2. Staff perceptions of community health centre team function in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Jennifer; Muldoon, Laura

    2017-07-01

    To examine perceptions of different staff groups about team functioning in mature, community-governed, interprofessional primary health care practices. Cross-sectional online survey. The 75 community health centres (CHCs) in Ontario at the time of the study, which have cared for people with barriers to access to traditional health services in community-governed, interprofessional settings, providing medical, social, and community services since the 1970s. Managers and staff of primary care teams in the CHCs. Scores on the short version of the Team Climate Inventory (with subscales addressing vision, task orientation, support for innovation, and participative safety), the Organizational Justice Scale (with subscales addressing procedural justice and interactional justice), and the Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale, stratified by staff group (clinical manager, FP, nurse practitioner [NP], registered nurse, medical secretary, social worker, allied health provider, counselor, outreach worker, and administrative assistant). A total of 674 staff members in 58 of 75 (77%) CHCs completed surveys. All staff groups generally reported positive perceptions of team function. The procedural justice subscale showed the greatest variation between groups. Family physicians and NPs rated procedural justice much lower than nurses and administrators did. This study provides a unique view of the perceptions of different groups of staff in a long-standing interprofessional practice model. Future research is needed to understand why FPs and NPs perceive procedural justice more negatively than other team members do, and whether such perceptions affect outcomes such as staff turnover and health outcomes for patients. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  3. Nursing teamwork, staff characteristics, work schedules, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether and how staff characteristics, staffing, and scheduling variables are associated with the level of teamwork in nursing staff on acute care hospital patient units. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 1,758 nursing staff members from two different hospitals on 38 patient care units who completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey in 2008. This study focused on nursing teams who are stationed on a particular patient care unit (as opposed to visitors to the units). The return rate was 56.9%. The sample was made up of 77.4% nurses (registered nurses and licensed practical nurses), 11.9% assistive personnel, and 7.9% unit secretaries. Teamwork varied by unit and service type, with the highest scores occurring in pediatrics and maternity and the lowest scores on the medical-surgical and emergency units. Staff with less than 6 months of experience, those working 8- or 10-hour shifts (as opposed to 12 hours or a combination of 8 and 12 hours), part-time staff (as opposed to full time), and those working on night shift had higher teamwork scores. The higher teamwork scores were also associated with no or little overtime. The higher perception of the adequacy of staffing and the fewer patients cared for on a previous shift, the higher the teamwork scores. There is a relationship between selected staff characteristics, aspects of work schedules, staffing, and teamwork. Nursing staff want to work where teamwork is high, and perceptions of good staffing lead to higher teamwork. Higher teamwork scores correlated with those who worked less overtime.

  4. Questionnaires, in-depth interviews and focus groups

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Anne; Cox, Anna L.

    2008-01-01

    With fast changing technologies and related human interaction issues, there is an increased need for timely evaluation of systems with distributed users in varying contexts (Pace, 2004). This has led to the increased use of questionnaires, in-depth interviews and focus groups in commercial usability and academic research contexts. Questionnaires are usually paper based or delivered online and consist of a set of questions which all participants are asked to complete. Once the questionnaire ha...

  5. Buffalo complete streets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Buffalo, NY formally adopted a local Complete Streets ordinance in 2008; however, implementation has yet : to become institutionalized. Buffalos Complete Streets Coalition, a multi-sector partnership was convened : to implement a Summit and Neighb...

  6. Safety and health practice among laboratory staff in Malaysian education sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husna Che Hassan, Nurul; Rasdan Ismail, Ahmad; Kamilah Makhtar, Nor; Azwadi Sulaiman, Muhammad; Syuhadah Subki, Noor; Adilah Hamzah, Noor

    2017-10-01

    Safety is the most important issue in industrial sector such as construction and manufacturing. Recently, the increasing number of accident cases reported involving school environment shows the important of safety issues in education sector. Safety awareness among staff in this sector is crucial in order to find out the method to prevent the accident occurred in future. This study was conducted to analyze the knowledge of laboratory staff in term of safety and health practice in laboratory. Survey questionnaires were distributing among 255 of staff laboratory from ten District Education Offices in Kelantan. Descriptive analysis shows that the understanding of safety and health practice are low while doing some job activities in laboratory. Furthermore, some of the staff also did not implemented safety practice that may contribute to unplanned event occur in laboratory. Suggestion that the staff at laboratory need to undergo on Occupational Safety and Health training to maintain and create safe environment in workplaces.

  7. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  8. The Joint Staff Officer's Guide 2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The Joint Forces Staff College (JFSC) educates staff officers and other leaders in joint operational-level planning and warfighting and instills a commitment to joint, multinational, and interagency teamwork, attitudes, and perspectives...

  9. Perceived role legitimacy and role importance of Australian school staff in addressing student cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J; Norberg, Melissa M; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    The high prevalence of cannabis use by Australian secondary school students makes schools an ideal setting for the delivery of substance use prevention programs. Although efficacious school-based cannabis prevention programs exist, there is scant research investigating the perceived role legitimacy and role importance of school staff. As such, this study surveyed a sample of 1691 Australian school staff by utilizing Generation Next seminars which are attended by professionals working with young people. The self-completed survey identified that, despite elevated contact with students relative to other school staff, teachers reported the least role importance and legitimacy of all school staff. Further, teachers reported the lowest level of staff drug education training, which was an important predictor of an increased feeling of role importance and legitimacy among school staff.

  10. Staff and Institutional Factors Associated with Substandard Care in the Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rousseau

    Full Text Available to identify staff and institutional factors associated with substandard care by midwives managing postpartum hemorrhage (PPH.A multicenter vignette-based study was e-mailed to a random sample of midwives at 145 French maternity units that belonged to 15 randomly selected perinatal networks. Midwives were asked to describe how they would manage two case-vignettes about PPH and to complete a short questionnaire about their individual (e.g., age, experience, and full- vs. part-time practice and institutional (private or public status and level of care characteristics. These previously validated case-vignettes described two different scenarios: vignette 1, a typical immediate, severe PPH, and vignette 2, a severe but gradual hemorrhage. Experts consensually defined 14 criteria to judge adherence to guidelines. The number of errors (possible range: 0 to 14 for the 14 criteria quantified PPH guideline adherence, separately for each vignette.450 midwives from 87 maternity units provided complete responses. Perfect adherence (no error for any of the 14 criteria was low: 25.1% for vignette 1 and 4.2% for vignette 2. After multivariate analysis, midwives' age remained significantly associated with a greater risk of error in guideline adherence in both vignettes (IRR 1.19 [1.09; 1.29] for vignette 1, and IRR 1.11 [1.05; 1.18] for vignette 2, and the practice of mortality and morbidity reviews in the unit with a lower risk (IRR 0.80 [0.64; 0.99], IRR 0.78 [0.66; 0.93] respectively. Risk-taking scores (IRR 1.41 [1.19; 1.67] and full-time practice (IRR 0.83 [0.71; 0.97] were significantly associated with adherence only in vignette 1.Both staff and institutional factors may be associated with substandard care in midwives' PPH management.

  11. Research productivity of junior academic staff at a tertiary medical college in south west, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesi, O A; Orenuga, O O; Roberts, A; Abudu, O O

    2009-01-01

    The research productivity of medical faculty has been well studied in developed countries, unlike in the developing countries. This study proposes to assess the level of research productivity over a 2 year period and identify the challenges to conducting research among junior academic staff of the College of Medicine, University of Lagos. An observational cross-sectional study in which the 120 junior academic staff from both basic sciences and clinical sciences were evaluated between January and September 2005. Data collection was by self-administered questionnaires distributed to the study population. There were 83 (69.1%) respondents comprising 38 males (45.6%) and 45 females (54.2%). The median age group was 31-40 years. Most respondents (57, 83%) spent less than 10 hours/week on research. On average they had completed 3-4 scholarly articles within the past 2 years. Nineteen (21.7%) of the subjects were considered to have optimal research productivity having completed over 5 scholarly research papers. The lecturers with optimal research productivity were significantly more likely to be male, and spent over 10 hours a week in hospital related clinical and laboratory related activities. (p = 0.02, and p = 0.03). Inadequate funding and laboratory facilities, and poor technological infrastructure were the most common causes of impediments to research reported by 78%, 69% and 55% of the lecturers respectively. Optimal research productivity was seen in about one quarter of the study population and was associated with male gender and prolonged duration of clinical/laboratory activities. Negligible research financing and poor laboratory support were major impediments to research productivity.

  12. Investigation of Multiple Imputation in Low-Quality Questionnaire Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ginkel, Joost R.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of multiple imputation in questionnaire data has been studied in various simulation studies. However, in practice, questionnaire data are usually more complex than simulated data. For example, items may be counterindicative or may have unacceptably low factor loadings on every subscale, or completely missing subscales may…

  13. [Effectiveness of managing styles of nursing management staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stychno, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    There are many possibilities of the division of the managing styles. In theory one can distinguish two basic styles: directive and integrative. Generalisations describing both styles result in the fact that they do not reflect reality taking place at work. Because of it they cannot be applied in such a form. Therefore, it is necessary to build up the theoretical concept of the managing styles through decreasing their generality and adjusting them to the reality requirements at the same time. For the reality of management Reddin concept seems to be useful. It describes the organizational behaviour of managers. He noticed that the managing style is effective when it fits into the manager's situation whereas it is ineffective in such a situation, when the manager cannot select and adjust the managing techniques to the circumstances of the concrete decision-taking situation. Putting together 3 handling ways: orientation on assignments, orientation on staff, effectiveness, 8 managing can be differentiated. The aim of the paper was an attempt to check what managing styles are used by the nursing management staff working in hospitals. To determine the managing style a questionnaire consisting of 64 statements divided into 8 groups was applied. The examined persons were assigned to distribute 10 points among the statements belonging to each group of tasks which are supposed to specify their solution in the best way. The nursing management staff prefer the styles belonging to the more effective one in which there is a high orientation on staff.

  14. TERAPI RUMATAN METADONE: KETANGGAPAN PASIEN, SIKAP STAFF DAN PENERIMAAN MASYARAKAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Isfandari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To minimize impact of injection drug use on HIV/AIDS transmission, known as Harm Reduction, a longitudinal study on methadone maintenance substitution (MMS trial was conducted in Drug Dependence Hospital, Jakarta in November 2003 and Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar in Januury 2004. Respondents of the study were 58 methadone clients From Jakarta and 22 from Denpasar, as well as 11 RSKO's staffs and seven staffs from Sanglah Hospital. Data were collected by questionnaires, interviews and focus group discussion in the third and sixth month from the client admission. In addition to minimize HIV/AIDS transmission, other benefit of the program is to increase productivity and social participation of the MMS participants. Applying the WHO responsiveness concept for health service performance, we measured the performance of MMS. Both In the first three and six month, patients had positif responsiveness with total and component average score not less than 30. But there was no significant change comparing responsiveness in the third and sixth month. Among the components of responsiveness, information and communication received most positif evaluation from patients, while regulation received the lowest evaluation. Generally, all patients support the MMS program. Staffs of MMS had neutral attitude toward the program, try their best to perform their job and learn to understand more on their clients world. The conclusionis that MMS indeed provide positive impact to the clients, and further understanding from staffs toward their clients is necessary for better communication with the clients.

  15. Staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimova, N.U.; Malisheva, E.Yu.; Shosafarova, Sh.G.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to staff radiation exposure in radiation diagnostics. Data on staff radiation exposure obtained during 2005-2008 years was analyzed. It was found that average individual doses of staff of various occupations in Dushanbe city for 2008 year are at 0.29-2.16 mSv range. They are higher than the average health indicators but lower than maximum permissible dose. It was defined that paramedical personnel receives the highest doses among the various categories of staff.

  16. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to providing contraceptive information and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Peter; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate pharmacy staff perspectives of a 2-year pharmacy intervention aimed at reducing unintended pregnancy in 18- to 30-year-old women. Pharmacy staff completed a 48-item, self-administered paper survey consisting of scaled and open-ended questions. 55 community pharmacies in 12 Iowa counties. All pharmacy staff participated, including pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and other pharmacy employees. Online continuing education (CE) training was made available to all pharmacy staff. Promotional materials including posters, brochures, and shelf talkers were displayed in all of the pharmacies. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to displaying posters, brochures, and shelf talkers in their pharmacies and providing contraceptive information and counseling to patients/customers. A total of 192 (43% return rate) pharmacy staff responded. Only 44% of respondents consistently provided contraceptive information and counseling, yet more than 90% felt that talking with patients/customers about contraceptives was easy, and more than 50% could do so privately. The study showed increased pharmacy staff desire to make this topic a priority. Community pharmacy staff can play a key role in educating and counseling young adult women about contraceptive health and pregnancy planning. This study indicates that staff are comfortable providing this service and that patients/customers are open to receiving guidance from pharmacists. However, pharmacy staff are missing additional opportunities to provide information and counseling. There is also a need for greater attention to provision of nonprescription contraceptive education.

  17. Summary of the Fourth International Nuclear Emergency Exercise (INEX-4). Exercise Conduct and Evaluation Questionnaires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclair, Jean Patrice; Duchesne, David; Caamano, Delphine; Cessac, Bruno; Mehl-auget, Isabelle; Gering, Florian; Macsuga, Geza; Fukumoto, Masahiro; Holo, Eldri Naadland; Ugletveit, Finn; Griffiths, Mike; Breitinger, Mark; Heinrich, Ann; Mcclelland, Vincent; Ahier, Brian; Lazo, Ted; Mcinturff, Sandi; Kawabata, Masanori; Lazo, Ted; Okyar, Halil Burcin

    2013-01-01

    The INEX-4 consequence management exercise, part of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's ongoing series of International Nuclear Emergency Exercises (INEX), was developed under the auspices of the NEA/CRPPH Working Party on Nuclear Emergency Matters (WPNEM) in response to members desire to better prepare for the longer-term response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. The INEX-4 exercise was designed to allow participants to investigate the national and, in some cases, international arrangements for responding to widespread radiological contamination of the urban environment from a radiological dispersal devise (or dirty bomb) and the consequence management issues likely to be raised in the medium to longer term after such an event. The experiences of participating countries were gathered through an evaluation questionnaire and are summarised in this report. The INEX-4 series was developed in 2008, and conducted throughout 2010 and 2011 with 17 participating countries using the INEX-4 scenario for an event involving a radiological dispersal device. An INEX-4 evaluation questionnaire was developed to document the process and results of the exercise, which was designed mainly to test emergency responses/actions related to consequence management and transition to recovery. The conclusions drawn from the INEX-4 experiences varied greatly, but this was to be expected given the nature of the scenario and the involvement of organisations outside of the nuclear community. The evaluation questionnaires completed by each participating country provided detailed information on the national approaches taken with respect to each of the exercise objectives and on issues relating to the international interfaces between countries. In collaboration with the NEA Secretariat, staff from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed each completed questionnaire to identify and summarise the essential information derived from the exercise for consideration by WPNEM members

  18. Become a staff delegate: why not you?

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2009-01-01

    Following a decision taken at the Staff Association General Assembly in May 2008, staff delegates are elected in the autumn of odd-numbered years. The next elections which will lead to a total renewal of the Staff Council will thus take place in November 2009. Will you be a candidate?

  19. Get the Staff You Need This Summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christy L.

    1997-01-01

    Strategies for recruiting camp staff include tailoring messages to the needs and interests of prospective staff; utilizing former staff; hiring older workers; encouraging parents, former campers, and special interest groups to volunteer; and offering competitive pay. Provides an example of a target population (Generation X, born 1963-83) and key…

  20. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  1. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was no significant difference between teaching staff and professional librarians on collective educators' self efficacy but significant difference existed between male and female academic staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was ...

  2. Short Communication Employee -Driven Staff Training and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the concept of staff training and development within the South African context. The changing labour legislation in South Africa makes it mandatory for the employer to provide training and development. However, staff have an important role to play in staff training and development. The paper gives an ...

  3. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as the...

  4. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  5. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff...

  6. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the staffs...

  7. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as the...

  8. Improving Staff Productivity in Mental Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide is concerned with productivity measurement and improvement in mental health centers, and focuses on the relationship between service outputs and available clinical staff, i.e., staff productivity. Staff productivity measures are described as useful in identifying existing levels of productivity, making comparisons to determine the…

  9. The Impact of Staff Training on the Knowledge of Support Staff in Relation to Bereavement and People with an Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Laura; McKenzie, Karen; Wright, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether a 1-day training course improved support staff knowledge about bereavement and grief in people with a learning disability. A questionnaire based, mixed design was used. Forty-eight participants were randomly assigned to one of two equal groups. A staggered design allowed for group 2 to act both as a control…

  10. "ASUKI Step" pedometer intervention in university staff: rationale and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Barbara E; Der Ananian, Cheryl; Soroush, Ali; Walker, Jenelle; Swan, Pamela; Poortvliet, Eric; Yngve, Agneta

    2012-08-15

    We describe the study design and methods used in a 9-month pedometer-based worksite intervention called "ASUKI Step" conducted at the Karolinska Institutet (KI) in Stockholm, Sweden and Arizona State University (ASU) in the greater Phoenix area, Arizona. "ASUKI Step" was based on the theory of social support and a quasi-experimental design was used for evaluation. Participants included 2,118 faculty, staff, and graduate students from ASU (n = 712) and KI (n = 1,406) who participated in teams of 3-4 persons. The intervention required participants to accumulate 10,000 steps each day for six months, with a 3-month follow-up period. Steps were recorded onto a study-specific website. Participants completed a website-delivered questionnaire four times to identify socio-demographic, health, psychosocial and environmental correlates of study participation. One person from each team at each university location was randomly selected to complete physical fitness testing to determine their anthropometric and cardiovascular health and to wear an accelerometer for one week. Study aims were: 1) to have a minimum of 400 employee participants from each university site reach a level of 10,000 steps per day on at least 100 days (3.5 months) during the trial period; 2) to have 70% of the employee participants from each university site maintain two or fewer inactive days per week, defined as a level of less than 3,000 steps per day; 3) to describe the socio-demographic, psychosocial, environmental and health-related determinants of success in the intervention; and 4) to evaluate the effects of a pedometer-based walking intervention in a university setting on changes in self-perceived health and stress level, sleep patterns, anthropometric measures and fitness.Incentives were given for compliance to the study protocol that included weekly raffles for participation prizes and a grand finale trip to Arizona or Sweden for teams with most days over 10,000 steps. "ASUKI Step" is

  11. Beliefs and Prejudices Versus Knowledge and Awareness: How to Cope Stigma Against Mental Illness. A College Staff E-survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizza, Chiara; Ghilardi, Alberto; Ferrari, Clarissa

    2017-07-01

    The aims of this study were to collect information about attitudes toward mental illness from the staff of Brescia University, and to detect predictors of issues regarding mental disorders and evaluate their relationship with public stigma. The study involved 1079 people and each participant received a letter explaining the purpose of the e-research. Four hundred and eighty-six people completed the questionnaires. The results showed that those who had a higher level of education, a personal life experience with mental disorders and a higher professional role were more likely to develop behaviours of acceptance toward the mentally ill. Factor analysis of the CAMI showed three main factors: Social distance and isolation, Social integration, Social responsibility and tolerance. Through the structural equation model it was found that the latent construct stigma was mainly defined by the first factor. From this study it emerged that education and personal contact were protective factors against public stigma.

  12. Nursing staff shortage and in-hospital informal care in an oncology hospital in Greece: the nursing staff's perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Lavdaniti, Maria; Psychogiou, Maria; Arsenos, Panagiotis; Paralikas, Theodossios; Triantafylidou, Paraskevi; Georgiadou, Charikleia

    2008-06-01

    There is a broad variety of factors that are contributing to the nursing staff shortage. They include low wages, poor image of nursing, job satisfaction, ageing of the nursing workforce and cost reductions. In the Greek National Health System, there is a policy of open-visiting hours in hospitals. Family members stay with the patients for many hours and provide in-hospital informal care. The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of nursing staff about the nursing staff shortage and the in-hospital informal care in a Greek oncology hospital. For the data collection we used a 30-item questionnaire. The majority of the participants (82.9%) stated that most patients have a family member staying longer than the official visiting hours for assisting with care. A main reason according to the nurses' opinion (37.4%) is the nursing staff shortage. In addition, most nurses disagree with relatives providing some of the informal caregiving activities. The findings are consistent with the findings of other studies. They might be of interest to Greek health authorities, to nurses and to Greek citizens in order to implement possible solutions to improve the hospitalization in Greek hospitals.

