WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable minimal cones

  1. Stability of r-minimal cones in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, A.; Sousa, P.

    2008-10-01

    The study of minimal cones C(M) in R construed over compact minimal hypersurface M of a unit Euclidean sphere Sn has an important link with the Bernstein problem, see e.g. Bombieri et al. [E. Bombieri, E. de Giorgi, E. Giusti, Minimal cones and Bernstein problem, Invent. Math. 7 (1969) 243-268]. It was studied by many authors with a remarkable paper due to Simmons [J. Simmons, Minimal varieties in Riemannian manifolds, Ann. of Math. 88 (1968) 62-105]. In a recent work Barbosa and Do Carmo [J.L.M. Barbosa, M.P. Do Carmo, On the stability of cones in R with zero scalar curvature, Ann. Global Anal. Geom. 28 (2005) 107-122] treated cones in R with the second function of curvature S2=0 and S3⁄=0. In these papers the authors showed the existence of a truncated cone which is unstable as well as truncated cones over Clifford tori that are stable. Here we partially extend such results for cones construed over compact hypersurfaces M of the unit sphere Sn with Sr=0 and S⁄=0 by showing that there exists ɛ>0 for which the truncated cone C( is (r-1)-unstable provided n≤r+5. Moreover, we also show that for n≥r+6 there exists a Clifford torus Sp(r1)×Sq(r2)⊂Sn with Sr=0 and S⁄=0, for which all truncated cones based on such a torus are (r-1)-stable.

  2. An energy minimization method for the correction of cupping artifacts in cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shipeng; Zhuang, Wenqin; Li, Haibo

    2016-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to reduce cupping artifacts and improve quantitative accuracy of the images in cone-beam CT (CBCT). An energy minimization method (EMM) is proposed to reduce cupping artifacts in reconstructed image of the CBCT. The cupping artifacts are iteratively optimized by using efficient matrix computations, which are verified to be numerically stable by matrix analysis. Moreover, the energy in our formulation is convex in each of its variables, which brings the robustness of the proposed energy minimization algorithm. The cupping artifacts are estimated as a result of minimizing this energy. The results indicate that proposed algorithm is effective for reducing the cupping artifacts and preserving the quality of the reconstructed image. The proposed method focuses on the reconstructed image without requiring any additional physical equipment; it is easily implemented and provides cupping correction using a single scan acquisition. The experimental results demonstrate that this method can successfully reduce the magnitude of cupping artifacts. The correction algorithm reported here may improve the uniformity of the reconstructed images, thus assisting the development of perfect volume visualization and threshold-based visualization techniques for reconstructed images. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. Regularity of minimal and almost minimal sets and cones : J. Taylor's theorem for beginners

    OpenAIRE

    David, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Notes for lectures that were given in the Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures (on metric spaces and transport) , Montréal, 2011; We discuss various settings for the Plateau problem, a proof of J. Taylor's regularity theorem for $2$-dimensional almost minimal sets, some applications, and potential extensions of regularity results to the boundary.

  4. Jet break-up in nano-suspensions during electrohydrodynamic atomization in the stable cone-jet mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, S N; Edirisinghe, M J

    2005-06-01

    This paper reports jet break-up phenomena, which occurs during the electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) of nano-suspensions. We investigated three ethylene glycol-based near-monodisperse suspensions, containing 30 wt% of SiO2 particles sized at 20, 80 and 120 nm. These suspensions were subjected to electrohydrodynamic atomization in the stable cone-jet mode and the jet break-up in each is discussed and compared with those of liquids reported in the literature.

  5. Square transition-metal carbides MC6 (M = Mo, W) as stable two-dimensional Dirac cone materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng-Fei; Wu, Yang; Bo, Tao; Hou, Ling; Xu, Juping; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Wang, Bao-Tian

    2017-12-15

    Searching for new two-dimensional (2D) Dirac cone materials has been popular since the exfoliation of graphene. Herein, based on density functional theory, we predict a novel family of 2D Dirac cone materials in square transition-metal carbides MC6 (M = Mo, W) which show inherent stability confirmed by phonon spectrum analysis and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations. The Dirac point, located exactly at the Fermi level, mainly arises from the hybridization of M-dz2,x2-y2 and C-pz orbitals which gives rise to an ultrahigh Fermi velocity comparable to that of graphene. Moreover, strong spin-orbit coupling related to M-d electrons can generate large band gaps of 35 and 89 meV for MoC6 and WC6 monolayers, respectively, which allows MC6 materials to be operable at room temperature (26 meV), as candidates for nanoelectronics in the upcoming post-silicon era. The conceived novel stable metal-carbon framework materials provide a platform for designing 2D Dirac cone materials.

  6. Efficient TpV minimization for circular, cone-beam computed tomography reconstruction via non-convex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ailong; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Li, Lei; Zhang, Hanming; Hu, Guoen

    2015-10-01

    An efficient iterative algorithm, based on recent work in non-convex optimization and generalized p-shrinkage mappings, is proposed for volume image reconstruction from circular cone-beam scans. Conventional total variation regularization makes use of L1 norm of gradient magnitude images (GMI). However, this paper utilizes a generalized penalty function, induced by p-shrinkage, of GMI which is proven to be a better measurement of its sparsity. The reconstruction model is formed using generalized total p-variation (TpV) minimization, which differs with the state of the art methods, with the constraint that the estimated projection data is within a specified tolerance of the available data and that the values of the volume image are non-negative. Theoretically, the proximal mapping for penalty functions induced by p-shrinkage has an exact and closed-form expression; thus, the constrained optimization can be stably and efficiently solved by the alternating direction minimization (ADM) scheme. Each sub-problem decoupled by variable splitting is minimized by explicit and easy-to-implement formulas developed by ADM. The proposed algorithm is efficiently implemented using a graphics processing unit and is referred to as "TpV-ADM." This method is robust and accurate even for very few view reconstruction datasets. Verifications and comparisons performed using various datasets (including ideal, noisy, and real projections) illustrate that the proposed method is effective and promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Minimalism

    CERN Document Server

    Obendorf, Hartmut

    2009-01-01

    The notion of Minimalism is proposed as a theoretical tool supporting a more differentiated understanding of reduction and thus forms a standpoint that allows definition of aspects of simplicity. This book traces the development of minimalism, defines the four types of minimalism in interaction design, and looks at how to apply it.

  8. Stable 1-Norm Error Minimization Based Linear Predictors for Speech Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacobello, Daniele; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm

    2014-01-01

    In linear prediction of speech, the 1-norm error minimization criterion has been shown to provide a valid alternative to the 2-norm minimization criterion. However, unlike 2-norm minimization, 1-norm minimization does not guarantee the stability of the corresponding all-pole filter and can generate...... of the shift operator associated with the particular prediction problem considered. The second method uses the alternative Cauchy bound to impose a convex constraint on the predictor in the 1-norm error minimization. These methods are compared with two existing methods: the Burg method, based on the 1-norm...... minimization of the forward and backward prediction error, and the iteratively reweighted 2-norm minimization known to converge to the 1-norm minimization with an appropriate selection of weights. The evaluation gives proof of the effectiveness of the new methods, performing as well as unconstrained 1-norm...

  9. Safety and efficacy of imatinib cessation for CML patients with stable undetectable minimal residual disease: results from the TWISTER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David M; Branford, Susan; Seymour, John F; Schwarer, Anthony P; Arthur, Christopher; Yeung, David T; Dang, Phuong; Goyne, Jarrad M; Slader, Cassandra; Filshie, Robin J; Mills, Anthony K; Melo, Junia V; White, Deborah L; Grigg, Andrew P; Hughes, Timothy P

    2013-07-25

    Most patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treated with imatinib will relapse if treatment is withdrawn. We conducted a prospective clinical trial of imatinib withdrawal in 40 chronic-phase CML patients who had sustained undetectable minimal residual disease (UMRD) by conventional quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on imatinib for at least 2 years. Patients stopped imatinib and were monitored frequently for molecular relapse. At 24 months, the actuarial estimate of stable treatment-free remission was 47.1%. Most relapses occurred within 4 months of stopping imatinib, and no relapses beyond 27 months were seen. In the 21 patients treated with interferon before imatinib, a shorter duration of interferon treatment before imatinib was significantly associated with relapse risk, as was slower achievement of UMRD after switching to imatinib. Highly sensitive patient-specific BCR-ABL DNA PCR showed persistence of the original CML clone in all patients with stable UMRD, even several years after imatinib withdrawal. No patients with molecular relapse after discontinuation have progressed or developed BCR-ABL mutations (median follow-up, 42 months). All patients who relapsed remained sensitive to imatinib re-treatment. These results confirm the safety and efficacy of a trial of imatinib withdrawal in stable UMRD with frequent, sensitive molecular monitoring and early rescue of molecular relapse.

  10. Retrograde tibial nailing: a minimally invasive and biomechanically superior alternative to angle-stable plate osteosynthesis in distal tibia fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Sebastian; Appelmann, Philipp; Mehler, Dorothea; Pairon, Philip; Rommens, Pol M

    2014-05-13

    Currently, antegrade intramedullary nailing and minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) represent the main surgical alternatives in distal tibial fractures. However, neither choice is optimal for all bony and soft tissue injuries. The Retrograde Tibial Nail (RTN) is a small-caliber prototype implant, which is introduced through a 2-cm-long incision at the tip of the medial malleolus with stab incisions sufficient for interlocking. During this project, we investigated the feasibility of retrograde tibial nailing in a cadaver model and conducted biomechanical testing. Anatomical implantations of the RTN were carried out in AO/OTA 43 A1-3 fracture types in three cadaveric lower limbs. Biomechanical testing was conducted in an AO/OTA 43 A3 fracture model for extra-axial compression, torsion, and destructive extra-axial compression. Sixteen composite tibiae were used to compare the RTN against an angle-stable plate osteosynthesis (Medial Distal Tibial Plate, Synthes®). Statistical analysis was performed by Student's t test. Retrograde intramedullary nailing is feasible in simple fracture types by closed manual reduction and percutaneous reduction forceps, while in highly comminuted fractures, the use of a large distractor can aid the reduction. Biomechanical testing shows a statistically superior stability (p maximum soft tissue protection by a minimally invasive surgical approach with the ability of secure fracture fixation by multiple locking options. Retrograde tibial nailing with the RTN is a promising concept in the treatment of distal tibia fractures.

  11. Cold knife cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  12. Minimally invasive mitral valve surgery through right mini-thoracotomy: recommendations for good exposure, stable cardiopulmonary bypass, and secure myocardial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiaki

    2015-07-01

    An apparent advantage of minimally invasive mitral surgery through right mini-thoracotomy is cosmetic appearance. Possible advantages of this procedure are a shorter ventilation time, shorter hospital stay, and less blood transfusion. With regard to hard endpoints, such as operative mortality, freedom from reoperation, or cardiac death, this method is reportedly equivalent, but not superior, to the standard median sternotomy technique. However, perfusion-related complications (e.g., stroke, vascular damage, and limb ischemia) tend to occur more frequently in minimally invasive technique than with the standard technique. In addition, valve repair through a small thoracotomy is technically demanding. Therefore, screening out patients who are not appropriate for performing minimally invasive surgery is the first step. Vascular disease and inadequate anatomy can be evaluated with contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Peripheral cannulation should be carefully performed, using transesophageal echocardiography guidance. Preoperative detailed planning of the valve repair process is desirable because every step is time-consuming in minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional echocardiography is a powerful tool for this purpose. For satisfactory exposure and detailed observation of the valve, a special left atrial retractor and high-definition endoscope are useful. Valve repair can be performed in minimally invasive surgery as long as cardiopulmonary bypass is stable and bloodless exposure of the valve is obtained.

  13. How Do Polyethylene Glycol and Poly(sulfobetaine) Hydrogel Layers on Ultrafiltration Membranes Minimize Fouling and Stay Stable in Cleaning Chemicals?

    KAUST Repository

    Le, Ngoc Lieu

    2017-05-18

    We compare the efficiency of grafting polyethylene glycol (PEG) and poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer on poly(ether imide) (PEI) hollow-fiber ultrafiltration membrane surfaces in terms of filtration performance, fouling minimization and stability in cleaning solutions. Two previously established different methods toward the two different chemistries (and both had already proven to be suited to reduce fouling significantly) are applied to the same PEI membranes. The hydrophilicity of PEI membranes is improved by the modification, as indicated by the change of contact angle value from 89° to 68° for both methods, due to the hydration layer formed in the hydrogel layers. Their pure water flux declines because of the additional permeation barrier from the hydrogel layers. However, these barriers increase protein rejection. In the exposure at a static condition, grafting PEG or poly(sulfobetaine) reduces protein adsorption to 23% or 11%, respectively. In the dynamic filtration, the hydrogel layers minimizes the flux reduction and increases the reversibility of fouling. Compared to the pristine PEI membrane that can recover its flux to 42% after hydraulic cleaning, the PEG and poly(sulfobetaine) grafted membranes can recover their flux up to 63% and 94%, respectively. Stability tests show that the poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layer is stable in acid, base and chlorine solutions, whereas the PEG hydrogel layer suffers alkaline hydrolysis in base and oxidation in chlorine conditions. With its chemical stability and pronounced capability of minimizing fouling, especially irreversible fouling, protective poly(sulfobetaine) hydrogel layers have great potential for various membrane-based applications.

  14. Ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Skopenkov, Mikhail

    2011-10-30

    A Laguerre minimal surface is an immersed surface in ℝ 3 being an extremal of the functional ∫ (H 2/K-1)dA. In the present paper, we prove that the only ruled Laguerre minimal surfaces are up to isometry the surfaces ℝ (φλ) = (Aφ, Bφ, Cφ + D cos 2φ) + λ(sin φ, cos φ, 0), where A,B,C,D ε ℝ are fixed. To achieve invariance under Laguerre transformations, we also derive all Laguerre minimal surfaces that are enveloped by a family of cones. The methodology is based on the isotropic model of Laguerre geometry. In this model a Laguerre minimal surface enveloped by a family of cones corresponds to a graph of a biharmonic function carrying a family of isotropic circles. We classify such functions by showing that the top view of the family of circles is a pencil. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Quotient normed cones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    general setting of the space CL(X, Y ) of all continuous linear mappings from a normed cone (X, p) to a normed cone (Y, q), extending several well-known results related to open continuous linear mappings between normed linear spaces. Keywords. Normed cone; extended quasi-metric; continuous linear mapping; bicom-.

  16. Cones in Supersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantzsche, W.; Wendt, H.

    1947-01-01

    In the case of cones in axially symmetric flow of supersonic velocity, adiabatic compression takes place between shock wave and surface of the cone. Interpolation curves betwen shock polars and the surface are therefore necessary for the complete understanding of this type of flow. They are given in the present report by graphical-numerical integration of the differential equation for all cone angles and airspeeds.

  17. Techniques for optimizing nanotips derived from frozen taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2017-12-05

    Optimization techniques are disclosed for producing sharp and stable tips/nanotips relying on liquid Taylor cones created from electrically conductive materials with high melting points. A wire substrate of such a material with a preform end in the shape of a regular or concave cone, is first melted with a focused laser beam. Under the influence of a high positive potential, a Taylor cone in a liquid/molten state is formed at that end. The cone is then quenched upon cessation of the laser power, thus freezing the Taylor cone. The tip of the frozen Taylor cone is reheated by the laser to allow its precise localized melting and shaping. Tips thus obtained yield desirable end-forms suitable as electron field emission sources for a variety of applications. In-situ regeneration of the tip is readily accomplished. These tips can also be employed as regenerable bright ion sources using field ionization/desorption of introduced chemical species.

  18. S-cone psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Hannah E

    2014-03-01

    We review the features of the S-cone system that appeal to the psychophysicist and summarize the celebrated characteristics of S-cone mediated vision. Two factors are emphasized: First, the fine stimulus control that is required to isolate putative visual mechanisms and second, the relationship between physiological data and psychophysical approaches. We review convergent findings from physiology and psychophysics with respect to asymmetries in the retinal wiring of S-ON and S-OFF visual pathways, and the associated treatment of increments and decrements in the S-cone system. Beyond the retina, we consider the lack of S-cone projections to superior colliculus and the use of S-cone stimuli in experimental psychology, for example to address questions about the mechanisms of visually driven attention. Careful selection of stimulus parameters enables psychophysicists to produce entirely reversible, temporary, "lesions," and to assess behavior in the absence of specific neural subsystems.

  19. different outer cone angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smyk Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the method of flow separation control is application of axisymmetric valve. It is composed of nozzle with core. Normally the main flow is attached to inner cone and flow by preferential collector to primary flow pipe. If through control nozzle starts flow jet (control jet the main flow is switched to annular secondary collector. In both situation the main flow is deflected to inner or outer cone (placed at the outlet of the valve’s nozzle by Coanda effect. The paper deals with the numerical simulation of this axisymetric annular nozzle with integrated synthetic jet actuator. The aim of the work is influence examination of outer cone angle on deflection on main stream.

  20. Insulin receptor signaling in cones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rajala, Ammaji; Dighe, Radhika; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Anderson, Robert E; Rajala, Raju V S

    2013-01-01

    .... To date there are no studies on the insulin receptor signaling in cones; however, mRNA levels of IR signaling proteins are significantly higher in cone-dominant neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl...

  1. Chloride equilibrium potential in salamander cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryson Eric J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GABAergic inhibition and effects of intracellular chloride ions on calcium channel activity have been proposed to regulate neurotransmission from photoreceptors. To assess the impact of these and other chloride-dependent mechanisms on release from cones, the chloride equilibrium potential (ECl was determined in red-sensitive, large single cones from the tiger salamander retinal slice. Results Whole cell recordings were done using gramicidin perforated patch techniques to maintain endogenous Cl- levels. Membrane potentials were corrected for liquid junction potentials. Cone resting potentials were found to average -46 mV. To measure ECl, we applied long depolarizing steps to activate the calcium-activated chloride current (ICl(Ca and then determined the reversal potential for the current component that was inhibited by the Cl- channel blocker, niflumic acid. With this method, ECl was found to average -46 mV. In a complementary approach, we used a Cl-sensitive dye, MEQ, to measure the Cl- flux produced by depolarization with elevated concentrations of K+. The membrane potentials produced by the various high K+ solutions were measured in separate current clamp experiments. Consistent with electrophysiological experiments, MEQ fluorescence measurements indicated that ECl was below -36 mV. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that ECl is close to the dark resting potential. This will minimize the impact of chloride-dependent presynaptic mechanisms in cone terminals involving GABAa receptors, glutamate transporters and ICl(Ca.

  2. Scale-up of electrospray atomization using linear arrays of Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Aaron J.; Flagan, Richard C.

    1993-03-01

    Linear arrays of Taylor cones were established on capillary electrode tubes opposite a slotted flat plate counterelectrode to investigate the feasibility of increasing the liquid throughput rate in electrospray atomizers. It was found that individual Taylor cones could be established on each capillary over a wide range of the capillary radius to spacing ratio R/S. The onset potential Vs required to establish the cones varied directly with R/S, but the liquid flow rate per cone and current per cone were nearly independent of R/S for a given overpotential ratio P=V/Vs. Only six working capillaries were used, but the results per cone are applicable to larger arrays of cones since end effects were minimized.

  3. Finite Coverings by Cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijs, S.H.; Reijnierse, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    This paper considers analogues of statements concerning compactness and finite coverings, in which the roles of spheres are replaced by cones. Furthermore, one of the finite covering results provides an application in Multi-Objective Programming; infinite sets of alternatives are reduced to finite

  4. Holographic entanglement entropy for hollow cones and banana shaped regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, Harald [Institut für Physik und IRIS Adlershof, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin,Zum Großen Windkanal 6, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-09

    We consider banana shaped regions as examples of compact regions, whose boundary has two conical singularities. Their regularised holographic entropy is calculated with all divergent as well as finite terms. The coefficient of the squared logarithmic divergence, also in such a case with internally curved boundary, agrees with that calculated in the literature for infinite circular cones with their internally flat boundary. For the otherwise conformally invariant coefficient of the ordinary logarithmic divergence an anomaly under exceptional conformal transformations is observed. The construction of minimal submanifolds, needed for the entanglement entropy of cones, requires fine-tuning of Cauchy data. Perturbations of such fine-tuning leads to solutions relevant for hollow cones. The divergent parts for the entanglement entropy of hollow cones are calculated. Increasing the difference between the opening angles of their outer and inner boundary, one finds a transition between connected solutions for small differences to disconnected solutions for larger ones.

  5. Ejecta evolution during cone impact

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, Jeremy

    2014-07-07

    We present findings from an experimental investigation into the impact of solid cone-shaped bodies onto liquid pools. Using a variety of cone angles and liquid physical properties, we show that the ejecta formed during the impact exhibits self-similarity for all impact speeds for very low surface tension liquids, whilst for high-surface tension liquids similarity is only achieved at high impact speeds. We find that the ejecta tip can detach from the cone and that this phenomenon can be attributed to the air entrainment phenomenon. We analyse of a range of cone angles, including some ogive cones, and impact speeds in terms of the spatiotemporal evolution of the ejecta tip. Using superhydrophobic cones, we also examine the entry of cones which entrain an air layer.

  6. Development of a full ice-cream cone model for halo CME structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2015-04-01

    The determination of three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is very important for space weather forecast. To estimate these parameters, several cone models based on a flat cone or a shallow ice-cream cone with spherical front have been suggested. In this study, we investigate which cone model is proper for halo CME morphology using 33 CMEs which are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From geometrical parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone CMEs (28 events) are dominant over shallow ice-cream cone CMEs (5 events). So we develop a new full ice-cream cone model by assuming that a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection points with the observed ones. We apply this model to several halo CMEs and compare the results with those from other methods such as a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model and a geometrical triangulation method.

  7. Cone Algorithm of Spinning Vehicles under Dynamic Coning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang-biao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that attitude error of vehicles has an intense trend of divergence when vehicles undergo worsening coning environment, in this paper, the model of dynamic coning environment is derived firstly. Then, through investigation of the effect on Euler attitude algorithm for the equivalency of traditional attitude algorithm, it is found that attitude error is actually the roll angle error including drifting error and oscillating error, which is induced directly by dynamic coning environment and further affects the pitch angle and yaw angle through transferring. Based on definition of the cone frame and cone attitude, a cone algorithm is proposed by rotation relationship to calculate cone attitude, and the relationship between cone attitude and Euler attitude of spinning vehicle is established. Through numerical simulations with different conditions of dynamic coning environment, it is shown that the induced error of Euler attitude fluctuates by the variation of precession and nutation, especially by that of nutation, and the oscillating frequency of roll angle error is twice that of pitch angle error and yaw angle error. In addition, the rotation angle is more competent to describe the spinning process of vehicles under coning environment than Euler angle gamma, and the real pitch angle and yaw angle are calculated finally.

  8. A method to quantify the "cone of economy".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddas, Ram; Lieberman, Isador H

    2017-10-10

    A non-randomized, prospective, concurrent control cohort study. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method to quantify the dimensions of the cone of economy (COE) and the energy expenditure associated with maintaining a balanced posture within the COE, scoliosis patients and compare them to matched non-scoliotic controls in a group of adult degenerative. Balance is defined as the ability of the human body to maintain its center of mass (COM) within the base of support with minimal postural sway. The cone of economy refers to the stable region of upright standing posture. The underlying assumption is that deviating outside one's individual cone challenges the balance mechanisms. Adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) patients exhibit a variety of postural changes within their COE, involving the spine, pelvis and lower extremities, in their effort to compensate for the altered posture. Ten ADS patients and ten non-scoliotic volunteers performed a series of functional balance tests. The dimensions of the COE and the energy expenditure related to maintaining balance within the COE were measured using a human motion video capture system and dynamic surface electromyography. ADS patients presented more COM sway in the sagittal (ADS: 1.59 cm vs. H: 0.61 cm; p = 0.049) and coronal (ADS: 2.84 cm vs. H: 1.72 cm; p = 0.046) directions in comparison to the non-scoliotic control. ADS patients presented with more COM (ADS: 33.30 cm vs. H: 19.13 cm; p = 0.039) and head (ADS: 31.06 cm vs. H: 19.13 cm; p = 0.013) displacements in comparison to the non-scoliotic controls. Scoliosis patients expended more muscle activity to maintain static standing, as manifest by increased muscle activity in their erector spinae (ADS: 37.16 mV vs. H: 20.31 mV; p = 0.050), and gluteus maximus (ADS: 33.12 mV vs. H: 12.09 mV; p = 0.001) muscles. We were able to develop and evaluate a method that quantifies the COE boundaries, COM displacement, and amount of sway within the COE

  9. Light cone matrix product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  10. Cone rod dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian P

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cone rod dystrophies (CRDs (prevalence 1/40,000 are inherited retinal dystrophies that belong to the group of pigmentary retinopathies. CRDs are characterized by retinal pigment deposits visible on fundus examination, predominantly localized to the macular region. In contrast to typical retinitis pigmentosa (RP, also called the rod cone dystrophies (RCDs resulting from the primary loss in rod photoreceptors and later followed by the secondary loss in cone photoreceptors, CRDs reflect the opposite sequence of events. CRD is characterized by primary cone involvement, or, sometimes, by concomitant loss of both cones and rods that explains the predominant symptoms of CRDs: decreased visual acuity, color vision defects, photoaversion and decreased sensitivity in the central visual field, later followed by progressive loss in peripheral vision and night blindness. The clinical course of CRDs is generally more severe and rapid than that of RCDs, leading to earlier legal blindness and disability. At end stage, however, CRDs do not differ from RCDs. CRDs are most frequently non syndromic, but they may also be part of several syndromes, such as Bardet Biedl syndrome and Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 7 (SCA7. Non syndromic CRDs are genetically heterogeneous (ten cloned genes and three loci have been identified so far. The four major causative genes involved in the pathogenesis of CRDs are ABCA4 (which causes Stargardt disease and also 30 to 60% of autosomal recessive CRDs, CRX and GUCY2D (which are responsible for many reported cases of autosomal dominant CRDs, and RPGR (which causes about 2/3 of X-linked RP and also an undetermined percentage of X-linked CRDs. It is likely that highly deleterious mutations in genes that otherwise cause RP or macular dystrophy may also lead to CRDs. The diagnosis of CRDs is based on clinical history, fundus examination and electroretinogram. Molecular diagnosis can be made for some genes, genetic counseling is

  11. Determination of HCME 3-D parameters using a full ice-cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae; Lee, Harim

    2016-05-01

    It is very essential to determine three dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, source location) of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) for space weather forecast. Several cone models (e.g., an elliptical cone model, an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model) have been examined to estimate these parameters. In this study, we investigate which cone type is close to a halo CME morphology using 26 CMEs: halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or STEREO-A or B) and as limb CMEs by the other ones. From cone shape parameters of these CMEs such as their front curvature, we find that near full ice-cream cone type CMEs are much closer to observations than shallow ice-cream cone type CMEs. Thus we develop a new cone model in which a full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. This model is carried out by the following steps: (1) construct a cone for given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3-D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (a geometrical triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model) based on multi-spacecraft data. We are developing a general ice-cream cone model whose front shape is a free parameter determined by observations.

  12. Flow Lines Under Perturbation within Section Cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal

    map from the closed unit interval with the natural partial order inherited from the order of the real numbers to the manifold with the partial order defined as above, which furthermore preserves the partial orders. We examine di-paths between two critical points of minimal and of maximal index up......We want to examine a closed smooth manifold together with a certain partial order: In the set of vector fields on , , we define a section cone - a convex subset of characterized by the property that if is a singular point for some vector field in then this is the case for all members of . We say...

  13. Comparison of Asymmetric and Ice-cream Cone Models for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, H.; Moon, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are major cause of the geomagnetic storms. To minimize the projection effect by coronagraph observation, several cone models have been suggested: an ice-cream cone model, an asymmetric cone model etc. These models allow us to determine the three dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone. In this study, we compare these parameters obtained from different models using 48 well-observed HCMEs from 2001 to 2002. And we obtain the root mean square error (RMS error) between measured projection speeds and calculated projection speeds for both cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with each other (R = 0.86), and the correlation coefficient of angular width is 0.6. The correlation coefficient of the angle between sky plane and central axis of the cone is 0.31, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be due to the fact that the source locations of the asymmetric cone model are distributed near the center, while those of the ice-cream cone model are located in a wide range. The average RMS error of the asymmetric cone model (85.6km/s) is slightly smaller than that of the ice-cream cone model (87.8km/s).

  14. Dynamics of turtle cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, K I; Itoh, M A; Chappell, R L

    1987-02-01

    The response dynamics of turtle photoreceptors (cones) were studied by the cross-correlation method using a white-noise-modulated light stimulus. Incremental responses were characterized by the kernels. White-noise-evoked responses with a peak-to-peak excursion of greater than 5 mV were linear, with mean square errors of approximately 8%, a degree of linearity comparable to the horizontal cell responses. Both a spot (0.17 mm diam) and a large field of light produced almost identical kernels. The amplitudes of receptor kernels obtained at various mean irradiances fitted approximately the Weber-Fechner relationship and the mean levels controlled both the amplitude and the response dynamics; kernels were slow and monophasic at low mean irradiance and were fast and biphasic at high mean irradiance. This is a parametric change and is a piecewise linearization. Horizontal cell kernels evoked by the small spot of light were monophasic and slower than the receptor kernels produced by the same stimulus. Larger spots of light or a steady annular illumination transformed the slow horizontal cell kernel into a fast kernel similar to those of the receptors. The slowing down of the kernel waveform was modeled by a simple low-pass circuit and the presumed feedback from horizontal cells onto cones did not appear to play a major role.

  15. Aerodynamic Rear Cone for Trucks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Wind-inflated cone reduces turbulence that ordinarily occurs in air just behind square-back truck traveling at high speed. Wind around truck would enter slits in folded cone and automatically deploy it. Energy lost to air turbulence greatly reduced, and fuel consumed by truck reduced accordingly. In addition, less air turbulence means less disturbance to nearby vehicles on highway.

  16. Cone and Seed Maturation of Southern Pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett

    1976-01-01

    If slightly reduced yields and viability are acceptable, loblolly and slash cone collections can begin 2 to 3 weeks before maturity if the cones are stored before processing. Longleaf(P. palestris Mill.) pine cones should be collected only when mature, as storage decreased germination of seeds from immature cones. Biochemical analyses to determine reducing sugar...

  17. Dirac fermions on graphite cones

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The electronic structure of graphitic cones is investigated within the self-consistent field-theory model. The local and total density of states near the apex is found for cones of different opening angles. For extended electronic states, total density of states is found to vanish at the Fermi level at any opening angles more than 60 deg. In turn, for power-law localized states, normalized zero-energy modes are shown to emerge

  18. Taxonomic minimalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattle, A J; Oliver, I

    1994-12-01

    Biological surveys are in increasing demand while taxonomic resources continue to decline. How much formal taxonomy is required to get the job done? The answer depends on the kind of job but it is possible that taxonomic minimalism, especially (1) the use of higher taxonomic ranks, (2) the use of morphospecies rather than species (as identified by Latin binomials), and (3) the involvement of taxonomic specialists only for training and verification, may offer advantages for biodiversity assessment, environmental monitoring and ecological research. As such, formal taxonomy remains central to the process of biological inventory and survey but resources may be allocated more efficiently. For example, if formal Identification is not required, resources may be concentrated on replication and increasing sample sizes. Taxonomic minimalism may also facilitate the inclusion in these activities of important but neglected groups, especially among the invertebrates, and perhaps even microorganisms. Copyright © 1994. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Families of bitangent planes of space curves and minimal non-fibration families

    KAUST Repository

    Lubbes, Niels

    2014-01-01

    A cone curve is a reduced sextic space curve which lies on a quadric cone and does not pass through the vertex. We classify families of bitangent planes of cone curves. The methods we apply can be used for any space curve with ADE singularities, though in this paper we concentrate on cone curves. An embedded complex projective surface which is adjoint to a degree one weak Del Pezzo surface contains families of minimal degree rational curves, which cannot be defined by the fibers of a map. Such families are called minimal non-fibration families. Families of bitangent planes of cone curves correspond to minimal non-fibration families. The main motivation of this paper is to classify minimal non-fibration families. We present algorithms which compute all bitangent families of a given cone curve and their geometric genus. We consider cone curves to be equivalent if they have the same singularity configuration. For each equivalence class of cone curves we determine the possible number of bitangent families and the number of rational bitangent families. Finally we compute an example of a minimal non-fibration family on an embedded weak degree one Del Pezzo surface.

  20. Shading correction assisted iterative cone-beam CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunlin; Wu, Pengwei; Gong, Shutao; Wang, Jing; Lyu, Qihui; Tang, Xiangyang; Niu, Tianye

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in total variation (TV) technology enable accurate CT image reconstruction from highly under-sampled and noisy projection data. The standard iterative reconstruction algorithms, which work well in conventional CT imaging, fail to perform as expected in cone beam CT (CBCT) applications, wherein the non-ideal physics issues, including scatter and beam hardening, are more severe. These physics issues result in large areas of shading artifacts and cause deterioration to the piecewise constant property assumed in reconstructed images. To overcome this obstacle, we incorporate a shading correction scheme into low-dose CBCT reconstruction and propose a clinically acceptable and stable three-dimensional iterative reconstruction method that is referred to as the shading correction assisted iterative reconstruction. In the proposed method, we modify the TV regularization term by adding a shading compensation image to the reconstructed image to compensate for the shading artifacts while leaving the data fidelity term intact. This compensation image is generated empirically, using image segmentation and low-pass filtering, and updated in the iterative process whenever necessary. When the compensation image is determined, the objective function is minimized using the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm accelerated on a graphic processing unit. The proposed method is evaluated using CBCT projection data of the Catphan© 600 phantom and two pelvis patients. Compared with the iterative reconstruction without shading correction, the proposed method reduces the overall CT number error from around 200 HU to be around 25 HU and increases the spatial uniformity by a factor of 20 percent, given the same number of sparsely sampled projections. A clinically acceptable and stable iterative reconstruction algorithm for CBCT is proposed in this paper. Differing from the existing algorithms, this algorithm incorporates a shading correction scheme into the low

  1. On the Dual of the Solvency Cone

    OpenAIRE

    Löhne, Andreas; Rudloff, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    A solvency cone is a polyhedral convex cone which is used in Mathematical Finance to model proportional transaction costs. It consists of those portfolios which can be traded into nonnegative positions. In this note, we provide a characterization of its dual cone in terms of extreme directions and discuss some consequences, among them: (i) an algorithm to construct extreme directions of the dual cone when a corresponding "contribution scheme" is given; (ii) estimates for the number of extreme...

  2. Minimal founded semantics for disjunctive logic programs and deductive databases

    OpenAIRE

    Furfaro, Filippo; Greco, Gianluigi; Greco, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a variant of stable model semantics for disjunctive logic programming and deductive databases. The semantics, called minimal founded, generalizes stable model semantics for normal (i.e. non disjunctive) programs but differs from disjunctive stable model semantics (the extension of stable model semantics for disjunctive programs). Compared with disjunctive stable model semantics, minimal founded semantics seems to be more intuitive, it gives meaning to programs which ...

  3. Seawave Slot-Cone Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicinanza, Diego; Margheritini, Lucia; Contestabile, Pasquale

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a new type of Wave Energy Converter (WEC) named Seawave Slot-Cone Generator (SSG). The SSG is a WEC of the overtopping type. The structure consists of a number of reservoirs one on the top of each others above the mean water level in which the water of incoming waves is store...

  4. Intrinsic volumes of symmetric cones

    OpenAIRE

    Amelunxen, Dennis; Bürgisser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.

  5. Atmospheric negative corona discharge using a Taylor cone as liquid electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Ryuto; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2012-10-01

    We examined characteristics of atmospheric negative corona discharge using liquid needle cathode. As a liquid needle cathode, we adopted Taylor cone with conical shape. A nozzle with inner diameter of 10 mm is filled with liquid, and a plate electrode is placed at 10 mm above the nozzle. By applying a dc voltage between electrodes, Taylor cone is formed. To change the liquid property, we added sodium dodecyl sulfate to reduce the surface tension, sodium sulfate to increase the conductivity, and polyvinyl alcohol to increase the viscosity, in distilled water. The liquid, with high surface tension such as pure water could not form a Taylor cone. When we reduced surface tension, a Taylor cone was formed and the stable corona discharge was observed at the tip of the cone. When we increased viscosity, a liquid filament protruded from the solution surface was formed and corona discharge was observed along the filament at position 0.7-1.0 mm above from the tip of the cone. Increasing the conductivity resulted in the higher light intensity of corona and the lower corona onset voltage. When we use the metal needle electrode, the corona discharge depends on the voltage and the gap length. Using Taylor cone, different types of discharges were observed by changing the property of the liquid.

  6. Unpredictably Stable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Failla, Virgilio; Melillo, Francesca; Reichstein, Toke

    2014-01-01

    Is entrepreneurship a more stable career choice for high employment turnover individuals? We find that a transition to entrepreneurship induces a shift towards stayer behavior and identify job matching, job satisfaction and lock-in effects as main drivers. These findings have major implications...

  7. Stable isotope

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results of the study suggest that there are two main carbon pathways for plankton and nekton in the Kariega estuary, carbon derived from the eelgrass and its associated epiphytes and carbon which has its origins in the salt marsh riparian vegetation and zooplankton. Keywords: stable isotope analysis; temperate estuary; ...

  8. [The use of tantalum cones for reconstruction of bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, M; Gehrke, T; Jakobs, O

    2015-02-01

    Revision arthroplasty of the knee is often associated with substantial femoral and/or tibial bone loss. Tantalum cones are used to reconstruct these defects and to improve initial stability. This requires an implantation in the "press-fit" technique with maximum contact to the host bone. Tantalum cones may be used in grade 2-3 femoral and/or tibial defects according to the AORI (Anderson Orthopedic Research Institute) classification system. There are no contraindications described. After removal of the implant and cement remnants, bone defects have to be evaluated. A tantalum cone which adequately fills the bone defect is implanted using the "press-fit" technique. If necessary, saving resection of surplus bone to fit the cone properly. Gaps between the cone and the host bone are filled with cancellous bone in "impaction-bone-grafting" technique to increase the area of contact. Fitting the revision knee prosthesis and fixing with the use of bone cement. Postoperative physiotherapy is adjusted to the result of the reconstruction. In most cases with stable reconstruction, mobilization with full weight-bearing and the use of two crutches can be performed. Additional bone grafting may require a partial weight-bearing regimen for postoperative mobilization. Physiotherapy to improve range of motion is performed starting on postoperative day 1. Several studies reported promising midterm results (observation period about 36 months) after implantation of tantalum cones in revision knee arthroplasty. There is consistent evidence for stable osteointegration of the cones. The main intraoperative complication is fracture of the host bone during impaction of the cones.

  9. Development of a Full Ice-cream Cone Model for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-04-01

    It is essential to determine three-dimensional parameters (e.g., radial speed, angular width, and source location) of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) for the space weather forecast. In this study, we investigate which cone type represents a halo CME morphology using 29 CMEs (12 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) halo CMEs and 17 Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation COR2 halo CMEs) from 2010 December to 2011 June. These CMEs are identified as halo CMEs by one spacecraft (SOHO or one of STEREO A and B) and limb ones by the other spacecraft (One of STEREO A and B or SOHO). From cone shape parameters of these CMEs, such as their front curvature, we find that the CME observational structures are much closer to a full ice-cream cone type than a shallow ice-cream cone type. Thus, we develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths to estimate the three-dimensional parameters of the halo CMEs. This model is constructed by carrying out the following steps: (1) construct a cone for a given height and angular width, (2) project the cone onto the sky plane, (3) select points comprising the outer boundary, and (4) minimize the difference between the estimated projection speeds with the observed ones. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (I.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model).

  10. Minimal asymmetric dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane M. Boucenna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the early Universe, any particle carrying a conserved quantum number and in chemical equilibrium with the thermal bath will unavoidably inherit a particle–antiparticle asymmetry. A new particle of this type, if stable, would represent a candidate for asymmetric dark matter (DM with an asymmetry directly related to the baryon asymmetry. We study this possibility for a minimal DM sector constituted by just one (generic SU(2L multiplet χ carrying hypercharge, assuming that at temperatures above the electroweak phase transition an effective operator enforces chemical equilibrium between χ and the Higgs boson. We argue that limits from DM direct detection searches severely constrain this scenario, leaving as the only possibilities scalar or fermion multiplets with hypercharge y=1, preferentially quintuplets or larger SU(2 representations, and with a mass in the few TeV range.

  11. Light-cone quantization of quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Pauli, H.C. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-06-01

    We discuss the light-cone quantization of gauge theories from two perspectives: as a calculational tool for representing hadrons as QCD bound-states of relativistic quarks and gluons, and also as a novel method for simulating quantum field theory on a computer. The light-cone Fock state expansion of wavefunctions at fixed light cone time provides a precise definition of the parton model and a general calculus for hadronic matrix elements. We present several new applications of light-cone Fock methods, including calculations of exclusive weak decays of heavy hadrons, and intrinsic heavy-quark contributions to structure functions. A general nonperturbative method for numerically solving quantum field theories, discretized light-cone quantization,'' is outlined and applied to several gauge theories, including QCD in one space and one time dimension, and quantum electrodynamics in physical space-time at large coupling strength. The DLCQ method is invariant under the large class of light-cone Lorentz transformations, and it can be formulated such at ultraviolet regularization is independent of the momentum space discretization. Both the bound-state spectrum and the corresponding relativistic light-cone wavefunctions can be obtained by matrix diagonalization and related techniques. We also discuss the construction of the light-cone Fock basis, the structure of the light-cone vacuum, and outline the renormalization techniques required for solving gauge theories within the light-cone Hamiltonian formalism.

  12. Geomorphometric variability of "monogenetic" volcanic cones: Evidence from Mauna Kea, Lanzarote and experimental cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervyn, M.; Ernst, G. G. J.; Carracedo, J.-C.; Jacobs, P.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic cones are the most common volcanic constructs on Earth. Their shape can be quantified using two morphometric ratios: the crater/cone base ratio (W cr/W co) and the cone height/width ratio (H co/W co). The average values for these ratios obtained over entire cone fields have been explained by the repose angle of loose granular material (i.e. scoria) controlling cone slopes. The observed variability in these ratios between individual cones has been attributed to the effect of erosional processes or contrasting eruptive conditions on cone morphometry. Using a GIS-based approach, high spatial resolution Digital Elevation Models and airphotos, two new geomorphometry datasets for cone fields at Mauna Kea (Hawaii, USA) and Lanzarote (Canary Islands, Spain) are extracted and analyzed here. The key observation in these datasets is the great variability in morphometric ratios, even for simple-shape and well-preserved cones. Simple analog experiments are presented to analyze factors influencing the morphometric ratios. The formation of a crater is simulated within an analog cone (i.e. a sand pile) by opening a drainage conduit at the cone base. Results from experiments show that variability in the morphometric ratios can be attributed to variations in the width, height and horizontal offset of the drainage point relative to the cone symmetry axis, to the dip of the underlying slope or to the influence of a small proportion of fine cohesive material. GIS analysis and analog experiments, together with specific examples of cones documented in the field, suggest that the morphometric ratios for well-preserved volcanic cones are controlled by a combination of 1) the intrinsic cone material properties, 2) time-dependent eruption conditions, 3) the local setting, and 4) the method used to estimate the cone height. Implications for interpreting cone morphometry solely as either an age or as an eruption condition indicator are highlighted.

  13. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  14. Topology of soft cone metric spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Ismet; Simsek, Dagistan; Taskopru, Kemal

    2017-09-01

    In Simsek's paper it was introduced a concept of soft cone metric space via soft elements and some fixed point theorems in soft cone metric space were provided. In this work, we examine topological structures such as open ball, soft neighbourhood and soft open set in soft metric spaces and their some properties, and prove that every soft cone metric space under some condition is a soft topological space according to elementary operations on soft sets.

  15. Programming Retinal Stem Cells into Cone Photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    to program human stem cells directly into cones. Using RNA -seq, we identified several genes that are upregulated in advance of the earliest...reverse vision loss. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cone photoreceptor, retina, retinal stem cell, Otx2, Onecut1, Blimp1, RNA -seq., transcription factors, and...sequential activation of OTX2, BLIMP1, and ONECUT1 are sufficient to program hES cell-derived retinal stem cells into transplant- competent cones

  16. G-weak contraction in ordered cone rectangular metric spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, S K; Sharma, J B; Shukla, Satish

    2013-01-01

    We prove some common fixed-point theorems for the ordered g-weak contractions in cone rectangular metric spaces without assuming the normality of cone. Our results generalize some recent results from cone metric and cone rectangular metric spaces into ordered cone rectangular metric spaces. Examples are provided which illustrate the results.

  17. g-Weak Contraction in Ordered Cone Rectangular Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Malhotra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove some common fixed-point theorems for the ordered g-weak contractions in cone rectangular metric spaces without assuming the normality of cone. Our results generalize some recent results from cone metric and cone rectangular metric spaces into ordered cone rectangular metric spaces. Examples are provided which illustrate the results.