  13. Presenteeism among emergency health care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Zaballos, Marta; Baldonedo-Mosteiro, María; Mosteiro-Díaz, Mª Pilar

    2018-02-01

    To estimate the prevalence of presenteeism among different categories of hospital and pre-hospital emergency health care professionals in the Principality of Asturias, Spain, and to define the sociodemographic characteristics and workplace factors associated with presenteeism in all categories. Cross-sectional descriptive study carried out during the last half of 2014 and first half of 2015. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collecta data on sociodemographic and work-related variables and perception of work as stressful. The respondents, who answered voluntarily and anonymously, assessed themselves on the Stanford Presenteeism Scale-6 adapted for use in Spain. The prevalence of presenteeism was 52.9% among the 323 respondents. Presenteeism was associated with stress (P<.01), place of work (P=.004), and bearing responsibility for dependent persons (P=.034) in the group overall. The association between stress and presenteeism was clearly present in emergency physicians (P=.049) and in nurses with dependents under their care (P=.016). The prevalence of presenteeism is high among emergency staff in the Principality of Asturias. Presenteeism is associated with diverse factors.

  14. The difficulties of interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care: a questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishimoto M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Miyako Kishimoto,1,2 Mitsuhiko Noda2,3 1Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism, Center Hospital, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Diabetes and Metabolism Information Center, Diabetes Research Center, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Diabetes Research, Diabetes Research Center, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: Diabetes is a multifactorial disease and its nature means that interprofessional teamwork is essential for its treatment. However, in general, interprofessional teamwork has certain problems that impede its function. To clarify these problems in relation to diabetes care, a questionnaire survey was conducted. Methods: The participants who were involved in diabetes-related educational seminars, and medical personnel who were engaged in diabetes care from the National Center for Global Health and Medicine, were asked to complete the questionnaire about perceptions of, and satisfaction with, interprofessional teamwork across multiple health care providers, who were actually involved in diabetes care. Results: From 456 people who were asked to take the questionnaire, 275 people answered. The percentages of the respondents according to profession who considered multidisciplinary teamwork sufficient were as follows: physicians, 20.5%; nurses, 12.7%; registered dietitians, 29.6%; pharmacists, 21.9%; physiotherapists, 18.2%; and clinical laboratory technicians 15.4%. Insufficient interprofessional communication and inconsistency in motivation levels among staff were frequently cited as causes of insufficient teamwork. All professions considered interprofessional meetings or conferences necessary and essential for teamwork. Conclusion: The survey revealed that interprofessional teamwork in diabetes care is currently insufficient. Continuous efforts to change each profession

  15. Workplace Bullying Among the Nursing Staff of Greek Public Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatza, Christine; Zyga, Sofia; Tziaferi, Styliani; Prezerakos, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    In this quantitative, cross-sectional study, the authors identified the impact of workplace bullying on nursing staff employed at select Greek public hospitals. They conducted the study using the Negative Acts Questionnaire with a convenience sample of 841 participants employed by five Greek hospitals in the 1st Regional Health Authority of Attica. One third of the respondents reported having been psychologically harassed at work in the past 6 months. According to the results, the impact workplace bullying has on nursing staff varies depending on the existence of a supportive familial or friend environment and if nurses parent children. These findings demonstrate the value of family and friend support when coping with workplace bullying.

  16. Effects of repeated questionnaire administration in longitudinal studies of adolescent males' sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, C T; Udry, J R; Suchindran, C

    1994-02-01

    By comparing four similar groups of young adolescent males who completed questionnaires about their sexual behavior different numbers of times at various intervals, we explore the hypothesis that repeated questionnaire completion will affect sexual behavior. We find little support for the hypothesis even when the number of questionnaire administrations is very high.

  17. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  18. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, G.; Christ, W.

    1988-01-01

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH) [de

  19. Nuclear Power Acceptance Among University Staffs and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayder, G.; Rahim, M. S. Ab

    2016-03-01

    The need to consider alternative energy sources becomes very real. Nuclear has been identified as an alternative electricity source. However, media reports seem to indicate that there is a resistance among peoples with regards to harnessing nuclear for energy. This study was conducted to assess the acceptance level of university staff and students towards nuclear energy by asking them to answer a questionnaire. The questionnaire was constructed in a way to gauge their background knowledge on the energy situation of the country, the risks involved with regards to nuclear energy and also what aspects need to be improved in order to have a safe integration of nuclear energy into the national energy mix. The overall result of the questionnaire indicated high level of support for nuclear energy. The main areas of concerns however, were waste management, control and governance and also nuclear accidents. These should be identified as fields that require extra attention. However, the positive result obtained from this survey should not be construed as overall strong support in general. There might be different outcomes if the survey was conducted on to the general population as compared to the university students and staff that were involved in this research.

  20. Physical examination skills training: Faculty staff vs. patient instructor feedback-A controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Krautter

    Full Text Available Standardized patients are widely used in training of medical students, both in teaching and assessment. They also frequently lead complete training sessions delivering physical examination skills without the aid of faculty teaching staff-acting as "patient instructors" (PIs. An important part of this training is their ability to provide detailed structured feedback to students which has a strong impact on their learning success. Yet, to date no study has assessed the quality of physical examination related feedback by PIs. Therefore, we conducted a randomized controlled study comparing feedback of PIs and faculty staff following a physical examination assessed by students and video assessors.14 PIs and 14 different faculty staff physicians both delivered feedback to 40 medical students that had performed a physical examination on the respective PI while the physicians observed the performance. The physical examination was rated by two independent video assessors to provide an objective performance standard (gold standard. Feedback of PI and physicians was content analyzed by two different independent video assessors based on a provided checklist and compared to the performance standard. Feedback of PIs and physicians was also rated by medical students and video assessors using a questionnaire consisting of 12 items.There was no statistical significant difference concerning overall matching of physician or PI feedback with gold standard ratings by video assessment (p = .219. There was also no statistical difference when focusing only on items that were classified as major key steps (p = .802, mistakes or parts that were left out during physical examination (p = .219 or mistakes in communication items (p = .517. The feedback of physicians was significantly better rated than PI feedback both by students (p = .043 as well as by video assessors (p = .034.In summary, our study demonstrates that trained PIs are able to provide feedback of equal

  1. Validation of a web-based dietary questionnaire designed for the DASH (dietary approaches to stop hypertension) diet: the DASH online questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apovian, Caroline M; Murphy, Megan C; Cullum-Dugan, Diana; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Gilbert, Kathryn Meyers; Coffman, Gerald; Jenkins, Mark; Bakun, Peter; Tucker, Katherine L; Moore, Thomas Joseph

    2010-05-01

    With the upsurge in online dietary modification programmes, online dietary assessment tools are needed to capture food intake. Although the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is recommended by the US Department of Agriculture, there are no online instruments that capture DASH food servings. Our objective was to assess the validity of a new, short, online dietary questionnaire developed to capture intake of DASH food servings. The DASH Online Questionnaire (OLQ) was validated against the well-known Block Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). This was a cross-sectional validation of the DASH OLQ, which contained eleven food groups (breakfast cereals; dairy; drinks; fats and oils; fruits; grains and snacks; meat, fish and poultry; mixed dishes; sweets; vegetables; and nuts, seeds and legumes). Each subject completed a DASH OLQ once weekly for four weeks and one 98.2 Block FFQ (110 questions) between weeks 2 and 4. DASH OLQ were averaged and then compared with the Block FFQ for nutrient intakes as well as intakes of DASH food groups. Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. One hundred and ninety-one faculty and staff at Boston University Medical Center aged 20-70 years. There were significant positive correlations between the Block FFQ and the DASH OLQ for all food groups ranging from r = 0.8 for the nuts/seeds/legumes category to r = 0.3 for vegetables and mixed dishes. A comparison of nutrient intakes found strong positive correlations in all nutrient categories. Of particular interest in the DASH diet and the web-based nutrition and physical activity programme were total fat (r = 0.62), total carbohydrate (r = 0.67), total K (r = 0.68), total Ca (r = 0.69), total vitamin C (r = 0.60) and total energy intake (r = 0.68). The DASH OLQ captures food and nutrient intake well in relation to the more established Block FFQ.

  2. Emergency department staff preparedness for mass casualty events involving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal; Avraham, Miri; Nasi-Bashari, Anat; Idelman, Sigalit; Peretz, Yaniv; Morag, Shani; Silner, Dina; Weiss, Gali

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the World Health Organization in general, and Israel in particular, have dealt with mass casualty events (MCEs) resulting from terrorism. Children are the casualties in many of these events-a reality that forces hospitals to prepare to deal with such a scenario. A literature review designed to identify unique recommendations regarding pediatric MCEs highlights both a lack of existing training programs and uncertainty on the part of health care staff when dealing with these events. The purpose of the study was to examine the preparedness level of emergency department staff to deal with MCEs involving pediatric casualties. The study included 104 physicians and nurses working in, or responding to, the emergency department at a hospital in Israel. The study included a 41-item questionnaire examining perception, approaches, and staff knowledge regarding dealing with pediatric MCEs versus those involving adults. The reliability of all sections of the questionnaire ranged between Chronbach's alpha coefficient 0.6 alpha-0.94. The preparedness levels for MCEs involving children were found to be low. Study participants ranked the likelihood of a pediatric MCE lower than one involving adults, while ranking significantly higher (P = .000) their ability to cope mentally and the knowledge and skills required when treating adults involved in MCEs. While nurses ranked higher than physicians regarding their knowledge and skills in dealing with pediatric MCE casualties, the level of knowledge for MCEs involving children was low in all subjects. Staff agreement for the parent of an MCE victim to be present during treatment was medium-low. On the basis of these findings, additional research involving a larger number of individuals and hospitals is indicated to determine if these results are consistent throughout the region.

  3. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  4. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  5. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  6. Review of utility staff training and certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) has reviewed the nuclear utility training programs in Canada and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) certification program, to determine their effectiveness in meeting current and future needs. It has also looked briefly at the practices in other countries and in the aviation industry in Canada, by way of comparison. While a quantitative measure of effectiveness was beyond the scope of this review, on a purely qualitative basis the ACNS concludes that the current training and certification regime produces qualified operators, but not necessarily in the most effective way. The report makes five recommendations. The thrust of these recommendations is towards a more effective and streamlined training and certification regime based on strict adherence to the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology combined with independent verification through a peer review and accreditation process. The Committee believes that training and qualification of nuclear power plant operating staff is the complete responsibility of the utilities and that the role of the AECB is to audit the process to ensure that the utilities discharge their responsibility appropriately. In other words, the AECB should deal with operator training and certification in the same way that it deals with other aspects of nuclear power plant operation that are important to health, safety, security and the environment - by inspections and audits. The Committee believes that the proposed regulatory requirement for recertification of certain nuclear power plant operating staff, which would come into effect when the new Regulations are promulgated, is not consistent with the government's thrust and with how the AECB regulates other aspects of nuclear power plant operations. (author)

  7. THE ROLE OF SUPPORT GROUPS IN THE COOPERATION BETWEEN PARENTS OF PEOPLE WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES AND PROFESSIONAL STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka NOVAK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the ways of building and developing a better cooperative relationship between parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff is the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Goal: To examine the correlation of the level of cooperative relationship between the parents of people with severe and profound intellectual disabilities and professional staff with the inclusion of parents in support groups for parents and staff in support groups for staff. Methodology: Respondents: parents (296 of people with severe and profound learning disabilities and staff (298 in five centres across Slovenia; Methods: descriptive statistics, test of homogeneity, the rankit method, one-way analysis of variance; Procedures: survey questionnaires for parents and staff. The data was processed using SPSS software for personal computers. Results: The difference between the variances of the groups (parent found is statistically significant (F = 6.16; p = 0.01. Staff included in support groups have a significantly lower level of cooperative relationship with parents (f=10; M = - 0.12 than staff not included in these groups (f = 191; M = 0.04. Conclusion:In contrast to theoretical findings the results indicated less successful cooperation for professional staff included in support groups. The results furthermore did not confirm any differences in the cooperative relationship of parents included in support groups and those who are not. We suggest an in-depth analysis of the workings of support groups.

  8. JUCS-Result on Questionnaire

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RPO

    parents committee has to be strengthened; the. University should pay due attention to the further improvement of the school from. KG to secondary levels; resource- center/pedagogical center should be strengthened. Staff and students lounges should be availed; sport-fields should be made proper for children; the school ...

  9. Identifying the best in nurse executive leadership: Part 1, Questionnaire results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Taylor, J; Klafehn, K

    1995-06-01

    Further analysis of a previously reported transformational leadership study indicated that the study's 81 excellent nurse executives can be further delineated into four groups based on the difference between the scores of nurse executives and staff for transformational and transactional leadership. Part 1 reports questionnaire results, indicating that staff identify two groups as more highly transformational. Part 2 will identify further characteristics of these groups based on interview data results.

  10. Development, reliability and validity of the Diabetes Illness Representations Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. C.; Howells, L.; Greene, S.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: This article reports on the development and validity of a Diabetes-specific Illness Representations Questionnaire (DIRQ) to assess all five dimensions of an individual's perception of diabetes, for adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: There were two development studies. Study 1...... consist of two subscales, perceived threat and perceived impact, and provide further support for the distinction between treatment effectiveness to control diabetes and treatment effectiveness to prevent complications. Along with the validation studies, the results indicate that the questionnaire scales......: participants (n = 115) completed a questionnaire assessing perceptions of the consequences of diabetes and the effectiveness of treatment, along with a questionnaire assessing self-care. Study 2: participants (n = 79) completed a questionnaire assessing their identity, timeline and causal beliefs, along...

  11. Attitude of health care professionals to organ donation: two surveys among the staff of a German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunz, S; Hertel, S; Schmid, K W; Heuer, M; Stommel, P; Frühauf, N R; Saner, F H; Paul, A; Kaiser, G M

    2010-01-01

    The persistent shortage of organs for transplantation could be minimized by increasing the number of potential donors. The opinion of the staff of a university hospital toward organ donation is of special interest because they are directly involved in solid organ transplantation. In 2007, we conducted a first voluntary survey concerning organ donation among the staff of the university hospital of Essen. A short information campaign and further opinion poll among staff as well as visitors was performed in 2009 to compare professional and public attitudes toward organ donation. The first poll comprised 242 questionnaires showing 55% of the hospital staff carrying organ donor cards, particularly more women (60%) than men (46%). After this survey, an additional 19% of the hospital staff imagined they might carrying an organ donor card in the future. In the second survey, we analyzed 151 questionnaires, showing 66% of staff members carrying an organ donor card, an incidence significantly greater than among visitors (48%). The need for information regarding organ donation was greater among visitors (35%). However, 21% of the hospital staff still also need education concerning organ donation. More education and increased transparency of transplantation practice are necessary for hospital staff to act successfully as initiators. Hospital staff with positive attitudes toward organ donation may have a positive impact on the attitudes of the general public toward organ donation.

  12. [Job satisfaction in an Italian university: difference between academic and technical-administrative staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Molino, Monica; Zito, Margherita; Curzi, Ylenia; Fabbri, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the academic world led to an increase in job demands and a decrease in the available job resources. In recent years, the positive image of work in academia has gradually blurred. The present study, within the theoretical framework of the job demands-resources model, aimed to analyse the relationship between some job demands (workload, work-family conflict and emotional dissonance) and some job resources (autonomy, supervisors' support and co-workers' support) and job satisfaction in a medium-sized Italian University, by observing the differences between the academic staff (professors and researchers) and the technical-administrative staff The research was conducted by administering a self-report questionnaire which allowed to detect job satisfaction and the mentioned variables. Respondents were 477 (177 from academic staff and 300 from technical-administrative staff). The analysis of variance (independent samples t-test) showed significant differences in variables of interest between academic staff and technical-administrative staff. Multiple regression pointed out that job autonomy is the main determinant of job satisfaction in the academic staff sample, whereas supervisor support is the main determinant of job satisfaction in the technical-administrative staff sample. This research represents one of the first Italian studies on these topics in the academic context and highlights the importance of further in-depth examinations of specific job dynamics for both teaching and technical-administrative staff. Among practical implications, the importance of keeping high levels of job autonomy for academic staff and of fostering an effective leadership development for technical-administrative staff emerged.

  13. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Completely random signed measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmund, Gunnar

    Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases.......Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases....

  16. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  18. Completeness, supervenience and ontology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maudlin, Tim W E

    2007-01-01

    In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen raised the issue of the completeness of the quantum description of a physical system. What they had in mind is whether or not the quantum description is informationally complete, in that all physical features of a system can be recovered from it. In a collapse theory such as the theory of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber, the quantum wavefunction is informationally complete, and this has often been taken to suggest that according to that theory the wavefunction is all there is. If we distinguish the ontological completeness of a description from its informational completeness, we can see that the best interpretations of the GRW theory must postulate more physical ontology than just the wavefunction

  19. SOURgraphs for efficient completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Lynch

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a data structure called SOUR graphs and present an efficient Knuth-Bendix completion procedure based on it. SOUR graphs allow for a maximal structure sharing of terms in rewriting systems. The term representation is a dag representation, except that edges are labelled with equational constraints and variable renamings. The rewrite rules correspond to rewrite edges, the unification problems to unification edges. The Critical Pair and Simplification inferences are recognized as patterns in the graph and are performed as local graph transformations. Our algorithm avoids duplicating term structure while performing inferences, which causes exponential behavior in the standard procedure. This approach gives a basis to design other completion algorithms, such as goal-oriented completion, concurrent completion and group completion procedures.

  20. 76 FR 33027 - Agency Information Collection (Supplemental Income Questionnaire (For Philippine Claims Only...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Supplemental Income Questionnaire (For Philippine Claims Only.... 2900-0668.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Supplemental Income Questionnaire (For Philippine Claims... approved collection. Abstract: Claimants residing in the Philippines complete VA Form 21-0784 to report...

  1. Effects of a Staff Training Intervention on Seclusion Rates on an Adult Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Julie; Paun, Olimpia; Fogg, Louis

    2018-02-15

    The current article presents the effects of a 90-minute staff training intervention aimed at reducing inpatient psychiatric seclusion rates through strengthened staff commitment to seclusion alternatives and improved de-escalation skills. The intervention occurred at an 18-bed adult inpatient psychiatric unit whose seclusion rates in 2015 were seven times the national average. Although the project's primary outcome compared patient seclusion rates before and after the intervention, anonymous staff surveys measured several secondary outcomes. Seclusion rates were reduced from a 6-month pre-intervention average of 2.95 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours to a 6-month post-intervention average of 0.29 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours, a 90.2% reduction. Completed staff surveys showed significant staff knowledge gains, non-significant changes in staff attitudes about seclusion, non-significant changes in staff de-escalation skill confidence, and use of the new resource sheet by only 17% of staff. The key study implication is that time-limited, focused staff training interventions can have a measurable impact on reducing inpatient seclusion rates. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy....

  3. The validated sun exposure questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, B; Søndergaard, J; Nielsen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Few questionnaires used in monitoring sun-related behavior have been tested for validity. We established criteria validity of a developed questionnaire for monitoring population sun-related behavior. During May-August 2013, 664 Danes wore a personal electronic UV-dosimeter for one week...... that measured the outdoor time and dose of erythemal UVR exposure. In the following week, they answered a questionnaire on their sun-related behavior in the measurement week. Outdoor time measured by dosimetry correlated strongly with both outdoor time and the developed exposure scale measured....... The weekly sunburn fraction correlated strongly with the number of ambient sun hours (r=0.73, p

  4. Complete Ureteral Avulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete avulsion of the ureter is one of the most serious complications of ureteroscopy. It requires open or laparoscopic intervention for repair. This case report emphasizes its management and presents recommendations for prevention in current urological practice.