  18. Light-cones, almost light-cones and almost-complex light-cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2017-08-01

    We point out (and then apply to a general situation) an unusual relationship among a variety of null geodesic congruences; (a) the generators of ordinary light-cones and (b) certain (related) shear-free but twisting congruences in Minkowski space-time as well as (c) asymptotically shear-free null geodesic congruences that exist in the neighborhood of Penrose's I^{ +} in Einstein or Einstein-Maxwell asymptotically flat-space-times. We refer to these geodesic congruences respectively as: Lignt-Cones (LCs), as "Almost-Complex"-Light-Cones (ACLCs), [though they are real they resemble complex light-cones in complex Minkowski space] and finally to a family of congruences in asymptotically flat-spaces as ` Almost Light-Cones' (ALC). The two essential points of resemblance among the three families are: (1) they are all either shear-free or asymptotically shear-free and (2) in each family the individual members of the family can be labeled by the points in a real or complex four-dimensional manifold. As an example, the Minkowski space LCs are labeled by the (real) coordinate value of their apex. In the case of (ACLCs) (complex coordinate values), the congruences will have non-vanishing twist whose magnitude is determined by the imaginary part of the complex coordinate values. In studies of gravitational radiation, Bondi-type of null surfaces and their associated Bondi coordinates have been almost exclusively used for calculations. It turns out that some surprising relations arise if, instead of the Bondi coordinates, one uses ALCs and their associated coordinate systems in the analysis of the Einstein-Maxwell equations in the neighborhood of I+. More explicitly and surprisingly, the asymptotic Bianchi Identities (arising directly from the Einstein equations), expressed in the coordinates of the ALCs, turn directly into many of the standard definitions and equations and relations of classical mechanics coupled with Maxwell's equations. These results extend and generalize the

  19. Vacuum Compatible Percussive Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible percussive dynamic cone penetrometer (PDCP), for establishing soil bin characteristics, with the ultimate...

  20. Ionic emission from Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Reina, Sergio

    Electrified Taylor cones have been seen as an efficient way to generate thrust for space propulsion. Especially the pure ionic regime (PIR) combines a very high specific impulse (thrust per unit mass) and efficiency, which is very important to reduce fuel transportation costs. The PIR has been primarily based on electrosprays of liquid metals [Swatik and Hendricks 1968, Swatik 1969]. However, emissions dominated by or containing exclusively ions have also been observed from nonmetallic purely ionic substances, initially sulfuric acid [Perel et al. 1969], and more recently room temperature molten salts referred to as ionic liquids (ILs) [Romero-Sanz et al. 2003]. The recent use of the liquid metal ion source (LMIS) with ILs, becoming this "new" source to be known as ionic liquid ion source (ILIS) [Lozano and Martinez-Sanchez 2005], has shown important differences on the emission from Taylor cones with the traditional hollow capillary. This new source seems to be more flexible than the capillary [Paulo, Sergio, carlos], although its low emission level (low thrust) is an important drawback from the space propulsion point of view. Throughout the thesis I have studied some aspects of the ionic emission from ionic liquid Taylor cones and the influence of the properties of the liquids and the characteristic of source on the emission. I have unraveled the reason why ILIS emits such low currents (˜200 nA) and found a way to solve this problem increasing the current up to capillary levels (˜1000 nA) [Castro and Fernandez de la Mora 2009]. I have also tried to reduce ion evaporation while reducing the emitted droplet size in order to increase the thrust generated while keeping the efficiency relatively high and I have measured the energy of evaporation of several cations composing ionic liquids, mandatory step to understand ionic evaporation.

  1. Increasing the Stability of Recombinant Human Green Cone Pigment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Timothy S; Salom, David; Sun, Wenyu; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2018-01-10

    Three types of cone cells exist in the human retina, each containing a different pigment responsible for the initial step of photo-transduction. These pigments are distinguished by their specific absorbance maxima, 425 nm (blue), 530 nm (green) and 560 nm (red). Each pigment contains a common chromophore, 11-cis-retinal covalently bound to an opsin protein via a Schiff base. The 11-cis-retinal protonated Schiff base has an absorbance maxima at 440 nm in methanol. Unfortunately, the chemistry allowing the same chromophore interacting with different opsin proteins to tune the absorbance of the resulting pigments to distinct λmax values is poorly understood. Rhodopsin is the only pigment with a native structure determined at high resolution. Homology models for cone pigments have been generated, but experimentally determined structures are needed for a precise understanding of spectral tuning. The principal obstacle to solving the structures of cone pigments has been their innate instability in recombinant constructs. By inserting five different thermo-stabilizing proteins, BRIL, T4L, PGS, RUB and FLAV, into the recombinant green opsin sequence, constructs were created that were up to 9-fold more stable than WT. Using cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), we developed a quick means of assessing the stability of the green pigment. CRALBP testing also confirmed a further 48-fold increase in pigment stability when varying the detergent used. These results suggest an efficient protocol for routine purification and stabilization of cone pigments that could be used for high-resolution determination of their structures as well as for other studies.

  2. Interior points of the completely positive cone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dür, Mirjam; Still, Georg J.

    2008-01-01

    A matrix A is called completely positive if it can be decomposed as A = BB^T with an entrywise nonnegative matrix B. The set of all such matrices is a convex cone. We provide a characterization of the interior of this cone as well as of its dual.

  3. A Practical Seedless Infrared Safe Cone Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, Gavin P.

    2007-01-01

    This writeup highlights the infrared unsafety of the "midpoint" cone jet-algorithm and provides a brief overview of why this is a serious issue. It then shows how one can build a safe (seedless) cone algorithm and discusses the potential impact on measurements.

  4. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  5. Cone calorimeter tests of wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; Kuma Sumathipala

    2013-01-01

    The cone calorimeter is widely used for the determination of the heat release rate (HRR) of building products and other materials. As part of an effort to increase the availability of cone calorimeter data on wood products, the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory and the American Wood Council conducted this study on composite wood products in cooperation with the Composite...

  6. Double Dirac cones in phononic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan

    2014-07-07

    A double Dirac cone is realized at the center of the Brillouin zone of a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC) consisting of a triangular array of core-shell-structure cylinders in water. The double Dirac cone is induced by the accidental degeneracy of two double-degenerate Bloch states. Using a perturbation method, we demonstrate that the double Dirac cone is composed of two identical and overlapping Dirac cones whose linear slopes can also be accurately predicted from the method. Because the double Dirac cone occurs at a relatively low frequency, a slab of the PC can be mapped onto a slab of zero refractive index material by using a standard retrieval method. Total transmission without phase change and energy tunneling at the double Dirac point frequency are unambiguously demonstrated by two examples. Potential applications can be expected in diverse fields such as acoustic wave manipulations and energy flow control.

  7. Mechanochemical regulation of growth cone motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C Kerstein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal growth cones are exquisite sensory-motor machines capable of transducing features contacted in their local extracellular environment into guided process extension during development. Extensive research has shown that chemical ligands activate cell surface receptors on growth cones leading to intracellular signals that direct cytoskeletal changes. However, the environment also provides mechanical support for growth cone adhesion and traction forces that stabilize leading edge protrusions. Interestingly, recent work suggests that both the mechanical properties of the environment and mechanical forces generated within growth cones influence axon guidance. In this review we discuss novel molecular mechanisms involved in growth cone force production and detection, and speculate how these processes may be necessary for the development of proper neuronal morphogenesis.

  8. Discovery of 2D Anisotropic Dirac Cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Baojie; Zhang, Jin; Ito, Suguru; Arita, Masashi; Cheng, Cai; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui; Komori, Fumio; Sugino, Osamu; Miyamoto, Koji; Okuda, Taichi; Meng, Sheng; Matsuda, Iwao

    2018-01-01

    2D anisotropic Dirac cones are observed in χ3 borophene, a monolayer boron sheet, using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The Dirac cones are centered at the X and X' points. The data also reveal that the hybridization between borophene and Ag(111) is very weak, which explains the preservation of the Dirac cones. As χ3 borophene has been predicated to be a superconductor, the results may stimulate further research interest in the novel physics of borophene, such as the interplay between Cooper pairs and the massless Dirac fermions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Correlation Between Cone Penetration Rate And Measured Cone Penetration Parameters In Silty Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2013-01-01

    penetration tests with varying penetration rates conducted at a test site where the subsoil primary consists of sandy silt. It is shown how a reduced penetration rate influences the cone penetration measurements e.g. the cone resistance, pore pressure, and sleeve friction.......This paper shows, how a change in cone penetration rate affects the cone penetration measurements, hence the cone resistance, pore pressure, and sleeve friction in silty soil. The standard rate of penetration is 20 mm/s, and it is generally accepted that undrained penetration occurs in clay while...... drained penetration occurs in sand. When lowering the penetration rate, the soil pore water starts to dissipate and a change in the drainage condition is seen. In intermediate soils such as silty soils, the standard cone penetration rate may result in a drainage condition that could be undrained...

  10. Metrizability of Cone Metric Spaces Via Renorming the Banach Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Soleimani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we show that by renorming an ordered Banach space, every cone $P$ can be converted to a normal cone with constant $K=1$ and consequently due to this approach every cone metric space is really a metric one and every theorem in metric space is valid for cone metric space automatically.

  11. Soft Cone Metric Spaces and Some Fixed Point Theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Altıntaş, İsmet; Taşköprü, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to soft cone metric spaces. We define the concept of soft cone metric via soft element, investigate soft converges in soft cone metric spaces and prove some fixed point theorems for contractive mappings on soft cone metric spaces.

  12. Evaluation of tilted cone-beam CT orbits in the development of a dedicated hybrid mammotomograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhav, P; Crotty, D J; Tornai, M P [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); McKinley, R L [Zumatek Incorporated, Chapel Hill, NC 27519 (United States)], E-mail: priti.madhav@duke.edu

    2009-06-21

    A compact dedicated 3D breast SPECT-CT (mammotomography) system is currently under development. In its initial prototype, the cone-beam CT sub-system is restricted to a fixed-tilt circular rotation around the patient's pendant breast. This study evaluated stationary-tilt angles for the CT sub-system that will enable maximal volumetric sampling and viewing of the breast and chest wall. Images of geometric/anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired using various fixed-tilt circular and 3D sinusoidal trajectories. The iteratively reconstructed images showed more distortion and attenuation coefficient inaccuracy from tilted cone-beam orbits than from the complex trajectory. Additionally, line profiles illustrated cupping artifacts in planes distal to the central plane of the tilted cone-beam, otherwise not apparent for images acquired with complex trajectories. This indicates that undersampled cone-beam data may be an additional cause of cupping artifacts. High-frequency objects could be distinguished for all trajectories, but their shapes and locations were corrupted by out-of-plane frequency information. Although more acrylic balls were visualized with a fixed-tilt and nearly flat cone-beam at the posterior of the breast, 3D complex trajectories have less distortion and more complete sampling throughout the reconstruction volume. While complex trajectories would ideally be preferred, negatively fixed-tilt source-detector configuration demonstrates minimally distorted patient images.

  13. Performance Analysis of Cone Detection Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Mariotti, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Many algorithms have been proposed to help clinicians evaluate cone density and spacing, as these may be related to the onset of retinal diseases. However, there has been no rigorous comparison of the performance of these algorithms. In addition, the performance of such algorithms is typically determined by comparison with human observers. Here we propose a technique to simulate realistic images of the cone mosaic. We use the simulated images to test the performance of two popular cone detection algorithms and we introduce an algorithm which is used by astronomers to detect stars in astronomical images. We use Free Response Operating Characteristic (FROC) curves to evaluate and compare the performance of the three algorithms. This allows us to optimize the performance of each algorithm. We observe that performance is significantly enhanced by up-sampling the images. We investigate the effect of noise and image quality on cone mosaic parameters estimated using the different algorithms, finding that the estimat...

  14. Cone-Parameter Convolution Semigroups and Their Subordination

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Jan; Sato, Ken-iti

    2003-01-01

    Convolution semigroups of probability measures with parameter in a cone in a Euclidean space generalize usual convolution semigroups with parameter in $[0,\\infty)$. A characterization of such semigroups is given and examples are studied. Subordination of cone-parameter convolution semigroups by cone-valued cone-parameter convolution semigroups is introduced. Its general description is given and inheritance properties are shown. In the study the distinction between cones with an...

  15. Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nathan Scott; Theiss, Susan Michelle; Harahush, Blake Kristin; Collin, Shaun Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Sharks are apex predators, and their evolutionary success is in part due to an impressive array of sensory systems, including vision. The eyes of sharks are well developed and function over a wide range of light levels. However, whilst close relatives of the sharks—the rays and chimaeras—are known to have the potential for colour vision, an evolutionary trait thought to provide distinct survival advantages, evidence for colour vision in sharks remains equivocal. Using single-receptor microspectrophotometry, we measured the absorbance spectra of visual pigments located in the retinal photoreceptors of 17 species of shark. We show that, while the spectral tuning of the rod (wavelength of maximum absorbance, λmax 484-518 nm) and cone (λmax 532-561 nm) visual pigments varies between species, each shark has only a single long-wavelength-sensitive cone type. This suggests that sharks may be cone monochromats and, therefore, potentially colour blind. Whilst cone monochromacy on land is rare, it may be a common strategy in the marine environment: many aquatic mammals (whales, dolphins and seals) also possess only a single, green-sensitive cone type. It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution. The spectral tuning of the rod and cone pigments of sharks is also discussed in relation to their visual ecology.

  16. Design of a trichromatic cone array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Garrigan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cones with peak sensitivity to light at long (L, medium (M and short (S wavelengths are unequal in number on the human retina: S cones are rare (<10% while increasing in fraction from center to periphery, and the L/M cone proportions are highly variable between individuals. What optical properties of the eye, and statistical properties of natural scenes, might drive this organization? We found that the spatial-chromatic structure of natural scenes was largely symmetric between the L, M and S sensitivity bands. Given this symmetry, short wavelength attenuation by ocular media gave L/M cones a modest signal-to-noise advantage, which was amplified, especially in the denser central retina, by long-wavelength accommodation of the lens. Meanwhile, total information represented by the cone mosaic remained relatively insensitive to L/M proportions. Thus, the observed cone array design along with a long-wavelength accommodated lens provides a selective advantage: it is maximally informative.

  17. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  18. XCone: N-jettiness as an exclusive cone jet algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Iain W. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Tackmann, Frank J. [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY),D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Thaler, Jesse [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Vermilion, Christopher K. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wilkason, Thomas F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-11-11

    We introduce a new jet algorithm called XCone, for eXclusive Cone, which is based on minimizing the event shape N-jettiness. Because N-jettiness partitions every event into N jet regions and a beam region, XCone is an exclusive jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets. We use a new “conical geometric” measure for which well-separated jets are bounded by circles of radius R in the rapidity-azimuth plane, while overlapping jet regions automatically form nearest-neighbor “clover jets”. This avoids the split/merge criteria needed in inclusive cone algorithms. A key feature of XCone is that it smoothly transitions between the resolved regime where the N signal jets of interest are well separated and the boosted regime where they overlap. The returned value of N-jettiness also provides a quality criterion of how N-jet-like the event looks. We also discuss the N-jettiness factorization theorems that occur for various jet measures, which can be used to compute the associated exclusive N-jet cross sections. In a companion paper http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.01518, the physics potential of XCone is demonstrated using the examples of dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs.

  19. XCone. N-jettiness as an Exclusive Cone Jet Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Iain W.; Thaler, Jesse; Wilkason, Thomas F. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Theoretical Physics; Tackmann, Frank J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Vermilion, Christopher K. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab.

    2015-08-15

    We introduce a new jet algorithm called XCone, for eXclusive Cone, which is based on minimizing the event shape N-jettiness. Because N-jettiness partitions every event into N jet regions and a beam region, XCone is an exclusive jet algorithm that always returns a fixed number of jets. We use a new ''conical geometric'' measure for which well-separated jets are bounded by circles of radius R in the rapidity-azimuth plane, while overlapping jet regions automatically form nearest-neighbor ''clover jets''. This avoids the split/merge criteria needed in inclusive cone algorithms. A key feature of XCone is that it smoothly transitions between the resolved regime where the N signal jets of interest are well separated and the boosted regime where they overlap. The returned value of N-jettiness also provides a quality criterion of how N-jet-like the event looks. We also discuss the N-jettiness factorization theorems that occur for various jet measures, which can be used to compute the associated exclusive N-jet cross sections. In a companion paper, the physics potential of XCone is demonstrated using the examples of dijet resonances, Higgs decays to bottom quarks, and all-hadronic top pairs.

  20. Clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual outcome in cone and cone-rod dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.; Phan, T.M.; Zekveld-Vroon, R.C.; Leroy, B.P.; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Klaver, C.C.; Writing Committee for the Cone Disorders Study Group, C.; Roosing, S.; Pott, J.W.; van Schooneveld, M.J.; van Moll-Ramirez, N.; van Genderen, M.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Hollander, A.I. den; Bergen, A.A.; De Baere, E.; Cremers, F.P.; Lotery, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  1. Clinical Course, Genetic Etiology, and Visual Outcome in Cone and Cone-Rod Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, Alberta A. H. J.; Phan, T. My Lan; Zekveld-Vroon, Renate C.; Leroy, Bart P.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Roosing, Susanne; Pott, Jan-Willem R.; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; van Moll-Ramirez, Norka; van Genderen, Maria M.; Boon, Camiel J. F.; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; De Baere, Elfride; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Lotery, Andrew J.

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical course, genetic etiology, and visual prognosis in patients with cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD). Design: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. Participants: Consecutive probands with CD (N = 98), CRD (N = 83), and affected relatives (N =

  2. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  3. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    OpenAIRE

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating...

  4. Turning cones off: the role of the 9-methyl group of retinal in red cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Maureen E; Ala-Laurila, Petri; Crouch, Rosalie K; Cornwall, M Carter

    2006-12-01

    Our ability to see in bright light depends critically on the rapid rate at which cone photoreceptors detect and adapt to changes in illumination. This is achieved, in part, by their rapid response termination. In this study, we investigate the hypothesis that this rapid termination of the response in red cones is dependent on interactions between the 9-methyl group of retinal and red cone opsin, which are required for timely metarhodopsin (Meta) II decay. We used single-cell electrical recordings of flash responses to assess the kinetics of response termination and to calculate guanylyl cyclase (GC) rates in salamander red cones containing native visual pigment as well as visual pigment regenerated with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal, an analogue of retinal in which the 9-methyl group is missing. After exposure to bright light that photoactivated more than approximately 0.2% of the pigment, red cones containing the analogue pigment had a slower recovery of both flash response amplitudes and GC rates (up to 10 times slower at high bleaches) than red cones containing 11-cis retinal. This finding is consistent with previously published biochemical data demonstrating that red cone opsin regenerated in vitro with 11-cis 9-demethyl retinal exhibited prolonged activation as a result of slowed Meta II decay. Our results suggest that two different mechanisms regulate the recovery of responsiveness in red cones after exposure to light. We propose a model in which the response recovery in red cones can be regulated (particularly at high light intensities) by the Meta II decay rate if that rate has been inhibited. In red cones, the interaction of the 9-methyl group of retinal with opsin promotes efficient Meta II decay and, thus, the rapid rate of recovery.

  5. Minimally Invasive Spinal Surgery with Intraoperative Image-Guided Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrence T. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our perioperative minimally invasive spine surgery technique using intraoperative computed tomography image-guided navigation for the treatment of various lumbar spine pathologies. We present an illustrative case of a patient undergoing minimally invasive percutaneous posterior spinal fusion assisted by the O-arm system with navigation. We discuss the literature and the advantages of the technique over fluoroscopic imaging methods: lower occupational radiation exposure for operative room personnel, reduced need for postoperative imaging, and decreased revision rates. Most importantly, we demonstrate that use of intraoperative cone beam CT image-guided navigation has been reported to increase accuracy.

  6. Correlates of minimal dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leck, Kira

    2006-10-01

    Researchers have associated minimal dating with numerous factors. The present author tested shyness, introversion, physical attractiveness, performance evaluation, anxiety, social skill, social self-esteem, and loneliness to determine the nature of their relationships with 2 measures of self-reported minimal dating in a sample of 175 college students. For women, shyness, introversion, physical attractiveness, self-rated anxiety, social self-esteem, and loneliness correlated with 1 or both measures of minimal dating. For men, physical attractiveness, observer-rated social skill, social self-esteem, and loneliness correlated with 1 or both measures of minimal dating. The patterns of relationships were not identical for the 2 indicators of minimal dating, indicating the possibility that minimal dating is not a single construct as researchers previously believed. The present author discussed implications and suggestions for future researchers.

  7. Minimally invasive orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Kaban, Leonard B; Troulis, Maria J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is defined as the discipline in which operative procedures are performed in novel ways to diminish the sequelae of standard surgical dissections. The goals of minimally invasive surgery are to reduce tissue trauma and to minimize bleeding, edema, and injury, thereby improving the rate and quality of healing. In orthognathic surgery, there are two minimally invasive techniques that can be used separately or in combination: (1) endoscopic exposure and (2) distraction osteogenesis. This article describes the historical developments of the fields of orthognathic surgery and minimally invasive surgery, as well as the integration of the two disciplines. Indications, techniques, and the most current outcome data for specific minimally invasive orthognathic surgical procedures are presented.

  8. Minimal Super Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antola, M.; Di Chiara, S.; Sannino, F.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce novel extensions of the Standard Model featuring a supersymmetric technicolor sector (supertechnicolor). As the first minimal conformal supertechnicolor model we consider N=4 Super Yang-Mills which breaks to N=1 via the electroweak interactions. This is a well defined, economical......, between unparticle physics and Minimal Walking Technicolor. We consider also other N =1 extensions of the Minimal Walking Technicolor model. The new models allow all the standard model matter fields to acquire a mass....

  9. Interrelationships Between 3 Keratoconic Cone Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Kyaw L; Tourkmani, Abdo K; Srinivas, Singaram

    2017-09-01

    To find out the interrelationships between 3 parameters of the keratoconic cone. A total of 101 keratoconic eyes of 58 patients were included in this retrospective case series study. A complete eye examination was performed. Kmax (K) and pachymetry at the thinnest point (T) were obtained from the Pentacam tomographer. The vertex to thinnest pachymetry distance (D for decentration) was calculated using trigonometry. Pearson correlation coefficients between T and D, between T and K, and between D and K were calculated. There is a statistically significant positive correlation between thinnest point pachymetry and decentration (R = 0.366, P = 0.0002) and also statistically significant negative correlation between thinnest point pachymetry and Kmax (R = -0.719, P < 0.00001) and decentration and Kmax (R = -0.281, P = 0.0044). The interrelationships between the 3 keratoconic cone parameters suggest that the thinner cones are largely central, that is, decenter less, but show greater steepening.

  10. Hygroscopic motions of fossil conifer cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Simon; Nestle, Nikolaus; Šandor, Andrea; Reible, Bruno; Masselter, Tom; Bruchmann, Bernd; Speck, Thomas

    2017-01-11

    Conifer cones represent natural, woody compliant structures which move their scales as passive responses to changes in environmental humidity. Here we report on water-driven opening and closing motions in coalified conifer cones from the Eemian Interglacial (approx. 126,000-113,000 years BP) and from the Middle Miocene (approx. 16.5 to 11.5 million years BP). These cones represent by far the oldest documented evidence of plant parts showing full functionality of such passive hydraulically actuated motion. The functional resilience of these structures is far beyond the biological purpose of seed dispersal and protection and is because of a low level of mineralization of the fossils. Our analysis emphasizes the functional-morphological integrity of these biological compliant mechanisms which, in addition to their biological fascination, are potentially also role models for resilient and maintenance-free biomimetic applications (e.g., adaptive and autonomously moving structures including passive hydraulic actuators).

  11. Tantalum Cones in Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric G; Patel, Nirav K; Chughtai, Morad; Elmallah, Randa D K; Delanois, Ronald E; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    The best strategy to address large bony defects in revision total knee arthroplasty has yet to be determined. The relatively recent development of porous tantalum cones and their use to address massive bone loss in knee arthroplasty has shown promising short- and intermediate-term results. The purpose of this review is to present the current literature on: (1) basic science of porous tantalum, (2) classification and treatment for bone loss, (3) clinical results, and (4) evolution of newer generation cones. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. ACCRETION OF SUPERSONIC WINDS ONTO BLACK HOLES IN 3D: STABILITY OF THE SHOCK CONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gracia-Linares, M.; Guzmán, F. S. [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo. Edificio C-3, Cd. Universitaria, 58040 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2015-10-10

    Using numerical simulations we present the accretion of supersonic winds onto a rotating black hole in three dimensions. We study five representative directions of the wind with respect to the axis of rotation of the black hole and focus on the evolution and stability of the high-density shock cone that is formed during the process. We explore both the regime in which the shock cone is expected to be stable in order to confirm previous results obtained with two-dimensional simulations, and the regime in which the shock cone is expected to show a flip–flop (FF) type of instability. The methods used to attempt a triggering of the instability were (i) the accumulation of numerical errors and (ii) the explicit application of a perturbation on the velocity field after the shock cone was formed. The result is negative, that is, we did not find the FF instability within the parameter space we explored, including cases that are expected to be unstable.

  13. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromatopsia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Komáromy, András M; Alexander, John J; Rowlan, Jessica S; Garcia, Monique M; Chiodo, Vince A; Kaya, Asli; Tanaka, Jacqueline C; Acland, Gregory M; Hauswirth, William W; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2010-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that rAAV-mediated gene replacement therapy with different forms of the human red cone opsin promoter led to the restoration of cone function and day vision in two canine models...

  14. Minimizing Mutual Couping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed herein are techniques, systems, and methods relating to minimizing mutual coupling between a first antenna and a second antenna.......Disclosed herein are techniques, systems, and methods relating to minimizing mutual coupling between a first antenna and a second antenna....

  15. Minimally invasive lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin T; Holly, Langston T; Schwender, James D

    2003-08-01

    Review article. To provide an overview of current techniques for minimally invasive lumbar fusion. Minimally invasive techniques have revolutionized the management of pathologic conditions in various surgical disciplines. Although these same principles have been used in the treatment of lumbar disc disease for many years, minimally invasive lumbar fusion procedures have only recently been developed. The goals of these procedures are to reduce the approach-related morbidity associated with traditional lumbar fusion, yet allow the surgery to be performed in an effective and safe manner. The authors' clinical experience with minimally invasive lumbar fusion was reviewed, and the pertinent literature was surveyed. Minimally invasive approaches have been developed for common lumbar procedures such as anterior and posterior interbody fusion, posterolateral onlay fusion, and internal fixation. As with all new surgical techniques, minimally invasive lumbar fusion has a learning curve. As well, there are benefits and disadvantages associated with each technique. However, because these techniques are new and evolving, evidence to support their potential benefits is largely anecdotal. Additionally, there are few long-term studies to document clinical outcomes. Preliminary clinical results suggest that minimally invasive lumbar fusion will have a beneficial impact on the care of patients with spinal disorders. Outcome studies with long-term follow-up will be necessary to validate its success and allow minimally invasive lumbar fusion to become more widely accepted.

  16. Closed graph and open mapping theorems for normed cones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A quasi-normed cone is a pair (, ) such that is a (not necessarily cancellative) cone and is a quasi-norm on . The aim of this paper is to prove a closed graph and an open mapping type theorem for quasi-normed cones. This is done with the help of appropriate notions of completeness, continuity and openness that ...

  17. Cones and craters on Mount Pavagadh, Deccan Traps: Rootless ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rootless cones, also (erroneously) called pseudocraters, form due to explosions that ensue when a lava flow enters a surface water body, ice, or wet ground. They do not represent primary vents connected by vertical conduits to a subsurface magma source. Rootless cones in Iceland are well studied. Cones on Mars ...

  18. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferreira, Amanda de Freitas; Henriques, João César Guimarães; Almeida, Guilherme Araújo; Machado, Asbel Rodrigues; Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio

    2009-01-01

    ...) and maximum intercuspation (MI), using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method). The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion...

  19. Hyperkahler cones and orthogonal Wolf spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anguelova, L.K.; Rocek, M.; Vandoren, S.

    2002-01-01

    We construct the hyperk¨ahler cones corresponding to the quaternion-K¨ahler orthogonal Wolf spaces SO(n+4)/ SO(n)×SO(4) and their non-compact versions, which appear in hypermultiplet couplings to N = 2 supergravity. The geometry is completely encoded by a single function, the hyperk¨ahler

  20. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  1. Analog Experiment for rootless cone eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, R.; Hamada, A.; Suzuki, A.; Kurita, K.

    2017-09-01

    Rootless cone is a unique geomorphological landmark to specify igneous origin of investigated terrane, which is formed by magma-water interaction. To understand its formation mechanism we conducted analog experiment for heat-induced vesiculation by using hot syrup and sodium bicarbonate solution.

  2. Lagrangian duality and cone convexlike functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.G. Frenk (Hans); G. Kassay

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we will show that the closely K-convexlike vector-valued functions with K Rm a nonempty convex cone and related classes of vector-valued functions discussed in the literature arise naturally within the theory of biconjugate functions applied to the Lagrangian perturbation

  3. Effects of the Cone and Edge on the Acoustic Characteristics of a Cone Loudspeaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Loudspeakers are designed for reproducing the original sound field as faithfully as possible. In order to faithfully reproduce sound, it is important to understand the relationships among the physical characteristics of the loudspeaker. This paper focuses on the cone, the edge, and the behavior of air around the voice coil, which are important elements in the design of cone loudspeakers and evaluates their effects on the acoustic characteristics of the loudspeaker.

  4. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langnau, Alex [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  5. Genetic heterogeneity among blue-cone monochromats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathans, J.; Maumenee, I.H.; Zrenner, E.; Sadowski, B.; Sharpe, L.T.; Lewis, R.A.; Hansen, E.; Rosenberg, T.; Schwartz, M.; Heckenlively, J.R.; Traboulsi, E.; Klingaman, R.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; LaRoche, G.R.; Pagon, R.A.; Murphey, W.H.; Weleber, R.G.

    1993-11-01

    Thirty-three unrelated subjects with blue-cone monochromacy or closely related variants of blue-cone monochromacy were examined for rearrangements in the tandem array of genes encoding the red- and green-cone pigments. In 24 subjects, eight genotypes were found that would be predicted to eliminate the function of all of the genes within the array. As observed in an earlier study, the rearrangements involve either deletion of a locus control region adjacent to the gene array or loss of function via homologous recombination and point mutation. One inactivating mutation, Cy[sup 203]-to-Arg, was found in 15 probands who carry single genes and in both visual pigment genes in one subject whose array has two genes. This mutation was also found in at least one of the visual pigment genes in one subject whose array has multiple genes and in 2 of 321 control subjects, suggesting that preexisting Cys[sup 203]-to-Arg mutations constitute a reservoir of chromosomes that are predisposed to generate blue-cone-monochromat genotypes by unequal homologous recombination and/or gene conversion. Two other point mutations were identified: (a) Arg[sup 247]-to-Ter in one subject with a single red-pigment gene and (b) Pro[sup 307]-to-Leu in one subject with a single 5[prime] red-3[prime] green hybrid gene. The observed heterogeneity of genotypes points to the existence of multiple one- and two-step mutational pathways to blue-cone monochromacy. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  7. Minimalism. Clip and Save.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Provides background information on the art movement called "Minimalism" discussing why it started and its characteristics. Includes learning activities and information on the artist, Donald Judd. Includes a reproduction of one of his art works and discusses its content. (CMK)

  8. On multivalued contractions in cone metric spaces without normality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Jamshaid

    2013-01-01

    Wardowski (2011) in this paper for a normal cone metric space (X, d) and for the family A of subsets of X established a new cone metric H : A × A → E and obtained fixed point of set-valued contraction of Nadler type. Further, it is noticed in the work of Janković et al., 2011 that the fixed-point problem in the setting of cone metric spaces is appropriate only in the case when the underlying cone is nonnormal. In the present paper we improve Wardowski's result by proving the same without the assumption of normality on cones.

  9. Stable canonical rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iemhoff, R.; Bezhanishvili, N.; Bezhanishvili, Guram

    2016-01-01

    We introduce stable canonical rules and prove that each normal modal multi-conclusion consequence relation is axiomatizable by stable canonical rules. We apply these results to construct finite refutation patterns for modal formulas, and prove that each normal modal logic is axiomatizable by stable

  10. Stable canonical rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezhanishvili, G.; Bezhanishvili, N.; Iemhoff, R.

    We introduce stable canonical rules and prove that each normal modal multi-conclusion consequence relation is axiomatizable by stable canonical rules. We apply these results to construct finite refutation patterns for modal formulas, and prove that each normal modal logic is axiomatizable by stable

  11. A new Dirac cone material: a graphene-like Be3C2 monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yuan, Shijun; Li, Yunhai; Shi, Li; Wang, Jinlan

    2017-05-04

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials with Dirac cones exhibit rich physics and many intriguing properties, but the search for new 2D Dirac materials is still a current hotspot. Using the global particle-swarm optimization method and density functional theory, we predict a new stable graphene-like 2D Dirac material: a Be3C2 monolayer with a hexagonal honeycomb structure. The Dirac point occurs exactly at the Fermi level and arises from the merging of the hybridized pz bands of Be and C atoms. Most interestingly, this monolayer exhibits a high Fermi velocity in the same order of graphene. Moreover, the Dirac cone is very robust and retains even included spin-orbit coupling or external strain. These outstanding properties render the Be3C2 monolayer a promising 2D material for special electronics applications.

  12. Long-term rescue of cone photoreceptor degeneration in retinitis pigmentosa 2 (RP2)-knockout mice by gene replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, Suddhasil; Hiriyanna, Suja; Kaneshiro, Kayleigh; Li, Linjing; Li, Yichao; Li, Wei; Qian, Haohua; Li, Tiansen; Khanna, Hemant; Colosi, Peter; Swaroop, Anand; Wu, Zhijian

    2015-11-15

    Retinal neurodegenerative diseases are especially attractive targets for gene replacement therapy, which appears to be clinically effective for several monogenic diseases. X-linked forms of retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) are relatively severe blinding disorders, resulting from progressive photoreceptor dysfunction primarily caused by mutations in RPGR or RP2 gene. With a goal to develop gene therapy for the XLRP-RP2 disease, we first performed detailed characterization of the Rp2-knockout (Rp2-KO) mice and observed early-onset cone dysfunction, which was followed by progressive cone degeneration, mimicking cone vision impairment in XLRP patients. The mice also exhibited distinct and significantly delayed falling phase of photopic b-wave of electroretinogram (ERG). Concurrently, we generated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying human RP2-coding sequence and demonstrated its ability to mediate stable RP2 protein expression in mouse photoreceptors. A long-term efficacy study was then conducted in Rp2-KO mice following AAV-RP2 vector administration. Preservation of cone function was achieved with a wide dose range over 18-month duration, as evidenced by photopic ERG and optomotor tests. The slower b-wave kinetics was also completely restored. Morphologically, the treatment preserved cone viability, corrected mis-trafficking of M-cone opsin and restored cone PDE6 expression. The therapeutic effect was achieved even in mice that received treatment at an advanced disease stage. The highest AAV-RP2 dose group demonstrated retinal toxicity, highlighting the importance of careful vector dosing in designing future human trials. The wide range of effective dose, a broad treatment window and long-lasting therapeutic effects should make the RP2 gene therapy attractive for clinical development. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. 3D dictionary learning based iterative cone beam CT reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti Bai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work is to develop a 3D dictionary learning based cone beam CT (CBCT reconstruction algorithm on graphic processing units (GPU to improve the quality of sparse-view CBCT reconstruction with high efficiency. Methods: A 3D dictionary containing 256 small volumes (atoms of 3 × 3 × 3 was trained from a large number of blocks extracted from a high quality volume image. On the basis, we utilized cholesky decomposition based orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to find the sparse representation of each block. To accelerate the time-consuming sparse coding in the 3D case, we implemented the sparse coding in a parallel fashion by taking advantage of the tremendous computational power of GPU. Conjugate gradient least square algorithm was adopted to minimize the data fidelity term. Evaluations are performed based on a head-neck patient case. FDK reconstruction with full dataset of 364 projections is used as the reference. We compared the proposed 3D dictionary learning based method with tight frame (TF by performing reconstructions on a subset data of 121 projections. Results: Compared to TF based CBCT reconstruction that shows good overall performance, our experiments indicated that 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction is able to recover finer structures, remove more streaking artifacts and also induce less blocky artifacts. Conclusion: 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is able to sense the structural information while suppress the noise, and hence to achieve high quality reconstruction under the case of sparse view. The GPU realization of the whole algorithm offers a significant efficiency enhancement, making this algorithm more feasible for potential clinical application.-------------------------------Cite this article as: Bai T, Yan H, Shi F, Jia X, Lou Y, Xu Q, Jiang S, Mou X. 3D dictionary learning based iterative cone beam CT reconstruction. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020240. DOI: 10

  14. Evaluation of the OSC-TV iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam optical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matenine, Dmitri; Mascolo-Fortin, Julia; Goussard, Yves; Després, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The present work evaluates an iterative reconstruction approach, namely, the ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm with regularization via total variation (TV) minimization in the field of cone-beam optical computed tomography (optical CT). One of the uses of optical CT is gel-based 3D dosimetry for radiation therapy, where it is employed to map dose distributions in radiosensitive gels. Model-based iterative reconstruction may improve optical CT image quality and contribute to a wider use of optical CT in clinical gel dosimetry. This algorithm was evaluated using experimental data acquired by a cone-beam optical CT system, as well as complementary numerical simulations. A fast GPU implementation of OSC-TV was used to achieve reconstruction times comparable to those of conventional filtered backprojection. Images obtained via OSC-TV were compared with the corresponding filtered backprojections. Spatial resolution and uniformity phantoms were scanned and respective reconstructions were subject to evaluation of the modulation transfer function, image uniformity, and accuracy. The artifacts due to refraction and total signal loss from opaque objects were also studied. The cone-beam optical CT data reconstructions showed that OSC-TV outperforms filtered backprojection in terms of image quality, thanks to a model-based simulation of the photon attenuation process. It was shown to significantly improve the image spatial resolution and reduce image noise. The accuracy of the estimation of linear attenuation coefficients remained similar to that obtained via filtered backprojection. Certain image artifacts due to opaque objects were reduced. Nevertheless, the common artifact due to the gel container walls could not be eliminated. The use of iterative reconstruction improves cone-beam optical CT image quality in many ways. The comparisons between OSC-TV and filtered backprojection presented in this paper demonstrate that OSC-TV can potentially improve the rendering of

  15. Dual energy approach for cone beam artifacts correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chulhee; Choi, Shinkook; Lee, Changwoo; Baek, Jongduk

    2017-03-01

    Cone beam computed tomography systems generate 3D volumetric images, which provide further morphological information compared to radiography and tomosynthesis systems. However, reconstructed images by FDK algorithm contain cone beam artifacts when a cone angle is large. To reduce the cone beam artifacts, two-pass algorithm has been proposed. The two-pass algorithm considers the cone beam artifacts are mainly caused by high density materials, and proposes an effective method to estimate error images (i.e., cone beam artifacts images) by the high density materials. While this approach is simple and effective with a small cone angle (i.e., 5 - 7 degree), the correction performance is degraded as the cone angle increases. In this work, we propose a new method to reduce the cone beam artifacts using a dual energy technique. The basic idea of the proposed method is to estimate the error images generated by the high density materials more reliably. To do this, projection data of the high density materials are extracted from dual energy CT projection data using a material decomposition technique, and then reconstructed by iterative reconstruction using total-variation regularization. The reconstructed high density materials are used to estimate the error images from the original FDK images. The performance of the proposed method is compared with the two-pass algorithm using root mean square errors. The results show that the proposed method reduces the cone beam artifacts more effectively, especially with a large cone angle.

  16. Cone damage in patients receiving high-dose irofulven treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael S; Gupta, Nisha; Penson, Richard T; Loewenstein, John; Wepner, Meredith S; Seiden, Michael V; Milam, Ann H

    2005-01-01

    To describe the clinical, perimetric, and electroretinographic (ERG) results of 4 patients with cone dysfunction following irofulven treatment including the histopathologic and immunocytochemical features of one patient's retinas. Observational case series. The patients were examined clinically, including perimetric and ERG evaluations. Eyes from patient 1 and healthy postmortem eyes were processed for histopathologic and immunocytochemistry studies with antibodies specific for cones, rods, and reactive Müller cells. Clinical signs and symptoms, perimetry, ERG, retinal histopathologic and immunocytochemistry study results. All 4 patients had ERG changes consistent with abnormal cone responses and relatively normal rod responses. Compared with control eyes, the retina of patient 1 had approximately half the normal numbers of macular cones and fewer peripheral cones. The number of rods were normal but all rod and cone outer segments were shortened. High-dose irofulven treatment causes cone-specific damage with relative sparing of rods.

  17. Effect of pulse voltage amplitude on electrohydrodynamic cone jetting behavior of non particle nano Ag conductive ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Bo; Zuo, Chuncheng; Lu, Yebo; Huang, Fengli; Tang, Chengli

    2017-04-01

    Non particle nano Ag conductive ink is a promising material for the patterning of flexible circuits by using the electrohydrodynamic micro printing technology. The pulse voltage control mold has been mainly used in the on demand droplet control in the patterning process. In this paper, the effect of pulse voltage amplitude on cone jetting behavior of this ink in one pulse period has been investigated by using the sequential images technology. Results indicated that under the same base direct current voltage applied on the nozzle, the pulse voltage applied on the substrate induced pulsant cone jetting rather than stable cone jetting in a pulse period if the value is under a critical value. When the voltage amplitude above this critical value was used, the stable cone jetting was obtained for each ejection. The increasing voltage amplitude resulted in the shortening of jetting starting time and also the ending time, and the jetting duration was decreased with the increasing of pulse voltage amplitude. Therefore, the jetting volume can be adjusted by adjusting the applied voltage amplitude. In addition, the profile evolution of the meniscus as the effect of pulse voltage has also been analysed by using a special designed analysis soft ware.

  18. Dirac cones in two-dimensional borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Canales, Miguel; Galeev, Timur R.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.; Pickard, Chris J.

    2017-11-01

    We introduce two-dimensional borane, a single-layered material of BH stoichiometry, with promising electronic properties. We show that, according to density functional theory calculations, two-dimensional borane is semimetallic, with two symmetry-related Dirac cones meeting right at the Fermi energy Ef. The curvature of the cones is lower than in graphene, thus closer to the ideal linear dispersion. Its structure, formed by a puckered trigonal boron network with hydrogen atoms connected to each boron atom, can be understood as distorted, hydrogenated borophene [Mannix et al., Science 350, 1513 (2015), 10.1126/science.aad1080]. Chemical bonding analysis reveals the boron layer in the network being bound by delocalized four-center two-electron σ bonds. Finally, we suggest high pressure could be a feasible route to synthesize two-dimensional borane.

  19. Lessons from the light-cone box

    CERN Document Server

    Leibbrandt, G

    2000-01-01

    Working in the noncovariant light-cone gauge, we discuss the explicit computation of the 1PI four-point function ("box diagram") in Yang- Mills theory. The complete box diagram which consists of 16 box subdiagrams, 8 lynx subdiagrams and 4 fish subdiagrams, yields both local and nonlocal UV divergent terms. The nonlocal terms are consistent with gauge symmetry and correspond to a nonlocal renormalization of the wave function. (14 refs).

  20. Minimalism and Speakers’ Intuitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Gariazzo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Minimalism proposes a semantics that does not account for speakers’ intuitions about the truth conditions of a range of sentences or utterances. Thus, a challenge for this view is to offer an explanation of how its assignment of semantic contents to these sentences is grounded in their use. Such an account was mainly offered by Soames, but also suggested by Cappelen and Lepore. The article criticizes this explanation by presenting four kinds of counterexamples to it, and arrives at the conclusion that minimalism has not successfully answered the above-mentioned challenge.

  1. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Mads Toudal

    2007-01-01

    I report on our construction and analysis of the effective low energy Lagrangian for the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are constrained by imposing modified Weinberg sum rules and by imposing a value for the S parameter estimated from the under......I report on our construction and analysis of the effective low energy Lagrangian for the Minimal Walking Technicolor (MWT) model. The parameters of the effective Lagrangian are constrained by imposing modified Weinberg sum rules and by imposing a value for the S parameter estimated from...

  2. Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cone/Cone-Rod Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Akio; Oishi, Maho; Ogino, Ken; Morooka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa and cone/cone-rod dystrophy are inherited retinal diseases characterized by the progressive loss of rod and/or cone photoreceptors. To evaluate the status of rod/cone photoreceptors and visual function, visual acuity and visual field tests, electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography are typically used. In addition to these examinations, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) has recently garnered attention. FAF visualizes the intrinsic fluorescent material in the retina, which is mainly lipofuscin contained within the retinal pigment epithelium. While conventional devices offer limited viewing angles in FAF, the recently developed Optos machine enables recording of wide-field FAF. With wide-field analysis, an association between abnormal FAF areas and visual function was demonstrated in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. In addition, the presence of "patchy" hypoautofluorescent areas was found to be correlated with symptom duration. Although physicians should be cautious when interpreting wide-field FAF results because the peripheral parts of the image are magnified significantly, this examination method provides previously unavailable information.

  3. The NLO jet vertex in the small-cone approximation for kt and cone algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colferai, D.; Niccoli, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze and INFN, Sezione di Firenze, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    We determine the jet vertex for Mueller-Navelet jets and forward jets in the small-cone approximation for two particular choices of jet algoritms: the kt algorithm and the cone algorithm. These choices are motivated by the extensive use of such algorithms in the phenomenology of jets. The differences with the original calculations of the small-cone jet vertex by Ivanov and Papa, which is found to be equivalent to a formerly algorithm proposed by Furman, are shown at both analytic and numerical level, and turn out to be sizeable. A detailed numerical study of the error introduced by the small-cone approximation is also presented, for various observables of phenomenological interest. For values of the jet “radius” R=0.5, the use of the small-cone approximation amounts to an error of about 5% at the level of cross section, while it reduces to less than 2% for ratios of distributions such as those involved in the measure of the azimuthal decorrelation of dijets.