  5. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  6. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  7. Morale in the English mental health workforce: questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sonia; Osborn, David P J; Araya, Ricardo; Wearn, Elizabeth; Paul, Moli; Stafford, Mai; Wellman, Nigel; Nolan, Fiona; Killaspy, Helen; Lloyd-Evans, Brynmor; Anderson, Emma; Wood, Stephen J

    2012-09-01

    High-quality evidence on morale in the mental health workforce is lacking. To describe staff well-being and satisfaction in a multicentre UK National Health Service (NHS) sample and explore associated factors. A questionnaire-based survey (n = 2258) was conducted in 100 wards and 36 community teams in England. Measures included a set of frequently used indicators of staff morale, and measures of perceived job characteristics based on Karasek's demand-control-support model. Staff well-being and job satisfaction were fairly good on most indicators, but emotional exhaustion was high among acute general ward and community mental health team (CMHT) staff and among social workers. Most morale indicators were moderately but significantly intercorrelated. Principal components analysis yielded two components, one appearing to reflect emotional strain, the other positive engagement with work. In multilevel regression analyses factors associated with greater emotional strain included working in a CMHT or psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU), high job demands, low autonomy, limited support from managers and colleagues, age under 45 years and junior grade. Greater positive engagement was associated with high job demands, autonomy and support from managers and colleagues, Black or Asian ethnic group, being a psychiatrist or service manager and shorter length of service. Potential foci for interventions to increase morale include CMHTs, PICUs and general acute wards. The explanatory value of the demand-support-control model was confirmed, but job characteristics did not fully explain differences in morale indicators across service types and professions.

  8. Psychological impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on university staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Caroline; Carter, Frances; Boden, Joseph; Wilkinson, Tim; McKenzie, Jan; Ali, Anthony

    2016-02-19

    To assess the impact of the Canterbury earthquakes on the psychological functioning of university staff, to identify predictors of adverse psychological functioning and to survey how different aspects of work roles (academic, teaching, clinical, administrative) were affected. Eighteen months following the most severe earthquake, 119 staff from the University of Otago based in Christchurch completed a retrospective survey. This included demographic information, a measure of earthquake exposure, standardised and self-rated measures to identify psychological distress and measures of how people perceived different aspects of their work roles were impacted. A substantial minority of staff reported moderate-extreme difficulties on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) subscales 18 months following the most severe earthquake (Depression=9%; Anxiety=3%; Stress =13%). Predictors of distress were higher levels of exposure to earthquake-related stressors, neuroticism and prior mental health disorders. There was an association between impact and work roles that was hierarchical; academic and administrative roles were most affected, followed by teaching with the least impact on clinical roles. This study shows that psychological symptoms following a disaster are common, but in a retrospective survey most people report that these improve with time. A minority however, continue to report difficulties which persist even 18 months post disaster. It also gives insights into how different work roles were impacted and from this makes suggestions for how organisations can support staff over difficult times.

  9. Emotional intelligence, performance, and retention in clinical staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codier, Estelle; Kamikawa, Cindy; Kooker, Barbara M; Shoultz, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Emotional intelligence has been correlated with performance, retention, and organizational commitment in professions other than nursing. A 2006 pilot study provided the first evidence of a correlation between emotional intelligence and performance in clinical staff nurses. A follow-up study was completed, the purpose of which was to explore emotional intelligence, performance level, organizational commitment, and retention. A convenience sample of 350 nurses in a large medical center in urban Hawaii participated in this study. This article reports the findings pertaining to the subset of 193 clinical staff nurses who responded. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test instrument was used to measure emotional intelligence abilities. Performance was defined as ranking on a clinical ladder. Commitment was scored on a Likert scale. The following variables measured retention: total years in nursing, years in current job, total years anticipated in current job, and total anticipated career length. Emotional intelligence scores in clinical staff nurses correlated positively with both performance level and retention variables. Clinical staff nurses with higher emotional intelligence scores demonstrated higher performance, had longer careers, and greater job retention.

  10. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-01-01

    Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109) at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion), and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, a...

  11. The staff regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Following the first comprehensive review of the Provisional Staff Regulations conducted by the Secretariat, the Board of Governors approved on 12 June 2002 amendments to the Provisional Staff Regulations including the removal of the attribute 'provisional' from their title. The revised Staff Regulations of the Agency are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  12. The selection of anterior teeth appropriate for the age and sex of the individual. How variable are dental staff in their choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, P N; Jagger, D C; Harrison, A

    2002-09-01

    As part of the development of a guide to aid the undergraduate in the selection of artificial teeth, the aim of this study was to investigate the variability in choice of dental staff to select teeth appropriate to the age and sex of the individual with the aid of a series of three-dimensional guides. Four three-dimensional guides were produced for use in the study. Fifty dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire designed to assess the variability in selection of anterior teeth appropriate for the age and sex of an individual. From this study it can be concluded that there was little consistency in the selection of the shade, mould and arrangement of anterior teeth appropriate for the age and sex of the individual by qualified dental staff. The development and implementation of an aesthetic proforma to guide dental staff, dental undergraduates and patients through the process of choosing tooth mould, shade and arrangement based on age and sex may be helpful.

  13. Nursing staff members' intentions to use physical restraints with older people: testing the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, P; Mendelsson, G

    2001-09-01

    To examine nursing staff members' attitudes, subjective norms, moral obligations and intentions to use physical restraints, using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA). During the last two decades an extensive body of research has examined nurses' attitudes as one of the main factors affecting the decision to use or not to use physical restraints with older persons. However, no studies have examined empirically the antecedents to nurses' intentions to use physical restraints within a theoretically based framework. A correlational design was used with 303 nursing staff members from an 800-bed elder care hospital in central Israel. Participants completed a questionnaire including questions based on the TRA as well as socio-demographic and professional characteristics. Regression analyses found attitudes, subjective norms and moral considerations to be significantly associated to intention to use physical restraints with older people. The TRA explained 48% of the variance in nurses' intentions. The TRA proved to be a useful framework for examining nurses' intentions to use physical restraints. Nurses' attitudes, beliefs and expectations of significant others should be examined before implementing educational programmes regarding the use of physical restraints.

  14. The pain self-efficacy questionnaire: validation of an abbreviated two-item questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briet, Jan Paul; Bot, Arjan G J; Hageman, Michiel G J S; Menendez, Mariano E; Mudgal, Chaitanya S; Ring, David C

    2014-01-01

    The Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) is a validated tool to assess pain self-efficacy and is strongly correlated with disability. Reducing the number of questions of the original PSEQ to screen for self-efficacy will result in more efficient screening and less burden for the patient. The aim of this study was to prospectively validate the shortened version of the PSEQ. Overall, 249 new and follow-up patients visiting our outpatient orthopedic hand surgery clinic were prospectively enrolled and asked to complete the PSEQ, short version of the Disabilities of the Arm Shoulder and Hand, and 2-question version of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2) depression questionnaires. The patients completed the questionnaires in the office and online 2 weeks after their visit. At the follow-up visit, the PSEQ was substituted with the 2-question version of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ-2). The factors associated with higher short forms of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were investigated in a bivariate and multivariable analysis. Paired t-test was used to compare the mean values of the short and long questionnaires at enrollment. There was a large correlation (r = 0.90; p correlation was found with the short forms of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (r = 0.71 vs r = 0.61). Both the PSEQ-2 and the PSEQ were the most important predictors of the short forms of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores. A substantial test-retest reliability was found for the PSEQ-2 (0.66). The PSEQ-2 can be used to quickly assess patients׳ pain self-efficacy. Copyright © 2014 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The relationship between empowerment and effectiveness of staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effectiveness is one of the management concepts considered and studied always by management scientists and experts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different dimensions of empowerment (servicing staff, staff monitoring, consulting staff, and training staff) on dimensions of effectiveness of staff (staff ...

  16. Staff opinions regarding the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, S.M. van der; Maguire, C.M.; Cessie, S.L.; Veen, S.; Wit, J.M.; Walther, F.J.; Bruil, J.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the opinions of (para)medical and nursing staff in two Dutch Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU's). A questionnaire was used that measured: a) the perceived impact of NIDCAP on several NICU conditions, b) attitudes, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, knowledge and

  17. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  18. Burnout and engagement in relation with job demands and resources among dental staff in Northern Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, R.C.; Freeman, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives:  To investigate the psychological health - in particular, levels of burnout and engagement, job demands, job resources, and general psychological distress - among dental staff in Northern Ireland. Methods:  Three hundred questionnaires were administered to all dental offices in the

  19. The Use of the Intranet and Internet by Teaching Staff of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of the Intranet and Internet among academic members of staff at the University of Zambia was surveyed using a questionnaire. The findings revealed that the University had a well-developed network for both Intranet and Internet that was established to foster communication and access to both internal and external ...

  20. Hospital reform and staff morale in South Africa: a case study of Dr ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Settings and subjects: This study included all medical and nursing staff working at the district hospital. Outcome measures: A semi-structured questionnaire coded for anonymity was used. It comprised three sections: the introduction, demographic information and a list of factors to which participants responded by indicating ...

  1. An Investigation into Staff:Student Ratios in Nursing and Midwifery Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Susan; And Others

    A study examined the calculation of staff:student ratios (SSRs) in nursing and midwifery education in courses validated by the English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting (ENB). Data were collected from questionnaires mailed to all 108 colleges of nursing and midwifery and higher education institutions offering ENB-validated…

  2. The opinions and attitudes of dental school academic staff towards oral healthcare education for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haresaku, S; Mariño, R; Naito, T; Morgan, M V

    2016-08-01

    The term 'oral health care for older adults' has various interpretations, and its meaning is not clear among dental school academic staff. Additionally, there are no theoretical or practical stand-alone courses on oral health care for older adults in Japanese dental schools. To improve oral health care education, we investigated the opinions and attitudes toward oral health care education for older adults among academic staff in dental schools. Data were collected in seven dental schools from May to September 2013 via an online questionnaire survey. Five-hundred-fifty-eight academics (428 male, 130 female) participated (response rate 57%). The average number of years since they had completed a university degree was 20.2 (SD 10.2) years. The majority (Over 90%) of participants perceived that oral health care should be provided in nursing facilities, hospitals, and at home. Its treatments and instructions should include, not only methods of keeping good oral hygiene, but also improvement of oral function such as swallowing training and salivary glands massage. The majority (84.2%) suggested oral health care education should be combined as a one-credit, stand-alone course. Findings indicate that dental academics have an understanding the need for a course in oral health care for older adults. Participants supported the need for further development of education in oral health care for older adults' in Japan, as a separate course on its own right. However there were some different views about content by teaching field. The need for a national core program for teaching oral health care education was suggested. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  4. Job Satisfaction Of Hospital Nursing Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pietersen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Health care managers realize that job satisfaction impacts on nursing staff retention. This study examined the job satisfaction of nursing staff (N = 109 at a government hospital. Just more than half of the respondents were generally satisfied. Feelings that nursing is worthwhile and satisfying, and financial stability at the hospital could promote staff retention. Specific intrinsic - (promotion, and extrinsic factors (routinization, working conditions, pay, interaction with supervisors, and organizational support could impact negatively on retention. Management should use these findings as a basis for staff consultation, developmental strategies, and interventions. Future research on other nursing populations is recommended.

  5. Investigating the Importance of Sports Facilities & Staff for Football Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelopi Athanasopoulou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available (a Purpose: This study seeks to investigate the importance of facilities and staff for football fans in Greece. (b Design/methodology/approach: A survey was carried out during two matches of Superleague games with a convenience sample of 312 spectators. A structured questionnaire was used with scales based on previous research. (c Findings: Factor analysis revealed four reliable factor dimensions: facilities design; staff; facilities maintenance, and quick & easy access. Staff and quick & easy access are shown to be the most important dimensions for respondents followed by the other two. Results also indicated that there are significant differences in the importance assigned to these 4 factor dimensions among different levels of age; education; income, and marital status. (d Research limitations/implications: This study is limited to one sport and on a convenience sample of football fans. Future research can validate further these findings and increase their generalisability. (e Practical implications: The results of this study challenge sport managers to manage effectively the design of the stadium; the processes of entry and exit of fans; the environment of the game; and the quality of stadium facilities.

  6. Sensibility assessment of the HIV Disability Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Bereket, Tarik; Swinton, Marilyn; Alexander, Rob; King, Kenneth; Solomon, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Our purpose was to assess the sensibility of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Disability Questionnaire (HDQ), the first HIV-specific disability questionnaire. We administered the HDQ, a sensibility questionnaire and a structured qualitative interview to 22 adults living with HIV and five experienced clinicians. We considered the HDQ sensible if median scores on the sensibility questionnaire were ≥5 for adults living with HIV and ≥4 for clinicians for at least 80% of the items. We analyzed the interview data using directed qualitative content analytical techniques. Questionnaire scores were ≥5 for 88% (15/17) of the items and ≥4 for 100% (17/17) of the items for adults living with HIV and clinicians, respectively. The interview analysis indicated participants felt the HDQ possessed face and content validity in all disability dimensions, had adequate response options, was easy to complete, and adequately captured the episodic nature of disability. Participants had mixed responses about the questionnaire title and provided recommendations to refine item wording and response options. The HDQ appears sensible for use with adults living with HIV. Next steps include further measurement property assessment. The HDQ may be used by rehabilitation clinicians and researchers to assess disability experienced by adults living with HIV. • As people with HIV infection live longer, individuals may face a range of health-related challenges due to the disease, concurrent health conditions and the potential adverse effects of treatment. Together, these health-related challenges may be termed disability. • The HIV Disability Questionnaire (HDQ) is the first HIV-specific instrument developed to describe the presence, severity and episodic nature of the disability experienced by adults living with HIV. The HDQ is comprised of four domains including symptoms and impairments, uncertainty about future health, difficulties carrying out day-to-day activities, and challenges

  7. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Medication Errors by Nursing Staff Working in Bushehr Medical Centers during one Year Interval (1385-1386

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zahmatkeshan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication errors refer to inappropriate use of drugs, can lead to harmful and serious consequent. Many factors contribute to incidence of these errors. To investigate this factors a descriptive analytic study was done that assess clinical staff medication errors in Bushehr medical centers. Methods: The participants were 400 clinical staff, including nurses, midwives and nurse assistances to complete designed medication errors questionnaire. This questionnaire include 2 parts, part one was demographic data and part two, assess influencing factors of medication errors in six domain. Results: Results showed that the half of participants (49.9% had medication errors in acquaintance and the most error in dosage (37.7% and then type of drugs(27.7%. 73.3% of participants reported their errors and in unreported cases the most cause was fear of managers. According to participants attitude factors that interfering to medication errors were physicians factor, including illegible order in patient file (24.94%, nurses factors including, incorrect documentation (24.38%, interpersonal relationship (19.45%, inappropriate environment (15.3%, knowledge deficit and lack of experience (11.23% and stressful events (4.66%. No statistical significant correlation between situation of job and shift work. Conclusion: Results show that medication errors are common and human factors are the most factors in these errors.

  8. Effect of web-supported health education on knowledge of health and healthy-living behaviour of female staff in a Turkish university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurgul, Keser; Nursan, Cinar; Dilek, Kose; Over, Ozcelik Tijen; Sevin, Altinkaynak

    2015-01-01

    Once limited with face-to face courses, health education has now moved into the web environment after new developments in information technology This study was carried out in order to give training to the university academic and administrative female staff who have difficulty in attending health education planned for specific times and places. The web-supported training focuses on healthy diet, the importance of physical activity, damage of smoking and stress management. The study was carried out in Sakarya University between the years 2012-2013 as a descriptive and quasi experimental study. The sample consisted of 30 participants who agreed to take part in the survey, filled in the forms and completed the whole training. The data were collected via a "Personel Information Form", "Health Promotion Life-Style Profile (HPLSP)", and "Multiple Choice Questionnaire (MCQ). There was a statistically significant difference between the total points from "Health Promotion Life-Style Profile" and the total points from the sub-scale after and before the training (t=3.63, p=0.001). When the points from the multiple choice questionnaire after and before training were compared, it was seen that the average points were higher after the training (t=8.57, ptraining has a positive effect on the healthy living behaviour of female staff working at a Turkish university and on their knowledge of health promotion.

  9. Job Stress and Related Factors Among Iranian Male Staff Using a Path Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad-Marzabadi, Esfandiar; Gholami Fesharaki, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, job stress has been cited as a risk factor for some diseases. Objectives Given the importance of this subject, we established a new model for classifying job stress among Iranian male staff using path analysis. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was done on male staff in Tehran, Iran, 2013. The participants in the study were selected using a proportional stratum sampling method. The tools used included nine questionnaires (1- HSE questionnaire; 2- GHQ questionnaire; 3- Beck depression inventory; 4- Framingham personality type; 5- Azad-Fesharaki’s physical activity questionnaire; 6- Adult attachment style questionnaire; 7- Azad socioeconomic questionnaire; 8- Job satisfaction survey; and 9- demographic questionnaire). Results A total of 575 individuals (all male) were recruited for the study. Their mean (±SD) age was 33.49 (±8.9) and their mean job experience was 12.79 (±8.98) years. The pathway of job stress among Iranian male staff showed an adequate model fit (RMSEA=0.021, GFI=0.99, AGFI=0.97, P=0.136). In addition, the total effect of variables like personality type (β=0.283), job satisfaction (β=0.287), and age (β=0.108) showed a positive relationship with job stress, while variables like general health (β=-0.151) and depression (β=-0.242) showed the reverse effect on job stress. Conclusions According to the results of this study, we can conclude that our suggested model is suited to explaining the pathways of stress among Iranian male staff. PMID:27621934

  10. Analysis and Prediction of Claustrophobia during MR Imaging with the Claustrophobia Questionnaire: An Observational Prospective 18-month Single-Center Study of 6500 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napp, Adriane E; Enders, Judith; Roehle, Robert; Diederichs, Gerd; Rief, Matthias; Zimmermann, Elke; Martus, Peter; Dewey, Marc

    2017-04-01

    Purpose To analyze claustrophobia during magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and to explore the potential of the 26-item claustrophobia questionnaire (CLQ) (range, 0-4) as a screening tool in patients scheduled for MR imaging. Materials and Methods The study received institutional review board approval, and patients in the CLQ cohort provided informed consent. A total of 6520 consecutive patients were included. Overall, 4288 patients completed the CLQ before MR imaging (CLQ cohort), and 2232 patients underwent MR imaging without having completed the CLQ (non-CLQ cohort). Claustrophobic events were recorded by the staff. Results The CLQ mean score in patients with claustrophobic events (1.48 ± 0.93) was significantly higher (P claustrophobia, prediction in individual patients is not possible. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. Assessing dual-role staff-interpreter linguistic competency in an integrated healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Maria R; Otero-Sabogal, Regina; Newman, Jeffrey

    2007-11-01

    Interpreter services for medical care increase physician-patient communication and safety, yet a "formal certification" process to demonstrate interpreter competence does not exist. Testing and training is left to individual health care facilities nationwide. Bilingual staff are often used to interpret, without any assessment of their skills. Assessing interpreters' linguistic competence and setting standards for testing is a priority. To assess dual-role staff interpreter linguistic competence in an integrated health care system to determine skill qualification to work as medical interpreters. Dual-role staff interpreters voluntarily completed a linguistic competency assessment using a test developed by a language school to measure comprehension, completeness, and vocabulary through written and oral assessment in English and the second language. Pass levels were predetermined by school as not passing, basic (limited ability to read, write, and speak English and the second language) and medical interpreter level. Five staff-interpreter focus groups discussed experiences as interpreters and with language test. A total of 840 dual-role staff interpreters were tested for Spanish (75%), Chinese (12%), and Russian (5%) language competence. Most dual-role interpreters serve as administrative assistants (39%), medical assistants (27%), and clinical staff (17%). Two percent did not pass, 21% passed at basic level, 77% passed at medical interpreter level. Staff that passed at the basic level was prone to interpretation errors, including omissions and word confusion. Focus groups revealed acceptance of exam process and feelings of increased validation in interpreter role. We found that about 1 in 5 dual-role staff interpreters at a large health care organization had insufficient bilingual skills to serve as interpreters in a medical encounter. Health care organizations that depend on dual-role staff interpreters should consider assessing staff English and second language

  12. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget.