  4. A Coning Theory of Bullet Motions

    CERN Document Server

    Boatright, James A

    2012-01-01

    Each observable ballistic phenomenon of a spin-stabilized rifle bullet can be explained in terms of the acceleration of gravity and the total aerodynamic force acting on that bullet. In addition to the coning motion itself, Coning Theory explains the spinning bullet's aerodynamic jump and its steadily increasing yaw of repose together with its resulting spin-drift. The total aerodynamic force on the bullet comprises its drag and lift rectangular components and produces an associated overturning moment acting upon the rigid bullet. The coning motion of the bullet includes two distinct but synchronized aspects: 1) the well-known gyroscopic precession of the spin-axis of the bullet, and 2) the previously little-known orbiting of the center of gravity of the bullet around its mean trajectory with the nose of the bullet angled inward toward that trajectory. New equations are developed governing the orbital motion of the CG as a circular, isotropic harmonic oscillation driven by the lift and drag forces as they rev...

  5. Minimal theory of quasidilaton massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji; Oliosi, Michele

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a quasidilaton scalar field to the minimal theory of massive gravity with the Minkowski fiducial metric, in such a way that the quasidilaton global symmetry is maintained and that the theory admits a stable self-accelerating de Sitter solution. We start with a precursor theory that contains three propagating gravitational degrees of freedom without a quasidilaton scalar and introduce Stückelberg fields to covariantize its action. This makes it possible for us to formulate the quasidilaton global symmetry that mixes the Stückelberg fields and the quasidilaton scalar field. By the Hamiltonian analysis we confirm that the precursor theory with the quasidilaton scalar contains 4 degrees of freedom, three from the precursor massive gravity and one from the quasidilaton scalar. We further remove one propagating degree of freedom to construct the minimal quasidilaton theory with three propagating degrees of freedom, corresponding to two polarizations of gravitational waves from the minimal theory of massive gravity and one scalar from the quasidilaton field, by carefully introducing two additional constraints to the system in the Hamiltonian language. Switching to the Lagrangian language, we find self-accelerating de Sitter solutions in the minimal quasidilaton theory and analyze their stability. It is found that the self-accelerating de Sitter solution is stable in a wide range of parameters.

  6. Minimal DBM Substraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Alexandre; Håkansson, John; G. Larsen, Kim

    In this paper we present an algorithm to compute DBM substractions with a guaranteed minimal number of splits and disjoint DBMs to avoid any redundance. The substraction is one of the few operations that result in a non-convex zone, and thus, requires splitting. It is of prime importance to reduce...

  7. Minimal constrained supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cribiori, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Dall' Agata, G., E-mail: dallagat@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Farakos, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”, Università di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Porrati, M. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    We describe minimal supergravity models where supersymmetry is non-linearly realized via constrained superfields. We show that the resulting actions differ from the so called “de Sitter” supergravities because we consider constraints eliminating directly the auxiliary fields of the gravity multiplet.

  8. Minimally invasive periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannan, Aous

    2011-10-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that preserves dentition and supporting structures. However, minimally invasive procedures in periodontal treatment are supposed to be limited within periodontal surgery, the aim of which is to represent alternative approaches developed to allow less extensive manipulation of surrounding tissues than conventional procedures, while accomplishing the same objectives. In this review, the concept of minimally invasive periodontal surgery (MIPS) is firstly explained. An electronic search for all studies regarding efficacy and effectiveness of MIPS between 2001 and 2009 was conducted. For this purpose, suitable key words from Medical Subject Headings on PubMed were used to extract the required studies. All studies are demonstrated and important results are concluded. Preliminary data from case cohorts and from many studies reveal that the microsurgical access flap, in terms of MIPS, has a high potential to seal the healing wound from the contaminated oral environment by achieving and maintaining primary closure. Soft tissues are mostly preserved and minimal gingival recession is observed, an important feature to meet the demands of the patient and the clinician in the esthetic zone. However, although the potential efficacy of MIPS in the treatment of deep intrabony defects has been proved, larger studies are required to confirm and extend the reported positive preliminary outcomes.

  9. Minimal constrained supergravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cribiori

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe minimal supergravity models where supersymmetry is non-linearly realized via constrained superfields. We show that the resulting actions differ from the so called “de Sitter” supergravities because we consider constraints eliminating directly the auxiliary fields of the gravity multiplet.

  10. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads Toudal; A. Ryttov, T.

    2007-01-01

    , pseudoscalars, vector mesons and other fields predicted by the minimal walking theory. We construct their self-interactions and interactions with standard model fields. Using the Weinberg sum rules, opportunely modified to take into account the walking behavior of the underlying gauge theory, we find...

  11. INVERSE STABLE SUBORDINATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M; Straka, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The inverse stable subordinator provides a probability model for time-fractional differential equations, and leads to explicit solution formulae. This paper reviews properties of the inverse stable subordinator, and applications to a variety of problems in mathematics and physics. Several different governing equations for the inverse stable subordinator have been proposed in the literature. This paper also shows how these equations can be reconciled.

  12. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  13. INVERSE STABLE SUBORDINATORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; STRAKA, PETER

    2013-01-01

    The inverse stable subordinator provides a probability model for time-fractional differential equations, and leads to explicit solution formulae. This paper reviews properties of the inverse stable subordinator, and applications to a variety of problems in mathematics and physics. Several different governing equations for the inverse stable subordinator have been proposed in the literature. This paper also shows how these equations can be reconciled. PMID:25045216

  14. Collective effects in tilted Weyl cones: Optical conductivity, polarization, and Coulomb interactions reshaping the cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detassis, Fabrizio; Fritz, Lars; Grubinskas, Simonas

    2017-11-01

    Recently, the existence of Dirac/Weyl cones in three-dimensional systems has been demonstrated experimentally. While in high-energy physics the isotropy of the Dirac/Weyl cones is guaranteed by relativistic invariance, in condensed-matter systems corrections to this can occur, with one possible type being a tilt. In this paper, we study the effect of tilted Weyl cones in collective effects. We study both the optical conductivity as well as the polarization function. We also investigate the perturbative effect of long-range Coulomb interactions using a renormalization-group calculation. We find that the tilt is perturbatively renormalized towards zero and at low energies the system flows to an effectively untilted theory.

  15. Tantalum cones and bone defects in revision total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, F; Putman, S; Arnould, A; Dereudre, G; Migaud, H; Pasquier, G

    2015-04-01

    Management of bone loss is a major challenge in revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The development of preformed porous tantalum cones offers new possibilities, because they seem to have biological and mechanical qualities that facilitate osseointegration. Compared to the original procedure, when metaphyseal bone defects are too severe, a single tantalum cone may not be enough and we have developed a technique that could extend the indications for this cone in these cases. We used 2 cones to fill femoral bone defects in 7 patients. There were no complications due to wear of the tantalum cones. Radiological follow-up did show any migration or loosening. The short-term results confirm the interest of porous tantalum cones and suggest that they can be an alternative to allografts or megaprostheses in case of massive bone defects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Transformation of a Taylor cone into a frustum upon discharge in viscous dielectric liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, A. M.; Yavtushenko, I. O.; Rynkova, O. G.

    2017-07-01

    The specifics of behavior of viscous electrolytes (exemplified by glycerol) subjected to spark discharges with direct connection of electrodes and in the induced charge mode have been studied. The transformation of a Taylor cone into a frustum, the stable existence of which depends on the polarization time, has been observed for the first time with cyclic discharges in the interelectrode space localized between an anodepolarizable viscous dielectric liquid (glycerol) and an overhanging cathode-polarizable metal electrode. The frustum development criteria (high dynamic viscosity and electric strength of the solution and low conductivity) have been determined.

  17. Neuronavigation in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ziev B; Mayer, Rory R; Strickland, Benjamin A; Kretzer, Ryan M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Baaj, Ali A

    2013-08-01

    Parallel advancements in image guidance technology and minimal access techniques continue to push the frontiers of minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). While traditional intraoperative imaging remains widely used, newer platforms, such as 3D-fluoroscopy, cone-beam CT, and intraoperative CT/MRI, have enabled safer, more accurate instrumentation placement with less radiation exposure to the surgeon. The goal of this work is to provide a review of the current uses of advanced image guidance in MISS. The authors searched PubMed for relevant articles concerning MISS, with particular attention to the use of image-guidance platforms. Pertinent studies published in English were further compiled and characterized into relevant analyses of MISS of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbosacral regions. Fifty-two studies were included for review. These describe the use of the iso-C system for 3D navigation during C1-2 transarticular screw placement, the use of endoscopic techniques in the cervical spine, and the role of navigation guidance at the occipital-cervical junction. The authors discuss the evolving literature concerning neuronavigation during pedicle screw placement in the thoracic and lumbar spine in the setting of infection, trauma, and deformity surgery and review the use of image guidance in transsacral approaches. Refinements in image-guidance technologies and minimal access techniques have converged on spinal pathology, affording patients the ability to undergo safe, accurate operations without the associated morbidities of conventional approaches. While percutaneous transpedicular screw placement is among the most common procedures to benefit from navigation, other areas of spine surgery can benefit from advances in neuronavigation and further growth in the field of image-guided MISS is anticipated.

  18. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  19. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  20. Minimal Composite Inflation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Channuie, Phongpichit; Jark Joergensen, Jakob; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We investigate models in which the inflaton emerges as a composite field of a four dimensional, strongly interacting and nonsupersymmetric gauge theory featuring purely fermionic matter. We show that it is possible to obtain successful inflation via non-minimal coupling to gravity, and that the u......We investigate models in which the inflaton emerges as a composite field of a four dimensional, strongly interacting and nonsupersymmetric gauge theory featuring purely fermionic matter. We show that it is possible to obtain successful inflation via non-minimal coupling to gravity......, and that the underlying dynamics is preferred to be near conformal. We discover that the compositeness scale of inflation is of the order of the grand unified energy scale....

  1. Minimally symmetric Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, Ian

    2015-06-01

    Models addressing the naturalness of a light Higgs boson typically employ symmetries, either bosonic or fermionic, to stabilize the Higgs mass. We consider a setup with the minimal amount of symmetries: four shift symmetries acting on the four components of the Higgs doublet, subject to the constraints of linearly realized SU(2)(L) x U(1)(Y) electroweak symmetry. Up to terms that explicitly violate the shift symmetries, the effective Lagrangian can be derived, irrespective of the spontaneously broken group G in the ultraviolet, and is universal among all models where the Higgs arises as a pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson. Very high energy scatterings of vector bosons could provide smoking gun signals of a minimally symmetric Higgs boson.

  2. The Shape of Color: Retinal Cones and Spectral Dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Medeiros, John A.; Medeiros, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Why are the retinal color receptors cone-shaped? This is not a trivial question: the cone shape is evidently a universal feature of the color receptors while the achromatic rod receptors are always rod-shaped. What might be behind this dichotomy has not previously been explored in any meaningful way. We suggest here that the cone shape is not an incidental feature, but actually integral to cone function. We describe a waveguide mode cut-off effect that can physically separate light into its s...

  3. Ion beam focusing with cone optics for WDM experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Jun, E-mail: jun.hasegawa@es.titech.ac.jp [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan); Kondo, Kotaro; Oguri, Yoshiyuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Horioka, Kazuhiko [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

    2014-01-01

    Beam focusing properties of cone optics were systematically investigated by Monte Carlo simulations under various combinations of beam and cone parameters. To optimize the cone optic design for accelerator-driven WDM experiments, the beam intensity gains after cone focusing were evaluated from the simulation results as functions of cone wall material and shape parameters such as taper angle and wall curvature. The uniformity of the cone-focused beam was also examined by considering not only various cone parameters but also the cases involving the misalignment of the cone optic. From the results, a parabolic gold cone was found to be the best choice at least for relatively light ions such as lithium having MeV energies. It is also found that although smaller taper angle improves the total beam transport efficiency in the optic, it brings more difficulties in the alignment of the optic because the alignment accuracy should be less than a half of the taper angle to obtain acceptable uniformity in the beam energy deposition on the target.

  4. The geometry of the flux cone of a metabolic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Clemens; Urbanczik, Robert

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of metabolic networks has become a major topic in biotechnology in recent years. Applications range from the enhanced production of selected outputs to the prediction of genotype-phenotype relationships. The concepts used are based on the assumption of a pseudo steady-state of the network, so that for each metabolite inputs and outputs are balanced. The stoichiometric network analysis expands the steady state into a combination of nonredundant subnetworks with positive coefficients called extremal currents. Based on the unidirectional representation of the system these subnetworks form a convex cone in the flux-space. A modification of this approach allowing for reversible reactions led to the definition of elementary modes. Extreme pathways are obtained with the same method but splitting up internal reactions into forward and backward rates. In this study, we explore the relationship between these concepts. Due to the combinatorial explosion of the number of elementary modes in large networks, we promote a further set of metabolic routes, which we call the minimal generating set. It is the smallest subset of elementary modes required to describe all steady states of the system. For large-scale networks, the size of this set is of several magnitudes smaller than that of elementary modes and of extreme pathways.

  5. Value of cone-beam computed tomography in the process of diagnosis and management of disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, E W J; Dijkstra, P U; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G M; Spijkervet, F K L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images in the primary diagnosis and management of 128 outpatients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Before a diagnosis was made and treatment planned, the history was taken, physical examination made, and the orthopantomogram studied. After assessment of the cone-beam CT, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon (specialist or resident) was allowed to revise the provisional primary diagnosis and management. The degree of certainty was rated by the clinician before and after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. The primary diagnosis was changed in 32 patients (25%), additional diagnostic procedures were changed in 57 (45%), and the treatment was changed in 15 (12%) (in 4 the treatment was changed to a (minimally) invasive procedure). A total of 74 patients (58%) had their diagnosis and management changed after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. Changes in diagnosis and management were clinically relevant in 9/32 and 9/61 patients, respectively. The clinician's certainty about the primary diagnosis increased after the cone-beam CT had been assessed in 57 patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds in favour of changes in primary diagnosis and management increased when limited mandibular function was a primary symptom, the patient was taking medication for pain, and the articular eminence could not be assessed on OPT. Assessment of cone-beam CT led to changes in primary diagnosis and management in more than half the patients with disorders of the TMJ. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cone visual pigments of aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Lucy A; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2005-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that the visual systems of animals are evolutionarily adapted to their visual environment. The entrance many millions of years ago of mammals into the sea gave these new aquatic mammals completely novel visual surroundings with respect to light availability and predominant wavelengths. This study examines the cone opsins of marine mammals, hypothesizing, based on previous studies [Fasick et al. (1998) and Levenson & Dizon (2003)], that the deep-dwelling marine mammals would not have color vision because the pressure to maintain color vision in the dark monochromatic ocean environment has been relaxed. Short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes from two orders (Cetacea and Sirenia) and an additional suborder (Pinnipedia) of aquatic mammals were amplified from genomic DNA (for SWS) and cDNA (for LWS) by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. All animals studied from the order Cetacea have SWS pseudogenes, whereas a representative from the order Sirenia has an intact SWS gene, for which the corresponding mRNA was found in the retina. One of the pinnipeds studied (harp seal) has an SWS pseudogene, while another species (harbor seal) appeared to have an intact SWS gene. However, no SWS cone opsin mRNA was found in the harbor seal retina, suggesting a promoter or splice site mutation preventing transcription of the gene. The LWS opsins from the different species were expressed in mammalian cells and reconstituted with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in order to determine maximal absorption wavelengths (lambda(max)) for each. The deeper dwelling Cetacean species had blue shifted lambda(max) values compared to shallower-dwelling aquatic species. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that in the monochromatic oceanic habitat, the pressure to maintain color vision has been relaxed and mutations are retained in the SWS genes, resulting in pseudogenes. Additionally, LWS opsins are retained in the

  7. Radappertization of minimally processed carrots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walder, Juliana F.A.; Walder, Julio M.M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: juwalder@gmail.com; jmwalder@cena.usp.br; Souza, Miriam C. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mcsouza@unimep.br; Spoto, Marta H.F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ)]. E-mail: mhfspoto@esalq.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Full text: The goal of this work was to obtain shelf-stable irradiated carrots. It was evaluate the effect of high-doses (radappertization) of gamma radiation (Cobalt-60) on minimally processed carrots cv. Nantes. Before irradiation carrots were blanched, vacuum packaged in polyethylene film (52 {mu}m) and frozen (-80 deg C) prior to and during radiation processing. Used doses were 10, 20 and 30 kGy. After irradiation the carrot bags were kept at room conditions (25 - 28 deg C and RH 60-80 %) for 90 days period. Physical-chemical characteristics and microorganism population were determined at 1, 30 60 and 90 days after radiation process. Radappertization decreased total soluble solids (TSS), hardness and color. Radiation was responsible for reduction of 15,5% of total carotenoids content. By the other hand the storage period was responsible for 35 % losses. pH was not affected by radiation nor by storage period. Complete sterilization was achieved with doses of 20 kGy and 30 kGy. Radappertization affected negatively the sensorial characteristics of flavor, color and general appearance. Through sensorial analysis was possible to evaluate that polyethylene seal was inadequate for the purpose because allowed photo-chemical reactions in the carrots during the storage period. The metallized film kept best appearance of the irradiated carrots after 90 days storage. (author)

  8. Development and Degeneration of Cone Bipolar Cells Are Independent of Cone Photoreceptors in a Mouse Model of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao; Wang, Ke; Lin, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Retinal photoreceptors die during retinal synaptogenesis in a portion of retinal degeneration. Whether cone bipolar cells establish regular retinal mosaics and mature morphologies, and resist degeneration are not completely understood. To explore these issues, we backcrossed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in one subset of cone bipolar cells (type 7) into rd1 mice, a classic mouse model of retinal degeneration, to examine the development and survival of cone bipolar cells in a background of retinal degeneration. Our data revealed that both the development and degeneration of cone bipolar cells are independent of the normal activity of cone photoreceptors. We found that type 7 cone bipolar cells achieved a uniform tiling of the retinal surface and developed normal dendritic and axonal arbors without the influence of cone photoreceptor innervation. On the other hand, degeneration of type 7 cone bipolar cells, contrary to our belief of central-to-peripheral progression, was spatially uniform across the retina independent of the spatiotemporal pattern of cone degeneration. The results have important implications for the design of more effective therapies to restore vision in retinal degeneration. PMID:22952865

  9. Development and degeneration of cone bipolar cells are independent of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Chen

    Full Text Available Retinal photoreceptors die during retinal synaptogenesis in a portion of retinal degeneration. Whether cone bipolar cells establish regular retinal mosaics and mature morphologies, and resist degeneration are not completely understood. To explore these issues, we backcrossed a transgenic mouse expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP in one subset of cone bipolar cells (type 7 into rd1 mice, a classic mouse model of retinal degeneration, to examine the development and survival of cone bipolar cells in a background of retinal degeneration. Our data revealed that both the development and degeneration of cone bipolar cells are independent of the normal activity of cone photoreceptors. We found that type 7 cone bipolar cells achieved a uniform tiling of the retinal surface and developed normal dendritic and axonal arbors without the influence of cone photoreceptor innervation. On the other hand, degeneration of type 7 cone bipolar cells, contrary to our belief of central-to-peripheral progression, was spatially uniform across the retina independent of the spatiotemporal pattern of cone degeneration. The results have important implications for the design of more effective therapies to restore vision in retinal degeneration.

  10. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  11. Stable Allocation Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Baïou, Mourad; Balinski, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The stable allocation problem is the generalization of the well-known and much studied stable (0,1)-matching problems to the allocation of real numbers (hours or quantities). There are two distinct sets of agents, a set I of "employees" or "buyers" and a set J of "employers" or "sellers", each agent with preferences over the opposite set and each with a given available time or quantity. In common with its specializations, and allocation problem may have exponentially many stable solutions (th...

  12. Cone beam optical computed tomography for gel dosimetry I: scanner characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L John, E-mail: tim.olding@krcc.on.c [Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-05-21

    The ongoing development of easily accessible, fast optical readout tools promises to remove one of the barriers to acceptance of gel dosimetry as a viable tool in cancer clinics. This paper describes the characterization of a number of basic properties of the Vista(TM) cone beam CCD-based optical scanner, which can obtain high resolution reconstructed data in less than 20 min total imaging and reconstruction time. The suitability of a filtered back projection cone beam reconstruction algorithm is established for optically absorbing dosimeters using this scanner configuration. The system was then shown to be capable of imaging an optically absorbing media-filled 1 L polyethylene terephthalate (PETE) jar dosimeter to a reconstructed voxel resolution of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}. At this resolution, more than 60% of the imaged volume in the dosimeter exhibits minimal spatial distortion, a measurement accuracy of 3-4% and the mean to standard deviation signal-to-noise ratio greater than 100 over an optical absorption range of 0.06-0.18 cm{sup -1}. An inter-day scan precision of 1% was demonstrated near the upper end of this range. Absorption measurements show evidence of stray light perturbation causing artifacts in the data, which if better managed would improve the accuracy of optical readout. Cone beam optical attenuation measurements of scattering dosimeters, on the other hand, are nonlinearly affected by angled scatter stray light. Scatter perturbation leads to significant cupping artifacts and other inaccuracies that greatly limit the readout of scattering polymer gel dosimeters with cone beam optical CT.

  13. Minimally Invasive Parathyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee F. Starker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP is an operative approach for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT. Currently, routine use of improved preoperative localization studies, cervical block anesthesia in the conscious patient, and intraoperative parathyroid hormone analyses aid in guiding surgical therapy. MIP requires less surgical dissection causing decreased trauma to tissues, can be performed safely in the ambulatory setting, and is at least as effective as standard cervical exploration. This paper reviews advances in preoperative localization, anesthetic techniques, and intraoperative management of patients undergoing MIP for the treatment of pHPT.

  14. Minimally Actuated Serial Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Moshe P.; Damti, Lior; Zarrouk, David

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel type of serial robot with minimal actuation. The robot is a serial rigid structure consisting of multiple links connected by passive joints and of movable actuators. The novelty of this robot is that the actuators travel over the links to a given joint and adjust the relative angle between the two adjacent links. The joints passively preserve their angles until one of the actuators moves them again. This actuation can be applied to any serial robot with two o...

  15. The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in the rabbit retina selectively contacts blue cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Margaret A.; Gaul, Paulette A.

    2010-01-01

    The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in rabbit retina is a sparsely populated ON cone bipolar cell with a broad dendritic arbor that does not contact all cones in its dendritic field. The purpose of our study was to identify the cone types that this cell contacts. We identified the bipolar cells by selective uptake of biocytin, labeled the cones with peanut agglutinin and then used antibodies against blue cone opsin and red-green cone opsin to identify the individual cone types. The biocytin-labeled cells selectively contacted cones whose outer segments stained for blue cone opsin and avoided cones that did not. We conclude that the biocytin wide-field bipolar cell is an ON blue cone bipolar cell in the rabbit retina and is homologous to the blue cone bipolar cells that have been previously described in primate, mouse, and ground squirrel retinas. PMID:17990268

  16. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver [Department of Physics, Queen' s University (United Kingdom); Schreiner, L John [Medical Physics Department, Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Tim.Olding@krcc.on.ca

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  17. Insectos de cones y semillas de las coniferas de Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Cibrián-Tovar; Bernard H. Ebel; Harry O. Yates; José Tulio Mhdez-Montiel

    1986-01-01

    The hosts, description, damage, life cycle, habits, and importance of 54 known cone and seed destroying insects attacking Mexican conifer trees are discussed. Distribution maps and color photos are provided. New species described are three species of Cydia (seedworm), four species of Dioryctria (coneworm), and four species of cone...

  18. Integrity of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in oligocone trichromacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelides, Michel; Rha, Jungtae; Dees, Elise W

    2011-01-01

    Oligocone trichromacy (OT) is an unusual cone dysfunction syndrome characterized by reduced visual acuity, mild photophobia, reduced amplitude of the cone electroretinogram with normal rod responses, normal fundus appearance, and normal or near-normal color vision. It has been proposed...

  19. Advances in Valveless Piezoelectric Pump with Cone-shaped Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Ying; Huang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    This paper reviews the development of valveless piezoelectric pump with cone-shaped tube chronologically, which have widely potential application in biomedicine and micro-electro-mechanical systems because of its novel principles and deduces the research direction in the future. Firstly, the history of valveless piezoelectric pumps with cone-shaped tubes is reviewed and these pumps are classified into the following types: single pump with solid structure or plane structure, and combined pump with parallel structure or series structure. Furthermore, the function of each type of cone-shaped tubes and pump structures are analyzed, and new directions of potential expansion of valveless piezoelectric pumps with cone-shaped tubes are summarized and deduced. The historical argument, which is provided by the literatures, that for a valveless piezoelectric pump with cone-shaped tubes, cone angle determines the flow resistance and the flow resistance determines the flow direction. The argument is discussed in the reviewed pumps one by one, and proved to be convincing. Finally, it is deduced that bionics is pivotal in the development of valveless piezoelectric pump with cone-shaped tubes from the perspective of evolution of biological structure. This paper summarizes the current valveless piezoelectric pumps with cone-shaped tubes and points out the future development, which may provide guidance for the research of piezoelectric actuators.

  20. Semi-Empirical Method Interpretation of Cone Penetration Test (CPT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cone Penetration Test (CPT) is a reliable technique for measuring subsurface soil friction, cohesion and bearing capacity for pile foundation. In some parts of the ... The approach is suitable because of the insensitivity of the mechanical cone penetrometer in measuring skin friction, especially in clay deposits. Discovery and ...

  1. Individual differences provide psychophysical evidence for separate on- and off-pathways deriving from short-wave cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosten, Jenny M; Bargary, Gary; Goodbourn, Patrick T; Hogg, Ruth E; Lawrance-Owen, Adam J; Mollon, J D

    2014-04-01

    Distinct neural populations carry signals from short-wave (S) cones. We used individual differences to test whether two types of pathways, those that receive excitatory input (S+) and those that receive inhibitory input (S-), contribute independently to psychophysical performance. We also conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to look for genetic correlates of the individual differences. Our psychophysical test was based on the Cambridge Color Test, but detection thresholds were measured separately for S-cone spatial increments and decrements. Our participants were 1060 healthy adults aged 16-40. Test-retest reliabilities for thresholds were good (ρ=0.64 for S-cone increments, 0.67 for decrements and 0.73 for the average of the two). "Regression scores," isolating variability unique to incremental or decremental sensitivity, were also reliable (ρ=0.53 for increments and ρ=0.51 for decrements). The correlation between incremental and decremental thresholds was ρ=0.65. No genetic markers reached genome-wide significance (pindividual differences in S-cone sensitivity in a normal adult population. Though a portion of the variance in sensitivity is shared between incremental and decremental sensitivity, over 26% of the variance is stable across individuals, but unique to increments or decrements, suggesting distinct neural substrates. Some of the variability in sensitivity is likely to be genetic. We note that four of the suggestive associations found in the GWAS are with genes that are involved in glucose metabolism or have been associated with diabetes.

  2. Topologies on superspaces of TVS-cone metric spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xun; Lin, Shou

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates superspaces 0(X) and 0(X) of a tvs-cone metric space (X, d), where 0(X) and 0(X) are the space consisting of nonempty subsets of X and the space consisting of nonempty compact subsets of X, respectively. The purpose of this paper is to establish some relationships between the lower topology and the lower tvs-cone hemimetric topology (resp., the upper topology and the upper tvs-cone hemimetric topology to the Vietoris topology and the Hausdorff tvs-cone hemimetric topology) on 0(X) and 0(X), which makes it possible to generalize some results of superspaces from metric spaces to tvs-cone metric spaces.

  3. 'Parabolic' trapped modes and steered Dirac cones in platonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhedran, R C; Movchan, A B; Movchan, N V; Brun, M; Smith, M J A

    2015-05-08

    This paper discusses the properties of flexural waves governed by the biharmonic operator, and propagating in a thin plate pinned at doubly periodic sets of points. The emphases are on the design of dispersion surfaces having the Dirac cone topology, and on the related topic of trapped modes in plates for a finite set (cluster) of pinned points. The Dirac cone topologies we exhibit have at least two cones touching at a point in the reciprocal lattice, augmented by another band passing through the point. We show that these Dirac cones can be steered along symmetry lines in the Brillouin zone by varying the aspect ratio of rectangular lattices of pins, and that, as the cones are moved, the involved band surfaces tilt. We link Dirac points with a parabolic profile in their neighbourhood, and the characteristic of this parabolic profile decides the direction of propagation of the trapped mode in finite clusters.

  4. The cone penetration test in unsaturated silty sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little is known about how to interpret the cone penetration test (CPT when performed in unsaturated soils. The few published studies on the CPT in unsaturated soils have focused on either clean sands or a silt. In this study new results of laboratory-controlled CPTs in an unsaturated silty sand are presented. The silty sand exhibits hydraulic hysteresis and suction hardening. Suction is observed to have a pronounced affect on measured cone penetration resistance. For an isotropic net confining stress of 60 kPa it is observed that higher suctions give rise to cone penetration resistances that are 50% larger than those for lower suctions. A semi-theoretical correlation is presented that links measured cone penetration resistances to initial relative density and mean effective stress. For this silty sand it is shown that failing to account for suction may result in significant overestimations and unsafe predictions of soil properties from measured cone penetration resistances.

  5. Minimal Left-Right Symmetric Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeck, Julian; Patra, Sudhanwa

    2015-09-18

    We show that left-right symmetric models can easily accommodate stable TeV-scale dark matter particles without the need for an ad hoc stabilizing symmetry. The stability of a newly introduced multiplet either arises accidentally as in the minimal dark matter framework or comes courtesy of the remaining unbroken Z_{2} subgroup of B-L. Only one new parameter is introduced: the mass of the new multiplet. As minimal examples, we study left-right fermion triplets and quintuplets and show that they can form viable two-component dark matter. This approach is, in particular, valid for SU(2)×SU(2)×U(1) models that explain the recent diboson excess at ATLAS in terms of a new charged gauge boson of mass 2 TeV.

  6. Seed cone anatomy of Cheirolepidiaceae (Coniferales): reinterpreting Pararaucaria patagonica Wieland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escapa, Ignacio H; Rothwell, Gar W; Stockey, Ruth A; Cúneo, N Rubén

    2012-06-01

    Seed cone morphology and anatomy reflect some of the most important changes in the phylogeny and evolutionary biology of conifers. Reexamination of the enigmatic Jurassic seed cone Pararaucaria patagonica reveals previously unknown systematically informative characters that demonstrate affinities with the Cheirolepidiaceae. This paper documents, for the first time, internal anatomy for seed cones of this important extinct Mesozoic conifer family, which may represent the ghost lineage leading to modern Pinaceae. Morphology and anatomy of cones from the Jurassic La Matilde Formation in Patagonia are described from a combination of polished wafers and thin section preparations. New photographic techniques are employed to reveal histological details of thin sections in which organic cell wall remains are not preserved. Specific terminology for conifer seed cones is proposed to help clarify hypotheses of homology for the various structures of the cones. Specimens are demonstrated to have trilobed ovuliferous scale tips along with a seed enclosing pocket of ovuliferous scale tissue. Originally thought to represent a seed wing in P. patagonica, this pocket-forming tissue is comparable to the flap of tissue covering seeds of compressed cheirolepidiaceous cones and is probably the most diagnostic character for seed cones of the family. Pararaucaria patagonica is assigned to Cheirolepidiaceae, documenting anatomical features for seed cones of the family and providing evidence for the antiquity of pinoid conifers leading to the origin of Pinaceae. A list of key morphological and anatomical characters for seed cones of Cheirolepidiaceae is developed to facilitate assignment of a much broader range of fossil remains to the family. This confirms the presence of Cheirolepidiaceae in the Jurassic of the Southern Hemisphere, which was previously suspected from palynological records.

  7. Transanal Minimally Invasive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBeche-Adams, Teresa; Nassif, George

    2015-01-01

    Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was first described in 2010 as a crossover between single-incision laparoscopic surgery and transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) to allow access to the proximal and mid-rectum for resection of benign and early-stage malignant rectal lesions. The TAMIS technique can also be used for noncurative intent surgery of more advanced lesions in patients who are not candidates for radical surgery. Proper workup and staging should be done before surgical decision-making. In addition to the TAMIS port, instrumentation and set up include readily available equipment found in most operating suites. TAMIS has proven its usefulness in a wide range of applications outside of local excision, including repair of rectourethral fistula, removal of rectal foreign body, control of rectal hemorrhage, and as an adjunct in total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer. TAMIS is an easily accessible, technically feasible, and cost-effective alternative to TEM. PMID:26491410

  8. Minimally extended SILH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chala, Mikael [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica y IFIC; Durieux, Gauthier; Matsedonskyi, Oleksii [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Grojean, Christophe [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Lima, Leonardo de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. Estadual Paulista, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Teorica

    2017-03-15

    Higgs boson compositeness is a phenomenologically viable scenario addressing the hierarchy problem. In minimal models, the Higgs boson is the only degree of freedom of the strong sector below the strong interaction scale. We present here the simplest extension of such a framework with an additional composite spin-zero singlet. To this end, we adopt an effective field theory approach and develop a set of rules to estimate the size of the various operator coefficients, relating them to the parameters of the strong sector and its structural features. As a result, we obtain the patterns of new interactions affecting both the new singlet and the Higgs boson's physics. We identify the characteristics of the singlet field which cause its effects on Higgs physics to dominate over the ones inherited from the composite nature of the Higgs boson. Our effective field theory construction is supported by comparisons with explicit UV models.

  9. Minimal Reducts with Grasp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Iddaly Mendez Gurrola

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The proper detection of patient level of dementia is important to offer the suitable treatment. The diagnosis is based on certain criteria, reflected in the clinical examinations. From these examinations emerge the limitations and the degree in which each patient is in. In order to reduce the total of limitations to be evaluated, we used the rough set theory, this theory has been applied in areas of the artificial intelligence such as decision analysis, expert systems, knowledge discovery, classification with multiple attributes. In our case this theory is applied to find the minimal limitations set or reduct that generate the same classification that considering all the limitations, to fulfill this purpose we development an algorithm GRASP (Greedy Randomized Adaptive Search Procedure.

  10. Natural minimal dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fabbrichesi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We show how the Higgs boson mass is protected from the potentially large corrections due to the introduction of minimal dark matter if the new physics sector is made supersymmetric. The fermionic dark matter candidate (a 5-plet of $SU(2)_L$) is accompanied by a scalar state. The weak gauge sector is made supersymmetric and the Higgs boson is embedded in a supersymmetric multiplet. The remaining standard model states are non-supersymmetric. Non vanishing corrections to the Higgs boson mass only appear at three-loop level and the model is natural for dark matter masses up to 15 TeV--a value larger than the one required by the cosmological relic density. The construction presented stands as an example of a general approach to naturalness that solves the little hierarchy problem which arises when new physics is added beyond the standard model at an energy scale around 10 TeV.

  11. Biocytin wide-field bipolar cells in rabbit retina selectively contact blue cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, Margaret A; Gaul, Paulette A

    2008-01-01

    The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in rabbit retina has a broad axonal arbor in layer 5 of the inner plexiform layer and a wide dendritic arbor that does not contact all cones in its dendritic field. The purpose of our study was to identify the types of cones that this cell contacts. We identified the bipolar cells by selective uptake of biocytin, labeled the cones with peanut agglutinin, and then used antibodies against blue cone opsin and red-green cone opsin to identify the individual cone types. The biocytin-labeled cells selectively contacted cones whose outer segments stained for blue cone opsin and avoided cones that did not. We conclude that the biocytin wide-field bipolar cell is an ON blue cone bipolar cell in the rabbit retina and is homologous to the blue cone bipolar cells that have been previously described in primate, mouse, and ground squirrel retinas. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Cone beam computed tomography in endodontic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durack, Conor; Patel, Shanon, E-mail: conordurack1@hotmail.com [Unit of Endodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a contemporary, radiological imaging system designed specifically for use on the maxillofacial skeleton. The system overcomes many of the limitations of conventional radiography by producing undistorted, three-dimensional images of the area under examination. These properties make this form of imaging particularly suitable for use in endodontic. The clinician can obtain an enhanced appreciation of the anatomy being assessed, leading to an improvement in the detection of endodontic disease and resulting in more effective treatment planning. In addition, CBCT operates with a significantly lower effective radiation dose when compared with conventional computed tomography (CT). The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature relating to the limitations and potential applications of CBCT in endodontic practice. (author)

  13. Numerical Aspects of Cone Beam Contour Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Alfred K.

    2017-12-01

    We describe a method for directly calculating the contours of a function from cone beam data. The algorithm is based on a new inversion formula for the gradient of a function presented in Louis (Inverse Probl 32(11):115005, 2016. http://stacks.iop.org/0266-5611/32/i=11/a=115005). The Radon transform of the gradient is found by using a Grangeat type of formula, reducing the inversion problem to the inversion of the Radon transform. In that way the influence of the scanning curve, vital for all exact inversion formulas for complete data, is avoided Numerical results are presented for the circular scanning geometry which neither fulfills the Tuy-Kirillov condition nor the much weaker condition given by the author in Louis (Inverse Probl 32(11):115005, 2016. http://stacks.iop.org/0266-5611/32/i=11/a=115005).

  14. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  15. On stable Baire classes

    OpenAIRE

    Karlova, Olena; Mykhaylyuk, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and study adhesive spaces. Using this concept we obtain a characterization of stable Baire maps $f:X\\to Y$ of the class $\\alpha$ for wide classes of topological spaces. In particular, we prove that for a topological space $X$ and a contractible space $Y$ a map $f:X\\to Y$ belongs to the $n$'th stable Baire class if and only if there exist a sequence $(f_k)_{k=1}^\\infty$ of continuous maps $f_k:X\\to Y$ and a sequence $(F_k)_{k=1}^\\infty$ of functionally ambiguous sets of the $n$'th...

  16. Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Ground Pine Cone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Izanloo, S Nasseri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A study on the removal of cadmium ions from aqueous solutions by pine cone was conducted in batch conditions. Kinetic data and equilibrium removal isotherms were obtained. The influence of different experimental parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of cadmium, pine cone mass and particle size, and temperature on the kinetics of cadmium removal was studied. Results showed that the main parameters that played an important role in removal phenomenon were initial cadmium concentration, particle size and pine cone mass. The necessary time to reach equilibrium was between 4 and 7 hours based on the initial concentration of cadmium. The capacity of cadmium adsorption at equilibrium increased with the decrease of pine cone particle size. The capacity of cadmium adsorption at equilibrium by pine cone increased with the quantity of pine cone introduced (1–4 g/L. Temperature in the range of 20-30°C showed a restricted effect on the removal kinetics (13.56 mg/g at 20°C and a low capacity of adsorption about 11.48 mg/g at 30°C. The process followed pseudo second-order kinetics. The cadmium uptake of pine cone was quantitatively evaluated using adsorption isotherms. Results indicated that the Langmuir model gave a better fit to the experimental data in comparison with the Freundlich equation.

  17. Swarm robotics and minimalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Amanda J. C.

    2007-09-01

    Swarm Robotics (SR) is closely related to Swarm Intelligence, and both were initially inspired by studies of social insects. Their guiding principles are based on their biological inspiration and take the form of an emphasis on decentralized local control and communication. Earlier studies went a step further in emphasizing the use of simple reactive robots that only communicate indirectly through the environment. More recently SR studies have moved beyond these constraints to explore the use of non-reactive robots that communicate directly, and that can learn and represent their environment. There is no clear agreement in the literature about how far such extensions of the original principles could go. Should there be any limitations on the individual abilities of the robots used in SR studies? Should knowledge of the capabilities of social insects lead to constraints on the capabilities of individual robots in SR studies? There is a lack of explicit discussion of such questions, and researchers have adopted a variety of constraints for a variety of reasons. A simple taxonomy of swarm robotics is presented here with the aim of addressing and clarifying these questions. The taxonomy distinguishes subareas of SR based on the emphases and justifications for minimalism and individual simplicity.

  18. Minimal dilaton model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oda Kin-ya

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Both the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC have reported the observation of the particle of mass around 125 GeV which is consistent to the Standard Model (SM Higgs boson, but with an excess of events beyond the SM expectation in the diphoton decay channel at each of them. There still remains room for a logical possibility that we are not seeing the SM Higgs but something else. Here we introduce the minimal dilaton model in which the LHC signals are explained by an extra singlet scalar of the mass around 125 GeV that slightly mixes with the SM Higgs heavier than 600 GeV. When this scalar has a vacuum expectation value well beyond the electroweak scale, it can be identified as a linearly realized version of a dilaton field. Though the current experimental constraints from the Higgs search disfavors such a region, the singlet scalar model itself still provides a viable alternative to the SM Higgs in interpreting its search results.

  19. Minimal Higgs inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debaprasad Maity

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose minimal Higgs inflation scenarios by non-polynomial modification of the Higgs potential. The modification is done in such a way that it creates a flat plateau for a huge range of field values at the inflationary energy scale μ≃(λ1/4α. Assuming the perturbative Higgs quartic coupling, λ≃O(1, our model prediction for all the cosmologically relevant quantities, (ns,r,dnsk, fit extremely well with observations made by PLANCK. For both the models the inflation energy scale turned out to be μ≃(1014,1015 GeV. Considering observed central value of the scalar spectral index, ns=0.968, models predict efolding number, N=(52,47. Within a wide range of viable parameter space, we found that the prediction of tensor to scalar ratio r(≤10−5 is far below the current experimental limit. The prediction for the running of scalar spectral index, dnsk, remains very small. We also computed the background field dependent unitarity scale Λ(h, which turned out to be much larger than the aforementioned inflationary energy scale.

  20. Stable Unhappy Marriages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Tim B.; Albrecht, Stan L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined prevalence and determinants of stable unhappy marriage using data from national survey. Results indicated age, lack of prior marital experience, commitment to marriage as an institution, low social activity, lack of control over one's life, and belief that divorce would detract from happiness were all predictive of stability in unhappy…

  1. The stable subgroup graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Tolue

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we introduce stable subgroup graph associated to the group $G$. It is a graph with vertex set all subgroups of $G$ and two distinct subgroups $H_1$ and $H_2$ are adjacent if $St_{G}(H_1\\cap H_2\

  2. Cofinal stable logics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezhanishvili, G.; Bezhanishvili, N.; Ilin, J.

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the (∧,∨)-canonical formulas to (∧,∨)-canonical rules, and prove that each intuitionistic multi-conclusion consequence relation is axiomatizable by (∧,∨)-canonical rules. This yields a convenient characterization of stable superintuitionistic logics. The (∧,∨)-canonical formulas are

  3. The phase-space analysis of scalar fields with non-minimally derivative coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yumei [Beijing Normal University, Department of Astronomy, Beijing (China); Gao, Qing; Gong, Yungui [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, MOE Key Laboratory of Fundamental Quantities Measurement, School of Physics, Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2015-04-01

    We perform a dynamical analysis for the exponential scalar field with non-minimally derivative coupling. For the quintessence case, the stable fixed points are the same with and without the non-minimally derivative coupling. For the phantom case, the attractor with dark energy domination exists for the minimal coupling only. For the non-minimally derivative coupling without the standard canonical kinetic term, only the de Sitter attractor exists, and the dark matter solution is unstable. (orig.)

  4. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  5. Light-cone averaging in cosmology: formalism and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari, Italy, (Italy); Marozzi, G.; Veneziano, G. [Collège de France, 11 Place M. Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France); Nugier, F., E-mail: gasperini@ba.infn.it, E-mail: giovanni.marozzi@college-de-france.fr, E-mail: fabien.nugier@lpt.ens.fr, E-mail: gabriele.veneziano@cern.ch [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de l' École Normale Supérieure, CNRS UMR 8549, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2011-07-01

    We present a general gauge invariant formalism for defining cosmological averages that are relevant for observations based on light-like signals. Such averages involve either null hypersurfaces corresponding to a family of past light-cones or compact surfaces given by their intersection with timelike hypersurfaces. Generalized Buchert-Ehlers commutation rules for derivatives of these light-cone averages are given. After introducing some adapted ''geodesic light-cone'' coordinates, we give explicit expressions for averaging the redshift to luminosity-distance relation and the so-called ''redshift drift'' in a generic inhomogeneous Universe.

  6. Estimating the Number of Stable Configurations for the Generalized Thomson Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calef, Matthew; Griffiths, Whitney; Schulz, Alexia

    2015-07-01

    Given a natural number , one may ask what configuration of points on the two-sphere minimizes the discrete generalized Coulomb energy. If one applies a gradient-based numerical optimization to this problem, one encounters many configurations that are stable but not globally minimal. This led the authors of this manuscript to the question, how many stable configurations are there? In this manuscript we report methods for identifying and counting observed stable configurations, and estimating the actual number of stable configurations. These estimates indicate that for approaching two hundred, there are at least tens of thousands of stable configurations.

  7. Minimal order observers for linear functions of the state vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinathkumar, S.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of estimating linear functions of a state vector in a multi-input/output system is considered. A simple lower bound on the observer order with arbitrary eigenvalues is established. Algorithms to construct minimal-order stable (or arbitrary dynamics) observers are also outlined.

  8. The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in the rabbit retina selectively contacts blue cones

    OpenAIRE

    MacNeil, Margaret A.; Gaul, Paulette A.

    2008-01-01

    The biocytin wide-field bipolar cell in rabbit retina is a sparsely populated ON cone bipolar cell with a broad dendritic arbor that does not contact all cones in its dendritic field. The purpose of our study was to identify the cone types that this cell contacts. We identified the bipolar cells by selective uptake of biocytin, labeled the cones with peanut agglutinin and then used antibodies against blue cone opsin and red-green cone opsin to identify the individual cone types. The biocytin-...

  9. Optimization of Cone Beam CT Reconstruction Algorithm Based on CUDA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang Li-Fang; Zhang Shu-Hai

    2013-01-01

    .... This paper optimizes cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm by CUDA and improves the speed of weighted back-projection and filtering, and shortens the data access time by using the texture memory...

  10. Testing the reliability of ice-cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zonghao; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Chuanbing; Liu, Kai; Xue, Xianghui; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2015-04-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CME)'s properties are important to not only the physical scene itself but space-weather prediction. Several models (such as cone model, GCS model, and so on) have been raised to get rid of the projection effects within the properties observed by spacecraft. According to SOHO/ LASCO observations, we obtain the 'real' 3D parameters of all the FFHCMEs (front-side full halo Coronal Mass Ejections) within the 24th solar cycle till July 2012, by the ice-cream cone model. Considering that the method to obtain 3D parameters from the CME observations by multi-satellite and multi-angle has higher accuracy, we use the GCS model to obtain the real propagation parameters of these CMEs in 3D space and compare the results with which by ice-cream cone model. Then we could discuss the reliability of the ice-cream cone model.

  11. New fixed and periodic point results on cone metric spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soleimani Rad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, several xed point theorems for T-contraction of two maps on cone metric spaces under normality condition are proved. Obtained results extend and generalize well-known comparable results in the literature.

  12. CNGA3 Mutations in Hereditary Cone Photoreceptor Disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wissinger, Bernd; Gamer, Daphne; Jägle, Herbert; Giorda, Roberto; Marx, Tim; Mayer, Simone; Tippmann, Sabine; Broghammer, Martina; Jurklies, Bernhard; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jacobson, Samuel G; Sener, E. Cumhur; Tatlipinar, Sinan; Hoyng, Carel B; Castellan, Claudio; Bitoun, Pierre; Andreasson, Sten; Rudolph, Günter; Kellner, Ulrich; Lorenz, Birgit; Wolff, Gerhard; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Schwartz, Marianne; Cremers, Frans P.M; Apfelstedt-Sylla, Eckart; Zrenner, Eberhart; Salati, Roberto; Sharpe, Lindsay T; Kohl, Susanne

    2001-01-01

    We recently showed that mutations in the CNGA3 gene encoding the alpha-subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel cause autosomal recessive complete achromatopsia linked to chromosome 2q11...

  13. Does the Dirac cone of germanene exist on metal substrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Li, Jingzhen; Xiong, Junhua; Pan, Yuanyuan; Ye, Meng; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Han; Quhe, Ruge; Lu, Jing

    2016-07-28

    Germanene, a germanium analogue of graphene and silicene, has been synthesized on metal substrates. It is predicted that the intrinsic germanene has a Dirac cone in its band structure, just like graphene and silicene. Using first-principles calculations, we investigate the geometrical structures and electronic properties of germanene on the Ag, Au, Cu, Al, Pt and Ir substrates. The Dirac cone of germanene is destroyed on the Al, Pt and Ir substrates but preserved on the Ag and Au substrates with a slight band hybridization. The upper part of the Dirac cone is destroyed for germanene on the Cu substrate while the lower part remains preserved. By contrast, the Dirac cone is always destroyed for silicene on these metal substrates because of a strong band hybridization. Our study suggests that it is possible to extract the intrinsic properties of germanene on the Ag and Au substrates although it appears impossible for silicene on these two substrates.

  14. Syndecan Promotes Axon Regeneration by Stabilizing Growth Cone Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyson J. Edwards

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Growth cones facilitate the repair of nervous system damage by providing the driving force for axon regeneration. Using single-neuron laser axotomy and in vivo time-lapse imaging, we show that syndecan, a heparan sulfate (HS proteoglycan, is required for growth cone function during axon regeneration in C. elegans. In the absence of syndecan, regenerating growth cones form but are unstable and collapse, decreasing the effective growth rate and impeding regrowth to target cells. We provide evidence that syndecan has two distinct functions during axon regeneration: (1 a canonical function in axon guidance that requires expression outside the nervous system and depends on HS chains and (2 an intrinsic function in growth cone stabilization that is mediated by the syndecan core protein, independently of HS. Thus, syndecan is a regulator of a critical choke point in nervous system repair.

  15. Microhabitats within Venomous Cone Snails Contain Diverse Actinobacteria▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraud, Olivier; Biggs, Jason S.; Hughen, Ronald W.; Light, Alan R.; Concepcion, Gisela P.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Schmidt, Eric W.

    2009-01-01

    Actinomycetes can be symbionts in diverse organisms, including both plants and animals. Some actinomycetes benefit their host by producing small molecule secondary metabolites; the resulting symbioses are often developmentally complex. Actinomycetes associated with three cone snails were studied. Cone snails are venomous tropical marine gastropods which have been extensively examined because of their production of peptide-based neurological toxins, but no microbiological studies have been reported on these organisms. A microhabitat approach was used in which dissected tissue from each snail was treated as an individual sample in order to explore bacteria in the tissues separately. Our results revealed a diverse, novel, and highly culturable cone snail-associated actinomycete community, with some isolates showing promising bioactivity in a neurological assay. This suggests that cone snails may represent an underexplored reservoir of novel actinomycetes of potential interest for drug discovery. PMID:19749071

  16. Determination of the Resistance of Cone-Shaped Solid Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Koch, Søren

    2017-01-01

    during processing can be avoided. Newman's formula for current constriction in the electrolyte is then used to deduce the active contact area based on the ohmic resistance of the cell, and from this the surface specific electro-catalytic activity. However, for electrode materials with low electrical...... conductivity (like Ce1-xPrxO2-δ), the resistance of the cell is significantly influenced by the ohmic resistance of the cone electrode, wherefore it must be included. In this work the ohmic resistance of a cone is modelled analytically based on simplified geometries. The two analytical models only differ...... by a model specific pre-factor, which is consequently determined by a finite element model. The model was applied to measurements on cones of Ce1-xPrxO2-δ  characterized on an YSZ electrolyte. Conclusively, the finite element model was used to obtain a formula for the resistance for different cone angles...

  17. Fractional quantum Hall states of bosons on cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying-Hai; Tu, Hong-Hao; Sreejith, G. J.

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment, which synthesizes Landau levels for photons on cones [Schine et al., Nature (London) 534, 671 (2016), 10.1038/nature17943], and more generally the interest in understanding gravitational responses of quantum Hall states, we study fractional quantum Hall states of bosons on cones. A variety of trial wave functions for conical systems are constructed and compared with exact diagonalization results. The tip of a cone is a localized geometrical defect with singular curvature, which can modify the density profiles of quantum Hall states. The density profiles on cones can be used to extract some universal information about quantum Hall states. The values of certain quantities are computed numerically using the density profiles of some quantum Hall states and they agree with analytical predictions.

  18. Stable Hybrid Adaptive Control,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    STABLE HYBRID ADAPTIVE CONTROL(U) YALE UNIV NEW HAVEN i/i CT CENTER FOR SYSTEMS SCIENCE K S NARENDRA ET AL. JUL 82 8286 Ne@04-76-C-8e7 UNCLASSIFIED...teasrallepsaaw1tflbe~ll b ydd Il"t 5 As is the comtanuous Case cistral to the stability analysis of the hybrid ~IVt* COnRol PO* IMare the sur Models

  19. Direct energy functional minimization under orthogonality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Valéry; VandeVondele, Joost; Hutter, Jürg; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2008-02-01

    The direct energy functional minimization problem in electronic structure theory, where the single-particle orbitals are optimized under the constraint of orthogonality, is explored. We present an orbital transformation based on an efficient expansion of the inverse factorization of the overlap matrix that keeps orbitals orthonormal. The orbital transformation maps the orthogonality constrained energy functional to an approximate unconstrained functional, which is correct to some order in a neighborhood of an orthogonal but approximate solution. A conjugate gradient scheme can then be used to find the ground state orbitals from the minimization of a sequence of transformed unconstrained electronic energy functionals. The technique provides an efficient, robust, and numerically stable approach to direct total energy minimization in first principles electronic structure theory based on tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or density functional theory. For sparse problems, where both the orbitals and the effective single-particle Hamiltonians have sparse matrix representations, the effort scales linearly with the number of basis functions N in each iteration. For problems where only the overlap and Hamiltonian matrices are sparse the computational cost scales as O(M2N ), where M is the number of occupied orbitals. We report a single point density functional energy calculation of a DNA decamer hydrated with 4003 water molecules under periodic boundary conditions. The DNA fragment containing a cis-syn thymine dimer is composed of 634 atoms and the whole system contains a total of 12 661 atoms and 103 333 spherical Gaussian basis functions.

  20. Weather effects on the success of longleaf pine cone crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Leduc; Shi-Jean Susana Sung; Dale G. Brockway; Mary Anne Sword Sayer

    2016-01-01

    We used National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration weather data and historical records of cone crops from across the South to relate weather conditions to the yield of cones in 10 longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) stands. Seed development in this species occurs over a three-year time period and weather conditions during any part of this...

  1. Effectiveness of different antimicrobial agents in disinfection of guttapercha cones

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Meléndez, Alexander; Escuela de Pregrado de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos; Ramos-Perfecto, Donald; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of various antimicrobial agents in disinfection of gutta-percha, was the aim of the study. Methodology: 40 cones were cultivated in Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) culture medium at 37 ° C for 24 hours to see if there was bacterial growth. These same cones were divided into five groups to be introduced in the antimicrobial solutions: 2% chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide 3% sodium hypochlorite 2.5% ethyl alcohol 70% and 10% povidone iodine for a time immersi...

  2. Scattering of wedges and cones with impedance boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lyalinov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    This book is a systematic and detailed exposition of different analytical techniques used in studying two of the canonical problems, the wave scattering by wedges or cones with impedance boundary conditions. It is the first reference on novel, highly efficient analytical-numerical approaches for wave diffraction by impedance wedges or cones. The applicability of the reported solution procedures and formulae to existing software packages designed for real-world high-frequency problems encountered in antenna, wave propagation, and radar cross section.

  3. Cinder cones of Mount Slamet, Central Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igan S. SutawIdjaja

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.vol4no1.20096The Mount Slamet volcanic field in Central Java, Indonesia, contains thirty five cinder cones within an area of 90 sq. km in the east flank of the volcano. The cinder cones occur singly or in small groups, with diameter of the base ranges from 130 - 750 m and the height is around 250 m. Within the volcanic field, the cinder cones are spread over the volcanic area at the distance of 4 to 14 km from the eruption center of the Slamet Volcano. They are concentrated within latitudes 7°11’00” - 7°16’00” S,, and longitudes 109°15’00” - 109°18’00” E. The density of the cinder cones is about 1.5 cones/km2. Most of the cinder cones lie on the Tertiary sedimentary rocks along the NW-trending fault system and on radial fractures. The structural pattern may be related to the radial faults in this region. The cone surfaces are commonly blanketed by Slamet air-falls and lava flows. The deposits consist of poorly bedded, very coarse-grained, occasionally overlain by oxidized scoria, and large-sized of ballistic bombs and blocks. There are various kind of volcanic bombs originating from scoriae ballistic rock fragments. The other kind of volcanic bombs are breadcrust bomb, almond seed or contorted shape. All of the cinder cones have undergone degradation, which can be observed from the characters of gully density and surface morphology. By using Porter parameters, Hco is equal to 0.25 Wco, whilst Wcr is equal to 0.40 Wco. The Hco/Wco ratio is higher than Hco = 0.2 Wco reference line. A radiometric dating using K-Ar method carried out on a scoria bomb yields the age of 0.042 + 0.020 Ma.  

  4. Efficacy of different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine in disinfection of contaminated Resilon cones

    OpenAIRE

    Zand, Vahid; Salem Milani, Amin; Shahi, Shahriar; Akhi, Mohammad-Taghi; Vazifekhah, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different concentrations of Chlorhexidine (CHX) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in disinfecting contaminated Resilon cones within one minute. Study design: Fifty Resilon cones were divided into seven experimental groups and three control groups of 5 cones each. The cones of experimental groups were contaminated with Entrococcus faecalis and subsequently disinfected with different concentrations of NaOCl or CHX. The cones w...

  5. Modulation of growth cone filopodial length by carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is physiologically produced via heme degradation by heme oxygenase enzymes. Whereas CO has been identified as an important physiological signaling molecule, the roles it plays in neuronal development and regeneration are poorly understood. During these events, growth cones guide axons through a rich cellular environment to locate target cells and establish synaptic connections. Previously, we have shown that another gaseous signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO), has potent effects on growth cone motility. With NO and CO sharing similar cellular targets, we wanted to determine whether CO affected growth cone motility as well. We assessed how CO affected growth cone filopodial length and determined the signaling pathway by which this effect was mediated. Using two well-characterized neurons from the freshwater snail, Helisoma trivolvis, it was found that the CO donor, carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2), increased filopodial length. CO utilized a signaling pathway that involved the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase, protein kinase G, and ryanodine receptors. While increases in filopodial length often occur from robust increases in intracellular calcium levels, the timing in which CO increased filopodial length corresponded with low basal calcium levels in growth cones. Taken together with findings of a heme oxygenase-like protein in the Helisoma nervous system, these results provide evidence for CO as a modulator of growth cone motility and implicate CO as a neuromodulatory signal during neuronal development and/or regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 677-690, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Meaning of visualizing retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Julie; Paques, Michel; Krivosic, Valérie; Dupas, Bénédicte; Couturier, Aude; Kulcsar, Caroline; Tadayoni, Ramin; Massin, Pascale; Gaudric, Alain

    2015-01-01

    To explore the anatomic correlation of the retinal cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. Retrospective nonconsecutive observational case series. A retrospective review of the multimodal imaging charts of 6 patients with focal alteration of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics was performed. Retinal diseases included acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (n = 1), hydroxychloroquine retinopathy (n = 1), and macular telangiectasia type 2 (n = 4). High-resolution retinal images were obtained using a flood-illumination adaptive optics camera. Images were recorded using standard imaging modalities: color and red-free fundus camera photography; infrared reflectance scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images. On OCT, in the marginal zone of the lesions, a disappearance of the interdigitation zone was observed, while the ellipsoid zone was preserved. Image recording demonstrated that such attenuation of the interdigitation zone co-localized with the disappearance of the cone mosaic on adaptive optics images. In 1 case, the restoration of the interdigitation zone paralleled that of the cone mosaic after a 2-month follow-up. Our results suggest that the interdigitation zone could contribute substantially to the reflectance of the cone photoreceptor mosaic. The absence of cones on adaptive optics images does not necessarily mean photoreceptor cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CRYOVOLCANISM AND THE MYSTERY OF THE PATOM CONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir R. Alekseyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Earth’s regions with cold climate, cryovolcanism is widespread. This phenomena is manifested as eruptions of material due to freezing of closed-type or open-type water-bearing systems which is accompanied by generation of effusive topographic forms, such as «pingo». The Patom cone is a typical structure created by cryovolcanism in fractured bedrocksof the Proterozoic age. The cone was shaped a result of the long-term, possibly multistage freezing of the hydrogeological structure during continuous and complicated phase of cryo- and speleo-genesis. The ice-saturated breccia containing limestone, sandstone and shale, which composed the cone, was subject to slow spreading due to its plastic properties; the top of the mound developed into a subsidence cone bordered by ring-shaped ramparts and a knoll in the middle, while thelongitudinal profile took on an asymmetric form. The absence of soil and vegetation cover on the surface of the cone, and a relatively weak degree of weathering of the rudaceous deposits bear no evidence that the geological object is young. The question as to the age of the cone is still open.

  8. Fast regulation of axonal growth cone motility by electrical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarretxe, Gaskon; Perrais, David; Jaskolski, Frédéric; Vimeney, Alice; Mulle, Christophe

    2007-07-18

    Axonal growth cones are responsible for the correct guidance of developing axons and the establishment of functional neural networks. They are highly motile because of fast and continuous rearrangements of their actin-rich cytoskeleton. Here we have used live imaging of axonal growth cones of hippocampal neurons in culture and quantified their motility with a temporal resolution of 2 s. Using novel methods of analysis of growth cone dynamics, we show that transient activation of kainate receptors by bath-applied kainate induced a fast and reversible growth cone stalling. This effect depends on electrical activity and can be mimicked by the transient discharge of action potentials elicited in the neuron by intracellular current injections at the somatic level through a patch pipette. Growth cone stalling induced by electrical stimulation is mediated by calcium entry from the extracellular medium as well as by calcium release from intracellular stores that define spatially restricted microdomains directly affecting cytoskeletal dynamics. We propose that growth cone motility is dynamically controlled by transient bursts of spontaneous electrical activity, which constitutes a prominent feature of developing neural networks in vivo.

  9. Heavy-to-light correlators beyond the light cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucha, W.; Melikhov, D. I. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Institute for High Energy Physics (Austria); Simula, S. [Sezione di Roma III, INFN (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    We present the first systematic analysis of the off-light-cone effects in correlators relevant for the extraction of the heavy-to-light form factors within the method of light-cone sum rules. In a model with scalar constituents, the correlator is calculated in two different ways: (i) by performing the expansion of the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude of the light meson near the light cone x{sup 2} = 0 and (ii) by adopting the known solution for the Bethe-Salpeter amplitude which allows one to calculate the correlator without invoking any expansion. We demonstrate that the contributions to the correlator from the off-light-cone terms x{sup 2} {ne} 0 are not suppressed by any large parameter compared to the contribution of the light-cone term x{sup 2} = 0. For decays of heavy particles of mass in the range 1.5-5 GeV, the light-cone correlator is shown to systematically overestimate the full correlator, numerically the difference being 10-20%.

  10. Functional complexity of the axonal growth cone: a proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estrada-Bernal

    Full Text Available The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥ 99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions.

  11. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Thielen, Bert; Siguenza, Francis; Hassan, Bassam

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal reconstructions were created using specialized software. Image quality and visibility of anatomical landmarks were subjectively assessed by two observers. Good image quality was obtained for the MPR para-sagittal reconstructions through multiple teeth. The image quality of the panoramic reconstructions of dogs was moderate while the panoramic reconstructions of cats were poor since the images were associated with an increased noise level. Segmental panoramic reconstructions of the mouth seem to be useful for studying the dental anatomy especially in dogs. The results of this study using human dental CBCT technology demonstrate the potential of this scanning technology in veterinary medicine. Unfortunately, the moderate image quality obtained with the CBCT technique reported here seems to be inferior to the diagnostic image quality obtained from 2-dimensional dental radiographs. Further research is required to optimize scanning and reconstruction protocols for veterinary applications.

  12. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton’s law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the “Chern number” occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton’s law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases.

  13. Manipulation of Dirac Cones in Mechanical Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Recently, quantum Hall state analogs in classical mechanics attract much attention from topological points of view. Topology is not only for mathematicians but also quite useful in a quantum world. Further it even governs the Newton’s law of motion. One of the advantages of classical systems over solid state materials is its clear controllability. Here we investigate mechanical graphene, which is a spring-mass model with the honeycomb structure as a typical mechanical model with nontrivial topological phenomena. The vibration spectrum of mechanical graphene is characterized by Dirac cones serving as sources of topological nontriviality. We find that the spectrum has dramatic dependence on the spring tension at equilibrium as a natural control parameter, i.e., creation and annihilation of the Dirac particles are realized as the tension increases. Just by rotating the system, the manipulated Dirac particles lead to topological transition, i.e., a jump of the “Chern number” occurs associated with flipping of propagating direction of chiral edge modes. This is a bulk-edge correspondence governed by the Newton’s law. A simple observation that in-gap edge modes exist only at the fixed boundary, but not at the free one, is attributed to the symmetry protection of topological phases. PMID:26667580

  14. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic imaging in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, W C; Azevedo, B; Toghyani, S; Farman, A G

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 15 years, cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has emerged as an important supplemental radiographic technique for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, especially in situations which require an understanding of the complex anatomic relationships and surrounding structures of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT imaging provides unique features and advantages to enhance orthodontic practice over conventional extraoral radiographic imaging. While it is the responsibility of each practitioner to make a decision, in tandem with the patient/family, consensus-derived, evidence-based clinical guidelines are available to assist the clinician in the decision-making process. Specific recommendations provide selection guidance based on variables such as phase of treatment, clinically-assessed treatment difficulty, the presence of dental and/or skeletal modifying conditions, and pathology. CBCT imaging in orthodontics should always be considered wisely as children have conservatively, on average, a three to five times greater radiation risk compared with adults for the same exposure. The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the operation of CBCT equipment as it relates to image quality and dose, highlight the benefits of the technique in orthodontic practice, and provide guidance on appropriate clinical use with respect to radiation dose and relative risk, particularly for the paediatric patient. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  15. Current emitted by highly conducting Taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamora, J. Fernandez; Loscertales, I. G.

    1994-02-01

    When a liquid meniscus held at the exit of a metallic capillary tube is charged to a high voltage V, the free surface often takes the form of a cone whose apex emits a steady microjet, and thus injects a certain charge I and liquid volume Q per unit time into the surrounding gas. This work deals with liquids with relatively large conductivities K, for which the jet diameter d(j) is much smaller than the diameter d(n) of the capillary tube. In the limit d(j)/d(n) to O, the structure of the jet (d(j) and I, in particular) becomes independent of electrostatic parameters such as V or the electrode configuration, being governed mostly by the liquid properties and flow rate Q. Furthermore, the measured current is given approximately by I = f(epsilon)(gamma QK/epsilon)(exp 1/2) for a wide variety of liquids and conditions (epsilon, and gamma are, respectively, the dielectric constant of the liquid and the coefficient of interfacial tension, f(epsilon) is shown). A proposed explanation for this behavior is presented.

  16. The Light-Cone Gauge without Prescriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A. T.; Schmidt, A. G. M.

    2000-05-01

    Feynman integrals in the physical light-cone gauge are more difficult to solve than their covariant counterparts. The difficulty is associated with the presence of unphysical singularities due to the inherent residual gauge freedom in the intermediate boson propagators constrained within this gauge choice. In order to circumvent these non-physical singularities, the headlong approach has always been to call for mathematical devices --- prescriptions --- some successful and others not. A more elegant approach is to consider the propagator from its physical point of view, that is, an object obeying basic principles such as causality. Once this fact is realized and carefully taken into account, the crutch of prescriptions can be avoided altogether. An alternative, third approach, which for practical computations could dispense with prescriptions as well as avoiding the necessity of careful stepwise consideration of causality, would be of great advantage. And this third option is realizable within the context of negative dimensions, or as it has been coined, the negative dimensional integration method (NDIM).

  17. How to make a minimal genome for synthetic minimal cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liu-Yan; Chang, Su-Hua; Wang, Jing

    2010-05-01

    As a key focus of synthetic biology, building a minimal artificial cell has given rise to many discussions. A synthetic minimal cell will provide an appropriate chassis to integrate functional synthetic parts, devices and systems with functions that cannot generally be found in nature. The design and construction of a functional minimal genome is a key step while building such a cell/chassis since all the cell functions can be traced back to the genome. Kinds of approaches, based on bioinformatics and molecular biology, have been developed and proceeded to derive essential genes and minimal gene sets for the synthetic minimal genome. Experiments about streamlining genomes of model bacteria revealed genome reduction led to unanticipated beneficial properties, such as high electroporation efficiency and accurate propagation of recombinant genes and plasmids that were unstable in other strains. Recent achievements in chemical synthesis technology for large DNA segments together with the rapid development of the whole-genome sequencing, have transferred synthesis of genes to assembly of the whole genomes based on oligonucleotides, and thus created strong preconditions for synthesis of artificial minimal genome. Here in this article, we review briefly the history and current state of research in this field and summarize the main methods for making a minimal genome. We also discuss the impacts of minimized genome on metabolism and regulation of artificial cell.

  18. Region-of-interest reconstruction for a cone-beam dental CT with a circular trajectory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhanli, E-mail: huzhanli1983@gmail.com [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Zou, Jing; Gui, Jianbao; Zheng, Hairong [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Xia, Dan, E-mail: dan.xia@siat.ac.cn [Paul C. Lauterbur Research Center For Biomedical Imaging, Institute of Biomedical and Health Engineering, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2013-04-21

    Dental CT is the most appropriate and accurate device for preoperative evaluation of dental implantation. It can demonstrate the quantity of bone in three dimensions (3D), the location of important adjacent anatomic structures and the quality of available bone with minimal geometric distortion. Nevertheless, with the rapid increase of dental CT examinations, we are facing the problem of dose reduction without loss of image quality. In this work, backprojection-filtration (BPF) and Feldkamp–Davis–Kress (FDK) algorithm was applied to reconstruct the 3D full image and region-of-interest (ROI) image from complete and truncated circular cone-beam data respectively by computer-simulation. In addition, the BPF algorithm was evaluated based on the 3D ROI-image reconstruction from real data, which was acquired from our developed circular cone-beam prototype dental CT system. The results demonstrated that the ROI-image quality reconstructed from truncated data using the BPF algorithm was comparable to that reconstructed from complete data. The FDK algorithm, however, created artifacts while reconstructing ROI-image. Thus it can be seen, for circular cone-beam dental CT, reducing scanning angular range of the BPF algorithm used for ROI-image reconstruction are helpful for reducing the radiation dose and scanning time. Finally, an analytical method was developed for estimation of the ROI projection area on the detector before CT scanning, which would help doctors to roughly estimate the total radiation dose before the CT examination. -- Highlights: ► BPF algorithm was applied by using dental CT for the first time. ► A method was developed for estimation of projection region before CT scanning. ► Roughly predict the total radiation dose before CT scans. ► Potential reduce imaging radiation dose, scatter, and scanning time.

  19. GPU-accelerated regularized iterative reconstruction for few-view cone beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenine, Dmitri, E-mail: dmitri.matenine.1@ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada); Goussard, Yves, E-mail: yves.goussard@polymtl.ca [Département de génie électrique/Institut de génie biomédical, École Polytechnique de Montréal, C.P. 6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Després, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.despres@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de physique, de génie physique et d’optique and Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The present work proposes an iterative reconstruction technique designed for x-ray transmission computed tomography (CT). The main objective is to provide a model-based solution to the cone-beam CT reconstruction problem, yielding accurate low-dose images via few-views acquisitions in clinically acceptable time frames. Methods: The proposed technique combines a modified ordered subsets convex (OSC) algorithm and the total variation minimization (TV) regularization technique and is called OSC-TV. The number of subsets of each OSC iteration follows a reduction pattern in order to ensure the best performance of the regularization method. Considering the high computational cost of the algorithm, it is implemented on a graphics processing unit, using parallelization to accelerate computations. Results: The reconstructions were performed on computer-simulated as well as human pelvic cone-beam CT projection data and image quality was assessed. In terms of convergence and image quality, OSC-TV performs well in reconstruction of low-dose cone-beam CT data obtained via a few-view acquisition protocol. It compares favorably to the few-view TV-regularized projections onto convex sets (POCS-TV) algorithm. It also appears to be a viable alternative to full-dataset filtered backprojection. Execution times are of 1–2 min and are compatible with the typical clinical workflow for nonreal-time applications. Conclusions: Considering the image quality and execution times, this method may be useful for reconstruction of low-dose clinical acquisitions. It may be of particular benefit to patients who undergo multiple acquisitions by reducing the overall imaging radiation dose and associated risks.

  20. Singularities of plane complex curves and limits of Kähler metrics with cone singularities. I: Tangent Cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borbon Martin de

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to provide a construction and classification, in the case of two complex dimensions, of the possible tangent cones at points of limit spaces of non-collapsed sequences of Kähler-Einstein metrics with cone singularities. The proofs and constructions are completely elementary, nevertheless they have an intrinsic beauty. In a few words; tangent cones correspond to spherical metrics with cone singularities in the projective line by means of the Kähler quotient construction with respect to the S1-action generated by the Reeb vector field, except in the irregular case ℂβ₁×ℂβ₂ with β₂/ β₁ ∉ Q.

  1. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM)

    OpenAIRE

    FERREIRA, Amanda de Freitas; Henriques,João César Guimarães; Almeida,Guilherme Araújo; Machado, Asbel Rodrigues; Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fernandes Neto,Alfredo Júlio

    2009-01-01

    This research consisted of a quantitative assessment, and aimed to measure the possible discrepancies between the maxillomandibular positions for centric relation (CR) and maximum intercuspation (MI), using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method). The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion: normal occlusion and Angle Class I occlusion. In order to obtain the centric relation, a JIG device and mandi...

  2. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM)

    OpenAIRE

    FERREIRA, Amanda de Freitas; HENRIQUES, Jo?o C?sar Guimar?es; Almeida, Guilherme de Ara?jo; Machado, Asbel Rodrigues; Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fernandes, Alfredo J?lio

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT This research consisted of a quantitative assessment, and aimed to measure the possible discrepancies between the maxillomandibular positions for centric relation (CR) and maximum intercuspation (MI), using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method). The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion: normal occlusion and Angle Class I occlusion. In order to obtain the centric relation, a JIG device ...

  3. Secondary Instability of Stationary Crossflow Vortices in Mach 6 Boundary Layer Over a Circular Cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Paredes-Gonzalez, Pedro; Duan, Lian

    2015-01-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer flows over a circular cone at moderate incidence can support strong crossflow instability. Due to more efficient excitation of stationary crossflow vortices by surface roughness, such boundary layer flows may transition to turbulence via rapid amplification of the high-frequency secondary instabilities of finite amplitude stationary crossflow vortices. The amplification characteristics of these secondary instabilities are investigated for crossflow vortices generated by an azimuthally periodic array of roughness elements over a 7-degree half-angle circular cone in a Mach 6 free stream. Depending on the local amplitude of the stationary crossflow mode, the most unstable secondary disturbances either originate from the second (i.e., Mack) mode instabilities of the unperturbed boundary layer or correspond to genuine secondary instabilities that reduce to stable disturbances at sufficiently small amplitudes of the stationary crossflow vortex. The predicted frequencies of dominant secondary disturbances are similar to those measured during wind tunnel experiments at Purdue University and the Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany.

  4. Eruptive and Geomorphic Processes at the Lathrop Wells Scoria Cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Valentine; D.J. Krier; F.V. Perry; G. Heiken

    2006-08-03

    The {approx}80 ka Lathrop Wells volcano (southern Nevada, U.S.A.) preserves evidence for a range of explosive processes and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic deposits and lava fields in a small-volume basaltic center. Early cone building by Strombolian bursts was accompanied by development of a fan-like lava field reaching {approx}800 m distance from the cone, built upon a gently sloping surface. Lava flows carried rafts of cone deposits, which provide indirect evidence for cone facies in lieu of direct exposures in the active quarry. Subsequent activity was of a violent Strombolian nature, with many episodes of sustained eruption columns up to a few km in height. These deposited layers of scoria lapilli and ash in different directions depending upon wind direction at the time of a given episode, reaching up to {approx}20 km from the vent, and also produced the bulk of the scoria cone. Lava effusion migrated from south to north around the eastern base of the cone as accumulation of lavas successively reversed the topography at the base of the cone. Late lavas were emplaced during violent Strombolian activity and continued for some time after explosive eruptions had waned. Volumes of the eruptive products are: fallout--0.07 km{sup 3}, scoria cone--0.02 km{sup 3}, and lavas--0.03 km{sup 3}. Shallow-derived xenolith concentrations suggest an upper bound on average conduit diameter of {approx}21 m in the uppermost 335 m beneath the volcano. The volcano was constructed over a period of at least seven months with cone building occurring only during part of that time, based upon analogy with historical eruptions. Post-eruptive geomorphic evolution varied for the three main surface types that were produced by volcanic activity: (1) scoria cone, (2) low relief surfaces (including lavas) with abundant pyroclastic material, and (3) lavas with little pyroclastic material. The role of these different initial textures must be accounted for in estimating relative ages of

  5. Galectin-1 in stable liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M J; Jurado, F; San Segundo, D; López-Hoyos, M; Iruzubieta, P; Llerena, S; Casafont, F; Arias, M; Puente, Á; Crespo, J; Fábrega, E

    2015-01-01

    The achievement of a state of tolerance and minimization of the immunosuppressive load form part of the "Holy Grail" in solid organ transplantation. Galectin-1 recently has been described to be involved in the maintenance of a tolerant environment, but there is no evidence of its role in human liver transplantation. The aim of our study was to measure the serum levels of galectin-1 in stable liver transplant recipients. Serum levels of galectin-1 were determined in 30 stable liver transplant recipients who had been free of rejection episodes for at least 8 years. Fifteen patients with an acute rejection episode and 34 healthy subjects were used as the control group. The concentrations of galectin-1 were significantly higher in stable liver transplant recipients compared with healthy subjects and with the acute rejection group. These preliminary results indicate that galectin-1 is upregulated in stable liver transplant recipients. Thus, our results extend the recent findings that galectin-1 may play an immune-suppressive role in liver transplantation. It remains to be established whether it might help to induce tolerance in liver transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stable and Enforceable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Hougaard Jensen, Svend E.

    2011-01-01

    -term stabilisation. We argue for public sector debt targets as a practical way to achieve such a set up, and an excess debt protocol is constructed to give enforceable form to those targets. The ideas of “fiscal space” and optimal debt levels are used to provide a mechanism for identifying a stable region within...... which the debt targeting regime should operate. Making these factors explicit would both improve the credibility of planned fiscal policies and reduce risk premia on borrowing costs. We finally show how Europe’s competitiveness pact, and debt restructuring operations, can be used to maximise...

  7. Minimal massive 3D gravity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Hohm, Olaf; Merbis, Wout; Routh, Alasdair J.; Townsend, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    We present an alternative to topologically massive gravity (TMG) with the same 'minimal' bulk properties; i.e. a single local degree of freedom that is realized as a massive graviton in linearization about an anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum. However, in contrast to TMG, the new 'minimal massive gravity'

  8. Energy minimization of ferromagnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Heliang; Li, Jiangyu

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, we present an energy-minimization theory of ferromagnetic particles to characterize the magnetization reversal and hysteresis loop of ferromagnetic polycrystals, with the inter-granular magneto-static interactions accounted for through the effective medium approximation. The energy-minimizing magnetization distribution is determined, and the remanence and coercivity are predicted.

  9. Minimal Webs in Riemannian Manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2008-01-01

    For a given combinatorial graph $G$ a {\\it geometrization} $(G, g)$ of the graph is obtained by considering each edge of the graph as a $1-$dimensional manifold with an associated metric $g$. In this paper we are concerned with {\\it minimal isometric immersions} of geometrized graphs $(G, g......)$ into Riemannian manifolds $(N^{n}, h)$. Such immersions we call {\\em{minimal webs}}. They admit a natural 'geometric' extension of the intrinsic combinatorial discrete Laplacian. The geometric Laplacian on minimal webs enjoys standard properties such as the maximum principle and the divergence theorems, which...... are of instrumental importance for the applications. We apply these properties to show that minimal webs in ambient Riemannian spaces share several analytic and geometric properties with their smooth (minimal submanifold) counterparts in such spaces. In particular we use appropriate versions of the divergence...

  10. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  11. Minimal Surfaces for Hitchin Representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qiongling; Dai, Song

    2018-01-01

    . In this paper, we investigate the properties of immersed minimal surfaces inside symmetric space associated to a subloci of Hitchin component: $q_n$ and $q_{n-1}$ case. First, we show that the pullback metric of the minimal surface dominates a constant multiple of the hyperbolic metric in the same conformal...... class and has a strong rigidity property. Secondly, we show that the immersed minimal surface is never tangential to any flat inside the symmetric space. As a direct corollary, the pullback metric of the minimal surface is always strictly negatively curved. In the end, we find a fully decoupled system......Given a reductive representation $\\rho: \\pi_1(S)\\rightarrow G$, there exists a $\\rho$-equivariant harmonic map $f$ from the universal cover of a fixed Riemann surface $\\Sigma$ to the symmetric space $G/K$ associated to $G$. If the Hopf differential of $f$ vanishes, the harmonic map is then minimal...

  12. Axonal branching and growth cone structure depend on target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S A; Moss, D; Bursztajn, S

    1993-09-01

    Growth cones provide crucial guidance to neurons in response to appropriate targets and other environmental cues. We have cocultured ciliary neurons with myotubes and utilized antibodies to GAP-43 (a neuron-specific, growth-associated phosphoprotein) and MAP-2 (a cytoskeletal marker for dendrites) together with immunofluorescence microscopy to characterize the changes in patterns and polarity that ciliary nerve growth cones undergo when they contact a "proper" target. Our results show that ciliary neurons plated alone or cocultured with fibroblasts have one or two axons, but, when cocultured with myotubes, most cells have 4 or 5 axons showing GAP-43 immunoreactivity. The mean number of axons per cell soma was 1.9 +/- 0.9 micron2 (SEM) when ciliary neurons were plated alone and 3.4 +/- 0.1 when ciliary neurons were cocultured with myotubes. Differences in growth cone size were readily apparent in these two types of cultures. In coculture with myotubes the neuronal growth cone lamelopodia occupied 20-30 microns2 with an average area of 25.0 +/- 2.3 microns2 (SEM) whereas those neurons plated alone or in the presence of fibroblasts occupied an average area of 56.3 microns2 +/- 4.1 microns2 (SEM). The number of growth cone filopodia depended on culture condition. In nerve-muscle cocultures, the average number of filopodia per growth cone was 3.6 +/- 0.2 (SEM), whereas in ciliary cultures plated in the absence of myotubes the number of filopodia was 6.8 +/- 0.4 (SEM). These results indicate that muscle cells or the factors they release can regulate the growth and topography of axons and their growth cones.

  13. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer proteins are post-synaptic density proteins with known functions in receptor trafficking and calcium homeostasis. While they are key mediators of synaptic plasticity, they are also known to function in axon guidance, albeit by mechanisms that are yet to be elucidated. Homer proteins couple extracellular receptors – such as metabotropic glutamate receptors and the transient receptor potential canonical family of cation channels – to intracellular receptors such as inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors on intracellular calcium stores and, therefore, are well placed to regulate calcium dynamics within the neural growth cone. Here we used growth cones from dorsal root ganglia, a well established model in the field of axon guidance, and a growth cone turning assay to examine Homer1 function in axon guidance. Results Homer1 knockdown reversed growth cone turning from attraction to repulsion in response to the calcium-dependent guidance cues brain derived neurotrophic factor and netrin-1. Conversely, Homer1 knockdown had no effect on repulsion to the calcium-independent guidance cue Semaphorin-3A. This reversal of attractive turning suggested a requirement for Homer1 in a molecular switch. Pharmacological experiments confirmed that the operational state of a calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II/calcineurin phosphatase molecular switch was dependent on Homer1 expression. Calcium imaging of motile growth cones revealed that Homer1 is required for guidance-cue-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and the attenuation of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients. Homer1 knockdown-induced calcium transients and turning were inhibited by antagonists of store-operated channels. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed the close association of Homer1 with the store-operated proteins TRPC1 and STIM1 within dorsal root ganglia growth cones. Conclusion These experiments provide evidence that Homer1 is an essential

  14. Horndeski extension of the minimal theory of quasidilaton massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji; Oliosi, Michele

    2017-11-01

    The minimal theory of quasidilaton massive gravity allows for a stable self-accelerating de Sitter solution in a wide range of parameters. On the other hand, in order for the theory to be compatible with local gravity tests, the fifth force due to the quasidilaton scalar needs to be screened at local scales. The present paper thus extends the theory by inclusion of a cubic Horndeski term in a way that (i) respects the quasidilaton global symmetry, that (ii) maintains the physical degrees of freedom in the theory being 3, that (iii) can accommodate the Vainshtein screening mechanism, and that (iv) still allows for a stable self-accelerating de Sitter solution. After adding the Horndeski term (and a k -essence type nonlinear kinetic term as well) to the precursor action, we switch to the Hamiltonian language and find a complete set of independent constraints. We then construct the minimal theory with 3 physical degrees of freedom by carefully adding a pair of constraints to the total Hamiltonian of the precursor theory. Switching back to the Lagrangian language, we study cosmological solutions and their stability in the minimal theory. In particular, we show that a self-accelerating de Sitter solution is stable for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, as in the minimal theory of massive gravity, the propagation speed of the massive gravitational waves in the high momentum limit precisely agrees with the speed of light.

  15. Radiative Walter's memory flow along a vertical cone in induced magnetic field with thermophoretic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Manjiul; Haque, Md. Mohidul

    2017-06-01

    A radiative heat and mass transfer study of Walter's memory flow along a vertical cone with thermophoresis is completed in the presence of induced magnetic field. A mathematical model of Walter's memory flow is developed from the basis of studying Magnetohydrodynamics(MHD). Some dimensionless quantities have been used to transform the model to non-dimensional system of equations. The dimensionless unsteady, coupled and non-linear partial differential conservation equations for the boundary layer regime are solved by an efficient, accurate and unconditionally stable finite difference scheme of the Crank-Nicolson type. The features of the flow, heat and mass transfer characteristics within the boundary layer are analyzed by plotting graphs and the physical aspects are discussed in detail. The obtained results show that the impact of flow variables plays an important role in the Walter's memory flow. Last of all, some important findings of the present problem are concluded in this work.

  16. An Analysis Model for Water Cone Subsidence in Bottom Water Drive Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Xu, Hui; Wu, Shucheng; Yang, Chao; Kong, lingxiao; Zeng, Baoquan; Xu, Haixia; Qu, Tailai

    2017-12-01

    Water coning in bottom water drive reservoirs, which will result in earlier water breakthrough, rapid increase in water cut and low recovery level, has drawn tremendous attention in petroleum engineering field. As one simple and effective method to inhibit bottom water coning, shut-in coning control is usually preferred in oilfield to control the water cone and furthermore to enhance economic performance. However, most of the water coning researchers just have been done on investigation of the coning behavior as it grows up, the reported studies for water cone subsidence are very scarce. The goal of this work is to present an analytical model for water cone subsidence to analyze the subsidence of water cone when the well shut in. Based on Dupuit critical oil production rate formula, an analytical model is developed to estimate the initial water cone shape at the point of critical drawdown. Then, with the initial water cone shape equation, we propose an analysis model for water cone subsidence in bottom water reservoir reservoirs. Model analysis and several sensitivity studies are conducted. This work presents accurate and fast analytical model to perform the water cone subsidence in bottom water drive reservoirs. To consider the recent interests in development of bottom drive reservoirs, our approach provides a promising technique for better understanding the subsidence of water cone.

  17. Immediate rehabilitation of the edentulous mandible using Ankylos SynCone telescopic copings and intraoral welding: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Piattelli, Adriano

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the suitability of immediate rehabilitation of the edentulous mandible using SynCone copings and the intraoral welding technique. Patients with an edentulous mandible were fitted with a removable restoration supported by an intraorally welded titanium bar. Copings were connected to their respective SynCone 5-degree abutments and then welded to a titanium bar using an intraoral welding unit. This framework was used to support the definitive restoration, which was delivered on the day of implant placement. Restoration success and survival, implant success, and biologic or technical complications were assessed immediately after surgery and at 6 and 12 months. Twenty-two patients were consecutively treated with 88 immediately loaded implants. No acrylic resin fractures or radiographically detectable alterations of the welded frameworks were present in the 22 restorations delivered. One implant (1.1%) failed 1 month after surgery; all remaining implants (98.9%) were clinically stable at the 12-month follow-up. Within its limitations, this pilot study demonstrated that it is possible to successfully rehabilitate the edentulous mandible on the day of surgery with a definitive restoration supported by an intraorally welded titanium framework and SynCone 5-degree abutments.

  18. An optimization-based method for geometrical calibration in cone-beam CT without dedicated phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, D; Belcari, N; Del Guerra, A; Moehrs, S

    2008-07-21

    In this paper we present a new method for the determination of geometrical misalignments in cone-beam CT scanners, from the analysis of the projection data of a generic object. No a priori knowledge of the object shape and positioning is required. We show that a cost function, which depends on the misalignment parameters, can be defined using the projection data and that such a cost function has a local minimum in correspondence to the actual parameters of the system. Hence, the calibration of the scanner can be carried out by minimizing the cost function using standard optimization techniques. The method is developed for a particular class of 3D object functions, for which the redundancy of the fan beam sinogram in the transaxial midplane can be extended to cone-beam projection data, even at wide cone angles. The method has an approximated validity for objects which do not belong to that class; in that case, a suitable subset of the projection data can be selected in order to compute the cost function. We show by numerical simulations that our method is capable to determine with high accuracy the most critical misalignment parameters of the scanner, i.e., the transversal shift and the skew of the detector. Additionally, the detector slant can be determined. Other parameters such as the detector tilt, the longitudinal shift and the error in the source-detector distance cannot be determined with our method, as the proposed cost function has a very weak dependence on them. However, due to the negligible influence of these latter parameters in the reconstructed image quality, they can be kept fixed at estimated values in both calibration and reconstruction processes without compromising the final result. A trade-off between computational cost and calibration accuracy must be considered when choosing the data subset used for the computation of the cost function. Results on real data of a mouse femur as obtained with a small animal micro-CT are shown as well, proving

  19. An optimization-based method for geometrical calibration in cone-beam CT without dedicated phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panetta, D; Belcari, N; Guerra, A Del; Moehrs, S [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' , University of Pisa, L.go B. Pontecorvo, 3-I-56127 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: daniele.panetta@pi.infn.it

    2008-07-21

    In this paper we present a new method for the determination of geometrical misalignments in cone-beam CT scanners, from the analysis of the projection data of a generic object. No a priori knowledge of the object shape and positioning is required. We show that a cost function, which depends on the misalignment parameters, can be defined using the projection data and that such a cost function has a local minimum in correspondence to the actual parameters of the system. Hence, the calibration of the scanner can be carried out by minimizing the cost function using standard optimization techniques. The method is developed for a particular class of 3D object functions, for which the redundancy of the fan beam sinogram in the transaxial midplane can be extended to cone-beam projection data, even at wide cone angles. The method has an approximated validity for objects which do not belong to that class; in that case, a suitable subset of the projection data can be selected in order to compute the cost function. We show by numerical simulations that our method is capable to determine with high accuracy the most critical misalignment parameters of the scanner, i.e., the transversal shift and the skew of the detector. Additionally, the detector slant can be determined. Other parameters such as the detector tilt, the longitudinal shift and the error in the source-detector distance cannot be determined with our method, as the proposed cost function has a very weak dependence on them. However, due to the negligible influence of these latter parameters in the reconstructed image quality, they can be kept fixed at estimated values in both calibration and reconstruction processes without compromising the final result. A trade-off between computational cost and calibration accuracy must be considered when choosing the data subset used for the computation of the cost function. Results on real data of a mouse femur as obtained with a small animal micro-CT are shown as well, proving

  20. Minimal Poems Written in 1979 Minimal Poems Written in 1979

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sirangelo Maggio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The reading of M. van der Slice's Minimal Poems Written in 1979 (the work, actually, has no title reminded me of a book I have seen a long time ago. called Truth, which had not even a single word printed inside. In either case we have a sample of how often excentricities can prove efficient means of artistic creativity, in this new literary trend known as Minimalism. The reading of M. van der Slice's Minimal Poems Written in 1979 (the work, actually, has no title reminded me of a book I have seen a long time ago. called Truth, which had not even a single word printed inside. In either case we have a sample of how often excentricities can prove efficient means of artistic creativity, in this new literary trend known as Minimalism.