  13. The Design and Development of Staff Wellbeing Initiatives: Staff Stressors, Burnout and Emotional Exhaustion at Children and Young People's Mental Health in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Dominiek D; Howe, Deborah

    2015-11-01

    Mental health work presents problems for staff over and above those encountered in other organisations, including other areas of healthcare. Healthcare workers, in particular mental health workers, have poorer job satisfaction and higher job burnout and turnover compared with established norms for other occupational groups. To make sense of why healthcare workers experience high levels of burnout, a strong body of literature points to the emotionally demanding nature of people-work. The negative effects of mental health work on employee health can be mitigated by the provision of appropriate job resources and wellbeing initiatives. As to develop initiatives that appropriately target staff sources of stress and needs, it is important to engage staff in this process. As such, Children and Young People's Mental Health (CYPMH) and headspace Gosford, in Australia, New South Wales (NSW), developed a survey to identify how staff experience and manage the emotional demands of mental health work, what they identify as key stressors and which initiatives they would like to see implemented. Fifty-five staff (response rate of 73 %) completed the survey, and the results suggest that while staff find the work emotionally demanding, they do not appear to be emotionally exhausted and report administrative rather than client issues as their primary concerns. While a strong body of literature identifies the management of emotions in the workplace as a significant cause of stress, organisational stressors such as working in a bureaucratic environment are also important to understanding staff wellbeing.

  14. [Job satisfaction of nursing staff in Spanish prisons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Remartínez, E J; Mora Parra, L M; González Gómez, J A; García Jiménez, J; Garcés Pina, E; Domínguez Zamorano, J A; Borraz Fernández, J R; Blanco Quiroga, A; Armenteros López, B

    2009-02-01

    There are no available studies assessing job satisfaction amongst nursing staff in Spanish prisons. The aim of this study is to establish overall levels of job satisfaction and determine each of the components. Cross-sectional and multi-centre descriptive study conducted in Spanish prisons. A Font Roja satisfaction questionnaire adapted by J. Arranz for the study was used to measure degrees of job satisfaction using a Likert's scale. A parametric test was used and a regression model was constructed for predictive ends. 376 nurses answered the questionnaire (Participation Rate 62.7%; Response Rate 76.7%) 67 centres took part (91.8%). The average satisfaction mark was 2.84 (CL 95%: 2.81-2.87). The lowest ranked components were job variety 1.66 (CL 95%: 1.58-1.74), job-related stress 2.15 (CL 95%: 2.08-2.23) and control over job 2.77 (CL 95%: 2.73-2.82). The highest ranked aspect was job satisfaction, averaging 3.52 (CL 95%: 3.44-3.58). The average satisfaction mark for prison nursing staff was low when compared to other groups of health care professionals, which implies the need for corrective measures.

  15. Having lunch at a staff canteen is associated with recommended food habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Eva; Sarlio-Lähteenkorva, Sirpa; Lallukka, Tea

    2004-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of employees having lunch at staff canteens and to examine the association between workplace lunch and recommended food habits. A mailed questionnaire including data on lunch pattern, food habits, sociodemographic background, work-related factors and body weight. Logistic regression models including food habits as dependent variables and lunch pattern, sociodemographic factors, work-related factors and body mass index as independent variables. Helsinki Health Study survey data, collected in spring 2001. Employees from the City of Helsinki reaching 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 years. The data included 2474 women and 591 men; the response rate was 68%. About half of those with a staff canteen at work had lunch there. Those with higher educational level were more likely to have lunch at the staff canteen, as also were women with pre-school children and normal-weight men. Those having lunch at staff canteens were more likely to follow recommended food habits, compared with other subjects. Having lunch at the staff canteen seemed to increase the consumption frequency of vegetables and fish. Having lunch at staff canteens is associated with the quality of the diet. To serve a cooked meal including vegetables during working time may be an efficient way to improve diet among adult employees. More emphasis should be put on increasing the possibility for employees to have lunch at staff canteens.

  16. The difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare staff involved in the process of breaking bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Clare; Buchanan, Jean; Tod, Angela Mary

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the difficulties experienced by nurses and healthcare professionals when engaging in the process of breaking bad news. The challenges faced by staff when breaking bad news have previously been researched in relation to particular settings or participants. This study involved staff from diverse settings and roles to develop broader insights into the range of difficulties experienced in clinical practice. The study used a descriptive survey design involving self-reported written accounts and framework analysis. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire containing a free text section that asked participants to describe a difficult experience they had encountered when involved in the process of breaking bad news. Data were collected from healthcare staff from hospital, community, hospice and care home settings attending training days on breaking bad news between April 2011 and April 2014. Multiple inter-related factors presented challenges to staff engaging in activities associated with breaking bad news. Traditional subjects such as diagnostic and treatment information were described but additional topics were identified such as the impact of illness and care at the end of life. A descriptive framework was developed that summarizes the factors that contribute to creating difficult experiences for staff when breaking bad news. The framework provides insights into the scope of the challenges faced by staff when they engage in the process of breaking bad news. This provides the foundation for developing interventions to support staff that more closely matches their experiences in clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Investigation of zoonotic infections among Auckland Zoo staff: 1991-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, M B; Morris, A J; Sinclair, D A; Pritchard, C P

    2012-12-01

    Investigation was undertaken to assess the occurrence of zoonotic infection among staff at Auckland Zoological Park, New Zealand, in 1991, 2002 and 2010. Serial cross-sectional health surveys in 1991, 2002 and 2010 comprising a health questionnaire, and serological, immunological and microbiological analysis for a range of potential zoonotic infections were performed. Laboratory results for zoo animals were also reviewed for 2004-2010 to assess the occurrence of potential zoonotic infections. Veterinary clinic, animal handler, grounds, maintenance and administrative staff participated in the surveys, with 49, 42 and 46 participants in the 1991, 2002 and 2010 surveys, respectively (29% of total zoo staff in 2010). A small number of staff reported work-related infections, including erysipelas (1), giardiasis (1) and campylobacteriosis (1). The seroprevalence of antibodies to hepatitis A virus and Toxoplasma gondii closely reflected those in the Auckland community. No carriage of hepatitis B virus (HBV) was detected, and most of those with anti-HBV antibodies had been vaccinated. Few staff had serological evidence of past leptospiral infection. Three veterinary clinic staff had raised Chlamydophila psittaci antibodies, all Auckland Zoo, this was uncommon and risks appear to be adequately managed under current policies and procedures. Nevertheless, ongoing assessment of risk factors is needed as environmental, human and animal disease and management factors change. Policies and procedures should be reviewed periodically in conjunction with disease monitoring results for both animals and staff to minimise zoonotic transmission. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Completeness of Lyapunov Abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    the vector field, which allows the generation of a complete abstraction. To compute the functions that define the subdivision of the state space in an algorithm, we formulate a sum of squares optimization problem. This optimization problem finds the best subdivisioning functions, with respect to the ability......This paper addresses the generation of complete abstractions of polynomial dynamical systems by timed automata. For the proposed abstraction, the state space is divided into cells by sublevel sets of functions. We identify a relation between these functions and their directional derivatives along...

  19. Active over 45: a step-up jogging programme for inactive female hospital staff members aged 45+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschung Pfister, Pierrette; Niedermann, Karin; Sidelnikov, Eduard; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A

    2013-10-01

    Inactive individuals face motivational obstacles for becoming and remaining physically active. Therefore, sustainable physical activity promotion programmes tailored to reach inactive individuals are needed. The aim of this study was to test the role of motivation and the effect and feasibility of a training programme. We enrolled physically inactive female hospital staff members aged 45 and older in an uncontrolled exercise trial. Follow-up assessments were at 3 and 12 months. The primary outcome was running distance (Cooper test). Secondary outcomes were level of physical activity (Freiburger Physical Activity Questionnaire) and body mass index. Out of 1249 female hospital staff, 275 classified themselves as inactive and 250 (91%) of them were interested in the exercise programme. Of these, 68 (27%; mean age 53.2 years) agreed to participate in our study and 47 (69%) completed the programme. Average running distance increased by 255.70 m [95% confidence interval (CI) 208.09-303.31] at 3-month follow-up with a sustained benefit at 12-month follow-up (194.02; 95% CI 143.75-244.47). Physical activity level increased by 1152.52 kcal week(-1) (95% CI 703.73-1601.32) at 3 months with a sustained benefit (1279.10 kcal week(-1), 95% CI 826.80-1731.40) after 12 months. Notably, baseline motivation to become physically active was not associated with change in physical performance or physical activity level during the programme. The 3-month step-up jogging programme is a feasible and effective exercise intervention for physically inactive, middle-aged female hospital staff members. The intervention leads to sustained benefits independently of motivation to become more physically active.

  20. Prevalence of Allergy to Natural Rubber Latex and Potential Cross Reacting Food in Operation Room Staff in Shiraz Hospitals -2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nabavizade

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Allergic reactions to natural rubber latex have increased during past 10 years especially among health care workers and patients with high exposure to latex allergens. Allergic reaction to latex is related to many diseases like occupational asthma. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of allergy to natural rubber latex and potential cross reacting food in operation room staff in Shiraz hospitals. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study five hundred eighty operation room staff of ten private and state hospitals in Shiraz completed latex allergy questionnaire. They were questioned about personal history and previous history of latex sensitivity, symptoms of latex reactivity and about other allergies particularly to foods that may cross react with latex. Informed consent was obtained and skin prick testing was performed with natural rubber latex. Skin prick tests were done with three potentially cross reacting food (banana, Kiwi, and potato. The obtained data were analyzed with SPSS software and Chi-square test. Results: Among the 580 operation room workers 104 (17.9 % of participants were positive to latex skin test. We found a significant association between positive skin test to latex in operation room staff and atopy, urticaria and food allergy. Positive skin test to latex related to positive kiwi skin test (p<0.05. The prevalence did not vary by sex, age, education, surgical and non surgical glove users, history of contact dermatitis or smoking status. Conclusion: Latex allergy has a high prevalence in personnel of operation room. Evaluation of present symptom and prediction of future disease necessitate screening test in individuals at risk.

  1. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision? RCT of a meta-supervision intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-04-01

    To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence supporting positive outcomes of clinical supervision in psychiatric nursing is not convincing. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. All permanently employed nursing staff members at three general psychiatric wards at a Danish university hospital (n = 83) were allocated to either an intervention group (n = 40) receiving the meta-supervision in addition to attending usual supervision or to a control group (n = 43) attending usual supervision. Self-reported questionnaire measures of clinical supervision effectiveness and benefits were collected at base line in January 2012 and at follow-up completed in February 2013. In addition, a prospective registration of clinical supervision participation was carried out over 3 months subsequent to the intervention. The main result was that it was possible to motivate staff in the intervention group to participate significantly more frequently in sessions of the ongoing supervision compared with the control group. However, more frequent participation was not reflected in the experienced effectiveness of the clinical supervision or in the general formative or restorative benefits. The intervention had a positive effect on individuals or wards already actively engaged in clinical supervision, which suggested that individuals and wards without well-established supervision practices may require more comprehensive interventions targeting individual and organizational barriers to clinical supervision. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Staff Group Trainer: Development of a Computer-Driven, Structured, Staff Training Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koger, Milton

    1998-01-01

    .... The project produced two training support packages (TSP)--battalion and brigade--designed to train these staffs to more effectively and efficiently communicate within and between staff sections, command post, and the unit commander...

  3. Complete NASA Dryden Staff of 1985, in front of building 4800

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    In 1985 the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility employees and contractors gathered around the base of the X-1E for a picture. The X-1E is mounted in front of building 4800, the main building at Dryden. On Wednesday, October 1, 1958, the NACA yellow-backed winged symbol (see E-33718) that represented the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics for 43-years, was removed from the front of the main building at the NASA High Speed Flight Station, making room for a new insignia belonging to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. This NASA Insignia was created by retiree James J. Modarelli, former Chief of Technical Publication of Lewis Research Center; designed by the Army Institute of Heraldry; and approved by the Commission of Fine Arts and the NASA Administrator. This official insignia of the NASA is a dark blue disc with white stars. The white hand-cut letters 'NASA' are in the center of the disc and are encircled by a white diagonal orbit. A solid red 'V' shape appears behind and in front of the letters and extends beyond the disc. The 'V' is patterned after an actual wing design being tested by NACA researchers during the late 1950s. This insignia was used from 1958 to 1975 and was affectionately known at the 'meatball,' returning to NASA Insignia status in 1992. In the photo above the NASA Logotype appearing on the front of the main building replaced the NASA Insignia. The NASA Logotype was developed under the Federal Design Improvement Program initiated by the President in 1972, with the preferred color being red. It was approved by the Commission of Fine Arts and the NASA Administrator in October 1975. It symbolized NASA's role in aeronautics and space from 1975 to 1992 and has since been retired. In the logotype, the letters 'NASA' are reduced with the strokes being of one width; the elimination of cross strokes in the two 'A' letters imparts a quality of uniqueness and contemporary character. This familiar logo was known as 'The Worm'. On May 22, 1992, NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin announced a change in the NASA Insignia: 'it seems only fitting that the original NASA Insignia be a part of our Future.' So once more the 'meatball' serves as the official NASA Insignia.

  4. Construction completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Construction Completion Report documents the major construction projects at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and related information on contracts, schedules, and other areas which affected construction. This report is not intended to be an exhaustive detailed analysis of construction, but is a general overview and summary of the WIPP construction. 10 refs., 29 figs

  5. Complete French Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Gaelle

    2010-01-01

    The best-selling complete course for a fun and effective way to learn French. This ISBN is for the paperback book. The corresponding audio support (ISBN: 9781444100068) is also available. The book and audio support can also be purchased as a pack (ISBN: 9781444100051).

  6. An Epidemiological Approach to Staff Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Edna

    This paper describes a conceptual model of staff burnout in terms of independent, intervening and dependent variables. Staff burnout is defined, symptoms are presented, and the epidemiological approach to burnout is descussed. Components of the proposed model, which groups determinants of mental health into three domains, consist of: (1)…

  7. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  8. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training. The...

  9. The Support Needs of Staff Developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at an annual staff development conference to determine the needs of professional staff developers in British higher education. An overview of the research strategy, which was based on an action research model, is provided; the ranking of needs areas is discussed; and needs statements with justifications are appended.…

  10. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined.

  11. Futuristics: A Tool for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Margaret J.; Hurst, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Creative use of future planning as a staff development tool can have short- and long-term benefits for the individual and the organization. Its potential for stimulating creativity, reducing crisis management, and developing staff cohesion is unequaled. The individual, the organization, the technology and the manager are the important factors.…

  12. 40 CFR 1.25 - Staff Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff Offices. 1.25 Section 1.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION Headquarters § 1.25 Staff Offices. (a) Office of Administrative Law Judges. The Office of...

  13. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  14. An Ivory Staff Terminal from Alcester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Heslop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Alcester staff terminal is an outstanding example of late Anglo-Saxon carving on a small scale. It was supposedly discovered in 1873 in the garden of the rectory at Alcester (Warwickshire and comes from a pastoral staff that would have belonged to a bishop or abbot. This article contains a 3D visualisation of the terminal.

  15. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  16. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark.......Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark....

  17. 29 CFR 511.7 - Committee staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Committee staff. 511.7 Section 511.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS WAGE ORDER PROCEDURE FOR AMERICAN SAMOA § 511.7 Committee staff. Each industry committee will be furnished a lawyer, to...

  18. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial Administration OFFICES OF INDEPENDENT COUNSEL, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL POWERS OF SPECIAL COUNSEL § 600.5 Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the...

  19. Impact of the Christchurch earthquakes on hospital staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovaranonte, Pleayo; Cawood, Tom J

    2013-06-01

    On September 4, 2010 a major earthquake caused widespread damage, but no loss of life, to Christchurch city and surrounding areas. There were numerous aftershocks, including on February 22, 2011 which, in contrast, caused substantial loss of life and major damage to the city. The research aim was to assess how these two earthquakes affected the staff in the General Medicine Department at Christchurch Hospital. Problem To date there have been no published data assessing the impact of this type of natural disaster on hospital staff in Australasia. A questionnaire that examined seven domains (demographics, personal impact, psychological impact, emotional impact, impact on care for patients, work impact, and coping strategies) was handed out to General Medicine staff and students nine days after the September 2010 earthquake and 14 days after the February 2011 earthquake. Response rates were ≥ 99%. Sixty percent of responders were earthquakes, respectively. A fifth to a third of people had to find an alternative route of transport to get to work but only eight percent to 18% took time off work. Financial impact was more severe following the February earthquake, with 46% reporting damage of >NZ $1,000, compared with 15% following the September earthquake (P earthquake than the September earthquake (42% vs 69%, P earthquake but this rose to 53% after the February earthquake (12/53 vs 45/85, P earthquake but this dropped significantly to 15% following the February earthquake (27/53 vs 13/62, P earthquakes upon General Medicine hospital staff. The effect was widespread with minor financial impact during the first but much more during the second earthquake. Moderate psychological impact was experienced in both earthquakes. This data may be useful to help prepare plans for future natural disasters. .

  20. An audit of acute oncology services: patient experiences of admission procedures and staff utilisation of a new telephone triage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Lorraine; Holch, Patricia; Kenyon, Lucille; Hector, Ceri; Kozlowska, Krystina; Kenny, Anne Marie; Ziegler, Lucy; Velikova, Galina

    2016-12-01

    In 2010, St. James Institute of Oncology (Leeds, UK) created a new acute oncology service (AOS) consisting of a new admissions unit with a nurse-led telephone triage (TT) system. This audit cycle (March 2011 and June 2013) evaluated patient experiences of the reconfigured AOS and staff use of the TT system. Patient views were elicited via a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The TT forms were analysed descriptively evaluating completion and data quality, reported symptoms and their severity and advice given (including admission rates). Patients (n = 40) reported high satisfaction with the new AOS. However, 56 % of patients delayed 2 days or more before contacting the unit. In 2011, 26 % of all the admitted patients were triaged via the TT system; 133 TT forms were completed. In June 2013, 49 % of the admitted patients were triaged; 264 forms were completed. The most commonly reported symptoms on the TT forms were pain, pyrexia/rigors/infection, diarrhoea, vomiting and dyspnoea. Half of the patients using the TT system were admitted (52 % in 2011, 49 % in 2013). Our audit provided evidence of successful implementation of the TT system with the number of TT forms doubling from 2011 to 2013. The new AOS was endorsed by patients, with the majority satisfied with the care they received.

  1. Staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in South African public sector mental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To document staff/bed and staff/patient ratios in public. sector mental health services in South Africa. Design. Cross-sectional survey. Method. Aquestionnaire was distributed to provincial mental health co-ordinators requesting numbers of full-time equivalent (FTE) staff who provide mental health care at all ...

  2. Quality and Use of Rolling Project Completion Reports | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... In 2005, IDRC adopted the rolling Project Completion Report (rPCR), creating a cross-organization interactive process to elicit staff reflection, deepen learning about projects, and fulfill an accountability function for the organization. Five years after its implementation, we commissioned an assessment of the ...

  3. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.

    1997-01-01

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff's responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au)

  4. QUESTIONNAIRES PRETESTING IN MARKETING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA-MIHAELA BABONEA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Designing the perfect survey questionnaire is impossible. However, researchers can still create an effective research. To make your questionnaire effective, it is necessary to pretest it before actually using it. The following paper reveals some general guidelines on pretesting and what to do for a more effective marketing research giving the fact that the existing literature highlights the importance and indispensability of pretesting and on the other hand, does not provide sufficient information in terms of methodology about it. Also, we have tried to explain the importance of questionnaires pretesting before applying them in order to obtain the best results in marketing research and we’ve kept in mind that high quality in this domain means using new tools and improving the existing ones if one searches for efficient results.