  1. Méthode analytique généralisée pour le calcul du coning. Nouvelle solution pour calculer le coning de gaz, d'eau et double coning dans les puits verticaux et horizontaux Generalized Analytical Method for Coning Calculation. New Solution to Calculation Both the Gas Coning, Water Coning and Dual Coning for Vertical and Horizontal Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietraru V.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Une nouvelle méthode analytique d'évaluation du coning d'eau par bottom water drive et/ou de gaz par gas-cap drive dans les puits horizontaux et verticaux a été développée pour les réservoirs infinis [1]. Dans cet article, une généralisation de cette méthode est présentée pour les réservoirs confinés d'extension limitée dont le toit est horizontal. La généralisation proposée est basée sur la résolution des équations différentielles de la diffusivité avec prise en compte des effets de drainage par gravité et des conditions aux limites pour un réservoir confiné. La méthode est applicable aux réservoirs isotropes ou anisotropes. L'hypothèse de pression constante à la limite de l'aire de drainage dans l'eau et/ou dans le gaz a été adoptée. Les pertes de charge dans l'aquifère et dans le gas-cap sont donc négligées. Les principales contributions de cet article sont : - L'introduction de la notion de rayon de cône, différent du rayon de puits. La hauteur du cône et le débit critique dépendent du rayon de cône alors qu'ils sont indépendants du rayon du puits. - Une nouvelle corrélation pour le calcul du débit critique sous forme adimensionnelle en fonction de trois paramètres : le temps, la longueur du drain horizontal (nulle pour un puits vertical et le rayon de drainage. - Des corrélations pour le calcul du rapport des débits gaz/huile (GOR ou de la fraction en eau (fw, pendant les périodes critique et postcritique, qui tiennent compte de la pression capillaire et des perméabilités relatives. - Des corrélations pour le calcul des rapports de débits gaz/huile et eau/huile pendant les périodes pré, post et supercritique en double coning. - Des critères pour le calcul du temps de percée au puits en simple coning de gaz ou d'eau, ou en double coning de gaz et d'eau. A new analytical method for assessing water and/or gas coning in horizontal and vertical wells has been developed for infinite

  2. Spray cone angle and air core diameter of hollow cone swirl rocket injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hussein Abdul Hamid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Fuel injector for liquid rocket is a very critical component since that small difference in its design can dramatically affect the combustion efficiency. The primary function of the injector is to break the fuel up into very small droplets. The smaller droplets are necessary for fast quiet ignition and to establish a flame front close to the injector head, thus shorter combustion chamber is possible to be utilized. This paper presents an experimetal investigation of a mono-propellant hollow cone swirl injector. Several injectors with different configuration were investigated under cold flow test, where water is used as simulation fluid. This investigation reveals that higher injection pressure leads to higher spray cone angle. The effect of injection pressure on spray cone angle is more prominent for injector with least number of tangential ports. Furthermore, it was found that injector with the most number of tangential ports and with the smallest tangential port diameter produces the widest resulting spray. Experimental data also tells that the diameter of an air core that forms inside the swirl chamber is largest for the injector with smallest tangential port diameter and least number of tangential ports.ABSTRAK : Injektor bahan api bagi roket cecair merupakan satu komponen yang amat kritikal memandangkan perbezaan kecil dalam reka bentuknya akan secara langsung mempengaruhi kecekapan pembakaran. Fungsi utama injektor adalah untuk memecahkan bahan api kepada titisan yang amat kecil. Titisan kecil penting untuk pembakaran pantas secara senyap dan untuk mewujudkan satu nyalaan di hadapan, berhampiran dengan kepala injektor, maka kebuk pembakaran yang lebih pendek berkemungkinan dapat digunakan. Kertas kerja ini mebentangkan satu penyelidikan eksperimental sebuah injektor ekabahan dorong geronggang kon pusar. Beberapa injektor dengan konfigurasi berbeza telah dikaji di bawah ujian aliran sejuk, di mana air digunakan sebagai bendalir

  3. Minimal flows and their extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, J

    1988-01-01

    This monograph presents developments in the abstract theory of topological dynamics, concentrating on the internal structure of minimal flows (actions of groups on compact Hausdorff spaces for which every orbit is dense) and their homomorphisms (continuous equivariant maps). Various classes of minimal flows (equicontinuous, distal, point distal) are intensively studied, and a general structure theorem is obtained. Another theme is the ``universal'' approach - entire classes of minimal flows are studied, rather than flows in isolation. This leads to the consideration of disjointness of flows, w

  4. High quality 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction using motion-compensated total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Ma, Jianhua; Bian, Zhaoying; Zeng, Dong; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2017-04-01

    Four dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) has great potential clinical value because of its ability to describe tumor and organ motion. But the challenge in 4D-CBCT reconstruction is the limited number of projections at each phase, which result in a reconstruction full of noise and streak artifacts with the conventional analytical algorithms. To address this problem, in this paper, we propose a motion compensated total variation regularization approach which tries to fully explore the temporal coherence of the spatial structures among the 4D-CBCT phases. In this work, we additionally conduct motion estimation/motion compensation (ME/MC) on the 4D-CBCT volume by using inter-phase deformation vector fields (DVFs). The motion compensated 4D-CBCT volume is then viewed as a pseudo-static sequence, of which the regularization function was imposed on. The regularization used in this work is the 3D spatial total variation minimization combined with 1D temporal total variation minimization. We subsequently construct a cost function for a reconstruction pass, and minimize this cost function using a variable splitting algorithm. Simulation and real patient data were used to evaluate the proposed algorithm. Results show that the introduction of additional temporal correlation along the phase direction can improve the 4D-CBCT image quality.

  5. Design of a cone target for fast ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunahara Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new type of target for the fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion. Pre-formed plasma inside a cone target can significantly reduce the energy coupling efficiency from the ultra-high intense short-pulse laser to the imploded core plasma. Also, in order to protect the tip of the cone and reduce generation of pre-formed plasma, we propose pointed shaped cone target. In our estimation, the shock traveling time can be delayed 20–30 ps by lower-Z material with larger areal density compared to the conventional gold flat tip. Also, the jet flow can sweep the blow-off plasma from the tip of the cone, and the implosion performance is not drastically affected by the existence of pointed tip. In addition, the self-generated magnetic field is generated along the boundary of cone tip and surrounding CD or DT plasma. This magnetic field can confine fast electrons and focus to the implosion core plasma. Resultant heating efficiency is improved by 30% compared to that with conventional gold flat tip.

  6. The photocurrent response of human cones is fast and monophasic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamb TD

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The precise form of the light response of human cone photoreceptors in vivo has not been established with certainty. To investigate the response shape we compare the predictions of a recent model of transduction in primate cone photoreceptors with measurements extracted from human cones using the paired-flash electroretinogram method. As a check, we also compare the predictions with previous single-cell measurements of ground squirrel cone responses. Results The predictions of the model provide a good description of the measurements, using values of parameters within the range previously determined for primate retina. The dim-flash response peaks in about 20 ms, and flash responses at all intensities are essentially monophasic. Three time constants in the model are extremely short: the two time constants for inactivation (of visual pigment and of transducin/phosphodiesterase are around 3 and 10 ms, and the time constant for calcium equilibration lies in the same range. Conclusion The close correspondence between experiment and theory, using parameters previously derived for recordings from macaque retina, supports the notion that the electroretinogram approach and the modelling approach both provide an accurate estimate of the cone photoresponse in the living human eye. For reasons that remain unclear, the responses of isolated photoreceptors from the macaque retina, recorded previously using the suction pipette method, are considerably slower than found here, and display biphasic kinetics.

  7. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  8. Pollen cone anatomy of Classostrobus crossii sp. nov. (Cheirolepidiaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, Gar W.; Mapes, Gene [Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, Ohio University, Athens OH 45701 (United States); Hilton, Jason [Department of Earth Sciences, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Hollingworth, Neville T. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Winfrith Technology Centre, Winfrith Newburgh, Dorchester, Dorset, DT2 8ZD (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-02

    Discovery of a permineralized fossil cone in Mesozoic deposits of southern England provides an opportunity to document the first detailed evidence of internal pollen cone anatomy for the extinct conifer family Cheirolepidiaceae. The specimen, described here as Classostrobus crossii sp. nov., occurs in a calcareous nodule recovered from Middle Jurassic marine sediments of the Lower Callovian Sigaloceras calloviense biozone, Kellaways, near Cirencester, England. The cone is 2.0 cm long and 1.8 cm wide. Sporophylls diverge helically from the axis. Each sporophyll displays a narrow stalk and a distal lamina approx. 11 mm long that tapers to a pointed tip. There is also a basal keel that bends inward at the bottom and sides to form a shallow pocket. A single vascular bundle diverges from the cone axis, extends distally into the sporophyll stalk at the contact of two distinctly different histological zones, and further expands into the distal lamina as transfusion tracheids. Several pollen sacs are attached abaxially at the juncture of the sporophyll stalk and keel. Pollen is roughly spheroidal, 26-35 {mu}m in diameter, with unequal polar caps separated by a striated belt with a subequatorial furrow. This specimen helps clarify the range of variation in the morphology of Mesozoic conifer pollen cones. (author)

  9. Large Scale Plasmonic nanoCones array For Spectroscopy Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Gobind

    2015-09-24

    Advanced optical materials or interfaces are gaining attention for diagnostic applications. However, the achievement of large device interface as well as facile surface functionalization largely impairs their wide use. The present work is aimed to address different innovative aspects related to the fabrication of large area 3D plasmonic arrays, their direct and easy functionalization with capture elements and their spectroscopic verifications through enhanced Raman and enhanced fluorescence techniques. In detail we have investigated the effect of Au-based nanoCones array, fabricated by means of direct nanoimprint technique over large area (mm2), on protein capturing and on the enhancement in optical signal. A selective functionalization of gold surfaces was proposed by using a peptide (AuPi3) previously selected by phage display. In this regard, two different sequences, labeled with fluorescein and biotin, were chemisorbed on metallic surfaces. The presence of Au nanoCones array consents an enhancement in electric field on the apex of cone, enabling the detection of molecules. We have witnessed around 12-fold increase in fluorescence intensity and SERS enhancement factor around 1.75 ×105 with respect to the flat gold surface. Furthermore, a sharp decrease in fluorescence lifetime over nanoCones confirms the increase in radiative emission (i.e. an increase in photonics density at the apex of cones).

  10. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart pacemaker - discharge ...

  11. SU-F-J-205: Effect of Cone Beam Factor On Cone Beam CT Number Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, W; Hua, C; Farr, J; Brady, S; Merchant, T [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the suitability of a Catphan™ 700 phantom for image quality QA of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system deployed for proton therapy. Methods: Catphan phantoms, particularly Catphan™ 504, are commonly used in image quality QA for CBCT. As a newer product, Catphan™ 700 offers more tissue equivalent inserts which may be useful for generating the electron density – CT number curve for CBCT based treatment planning. The sensitometry-and-geometry module used in Catphan™ 700 is located at the end of the phantom and after the resolution line pair module. In Catphan™ 504 the line pair module is located at the end of the phantom and after the sensitometry-and-geometry module. To investigate the effect of difference in location on CT number accuracy due to the cone beam factor, we scanned the Catphan™ 700 with the central plane of CBCT at the center of the phantom, line pair and sensitometry-andgeometry modules of the phantom, respectively. The protocol head and thorax scan modes were used. For each position, scans were repeated 4 times. Results: For the head scan mode, the standard deviation (SD) of the CT numbers of each insert under 4 repeated scans was up to 20 HU, 11 HU, and 11 HU, respectively, for the central plane of CBCT located at the center of the phantom, line pair, and sensitometry-and-geometry modules of the phantom. The mean of the SD was 9.9 HU, 5.7 HU, and 5.9 HU, respectively. For the thorax mode, the mean of the SD was 4.5 HU, 4.4 HU, and 4.4 HU, respectively. The assessment of image quality based on resolution and spatial linearity was not affected by imaging location changes. Conclusion: When the Catphan™ 700 was aligned to the center of imaging region, the CT number accuracy test may not meet expectations. We recommend reconfiguration of the modules.

  12. Dysflective cones: Visual function and cone reflectivity in long-term follow-up of acute bilateral foveolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Joanna H; Foote, Katharina G; Lujan, Brandon J; Ratnam, Kavitha; Qin, Jia; Gorin, Michael B; Cunningham, Emmett T; Tuten, William S; Duncan, Jacque L; Roorda, Austin

    2017-09-01

    Confocal adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images provide a sensitive measure of cone structure. However, the relationship between structural findings of diminished cone reflectivity and visual function is unclear. We used fundus-referenced testing to evaluate visual function in regions of apparent cone loss identified using confocal AOSLO images. A patient diagnosed with acute bilateral foveolitis had spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) (Spectralis HRA + OCT system [Heidelberg Engineering, Vista, CA, USA]) images indicating focal loss of the inner segment-outer segment junction band with an intact, but hyper-reflective, external limiting membrane. Five years after symptom onset, visual acuity had improved from 20/80 to 20/25, but the retinal appearance remained unchanged compared to 3 months after symptoms began. We performed structural assessments using SD-OCT, directional OCT (non-standard use of a prototype on loan from Carl Zeiss Meditec) and AOSLO (custom-built system). We also administered fundus-referenced functional tests in the region of apparent cone loss, including analysis of preferred retinal locus (PRL), AOSLO acuity, and microperimetry with tracking SLO (TSLO) (prototype system). To determine AOSLO-corrected visual acuity, the scanning laser was modulated with a tumbling E consistent with 20/30 visual acuity. Visual sensitivity was assessed in and around the lesion using TSLO microperimetry. Complete eye examination, including standard measures of best-corrected visual acuity, visual field tests, color fundus photos, and fundus auto-fluorescence were also performed. Despite a lack of visible cone profiles in the foveal lesion, fundus-referenced vision testing demonstrated visual function within the lesion consistent with cone function. The PRL was within the lesion of apparent cone loss at the fovea. AOSLO visual acuity tests were abnormal, but measurable: for trials in which the stimulus remained completely

  13. Prediction of transparency perception based on cone-excitation ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Caterina; Westland, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    Perceptual transparency was measured in two experiments by using simulations of illuminated surfaces presented on a CRT monitor. In a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm, observers viewed two simulated Mondrians in temporal sequence. In one sequence the Mondrian was simulated to be partially covered by a transparent filter; in the other sequence the filter color over each Mondrian patch was modified. Observers were instructed to select the sequence containing a transparent filter. Observers' selections corresponded to sequences in which the cone-excitation ratios for each adjacent pair of Mondrian patches were approximately the same as the cone-excitation ratios for the pair of patches covered by a filter. The results suggest that cone-excitation ratios may be a cue for perceptual transparency.

  14. Gradient angle estimation by uniform directional simulation on a cone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1997-01-01

    of these projections is derived assuming the limit-state surface to be a hyperplane. This distribution depends on the angle between the cone axis and the normal vector to the hyperplane. Assuming sufficient flatness of the actual limit-state surface within a neighbourhood of the cut point with the cone axis, the cone...... top angle can be chosen small enough that this distribution can be taken as the basis for the formulation of the likelihood function of the angle given the sample of projections. The angle of maximum likelihood is then the indicator of whether the cut point can be taken as a sufficiently accurate...... approximation to a locally most central limit state point. Moreover, the estimated angle can be used to correct the geometric reliability index.\\bfseries Keywords: Directional simulation, effectivity factor, gradient angle estimation, maximum likelihood, model-correction-factor method, Monte Carlo simulation...

  15. An ice-cream cone model for coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X. H.; Wang, C. B.; Dou, X. K.

    2005-08-01

    In this study, we use an ice-cream cone model to analyze the geometrical and kinematical properties of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Assuming that in the early phase CMEs propagate with near-constant speed and angular width, some useful properties of CMEs, namely the radial speed (v), the angular width (α), and the location at the heliosphere, can be obtained considering the geometrical shapes of a CME as an ice-cream cone. This model is improved by (1) using an ice-cream cone to show the near real configuration of a CME, (2) determining the radial speed via fitting the projected speeds calculated from the height-time relation in different azimuthal angles, (3) not only applying to halo CMEs but also applying to nonhalo CMEs.

  16. [The forms and frequency of renal parenchymal cones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Murat; Tuma, Jan

    2014-02-12

    The renal parenchymal cone (RPC) is an important differential diagnosis to the real kidney tumors. It is defined as at least 15 mm large part of the normal renal parenchyma which protrudes into the space of the renal sinus. If the RPC is solely formed from renal cortical tissue, it is called "Column of Bertin" renal parenchymal cones (CB-RPC). If the renal medulla is part of RPC, together with the renal cortex, it is called lobular renal parenchymal cones (L-RPC). The aim of this prospective study was to determine the frequency of CB-RPC and the L-RPC. 200 kidneys from 100 patients were evaluated. At least one RPC was found in 53 patients. 27 RPC were on both sides. CB-RPC was present in 27,5% of the kidneys, a L-RPC in 12,5%. The high frequency of RPC underlines its importance in the diagnosis of focal renal parenchymal changes.

  17. How do horizontal cells 'talk' to cone photoreceptors? Different levels of complexity at the cone-horizontal cell synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapot, Camille A; Euler, Thomas; Schubert, Timm

    2017-08-15

    The first synapse of the retina plays a fundamental role in the visual system. Due to its importance, it is critical that it encodes information from the outside world with the greatest accuracy and precision possible. Cone photoreceptor axon terminals contain many individual synaptic sites, each represented by a presynaptic structure called a 'ribbon'. These synapses are both highly sophisticated and conserved. Each ribbon relays the light signal to one ON cone bipolar cell and several OFF cone bipolar cells, while two dendritic processes from a GABAergic interneuron, the horizontal cell, modulate the cone output via parallel feedback mechanisms. The presence of these three partners within a single synapse has raised numerous questions, and its anatomical and functional complexity is still only partially understood. However, the understanding of this synapse has recently evolved, as a consequence of progress in understanding dendritic signal processing and its role in facilitating global versus local signalling. Indeed, for the downstream retinal network, dendritic processing in horizontal cells may be essential, as they must support important functional operations such as contrast enhancement, which requires spatial averaging of the photoreceptor array, while at the same time preserving accurate spatial information. Here, we review recent progress made towards a better understanding of the cone synapse, with an emphasis on horizontal cell function, and discuss why such complexity might be necessary for early visual processing. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  18. Organizational motifs for ground squirrel cone bipolar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Adam C.; Zhu, Yongling; Shi, Jun; Saszik, Shannon; Lindstrom, Sarah; Davidson, Laura; Li, Xiaoyu; Chiodo, Vince A.; Hauswirth, William W.; Li, Wei; DeVries, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    In daylight vision, parallel processing starts at the cone synapse. Cone signals flow to On and Off bipolar cells, which are further divided into types according to morphology, immunocytochemistry, and function. The axons of the bipolar cell types stratify at different levels in the inner plexiform layer (IPL), and can interact with costratifying amacrine and ganglion cells. These interactions endow the ganglion cell types with unique functional properties. The wiring that underlies the interactions between bipolar, amacrine, and ganglion cells is poorly understood. It may be easier to elucidate this wiring if organizational rules can be established. We identify 13 types of cone bipolar cells in the ground squirrel, 11 of which contact contiguous cones with the possible exception of short-wavelength sensitive cones. Cells were identified by antibody labeling, tracer filling, and Golgi-like filling following transduction with an adeno-associated virus encoding for GFP. The 11 bipolar cell types displayed two organizational patterns. In the first pattern, 8-10 of the 11 types came in pairs with partially overlapping axonal stratification. Pairs shared morphological, immunocytochemical, and functional properties. The existence of similar pairs is a new motif that may have implications for how signals first diverge from a cone to bipolar cells, and then re-converge onto a costratifying ganglion cell. The second pattern is a mirror symmetric organization about the middle of the IPL involving at least 7 bipolar cell types. This anatomical symmetry may be associated with a functional symmetry in On and Off ganglion cell responses. PMID:22778006

  19. Spawning rings of exceptional points out of Dirac cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Bo; Hsu, Chia Wei; Igarashi, Yuichi; Lu, Ling; Kaminer, Ido; Pick, Adi; Chua, Song-Liang; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljačić, Marin

    2015-09-17

    The Dirac cone underlies many unique electronic properties of graphene and topological insulators, and its band structure--two conical bands touching at a single point--has also been realized for photons in waveguide arrays, atoms in optical lattices, and through accidental degeneracy. Deformation of the Dirac cone often reveals intriguing properties; an example is the quantum Hall effect, where a constant magnetic field breaks the Dirac cone into isolated Landau levels. A seemingly unrelated phenomenon is the exceptional point, also known as the parity-time symmetry breaking point, where two resonances coincide in both their positions and widths. Exceptional points lead to counter-intuitive phenomena such as loss-induced transparency, unidirectional transmission or reflection, and lasers with reversed pump dependence or single-mode operation. Dirac cones and exceptional points are connected: it was theoretically suggested that certain non-Hermitian perturbations can deform a Dirac cone and spawn a ring of exceptional points. Here we experimentally demonstrate such an 'exceptional ring' in a photonic crystal slab. Angle-resolved reflection measurements of the photonic crystal slab reveal that the peaks of reflectivity follow the conical band structure of a Dirac cone resulting from accidental degeneracy, whereas the complex eigenvalues of the system are deformed into a two-dimensional flat band enclosed by an exceptional ring. This deformation arises from the dissimilar radiation rates of dipole and quadrupole resonances, which play a role analogous to the loss and gain in parity-time symmetric systems. Our results indicate that the radiation existing in any open system can fundamentally alter its physical properties in ways previously expected only in the presence of material loss and gain.

  20. Light-cone quantized QCD and novel hadron phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1997-09-01

    The authors reviews progress made in solving gauge theories such as collinear quantum chromodynamics using light-cone Hamiltonian methods. He also shows how the light-cone Fock expansion for hadron wavefunctions can be used to compute operator matrix elements such as decay amplitudes, form factors, distribution amplitudes, and structure functions, and how it provides a tool for exploring novel features of QCD. The author also reviews commensurate scale relations, leading-twist identities which relate physical observables to each other, thus eliminating renormalization scale and scheme ambiguities in perturbative QCD predictions.

  1. Does the Dirac Cone Exist in Silicene on Metal Substrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quhe, Ruge; Yuan, Yakun; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wang, Yangyang; Ni, Zeyuan; Shi, Junjie; Yu, Dapeng; Yang, Jinbo; Lu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Absence of the Dirac cone due to a strong band hybridization is revealed to be a common feature for epitaxial silicene on metal substrates according to our first-principles calculations for silicene on Ir, Cu, Mg, Au, Pt, Al, and Ag substrates. The destroyed Dirac cone of silicene, however, can be effectively restored with linear or parabolic dispersion by intercalating alkali metal atoms between silicene and the metal substrates, offering an opportunity to study the intriguing properties of silicene without further transfer of silicene from the metal substrates. PMID:24969493

  2. Large stable magnetic domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, G. R.; Ross, W. E.; MacNeal, B.; Bailey, R. F.

    1982-03-01

    Large, thin-film single domain areas have been observed, in the absence of a bias field, in garnets with magnetization perpendicular to the film plane.1,2 The domain stability in the work by Krumme1 was attributed to a combination of low saturation magnetization and a low Curie temperature. Uchishiba2 relates the stability in his double layer system to appropriate anisotropy fields in one layer compared to the magnetization in the other layer. A more complete model for large domain stability in a bias field free environment is given in this work. Three distinct stability regimes are predicted by the model and all have been observed experimentally. Areas 3.5-cm in diameter have been made into stable single domains. This was achieved in a material showing a zero bias strip width of 4.5 μm. The single domain diameter was, therefore, 7500 times the equilibrium energy domain width. The technique developed and the model have led to a new means for observing magnetic defects. More importantly, it also offers a means for measuring the strength of the defects. Possible applications of the model are also discussed.

  3. Minimally invasive operative care. I. Minimal intervention and concepts for minimally invasive cavity preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, M C; McLean, M E

    2001-01-01

    From the mainly reparative dentistry of the 20th century, contemporary dentistry shifts towards a minimal intervention (MI) approach encompassing up-to-date caries diagnosis and risk assessment before arriving at a treatment decision. An overview is provided of incorporating MI philosophy into the field of operative dentistry. The ultimate goal of MI is to extend the lifetime of restored teeth with as little intervention as possible. When operative care is indicated, it should be aimed at "prevention of extension." Black's principles for cavity design are considered and put in the perspective of minimally invasive operative care. Guiding principles for contemporary adhesive cavities are reviewed. Contemporary operative care should be based on a minimally invasive approach. Minimal intervention is not just a technique, it is a philosophy!

  4. Minimally invasive cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2017-06-01

    Degenerative disorders of the cervical spine requiring surgical intervention have become increasingly more common over the past decade. Traditionally, open surgical approaches have been the mainstay of surgical treatment. More commonly, minimally invasive techniques are being developed with the intent to decrease surgical morbidity and iatrogenic spinal instability. This study will review four minimally invasive cervical techniques that have been increasingly utilized in the treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease. A series of PubMed-National Library of Medicine searches were performed. Only articles in English journals or with published with English language translations were included. Level of evidence of the selected articles was assessed. The significant incidence of postoperative dysphagia following ACDF has led to the development and increased use of zero-profile, stand-alone anterior cervical cages. The currently available literature examining the safety and effectiveness of zero-profile interbody devices supports the use of these devices in patients undergoing single-level ACDF. A multitude of studies demonstrating the significant incidence and impact of axial neck pain following open posterior spine surgery have led to a wave of research and development of techniques aimed at minimizing posterior cervical paraspinal disruption while achieving appropriate neurological decompression and/or spinal fixation. The currently available literature supports the use of minimally invasive posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy for the treatment of single-level radiculopathy. The literature suggests that fluoroscopically-assisted percutaneous cervical lateral mass screw fixation appears to be a technically feasible, safe and minimally invasive technique. Based on the currently available literature it appears that the DTRAX® expandable cage system is an effective minimally invasive posterior cervical technique for the treatment of single-level cervical

  5. Minimal but non-minimal inflation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzola, Luca [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia); Institute of Physics, University of Tartu,Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Racioppi, Antonio [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2016-10-07

    We consider the most minimal scale invariant extension of the standard model that allows for successful radiative electroweak symmetry breaking and inflation. The framework involves an extra scalar singlet, that plays the rôle of the inflaton, and is compatibile with current experimental bounds owing to the non-minimal coupling of the latter to gravity. This inflationary scenario predicts a very low tensor-to-scalar ratio r≈10{sup −3}, typical of Higgs-inflation models, but in contrast yields a scalar spectral index n{sub s}≃0.97 which departs from the Starobinsky limit. We briefly discuss the collider phenomenology of the framework.

  6. Horizontal Cells of the Primate Retina: Cone Specificity Without Spectral Opponency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Dennis M.; Lee, Barry B.; Stafford, Donna K.; Pokorny, Joel; Smith, Vivianne C.

    1996-02-01

    The chromatic dimensions of human color vision have a neural basis in the retina. Ganglion cells, the output neurons of the retina, exhibit spectral opponency; they are excited by some wavelengths and inhibited by others. The hypothesis that the opponent circuitry emerges from selective connections between horizontal cell interneurons and cone photoreceptors sensitive to long, middle, and short wavelengths (L-, M-, and S-cones) was tested by physiologically and anatomically characterizing cone connections of horizontal cell mosaics in macaque monkeys. H1 horizontal cells received input only from L- and M-cones, whereas H2 horizontal cells received a strong input from S-cones and a weaker input from L- and M-cones. All cone inputs were the same sign, and both horizontal cell types lacked opponency. Despite cone type selectivity, the horizontal cell cannot be the locus of an opponent transformation in primates, including humans.

  7. Some Fixed Point Theorems of Integral Type Contraction in Cone Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshid Khojasteh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We define a new concept of integral with respect to a cone. Moreover, certain fixed point theorems in those spaces are proved. Finally, an extension of Meir-Keeler fixed point in cone metric space is proved.

  8. Analysis of New Aerodynamic Design of the Nose Cone Section Using CFD and SPH

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdan-Alexandru BELEGA

    2015-01-01

    A new nose cones concept that promises a gain in performance over existing conventional nose cones is discussed in this paper. It is shown that significant performance gains result from the adaptation of the exhaust flow to the ambient pressure. For this complex work, it was necessary to collect and study the various nose cone shapes and the equations describing them? The paper objective was to identify the types of nose cones with ejector channels and specific aerodynamic characteristics of ...

  9. Some Nonunique Fixed Point Theorems of Ćirić Type on Cone Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Karapınar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some results of (Ćirić, 1974 on a nonunique fixed point theorem on the class of metric spaces are extended to the class of cone metric spaces. Namely, nonunique fixed point theorem is proved in orbitally complete cone metric spaces under the assumption that the cone is strongly minihedral. Regarding the scalar weight of cone metric, we are able to remove the assumption of strongly minihedral.

  10. Opponent melanopsin and S-cone signals in the human pupillary light response

    OpenAIRE

    Spitschan, Manuel; Jain, Sandeep; Brainard, David H.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K.

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes sense bright light using cones (L, M, and S) and recently discovered melanopsin-containing ganglion cells. Both S cones and melanopsin respond to blueish (short-wavelength) light. How does melanopsin interact with the cones in visual function? We measured the response of the human pupil to isolated stimulation of the different photoreceptors. Our work reveals a curious, opponent response to blue light in the otherwise familiar pupillary light response. Increased stimulation of S cone...

  11. Stable electroosmotically driven actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharan, Deepa; Motsebo, Mylene; Tumbic, Julia; Smela, Elisabeth

    2013-04-01

    We have previously presented "nastic" actuators based on electroosmotic (EO) pumping of fluid in microchannels using high electric fields for potential application in soft robotics. In this work we address two challenges facing this technology: applying EO to meso-scale devices and the stability of the pumping fluid. The hydraulic pressure achieved by EO increases with as 1/d2, where d is the depth of the microchannel, but the flow rate (which determines the stroke and the speed) is proportional to nd, where n is the number of channels. Therefore to get high force and high stroke the device requires a large number of narrow channels, which is not readily achievable using standard microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, for soft robotics the structure must be soft. In this work we present a method of fabricating a three-dimensional porous elastomer to serve as the array of channels based on a sacrificial sugar scaffold. We demonstrate the concept by fabricating small pumps. The flexible devices were made from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and comprise the 3D porous elastomer flanked on either side by reservoirs containing electrodes. The second issue addressed here involves the pumping fluid. Typically, water is used for EO, but water undergoes electrolysis even at low voltages. Since EO takes place at kV, these systems must be open to release the gases. We have recently reported that propylene carbonate (PC) is pumped at a comparable rate as water and is also stable for over 30 min at 8 kV. Here we show that PC is, however, degraded by moisture, so future EO systems must prevent water from reaching the PC.

  12. Minimally Invasive Video-Assisted versus Minimally Invasive Nonendoscopic Thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Fík

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT and minimally invasive nonendoscopic thyroidectomy (MINET represent well accepted and reproducible techniques developed with the main goal to improve cosmetic outcome, accelerate healing, and increase patient’s comfort following thyroid surgery. Between 2007 and 2011, a prospective nonrandomized study of patients undergoing minimally invasive thyroid surgery was performed to compare advantages and disadvantages of the two different techniques. There were no significant differences in the length of incision to perform surgical procedures. Mean duration of hemithyroidectomy was comparable in both groups, but it was more time consuming to perform total thyroidectomy by MIVAT. There were more patients undergoing MIVAT procedures without active drainage in the postoperative course and we also could see a trend for less pain in the same group. This was paralleled by statistically significant decreased administration of both opiates and nonopiate analgesics. We encountered two cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies in the MIVAT group only. MIVAT and MINET represent safe and feasible alternative to conventional thyroid surgery in selected cases and this prospective study has shown minimal differences between these two techniques.

  13. Minimal Erythema Dose (MED) testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Carolyn J; Chandler, Rachel; Kloss, Jacqueline D; Benson, Amy; Rooney, Deborah; Munshi, Teja; Darlow, Susan D; Perlis, Clifford; Manne, Sharon L; Oslin, David W

    2013-05-28

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) therapy is sometimes used as a treatment for various common skin conditions, including psoriasis, acne, and eczema. The dosage of UV light is prescribed according to an individual's skin sensitivity. Thus, to establish the proper dosage of UV light to administer to a patient, the patient is sometimes screened to determine a minimal erythema dose (MED), which is the amount of UV radiation that will produce minimal erythema (sunburn or redness caused by engorgement of capillaries) of an individual's skin within a few hours following exposure. This article describes how to conduct minimal erythema dose (MED) testing. There is currently no easy way to determine an appropriate UV dose for clinical or research purposes without conducting formal MED testing, requiring observation hours after testing, or informal trial and error testing with the risks of under- or over-dosing. However, some alternative methods are discussed.

  14. Minimizing Costs Can Be Costly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Rasmussen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A quite common practice, even in academic literature, is to simplify a decision problem and model it as a cost-minimizing problem. In fact, some type of models has been standardized to minimization problems, like Quadratic Assignment Problems (QAPs, where a maximization formulation would be treated as a “generalized” QAP and not solvable by many of the specially designed softwares for QAP. Ignoring revenues when modeling a decision problem works only if costs can be separated from the decisions influencing revenues. More often than we think this is not the case, and minimizing costs will not lead to maximized profit. This will be demonstrated using spreadsheets to solve a small example. The example is also used to demonstrate other pitfalls in network models: the inability to generally balance the problem or allocate costs in advance, and the tendency to anticipate a specific type of solution and thereby make constraints too limiting when formulating the problem.

  15. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McNeilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson’s School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The “minimal-marking” concept (Haswell, 1983, which requires dramatically more student engagement, resulted in more successful learning outcomes for surface-level knowledge acquisition than the more traditional approach of “teacher-corrects-all.” Results suggest it would be effective, not just for grammar, punctuation, and word usage, the objective here, but for any material that requires rote-memory learning, such as the Associated Press or Canadian Press style rules used by news publications across North America.

  16. On an equivalence of the topology of algebraic cone metric spaces and metric spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gamchi, Saeedeh Shamsi; Janfada, Mohammad; Niknam, Assadollah

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we prove that the topology induced by algebraic cone metric coincides with the topology induced by the metric obtained via a nonlinear scalarization function, i.e. any algebraic cone metric space is metrizable. Furthermore, the notion of algebraic cone normed space is introduced and also normability of the topology of this space is proved.

  17. Some Extensions of Banach's Contraction Principle in Complete Cone Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper we consider complete cone metric spaces. We generalize some definitions such as -nonexpansive and -uniformly locally contractive functions -closure, -isometric in cone metric spaces, and certain fixed point theorems will be proved in those spaces. Among other results, we prove some interesting applications for the fixed point theorems in cone metric spaces.

  18. The eddy-eliminating method of guide cone in the closed sump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. J.; Cheng, L.; Xia, C. Z.; Zhou, J. R.; Yan, H. Q.; Jiang, H. Y.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the effect on eddy-eliminating method of guide cone in the closed sump, the simple factor analysis and CFD numerical simulation are applied to calculate the flow field of closed sump and select ω-shaped back wall. ω-shaped back wall is consistent with the stream line in the suction sump, on this basis, CFD numerical simulation is conducted with the eddy-eliminating of the triangle guide cone and traditional guide cone. The results show that, for eddy-eliminating measures, with the height of triangular guide cone from 0 to 0.407HZ/DL , the excessive triangle guide cone hinder water into the flared pipe. With the width of triangular guide cone from 0.5 to 1.0BZ/DL , increasing width of triangular guide cone may increase the pumping hydraulic performance and pumping efficiency. However with the width of triangular guide cone from 0.5 to 1.0 BZ/DL , too broad traditional guide cone hinder water into the flared pipe. In the design discharge, whether triangle guide cone or traditional guide cone have a little effect on the efficiency of the pumping station. But in terms of the eddy-eliminating on the bottom of suction sump, it is necessary to set up guide cone.

  19. Fixed Points of α-Admissible Mappings in Cone Metric Spaces with Banach Algebra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Malhotra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the $\\alpha$-admissible mappings in the setting of cone metric spaces equipped with Banach algebra and solid cones. Our results generalize and extend several known results of metric and cone metric spaces. An example is presented which illustrates and shows the significance of results proved herein.

  20. Does Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Minimize Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ravish Shammi; Dutta, Shumayou

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Purpose To evaluate the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) in minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) in a cohort of patients and compare with available historical data on SSI in open spinal surgery cohorts, and to evaluate additional direct costs incurred due to SSI. Overview of Literature SSI can lead to prolonged antibiotic therapy, extended hospitalization, repeated operations, and implant removal. Small incisions and minimal dissection intrinsic to MISS may minimize the risk of postoperative infections. However, there is a dearth of literature on infections after MISS and their additional direct financial implications. Methods All patients from January 2007 to January 2015 undergoing posterior spinal surgery with tubular retractor system and microscope in our institution were included. The procedures performed included tubular discectomies, tubular decompressions for spinal stenosis and minimal invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). The incidence of postoperative SSI was calculated and compared to the range of cited SSI rates from published studies. Direct costs were calculated from medical billing for index cases and for patients with SSI. Results A total of 1,043 patients underwent 763 noninstrumented surgeries (discectomies, decompressions) and 280 instrumented (TLIF) procedures. The mean age was 52.2 years with male:female ratio of 1.08:1. Three infections were encountered with fusion surgeries (mean detection time, 7 days). All three required wound wash and debridement with one patient requiring unilateral implant removal. Additional direct cost due to infection was $2,678 per 100 MISS-TLIF. SSI increased hospital expenditure per patient 1.5-fold after instrumented MISS. Conclusions Overall infection rate after MISS was 0.29%, with SSI rate of 0% in non-instrumented MISS and 1.07% with instrumented MISS. MISS can markedly reduce the SSI rate and can be an

  1. Minimal Flavor Constraints for Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakuma, Hidenori; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self-coupling and mas......We analyze the constraints on the the vacuum polarization of the standard model gauge bosons from a minimal set of flavor observables valid for a general class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. We will show that the constraints have a strong impact on the self...

  2. Riemannian light cone from vanishing birefringence in premetric vacuum electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; Hehl, Friedrich W.

    2004-01-01

    We consider premetric electrodynamics with a local and linear constitutive law for the vacuum. Within this framework, we find quartic Fresnel wave surfaces for the propagation of light. If we require vanishing birefringence in vacuum, then a Riemannian light cone is implied. No proper Finslerian structure can occur. This is generalized to dynamical equations of any order.

  3. Prediction of Cone Crusher Performance Considering Liner Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Ma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cone crushers are used in the aggregates and mining industries to crush rock material. The pressure on cone crusher liners is the key factor that influences the hydraulic pressure, power draw and liner wear. In order to dynamically analyze and calculate cone crusher performance along with liner wear, a series of experiments are performed to obtain the crushed rock material samples from a crushing plant at different time intervals. In this study, piston die tests are carried out and a model relating compression coefficient, compression ratio and particle size distribution to a corresponding pressure is presented. On this basis, a new wear prediction model is proposed combining the empirical model for predicting liner wear with time parameter. A simple and practical model, based on the wear model and interparticle breakage, is presented for calculating compression ratio of each crushing zone along with liner wear. Furthermore, the size distribution of the product is calculated based on existing size reduction process model. A method of analysis of product size distribution and shape in the crushing process considering liner wear is proposed. Finally, the validity of the wear model is verified via testing. The result shows that there is a significant improvement of the prediction of cone crusher performance considering liner wear as compared to the previous model.

  4. Heat kernel analysis for Bessel operators on symmetric cones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möllers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the heat equation corresponding to the Bessel operators on a symmetric cone $Ω=G/K$. These operators form a one-parameter family of elliptic self-adjoint second order differential operators and occur in the Lie algebra action of certain unitary highest weight representations...

  5. Role of laminin and integrin interactions in growth cone guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKerracher, L; Chamoux, M; Arregui, C O

    1996-04-01

    Laminin is well known to promote neuronal adhesion and axonal growth, but recent experiments suggest laminin has a wider role in guiding axons, both in development and regeneration. In vitro experiments demonstrate that laminin can alter the rate and direction of axonal growth, even when growth cone contact with laminin is transient. Investigations focused on a single neuronal type, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), strongly implicate laminin as an important guidance molecule in development and suggest the involvement of integrins. Integrins are receptors for laminin, and neurons express multiple types of integrins that bind laminin. Morphologically, integrins cluster in point contacts, specialized regions of the growth cone that may coordinately regulate adhesion and motility. Recent evidence suggests that the structure and regulation of point contacts may differ from that of their nonneuronal counterpart, focal contacts. In part, this may be because the interaction of the cytoplasmic domain of integrin with the cytoskeleton is different in point contacts and focal contracts. Mutational studies where the cytoplasmic domain is truncated or altered are leading to a better understanding of the role of the alpha and beta subunit in regulating integrin clustering and binding to the cytoskeleton. In addition, whereas integrins may regulate motility through direct physical linkages to the growth cone cytoskeleton, an equally important role is their ability to elicit signaling, both through protein tyrosine phosphorylation and modulating calcium levels. Through such mechanisms integrins likely regulate the dynamic attachment and detachment of the growth cone as it moves on laminin substrates.

  6. Expanded clinical spectrum of enhanced S-cone syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, Suzanne; Barbazetto, Irene; Allikmets, Rando; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Bergen, Arthur; Tsang, Stephen H.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    New funduscopic findings in patients with enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) may help clinicians in diagnosing this rare autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy. To expand the clinical spectrum of ESCS due to mutations in the NR2E3 gene. Retrospective, noncomparative case series of 31 patients examined

  7. Spatial correlation length of normalized cone data in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firouzianbandpey, Sarah; Griffiths, D. V.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    The main topic of this study is to assess the anisotropic spatial correlation lengths of a sand layer deposit based on cone penetration testing with pore pressure measurement (CPTu) data. Spatial correlation length can be an important factor in reliability analysis of geotechnical systems, yet...

  8. Cone Penetration Testing: A Sound Method for Urban Archaeological Prospection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone Penetration Testing (CPT) is a geotechnical in situ site investigation method and is widely applied in urbanized areas of the Netherlands. Approximately 20,000 CPTs are conducted in the Netherlands each year. The frequency of such testing, and the presence of archaeological deposits within the

  9. Variability and Reliabiltiy in Axon Growth Cone Navigation Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnelo, Marta; Ricoult, Sébastien G.; Juncker, David; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Faisal, Aldo A.

    2015-03-01

    The nervous system's wiring is a result of axon growth cones navigating through specific molecular environments during development. In order to reach their target, growth cones need to make decisions under uncertainty as they are faced with stochastic sensory information and probabilistic movements. The overall system therefore exhibits features of whole organisms (perception, decision making, action) in the subset of a single cell. We aim to characterise growth cone navigation in defined nano-dot guidance cue environments, by using the tools of computational neuroscience to conduct ``molecular psychophysics.'' We start with a generative model of growth cone behaviour and we 1. characterise sensory and internal sources of noise contributing to behavioural variables, by combining knowledge of the underlying stochastic dynamics in cue sensing and the growth of the cytoskeleton. This enables us to 2. produce bottom-up lower limit estimates of behavioural response reliability and visualise it as probability distributions over axon growth trajectories. Given this information we can match our in silico model's ``psychometric'' decision curves with empirical data. Finally we use a Monte-Carlo approach to predict response distributions of axon trajectories from our model.

  10. Dependence of the cone angles of phosphorus-containing ligands ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Dependence of the cone angles of phosphorus-containing ligands in the chemistry of hydride and dihydrogen complexes of ruthenium. NISHA MATHEW and BALAJI R JAGIRDAR. Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science,. Bangalore 560 012, India. A series of new hydride complexes of ...

  11. Development research in the Southern Cone | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-05

    Jan 5, 2011 ... In the 1970s, the countries of South America's Southern Cone shared most of the common and ruinous features of their dictatorships: murder, torture, persecution of democratic political movements, purges of university faculties — and the terrifying phenomenon of disappearances. Among researchers and ...