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  6. [Burnout syndrome among health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel-García, José Angel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome components among the medical and nursing staff of the second care level hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado from Durango, Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 73 physicians and 100 nurses randomly selected from both hospitals. The prevalence of burnout syndrome components was established by the Maslash Burnout Inventory, which determines the presence of physical/emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and labor performance. In addition, sociodemographic and labor information was collected. Prevalence was calculated with a reliability interval of 95% (CI 95%). 73 physicians and 100 nurses enrolled, corresponding to 22.8% and 14.5% of such personnel working in both institutions. Among the IMSS and ISSSTE workers respectively, the prevalence of depersonalization was 43.2% (34.4-52.9) and 14.5% (6.8-25.8), whereas the prevalence of physical/emotional exhaustion was 41.4% (32.7-51.1) and 19.4% (10.4-31.4). Pre-valence of labor performance was higher among the personnel of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 99.1% (95.1-100) versus 96.8% (88.8-100). Severe depersonalization (p = 0.004), but not emotional exhaustion (p = 0.09) nor labor performance (p = 0.06) was significantly higher among personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Prevalence of depersonalization and physical/emotional exhaustion was higher among physicians and nurses of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; nonetheless, their labor performance was high. Our finding suggests that personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social make a greater effort to maintain the high labor performance that medical care requires.

  7. Physical Appearance Concern Questionnaire (PACQ in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoun Khademi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to make questionnaire for screening body dysmorphic disorder sufferers in cosmetic clinics. Methods: A sample of 150 female patients with age average 29.4 years completed Physical Appearance Concern Questionnaire. It has been used as screening tool for screening patients with body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in cosmetic clinics. Results: Result of reliability analysis (α=0.908 and validity have shown the effectiveness of this questionnaire for recognizing individuals with BDD symptoms. Discussion: Physical appearance concern questionnaire can be used in cosmetic clinics for identifying BDD sufferers among clients, with score for the severity of symptoms. Almost all of the researches have been studying in cosmetic clinics or dermatology settings and there is no investigation for people with special needs, thus further research is required in the development of a screening questionnaire or interview for identifying patients with BDD with special needs.

  8. Evaluation of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sue

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic/common condition that causes a significant effect on the individual (reduced quality of life, society (time lost off work and health services. Comparison of studies evaluating the management of IBS has been hindered by the lack of a widely adopted validated symptom score. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a disease specific score to measure the symptoms of patients with IBS. Methods A self-administered 14-item symptom questionnaire (based on Rome II criteria was mailed to 533 persons included in a prevalence study of IBS. The reliability of each underlying dimension identified was measured by Cronbach's α. Validity was assessed by comparing symptom scores with concurrent IBS specific quality of life (QoL scores. Reproducibility was measured by the test-retest method and responsiveness measured by effect size. Results 379 (71% questionnaires were returned. The underlying dimensions identified were pain, diarrhoea and constipation. Cronbach's α was 0.74 for pain, 0.90 for diarrhoea and 0.79 for constipation. Pain and diarrhoea dimensions had good external validity (r = -0.3 to -0.6, constipation dimension had moderate external validity (r = -0.2 to -0.3. All dimensions were reproducible (ICCs 0.75 to 0.81. Effect sizes of 0.27 to 0.53 were calculated for those with a reported improvement in symptoms. Conclusion The Birmingham IBS Symptom Questionnaire has been developed and tested. It has been shown to be suitable for self-completion and acceptable to patients. The questionnaire has 3 internal dimensions which have good reliability, external validity and are responsive to a change in health status.

  9. Evaluation of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roalfe, Andrea K; Roberts, Lesley M; Wilson, Sue

    2008-07-23

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic/common condition that causes a significant effect on the individual (reduced quality of life), society (time lost off work) and health services. Comparison of studies evaluating the management of IBS has been hindered by the lack of a widely adopted validated symptom score. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a disease specific score to measure the symptoms of patients with IBS. A self-administered 14-item symptom questionnaire (based on Rome II criteria) was mailed to 533 persons included in a prevalence study of IBS. The reliability of each underlying dimension identified was measured by Cronbach's alpha. Validity was assessed by comparing symptom scores with concurrent IBS specific quality of life (QoL) scores. Reproducibility was measured by the test-retest method and responsiveness measured by effect size. 379 (71%) questionnaires were returned. The underlying dimensions identified were pain, diarrhoea and constipation. Cronbach's alpha was 0.74 for pain, 0.90 for diarrhoea and 0.79 for constipation. Pain and diarrhoea dimensions had good external validity (r = -0.3 to -0.6), constipation dimension had moderate external validity (r = -0.2 to -0.3). All dimensions were reproducible (ICCs 0.75 to 0.81). Effect sizes of 0.27 to 0.53 were calculated for those with a reported improvement in symptoms. The Birmingham IBS Symptom Questionnaire has been developed and tested. It has been shown to be suitable for self-completion and acceptable to patients. The questionnaire has 3 internal dimensions which have good reliability, external validity and are responsive to a change in health status.

  10. A PHYSICAL ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE: REPRODUCIBILITY AND VALIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the Quantification de L'Activite Physique en Altitude chez les Enfants (QAPACE supervised self-administered questionnaire reproducibility and validity on the estimation of the mean daily energy expenditure (DEE on Bogotá's schoolchildren. The comprehension was assessed on 324 students, whereas the reproducibility was studied on a different random sample of 162 who were exposed twice to it. Reproducibility was assessed using both the Bland-Altman plot and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. The validity was studied in a sample of 18 girls and 18 boys randomly selected, which completed the test - re-test study. The DEE derived from the questionnaire was compared with the laboratory measurement results of the peak oxygen uptake (Peak VO2 from ergo-spirometry and Leger Test. The reproducibility ICC was 0.96 (95% C.I. 0.95-0.97; by age categories 8-10, 0.94 (0.89-0. 97; 11-13, 0.98 (0.96- 0.99; 14-16, 0.95 (0.91-0.98. The ICC between mean TEE as estimated by the questionnaire and the direct and indirect Peak VO2 was 0.76 (0.66 (p<0.01; by age categories, 8-10, 11-13, and 14-16 were 0.89 (0.87, 0.76 (0.78 and 0.88 (0.80 respectively. The QAPACE questionnaire is reproducible and valid for estimating PA and showed a high correlation with the Peak VO2 uptake

  11. The effect of a care bundle on nursing staff when caring for the dying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Katherine; Curry, Therese; Byfieldt, Naomi

    2015-08-01

    Most Australians die in acute hospital settings. Despite this, hospitals remain ill-equipped to care for dying patients with hospital deaths not uncommonly perceived as distressing by both patients and their families. As a quality improvement project, a care bundle for the dying was developed and piloted on two medical wards. The aim of this study was to examine whether or not the quality initiative had any effect on the ward nurse's attitudes and self-assessed competency to care for dying patients. A pre- and post-survey using self-administered questionnaires were given to nursing staff who voluntarily completed these before and after implementation of the caring for the dying bundle. Over the 6 months the bundle was piloted, 74.5% of people who died did so with the bundle in place. While this was seen as clinically useful by nearly half the nurses who responded, there was not a significant change in the staff's attitudes or self-assessed competency to care for dying patients. There was a minor change in the Thanatophobia Scale (pre 18.2: SD±9.0 versus post 16.8: SD 7.8; P=0.53), the Self-efficacy in Palliative Care Scale for communication (pre 47.4: SD ±17.4 versus post 54.7:SD±17.9; P=0.11) and patient management respectively (pre 54.3: SD ±12.9 versus 59.1: SD ±12.6; P=0.15). This work highlighted that at least in the short term, that a quality initiative had only a modest impact on nursing attitudes to caring for dying patients. However, as a collection of clinical tools grouped as a care bundle, a proportion of nursing staff acknowledged this initiative as useful. Further research is required to understand if such an initiative approach may, in the long term, positively impacts attitude. This is highly relevant given the increasing numbers of people likely to die in acute care.

  12. Investigation acoustic comfort indexes in staff of open plan offices in state banks in Hamadan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifah Nezami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Noise is one of the most detrimental factors in working environments that alongside other physical problems have adverse effects on the mental health of employees. Open plan offices such as banks are under the influence of noise pollution sources, which can have a negative impact on health and comfort of employees. This study aimed to identify the sources of noise pollution in the banks and the level of noise annoyance among their employees . Methods: A-weighted Sound Pressure Level measured in the banks by a sound level meter. Perefferd noise curve (PNC and speech interference index (SIL were calculated, prevalence of noise annoyance, effects and clarity of speech were determined using a questionnaire with a reliability coefficient of 0.88 completed by 175 employees of Hamadan banks . Results: Sound Pressure Level equivalent of the banks were 64.11 dB. The average value of SIL index was calculated 54.93 dB and PNC index were calculated 58.17 dB and 48.2 dB for banks working and not-working times, respectively. According to bank staff opinions, the main source of noise pollution was commotion of clienteles that reduce concentration and increase overall effort to understand speech of colleagues. Conclusion: Noise emission in the studied banks had a low frequency band. PNC, and SIL indexes are perfect indexes for describing the acoustics condition and control plan for open office environments .

  13. Frequency of and predictors for withholding patient safety concerns among oncology staff: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwappach, D L B; Gehring, K

    2015-05-01

    Speaking up about patient safety is vital to avoid errors reaching the patient and to improve a culture of safety. This study investigated the prevalence of non-speaking up despite concerns for safety and aimed to identify predictors for withholding voice among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in oncology. A self-administered questionnaire assessed safety concerns, speaking up beliefs and behaviours among nurses and doctors from nine oncology departments. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors for withholding safety concerns. A total of 1013 HCPs returned the completed survey (response rate 65%). Safety concerns were common among responders. Fifty-four per cent reported to recognise their colleagues making potentially harmful errors at least sometimes. A majority of responders reported at least some episodes of withholding concerns about patient safety. Thirty-seven per cent said they remained silent at least once when they had information that might have helped prevent an incident. Respondents believed that a high level of interpersonal, communication and coping skills are necessary to speak up about patient safety issues at their workplace. Higher levels of perceived advocacy for patient safety and psychological safety significantly decreased the frequency of withholding voice. Remaining silent about safety concerns is a common phenomenon in oncology. Improved strategies are needed to support staff in effective communication and make cancer care safer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The complete cosmicomics

    CERN Document Server

    Calvino, Italo

    2014-01-01

    The definitive edition of Calvino’s cosmicomics, bringing together all of these enchanting stories—including some never before translated—in one volume for the first time. In Italo Calvino’s cosmicomics, primordial beings cavort on the nearby surface of the moon, play marbles with atoms, and bear ecstatic witness to Earth’s first dawn. Exploring natural phenomena and the origins of the universe, these beloved tales relate complex scientific concepts to our common sensory, emotional, human world. Now, The Complete Cosmicomics brings together all of the cosmicomic stories for the first time. Containing works previously published in Cosmicomics, t zero, and Numbers in the Dark, this single volume also includes seven previously uncollected stories, four of which have never been published in translation in the United States. This “complete and definitive collection” (Evening Standard) reconfirms the cosmicomics as a crowning literary achievement and makes them available to new generations of reader...

  15. Complete scanpaths analysis toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Piotr; Mikrut, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a complete open software environment for control, data processing and assessment of visual experiments. Visual experiments are widely used in research on human perception physiology and the results are applicable to various visual information-based man-machine interfacing, human-emulated automatic visual systems or scanpath-based learning of perceptual habits. The toolbox is designed for Matlab platform and supports infra-red reflection-based eyetracker in calibration and scanpath analysis modes. Toolbox procedures are organized in three layers: the lower one, communicating with the eyetracker output file, the middle detecting scanpath events on a physiological background and the one upper consisting of experiment schedule scripts, statistics and summaries. Several examples of visual experiments carried out with use of the presented toolbox complete the paper.

  16. Psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ, Generic version (Short Form 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofoss Dag

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How to protect patients from harm is a question of universal interest. Measuring and improving safety culture in care giving units is an important strategy for promoting a safe environment for patients. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ is the only instrument that measures safety culture in a way which correlates with patient outcome. We have translated the SAQ to Norwegian and validated the translated version. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented in this article. Methods The questionnaire was translated with the back translation technique and tested in 47 clinical units in a Norwegian university hospital. SAQ's (the Generic version (Short Form 2006 the version with the two sets of questions on perceptions of management: on unit management and on hospital management were distributed to 1911 frontline staff. 762 were distributed during unit meetings and 1149 through the postal system. Cronbach alphas, item-to-own correlations, and test-retest correlations were calculated, and response distribution analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were performed, as well as early validity tests. Results 1306 staff members completed and returned the questionnaire: a response rate of 68%. Questionnaire acceptability was good. The reliability measures were acceptable. The factor structure of the responses was tested by confirmatory factor analysis. 36 items were ascribed to seven underlying factors: Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Stress Recognition, Perceptions of Hospital Management, Perceptions of Unit Management, Working conditions, and Job satisfaction. Goodness-of-Fit Indices showed reasonable, but not indisputable, model fit. External validity indicators – recognizability of results, correlations with "trigger tool"-identified adverse events, with patient satisfaction with hospitalization, patient reports of possible maltreatment, and patient evaluation of organization of hospital work

  17. CMS Is Finally Completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Yet another step in the completion of the Large Hadron Collider was taken yesterday morning, as the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid was lowered nearly 100 meters bellow ground. After more than eight years of work at the world's most powerful particle accelerator, scientists hope that they will be able to start initial experiments with the LHC until the end of this year.

  18. LEAR construction completed

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1982-01-01

    In July 1982, LEAR construction was completed, the individual systems had been dry-tested. On 16 July, the first 50 MeV (309 MeV/c) protons from Linac 1 were injected and circulated. On 11 October, the first antiprotons from the AA, decelerated in the PS to 609 MeV/c, were injected. Also in 1982, acceleration, deceleration and stochastic cooling were successfully tested. See 9007366 for a more detailed description. See also 8201061, 8204131, 8309026.

  19. SOURgraphs for efficient completion

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Lynch; Polina Strogova

    1998-01-01

    We introduce a data structure called SOUR graphs and present an efficient Knuth-Bendix completion procedure based on it. SOUR graphs allow for a maximal structure sharing of terms in rewriting systems. The term representation is a dag representation, except that edges are labelled with equational constraints and variable renamings. The rewrite rules correspond to rewrite edges, the unification problems to unification edges. The Critical Pair and Simplification inferences are recogniz...

  20. SHIVA laser: nearing completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, J.A.; Godwin, R.O.

    1977-01-01

    Construction of the Shiva laser system is nearing completion. This laser will be operating in fall 1977 and will produce over 20 terawatts of focusable power in a subnanosecond pulse. Fusion experiments will begin early in 1978. It is anticipated that thermonuclear energy release equal to one percent that of the incident light energy will be achieved with sub-millimeter deuterium-tritium targets. From other experiments densities in excess of a thousand times that of liquid are also expected

  1. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  2. Child abuse: validation of a questionnaire translated into Brazilian Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Marengo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to validate the Portuguese translation of a questionnaire on maltreatment of children and adolescents, developed by Russell et al. and to test its psychometric properties for use in Brazil. The original questionnaire was translated into Portuguese using a standardized forward-backward linguistic translation method. Both face and content validity were tested in a small pilot study (n = 8. In the main study, a convenience sample of 80 graduate dentistry students with different specialties, from Curitiba, PR, Brazil, were invited to complete the final Brazilian version of the questionnaire. Discriminant validity was assessed by comparing the results obtained from the questionnaire for different specialties (pediatric dentistry, for example. The respondents completed the questionnaire again after 4 weeks to evaluate test-retest reliability. The comparison of test versus retest questionnaire answers showed good agreement (kappa > 0.53, intraclass correlation > 0.84 for most questions. In regard to discriminant validity, a statistically significant difference was observed only in the experience and interest domains, in which pediatric dentists showed more experience with and interest in child abuse compared with dentists of other specialties (Mann-Whitney test, p < 0.05. The Brazilian version of the questionnaire was valid and reliable for assessing knowledge regarding child abuse by Portuguese-speaking dentists.

  3. The well-being questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J; Van Der Ploeg, Henk M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Well-being Questionnaire (W-BQ) has been designed to measure psychological well-being in people with a chronic somatic illness and is recommended by the World Health Organization for widespread use. However, studies into the factor structure of this instrument are still limited...

  4. Manual Health and Labour Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona); M.L.E. Essink-Bot (Marie-Louise)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWhen the indirect costs form a part of an economical evaluation, a standardised method for measuring production losses, as a result of illness, is required. Standardisation will increase the comparability and transparency of the results. The Health and Labour Questionnaire (HLQ) is

  5. 572 OR questionnaire.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-27

    Apr 27, 2010 ... Original Research: Patients' perception and knowledge of anaesthesia and anaesthetists – a questionnaire survey. 2010;16(4) ... determine patients' knowledge of anaesthesia and of the qualifications and role of anaesthetists in patient care. Methods: ..... information leaflets on anaesthesia and focus group.

  6. Impact of the introduction of electronic prescribing on staff perceptions of patient safety and organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, James; Pucher, Philip H; Ibrahim, Heba; Stubbs, Ben

    2017-05-15

    Electronic prescribing (EP) systems are online technology platforms by which medicines can be prescribed, administered, and stock controlled. The actual impact of EP on patient safety is not truly understood. This study seeks to assess the impact of the implementation of an EP system on safety culture, as well as assessing differences between clinical respondent groups and considering their implications. Staff completed a modified Safety Attitudes Questionnaire survey, 6 weeks following the introduction of EP across surgical services in a hospital in Dorset, England. Responses were assessed and differences between respondent groups compared. Rates of self-reported adverse events were compared before and after implementation. Overall response rate was 34.5%. There was no significant difference between usage patterns and previous experience with EP between user groups. Overall safety was felt to have been reduced by the introduction of EP. Significant differences between clinician and nonclinicians were seen in ability to discuss errors (3.23 ± 0.5 versus 2.8 ± 0.69, P = 0.004), drug chart access, and ease of medication prescribing. Regression analysis did not identify any confounding factors. Despite a significant reduction in the adverse event rate in other divisions of the hospital that did not implement EP at the same time, this same reduction was not seen in the surgical department. This is the first study to assess the impact of EP on safety culture using a validated assessment tool (Safety Attitudes Questionnaire). Overall safety culture deteriorated following introduction of EP. Problems with system usability/intuitiveness, nonstandardized implementation, and competence assessment strategies may have all contributed to this result. Centers seeking to implement EP in future must consider these factors to ensure a positive impact on patient safety and outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An investigation of factors supporting the psychological health of staff in a UK emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Philip J; Benson, Elizabeth V; Harris, Adrian; Baron, Rachel

    2012-07-01

    Research indicates emergency department doctors experience high levels of stress. Poor psychological health affects staff well-being and patient care, with considerable organisational and financial cost. This study compares levels of psychological health in medical, nursing and administrative staff from a UK emergency department with an orthopaedic comparison department. The study investigates the influence of coping strategies and the support people receive from their colleagues (ie, social support). Comparative design, using self-report questionnaires comparing emergency (n=73) and orthopaedic (n=63) staff. Measures included: General Health Questionnaire-12, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Brief COPE, and questions relating to social identity and social support. The proportion of staff experiencing clinically significant levels of distress was higher than would be expected in the general population. The increased risk of psychological distress previously shown for emergency doctors is not present here for other emergency staff members. Better psychological health was associated with greater use of problem-focused coping and less use of maladaptive coping. Social support was associated with better psychological health and greater use of problem-focused coping. Priority should be given to developing and evaluating interventions to improve psychological health for this group. Findings suggest that coping strategies and social support are important factors to incorporate into such interventions.

  8. Do the supportive staff have enough oral health knowledge? - A study at a teaching health care institution in South India

    OpenAIRE

    Venumbaka Siva Kalyan; A S Kalyana Bhargava; T Madhavi Padma; KVNR Pratap; G Venkateswara Rao; Anitha Akkaloori

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Oral hygiene plays an imperative role in preventing oral diseases. The assessment of knowledge, attitude and practice in relation to oral hygiene among the supportive staff members would help the professional, to inculcate in their patients the acceptable oral habits to thwart oral diseases as these staff members are a bridge between healthcare professional and the patient. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was conducted at a teaching health care...

  9. The Relationship between Quality of Work Life, Job Stress, Job Satisfaction and Citizenship Behavior in Oshnaviyeh Hospital’s Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB is an important variable in the study of organization management. It is partly hard to build relationships and performance within the organization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the quality of work life, job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior in Oshnaviyeh Hospital’s staff. Materials and Methods:To collect data, quality of work life by Walton, hospital job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior questionnaires were used. To determine the reliability of the questionnaires. To analyze data, Pearson Correlation Test,T test, Regression, Path analysis were used. Results: The results show that there is a significant positive relationship between the quality of work life, job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior. The quality of work life is the most important variable among the independent variables since it was able to identify approximately 18% of citizen behavior. Conclusion: Because OCB is completely voluntary, behaviors are more influenced by their interactions and organizational procedures. Hence, it  is  fair to organizations to know how to deal with employees' level of organizational citizenship behavior.

  10. Emergency medicine in the Netherlands, the necessity for changing the system: results from two questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geloven, Anna A. W.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Simons, Maarten P.; Volker, Beijtje S.; Verbeek, Marjos J.; Obertop, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information about patient, staff and organization characteristics of Emergency Departments in the Netherlands, and evaluate the changes between 1996 and 1999. Methods: The heads of the Emergency Departments of all hospitals in the Netherlands were sent a questionnaire concerning

  11. Emotional labour, job satisfaction and organizational commitment amongst clinical nurses: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng-Hua; Chang, Chen-Chieh

    2008-06-01

    According to Hochschild's (1983. The Managed Heart. Berkeley: University of California Press) classification of emotional labour, nursing staff express high emotional labour. This paper investigates how nursing staff influence job satisfaction and organizational commitment when they perform emotional labour. This paper examines the relationship between emotional labour, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment from the perspective of nursing staff. A questionnaire survey was carried out to explore these interrelationships. Teaching hospital in Taiwan. Questionnaires were distributed to 500 nursing staff; 295 valid questionnaires were collected and analysed-a 59% response rate. The questionnaires contained items on emotional labour, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment as well as some basic socio-demographics. In addition, descriptive statistics, correlation and linear structure relation (LISREL) were computed. Emotional display rule (EDR) was significantly and negatively related to job satisfaction. Surface acting (SA) was not significantly related to job satisfaction but demonstrated a significantly negative relationship with organizational commitment. Deep acting (DA) significantly and positively correlated with job satisfaction but demonstrated no significance with organizational commitment. The variety of emotions required (VER) was not significantly related to job satisfaction; frequency and duration of interaction (FDI) and negatively related to job satisfaction; and job satisfaction significantly and positively correlated with organizational commitment. We found that some dimensions of emotional labour significantly relate to job satisfaction. Job satisfaction positively affects organizational commitment and has an intervening effect on DA and organizational commitment.

  12. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  13. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toline, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  14. Emotional Intelligence and Occupational Stress among Rehabilitation Staffs working in Tehran’s Training Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khaniyan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress among rehabilitation staffs in Tehran’s training hospitals . Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 169 staff members selected from a total of 300 rehabilitation staffs working in Tehran’s training hospitals, recruited by random cluster sampling. Two questionnaires were used: The emotional intelligence questionnaire designed by Petrides and Furnham and HSE occupational stress questionnaire. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression tests. Results: An inverse significant relationship existed between occupational stress and emotional intelligence (P<0.001, r=-0.33. There are, also, significant relationships between subscales of emotional intelligence including self-awareness (P=0.031, r=-0.18, social skills (P<0.001, r=-0.302, empathy (P=0.006, r=-0.238 and occupational stress. The results of multiple regressions indicated that the two subscales of ‘understanding other’s emotions’ and ‘social skills’ can be used for predicting occupational stress. Discussion: This study confirmed the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress. Promotion of emotional intelligence through implementing training courses may lower rehabilitation staffs occupational stress or prevent it.

  15. Cooptation of Peer Support Staff: Quantitative Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Alberta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective In 2007, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS sent a letter to state Medicaid directors outlining requirements for implementing peer-based recovery support services (P-BRSS as a Medicaid-funded service. Since then, 30 states have implemented these services. Although the literature describing implementation of P-BRSS has identified the cooptation of peer support staff (PSS as a barrier to the effective provision of P-BRSS, the evidence for it remains anecdotal. This study attempts to determine if the context of employment in either a treatment organization or peer organization affected cooptation. Methods We conducted a survey of PSS in the fall of 2013. In all, 92 of the 181 respondents were working as PSS at the time, 53 in treatment organizations. Chi-square analysis was used to determine if the context of employment had an effect on the cooptation of peer staff. Results Peer staff working in treatment organizations reported that they were supervised by treatment staff and participated in employment-related training to improve their skills at providing treatment services more frequently than their counterparts in peer organizations. Peer staff working in treatment organizations also participated in training and education to prepare for employment as treatment professionals more frequently than peer staff working in peer organizations. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Peer staff members working in treatment organizations are subject to processes of acculturation into professional cultures that peer staff working in peer organizations are not. Effective implementation of P-BRSS should include specific efforts to minimize the cooptation of peer staff.

  16. STAFF MARKETING IN MODERN RUSSIAN CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya N. Kretova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The conception of staff marketing, which was developed abroad, is effectively used in the developed countries for a long time. Its main advantage consists in the possibility of organizing some planning for the implementation of staff strategy: staff marketing provides the enterprise on the long-term basis with human resources capable of forming strategic potential, which would allow to implement the planned activities. Numerous problems of formation and development of civilized market relations in our country do not allow to fully implement the detailed models of staff marketing in domestic realities. On the basis of the analysis of theoretical developments and factors that have a practical impact on the implementation of marketing personnel in modern Russian conditions, the authors describe the essential elements of the conception. The primary purposes of staff marketing for domestic enterprises, grouped into the internal and external marketing are substantiated and disclosed. The special attention is paid to increasing the staff loyalty, which has dominant influence on business outcomes. The algorithm of events for the development of motivation system is proposed; at the stage of studying job satisfaction it is recommend to apply analytical calculations with the use of Shewhart control charts. Unlike traditional statistical tools based on the inspection of already implemented results, this approach is aimed at preventing negative tendencies and avoids losses associated with dissatisfaction with difficulty, as the individual employee and the team as a whole. Modern Russian enterprises can fully realize the conception of staff marketing only through rethinking of the consequences for all directions of work with the staff, as reflected in the definition of objectives, motivating staff and ensuring social responsibility of the enterprise.

  17. The role of conflict resolution styles on nursing staff morale, burnout, and job satisfaction in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoro-Rodriguez, Julian; Small, Jeff A

    2006-06-01

    This study focuses on the ability of nursing staff to interact with residents in a way that affects positively on the nurses' well-being and occupational satisfaction. It investigates the role of coping skills related to staff-resident interactions, in particular, the use of conflict resolution styles and their influence on the level of morale, burnout and job satisfaction of nursing professionals. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information from 161 direct care nursing staff. The authors used a multiple regression procedure to examine the influence of predictors on nursing staff outcomes. Multivariate analyses indicated that nurses' psychological morale, occupational stress, and job satisfaction are influenced by conflict resolution styles, after controlling by individual characteristics, work demands, and work resources factors. The findings highlight the importance of considering personal coping abilities to foster positive staff-resident interactions and to increase nurses' morale and job satisfaction.

  18. Statistics a complete introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Statistics: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to using Statistics. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all the key areas of Statistics including graphs, data interpretation, spreadsheets, regression, correlation and probability. Everything you will need is here in this one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.

  19. Complete pancreas traumatic transsection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hodžić

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case of a twenty-year old male with complete pancreas breakdown in the middle of its corpus, which was caused by a strong abdomen compression, with injuries of the spleen, the firstjejunumcurve,mesocolon transversum, left kidney, and appereance of retroperitoneal haemathoma. Surgical treatment started 70 minutes after the injury. The treatment consisted of left pancreatectomy with previous spleenectomy, haemostasis of ruptured mesocolon transversum blood vessels, left kidney exploration, suturing of the firstjejunumcurvelession and double abdomen drainage. Posttraumatic pancreatitis which appeared on the second postoperative day and prolonged drain secretion were successfully solved by conservative treatment.

  20. TestComplete cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaev, Gennadiy

    2013-01-01

    A practical cookbook, with a perfect package of simple, medium, and advanced recipes targeted at basic programmers as well as expert software testers, who will learn to create, manage, and run automated tests. It is packed with problem-solving recipes that are supported by simple examples.If you are a software tester or a programmer who is involved with testing automation using TestComplete, this book is ideal for you! You will be introduced to the very basics of using the tool, as well as polish any previously gained knowledge in using the tool. If you are already aware of programming basics,

  1. 14 CFR 385.33 - Review by the staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Review by the staff. 385.33 Section 385.33...) ORGANIZATION STAFF ASSIGNMENTS AND REVIEW OF ACTION UNDER ASSIGNMENTS Procedure on Review of Staff Action § 385.33 Review by the staff. Where a petition for review is duly filed, the staff member may, upon...

  2. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519... by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee to pay a project staff member for time or work for which that staff member is compensated from some other...

  3. Work motivation, task delegation and job satisfaction of general practice staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Søndergaard, Jens; Munch, Maria; Le, Jette V; Ledderer, Loni; Pedersen, Line B; Nexøe, Jørgen

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a high degree of task delegation is associated with the practise staff's overall job satisfaction, and this association is important to explore since job satisfaction is related to medical as well as patient-perceived quality of care. This study aimed: (1) to investigate associations between degrees of task delegation in the management of chronic disease in general practice, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a case and the staff's work motivation, (2) to investigate associations between the work motivation of the staff and their job satisfaction. The study was based on a questionnaire to which 621 members of the practice staff responded. The questionnaire consisted of a part concerning degree of task delegation in the management of COPD in their respective practice and another part being about their job satisfaction and motivation to work. In the first analysis, we found that 'maximal degree' of task delegation was significantly associated with the staff perceiving themselves to have a large degree of variation in tasks, odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, confidence interval (CI) = 1.09, 16.62. In the second analysis, we found that this perceived large degree of variation in tasks was significantly associated with their overall job satisfaction, OR = 2.81, confidence interval = 1.71, 4.61. The results suggest that general practitioners could delegate highly complex tasks in the management of COPD to their staff without influencing the staff's work motivation, and thereby their job satisfaction, negatively, as long as they ensure sufficient variation in the tasks. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. [Aggresive acts of psychiatric inpatients as reported by nursing staff. A retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, K

    1975-01-01

    Method. Questionnaire method with reconstruction of the serious incidents by interview and documents. Results. 253 members of staff remembered 626 aggressive acts which happened to them in the course of a year. Slight acts were caused more often by women than by men, and were directed more frequently against the junior than the senior staff - contrasting in both points with the serious acts. One in every four qualified nurses over the age of 50 shows today a verifiable physical defect resulting from an aggressive act by a patient at one time or another. The clinical-psychological and therapeutic background and consequences of aggressive incidences are briefly presented.

  5. Delirium superimposed on dementia: A quantitative and qualitative evaluation of informal caregivers and health care staff experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Alessandro; Lucchi, Elena; Turco, Renato; Morghen, Sara; Guerini, Fabio; Santi, Rossana; Gentile, Simona; Meagher, David; Voyer, Philippe; Fick, Donna M; Schmitt, Eva M; Inouye, Sharon K; Trabucchi, Marco; Bellelli, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Delirium superimposed on dementia is common and potentially distressing for patients, caregivers, and health care staff. We quantitatively and qualitatively assessed the experience of informal caregiver and staff (staff nurses, nurse aides, physical therapists) caring for patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. Caregivers' and staff experience was evaluated three days after delirium superimposed on dementia resolution (T0) with a standardized questionnaire (quantitative interview) and open-ended questions (qualitative interview); caregivers were also evaluated at 1-month follow-up (T1). A total of 74 subjects were included; 33 caregivers and 41 health care staff (8 staff nurses, 20 physical therapists, 13 staff nurse aides/health care assistants). Overall, at both T0 and T1, the distress level was moderate among caregivers and mild among health care staff. Caregivers reported, at both T0 and T1, higher distress related to deficits of sustained attention and orientation, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence and delusions. The distress of health care staff related to each specific item of the Delirium-O-Meter was relatively low except for the physical therapists who reported higher level of distress on deficits of sustained/shifting attention and orientation, apathy, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence, delusion, hallucinations, and anxiety/fear. The qualitative evaluation identified important categories of caregivers' and staff feelings related to the delirium experience. This study provides information on the implication of the experience of delirium on caregivers and staff. The distress related to delirium superimposed on dementia underlines the importance of providing continuous training, support and experience for both the caregivers and health care staff to improve the care of patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Delirium superimposed on dementia: a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of informal caregivers and health care staff experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Alessandro; Lucchi, Elena; Turco, Renato; Morghen, Sara; Guerini, Fabio; Santi, Rossana; Gentile, Simona; Meagher, David; Voyer, Philippe; Fick, Donna M.; Schmitt, Eva M.; Inouye, Sharon K.; Trabucchi, Marco; Bellelli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objective Delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is common and potentially distressing for patients, caregivers, and health care staff. We quantitatively and qualitatively assessed the experience of informal caregiver and staff (staff nurses, nurse aides, physical therapists) caring for patients with DSD. Methods Caregivers’ and staff experience was evaluated three days after DSD resolution (T0) with a standardized questionnaire (quantitative interview) and open-ended questions (qualitative interview); caregivers were also evaluated at 1-month follow-up (T1). Results A total of 74 subjects were included; 33 caregivers and 41 health care staff (8 staff nurses, 20 physical therapists, 13 staff nurse aides/health care assistants). Overall, at both T0 and T1, the distress level was moderate among caregivers and mild among health care staff. Caregivers reported, at both T0 and T1, higher distress related to deficits of sustained attention and orientation, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence and delusions. The distress of health care staff related to each specific item of the Delirium-O-Meter was relatively low except for the physical therapists who reported higher level of distress on deficits of sustained/shifting attention and orientation, apathy, hypokinesia/psychomotor retardation, incoherence, delusion, hallucinations, anxiety/fear. The qualitative evaluation identified important categories of caregivers ‘and staff feelings related to the delirium experience. Conclusions This study provides information on the implication of the experience of delirium on caregivers and staff. The distress related to DSD underlines the importance of providing continuous training, support and experience for both the caregivers and health care staff to improve the care of patients with delirium superimposed on dementia. PMID:26286892

  7. A comprehensive professional development training's effect on afterschool program staff behaviors to promote healthy eating and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Robert Glenn; Beets, Michael W; Saunders, Ruth P; Beighle, Aaron; Webster, Collin

    2014-01-01

    Evaluate a comprehensive intervention designed to support staff and program leaders in the implementation of the YMCA of USA healthy eating and physical activity (HEPA) standards for their afterschool programs (3-6 pm). Pre- (fall 2011) and postassessment (spring 2012) no-control group. Four large-scale YMCA afterschool programs serving approximately 500 children. Professional development training founded on the 5Ms (ie, Mission, Model, Manage, Monitor, and Maximize) and LET US Play principles (ie, Lines, Elimination, Team size, Uninvolved staff/kids, and Space, equipment, and rules), on-site booster training sessions, workshops, and ongoing technical support for staff and program leaders from January to May 2012. System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition. Multilevel mixed-effects linear (ie, staff behaviors expressed as a percentage of the number of scans observed) and logistic regression. A total of 5328 System for Observing Staff Promotion of Activity and Nutrition scans were completed over the 2 measurement periods. Of the 20 staff behaviors identified in HEPA standards and measured in this study, 17 increased or decreased in the appropriate direction. For example, the proportion staff engaged in physical activity with children increased from 26.6% to 37% and the proportion of staff eating unhealthy foods decreased from 42.1% to 4.5%. Comprehensive professional development training, founded on the 5Ms and LET US Play principles, and ongoing technical assistance can have a sizable impact on key staff behaviors identified by HEPA standards for afterschool programs.

  8. Organizational climate and self-efficacy as predictors of staff strain in caring for dementia residents: A mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantzas, Gery C; McCabe, Marita P; Mellor, David; Von Treuer, Kathryn; Davison, Tanya E; O'Connor, Daniel; Haselden, Rachel; Konis, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    To date, no research has investigated how the organizational climate of aged care influences the self-efficacy of staff in caring for residents with dementia, or, how self-efficacy is associated with the strain experienced by staff. This study sought to investigate the extent to which the self-efficacy of aged care staff mediates the association between organizational climate variables (such as autonomy, trusting and supportive workplace relations, and the recognition of competence and ability, and perceptions of workplace pressure) and staff strain. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented in which 255 residential aged care staff recruited across aged care facilities in Melbourne, Australia. Staff completed self-report measures of organizational climate, self-efficacy, and strains in caring for residents with dementia. Indirect effects analyses using bootstrapping indicated that self-efficacy of staff mediated the association between the organizational climate variables of autonomy, trust, support, pressure, and staff strain. The findings of this study emphasize that the aged care sector needs to target organizational climate variables that enhance the self-efficacy of staff, and that this in turn, can help ameliorate the strain experienced by staff caring for residents experiencing dementia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Báez, María Valeria; Acuña-Reyes, Raquel; Cigarroa-Martínez, Didier; Ureña-Bogarín, Enrique; Orgaz-Fernández, Jose David

    2014-01-01

    Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish) was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01). Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1) than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8). The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population.

  10. Behavioral Emergency Response Team: Implementation Improves Patient Safety, Staff Safety, and Staff Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zicko, Cdr Jennifer M; Schroeder, Lcdr Rebecca A; Byers, Cdr William S; Taylor, Lt Adam M; Spence, Cdr Dennis L

    2017-10-01

    Staff members working on our nonmental health (non-MH) units (i.e., medical-surgical [MS] units) were not educated in recognizing or deescalating behavioral emergencies. Published evidence suggests a behavioral emergency response team (BERT) composed of MH experts who assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies may be beneficial in these situations. Therefore, we sought to implement a BERT on the inpatient non-MH units at our military treatment facility. The objectives of this evidence-based practice process improvement project were to determine how implementation of a BERT affects staff and patient safety and to examine nursing staffs' level of knowledge, confidence, and support in caring for psychiatric patients and patients exhibiting behavioral emergencies. A BERT was piloted on one MS unit for 5 months and expanded to two additional units for 3 months. Pre- and postimplementation staff surveys were conducted, and the number of staff assaults and injuries, restraint usage, and security intervention were compared. The BERT responded to 17 behavioral emergencies. The number of assaults decreased from 10 (pre) to 1 (post); security intervention decreased from 14 to 1; and restraint use decreased from 8 to 1. MS staffs' level of BERT knowledge and rating of support between MH staff and their staff significantly increased. Both MS and MH nurses rated the BERT as supportive and effective. A BERT can assist with deescalating behavioral emergencies, and improve staff collaboration and patient and staff safety. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  11. Hospital organizational environment and staff satisfaction in China: A large-scale survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shu; Cai, Wenzhi; Deng, Ling; Cai, Baota; Yu, Min

    2016-12-01

    The aims of the study are to explore the satisfaction of health-care staff in Chinese public hospitals with different aspects of their organizational environment and to identify factors affecting this satisfaction. The satisfaction of hospital staff members with organizational environment could be associated with the quality of patient care and patients' satisfaction. The design of the study is in the form of a survey. A questionnaire survey was performed from April to November 2008 to collect demographic characteristics of hospital staff members and analyse which organizational environment factors (hospital security policy and professional care, environmental security, safety of operations and management of human resources) influence staff satisfaction. Hospital members' satisfaction scores were high for hospital security policy and professional care but lower for safety of operations, the security of the environment and management of the human resources (lowest). Multivariate analysis identified that hospital size (large hospitals scoring highest), department (non-clinical department such as administrative or logistics department), professional title (student), position (administration) and years of employment (China, hospital staff members were mostly dissatisfied with the administration and management of human resources. The organizational environment of hospitals should be improved to improve staff satisfaction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Operational Work System Design and Staff Performance in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ejikeme Isichei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study investigated the impact of operational work system design on staff performance in selected construction firms in Nigeria. Research Design & Methods: The study used primary data gathered with the use of a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire format administered to 138 respondents. A hypothesis was postulated to test the significance of the research problem. Data analysis was carried out using correlation and multiple regression analysis which proved the significance of the alternative hypothesis as a result of testing the hypothesis. Findings: The findings show that there is a significant relationship between operational work system design and staff performance. The study concludes that operational job design can be advanced as a motivation tool, which is non-monetary in nature, to improve staff performance. Implications & Recommendations: A key drive to improve performance is the satisfaction of staff coupled with an outstanding operational job design which takes into consideration the total physical and mental well-being of staff and its interaction with other organisational factors. The study recommends, among others, that there should be active participation of staff in the design of work in the organisation. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides an empirical approach to enhancing performance in the construction industry and thereby developing an indigenous firm to compete favourably on a growing market.