  12. Ignitability analysis using the cone calorimeter and lift apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    1996-01-01

    The irradiance plotted as function of time to ignition for wood materials tested in the Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354) differs signiticantly from that tested in the Lateral Ignition and Flame spread Test (LIFT) apparatus (ASTM E1321). This difference in piloted ignitabilty is primarily due to the difference in forced convective cooling of the specimen tested in both...

  13. Cone calorimeter testing of vegetation--an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert H. White; David R. Weise; Kurt Mackes; Alison C. Dibble

    2002-01-01

    As part of efforts to address fire problems in the wildland-urban interface, the cone calorimeter is being used to measure the relative flammability of different plant species. In the first two studies, we tested plants used to landscape homes in California and an assortment of plants found in Colorado. Using the effective heat of combustion and the peak heat release...

  14. Twist-2 Light-Cone Pion Wave Function

    OpenAIRE

    Belyaev, V. M.; Johnson, Mikkel B.

    1997-01-01

    We present an analysis of the existing constraints for the twist-2 light-cone pion wave function. We find that existing information on the pion wave function does not exclude the possibility that the pion wave function attains its asymptotic form. New bounds on the parameters of the pion wave function are presented.

  15. Dirac cones beyond the honeycomb lattice : a symmetry based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miert, G. van; de Morais Smith, Cristiane

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several new materials exhibiting massless Dirac fermions have been proposed. However, many of these do not have the typical graphene honeycomb lattice, which is often associated with Dirac cones. Here, we present a classification of these different two-dimensional Dirac systems based on

  16. Longleaf Pine Cone Crops and Climate: A Possible Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil Pederson; John S. Kush; Ralph S. Meldahl; William D. Bayer

    1999-01-01

    The physiological development of longieaf pine seed extends over three calendar years. The duration of this process may explain the reason for infrequent seed crops. Infrequent crops cause problems for those interested in natural regeneration. Longleaf pine cone crops have been monitored on the Escambia Experimental Forest (EEF) in Brewton, AL since 1958. Weather data...

  17. Bi-cone vacuum chamber in the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The "bi-cone" vacuum chamber in ISR intersection I-7, for experiment R702. Made from 0.28 mm thick titanium, it was at its time the most transparent chamber ever built. Ian Wilson is standing next to the chamber. See also 7609219.

  18. Harmonic Function of Poincare Cone Condition In Solving Dirichlet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the dirichlet problem and maximum principle where we conclude that the application of sums , differences and scalar multiples of harmonic functions are again harmonic. Keywords: Harmonic, maximum principles, Vector space, Poincare cone, Holder condition. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics, ...

  19. Cracking cone fracture after cold compaction of argillaceous particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work an experimental investigation has been focused on the `cracking cone' fracture in powder compacts. This includes studies of crack propagation and determination of operating conditions to avoid the green body fracture. The numerical modelling is implemented using a finite element method based on the Von ...

  20. Closed graph and open mapping theorems for normed cones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    right) K-completeness; closed graph; open mapping. 1. Introduction. In the last few years there is a growing interest in the theory of quasi-metric spaces and other related structures such as quasi-normed cones and asymmetric normed linear ...

  1. Bessel-like beams with z-dependent cone angles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Belyi, VN

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new type of Bessel-like optical beams, which is distinguished by the dependence on the cone angle from the longitudinal coordinate, is investigated. Such beams have the properties of Bessel beams (ring-spatial spatial spectrum) as well as Gaussian...

  2. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, S.; Durack, C.; Abella, F.; Shemesh, H.; Roig, M.; Lemberg, K.

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on

  3. Nonlinear Contractive Conditions for Coupled Cone Fixed Point Theorems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Wei-Shih

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish some new coupled fixed point theorems for various types of nonlinear contractive maps in the setting of quasiordered cone metric spaces which not only obtain several coupled fixed point theorems announced by many authors but also generalize them under weaker assumptions.

  4. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  5. Relationship between foveal cone specialization and pit morphology in albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Melissa A; McAllister, John T; Cooper, Robert F; Dubis, Adam M; Patitucci, Teresa N; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Anderson, Jennifer L; Stepien, Kimberly E; Costakos, Deborah M; Connor, Thomas B; Wirostko, William J; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Dubra, Alfredo; Curcio, Christine A; Brilliant, Murray H; Summers, C Gail; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-05-20

    Albinism is associated with disrupted foveal development, though intersubject variability is becoming appreciated. We sought to quantify this variability, and examine the relationship between foveal cone specialization and pit morphology in patients with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. We recruited 32 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. DNA was obtained from 25 subjects, and known albinism genes were analyzed for mutations. Relative inner and outer segment (IS and OS) lengthening (fovea-to-perifovea ratio) was determined from manually segmented spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) B-scans. Foveal pit morphology was quantified for eight subjects from macular SD-OCT volumes. Ten subjects underwent imaging with adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), and cone density was measured. We found mutations in 22 of 25 subjects, including five novel mutations. All subjects lacked complete excavation of inner retinal layers at the fovea, though four subjects had foveal pits with normal diameter and/or volume. Peak cone density and OS lengthening were variable and overlapped with that observed in normal controls. A fifth hyper-reflective band was observed in the outer retina on SD-OCT in the majority of the subjects with albinism. Foveal cone specialization and pit morphology vary greatly in albinism. Normal cone packing was observed in the absence of a foveal pit, suggesting a pit is not required for packing to occur. The degree to which retinal anatomy correlates with genotype or visual function remains unclear, and future examination of larger patient groups will provide important insight on this issue. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Impact of oral melatonin on the electroretinogram cone response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosolen Serge G

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the eye, melatonin plays a role in promoting light sensitivity at night and modulating many aspects of circadian retinal physiology. It is also an inhibitor of retinal dopamine, which is a promoter of day vision through the cone system. Consequently, it is possible that oral melatonin (an inhibitor of retinal dopamine taken to alleviate circadian disorders may affect cone functioning. Our aim was to assess the impact of melatonin on the cone response of the human retina using electroretinography (ERG. Methods Twelve healthy participants aged between 18 to 52 years old were submitted to a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover, and counterbalanced-order design. The subjects were tested on 2 sessions beginning first with a baseline ERG, followed by the administration of the placebo or melatonin condition and then, 30 min later, a second ERG to test the effect. Results Following oral melatonin administration, a significant decrease of about 8% of the cone maximal response was observed (mean 6.9 μV ± SEM 2.0; P = 0.0065 along with a prolonged b-wave implicit time of 0.4 ms ± 0.1, 50 minutes after ingestion. Conclusion Oral melatonin appears to reach the eye through the circulation. When it is administered at a time of day when it is not usually present, melatonin appears to reduce input to retinal cones. We believe that the impact of melatonin on retinal function should be taken into consideration when used without supervision in chronic self-medication for sleep or circadian disorder treatment.

  7. Chemical basis for minimal cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin; Ikegami, Takashi

    -movement. Different from the mere physicalchemical process, any life system preserves its own identity and consistency with respect to the environment. This homeostasis, rooted on the sensory motor couplings, will organize minimal cognition (see also, Ikegami , T. et al., 2008, BioSys., 91, p.388 ]...

  8. A Defense of Semantic Minimalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su

    2012-01-01

    Semantic Minimalism is a position about the semantic content of declarative sentences, i.e., the content that is determined entirely by syntax. It is defined by the following two points: "Point 1": The semantic content is a complete/truth-conditional proposition. "Point 2": The semantic content is useful to a theory of…

  9. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy...

  10. Harm minimization among teenage drinkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Hulvej; Curtis, Tine; Christensen, Pia Haudrup

    2007-01-01

    . In regulating the social context of drinking they relied on their personal experiences more than on formalized knowledge about alcohol and harm, which they had learned from prevention campaigns and educational programmes. CONCLUSIONS: In this study we found that teenagers may help each other to minimize alcohol...

  11. Development and Verification of Novel Porous Titanium Metaphyseal Cones for Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizan, Ahmad; Bhowmik-Stoker, Manoshi; Alipit, Vincent; Kirk, Amanda E; Krebs, Viktor E; Harwin, Steven F; Meneghini, R Michael

    2017-06-01

    Porous metaphyseal cones are widely used in revision knee arthroplasty. A new system of porous titanium metaphyseal cones has been designed based on the femoral and tibial morphology derived from a computed tomography-based anatomical database. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the initial mechanical stability of the new porous titanium revision cone system by measuring the micromotion under physiologic loading compared with a widely-used existing porous tantalum metaphyseal cone system. The new cones were designed to precisely fit the femoral and tibial anatomy, and 3D printing technology was used to manufacture these porous titanium cones. The stability of the new titanium cones and the widely-used tantalum cones were compared under physiologic loading conditions in bench top test model. The stability of the new titanium cones was either equivalent or better than the tantalum cones. The new titanium femoral cone construct had significantly less micromotion compared with the traditional femoral cone construct in 5 of the 12 directions measured (P titanium metaphyseal tibial cones demonstrated less micromotion in medial varus/valgus (P = .004) and posterior compressive micromotion (P = .002) compared with the traditional porous tantalum system. The findings of this biomechanical study demonstrate satisfactory mechanical stability of an anatomical-based porous titanium metaphyseal cone system for femoral and tibial bone loss as measured by micromotion under physiologic loading. The new cone design, in combination with instrumentation that facilitates surgical efficiency, is encouraging. Long-term clinical follow-up is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cone photoreceptor structure in patients with x-linked cone dysfunction and red-green color vision deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patterson, Emily J.; Wilk, Melissa; Langlo, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE. Mutations in the coding sequence of the L and M opsin genes are often associated with X-linked cone dysfunction (such as Bornholm Eye Disease, BED), though the exact color vision phenotype associated with these disorders is variable. We examined individuals with L/ M opsin gene mutations...

  13. Essentially asymptotically stable homoclinic networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driesse, R.; Homburg, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Melbourne [An example of a nonasymptotically stable attractor, Nonlinearity 4(3) (1991), pp. 835-844] discusses an example of a robust heteroclinic network that is not asymptotically stable but which has the strong attracting property called essential asymptotic stability. We establish that this

  14. Minimal cut sets in biochemical reaction networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klamt, Steffen; Gilles, Ernst Dieter

    2004-01-01

    .... We introduce the concept of minimal cut sets for biochemical networks. A minimal cut set (MCS) is a minimal (irreducible) set of reactions in the network whose inactivation will definitely lead to a failure in certain network functions...

  15. Field Test Evaluation of Effect on Cone Resistance Caused by Change in Penetration Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Rikke; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents how a change in cone penetration rate affects the measured cone resistance during cone penetration testing in silty soils. Regardless of soil, type the standard rate of penetration is 20 mm/s and it is generally accepted that undrained penetration occurs in clay while drained...... in the laboratory. A change in the measured cone resistance occurs by lowering the penetration rate. This is caused by the changes in drainage conditions. Compared to the normal penetration rate of 20 mm/s, this paper illustrates that lowering the penetration rate leads to an increase in the cone resistance from 1...

  16. A Class of Coning Algorithms Based on a Half-Compressed Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanye Tang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to advance the coning algorithm performance of strapdown inertial navigation systems, a new half-compressed coning correction structure is presented. The half-compressed algorithm structure is analytically proven to be equivalent to the traditional compressed structure under coning environments. The half-compressed algorithm coefficients allow direct configuration from traditional compressed algorithm coefficients. A type of algorithm error model is defined for coning algorithm performance evaluation under maneuver environment conditions. Like previous uncompressed algorithms, the half-compressed algorithm has improved maneuver accuracy and retained coning accuracy compared with its corresponding compressed algorithm. Compared with prior uncompressed algorithms, the formula for the new algorithm coefficients is simpler.

  17. A Minimal Self-affine Stable Model for Space Physics Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, N. W.; Credgington, D.; Freeman, M. P.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2006-12-01

    Direct inspiration for the measurement of scaling in space physics has come from inherently multiscale physics such as self-organised criticality and turbulence. Additionally, the ability to assess the likelihood of a fluctuation of a given size has "space weather" implications. However, we have elsewhere argued that it is also useful to capture the "stylised facts" of the scaling behaviour of auroral indices and solar wind quantities by much simpler, purely phenomenological models. To make this idea more concrete we here illustrate it by studying the use of fractional Lévy motion as a model for solar wind and auroral index time series, although this example could be taken as a prototype for other possible models. In fLm there are only three exponents, the Lévy exponent μ, the persistence exponent β and the selfsimilarity exponent H which depends additively on the other two. By postulating an fLm description we explore how the previously experimentally measured scaling exponents for quantities like superposed epoch averaged activity, or the probability distribution of the differenced time series, would depend on the model's parameters. We can then also derive predictions for the exponents of the more complicated measurements which have also been made, such as size and duration of bursts above a threshold, or the survival probability of a burst. Comparison of these predictions with data is then used to assess the usefulness of fLm as a toy model for space physics time series.

  18. Assessing the Effectiveness of the Cone of Probability as a Visual Means of Communicating Scientific Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlove, B. S.; Broad, K.; Meyer, R.

    2010-12-01

    We review the evolution, communication, and differing interpretations of the National Hurricane Center (NHC)'s "cone of uncertainty" hurricane forecast graphic, drawing on several related disciplines—cognitive psychology, visual anthropology, and risk communication theory. We examine the 2004 hurricane season, two specific hurricanes (Katrina 2005 and Ike 2008) and the 2010 hurricane season, still in progress. During the 2004 hurricane season, five named storms struck Florida. Our analysis of that season draws upon interviews with key government officials and media figures, archival research of Florida newspapers, analysis of public comments on the NHC cone of uncertainty graphic and a multiagency study of 2004 hurricane behavior. At that time, the hurricane forecast graphic was subject to misinterpretation by many members of the public. We identify several characteristics of this graphic that contributed to public misinterpretation. Residents overemphasized the specific track of the eye, failed to grasp the width of hurricanes, and generally did not recognize the timing of the passage of the hurricane. Little training was provided to emergency response managers in the interpretation of forecasts. In the following year, Katrina became a national scandal, further demonstrating the limitations of the cone as a means of leading to appropriate responses to forecasts. In the second half of the first decade of the 21st century, three major changes occurred in hurricane forecast communication: the forecasts themselves improved in terms of accuracy and lead time, the NHC made minor changes in the graphics and expanded the explanatory material that accompanies the graphics, and some efforts were made to reach out to emergency response planners and municipal officials to enhance their understanding of the forecasts and graphics. There were some improvements in the responses to Ike, though a number of deaths were due to inadequate evacuations, and property damage probably

  19. Cone beam computed tomography guidance for setup of patients receiving accelerated partial breast irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Elizabeth A; Cho, John; Vallis, Katherine A; Sharpe, Michael B; Lee, Grace; Blackburn, Helen; Nageeti, Tahani; McGibney, Carol; Jaffray, David A

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the role of cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance for setup error reduction and soft tissue visualization in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Twenty patients were recruited for the delivery of radiotherapy to the postoperative cavity (3850 cGy in 10 fractions over 5 days) using an APBI technique. Cone-beam CT data sets were acquired after an initial skin-mark setup and before treatment delivery. These were registered online using the ipsilateral lung and external contours. Corrections were executed for translations exceeding 3 mm. The random and systematic errors associated with setup using skin-marks and setup using CBCT guidance were calculated and compared. A total of 315 CBCT data sets were analyzed. The systematic errors for the skin-mark setup were 2.7, 1.7, and 2.4 mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. These were reduced to 0.8, 0.7, and 0.8 mm when CBCT guidance was used. The random errors were reduced from 2.4, 2.2, and 2.9 mm for skin-marks to 1.5, 1.5, and 1.6 mm for CBCT guidance in the right-left, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. A skin-mark setup for APBI patients is sufficient for current planning target volume margins for the population of patients studied here. Online CBCT guidance minimizes the occurrence of large random deviations, which may have a greater impact for the accelerated fractionation schedule used in APBI. It is also likely to permit a reduction in planning target volume margins and provide skin-line visualization and dosimetric evaluation of cardiac and lung volumes.

  20. Loss and gain of cone types in vertebrate ciliary photoreceptor evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jacob M; Arendt, Detlev

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary photoreceptors are a diverse cell type family that comprises the rods and cones of the retina and other related cell types such as pineal photoreceptors. Ciliary photoreceptor evolution has been dynamic during vertebrate evolution with numerous gains and losses of opsin and phototransduction genes, and changes in their expression. For example, early mammals lost all but two cone opsins, indicating loss of cone receptor types in response to nocturnal lifestyle. Our review focuses on the comparison of specifying transcription factors and cell type-specific transcriptome data in vertebrate retinae to build and test hypotheses on ciliary photoreceptor evolution. Regarding cones, recent data reveal that a combination of factors specific for long-wavelength sensitive opsin (Lws)- cones in non-mammalian vertebrates (Thrb and Rxrg) is found across all differentiating cone photoreceptors in mice. This suggests that mammalian ancestors lost all but one ancestral cone type, the Lws-cone. We test this hypothesis by a correlation analysis of cone transcriptomes in mouse and chick, and find that, indeed, transcriptomes of all mouse cones are most highly correlated to avian Lws-cones. These findings underscore the importance of specifying transcription factors in tracking cell type evolution, and shed new light on the mechanisms of cell type loss and gain in retina evolution. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cone Factors from Field Vane and Triaxial Tests in Danish Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luke, Kirsten

    1996-01-01

    Six Danish cohesive soils are investigated using Cone Penetration Test (CPT) to estimate the undrained shear strength, cu. Field vane tests and consolidated triaxial tests are used to estimate cu for the six soils. The tested soils all come up with cone factors very close to 10 when using cu from...... the triaxial tests whereas cone factors ranging from 7 to 11 are estimated by using measurements from field vane tests. A strong correlation between the cone factor, Nkt and the friction ratio, fR is obtained when the cone factor is estimated from vane tests. This relation, which is obtained using only the six...... thoroughly investigated soils, is tested on data from other Danish and international sites. Likewise the constant cone factor of Nkt = 10 obtained from the triaxial tests is evaluated and compared with cone factors obtained from triaxial tests in other countries....

  2. Adaptive optics retinal imaging reveals S-cone dystrophy in tritan color-vision deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraas, Rigmor C.; Carroll, Joseph; Gunther, Karen L.; Chung, Mina; Williams, David R.; Foster, David H.; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Tritan color-vision deficiency is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with mutations in the short-wavelength-sensitive- (S-) cone-pigment gene. An unexplained feature of the disorder is that individuals with the same mutation manifest different degrees of deficiency. To date, it has not been possible to examine whether any loss of S-cone function is accompanied by physical disruption in the cone mosaic. Two related tritan subjects with the same novel mutation in their S-cone-opsin gene, but different degrees of deficiency, were examined. Adaptive optics was used to obtain high-resolution retinal images, which revealed distinctly different S-cone mosaics consistent with their discrepant phenotypes. In addition, a significant disruption in the regularity of the overall cone mosaic was observed in the subject completely lacking S-cone function. These results taken together with other recent findings from molecular genetics indicate that, with rare exceptions, tritan deficiency is progressive in nature.

  3. Minimalism and the Pragmatic Frame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Falcato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the debate between literalism and contextualism in semantics, Kent Bach’s project is often taken to stand on the latter side of the divide. In this paper I argue this is a misleading assumption and justify it by contrasting Bach’s assessment of the theoretical eliminability of minimal propositions arguably expressed by well-formed sentences with standard minimalist views, and by further contrasting his account of the division of interpretative processes ascribable to the semantics and pragmatics of a language with a parallel analysis carried out by the most radical opponent to semantic minimalism, i.e., by occasionalism. If my analysis proves right, the sum of its conclusions amounts to a refusal of Bach’s main dichotomies.

  4. Minimal universal quantum heat machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D.; Alicki, R.; Kurizki, G.

    2013-01-01

    In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows us to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation, the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed.

  5. Construction schedules slack time minimizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemiński, Michał

    2017-07-01

    The article presents two copyright models for minimizing downtime working brigades. Models have been developed for construction schedules performed using the method of work uniform. Application of flow shop models is possible and useful for the implementation of large objects, which can be divided into plots. The article also presents a condition describing gives which model should be used, as well as a brief example of optimization schedule. The optimization results confirm the legitimacy of the work on the newly-developed models.

  6. Torsional Rigidity of Minimal Submanifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Palmer, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    We prove explicit upper bounds for the torsional rigidity of extrinsic domains of minimal submanifolds $P^m$ in ambient Riemannian manifolds $N^n$ with a pole $p$. The upper bounds are given in terms of the torsional rigidities of corresponding Schwarz symmetrizations of the domains in warped...... for the torsional rigidity are actually attained and give conditions under which the geometric average of the stochastic mean exit time for Brownian motion at infinity is finite....

  7. Optimizing Processes to Minimize Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, David

    2017-01-01

    NASA, like the other hazardous industries, has suffered very catastrophic losses. Human error will likely never be completely eliminated as a factor in our failures. When you can't eliminate risk, focus on mitigating the worst consequences and recovering operations. Bolstering processes to emphasize the role of integration and problem solving is key to success. Building an effective Safety Culture bolsters skill-based performance that minimizes risk and encourages successful engagement.

  8. Avian cone photoreceptors tile the retina as five independent, self-organizing mosaics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph A Kram

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The avian retina possesses one of the most sophisticated cone photoreceptor systems among vertebrates. Birds have five types of cones including four single cones, which support tetrachromatic color vision and a double cone, which is thought to mediate achromatic motion perception. Despite this richness, very little is known about the spatial organization of avian cones and its adaptive significance. Here we show that the five cone types of the chicken independently tile the retina as highly ordered mosaics with a characteristic spacing between cones of the same type. Measures of topological order indicate that double cones are more highly ordered than single cones, possibly reflecting their posited role in motion detection. Although cones show spacing interactions that are cell type-specific, all cone types use the same density-dependent yardstick to measure intercone distance. We propose a simple developmental model that can account for these observations. We also show that a single parameter, the global regularity index, defines the regularity of all five cone mosaics. Lastly, we demonstrate similar cone distributions in three additional avian species, suggesting that these patterning principles are universal among birds. Since regular photoreceptor spacing is critical for uniform sampling of visual space, the cone mosaics of the avian retina represent an elegant example of the emergence of adaptive global patterning secondary to simple local interactions between individual photoreceptors. Our results indicate that the evolutionary pressures that gave rise to the avian retina's various adaptations for enhanced color discrimination also acted to fine-tune its spatial sampling of color and luminance.

  9. Minimally Invasive Heart Valve Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhout, Ismail; Morgant, Marie-Catherine; Bouchard, Denis

    2017-09-01

    Minimally invasive valve surgery represents a recent and significant advance in modern heart surgery. Indeed, many less invasive approaches for both the aortic and mitral valves have been developed in the past 2 decades. These procedures were hypothesized to result in less operative trauma, which might translate into better patient outcomes. However, this clinical benefit remains controversial in the literature. The aim of this review is to discuss the evidence surrounding minimally invasive heart valve surgery in the current era. A systematic search of the literature from 2006-2016 was performed looking for articles reporting early or late outcomes after minimally invasive valve surgery. Less invasive valve surgery is safe and provides long-term surgical outcomes similar to those of standard sternotomy. In addition, these approaches result in a reduction in overall hospital length of stay and may mitigate the risk of early morbidity-mainly postoperative bleeding, transfusions, and ventilation duration. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonutti, Peter M; Mont, Michael A; McMahon, Margo; Ragland, Phillip S; Kester, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Currently, minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty is defined as an incision length of definition are: 1. The amount of soft-tissue dissection (including muscle, ligament, and capsular damage). 2. Patellar retraction or eversion. 3. Tibiofemoral dislocation. Minimally invasive surgery should not be considered to be a cosmetic procedure but rather one that addresses patients' concerns with regard to postoperative pain and slow rehabilitation. Standard total knee arthroplasties provide pain relief, but returning to activities of daily living remains a challenge for some individuals, who may take several weeks to recover. Several studies have demonstrated long-term success (at more than ten years) of standard total knee arthroplasties. However, many patients remain unsatisfied with the results of the surgery. In a study of functional limitations of patients with a Knee Society score of > or = 90 points after total knee arthroplasty, only 35% of patients stated that they had no limitations. This finding was highlighted in a study by Dickstein et al., in which one-third of the elderly patients who underwent knee replacement were unhappy with the outcome at six and twelve months postoperatively. Although many surgeons utilize objective functional scoring systems to evaluate outcome, it is likely that the criteria for a successful result of total knee arthroplasty differ between the patient and the surgeon. This was evident in a report by Bullens et al., who concluded that surgeons are more satisfied with the results of total knee arthroplasty than are their patients. Trousdale et al. showed that, in addition to concerns about long-term functional outcome, patients' major concerns were postoperative pain and the time required for recovery. Patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty have specific functional goals, such as climbing stairs, squatting, kneeling, and returning to some level of low-impact sports after surgery. Our clinical investigations demonstrated that

  11. Mandibular condyle position in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ. School of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To evaluate position of the mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population radiographically by a cone beam computed tomography. Cone beam computed tomography of 60 temporomandibular joints was performed on 15 males and 15 females with no history of any temporomandibular disorders, or any other orthodontic or photoconductors treatments. Position of mandibular condyle within articular fossa at centric occlusion was evaluated. A statistical evaluation was done using a SPSS. In the sagittal views, mandibular condyle within articular fossa was laterally located at central section. Mandibular condyles in the right and left sides were showed asymmetric positional relationship at medial, central, and lateral sections. Mandibular condyle within articular fossa in an asymptomatic population was observed non-concentric position in the sagittal and coronal views.

  12. Cone beam CT in radiology; DVT in der Radiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, Florian [ALB FILS KLINIKEN GmbH, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2013-06-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a cross-sectional X-ray modality using an imaging system with cone-beam geometry. Unlike CT, the data set is acquired in a single circulation of a C-arm shaped tube-detector unit. Image characteristics vs. exposure dose ratio is similar to conventional CT, but varies widely depending on the CBVT device and the selected settings, and is limited to low dose/high noise applications. Up to now, only few data is available to estimate the clinical value of CBCT. Nevertheless, the use of CBCT is increasing drastically in the recent years, especially in the dental and ENT diagnostic field. For this reason the European Commission recently published guidelines concerning the clinical application of CBCT. These guidelines, as well as clinically relevant technical features of CBCT and examples of the most frequent dental applications are presented in the following article. (orig.)

  13. Removal of cationic dye from water by activated pine cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Milan Z.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of a cationic phenothyazine dye methylene blueonto activated carbon prepared from pine cones was investigated with the variation in parameters of contact time, dye concentration and pH. The kinetic data were found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic modelclosely. The equilibrium data were best represented by the Langmuir isotherm with maximum adsorption capacity of 233.1 mg g-1. Adsorption was favored by using a higher solution pH. Textural analysis by nitrogen adsorption was used to determine specific surface area and pore structure of the obtained carbon. Boehm titrations revealed that carboxylic groups are present in the highest degree on the carbon surface. The results indicate that the presented method for activation of pine cones could yield activated carbon with significant porosity, developed surface reactivity and considerable adsorption affinity toward cationic dye methylene blue.

  14. Adenosine induces growth-cone turning of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Benjamin; Eilert, John-Christian; Munck, Sebastian; Harz, Hartmann

    2008-12-01

    The formation of appropriate connections between neurons and their specific targets is an essential step during development and repair of the nervous system. Growth cones are located at the leading edges of the growing neurites and respond to environmental cues in order to be guided to their final targets. Directional information can be coded by concentration gradients of substrate-bound or diffusible-guidance molecules. Here we show that concentration gradients of adenosine stimulate growth cones of sensory neurons (dorsal root ganglia) from chicken embryos to turn towards the adenosine source. This response is mediated by adenosine receptors. The subsequent signal transduction process involves cAMP. It may be speculated that the in vivo function of this response is concerned with the formation or the repair and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system.

  15. Clinical diagnosis of high myopia with cone dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-He Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available High myopia associated with cone dystrophy is relatively rare in clinical practice. Because the two diseases have a certain genetic predisposition, with the disease developed, clinical examination and clinical symptoms have some similarities, one disease diagnosis is easily confused or masked by the other diagnosis, especially in the face of patients with high myopia associated abnormalities, we should carefully screen abnormal visual function of its own or combined cone dystrophy diagnosis. In addition, the development of the disease may mutually reinforce, aggravate the symptoms of each other, which is likely to cause mission or misdiagnosis, or delay the proper treatment. Therefore, it is clinically difficult to correct and comprehensively and timely diagnosis.

  16. Interplay between Mach cone and radial expansion in jet events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Y., E-mail: tachibana@nt.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Theoretical Research Division, Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Engineering, Nishinippon Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 800-0344 (Japan); Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Hirano, T., E-mail: hirano@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    We study the hydrodynamic response to jet propagation in the expanding QGP and investigate how the particle spectra after the hydrodynamic evolution of the QGP reflect it. We perform simulations of the space-time evolution of the QGP in gamma-jet events by solving (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic equations with source terms. Mach cone is induced by the jet energy deposition and pushes back the radial flow of the expanding background. Especially in the case when the jet passage is off-central one, the number of particles emitted in the direction of the push back decreases. This is the signal including the information about the formation of the Mach cone and the jet passage in the QGP fluid.

  17. Mitogenomic phylogeny of cone snails endemic to Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalde, Samuel; Tenorio, Manuel J; Afonso, Carlos M L; Zardoya, Rafael

    2017-07-01

    Cone snails attain in Senegal one of their highest peaks of species diversity throughout the continental coast of Western Africa. A total of 15 endemic species have been described, all placed in the genus Lautoconus. While there is ample data regarding the morphology of the shell and the radular tooth of these species, virtually nothing is known regarding the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of one of the most endangered groups of cones. In this work, we determined the complete or near-complete (only lacking the control region) mitochondrial (mt) genomes of 17 specimens representing 11 endemic species (Lautoconus belairensis, Lautoconus bruguieresi, Lautoconus cacao, Lautoconus cloveri, Lautoconus cf. echinophilus, Lautoconus guinaicus, Lautoconus hybridus, Lautoconus senegalensis, Lautoconus mercator, Lautoconus taslei, and Lautoconus unifasciatus). We also sequenced the complete mt genome of Lautoconus guanche from the Canary Islands, which has been related to the cones endemic to Senegal. All mt genomes share the same gene arrangement, which conforms to the consensus reported for Conidae, Neogastropoda and Caenogastropoda. Phylogenetic analyses using probabilistic methods recovered three major lineages, whose divergence coincided in time with sea level and ocean current changes as well as temperature fluctuations during the Messinian salinity crisis and the Plio-Pleistocene transition. Furthermore, the three lineages corresponded to distinct types of radular tooth (robust, small, and elongated), suggesting that dietary specialization could be an additional evolutionary driver in the diversification of the cones endemic to Senegal. The reconstructed phylogeny showed several cases of phenotypic convergence (cryptic species) and questions the validity of some species (ecotypes or phenotypic plasticity), both results having important taxonomic and conservation consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Priyank Sethi; Ritu Tiwari; Maneesha Das; Mahesh Pratap Singh; Manish Agarwal; Alfred Joseph Ravikumar

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D) structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), a...

  19. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Cone beam computed tomography in Endodontics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Durack, C; Abella, F; Shemesh, H; Roig, M; Lemberg, K

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) produces undistorted three-dimensional information of the maxillofacial skeleton, including the teeth and their surrounding tissues with a lower effective radiation dose than computed tomography. The aim of this paper is to: (i) review the current literature on the applications and limitations of CBCT; (ii) make recommendations for the use of CBCT in Endodontics; (iii) highlight areas of further research of CBCT in Endodontics. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Use of Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, William C.; Levin, Martin D.; Gane, David; Farman, Allan G.

    2009-01-01

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a diagnostic imaging modality that provides high-quality, accurate three-dimensional (3D) representations of the osseous elements of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT systems are available that provide small field of view images at low dose with sufficient spatial resolution for applications in endodontic diagnosis, treatment guidance, and posttreatment evaluation. This article provides a literature review and pictorial demonstration of CBCT as an imaging adjunct for endodontics. PMID:20379362

  2. Estudios preliminares sobre las estructuras diagenéticas tipo "cone-in-cone" y nodulos septariformes de la Formación Escucha en Estercuel (Teruel)

    OpenAIRE

    F. J. Torrijo; Rubio, C.; Bona, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The present contribution shows the first dates of study carried out in the Lower Cretaceous of Iberian Range (Estercuel, Teruel). This is a preliminary report focused on the analysis of diagenetic structures, septarized nodules and cone-in-cone structures, based in morphological features and others field indicators

  3. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past a sharp cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Peter W.; Shaw, Stephen J.

    1990-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer which forms on a sharp cone in a supersonic freestream, where lateral curvature plays a key role in the physics of the problem is considered. This flow is then analyzed from the point of view of linear, temporal, inviscid stability. The basic, non-axisymmetric disturbance equations are derived for general flows of this class, and a so called triply generalized inflexion condition is found for the existence of subsonic neutral modes of instability. This condition is analogous to the well-known generalized inflexion condition found in planar flows, although in the present case the condition depends on both axial and aximuthal wavenumbers. Extensive numerical results are presented for the stability problem at a freestream Mach number of 3.8, for a range of streamwise locations. These results reveal that a new mode of instability may occur, peculiar to flows of this type involving curvature. Additionally, asymptotic analyses valid close to the tip of the cone, far downstream of the cone are presented, and these give a partial (asymptotic) description of this additional mode of instability.

  4. Impact of a Liquid Cone on a Plain Rigid Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Aganin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical study of high-speed (with the velocity of 250 m/s impact of a liquid cone (cone-like jet on a plain rigid wall has been performed. The range of the angles of inclination of the cone surface to the wall corresponds to that of their variation in the process of impact on the wall of a cylindrical jet with the semi-spherical end. The direct numerical simulation has been used on the basis of the gas dynamics equations by the CIP-CUP method on the dynamically adaptive Soroban-grids without explicit tracking of the interphase boundary. It has been found that three regimes of impact are set in the examined range of the angles. At the small angles the impact with shock wave attached to the wall without liquid spreading is realized. An abrupt transition to the regime with the shock wave detached from the wall together with the radial jet of the liquid spreading on the wall takes place with increasing the angle. A smooth transition to the shockless regime with the radial liquid jet is realized with further increasing the angle.

  5. Anatomical structure of lingual foramen in cone beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ki, Min Woo; Hwang, Eui Hwan; Lee, Sang Rae [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-15

    To evaluate whether cone beam computed tomography can depict the distribution, position, frequency, relative vertical dimension, and the diameter of the lingual foramen and direction of lingual bone canal. Cone beam computed tomography of mandible was performed on 25 males and 25 females with no history of any orthodontic treatments or any other dental surgeries. A statistical comparison was done on the mean values of males and females. In the location and distribution of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was found in all subjects and lateral lingual foramen in 58%. In the lateral lingual foramen, bilateral type was found in 28% and unilateral type in 30%. In the number of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen had two foramina and lateral lingual foramen had one foramen, mostly. In the relative mean vertical dimension of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.03 {+-} 0.08, and both lateral lingual foramina was 0.20 {+-} 0.04. The mean diameter of lingual foramina, median lingual foramen was 0.9 mm {+-} 0.28, right lateral lingual foramen was 0.92 mm {+-} 0.23, and left lateral lingual foramen was 0.88 mm {+-} 0.27. The most frequent direction of the lingual bone canals, median lingual bone canal proceeded in anteroinferior direction and lateral lingual bone canal in anterosuperolateral direction. Cone beam computed tomography can be helpful for surgery and implantation on the mandibular area. Radiologist should be aware of this anatomical feature and its possible implications.

  6. Camera Layout Design for the Upper Stage Thrust Cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Tevin; Fowler, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Engineers in the Integrated Design and Analysis Division (EV30) use a variety of different tools to aid in the design and analysis of the Ares I vehicle. One primary tool in use is Pro-Engineer. Pro-Engineer is a computer-aided design (CAD) software that allows designers to create computer generated structural models of vehicle structures. For the Upper State thrust cone, Pro-Engineer was used to assist in the design of a layout for two camera housings. These cameras observe the separation between the first and second stage of the Ares I vehicle. For the Ares I-X, one standard speed camera was used. The Ares I design calls for two separate housings, three cameras, and a lighting system. With previous design concepts and verification strategies in mind, a new layout for the two camera design concept was developed with members of the EV32 team. With the new design, Pro-Engineer was used to draw the layout to observe how the two camera housings fit with the thrust cone assembly. Future analysis of the camera housing design will verify the stability and clearance of the camera with other hardware present on the thrust cone.

  7. Diffraction Dissociation in QCD and Light-Cone Wavefunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2001-09-20

    The diffractive dissociation of a hadron at high energies, by either Coulomb or Pomeron exchange, has a natural description in QCD as the materialization of the projectile's light-cone wavefunctions; in particular, the diffractive dissociation of a meson, baryon, or photon into high transverse momentum jets measures the shape and other features of the projectile's distribution amplitude. Diffractive dissociation can thus test fundamental properties of QCD, including color transparency and intrinsic charm. All of these effects have an impact on exclusive decays of B mesons and the study of CP violation. I also discuss recent work which shows that the structure functions measured in deep inelastic lepton scattering are affected by final-state rescattering, thus modifying their connection to light-cone probability distributions. In particular, the shadowing of nuclear structure functions is due to destructive interference effects from leading-twist diffraction of the virtual photon, physics not included in the nuclear light-cone wavefunctions.

  8. Strong Localization in Disordered Media: Analysis of the Backscattering Cone

    KAUST Repository

    Delgado, Edgar

    2012-06-01

    A very interesting effect in light propagation through a disordered system is Anderson localization of light, this phenomenon emerges as the result of multiple scattering of waves by electric inhomogeneities like spatial variations of index of refraction; as the amount of scattering is increased, light propagation is converted from quasi-diffusive to exponentially localized, with photons confined in a limited spatial region characterized by a fundamental quantity known as localization length. Light localization is strongly related to another interference phenomenon emerged from the multiple scattering effect: the coherent backscattering effect. In multiple scattering of waves, in fact, coherence is preserved in the backscattering direction and produces a reinforcement of the field flux originating an observable peak in the backscattered intensity, known as backscattering cone. The study of this peak provide quantitative information about the transport properties of light in the material. In this thesis we report a complete FDTD ab-initio study of light localization and coherent backscattering. In particular, we consider a supercontinuum pulse impinging on a sample composed of randomly positioned scatterers. We study coherent backscattering by averaging over several realizations of the sample properties. We study then the coherent backscattering cone properties as the relative permittivity of the sample is changed, relating the latter with the light localization inside the sample. We demonstrate important relationships between the width of the backscattering cone and the localization length, which shows a linear proportionality in the strong localization regime.

  9. Relativistic shocks and mach cones in viscous gluon matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouras, Ioannis; Xu, Zhe; El, Andrej; Fochler, Oliver; Lauciello, Francesco; Greiner, Carsten [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Molnar, Etele; Niemi, Harri [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Rischke, Dirk [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We solve the relativistic Riemann problem in a viscous and heat conducting gluon matter employing a microscopic parton cascade and compare it to the relativistic causal dissipative fluid dynamical model of Israel and Stewart. We demonstrate the transition from ideal to viscous shocks by varying the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio {eta}/s from zero to infinity and compare different dissipative quantities. We show the behaviour and the break down of viscous hydrodynamics for an out of equilibrium state using the local Knudsen number. Employing the microscopic parton cascade we investigate the evolution of mach cones in a viscous gluonic matter. We see that for {eta}/s=1/4{pi} a collective behaviour of the medium is observed, resulting in cone structure and diffusion wake of the energy density profile. The mach cone vanish very fast when increasing the shear viscosity in the medium. As comparison to experiments two-particle correlations are shown. We have derived third-order corrections to the Israel-Stewart theory using the entropy principle. This new equation is solved for one-dimensional Bjorken boost-invariant expansion. The scaling solutions for various values of {eta}/s are shown to be in very good agreement with those obtained from kinetic transport calculations.

  10. SWCX Emission from the Helium Focusing Cone - Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Kuntz, K. D.; Collier, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary results from an XMM-Newton campaign to study solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission from the heliospheric focusing cone of interstellar helium are presented. The detections of enhanced O VII and O VIII emission from the cone are at the 2(sigma) and 4(sigma) levels. The solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission in the heliosphere not associated with distinct objects (e.g., comets and planets including exospheric material in and near Earth s magnetosheath) is proportional to the flux of the solar wind and the space density of neutral material. The neutral material originates in the interstellar medium (ISM) and passes through the solar system due to the relative motion of the Sun and the ISM. The flow of the neutral material through the solar system is strongly perturbed by the Sun both by gravity and by radiation pressure. Because of the relative radiative scattering cross sections and the effect of solar gravitation the density of interstellar hydrogen near the Sun is reduced while interstellar helium is gravitationally focused. This creates a helium focusing cone downstream of the Sun [e.g., 1, and references therein].

  11. Topografia do cone medular da paca (Agouti paca, Linnaeus - 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Regina Freixo Scavone

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivamos neste trabalho determinar a esqueletopia da terminação do cone medular da paca relacionando com as vértebras lombares e sacrais, visando assim estabelecer parâmetros morfométricos e topográficos do cone medular nesta espécie. Para tanto, procedemos à dissecação, mediante incisão, rebatimento da pele, da tela subcutânea e da musculatura da região dorsal à coluna vertebral, com posterior secção e remoção dos arcos vertebrais para melhor visualização da medula espinhal. Após a individualização do cone medular, registramos os aspectos anatômicos de interesse, enfatizando seu início (base e seu término (ápice em relação às vértebras, e a partir de então efetuamos suas medidas com o auxílio de paquímetro; visando documentar nossos achados, realizamos fotografias e esquemas dos espécimes estudados.

  12. Resin Transfer Moulding Of An Engine Thrust Frame Cone Cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsjo, Anders; Fatemi, Javad; de Vries, Henri

    2012-07-01

    For the Ariane 5 Midlife Evolution, a new Engine Thrust Frame for the upper stage is being developed. Part of this Engine Thrust Frame is the so-called Cone Cap, which closes the inverted cone shape of the structure. This part is highly loaded, as it transfers all the loads from the engines to the cone shape, and includes the hinge points for the mechanism that steer the engines. Besides strength to cope with the loads, stiffness is a very important design parameter. A composite design of this structure has been developed, which is approximately 15 kg’s lighter than the aluminium structure. To manufacture such a part in composites is challenging, because of the complexity of the shape and large laminate thickness. Due to these requirements, Resin Transfer Moulding has been selected as manufacturing method, which allows this highly integrated structure to be made in one step. As part of this project, a quarter segment of the full-scale design has been manufactured. From the design model, a detailed design for the dry fibre preform has been made using advanced composite laminate software tools. This preform was placed inside a heated, double sided tool and injected with the resin.

  13. Minimal families of curves on surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Lubbes, Niels

    2014-11-01

    A minimal family of curves on an embedded surface is defined as a 1-dimensional family of rational curves of minimal degree, which cover the surface. We classify such minimal families using constructive methods. This allows us to compute the minimal families of a given surface.The classification of minimal families of curves can be reduced to the classification of minimal families which cover weak Del Pezzo surfaces. We classify the minimal families of weak Del Pezzo surfaces and present a table with the number of minimal families of each weak Del Pezzo surface up to Weyl equivalence.As an application of this classification we generalize some results of Schicho. We classify algebraic surfaces that carry a family of conics. We determine the minimal lexicographic degree for the parametrization of a surface that carries at least 2 minimal families. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Simultaneous contribution of two rod pathways to AII amacrine and cone bipolar cell light responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, E Brady; Li, Wei; Massey, Stephen C

    2005-03-01

    Rod signals traverse several synapses en route to cone bipolar cells. In one pathway, rods communicate directly with cones via gap junctions. In a second pathway, signals flow rods-rod bipolars-AII amacrines-cone bipolars. The relative contribution of each pathway to retinal function is not well understood. Here we have examined this question from the perspective of the AII amacrine. AIIs form bidirectional electrical synapses with on cone bipolars. Consequently, as on cone bipolars are activated by outer plexiform inputs, they too should contribute to the AII response. Rod bipolar inputs to AIIs were blocked by AMPA receptor antagonists, revealing a smaller, non-AMPA component of the light response. This small residual response did not reverse between -70 and +70 mV and was blocked by carbenoxolone, suggesting that the current arose in on cone bipolars and was transmitted to AIIs via gap junctions. The residual component was evident for stimuli 2 log units below cone threshold and was prolonged for bright stimuli, demonstrating that it was rod driven. Because the rod bipolar-AII pathway was blocked, the rod-driven residual current likely was generated via the rod-cone pathway activation of on cone bipolars. Thus for a large range of intensities, rod signals reach the inner retina by both rod bipolar-AII and rod-cone coupling pathways.

  15. Design and development of new collimator cones for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy in Samsung Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Y C; Ju, S G; Kim, D Y; Choi, D R; Huh, S J; Park, Y H; Lim, D H; Kim, M K

    1999-05-01

    In stereotactic radiotherapy using X-Knife system, the commercially supplied collimator cone system had a few mechanical limitations. The authors have developed new collimator cones to overcome these limitations and named them "SMC type" collimator cones. We made use of cadmium-free cerrobend alloy within the stainless steel cylinder housing. We made nine cones of relatively larger sizes (3.0 cm to 7.0 cm in diameter) and of shorter length with bigger clearance from the isocenter than the commercial cones. The cone housing and the collimator cones were designed to insert into the wedge mount of the gantry head to enable double-exposure linac-gram taking. The mechanical accuracy of pointing to the isocenter was tested by ball test and cone rotation test, and the dosimetric measurements were performed, all of which were with satisfactory results. A new innovative quality assurance procedure using linac-grams on the patients at the actual treatment setup was attempted after taking 10 sets of AP and lateral linac-grams and the overall mechanical isocenter accuracy was excellent (average error = 0.4 +/- 0.2 mm). We have developed the SMC type collimator cone system mainly for fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy use with our innovative ideas. The new cones' mechanical accuracy and physical properties were satisfactory for clinical use, and the verification of the isocenter accuracy on the actual treatment setup has become possible.