  13. Organ donation after cardiac death in children: acceptance of a protocol by multidisciplinary staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowl, Allison S; Cummings, Brian M; Yager, Phoebe H; Miller, Brenda; Noviski, Natan

    2012-09-01

    Organ donation after cardiac death is increasingly implemented, with outcomes similar to those of organ donation after brain death. Many hospitals hesitate to implement a protocol for donation after cardiac death because of the potential negative reactions among health care providers. To determine the acceptance of a protocol for donation after cardiac death among multidisciplinary staff in a pediatric intensive care unit. An anonymous, 15-question, Likert-scale questionnaire (scores 1-5) was used to determine the opinions of staff about donation after brain death and after cardiac death in a pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary-care university hospital. Survey response rate was 67% (n = 60). All physicians, 89% of nurses, and 82% of the remaining staff members stated that they understood the difference between donation after brain death and donation after cardiac death; staff supported both types of donation, at rates of 90% and 85%, respectively. Staff perception was the same for each type of donation (ρ = 0.82; r = 0.92; P death considered such donation worthwhile. However, 60% of those providers offered suggestions to improve the established protocol for donation. The multidisciplinary staff has accepted organ donation after cardiac death and has fully integrated this kind of donation without reported differences from their acceptance of donation after brain death.

  14. The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Godballe, Christian; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2013-01-01

    The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire (OM-6) is the most frequently used instrument to measure health related quality of life in children with otitis media. The main objectives of this study are 1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt the OM-6 into Danish, and 2) to assess important psychometric...... properties including structural validity and interpretability of the OM-6 in a Danish population of children suffering from otitis media....

  15. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities.

  16. Development of a Refined Staff Group Trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quensel, Susan

    1999-01-01

    .... As a follow-on effort to the previous SGT project, the goal was to refine a brigade-level staff training program to more effectively and efficiently coordinate the activities within and between the...

  17. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  18. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frye, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  19. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  20. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  1. Patient and staff doses in interventional neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bor, D.; Cekirge, S.; Tuerkay, T.; Turan, O.; Guelay, M.; Oenal, E.; Cil, B.

    2005-01-01

    Radiation doses for interventional examinations are generally high and therefore necessitate dose monitoring for patients and staff. Relating the staff dose to a patient dose index, such as dose-area product (DAP), could be quite useful for dose comparisons. In this study, DAP and skin doses of 57 patients, who underwent neuro-interventional examinations, were measured simultaneously with staff doses. Although skin doses were comparable with the literature data, higher DAP values of 215 and 188.6 Gy cm 2 were measured for the therapeutical cerebral and carotid examinations, respectively, owing to the use of biplane system and complexity of the procedure. Mean staff doses for eye, finger and thyroid were measured as 80.6, 77.6 and 28.8 μGy per procedure. The mean effective dose per procedure for the radiologists was 32 μSv. In order to allow better comparisons to be made, DAP normalised doses were also presented. (authors)

  2. Improvements in Productivity Through Staff Integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelly, David S

    1988-01-01

    .... The prognosis is not good. This paper addresses one facet of improving a shipyard's position in an increasingly competitive environment improvements in over-all productivity resulting from integration of the functions of the shipyard staff...

  3. Correntropy Based Matrix Completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the matrix completion problems when the entries are contaminated by non-Gaussian noise or outliers. The proposed approach employs a nonconvex loss function induced by the maximum correntropy criterion. With the help of this loss function, we develop a rank constrained, as well as a nuclear norm regularized model, which is resistant to non-Gaussian noise and outliers. However, its non-convexity also leads to certain difficulties. To tackle this problem, we use the simple iterative soft and hard thresholding strategies. We show that when extending to the general affine rank minimization problems, under proper conditions, certain recoverability results can be obtained for the proposed algorithms. Numerical experiments indicate the improved performance of our proposed approach.

  4. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  5. Training for staff who support students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Eleanor; Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hu, Wendy

    2016-02-01

    Front-line administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff often find themselves providing pastoral and learning support to students, but they are often not trained for this role, and this aspect of their work is under-acknowledged. Staff participating in an action research study at two medical schools identified common concerns about the personal impact of providing student support, and of the need for professional development to carry out this responsibility. This need is magnified in clinical placement settings that are remote from on-campus services. Informed by participatory action research, brief interactive workshops with multimedia training resources were developed, conducted and evaluated at eight health professional student training sites. These workshops were designed to: (1) be delivered in busy clinical placement and university settings; (2) provide a safe and inclusive environment for administrative, academic and clinical teaching staff to share experiences and learn from each other; (3) be publicly accessible; and (4) promote continued development and roll-out of staff training, adapted to each workplace (see http://www.uws.edu.au/meusupport). The workshops were positively evaluated by 97 participants, with both teaching and administrative staff welcoming the opportunity to discuss and share experiences. Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves Staff supporting health professional students have shared, often unmet, needs for support themselves. Participatory action research can be a means for producing and maintaining effective training resources as well as the conditions for change in practice. In our workshops, staff particularly valued opportunities for guided discussion using videos of authentic cases to trigger reflection, and to collaboratively formulate student support guidelines, customised to each site. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  7. GOGOL: ACADEMIC AND COMPLETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri V. Mann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ever-increasing international interest to Gogol explains the necessity of publishing a new edition of his works. The present Complete Collection of Gogol’s Works and Letters is an academic edition prepared and published by the A. M. Gorky Institute of World Literature of the Russian Academy of Sciences. It draws on rich experience of studying and publishing Gogol’s heritage in Russia but at the same time questions and underscores Gogol’s relevance for the modern reader and his place in the world culture of our time. It intends to fill in the gaps left by the previous scholarly tradition that failed to recognize some of Gogol’s texts as part of his heritage. Such are, for example, dedicatory descriptions in books and business notes. The present edition accounts not only for the completeness of texts but also for their place within the body of Gogol’s work, as part of his life-long creative process. By counterpoising different editions, it attempts to trace down the dynamics of Gogol’s creative thought while at the same time underscores the autonomy and relevance of each period in his career. For example, this collection publishes two different versions (editions of the same work: while the most recent version has become canonical at the expense of the preceding one, the latter still preserves its meaning and historical relevance. The present edition has the advantage over its predecessors since it has an actual, physical opportunity to erase the gaps, e.g. to publish the hitherto unpublished texts. However, the editors realize that new, hitherto unknown gaps may appear and the present edition will become, in its turn, outdated. At this point, there will be a necessity in the new edition.

  8. The impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on competence in person-centred dementia care and job satisfaction of care staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokstad, Anne Marie Mork; Døble, Betty Sandvik; Engedal, Knut; Kirkevold, Øyvind; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Selbaek, Geir

    2017-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the Dementia ABC educational programme on the participants' competence in person-centred care and on their level of job satisfaction. The development of person-centred care for people with dementia is highly recommended, and staff training that enhances such an approach may positively influence job satisfaction and the possibility of recruiting and retaining competent care staff. The study is a longitudinal survey, following participants over a period of 24 months with a 6-month follow-up after completion of the programme. A total of 1,795 participants from 90 municipalities in Norway are included, and 580 from 52 municipalities completed all measurements. The person-centred care assessment tool (P-CAT) is used to evaluate person-centredness. The psychosocial workplace environment and job satisfaction questionnaire is used to investigate job satisfaction. Measurements are made at baseline, and after 12, 24 and 30 months. A statistically significant increase in the mean P-CAT subscore of person-centred practice and the P-CAT total score is found at 12, 24 and 30 months compared to baseline. A statistically significant decrease in scores in the P-CAT subscore for organisational support is found at all points of measurement compared to baseline. Statistically significant increases in satisfaction with workload, personal and professional development, demands balanced with qualifications and variation in job tasks as elements of job satisfaction are reported. The evaluation of the Dementia ABC educational programme identifies statistically significant increases in scores of person-centredness and job satisfaction, indicating that the training has a positive impact. The results indicate that a multicomponent training programme including written material, multidisciplinary reflection groups and workshops has a positive impact on the development of person-centred care practice and the job satisfaction of care

  9. Conflict management style of Jordanian nurse managers and its relationship to staff nurses' intent to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, Zaid; Nussera, Hayat; Masa'deh, Rami

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between conflict management styles used by nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses. Nursing shortages require managers to focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between conflict management styles of nurse managers and intent to stay of staff nurses is one strategy to retain nurses in the workforce. A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative study was carried out in Jordan. The Rahim organization conflict inventory II (ROCI II) was completed by 42 nurse managers and the intent to stay scale was completed by 320 staff nurses from four hospitals in Jordan. The anova analysis was carried out. An integrative style was the first choice for nurse managers and the last choice was a dominating style. The overall level of intent to stay for nurses was moderate. Nurses tend to keep their current job for 2-3 years. There was a negative relationship between the dominating style as a conflict management style and the intent to stay for nurses. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices affect the staff nurses' intent to stay and the quality of care. Nurse managers can improve the intent to stay for staff nurses if they use the appropriate conflict management styles. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Health smart cards: differing perceptions of emergency department patients and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Rosli, Reizal; Taylor, David McD; Knott, Jonathan C; Das, Atandrila; Dent, Andrew W

    2009-02-01

    An analytical, cross-sectional survey of 270 emergency department patients and 92 staff undertaken in three tertiary referral hospital emergency departments was completed to compare the perceptions of patients and staff regarding the use of health smart cards containing patient medical records. The study recorded data on a range of health smart card issues including awareness, privacy, confidentiality, security, advantages and disadvantages, and willingness to use. A significantly higher proportion of staff had heard of the card. The perceived disadvantages reported by patients and staff were, overall, significantly different, with the staff reporting more disadvantages. A significantly higher proportion of patients believed that they should choose what information is on the card and who should have access to the information. Patients were more conservative regarding what information should be included, but staff were more conservative regarding who should have access to the information. Significantly fewer staff believed that patients could reliably handle the cards. Overall, however, the cards were considered acceptable and useful, and their introduction would be supported.

  11. Leadership practices and staff nurses' intent to stay: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowden, Tracy; Cummings, Greta; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the findings of a systematic review of the literature that examined the relationship between managers' leadership practices and staff nurses' intent to stay in their current position. The nursing shortage demands that managers focus on the retention of staff nurses. Understanding the relationship between leadership practices and nurses' intent to stay is fundamental to retaining nurses in the workforce. Published English language articles on leadership practices and staff nurses' intent to stay were retrieved from computerized databases and a manual search. Data extraction and quality assessments were completed for the final 23 research articles. Relational leadership practices influence staff nurses' intentions to remain in their current position. This study supports a positive relationship between transformational leadership, supportive work environments and staff nurses' intentions to remain in their current positions. Incorporating relational leadership theory into management practices will influence nurse retention. Advancing current conceptual models will increase knowledge of intent to stay. Clarifying the distinction between the concepts intent to stay and intent to leave is needed to establish a clear theoretical foundation for further intent to stay research. Nurse managers and leaders who practice relational leadership and ensure quality workplace environments are more likely to retain their staff. The findings of the present study support the claim that leadership practices influence staff nurse retention and builds on intent to stay knowledge. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  13. [Constipation in the hospital. Ethical reflection on its care by the nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Valérie; Durand, Luc; Grocq, Martine

    2010-12-01

    The intestinal elimination of the hospitalized patients is a function insufficiently taken into account by the nursing staff from a preventive point of view. Nevertheless, numerous patients present transit disorders which are mostly translated into a diagnosis of constipation requiring therapeutic prescriptions and sometimes even aggressive and expensive medical examinations. The objective of this work is to lead an ethical reflection on the care of intestinal elimination by the nursing staff. Through a questionnaire, we wish to answer 3 questions: how come the nursing staff have difficulties taking care of the intestinal elimination of the hospitalized patients? What are the determiners which influence the care of the intestinal elimination by the nursing staff? Does training prepare the nursing staff to take care of the intestinal elimination of the hospitalized patients? The questionnaire was distributed to doctors, male and female nurses, nursing auxiliaries and students in care of the sick working in medicine, surgery and intensive care of the same hospital. This survey allowed to question 130 persons among whom 36 doctors, 37 male and female nurses, 30 nursing auxiliaries and 27 students. We were able to confirm that the care of the intestinal elimination is insufficiently taken into account in a preventive way, because 56 % of the people interviewed explain that the problem of intestinal elimination is not approached before the complaint of the patient Several determiners make that the nursing staff are not in a preventive approach. This care does not meet much interest, is experienced as devaluing, taboo and the relation nursing staff-patient is hindered because everyone has difficulties to speak about it. Institutional difficulties are also discussed, such as the lack of coordination of the nursing staff and the lack of time. Another point of this survey shows that work experience is not an element which facilitates this care because the more the nursing

  14. Initiation and preliminary evaluation of an oncology pharmacy training course for staff pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Matthew S; Blanchette, Lisa M; Smith, Morgan B; Cambron, Katie; Andricopulos, Katie; Brown, M Jay

    2016-08-01

    There is currently a disparity between oncology pharmacy job openings and PGY2 trained pharmacists completing residency training each year. As a result, pharmacists without specialized training in oncology are filling much needed oncology positions and may need on-the-job oncology training. To improve oncology knowledge among non-PGY2 trained pharmacists working in oncology positions, Novant Health coordinated an Oncology Pharmacy Training Course (OPTC). The primary objective was to assess efficacy of the OPTC through evaluation of post-intervention oncology knowledge. Secondary objectives included efficacy of each lecture, assessment of knowledge improvement in those with and without residency or chemotherapy training, and assessment of satisfaction with the OPTC. This was a prospective, cohort study. All pharmacists expressing interest in the OPTC were included unless PGY2 oncology residency trained or Board-Certified in Oncology Pharmacy (BCOP). Participants were invited to attend twice monthly lectures and were evaluated using questionnaires at baseline, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. At the 3-month evaluation, 29 pharmacists completed the per-protocol evaluation. Knowledge scores increased from a mean of 29.6% to 52.2% (p trained. Baseline knowledge scores were slightly higher in the chemotherapy-trained than training naïve participants (mean 42.5% vs. 27.4%). Both groups experienced significantly improved knowledge scores at 3 months (mean 59% and 48.1% respectively, p staff pharmacists in a community hospital system. This improvement in knowledge is consistent regardless of baseline chemotherapy training. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Smoking and its treatment in addiction services: clients' and staff behaviour and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Camilla; Strang, John; Ratschen, Elena; Sutherland, Gay; Finch, Emily; McNeill, Ann

    2014-07-14

    High smoking prevalence has been observed among those misusing other substances. This study aimed to establish smoking behaviours and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment among clients and staff in substance abuse treatment settings. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff and clients in a convenience sample of seven community and residential addiction services in, or with links to, Europe's largest provider of mental health care, the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Survey items assessed smoking behaviour, motivation to quit, receipt of and attitudes towards nicotine dependence treatment. Eighty five percent (n = 163) and 97% (n = 145) response rates of clients and staff were achieved. A high smoking prevalence was observed in clients (88%) and staff (45%); of current smokers, nearly all clients were daily smokers, while 42% of staff were occasional smokers. Despite 79% of clients who smoked expressing a desire to quit and 46% interested in receiving advice, only 15% had been offered support to stop smoking during their current treatment episode with 56% reported never having been offered support. Staff rated smoking treatment significantly less important than treatment of other substances (p < 0.001), and only 29% of staff thought it should be addressed early in a client's primary addiction treatment, compared with 48% of clients. A large unmet clinical need is evident with a widespread failure to deliver smoking cessation interventions to an extraordinarily high prevalence population of smokers in addiction services. This is despite the majority of smokers reporting motivation to quit. Staff smoking and attitudes may be a contributory factor in these findings.

  16. Adapting the helpful responses questionnaire to assess communication skills involved in delivering contingency management: preliminary psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan

    2015-08-01

    A paper/pencil instrument, adapted from Miller and colleagues' (1991) Helpful Responses Questionnaire (HRQ), was developed to assess clinician skill with core communicative aspects involved in delivering contingency management (CM). The instrument presents a single vignette consisting of six points of client dialogue to which respondents write 'what they would say next.' In the context of an implementation/effectiveness hybrid trial, 19 staff clinicians at an opiate treatment program completed serial training outcome assessments before, following, and three months after CM training. Assessments included this adaptation of the HRQ, a multiple-choice CM knowledge test, and a recorded standardized patient encounter scored for CM skillfulness. Study results reveal promising psychometric properties for the instrument, including strong scoring reliability, internal consistency, concurrent and predictive validity, test-retest reliability and sensitivity to training effects. These preliminary findings suggest the instrument is a viable, practical method to assess clinician skill in communicative aspects of CM delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Staff practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice before and after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollon, Deene; Fields, Willa; Gallo, Ana-Maria; Wagener, Rebecca; Soucy, Jacqui; Gustafson, Brandi; Kim, Son Chae

    2012-09-01

    Today's clinicians have different levels of knowledge and skill related to evidence-based practice, depending on their educational background, level of experience, and interest. This multidisciplinary study assessed nurses' baseline and posteducation practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice. A descriptive pre- and postsurvey design study evaluated clinical staff's practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice with the Clinical Effectiveness and Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire. A total of 327 participants (24%) completed the presurvey and 282 (20%) completed the postsurvey. No statistically significant changes were found in practice, attitudes, and knowledge/skills after the online education. In the multivariate analysis, online education was not a significant predictor of practice, attitudes, or knowledge/skills regarding evidence-based practice; graduate educational degree, formal evidence-based practice classes, and registered nurse status were statistically significant positive predictors. Administering self-learning online modules may not be the most effective method for expanding evidence-based practice abilities and knowledge/skills of nurses. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Healthy work environments and staff nurse retention: the relationship between communication, collaboration, and leadership in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Nancy; Leach, Linda Searle; Robbins, Wendy; Pike, Nancy; Needleman, Jack

    2013-01-01

    A healthy work environment can improve patient outcomes and registered nurse (RN) turnover. Creating cultures of retention and fostering healthy work environments are 2 major challenges facing nurse leaders today. Examine the effects of the healthy work environment (communication, collaboration, and leadership) on RN turnover from data collected from a research study. Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational design. Pediatric critical care RNs from 10 pediatric intensive care units (PICU) completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index Revised and a subscale of the Intensive Care Unit Nurse-Physician Communication Questionnaire. These staff nurses were asked whether they intend to leave their current job in the next 6 months. Statistical analysis included correlations, multiple linear regression, t tests (2-tailed), and 1-way analysis of variance. A total of 415 RNs completed the survey. There was a statistically significant relationship between leadership and the intent to leave (P communication variables between RNs and among RNs and MDs or collaboration were significantly associated with PICU nurses' intention to leave. Effective leadership in the PICU is important to PICU RNs and significantly influences their decisions about staying in their current job.