  16. About the ZOOM minimization package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischler, M.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  17. Analysis of macular cone photoreceptors in a case of occult macular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tojo N

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Naoki Tojo Tomoko Nakamura Hironori Ozaki Miyako Oka Toshihiko Oiwake Atsushi HayashiDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Toyama, Toyama, JapanPurpose: To investigate changes in cone photoreceptors with adaptive optics (AO fundus imaging and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT in a case of occult macular dystrophy (OMD.Patient and methods: Both eyes of a 42-year-old woman diagnosed with OMD were examined. We used an AO fundus camera to obtain images of cone photoreceptors in the macula of the OMD subject and five healthy control subjects. Correlations between the AO images and the SD-OCT images were examined. Cone photoreceptors in eight areas in the macula of OMD and healthy control subjects were analyzed and compared.Results: SD-OCT showed a loss of the cone outer-segment tips line outside of the fovea in both eyes of the subject with OMD. The left eye with decreased visual acuity showed a discontinuous photoreceptor inner-segment and outer-segment line and cone outer-segment tips line at the fovea in SD-OCT and loss of cone mosaics as a dark spot in the AO image. In panoramic AO images and cone-density maps, less cone density was observed in a ring-like region outside the fovea than in the peripheral retina. In most of the areas examined, the cone densities were lower in the OMD eyes than in the healthy control eyes.Conclusions: Cone densities in the macula of the OMD patient were greatly decreased. AO images were found to be useful to evaluate morphologic changes in cone photoreceptors in patients with OMD.Keywords: occult macular dystrophy, adaptive optics, cone photoreceptor, cone analysis, optical coherence tomography

  18. How the unstable eye sees a stable and moving world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arathorn, David W; Stevenson, Scott B; Yang, Qiang; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Roorda, Austin

    2013-08-29

    Eye motion, even during fixation, results in constant motion of the image of the world on our retinas. Vision scientists have long sought to understand the process by which we perceive the stable parts of the world as unmoving despite this instability and perceive the moving parts with realistic motion. We used an instrument capable of delivering visual stimuli with controlled motion relative to the retina at cone-level precision while capturing the subjects' percepts of stimulus motion with a matching task. We found that the percept of stimulus motion is more complex than conventionally thought. Retinal stimuli that move in a direction that is consistent with eye motion (i.e., opposite eye motion) appear stable even if the magnitude of that motion is amplified. The apparent stabilization diminishes for stimulus motions increasingly inconsistent with eye motion direction. Remarkably, we found that this perceived direction-contingent stabilization occurs separately for each separately moving pattern on the retina rather than for the image as a whole. One consequence is that multiple patterns that move at different rates relative to each other in the visual input are perceived as immobile with respect to each other, thereby disrupting our hyperacute sensitivity to target motion against a frame of reference. This illusion of relative stability has profound implications regarding the underlying visual mechanisms. Functionally, the system compensates retinal slip induced by eye motion without requiring an extremely precise optomotor signal and, at the same time, retains an exquisite sensitivity to an object's true motion in the world.

  19. Real-World Multicenter Experience of Immunosuppression Minimization Among 661 Liver Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Diego; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; de la Mata, Manuel; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Rubín, Angel; Puchades, Lorena; Serrano, Trinidad; Montero, Jessica; Cuadrado, Antonio; Casafont, Fernando; Salcedo, Magdalena; Rincón, Diego; Pons, Jose A; Herrero, Jose I

    2017-05-02

    BACKGROUND Long-term morbidity and mortality in liver transplant recipients is frequently secondary to immunosuppression toxicity. However, data are scarce regarding immunosuppression minimization in clinical practice. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this cross-sectional, multicenter study, we reviewed the indications of immunosuppression minimization (defined as tacrolimus levels below 5 ng/mL or cyclosporine levels below 50 ng/mL) among 661 liver transplant recipients, as well as associated factors and the effect on renal function. RESULTS Fifty-three percent of the patients received minimized immunosuppression. The median time from transplantation to minimization was 32 months. The most frequent indications were renal insufficiency (49%), cardiovascular risk (19%), de novo malignancy (8%), and cardiovascular disease (7%). The factors associated with minimization were older age at transplantation, longer post-transplant follow-up, pre-transplant diabetes mellitus and renal dysfunction, and the hospital where the patients were being followed. The patients who were minimized because of renal insufficiency had a significant improvement in renal function (decrease of the median serum creatinine level, from 1.50 to 1.34 mg/dL; P=0.004). Renal function significantly improved in patients minimized for other indications, too. In the long term, glomerular filtration rate significantly decreased in non-minimized patients and remained stable in minimized patients. CONCLUSIONS Immunosuppression minimization is frequently undertaken in long-term liver transplant recipients, mainly for renal insufficiency. Substantial variability exists regarding the use of IS minimization among centers.

  20. Next-to-minimal SOFTSUSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanach, B. C.; Athron, P.; Tunstall, Lewis C.; Voigt, A.; Williams, A. G.

    2014-09-01

    We describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program that provides for the calculation of the sparticle spectrum in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), where a chiral superfield that is a singlet of the Standard Model gauge group is added to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) fields. Often, a Z3 symmetry is imposed upon the model. SOFTSUSY can calculate the spectrum in this case as well as the case where general Z3 violating (denoted as =) terms are added to the soft supersymmetry breaking terms and the superpotential. The user provides a theoretical boundary condition for the couplings and mass terms of the singlet. Radiative electroweak symmetry breaking data along with electroweak and CKM matrix data are used as weak-scale boundary conditions. The renormalisation group equations are solved numerically between the weak scale and a high energy scale using a nested iterative algorithm. This paper serves as a manual to the NMSSM mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v4_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 154886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1870890 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, fortran. Computer: Personal computer. Operating system: Tested on Linux 3.x. Word size: 64 bits Classification: 11.1, 11.6. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v3_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 785 Nature of problem: Calculating supersymmetric particle spectrum and mixing parameters in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the

  1. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Freitas Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research consisted of a quantitative assessment, and aimed to measure the possible discrepancies between the maxillomandibular positions for centric relation (CR and maximum intercuspation (MI, using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method. The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion: normal occlusion and Angle Class I occlusion. In order to obtain the centric relation, a JIG device and mandible manipulation were used to deprogram the habitual conditions of the jaw. The evaluations were conducted in both frontal and lateral tomographic images, showing the condyle/articular fossa relation. The images were processed in the software included in the NewTom 3G device (QR NNT software version 2.00, and 8 tomographic images were obtained per patient, four laterally and four frontally exhibiting the TMA's (in CR and MI, on both sides, right and left. By means of tools included in another software, linear and angular measurements were performed and statistically analyzed by student t test. According to the methodology and the analysis performed in asymptomatic patients, it was not possible to detect statistically significant differences between the positions of centric relation and maximum intercuspation. However, the resources of cone beam tomography are of extreme relevance to the completion of further studies that use heterogeneous groups of samples in order to compare the results.

  2. Comparative analysis between mandibular positions in centric relation and maximum intercuspation by cone beam computed tomography (CONE-BEAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Amanda de Freitas; Henriques, João César Guimarães; Almeida, Guilherme Araújo; Machado, Asbel Rodrigues; Machado, Naila Aparecida de Godoi; Fernandes Neto, Alfredo Júlio

    2009-01-01

    This research consisted of a quantitative assessment, and aimed to measure the possible discrepancies between the maxillomandibular positions for centric relation (CR) and maximum intercuspation (MI), using computed tomography volumetric cone beam (cone beam method). The sample of the study consisted of 10 asymptomatic young adult patients divided into two types of standard occlusion: normal occlusion and Angle Class I occlusion. In order to obtain the centric relation, a JIG device and mandible manipulation were used to deprogram the habitual conditions of the jaw. The evaluations were conducted in both frontal and lateral tomographic images, showing the condyle/articular fossa relation. The images were processed in the software included in the NewTom 3G device (QR NNT software version 2.00), and 8 tomographic images were obtained per patient, four laterally and four frontally exhibiting the TMA's (in CR and MI, on both sides, right and left). By means of tools included in another software, linear and angular measurements were performed and statistically analyzed by student t test. According to the methodology and the analysis performed in asymptomatic patients, it was not possible to detect statistically significant differences between the positions of centric relation and maximum intercuspation. However, the resources of cone beam tomography are of extreme relevance to the completion of further studies that use heterogeneous groups of samples in order to compare the results.

  3. Multiple rod-cone and cone-rod photoreceptor transmutations in snakes: evidence from visual opsin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Bruno F; Sampaio, Filipa L; Loew, Ellis R; Sanders, Kate L; Fisher, Robert N; Hart, Nathan S; Hunt, David M; Partridge, Julian C; Gower, David J

    2016-01-27

    In 1934, Gordon Walls forwarded his radical theory of retinal photoreceptor 'transmutation'. This proposed that rods and cones used for scotopic and photopic vision, respectively, were not fixed but could evolve into each other via a series of morphologically distinguishable intermediates. Walls' prime evidence came from series of diurnal and nocturnal geckos and snakes that appeared to have pure-cone or pure-rod retinas (in forms that Walls believed evolved from ancestors with the reverse complement) or which possessed intermediate photoreceptor cells. Walls was limited in testing his theory because the precise identity of visual pigments present in photoreceptors was then unknown. Subsequent molecular research has hitherto neglected this topic but presents new opportunities. We identify three visual opsin genes, rh1, sws1 and lws, in retinal mRNA of an ecologically and taxonomically diverse sample of snakes central to Walls' theory. We conclude that photoreceptors with superficially rod- or cone-like morphology are not limited to containing scotopic or photopic opsins, respectively. Walls' theory is essentially correct, and more research is needed to identify the patterns, processes and functional implications of transmutation. Future research will help to clarify the fundamental properties and physiology of photoreceptors adapted to function in different light levels. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. The palaeogeographic setting and the local environmental impact of the 130 ka Falconiera tuff-cone eruption (Ustica island, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, Sandro; Foresta Martin, Franco

    2017-04-01

    This research focuses on the effects of the last eruption at Ustica (Suthern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), which formed the Falconiera tuff-cone at around 130 ka BP in the north-eastern tip of the island. This eruption was mainly explosive and phreatomagmatic, and emplaced a series of pyroclastic surge beds that formed an asymmetric tuff cone. This is the most easily recognizable volcanic edifice on Ustica, although its north-eastern sector has been partially eroded. A section of the feeding conduit is exposed northward, and is composed of lavas that fed the last stages of the eruption characterized by an intracrateric lava lake and a Strombolian scoria-fallout deposit. The eruption occurred during Upper Pleistocene Marine Isotopic Substage 5.5, a warm period characterized by a high sea-level stand (6±3 m above the present sea level in stable areas) and the diffusion of subtropical flora and fauna across the Mediterranean sea. This eruption slightly modified the morphology of Ustica, but impacted both marine and terrestrial environments, burying beach deposits rich in mollusk shells (i.e. Strombus bubonius, Conus testudinarius, Brachidontes puniceus), colonies of corals (Cladocora caespitosa) and subaerial plants (Chamaerops humilis). These organisms, found in some cases in their life position, along with other lines of evidence, provide information on the palaeogeography of this sector of the island at the time of the eruption, and on the local impact of this event on the environment.

  5. Dirac cone protected by non-symmorphic symmetry and three-dimensional Dirac line node in ZrSiS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Leslie M; Ali, Mazhar N; Straßer, Carola; Topp, Andreas; Varykhalov, Andrei; Marchenko, Dmitry; Duppel, Viola; Parkin, Stuart S P; Lotsch, Bettina V; Ast, Christian R

    2016-05-31

    Materials harbouring exotic quasiparticles, such as massless Dirac and Weyl fermions, have garnered much attention from physics and material science communities due to their exceptional physical properties such as ultra-high mobility and extremely large magnetoresistances. Here, we show that the highly stable, non-toxic and earth-abundant material, ZrSiS, has an electronic band structure that hosts several Dirac cones that form a Fermi surface with a diamond-shaped line of Dirac nodes. We also show that the square Si lattice in ZrSiS is an excellent template for realizing new types of two-dimensional Dirac cones recently predicted by Young and Kane. Finally, we find that the energy range of the linearly dispersed bands is as high as 2 eV above and below the Fermi level; much larger than of other known Dirac materials. This makes ZrSiS a very promising candidate to study Dirac electrons, as well as the properties of lines of Dirac nodes.

  6. A novel GCAP1(N104K) mutation in EF hand 3 (EF3) linked to autosomal dominant cone dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Wheaton, Dianna; Bereta, Greg; Zhang, Kang; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Birch, David G.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    The GUCA1A gene encodes a guanylate cyclase-activating protein (GCAP1) that is involved in regulation of phototransduction in the vertebrate retina. We discovered a novel C312A transversion in exon 2 of the human GUCA1A gene, replacing Asn-104 (N104) in GCAP1 with Lys (K), in two affected members of a family with dominant cone dystrophy. The mutation N104K is located in the third EF hand motif (EF3) shown previously to be instrumental in converting Ca2+-free GCAP1 to a GC inhibitor in the Ca2+-bound form. In one patient, rod ERGs were fairly stable over a 12-year-period whereas 30 Hz flicker ERG and single-flash cone ERGs declined. In both patients, double flash ERGs showed that rod recovery from an intense test flash was significantly delayed. The EC50 for GC stimulation shifted from ~250 nM in wild-type GCAP1 to ~800 nM in the GCAP1(N104K) mutant suggesting inability of the mutant to assume an inactive form under physiological conditions. The replacement of N104 by K in GCAP1 is the first naturally occurring mutation identified in the EF3 loop. The rod recovery delays observed in double-flash ERG of affected patients suggest a novel dominant-negative effect that slows GC stimulation. PMID:18706439

  7. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  8. Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2008-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.

  9. Simulation of Heat Transfer in Husk Furnace with Cone Geometry Based on Conical Coordinate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Iman; Ahmad, Faozan; Irzaman; alatas, Husin

    2017-07-01

    Simulation of Heat Transfer in Husk Furnace with Cone Geometry Based on Conical Coordinates has been performed. This simulation aimed to study the heat distribution of temperature based on conduction and convection mechanism on conical coordinate system. Fluid dynamics inside the cone of husk furnace was obtained by solving the Navier - Stokes equations with laminar flow approach. The initial temperature in all parts of the cone is room temperature, except at the bottom of the cone is 700 °C. Through numerical calculation of heat conduction and convection equation by FDM method, we got that the velocity of fluid flow at the center cone is 13.69 m/s for 45 s, 11.90 m/s for 60 s, and 7.25 m/s for 120 s, with unfixed temperature condition in the cone.

  10. Bright and durable field emission source derived from refractory taylor cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Gregory

    2016-12-20

    A method of producing field emitters having improved brightness and durability relying on the creation of a liquid Taylor cone from electrically conductive materials having high melting points. The method calls for melting the end of a wire substrate with a focused laser beam, while imposing a high positive potential on the material. The resulting molten Taylor cone is subsequently rapidly quenched by cessation of the laser power. Rapid quenching is facilitated in large part by radiative cooling, resulting in structures having characteristics closely matching that of the original liquid Taylor cone. Frozen Taylor cones thus obtained yield desirable tip end forms for field emission sources in electron beam applications. Regeneration of the frozen Taylor cones in-situ is readily accomplished by repeating the initial formation procedures. The high temperature liquid Taylor cones can also be employed as bright ion sources with chemical elements previously considered impractical to implement.

  11. The Minimal Model of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Frank; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concerns ODE modeling of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenalaxis (HPA axis) using an analytical and numerical approach, combined with biological knowledge regarding physiological mechanisms and parameters. The three hormones, CRH, ACTH, and cortisol, which interact in the HPA axis are m...... thereof. The second part of the paper concerns a specific realization of the minimal model in which feedback functions are built explicitly using receptor dynamics. Using physiologically reasonable parameter values, along with the results of the general case, it is demonstrated that un......-physiological values of the parameters are needed in order to achieve local instability of the fixed point. Small changes inphysiologically relevant parameters cause the system to be globally stable using the analytical criteria. All simulations show a globally stable fixed point, ruling out periodic solutions even...

  12. Millicharge or decay: a critical take on Minimal Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobile, Eugenio Del [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “G. Galilei”, Università di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Nardecchia, Marco [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Panci, Paolo [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France)

    2016-04-26

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) is a theoretical framework highly appreciated for its minimality and yet its predictivity. Of the two only viable candidates singled out in the original analysis, the scalar eptaplet has been found to decay too quickly to be around today, while the fermionic quintuplet is now being probed by indirect Dark Matter (DM) searches. It is therefore timely to critically review the MDM paradigm, possibly pointing out generalizations of this framework. We propose and explore two distinct directions. One is to abandon the assumption of DM electric neutrality in favor of absolutely stable, millicharged DM candidates which are part of SU(2){sub L} multiplets with integer isospin. Another possibility is to lower the cutoff of the model, which was originally fixed at the Planck scale, to allow for DM decays. We find new viable MDM candidates and study their phenomenology in detail.

  13. The minimal flavour violating axion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Aragón, F.; Merlo, L.

    2017-10-01

    The solution to the Strong CP problem is analysed within the Minimal Flavour Violation (MFV) context. An Abelian factor of the complete flavour symmetry of the fermionic kinetic terms may play the role of the Peccei-Quinn symmetry in traditional axion models. Its spontaneous breaking, due to the addition of a complex scalar field to the Standard Model scalar spectrum, generates the MFV axion, which may redefine away the QCD theta parameter. It differs from the traditional QCD axion for its couplings that are governed by the fermion charges under the axial Abelian symmetry. It is also distinct from the so-called Axiflavon, as the MFV axion does not describe flavour violation, while it does induce flavour non-universality effects. The MFV axion phenomenology is discussed considering astrophysical, collider and flavour data.

  14. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  15. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hee Lee

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK and pharmacodynamic (PD properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST, clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care, the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing. The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  16. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  17. CNTF induces regeneration of cone outer segments in a rat model of retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cone photoreceptors are responsible for color and central vision. In the late stage of retinitis pigmentosa and in geographic atrophy associated with age-related macular degeneration, cone degeneration eventually causes loss of central vision. In the present work, we investigated cone degeneration secondary to rod loss in the S334ter-3 transgenic rats carrying the rhodopsin mutation S334ter.Recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF was delivered by intravitreal injection to the left eye of an animal, and vehicle to the right eye. Eyes were harvested 10 days after injection. Cone outer segments (COS, and cell bodies were identified by staining with peanut agglutinin and cone arrestin antibodies in whole-mount retinas. For long-term treatment with CNTF, CNTF secreting microdevices were implanted into the left eyes at postnatal day (PD 20 and control devices into the right eyes. Cone ERG was recorded at PD 160 from implanted animals. Our results demonstrate that an early sign of cone degeneration is the loss of COS, which concentrated in many small areas throughout the retina and is progressive with age. Treatment with CNTF induces regeneration of COS and thus reverses the degeneration process in early stages of cone degeneration. Sustained delivery of CNTF prevents cones from degeneration and helps them to maintain COS and light-sensing function.Loss of COS is an early sign of secondary cone degeneration whereas cell death occurs much later. At early stages, degenerating cones are capable of regenerating outer segments, indicating the reversal of the degenerative process. Sustained delivery of CNTF preserves cone cells and their function. Long-term treatment with CNTF starting at early stages of degeneration could be a viable strategy for preservation of central vision for patients with retinal degenerations.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE STARTING LENGTH ON MASS TRANSFER FROM A CONE IN SUPERSONIC FLOW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this investigation was to see what effect, if any, the starting length had on mass transfer from a cone. A blowdown supersonic wind...tunnel was utilized to bring about a flow regime of approximately Mach 3.15. The experimental results of mass transfer from cones in supersonic flow...are presented and a comparison to theoretical values is made. The cones used in the mass transfer tests were made of copper coated with p

  19. Superior performance of cone beam tomography in detecting a calcaneus fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohse, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cone beam computed tomography is a state-of-the-art imaging tool, initially developed for dental and maxillofacial application. With its high resolution and low radiation dose, cone beam tomography has been expanding its application fields, for example, to diagnosis of traumata and fractures in the head and neck area. In this study, we demonstrate superior and satisfactory performance of cone beam tomography for the imaging of a calcaneus fracture in comparison to conventional and computed tomography.

  20. Spinning cones as pumps, degassers and level controllers in mechanically stirred tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, M.; Heggs, P.J. [Manchester Univ. Inst. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Eaglesham, A. [Huntsman Polyurethanes, Eveburg (Belgium); Housley, D. [Dupont Textiles and Interiors (UK) Ltd., INVISTA Performance Technologies, Redcar (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    The literature on spinning cones as pumps and degassers is reviewed. Experiments on a spinning cone rig designed to measure spinning cone-pumping rates are described. A large number of experiments were carried out, measuring pumping rates as a function of cone angle and immersion depth. Cone half angles were from 15 to 60 deg. Most of the tests were done with water but a number of runs were carried out with 75% by volume glycerol solution. This changed the viscosity and fluid density. An equation is proposed to predict the volumetric pumping rate (Q) of a cone in terms of its geometry and the physical properties of the fluids. Experiments with gassed fluids indicate that the liquid pumping rate of a spinning cone is independent of any gas present. It was also found that both outside and inside surfaces of the cone contribute equally to the fluid pumping process. The effectiveness of spinning cones as a degasser and/or level controller have been tested in mechanically agitated baffled vessels using cones mounted on the agitator shaft at the liquid surface. Under gassed conditions and with surfactants added to the liquid, the spinning cone was shown to be effective in controlling the level and reducing the gas voidage over a wide range of operating conditions. The effectiveness of the cone as a defoamer appears to scale at equal tip speed, suggesting that shear rate is the dominant mechanism. Tests were done on 2 ft (0.61 m) and 3 ft (0.914 m) diameter stirred tanks. (Author)

  1. Topological Vector Space-Valued Cone Metric Spaces and Fixed Point Theorems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenović Stojan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop the theory of topological vector space valued cone metric spaces with nonnormal cones. We prove three general fixed point results in these spaces and deduce as corollaries several extensions of theorems about fixed points and common fixed points, known from the theory of (normed-valued cone metric spaces. Examples are given to distinguish our results from the known ones.

  2. Analysis of Windward Side Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition on Blunted Cones at Angle of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-09

    Maccoll) solution e condition at boundary layer edge w condition at wall, viscous ∞ condition in freestream Conventions LST Linear Stability Theory PSE...location XTS sharp cone transition location y non-dimensional distance to conical shock α angle of attack γ specific heat ratio ∗Research Engineer, Ohio ...complex changes in the transition behavior on cones. As a point of reference, consider the windward meridian of a cone at AoA. This is also a

  3. Nonlinear control of non-minimal tensegrity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, R.; Mirats-Tur, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    The simplest form for the dynamics of constrained tensegrity system is a non-minimal realization. This paper gives a control law to force the tensegrity system to modify its shape to a pre-specified shape, using the smallest control force. The approach is similar to a multi-Lyapunov approach. We create a vector of Lyapunov functions, chosen to force the desired shape change, as well as other performance properties that may be selected. This vector is forced by the control system to satisfy a linear stable differential equation. Some tensegrity examples illustrate the ideas.

  4. Disinfection of gutta-percha cones with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Vianna, Morgana Eli; Matsumoto, Carolina Ujissato; Rossi, Vanessa de Paula e Silva; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi; Souza Filho, Francisco José de

    2005-10-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in disinfecting gutta-percha cones, to verify contamination of gutta-percha cones in their boxes, and to identify microorganisms after intentional contamination by handling cones. Gutta-percha cones contaminated in vitro with several microorganisms were left in contact with tested disinfecting solutions for different times, sterility of storage boxes was evaluated by immersing cones in broth medium, and the microorganisms most frequently found in handling cones were identified using biochemical tests. CHX was not effective in eliminating Bacillus subtilis spores on gutta-percha cones after 72 h of contact with the disinfecting substance. 5.25% NaOCl eliminated spores from gutta-percha after 1 min of disinfection. The cones evaluated from their boxes did not show contamination in 94.5% of the cases. The microbial genus most frequently found after intentional contamination with gloves was Staphylococcus. 5.25% NaOCl is an effective agent for a rapid disinfection of gutta-percha cones.

  5. Involvement of small-field horizontal cells in feedback effects on green cones of turtle retina.

    OpenAIRE

    Neyton, J.; Piccolino, M; Gerschenfeld, H M

    1981-01-01

    Light stimuli depolarize green cones of turtle retina through a circuit involving a feedback connection from luminosity horizontal cells (L-HC) to green cones. In turtle retina two types of L-HC have been distinguished: large-field L-HC and small-field L-HC. The spatial properties of the feedback depolarizations of green cones were compared with those of both large- and small-field L-HC. Green cones were found to be more effectively depolarized by relatively small spots of red light than by l...

  6. Does hyrax expansion therapy affect maxillary sinus volume? A cone-beam computed tomography report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darsey, Drew M.; English, Jeryl D.; Ellis, Randy K.; Akyalcin, Sercan [School of Dentistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston (United States); Kau, Chung H [School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the initial effects of maxillary expansion therapy with Hyrax appliance and to evaluate the related changes in maxillary sinus volume. Thirty patients (20 females, 10 males; 13.8 years) requiring maxillary expansion therapy, as part of their comprehensive orthodontic treatment, were examined. Each patient had cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images taken before (T1) and after (T2) maxillary expansion therapy with a banded Hyrax appliance. Multiplanar slices were used to measure linear dimensions and palatal vault angle. Volumetric analysis was used to measure maxillary sinus volumes. Student t tests were used to compare the pre- and post-treatment measurements. Additionally, differences between two age groups were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. The level of significance was set at p=0.05. Comparison of pre-treatment to post-treatment variables revealed significant changes in the transverse dimension related to both maxillary skeletal and dental structures and palatal vault angle, resulting in a widened palatal vault (p<0.05). Hard palate showed no significant movement in the vertical and anteroposterior planes. Nasal cavity width increased on a mean value of 0.93 mm(SD=0.23, p<0.05). Maxillary sinus volume remained virtually stable. No significant age differences were observed in the sample. Hyrax expansion therapy did not have a significant impact on maxillary sinus volume.

  7. Synaptic elements for GABAergic feed-forward signaling between HII horizontal cells and blue cone bipolar cells are enriched beneath primate S-cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puller, Christian; Haverkamp, Silke; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The functional roles and synaptic features of horizontal cells in the mammalian retina are still controversial. Evidence exists for feedback signaling from horizontal cells to cones and feed-forward signaling from horizontal cells to bipolar cells, but the details of the latter remain elusive. Here, immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy were used to analyze the expression patterns of the SNARE protein syntaxin-4, the GABA receptor subunits α1 and ρ, and the cation-chloride cotransporters NKCC and KCC2 in the outer plexiform layer of primate retina. In macaque retina, as observed previously in other species, syntaxin-4 was expressed on dendrites and axon terminals of horizontal cells at cone pedicles and rod spherules. At cones, syntaxin-4 appeared densely clustered in two bands, at horizontal cell dendritic tips and at the level of desmosome-like junctions. Interestingly, in the lower band where horizontal cells may synapse directly onto bipolar cells, syntaxin-4 was highly enriched beneath short-wavelength sensitive (S) cones and colocalized with calbindin, a marker for HII horizontal cells. The enrichment at S-cones was not observed in either mouse or ground squirrel. Furthermore, high amounts of both GABA receptor and cation-chloride cotransporter subunits were found beneath primate S-cones. Finally, while syntaxin-4 was expressed by both HI and HII horizontal cell types, the intense clustering and colocalization with calbindin at S-cones indicated an enhanced expression in HII cells. Taken together, GABA receptors beneath cone pedicles, chloride transporters, and syntaxin-4 are putative constituents of a synaptic set of proteins which would be required for a GABA-mediated feed-forward pathway via horizontal cells carrying signals directly from cones to bipolar cells.

  8. Phenomenology in minimal theory of massive gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Antonio; Mukohyama, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the minimal theory of massive gravity (MTMG) recently introduced. After reviewing the original construction based on its Hamiltonian in the vielbein formalism, we reformulate it in terms of its Lagrangian in both the vielbein and the metric formalisms. It then becomes obvious that, unlike previous attempts in the literature of Lorentz-violating massive gravity, not only the potential but also the kinetic structure of the action is modified from the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity theory. We confirm that the number of physical degrees of freedom in MTMG is two at fully nonlinear level. This proves the absence of various possible pathologies such as superluminality, acausality and strong coupling. Afterwards, we discuss the phenomenology of MTMG in the presence of a dust fluid. We find that on a flat homogeneous and isotropic background we have two branches. One of them (self-accelerating branch) naturally leads to acceleration without the genuine cosmological constant or dark energy. For this branch both the scalar and the vector modes behave exactly as in general relativity (GR). The phenomenology of this branch differs from GR in the tensor modes sector, as the tensor modes acquire a non-zero mass. Hence, MTMG serves as a stable nonlinear completion of the self-accelerating cosmological solution found originally in dRGT theory. The other branch (normal branch) has a dynamics which depends on the time-dependent fiducial metric. For the normal branch, the scalar mode sector, even though as in GR only one scalar mode is present (due to the dust fluid), differs from the one in GR, and, in general, structure formation will follow a different phenomenology. The tensor modes will be massive, whereas the vector modes, for both branches, will have the same phenomenology as in GR.

  9. 3D Alternating Direction TV-Based Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction with Efficient GPU Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailong Cai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iterative image reconstruction (IIR with sparsity-exploiting methods, such as total variation (TV minimization, claims potentially large reductions in sampling requirements. However, the computation complexity becomes a heavy burden, especially in 3D reconstruction situations. In order to improve the performance for iterative reconstruction, an efficient IIR algorithm for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT with GPU implementation has been proposed in this paper. In the first place, an algorithm based on alternating direction total variation using local linearization and proximity technique is proposed for CBCT reconstruction. The applied proximal technique avoids the horrible pseudoinverse computation of big matrix which makes the proposed algorithm applicable and efficient for CBCT imaging. The iteration for this algorithm is simple but convergent. The simulation and real CT data reconstruction results indicate that the proposed algorithm is both fast and accurate. The GPU implementation shows an excellent acceleration ratio of more than 100 compared with CPU computation without losing numerical accuracy. The runtime for the new 3D algorithm is about 6.8 seconds per loop with the image size of 256×256×256 and 36 projections of the size of 512×512.

  10. A level set method for cupping artifact correction in cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shipeng; Li, Chunming; Li, Haibo; Ge, Qi

    2015-08-01

    To reduce cupping artifacts and improve the contrast-to-noise ratio in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A level set method is proposed to reduce cupping artifacts in the reconstructed image of CBCT. The authors derive a local intensity clustering property of the CBCT image and define a local clustering criterion function of the image intensities in a neighborhood of each point. This criterion function defines an energy in terms of the level set functions, which represent a segmentation result and the cupping artifacts. The cupping artifacts are estimated as a result of minimizing this energy. The cupping artifacts in CBCT are reduced by an average of 90%. The results indicate that the level set-based algorithm is practical and effective for reducing the cupping artifacts and preserving the quality of the reconstructed image. The proposed method focuses on the reconstructed image without requiring any additional physical equipment, is easily implemented, and provides cupping correction through a single-scan acquisition. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully reduces the cupping artifacts.

  11. A level set method for cupping artifact correction in cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Shipeng; Li, Haibo; Ge, Qi [College of Telecommunications and Information Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210003 (China); Li, Chunming, E-mail: li-chunming@hotmail.com [School of Electronic Engineering, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, Sichuan 611731 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: To reduce cupping artifacts and improve the contrast-to-noise ratio in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A level set method is proposed to reduce cupping artifacts in the reconstructed image of CBCT. The authors derive a local intensity clustering property of the CBCT image and define a local clustering criterion function of the image intensities in a neighborhood of each point. This criterion function defines an energy in terms of the level set functions, which represent a segmentation result and the cupping artifacts. The cupping artifacts are estimated as a result of minimizing this energy. Results: The cupping artifacts in CBCT are reduced by an average of 90%. The results indicate that the level set-based algorithm is practical and effective for reducing the cupping artifacts and preserving the quality of the reconstructed image. Conclusions: The proposed method focuses on the reconstructed image without requiring any additional physical equipment, is easily implemented, and provides cupping correction through a single-scan acquisition. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully reduces the cupping artifacts.

  12. Polymer tensiometers with ceramic cones: direct observations of matric pressures in drying soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. van der Ploeg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring soil water potentials is crucial to characterize vadose zone processes. Conventional tensiometers only measure until approximately −0.09 MPa, and indirect methods may suffer from the non-uniqueness in the relationship between matric potential and measured properties. Recently developed polymer tensiometers (POTs are able to directly measure soil matric potentials until the theoretical wilting point (−1.6 MPa. By minimizing the volume of polymer solution inside the POT while maximizing the ceramic area in contact with that polymer solution, response times drop to acceptable ranges for laboratory and field conditions. Contact with the soil is drastically improved with the use of cone-shaped solid ceramics instead of flat ceramics. The comparison between measured potentials by polymer tensiometers and indirectly obtained potentials with time domain reflectometry highlights the risk of using the latter method at low water contents. By combining POT and time domain reflectometry readings in situ moisture retention curves can be measured over the range permitted by the measurement range of both POT and time domain reflectometry.

  13. Statistical analysis of cone penetration resistance of railway ballast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saussine Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic penetrometer tests are widely used in geotechnical studies for soils characterization but their implementation tends to be difficult. The light penetrometer test is able to give information about a cone resistance useful in the field of geotechnics and recently validated as a parameter for the case of coarse granular materials. In order to characterize directly the railway ballast on track and sublayers of ballast, a huge test campaign has been carried out for more than 5 years in order to build up a database composed of 19,000 penetration tests including endoscopic video record on the French railway network. The main objective of this work is to give a first statistical analysis of cone resistance in the coarse granular layer which represents a major component of railway track: the ballast. The results show that the cone resistance (qd increases with depth and presents strong variations corresponding to layers of different natures identified using the endoscopic records. In the first zone corresponding to the top 30cm, (qd increases linearly with a slope of around 1MPa/cm for fresh ballast and fouled ballast. In the second zone below 30cm deep, (qd increases more slowly with a slope of around 0,3MPa/cm and decreases below 50cm. These results show that there is no clear difference between fresh and fouled ballast. Hence, the (qd sensitivity is important and increases with depth. The (qd distribution for a set of tests does not follow a normal distribution. In the upper 30cm layer of ballast of track, data statistical treatment shows that train load and speed do not have any significant impact on the (qd distribution for clean ballast; they increase by 50% the average value of (qd for fouled ballast and increase the thickness as well. Below the 30cm upper layer, train load and speed have a clear impact on the (qd distribution.

  14. Statistical analysis of cone penetration resistance of railway ballast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saussine, Gilles; Dhemaied, Amine; Delforge, Quentin; Benfeddoul, Selim

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic penetrometer tests are widely used in geotechnical studies for soils characterization but their implementation tends to be difficult. The light penetrometer test is able to give information about a cone resistance useful in the field of geotechnics and recently validated as a parameter for the case of coarse granular materials. In order to characterize directly the railway ballast on track and sublayers of ballast, a huge test campaign has been carried out for more than 5 years in order to build up a database composed of 19,000 penetration tests including endoscopic video record on the French railway network. The main objective of this work is to give a first statistical analysis of cone resistance in the coarse granular layer which represents a major component of railway track: the ballast. The results show that the cone resistance (qd) increases with depth and presents strong variations corresponding to layers of different natures identified using the endoscopic records. In the first zone corresponding to the top 30cm, (qd) increases linearly with a slope of around 1MPa/cm for fresh ballast and fouled ballast. In the second zone below 30cm deep, (qd) increases more slowly with a slope of around 0,3MPa/cm and decreases below 50cm. These results show that there is no clear difference between fresh and fouled ballast. Hence, the (qd) sensitivity is important and increases with depth. The (qd) distribution for a set of tests does not follow a normal distribution. In the upper 30cm layer of ballast of track, data statistical treatment shows that train load and speed do not have any significant impact on the (qd) distribution for clean ballast; they increase by 50% the average value of (qd) for fouled ballast and increase the thickness as well. Below the 30cm upper layer, train load and speed have a clear impact on the (qd) distribution.

  15. Spray Modeling for Outwardly-Opening Hollow-Cone Injector

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2016-04-05

    The outwardly-opening piezoelectric injector is gaining popularity as a high efficient spray injector due to its precise control of the spray. However, few modeling studies have been reported on these promising injectors. Furthermore, traditional linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) model was originally developed for pressure swirl hollow-cone injectors with moderate spray angle and toroidal ligament breakups. Therefore, it is not appropriate for the outwardly-opening injectors having wide spray angles and string-like film structures. In this study, a new spray injection modeling was proposed for outwardly-opening hollow-cone injector. The injection velocities are computed from the given mass flow rate and injection pressure instead of ambiguous annular nozzle geometry. The modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) breakup model is used with adjusted initial Sauter mean diameter (SMD) for modeling breakup of string-like structure. Spray injection was modeled using a Lagrangian discrete parcel method within the framework of commercial CFD software CONVERGE, and the new model was implemented through the user-defined functions. A Siemens outwardly-opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated with existing experimental data at the injection pressure of 100 bar. It was found that the collision modeling becomes important in the current injector because of dense spray near nozzle. The injection distribution model showed insignificant effects on spray due to small initial droplets. It was demonstrated that the new model can predict the liquid penetration length and local SMD with improved accuracy for the injector under study.

  16. Four-dimensional Cone Beam CT Reconstruction and Enhancement using a Temporal Non-Local Means Method

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Xun; Lou, Yifei; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography (4D-CBCT) has been developed to provide respiratory phase resolved volumetric imaging in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Inadequate number of projections in each phase bin results in low quality 4D-CBCT images with obvious streaking artifacts. In this work, we propose two novel 4D-CBCT algorithms: an iterative reconstruction algorithm and an enhancement algorithm, utilizing a temporal nonlocal means (TNLM) method. We define a TNLM energy term for a given set of 4D-CBCT images. Minimization of this term favors those 4D-CBCT images such that any anatomical features at one spatial point at one phase can be found in a nearby spatial point at neighboring phases. 4D-CBCT reconstruction is achieved by minimizing a total energy containing a data fidelity term and the TNLM energy term. As for the image enhancement, 4D-CBCT images generated by the FDK algorithm are enhanced by minimizing the TNLM function while keeping the enhanced images close to the FDK results. A...

  17. How accurate are the fusion of cone-beam CT and 3-D stereophotographic images?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasas S N Jayaratne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cone-beam Computed Tomography (CBCT and stereophotography are two of the latest imaging modalities available for three-dimensional (3-D visualization of craniofacial structures. However, CBCT provides only limited information on surface texture. This can be overcome by combining the bone images derived from CBCT with 3-D photographs. The objectives of this study were 1 to evaluate the feasibility of integrating 3-D Photos and CBCT images 2 to assess degree of error that may occur during the above processes and 3 to identify facial regions that would be most appropriate for 3-D image registration. METHODOLOGY: CBCT scans and stereophotographic images from 29 patients were used for this study. Two 3-D images corresponding to the skin and bone were extracted from the CBCT data. The 3-D photo was superimposed on the CBCT skin image using relatively immobile areas of the face as a reference. 3-D colour maps were used to assess the accuracy of superimposition were distance differences between the CBCT and 3-D photo were recorded as the signed average and the Root Mean Square (RMS error. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The signed average and RMS of the distance differences between the registered surfaces were -0.018 (±0.129 mm and 0.739 (±0.239 mm respectively. The most errors were found in areas surrounding the lips and the eyes, while minimal errors were noted in the forehead, root of the nose and zygoma. CONCLUSIONS: CBCT and 3-D photographic data can be successfully fused with minimal errors. When compared to RMS, the signed average was found to under-represent the registration error. The virtual 3-D composite craniofacial models permit concurrent assessment of bone and soft tissues during diagnosis and treatment planning.

  18. Approximation by Penultimate Stable Laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.F.M. de Haan (Laurens); L. Peng (Liang); H. Iglesias Pereira

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn certain cases partial sums of i.i.d. random variables with finite variance are better approximated by a sequence of stable distributions with indices \\\\alpha_n \\\\to 2 than by a normal distribution. We discuss when this happens and how much the convergence rate can be improved by using

  19. Operational Based Vision Assessment Cone Contrast Test: Description and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    Laboratory, Aeromedical Research Department, Human Performance Branch , U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, with...Performance Branch , U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH, with support from SpecPro Technical Services. The report... Psychology Series, No. 16. 7. Cole GR, Hine T, McIlhagga W. Detection mechanisms in L-, M-, and S-cone contrast space. J Opt Soc Am A. 1993; 10(1):38-51

  20. Use and interpretation of the dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) test

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Officials B or BN - Balance Number (Standard Pavement Balance Curve) BN100 - Number of blows as a percentage of the DSN800 required to penetrate 100 mm CBR - California Bearing Ratio Cm - Moisture factor D - Pavement depth DCP - Dynamic Cone... Penetrometer DN - DCP number (mm/blow) DSN800 - DCP structural number (number of blows to 800 mm depth) E80 – Equivalent standard 80 kN axle Eeff - Effective elastic modulus LSD - Layer strength diagram MISA - Million standard axles (80 kN) to achieve a...

  1. Incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography: Relate and relay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas P Pande

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the presence of incidental findings on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images and to recognize their clinical importance. Materials and Methods: A total of 700 CBCT scans between January 2013 to August 2014 at Government Dental College and Hospital were evaluated retrospectively. Results: 459 incidental findings (65.57% were observed in 700 patients. Most common individual incidental finding was mucosal thickening (119 followed by pineal/habenula calcification (99 and choroid plexus (77. Conclusion: The oral and maxillofacial radiologist should carefully interpret all scans and should not ignore the incidental findings and hence avoid untoward snowballing effects.

  2. Disappearance of the Mach Cone in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Nattrass, Christine; Mazer, Joel; Stuart, Meghan; Bejnood, Aram

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of di-hadron correlations using recently developed methods for background subtraction which allow for higher precision measurements with fewer assumptions about the background. These studies indicate that low momentum jets interacting with the medium do not equilibrate with the medium, but rather that interactions with the medium lead to more subtle increases in their widths and fragmentation functions, consistent with observations from studies of higher momentum fully reconstructed jets. The away-side shape is not consistent with a Mach cone.

  3. Cyclone Simulation via Action Minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, D. A.; Weare, J.; Abbot, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    A postulated impact of climate change is an increase in intensity of tropical cyclones (TCs). This hypothesized effect results from the fact that TCs are powered subsaturated boundary layer air picking up water vapor from the surface ocean as it flows inwards towards the eye. This water vapor serves as the energy input for TCs, which can be idealized as heat engines. The inflowing air has a nearly identical temperature as the surface ocean; therefore, warming of the surface leads to a warmer atmospheric boundary layer. By the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship, warmer boundary layer air can hold more water vapor and thus results in more energetic storms. Changes in TC intensity are difficult to predict due to the presence of fine structures (e.g. convective structures and rainbands) with length scales of less than 1 km, while general circulation models (GCMs) generally have horizontal resolutions of tens of kilometers. The models are therefore unable to capture these features, which are critical to accurately simulating cyclone structure and intensity. Further, strong TCs are rare events, meaning that long multi-decadal simulations are necessary to generate meaningful statistics about intense TC activity. This adds to the computational expense, making it yet more difficult to generate accurate statistics about long-term changes in TC intensity due to global warming via direct simulation. We take an alternative approach, applying action minimization techniques developed in molecular dynamics to the WRF weather/climate model. We construct artificial model trajectories that lead from quiescent (TC-free) states to TC states, then minimize the deviation of these trajectories from true model dynamics. We can thus create Monte Carlo model ensembles that are biased towards cyclogenesis, which reduces computational expense by limiting time spent in non-TC states. This allows for: 1) selective interrogation of model states with TCs; 2) finding the likeliest paths for

  4. Minimal Inter-Fractional Fiducial Migration during Image-Guided Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using SuperLock Nitinol Coil Fiducial Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yi; Bazan, Jose G; Sekhon, Ashley; Haglund, Karl; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Williams, Terence

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of patients with lung cancer or lung metastasis who are medically unfit to undergo resection. In order to improve accuracy and confidence in targeting tumors, many centers rely on fiducial implantation. We evaluated the migration of a novel fiducial marker specifically designed for lung tissue implanted via electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB). We retrospectively quantified the individual and group migrations of SuperLock nitinol coil fiducials for 15 patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), in order to evaluate the reliability of using these fiducials as a target surrogate for cases where tumors cannot be clearly delineated on cone beam CTs (CBCTs). For each fraction, we compared the individual and group migrations of the fiducials between the planning CT and the acquired CBCT. The group migration was defined as the distance between the centroids of the fiducial group and GTV. A total of 16 lung targets were included in our study for these 15 patients (one patient with two targets). Of 55 fiducials placed, we observed a 100% retention rate. The mean individual migration was 1.87 mm (range, 0.63-5.25 mm) with a standard deviation of 1.26 mm. The mean group migration was 1.94 mm (range, 0.03-6.19 mm) with a standard deviation of 1.45 mm. Overall, there was minimal change in the relative locations of the markers with respect to each other, as well as to the target. We found that the SuperLock nitinol coil fiducial marker positions are stable throughout the radiation treatment, and can be used as a reliable surrogate to target, and to avoid geometric misses during gated treatments.