  19. Association between Occupational Accidents and Sleep Apnea in Hospital Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Somayeh; Rahnama, Nooshin; Seyedmehdi, Seyed Mohammad; Yazdanparast, Taraneh; Roozbahani, Rahim; Attarchi, Mirsaeed; Adimi Naghan, Parisa; Jamaati, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder in which instability of the upper airways leads to a reduction or cessation of airflow during sleep. Sleep disorders such as OSAS increase the risk of occupational accidents and impaired work performance. Sleep deprivation during shift increases the risk of occupational accidents among health care employees. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between occupational injuries in hospital staff and the risk of sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study was conducted on hospital staff of Masih Daneshvari Hospital in 2012. In this study, the hospital staff's (715) response to the Berlin questionnaire plus additional information including a history of an occupational accident, night shifts, less than four hours of night sleep, history of smoking, chronic disease and quality of sleep were assessed. Information obtained was analyzed using SPSS 15. In general, 27.6% reported a history of occupational accidents. The incidence of occupational accidents in the high-risk group for sleep apnea was significantly higher than the low-risk group (OR=2.736, CI=1.522-4.917, P=0.001). The results of logistic regression analysis also showed a statistically significant association between occupational accidents and risk of sleep apnea (OR = 2.247, CI = 1.194-4.231, P= 0.012). This study showed that the incidence of occupational accidents in the hospital employees is strongly related to the probability of OSA. Therefore, special attention should be directed to respiratory sleep disorders in order to reduce occupational injuries at hospitals.

  20. Job stress in the staff of a tire factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    marzieh torshizi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Occupational stress is a major problem in industrial societies. Its relationship with various diseases is increasing ,but it probably has vast socio-economic consequences manifested in the form of absenteeism, labour turnover, loss of productivity and disability pension costs. The present study aimed at determining stress in the staff of a tyre factory.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was done on 196 members of staff from various sections of a tire factory in 2008 through proportional classification and randomized sampling .Data was collected by means of Coudron two questionnaires "demographic" and "standardized job stress" . The obtained data was analyzed using SPSS software (v: 11.5, chi-square test, and Pearson's correlation coefficient (P ≤ 0.05.   Results: It was found that 49.5% of the staff had severe job stress .Severe job stress was 55.8% in the production unit (No. =53, 50% in the administrative unit (No. =16 and 40.6% supporting the backing unit (No=28.   There was a significant relationship between variables income and adequate sleep on one hand and level of job stress on the other (P < 0.001.However, no significant relationship was observed between job stress and age, marital status, education, working record ,and exercise.   Conclusion: Based on the results of the current study, more than half of the employees suffered from job stress. Compared with employees in other industrialized countries, Iranian employees appeared to have much higher prevalence of stress. Therefore, more studies are required in order to reduce the amount of stress and its consequences.

  1. Referrals to child psychiatry--a survey of staff attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, S; Mayer, R

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire study was conducted in a health district to evaluate the attitudes of paediatricians and child psychiatry staff as to which categories of problems should be referred to child psychiatry. In the majority of categories the two groups disagreed as to the frequency with which the problem should be referred. In the categories relating to child sexual abuse responses were often not in accord with Department of Health and Social Security guidelines. Reasons for not referring were also looked at and again it was found that there were a number of significant differences in opinion as to what are reasons for not referring to child psychiatry. Both groups agree that lack of communication is a reason for non-referral. Some suggestions are made as to how this problem could be addressed. PMID:1863101

  2. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    materials from their home address. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether such developments will necessarily lead to a situation where public libraries become self-service institutions or to what extent self-service and innovative staff-intensive library services can develop and co...... that staff attitudes toward staff-less libraries, and – more surprising – also toward more staff-intensive practices have been somewhat reluctant and skeptical. The paper also presents leadership initiatives which have proved to handle such resistances constructively. Originality/value – The paper contains...

  3. German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groeters, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "German General Staff Officer Education and Current Challenges" examines the institutional education of German General Staff Officers, as experienced by the author, and offers a "Conceptual Competency...

  4. Use of a safety climate questionnaire in UK health care: factor structure, reliability and usability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, A; Cooper, K L; Dean, J E; McIntosh, A; Patterson, M; Stride, C B; Laurence, B E; Smith, C M

    2006-01-01

    Aim To explore the factor structure, reliability, and potential usefulness of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care. Setting Four acute hospital trusts and nine primary care trusts in England. Methods The questionnaire used was the 27 item Teamwork and Safety Climate Survey. Thirty three healthcare staff commented on the wording and relevance. The questionnaire was then sent to 3650 staff within the 13 NHS trusts, seeking to achieve at least 600 responses as the basis for the factor analysis. 1307 questionnaires were returned (36% response). Factor analyses and reliability analyses were carried out on 897 responses from staff involved in direct patient care, to explore how consistently the questions measured the underlying constructs of safety climate and teamwork. Results Some questionnaire items related to multiple factors or did not relate strongly to any factor. Five items were discarded. Two teamwork factors were derived from the remaining 11 teamwork items and three safety climate factors were derived from the remaining 11 safety items. Internal consistency reliabilities were satisfactory to good (Cronbach's alpha ⩾0.69 for all five factors). Conclusions This is one of the few studies to undertake a detailed evaluation of a patient safety climate questionnaire in UK health care and possibly the first to do so in primary as well as secondary care. The results indicate that a 22 item version of this safety climate questionnaire is useable as a research instrument in both settings, but also demonstrates a more general need for thorough validation of safety climate questionnaires before widespread usage. PMID:17074872

  5. Managing missing scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2009-01-01

    error present when the Oswestry was scored in the same way. Methods ·         For each of 311 fully completed RMDQ23 questionnaires from people seeking primary or secondary care, a sum score was calculated and standardized to a 100-point scale. ·         Using random number generation, questions were...... Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) sum scores when one or more questions have not been answered. However, missing data are common on the RMDQ and the current options are: calculate a sum score regardless of unanswered questions, reject all data containing unanswered questions, or to impute scores. Other...... questionnaires, such as the Oswestry Disability Index (Oswestry) convert their raw score into a standardized score out of 100. An advantage of this method is that it allows missing data to be accommodated by proportional recalculation. For example, if 17 questions had been answered ’yes’ on a RMDQ questionnaire...

  6. Teacher Stress Questionnaire: validity and reliability study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurlo, Maria Clelia; Pes, Daniela; Capasso, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    This study analyses the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Teacher Stress Questionnaire elaborated in England by Travers and Cooper in 1996. This Italian survey was completed by 863 teachers randomly drawn from a cross-section of Italian school levels. The construct validity of the questionnaire was verified by factor analysis and by measuring the internal consistency of the single scales. All dimensions measured by the Teacher Stress Questionnaire were compared for sample subgroups of all teacher levels. Several meaningful and reliable factors emerged from the factor analysis of the scales. The internal consistency of each scale (Cronbach's alpha) revealed satisfactory values. Teachers' age and school level were determining factors for all dimensions of stress explored. The Italian version of the Teacher Stress Questionnaire showed satisfactory psychometric properties and constitutes a useful and reliable measure to analyse stress in Italian schools.

  7. Validation of the Danish-language chronic pain acceptance questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, P; Højsted, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ, 20 items) measures patients' acceptance of chronic pain. This questionnaire has demonstrated good psychometric qualities and versions have been validated in several different languages. This study describes the validation of the Danish...... version of the CPAQ. METHODS: A total of 114 patients with chronic pain completed the questionnaire as well as other measures of pain, anxiety, depression, coping, and health-related quality of life. RESULTS: Internal consistency was satisfactory and the factorial analysis yielded a two-factor solution......, confirming the original structure of the questionnaire. CONCLUSION: The psychometric properties of the Danish version of the 20-item CPAQ were satisfactory, showing that the Danish version of CPAQ is valid and reliable....

  8. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed

  9. Survey and comparison of sleep quality among fixed and changing shift staff in a steel factory in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian, Farugh; Abbasinia, Marzieh; Rahmani, Abdolrasoul; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Asghari, Mehdi; Ahmadnezhad, Iman; Asadi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Given the hazardous nature of the work in steel factories and that the staff has to deal with hazardous equipment and machines, improper sleep quality and drowsiness among the works tackles performance and boosts rate of job accidents. This study is aimed to survey the quality of sleep and sleepiness status and the pertinent factors among the workers in a rolling mill and a steel production company in Tehran, Iran. In a Cross-Sectional study 2011, 180 workers were selected randomly from a rolling mill and a steel production company in Tehran. A questionnaire was designed to collect demographic data and variables of work condition. Pitersborg's sleep quality questionnaire was used to survey quality and problems of Participants' sleep. Epworth Sleepiness questionnaire was used to deals with sleepiness during work, studying, watching TV, or during time spent in public. Average score of sleep quality for the fixed shift staff and changing shift staff were 7.5±2.82 and 8.49±2.95 respectively. Surveys of sleep quality for the two groups of the participants based on T-test showed a significant difference between the two groups so that the changing shift staff group suffered poorer sleep quality (p=0.03). Comparison of average drowsiness scores between the two groups of participants based on Mann-Whitney test showed no significant difference (p>0.005). Chi square test showed a significant difference between severity of drowsiness and type of working shift (p =0.028 and 0.009). Staff in revolving shifts suffers poor sleep quality comparing with staff with fixed working shift. Moreover, type of working shift greatly affects severity of drowsiness as staff at different work shift experienced different level of sleepiness. It is essential to survey sleep disorder of the staff in the industry and pay more emphasis on sleep disorder epidemic in other fields of industry.

  10. [Medical questionnaire, sleep diary, actigraphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizaki, Masanori; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorders, including insomnia are common in older people. Since the sleep problems are generally subjective, intensive medical interviews using various sleep questionnaires are critical in the diagnosis and assessment. As an objective examination of sleep quality, an overnight polysomnography at a hospital is the gold standard, but sleep diary and actigraphy, which record sleep for a prolonged period at home, are useful to examine the sleep habit and sleep phase. In older people, the discrepancy between sleep diary and actigraphy sometimes become broader, and the prevalence of comorbidity increase. Thus, the systematic assessment using both subjective and objective measurements becomes more important.

  11. Occupational hazards among clinical dental staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasunloro, Adebola; Owotade, Foluso John

    2004-05-15

    Although identification of risks to dental healthcare workers has been explored in several industrialized nations, very little data is available from developing countries. This paper examines the occupational hazards present in the dental environment and reports survey results concerning attitudes and activities of a group of Nigerian dental care providers. A survey on occupational hazards was conducted among the clinical dental staff at the Dental Hospital of the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife in Osun State, Nigeria. Thirty eight of the forty staff responded, yielding a response rate of 95%. Subject ages ranged from 26 to 56 years with approximately 25% in the 31-46 year old bracket. All of the staff were aware of the occupational exposure to hazards, and the majority had attended seminars/workshops on the subject. Only five staff members (13.2%) owned a health insurance policy and 26 (68.4%) had been vaccinated against Hepatitis B infection. All dentists (24) had been vaccinated compared with only two non-dentists; this relationship was significant (p= 30.07, chi2=0.000). Fourteen members of the clinical staff (36.8%) could recall a sharp injury in the past six months, and the majority (71.1%) had regular contact with dental amalgam. Wearing protective eye goggles was the least employed cross infection control measure, while backache was the most frequently experienced hazard in 47% of the subjects. The need for Hepatitis B vaccinations for all members of the staff was emphasized, and the enforcement of strict cross infection control measures was recommended. The physical activities and body positions that predispose workers to backaches were identified and staff education on the prevention of backaches was provided.

  12. Language barriers in medical education and attitudes towards Arabization of medicine: student and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbour, S M; Dewedar, S A; Kandil, S K

    2012-12-04

    Students and staff perspectives on language barriers in medical education in Egypt and their attitude towards Arabization of the medical curriculum were explored in a questionnaire survey of 400 medical students and 150 staff members. Many students (56.3%) did not consider learning medicine in English an obstacle, and 44.5% of staff considered it an obstacle only in the 1st year of medical school. Many other barriers to learning other than language were mentioned. However, 44.8% of students translated English terms to Arabic to facilitate studying and 70.6% of students in their clinical study years would prefer to learn patient history-taking in Arabic. While Arabization in general was strongly declined, teaching in Arabic language was suggested as appropriate in some specialties.

  13. Anaphylaxis Preparedness among Preschool Staff before and after an Educational Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A. Foster

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Children with severe food allergies may spend many hours in the preschool setting. Little is known about anaphylaxis recognition and management preparedness among preschool staff. The objective of this study was to assess anaphylaxis preparedness among preschool staff. Methods. Anonymous questionnaires were administered before and after a 40-minute educational seminar on anaphylaxis recognition and management. Results. In total, 181 individuals participated in the preintervention survey and 171 participated in the postintervention survey. The comfort level with recognizing anaphylaxis and administering an epinephrine autoinjector significantly increased after the intervention (P<.001 for both. Of the 5 steps needed to administer an epinephrine autoinjector, staff named a mean (SD of 3 (1.3 steps in the correct order compared with 4.2 (1.1 steps after the educational intervention (P<.001. Conclusion. This study shows that a brief education intervention can significantly increase caregiver comfort regarding identifying anaphylaxis and administering an epinephrine autoinjector.

  14. Usefulness of self-report questionnaires for psychological assessment of patients with tinnitus and hyperacusis and patients' views of the questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazh, Hashir; Moore, Brian C J

    2017-07-01

    The objective was to determine the relevance and applicability of psychological questionnaires to patients seeking help for tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. This was a questionnaire-based survey. The following questionnaires were administered: Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7), Short Health Anxiety Inventory (SHAI), Mini-Social Phobia Inventory (Mini-SPIN), Obsessive Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R), Panic Disorder Severity Scale-Self Report (PDSS-SR), Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Abbreviated version (PSWQ-A). In addition, a patient feedback questionnaire was completed asking about the extent to which each questionnaire was relevant to them and how strongly they would recommend its use in the assessment of patients with tinnitus and hyperacusis. A total of 150/402 consecutive patients seen in a one-year period completed the questionnaires. 65% of patients had abnormal scores for one or more of the questionnaires. All questionnaires except the PDSS-SR were rated as relevant and recommended for use. The GAD-7, SHAI, Mini-SPIN, OCI-R, PSWQ-A and PHQ-9 are recommended for evaluation of psychological problems for patients seeking help for tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. Abnormal results on these questionnaires may indicate the need for referral for possible treatment of psychological problems.

  15. Key health promotion factors among male members of staff at a higher educational institution: A cross-sectional postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Garth

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Men's lifestyles are generally less healthy than women's. This study identifies associations between health-related behaviour in different groups of men working in a Higher Education (HE institution. In addition, men were asked whether they regarded their health-related behaviours as a concern. This article highlights smoking, consumption of alcohol and physical activity as most common men's health-related lifestyle behaviours. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted among all male staff employed by a Higher Education institute in Scotland using a postal self-completed questionnaire. A total of 1,335 questionnaires were distributed and 501 were returned completed (38% return rate. The data were analysed using SPSS 13.0 for Windows. Results Less than 10% currently smoked and almost 44% of these smokers were light smokers. Marital status, job title, consumption of alcohol and physical activity level were the major factors associated with smoking behaviour. Men in manual jobs were far more likely to smoke. Nearly all (90% consumed alcohol, and almost 37% had more than recommended eight units of alcohol per day at least once a week and 16% had more than 21 units weekly. Younger men reported higher amount of units of alcohol on their heaviest day and per week. Approximately 80% were physically active, but less than 40% met the current Government guidelines for moderate physical activity. Most men wanted to increase their activity level. Conclusion There are areas of health-related behaviour, which should be addressed in populations of this kind. Needs assessment could indicate which public health interventions would be most appropriately aimed at this target group. However, the low response rate calls for some caution in interpreting our findings.

  16. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  17. SUPPORTING PRETERM INFANT ATTACHMENT AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: STAFF PERCEPTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twohig, Aoife; Reulbach, Udo; Figuerdo, Ricardo; McCarthy, Anthony; McNicholas, Fiona; Molloy, Eleanor Joan

    2016-01-01

    The infant-parent relationship has been shown to be of particular significance to preterm infant socioemotional development. Supporting parents and infants in this process of developing their relationships is an integral part of neonatal intensive care; however, there is limited knowledge of NICU staff perceptions about this aspect of care. To explore NICU staff perceptions about attachment and socioemotional development of preterm infants, experience of training in this area and the emotional impact of their work. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of staff perceptions of the emotional experiences of parents and the developing parent-infant relationship in an NICU was conducted in a Level III NICU, after pilot testing, revision, and ethical approval. Fifty-seven (68%) of NICU staff responded to the survey. Respondents identified parents' emotional experiences such as "anxiety," "shock," "loss of control," and "lack of feelings of competence as parents" as highly prevalent. Infant cues of "responding to parent's voice" and "quieting-alerting" were ranked most highly; "crying" and "physiological changes" were ranked lowest. Preterm infant medical risk, maternal emotional state, and mental health are perceived to impact most highly on the developing relationship, as compared with infant state or behavior and socioeconomic factors. Fifty-three (93%) respondents felt confident, and 50 (87.8%) felt competent discussing their emotional experiences with parents. Fifty-four (95%) responded that attending to these areas was an integral part of their role; however, staff had seldom received education in this area. Respondents also perceived that specific psychological support for parents was lacking both during and after the infant's discharge. While all staff surveyed perceived the nature of their work to be emotionally stressful, there were differences among NICU staff disciplines and with years of experience in the NICU in terms of their perceptions about education in

  18. Training Nonnursing Staff to Assist with Nutritional Care Delivery in Nursing Homes: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Sandra F; Hollingsworth, Emily K; Long, Emily A; Liu, Xulei; Shotwell, Matthew S; Keeler, Emmett; An, Ruopeng; Silver, Heidi J

    2017-02-01

    To determine the effect and cost-effectiveness of training nonnursing staff to provide feeding assistance for nutritionally at-risk nursing home (NH) residents. Randomized, controlled trial. Five community NHs. Long-stay NH residents with an order for caloric supplementation (N = 122). Research staff provided an 8-hour training curriculum to nonnursing staff. Trained staff were assigned to between-meal supplement or snack delivery for the intervention group; the control group received usual care. Research staff used standardized observations and weighed-intake methods to measure frequency of between-meal delivery, staff assistance time, and resident caloric intake. Fifty staff (mean 10 per site) completed training. The intervention had a significant effect on between-meal caloric intake (F = 56.29, P frequency and number of snack items given per person per day and the associated staff time to provide assistance. It is cost effective to train nonnursing staff to provide caloric supplementation, and this practice has a positive effect on residents' between-meal intake. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Multilevel Examination of Burnout among High School Staff: Importance of Staff and School Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey; Pas, Elise; Bradshaw, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have linked teacher burnout with job performance, satisfaction, and retention; however, there has been limited exploration of potential individual and school contextual factors that may influence burnout. The current study examined high school staff members' reports of burnout as they relate to staff demographics and perceptions…

  20. EIA completes corrections to drilling estimates series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapmann, W.; Shambaugh, P.

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of US oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status. They are assessed directly for trends, as well as in combination with other measures to assess the productivity and profitability of upstream industry operations. They are major reference points for federal and state policymakers. EIA does not itself collect drilling activity data. Instead, it relies on an external source for data on oil, bas, and dry well completions. These data are provided to EIA monthly on an as reported basis. During a recent effort to enhance EIA's well completion data system, the detection of unusual patterns in the well completion data as received led to an expanded examination of these data. Substantial discrepancies between the data as received by EIA and correct record counts since 1987 were identified. For total wells by year, the errors ranged up to more than 2,300 wells, 11% of the 1995 total, and the impact of these errors extended backward in time to at least the early 1980s. When the magnitude and extent of the as reported well completion data problem were confirmed, EIA suspended its publication and distribution of updated drilling data. EIA staff proceeded to acquire replacement files with the as reported records and then revise the statistical portion of its drilling data system to reflect the new information. The replacement files unfortunately also included erroneous data based on the improper allocation of wells between exploration and development. EIA has now resolved the two data problems and generated revised time series estimates for well completions and footage drilled. The paper describes the problems in the data, differences between the series, and maintaining future data quality