  5. Minimal Inter-Fractional Fiducial Migration during Image-Guided Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using SuperLock Nitinol Coil Fiducial Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Rong

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is being increasingly used for the treatment of patients with lung cancer or lung metastasis who are medically unfit to undergo resection. In order to improve accuracy and confidence in targeting tumors, many centers rely on fiducial implantation. We evaluated the migration of a novel fiducial marker specifically designed for lung tissue implanted via electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB.We retrospectively quantified the individual and group migrations of SuperLock nitinol coil fiducials for 15 patients receiving lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, in order to evaluate the reliability of using these fiducials as a target surrogate for cases where tumors cannot be clearly delineated on cone beam CTs (CBCTs. For each fraction, we compared the individual and group migrations of the fiducials between the planning CT and the acquired CBCT. The group migration was defined as the distance between the centroids of the fiducial group and GTV.A total of 16 lung targets were included in our study for these 15 patients (one patient with two targets. Of 55 fiducials placed, we observed a 100% retention rate. The mean individual migration was 1.87 mm (range, 0.63-5.25 mm with a standard deviation of 1.26 mm. The mean group migration was 1.94 mm (range, 0.03-6.19 mm with a standard deviation of 1.45 mm. Overall, there was minimal change in the relative locations of the markers with respect to each other, as well as to the target.We found that the SuperLock nitinol coil fiducial marker positions are stable throughout the radiation treatment, and can be used as a reliable surrogate to target, and to avoid geometric misses during gated treatments.

  6. Mini-Med School Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Mini-Med Schools are public education programs now offered by more than 70 medical schools, universities, research institutions, and hospitals across the nation. There are even Mini-Med Schools in Ireland, Malta, and Canada! The program is typically a lecture series that meets once a week and provides "mini-med students" information on some of the…

  7. Against explanatory minimalism in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eThornton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticised both as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell’s criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation respectively and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein’s Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein’s remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of level of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation.

  8. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell's criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein's Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein's remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation.

  9. Minimalism through intraoperative functional mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M S

    1996-01-01

    Intraoperative stimulation mapping may be used to avoid unnecessary risk to functional regions subserving language and sensori-motor pathways. Based on the data presented here, language localization is variable in the entire population, with only certainty existing for the inferior frontal region responsible for motor speech. Anatomical landmarks such as the anterior temporal tip for temporal lobe language sites and the posterior aspect of the lateral sphenoid wing for the frontal lobe language zones are unreliable in avoiding postoperative aphasias. Thus, individual mapping to identify essential language sites has the greatest likelihood of avoiding permanent deficits in naming, reading, and motor speech. In a similar approach, motor and sensory pathways from the cortex and underlying white matter may be reliably stimulated and mapped in both awake and asleep patients. Although these techniques require an additional operative time and equipment nominally priced, the result is often gratifying, as postoperative morbidity has been greatly reduced in the process of incorporating these surgical strategies. The patients quality of life is improved in terms of seizure control, with or without antiepileptic drugs. This avoids having to perform a second costly operative procedure, which is routinely done when extraoperative stimulation and recording is done via subdural grids. In addition, an aggressive tumor resection at the initial operation lengthens the time to tumor recurrence and often obviates the need for a subsequent reoperation. Thus, intraoperative functional mapping may be best alluded to as a surgical technique that results in "minimalism in the long term".

  10. Robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palep Jaydeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term "robot" was coined by the Czech playright Karel Capek in 1921 in his play Rossom′s Universal Robots. The word "robot" is from the check word robota which means forced labor.The era of robots in surgery commenced in 1994 when the first AESOP (voice controlled camera holder prototype robot was used clinically in 1993 and then marketed as the first surgical robot ever in 1994 by the US FDA. Since then many robot prototypes like the Endoassist (Armstrong Healthcare Ltd., High Wycombe, Buck, UK, FIPS endoarm (Karlsruhe Research Center, Karlsruhe, Germany have been developed to add to the functions of the robot and try and increase its utility. Integrated Surgical Systems (now Intuitive Surgery, Inc. redesigned the SRI Green Telepresence Surgery system and created the daVinci Surgical System ® classified as a master-slave surgical system. It uses true 3-D visualization and EndoWrist ® . It was approved by FDA in July 2000 for general laparoscopic surgery, in November 2002 for mitral valve repair surgery. The da Vinci robot is currently being used in various fields such as urology, general surgery, gynecology, cardio-thoracic, pediatric and ENT surgery. It provides several advantages to conventional laparoscopy such as 3D vision, motion scaling, intuitive movements, visual immersion and tremor filtration. The advent of robotics has increased the use of minimally invasive surgery among laparoscopically naοve surgeons and expanded the repertoire of experienced surgeons to include more advanced and complex reconstructions.

  11. Renormalization of minimally doubled fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitani, Stefano; Creutz, Michael; Weber, Johannes; Wittig, Hartmut

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the renormalization properties of minimally doubled fermions, at one loop in perturbation theory. Our study is based on the two particular realizations of Boriçi-Creutz and Karsten-Wilczek. A common feature of both formulations is the breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry, which requires that the lattice actions are supplemented by suitable counterterms. We show that three counterterms are required in each case and determine their coefficients to one loop in perturbation theory. For both actions we compute the vacuum polarization of the gluon. It is shown that no power divergences appear and that all contributions which arise from the breaking of Lorentz symmetry are cancelled by the counterterms. We also derive the conserved vector and axial-vector currents for Karsten-Wilczek fermions. Like in the case of the previously studied Boriçi-Creutz action, one obtains simple expressions, involving only nearest-neighbour sites. We suggest methods how to fix the coefficients of the counterterms non-perturbatively and discuss the implications of our findings for practical simulations.

  12. Response of Spectral Reflectances and Vegetation Indices on Varying Juniper Cone Densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo E. Ponce-Campos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Juniper trees are widely distributed throughout the world and are common sources of allergies when microscopic pollen grains are transported by wind and inhaled. In this study, we investigated the spectral influences of pollen-discharging male juniper cones within a juniper canopy. This was done through a controlled outdoor experiment involving ASD FieldSpec Pro Spectroradiometer measurements over juniper canopies of varying cone densities. Broadband and narrowband spectral reflectance and vegetation index (VI patterns were evaluated as to their sensitivity and their ability to discriminate the presence of cones. The overall aim of this research was to assess remotely sensed phenological capabilities to detect pollen-bearing juniper trees for public health applications. A general decrease in reflectance values with increasing juniper cone density was found, particularly in the Green (545–565 nm and NIR (750–1,350 nm regions. In contrast, reflectances in the shortwave-infrared (SWIR, 2,000 nm to 2,350 nm region decreased from no cone presence to intermediate amounts (90 g/m2 and then increased from intermediate levels to the highest cone densities (200 g/m2. Reflectance patterns in the Red (620–700 nm were more complex due to shifting contrast patterns in absorptance between cones and juniper foliage, where juniper foliage is more absorbing than cones only within the intense narrowband region of maximum chlorophyll absorption near 680 nm. Overall, narrowband reflectances were more sensitive to cone density changes than the equivalent MODIS broadbands. In all VIs analyzed, there were significant relationships with cone density levels, particularly with the narrowband versions and the two-band vegetation index (TBVI based on Green and Red bands, a promising outcome for the use of phenocams in juniper phenology trait studies. These results indicate that spectral indices are sensitive to certain juniper phenologic traits that can potentially be

  13. Minimally invasive surgery for the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, S D; Anderson, D G

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery is a rapidly developing field that has the potential to decrease surgical morbidity and improve recovery compared to traditional spinal approaches. Minimally invasive approaches have been developed for all regions of the spine, but have been best documented for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. Lumbar decompression and lumbar interbody fusion are two of the most well-studied minimally invasive surgical approaches. This article will review both the rationale and technique for minimally invasive lumbar decompression and for a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF).

  14. Minimally invasive surgery in pelvic floor repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwain, Omar; Aoun, Joelle; Eisenstein, David

    2017-08-01

    To review the use and efficacy of minimally invasive surgery in pelvic organ prolapse (POP) repair. This review summarizes surgical options for management of POP with special emphasis on minimally invasive surgical approach and discusses the recent experience and feasibility of integrating robot-assisted technology. Minimally invasive approaches have equal efficacy and less morbidity than laparotomy for POP repair, particularly apical prolapse. Robotics may facilitate the rate of minimally invasive surgery for POP repair with greater cost and as yet no proven superiority for conventional laparoscopy. Minimally invasive surgery is the preferred approach to POP repair. Conventional laparoscopic or robotic sacral colpopexy is recommended for apical defect and procidentia.

  15. Composition and chemical variability of Corsican Pinus halepensis cone oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix; Bighelli, Ange

    2014-09-01

    The composition of the essential oil isolated from cones of Pinus halepensis grown in Corsica has been investigated by a combination of chromatographic (CC, GC) and spectroscopic (MS, 13C NMR) techniques. In total, 48 compounds that accounted for 95.5% of the whole composition have been identified. α-Pinene (47.5%) was the major component followed by myrcene (11.0%), (E)-β-caryophyllene (8.3%) and caryophyllene oxide (5.9%). Various diterpenes have been identified by 13C NMR in the fractions of CC. Fifteen oil samples isolated from cones harvested in three forests have been analyzed and two groups of similar importance have been differentiated within the 15 compositions. Oil samples of the first group contained α-pinene (mean 45.0 g/100 g, SD = 5.5) as the major component. The composition of samples of the second group was dominated by myrcene (mean 30.3 g/100g, SD = 9.0) and α-pinene (mean 24.6 g/100 g, SD = 3.1).

  16. ASYMMETRIC CONE DISTRIBUTION AND ITS CLINICAL APPEARANCE IN RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Satoko; Oishi, Akio; Ogino, Ken; Morooka, Satoshi; Oishi, Maho; Sugahara, Masako; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-07-01

    To report the characteristic changes of fundus autofluorescence in the nasal retina of patients with retinitis pigmentosa. We investigated 113 eyes of 113 patients with retinitis pigmentosa. We obtained wide-field fundus autofluorescence images and evaluated the status of the retina nasal to the optic disk. The patients were divided into the following three groups: those without nasal sparing (advanced), those with nasal sparing, and those with larger intact areas in addition to the nasal retina (early). Visual acuity, visual field area, age, and the duration of the symptom were compared among the groups. Twenty eyes (17.7%), 51 (45.1%), and 42 (37.1%) were classified as early, nasal sparing, and advanced, respectively. The nasal retina was essentially preserved in the early group. The clinical characteristics' analysis suggested that the disease progression appears from that represented by early groups, then nasal sparing groups, and finally advanced groups. The authors found that the nasal sparing pattern bears a close resemblance to the previously reported cone photoreceptor distribution. Wide-field fundus autofluorescence imaging detected nasal sparing in retinitis pigmentosa. The characteristic fundus autofluorescence pattern should reflect cone photoreceptor distribution in the human retina. This finding may be an example of the clinical appearance of asymmetric photoreceptor distribution.

  17. Areal geology of the Little Cone quadrangle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, A.L.; Marsh, O.T.; Taylor, R.B.

    1960-01-01

    The Little Cone quadrangle includes an area of about 59 square miles in eastern San Miguel County in southwestern Colorado. The quadrangle contains features characteristic of both the Colorado Plateaus physiographic province and the San Juan Mountains, and it has been affected by geologic events and processes of two different geologic environments. The continental sedimentary rocks of the Cutler formation of Permian age are the oldest rocks exposed in the quadrangle. Deposition of the Cutler was followed by a long period of erosion and peneplanation. There is no marked angular discordance between the Cutler and the overlying Dolores formation in the Little Cone quadrangle, but there is in areas some tens of miles east and west of the quadrangle where some crustal warping took place. The continental sedimentary rocks of the Dolores formation of Late Triassic age are red beds that are similar in gross lithology to those of the Cutler. The Dolores formation is subdivided into five general units that persist throughout the quadrangle and for some tens of miles to the north, south, and east. A second long period of erosion followed deposition of the Dolores. The Entrada sandstone of Late Jurassic age overlies the Dolores formation, and is in turn overlain by the Wanakah formation, also of Late Jurassic age. The Wanakah consists of the Pony Express limestone member at the base, the Bilk Creek sandstone'member near the center, and a "marl" member at the top. The Morrison formation, which overlies the Wanakah, consists of the Salt Wash sandstone member in the lower part and the Brushy Basin shale member in the upper part. A period of erosion, probably of relatively short duration, followed deposition of the Brushy Basin member. The Burro Canyon formation of Early Cretaceous age occurs as discontinuous bodies that fill channels cut in the top of the Morrison formation. Deposition of the Burro Canyon formation was followed by another period of erosion, which in turn ended

  18. Increasing Cone-beam projection usage by temporal fitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyksborg, Mark; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    A Cone-beam CT system can be used to image the lung region. The system records 2D projections which will allow 3D reconstruction however a reconstruction based on all projections will lead to a blurred reconstruction in regions were respiratory motion occur. To avoid this the projections are typi...... on Poisons assumptions using an L-BFGS-B optimizer [5]. It will be demonstrated on a phantom data set that the information gained from a 4D model leads to smaller reconstruction errors than a 3D iterative reconstruction based on phase binned data.......A Cone-beam CT system can be used to image the lung region. The system records 2D projections which will allow 3D reconstruction however a reconstruction based on all projections will lead to a blurred reconstruction in regions were respiratory motion occur. To avoid this the projections...... in [6] prior knowledge of the lung deformation estimated from the planning CT could be used to include all projections into the reconstruction. It has also been attempted to estimate both the motion and 3D volume simultaneously in [4]. Problems with motion estimation are ill-posed leading to suboptimal...

  19. Quasiparticle dynamics in reshaped helical Dirac cone of topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lin; Wang, Z F; Ming, Wenmei; Yao, Meng-Yu; Wang, Meixiao; Yang, Fang; Song, Y R; Zhu, Fengfeng; Fedorov, Alexei V; Sun, Z; Gao, C L; Liu, Canhua; Xue, Qi-Kun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Liu, Feng; Qian, Dong; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2013-02-19

    Topological insulators and graphene present two unique classes of materials, which are characterized by spin-polarized (helical) and nonpolarized Dirac cone band structures, respectively. The importance of many-body interactions that renormalize the linear bands near Dirac point in graphene has been well recognized and attracted much recent attention. However, renormalization of the helical Dirac point has not been observed in topological insulators. Here, we report the experimental observation of the renormalized quasiparticle spectrum with a skewed Dirac cone in a single Bi bilayer grown on Bi(2)Te(3) substrate from angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. First-principles band calculations indicate that the quasiparticle spectra are likely associated with the hybridization between the extrinsic substrate-induced Dirac states of Bi bilayer and the intrinsic surface Dirac states of Bi(2)Te(3) film at close energy proximity. Without such hybridization, only single-particle Dirac spectra are observed in a single Bi bilayer grown on Bi(2)Se(3), where the extrinsic Dirac states Bi bilayer and the intrinsic Dirac states of Bi(2)Se(3) are well separated in energy. The possible origins of many-body interactions are discussed. Our findings provide a means to manipulate topological surface states.

  20. Analysis of the mental foramen using cone beam computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Saito

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionKnowledge of the anatomical structures located in the region between the mental foramina is of critical importance in pre-operative planning.ObjectiveTo evaluate the position of the mental foramen relative to the apices of the teeth and the distance to the edges of the mandible, using cone beam computerized tomography.Material and methodOne hundred cone beam computerized tomographs of the mandible were evaluated; the tomographs were taken using a single tomographic device. Each image chosen was evaluated repeatedly from both sides of the mandible, the position of the mental foramen, indicating the region in which the foramen was found and the measures of the mental foramen, the lingual cortex and the mandibular base. Initially, the data were analyzed descriptively. A value of pResultForty-two percent of the mental foramina were located in the apex of the second pre-molar. The lingual margin of the mental foramen was located, on average, 3.1mm from the lingual cortex. The lower margin of the mental foramen was located 7.25 mm above the lower edge of the mandible.ConclusionThe mental foramen was located more frequently at a level of the apices of the second pre-molars, with a distance to the lingual cortex, on average, of 3.1mm and to the base of the mandible, on average, of 7.25 mm.

  1. Rapid synaptic vesicle endocytosis in cone photoreceptors of salamander retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Matthew J.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2013-01-01

    Following synaptic vesicle exocytosis, neurons retrieve the fused membrane by a process of endocytosis in order to provide a supply of vesicles for subsequent release and maintain the presynaptic active zone. Rod and cone photoreceptors use a specialized structure called the synaptic ribbon that enables them to sustain high rates of neurotransmitter release. They must also employ mechanisms of synaptic vesicle endocytosis capable of keeping up with release. While much is known about endocytosis at another retinal ribbon synapse, that of the goldfish Mb1 bipolar cell, less is known about endocytosis in photoreceptors. We used capacitance recording techniques to measure vesicle membrane fusion and retrieval in photoreceptors from salamander retinal slices. We found that application of brief depolarizing steps (endocytosis with a time constant ~250 ms. In some cases, the capacitance trace overshot the baseline, indicating excess endocytosis. Calcium had no effect on the time constant, but enhanced excess endocytosis resulting in a faster rate of membrane retrieval. Surprisingly, endocytosis was unaffected by blockers of dynamin, suggesting that cone endocytosis is dynamin-independent. This contrasts with synaptic vesicle endocytosis in rods, which was inhibited by the dynamin inhibitor dynasore and GTPγS introduced through the patch pipette, suggesting that the two photoreceptor types employ distinct pathways for vesicle retrieval. The fast kinetics of synaptic vesicle endocytosis in photoreceptors likely enables these cells to maintain a high rate of transmitter release, allowing them to faithfully signal changes in illumination to second-order neurons. PMID:23238726

  2. Hollow-Cone Spray Modeling for Outwardly Opening Piezoelectric Injector

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2016-01-04

    Linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) breakup model has been widely used for modeling hollow-cone spray. However, the model was originally developed for inwardlyopening pressure-swirl injectors by assuming toroidal ligament breakups. Therefore, LISA model is not suitable for simulating outwardly opening injectors having string-like structures at wide spray angles. Furthermore, the varying area and shape of the annular nozzle exit makes the modeling difficult. In this study, a new spray modeling was proposed for outwardly opening hollow-cone injector. The injection velocities are computed from the given mas flow rate and injection pressure regardless of ambiguous nozzle exit geometries. The modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) breakup model is used with adjusted initial Sauter mean diameter (SMD) for modeling breakup of string-like liquid film spray. Liquid spray injection was modeled using Lagrangian discrete parcel method within the framework of commercial CFD software CONVERGE, and the detailed model was implemented by user defined functions. It was found that the new model predicted the liquid penetration length and local SMD accurately for various fuels and chamber conditions.

  3. Effects of scoria-cone eruptions upon nearby human communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ort, M.H.; Elson, M.D.; Anderson, K.C.; Duffield, W.A.; Hooten, J.A.; Champion, D.E.; Waring, G.

    2008-01-01

    Scoria-cone eruptions are typically low in volume and explosivity compared with eruptions from stratovolcanoes, but they can affect local populations profoundly. Scoria-cone eruption effects vary dramatically due to eruption style, tephra blanket extent, climate, types of land use, the culture and complexity of the affected group, and resulting governmental action. A comparison of a historic eruption (Pari??cutin, Me??xico) with prehistoric eruptions (herein we primarily focus on Sunset Crater in northern Arizona, USA) elucidates the controls on and effects of these variables. Long-term effects of lava flows extend little beyond the flow edges. These flows, however, can be used for defensive purposes, providing refuges from invasion for those who know them well. In arid lands, tephra blankets serve as mulches, decreasing runoff and evaporation, increasing infiltration, and regulating soil temperature. Management and retention of these scoria mulches, which can open new areas for agriculture, become a priority for farming communities. In humid areas, though, the tephra blanket may impede plant growth and increase erosion. Cultural responses to eruptions vary, from cultural collapse, through fragmentation of society, dramatic changes, and development of new technologies, to little apparent change. Eruptions may also be viewed as retribution for poor behavior, and attempts are made to mollify angry gods. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  4. Suture With Resorbable Cones: Histology and Physico-Mechanical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Fabio; Pizzamiglio, Roberto; Parodi, Pier Camillo; De Biasio, Fabrizio; Machin, Pier Nicola; Di Loreto, Carla; Gamboa, Mabel

    2016-01-01

    Background Silhouette Sutures (Kolster Methods, Inc., Corona, CA) exhibit different biological characteristics at various time points after their placement. Objectives The goals of this study were to understand the biological reactions of Silhouette Sutures in human tissues at different time intervals and to determine the index of resistance of the sutures in subcutaneous tissue. Methods Histologic examination was performed on section soft tissue containing the sutures at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after suture placement. The study comprised 8 patients, each of whom received 4 sutures in the lower abdomen under local anesthesia. The sutures were placed exactly 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year before planned post-bariatric abdominal surgery. Dynamometric evaluation was performed on a never-used suture and on sutures removed from 1 year after placement. The scar process around the threads was also examined. Results A progressive increase in scar tissue around the sutures was observed. One year after placement, there was a reduction of 16.7% in yield and tensile strength and a reduction of 14.29% in elongation at break, relative to the never-used suture. By 1 year, the cones in polylactic and glycolic acids had been replaced by scar tissue. Conclusions Fibrous tissue around the sutures increased progressively over time, and was most prominent at the level of the nodes. Cones were completely resorbed within 6 months. A reduction in the index of resistance of the suspension sutures occurred over 1 year. PMID:26879301

  5. Minimal complexity control law synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Nett, Carl N.

    1989-01-01

    A paradigm for control law design for modern engineering systems is proposed: Minimize control law complexity subject to the achievement of a specified accuracy in the face of a specified level of uncertainty. Correspondingly, the overall goal is to make progress towards the development of a control law design methodology which supports this paradigm. Researchers achieve this goal by developing a general theory of optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback compensation, where here constrained-structure means that the dynamic-structure (e.g., dynamic order, pole locations, zero locations, etc.) of the output feedback compensation is constrained in some way. By applying this theory in an innovative fashion, where here the indicated iteration occurs over the choice of the compensator dynamic-structure, the paradigm stated above can, in principle, be realized. The optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problem is formulated in general terms. An elegant method for reducing optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problems to optimal static output feedback problems is then developed. This reduction procedure makes use of star products, linear fractional transformations, and linear fractional decompositions, and yields as a byproduct a complete characterization of the class of optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problems which can be reduced to optimal static output feedback problems. Issues such as operational/physical constraints, operating-point variations, and processor throughput/memory limitations are considered, and it is shown how anti-windup/bumpless transfer, gain-scheduling, and digital processor implementation can be facilitated by constraining the controller dynamic-structure in an appropriate fashion.

  6. Minimal models of multidimensional computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Fitzgerald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The multidimensional computations performed by many biological systems are often characterized with limited information about the correlations between inputs and outputs. Given this limitation, our approach is to construct the maximum noise entropy response function of the system, leading to a closed-form and minimally biased model consistent with a given set of constraints on the input/output moments; the result is equivalent to conditional random field models from machine learning. For systems with binary outputs, such as neurons encoding sensory stimuli, the maximum noise entropy models are logistic functions whose arguments depend on the constraints. A constraint on the average output turns the binary maximum noise entropy models into minimum mutual information models, allowing for the calculation of the information content of the constraints and an information theoretic characterization of the system's computations. We use this approach to analyze the nonlinear input/output functions in macaque retina and thalamus; although these systems have been previously shown to be responsive to two input dimensions, the functional form of the response function in this reduced space had not been unambiguously identified. A second order model based on the logistic function is found to be both necessary and sufficient to accurately describe the neural responses to naturalistic stimuli, accounting for an average of 93% of the mutual information with a small number of parameters. Thus, despite the fact that the stimulus is highly non-Gaussian, the vast majority of the information in the neural responses is related to first and second order correlations. Our results suggest a principled and unbiased way to model multidimensional computations and determine the statistics of the inputs that are being encoded in the outputs.

  7. Robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palep, Jaydeep H

    2009-01-01

    The term “robot” was coined by the Czech playright Karel Capek in 1921 in his play Rossom's Universal Robots. The word “robot” is from the check word robota which means forced labor. The era of robots in surgery commenced in 1994 when the first AESOP (voice controlled camera holder) prototype robot was used clinically in 1993 and then marketed as the first surgical robot ever in 1994 by the US FDA. Since then many robot prototypes like the Endoassist (Armstrong Healthcare Ltd., High Wycombe, Buck, UK), FIPS endoarm (Karlsruhe Research Center, Karlsruhe, Germany) have been developed to add to the functions of the robot and try and increase its utility. Integrated Surgical Systems (now Intuitive Surgery, Inc.) redesigned the SRI Green Telepresence Surgery system and created the daVinci Surgical System® classified as a master-slave surgical system. It uses true 3-D visualization and EndoWrist®. It was approved by FDA in July 2000 for general laparoscopic surgery, in November 2002 for mitral valve repair surgery. The da Vinci robot is currently being used in various fields such as urology, general surgery, gynecology, cardio-thoracic, pediatric and ENT surgery. It provides several advantages to conventional laparoscopy such as 3D vision, motion scaling, intuitive movements, visual immersion and tremor filtration. The advent of robotics has increased the use of minimally invasive surgery among laparoscopically naïve surgeons and expanded the repertoire of experienced surgeons to include more advanced and complex reconstructions. PMID:19547687

  8. Palatal mucosal measurements in a Japanese population using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Daisuke; Sekiguchi, Rei; Morita, Masayuki; Jayawardena, Asiri; Shinpo, Satoro; Sato, Junichi; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    2014-01-01

    Although assessment of entire palatal mucosal thickness is important in many dental procedures, available data are mostly limited to the lateral aspect of the palate. The objective of this study was to use cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to perform a comprehensive analysis of the palatal mucosal thickness from the gingival margin to the mid-palatine suture in a Japanese population. Associations of palatal mucosal thickness with the palatal vault depth were also examined. Measurements on the coronal plane were obtained from 44 adults with 3-mm interval in the canine (Ca), first premolar (P1), second premolar (P2), midpoint between first and second molars (M1d), first molar (M1), and second molar (M2). Furthermore, the location of greater palatine foramen (GPF) and palatine groove (PG) were also investigated. Canine region did not show a significant difference throughout measured points. P1, P2, and all molar regions were thickest at 9, 12, and 12 mm from the gingival margin, respectively. At 3 and 6 mm, Ca, P1, and P2 showed significantly greater thickness than the molar region. At 9 mm, P1 demonstrated a greater thickness than M1d, and P2 was greater than M1 and Mi. At 12 and 15 mm, P1 was thinner than P2, M1, and M2, whereas P2 was thinner than M2. M1 was thinner than M2. The high-vault group showed a significantly greater thickness than the low-vault group. In majority of subjects, GPF and PG were identified in second molar and first premolar to first molar, respectively. Palatal mucosa in a Japanese population was the thickest in canine to premolar regions at 9 to 12 mm from the gingival margin. Identification of GPF and PG using CBCT can assist diagnosis of palate seems to minimize surgical complications. This study evaluated the thickness of palatal mucosa in a Japanese population using cone-beam computed tomography, covering a wide range. Canine to second premolar regions are the most suitable in harvesting palatal mucosa for the purpose of soft tissue

  9. Directional sinogram interpolation for motion weighted 4D cone-beam CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Kruis, Matthijs; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2017-03-01

    The image quality of respiratory sorted four-dimensional (4D) cone-beam (CB) computed tomography (CT) is often limited by streak artifacts due to insufficient projections. A motion weighted reconstruction (MWR) method is proposed to decrease streak artifacts and improve image quality. Firstly, respiratory correlated CBCT projections were interpolated by directional sinogram interpolation (DSI) to generate additional CB projections for each phase and subsequently reconstructed. Secondly, local motion was estimated by deformable image registration of the interpolated 4D CBCT. Thirdly, a regular 3D FDK CBCT was reconstructed from the non-interpolated projections. Finally, weights were assigned to each voxel, based on the local motion, and then were used to combine the 3D FDK CBCT and interpolated 4D CBCT to generate the final 4D image. MWR method was compared with regular 4D CBCT scans as well as McKinnon and Bates (MKB) based reconstructions. Comparisons were made in terms of (1) comparing the steepness of an extracted profile from the boundary of the region-of-interest (ROI), (2) contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) inside certain ROIs, and (3) the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) between the planning CT and CBCT inside a homogeneous moving region. Comparisons were made for both a phantom and four patient scans. In a 4D phantom, RMSE were reduced by 24.7% and 38.7% for MKB and MWR respectively, compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Meanwhile, interpolation induced blur was minimal in static regions for MWR based reconstructions. In regions with considerable respiratory motion, image blur using MWR is less than the MKB and 3D Feldkamp (FDK) methods. In the lung cancer patients, average CNRs of MKB, DSI and MWR improved by a factor 1.7, 2.8 and 3.5 respectively relative to 4D FDK. MWR effectively reduces RMSE in 4D cone-beam CT and improves the image quality in both the static and respiratory moving regions compared to 4D FDK and MKB methods.

  10. Aerodynamic performance of osculating-cones waveriders at high altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Rick Evan

    The steady-state aerodynamic characteristics of three-dimensional waverider configurations immersed in hypersonic rarefied flows are investigated. Representative geometries are generated using an inverse design procedure, the method of osculating cones, which defines an exit plane shock shape and approximates the flow properties of the compression surface by assuming that each spanwise station along the shock profile lies within a region of locally conical flow. Vehicle surface and flow field properties are predicted using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method, a probabilistic numerical scheme in which simulated molecules are followed through representative collisions with each other and solid surfaces, and subsequent deterministic displacement. The aerodynamic properties of high- and low-Reynolds number waverider geometries, optimized for maximum lift-to-drag ratio and subject to mission-oriented constraints, are contrasted with results from reference caret and delta wings with similar internal volumes to quantify the relevance and advantage of the waverider concept at high altitudes. The high-Reynolds number waverider, optimized for the continuum regime at Minfinity = 4 and Reinfinity = 250 million, was the focus of recent wind tunnel testing for near on-design and off-design conditions, including low subsonic speeds. The present work extends the previous analyses into the high-altitude regime. The low-Reynolds number waverider, optimized at Minfinity = 20 and Reinfinity = 2.5 million, is studied to determine if optimization potential exists for a high-Mach number waverider at high altitudes. A characteristic length of 5 m is assumed for both waverider configurations, representative of a hypersonic missile concept. The geometries are aerodynamically evaluated over a parametric space consisting of an altitude variation of 95 km to 150 km and an angle of attack range of --5° to 10°. The effect of off-design Mach number on the performance of the high

  11. Toward Practical Secure Stable Matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riazi M. Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Stable Matching (SM algorithm has been deployed in many real-world scenarios including the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP and financial applications such as matching of suppliers and consumers in capital markets. Since these applications typically involve highly sensitive information such as the underlying preference lists, their current implementations rely on trusted third parties. This paper introduces the first provably secure and scalable implementation of SM based on Yao’s garbled circuit protocol and Oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our scheme can securely compute a stable match for 8k pairs four orders of magnitude faster than the previously best known method. We achieve this by introducing a compact and efficient sub-linear size circuit. We even further decrease the computation cost by three orders of magnitude by proposing a novel technique to avoid unnecessary iterations in the SM algorithm. We evaluate our implementation for several problem sizes and plan to publish it as open-source.

  12. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-12-19

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate in fact contains stable prenucleation ion clusters forming even in undersaturated solution. The cluster formation can be characterized by means of equilibrium thermodynamics, applying a multiple-binding model, which allows for structural preformation. Stable clusters are the relevant species in calcium carbonate nucleation. Such mechanisms may also be important for the crystallization of other minerals.

  13. The minimal model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Frank; Andersen, Morten; Ottesen, Johnny T

    2011-10-01

    This paper concerns ODE modeling of the hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal axis (HPA axis) using an analytical and numerical approach, combined with biological knowledge regarding physiological mechanisms and parameters. The three hormones, CRH, ACTH, and cortisol, which interact in the HPA axis are modeled as a system of three coupled, nonlinear differential equations. Experimental data shows the circadian as well as the ultradian rhythm. This paper focuses on the ultradian rhythm. The ultradian rhythm can mathematically be explained by oscillating solutions. Oscillating solutions to an ODE emerges from an unstable fixed point with complex eigenvalues with a positive real parts and a non-zero imaginary parts. The first part of the paper describes the general considerations to be obeyed for a mathematical model of the HPA axis. In this paper we only include the most widely accepted mechanisms that influence the dynamics of the HPA axis, i.e. a negative feedback from cortisol on CRH and ACTH. Therefore we term our model the minimal model. The minimal model, encompasses a wide class of different realizations, obeying only a few physiologically reasonable demands. The results include the existence of a trapping region guaranteeing that concentrations do not become negative or tend to infinity. Furthermore, this treatment guarantees the existence of a unique fixed point. A change in local stability of the fixed point, from stable to unstable, implies a Hopf bifurcation; thereby, oscillating solutions may emerge from the model. Sufficient criteria for local stability of the fixed point, and an easily applicable sufficient criteria guaranteeing global stability of the fixed point, is formulated. If the latter is fulfilled, ultradian rhythm is an impossible outcome of the minimal model and all realizations thereof. The second part of the paper concerns a specific realization of the minimal model in which feedback functions are built explicitly using receptor dynamics. Using

  14. Ablation and cone formation mechanism on CR-39 by ArF laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri Jooybari, B., E-mail: baninshakery@gmail.com, E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute NSRT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afarideh, H., E-mail: baninshakery@gmail.com, E-mail: hafarideh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lamehi-Rachti, M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute NSRT, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghergherehchi, M. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-07

    In this work, chemical properties, surface modification, and micro structures formation on ablated polyallyl di-glycol carbonate (CR-39) polymer by ArF laser irradiation (λ = 193 nm) at various fluences and pulse number were investigated. CR-39 samples have been irradiated with an ArF laser (193 nm) at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. Threshold fluence of ablation and effective absorption coefficient of CR-39 were determined. Conical microstructures (Taylor cone) formed on laser-ablated CR-39 exhibit: smooth, Taylor cone shape walls and sharp tips together with interference and well defined fringe-structure with a period of 230 nm, around cone base. Mechanism of cone formation and cone evolution of CR-39 ablated surface were investigated by change of fluences (at a given pulse number) and pulse number (at a given fluence). Cone height, cone base, and region of interface were increased in micrometer steps by increasing the total fluence. Depression on the base of the cone and the circular fringe were simulated. FTIR spectra were measured and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of irradiated and un-irradiated samples was performed.

  15. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.H.J. Thiadens (Alberta); G.G. Soerjoesing (Gyan); R.J. Florijn; A.G. Tjiam; A.I. Hollander (Anneke); L.I. van den Born (Ingeborgh); F.C.C. Riemslag (Frans); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. Methods: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1)

  16. Clinical course of cone dystrophy caused by mutations in the RPGR gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Soerjoesing, G.G.; Florijn, R.J.; Tjiam, A.G.; Hollander, A.I. den; Born, L.I. van den; Riemslag, F.C.; Bergen, A.A.B.; Klaver, C.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the RPGR gene predominantly cause rod photoreceptor disorders with a large variability in clinical course. In this report, we describe two families with mutations in this gene and cone involvement. METHODS: We investigated an X-linked cone dystrophy family (1) with 25

  17. Scoria cones on Mars: detailed investigation of morphometry based on high - resolution Digital Elevation Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, Petr; Čadek, O.; Hauber, E.; Rossi, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 9 (2015), s. 1512-1527 ISSN 2169-9097 Institutional support: RVO:67985530 Keywords : Mars surface * volcanism * pyroclastic cone * scoria cone Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013

  18. Local joint-limits using distance field cones in euler angle space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Abel, Sarah Maria Niebe; Erleben, Kenny

    Joint–limits are often modeled too simple, causing redundancy and allowing unnatural poses. We model the boundary of the feasible region, using a geometric approach. We show how to generate fast, general joint–limit cones for kinematic figures using signed distance fields. The distance–cone joint...

  19. Gauging isometries on hyperKahler cones and quaternion Kahler manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, Bernard de; Rocek, M.; Vandoren, S.

    2001-01-01

    We extend our previous results on the relation between quaternion-Kähler manifolds and hyperk¨ahler cones and we describe how isometries, moment maps and scalar potentials descend from the cone to the quaternion-Kähler space. As an example of the general construction, we discuss the gauging and

  20. Cone production, seed dispersal, germination in...old-growth redwood cut and uncut stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth N. Boe

    1968-01-01

    Records of 5 and 6 years' cone crops in old-growth redwood (Sequoia sempervirens [D. Don Endl.] stands in northern California were studied for silvical facts. They show that (a) the principal trees in both cut and uncut stands bore fair to good cone crops for 5 consecutive years, (b) maximum seed dispersal of both total and sound seed occurred in winter, (c)...

  1. Pyrolysis kinetics and combustion of thin wood using advanced cone calorimetry test method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger

    2011-01-01

    Mechanistic pyrolysis kinetics analysis of extractives, holocellulose, and lignin in solid wood over entire heating regime was possible using specialized cone calorimeter test and new mathematical analysis tools. Added hardware components include: modified sample holder for thin specimen with tiny thermocouples, methane ring burner with stainless steel mesh above cone...

  2. A simplified approach for the generation of projection data for cone ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Following the same line of argument as above, the effective ray path in the voxel ... For cone beam data collection geometry, arguing on similar lines, the projection data. gϕ,η at cone angle ϕ and fan .... For numerical simulation purpose, Phantom 1 was discretized on a regular grid of 101 ×. 101 × 241 units. The projections ...

  3. On the closure of the completely positive semidefinite cone and linear approximations to quantum colorings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgdorf, S.; Laurent, Monique; Piovesan, Teresa; Beigi, S.; Koenig, R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate structural properties of the completely positive semidefinite cone CS^n_+, consisting of all the n x n symmetric matrices that admit a Gram representation by positive semidefinite matrices of any size. This cone has been introduced to model quantum graph parameters as conic

  4. Mitochondrial phylogeny of pine cone beetles (Scolytinae, Conophthorus) and their affiliation with geographic area and host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony I. Cognato; Nancy E. Gillette; Rodolfo Campos Bolanos; Felix A.H. Sperling

    2005-01-01

    Pine cone beetles (Conophthorus spp.) feed and kill immature cones of Pinus species, thereby reducing seed production and seriously impairing reforestation of forest ecosystems. Population variation of Conophthorus reproductive behavior has hampered the development of semiochemical control of these pests. This diYculty is...

  5. Mutations in PCDH21 cause autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Elsebet; Batbayli, M; Dunø, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy is a retinal dystrophy with early loss of cone photoreceptors and a parallel or subsequent loss of rod photoreceptors. It may be syndromic, but most forms are non-syndromic with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked recessive inheritance....

  6. Efficacy of different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine in disinfection of contaminated Resilon cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, V; Salem-Milani, A; Shahi, S; Akhi, M-T; Vazifekhah, S

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different concentrations of Chlorhexidine (CHX) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) in disinfecting contaminated Resilon cones within one minute. Fifty Resilon cones were divided into seven experimental groups and three control groups of 5 cones each. The cones of experimental groups were contaminated with E. faecalis and subsequently disinfected with different concentrations of NaOCl or CHX. The cones were then transferred into glass tubes containing thioglycollate media and incubated for 7 days. The tubes were examined for turbidity every 24 hours, and if bacterial growth occurred, samples were plated, incubated, gram stained and observed under microscope to confirm E. faecalis growth. Negative, positive, and washing control groups were also used. All the positive and washing control showed profound E.faecalis growth. All the cones disinfected with CHX showed bacterial growth; however, no E. faecalis growth occurred in any samples disinfected with NaOCl. Sodium hypochlorite, at concentrations of 0.5 to 5.25%, is an effective agent for disinfection of contaminated Resilon cones within one minute; however, chlorhexidine is unable to disinfect Resilon cones during one-minute exposure.

  7. Determination of CME 3D parameters based on a new full ice-cream cone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Yong-Jae

    2017-08-01

    In space weather forecast, it is important to determine three-dimensional properties of CMEs. Using 29 limb CMEs, we examine which cone type is close to a CME three-dimensional structure. We find that most CMEs have near full ice-cream cone structure which is a symmetrical circular cone combined with a hemisphere. We develop a full ice-cream cone model based on a new methodology that the full ice-cream cone consists of many flat cones with different heights and angular widths. By applying this model to 12 SOHO/LASCO halo CMEs, we find that 3D parameters from our method are similar to those from other stereoscopic methods (i.e., a triangulation method and a Graduated Cylindrical Shell model). In addition, we derive CME mean density (ρmean=Mtotal/Vcone) based on the full ice-cream cone structure. For several limb events, we determine CME mass by applying the Solarsoft procedure (e.g., cme_mass.pro) to SOHO/LASCO C3 images. CME volumes are estimated from the full ice-cream cone structure. From the power-law relationship between CME mean density and its height, we estimate CME mean densities at 20 solar radii (Rs). We will compare the CME densities at 20 Rs with their corresponding ICME densities.

  8. Analysis of New Aerodynamic Design of the Nose Cone Section Using CFD and SPH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan-Alexandru BELEGA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new nose cones concept that promises a gain in performance over existing conventional nose cones is discussed in this paper. It is shown that significant performance gains result from the adaptation of the exhaust flow to the ambient pressure. For this complex work, it was necessary to collect and study the various nose cone shapes and the equations describing them? The paper objective was to identify the types of nose cones with ejector channels and specific aerodynamic characteristics of different types of nose cones. The scope of this paper is to develop some prototype profiles with outstanding aerodynamic qualities and low cost for use in construction projects for missile increasing their range and effect on target. The motivation for such a work is caused by a lack of data on aerodynamics for profiles of some nose cones and especially improved aerodynamic qualities that can be used in designing missiles/ rockets. This design method consists of a geometry creation step in which a three-dimensional geometry is generated, a mathematical model presented and a simple flow analysis (FLUENT Simulation from SolidWorks2012 and ANSYS Simulation with SPH for fluid-structure interaction, step which predicts the air intake mass flow rate. Flow phenomena observed in numerical simulations during different nose cone operations are highlighted, critical design aspects and operation conditions are discussed, and performance characteristics of the selected nose cone are presented.

  9. Sealing ability of three single-cone obturation systems: An in-vitro glucose leakage study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El Sayed, Mohamed Abdel Aziz Mohamed; Taleb, Ahmed Abdel Aziz; Balbahaith, Mohammed Sulaiman Mubarak

    2013-01-01

    ...; Group 3, single-cone Gutta-percha/and GuttaFlow2; Group 4, single-cone Resilon/RealSeal SE after 7 days, the sealing ability of root canal fillings was tested at different time intervals using glucose leakage model...

  10. Cone bipolar cells in the retina of the microbat Carollia perspicillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Elisabeth; Peichl, Leo; Müller, Brigitte

    2015-04-15

    We studied the retinal cone bipolar cells of Carollia perspicillata, a microchiropteran bat of the phyllostomid family. Microchiroptera are strongly nocturnal, with small eyes and rod-dominated retinae. However, they also possess a significant cone population (2-4%) comprising two spectral types, which are hence the basis for daylight and color vision. We used antibodies against the calcium-binding protein recoverin and the carbohydrate epitope 15 (CD15) as reliable markers for certain cone bipolar cells. Dye injections of recoverin- or CD15-prelabeled cone bipolar cells in vertical slices revealed the morphology of the axon terminal system of individual bipolar cells. Seven distinct cone bipolar cell types were identified. They differed in the morphology and stratification level of their axon terminal system in the inner plexiform layer and in immunoreactivity for recoverin and/or CD15. Additional immunocytochemical markers were used to assess the functional ON/OFF subdivision of the inner plexiform layer. In line with the extended thickness of the ON sublayer of the inner plexiform layer in the microbat retina, more ON than OFF cone bipolar cell types were found, namely, four versus three. Most likely, in the bats' predominantly dark environment, ON signals have greater importance for contrast perception. We conclude that the microbat retina conforms to the general mammalian blueprint, in which light signals of intensities above rod sensitivity are detected by cones and transmitted to various types of ON and OFF cone bipolar cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. New records and new species of cones from deeper water off Fiji (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Conidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolenbeek, R.G.; Röckel, D.; Bouchet, P.

    2008-01-01

    A little less than 100 species of cones are known in the literature from waters around the Fiji islands, all intertidal to subtidal. We report here on the species taken by recent offshore and deep-water benthic sampling expeditions. Samples were taken to depths of 1300 m, although cones were taken

  12. Some Equivalences between Cone $b$ -Metric Spaces and $b$ -Metric Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Poom Kumam; Nguyen Dung; Vo Thi Le Hang

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a $b$ -metric on the cone $b$ -metric space and then prove some equivalences between them. As applications, we show that fixed point theorems on cone $b$ -metric spaces can be obtained from fixed point theorems on $b$ -metric spaces.

  13. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis.

  14. Role of a Dual Splicing and Amino Acid Code in Myopia, Cone Dysfunction and Cone Dystrophy Associated withL/MOpsin Interchange Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Scott H; Kuchenbecker, James A; Rowlan, Jessica S; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2017-05-01

    Human long ( L ) and middle ( M ) wavelength cone opsin genes are highly variable due to intermixing. Two L / M cone opsin interchange mutants, designated LIAVA and LVAVA , are associated with clinical diagnoses, including red-green color vision deficiency, blue cone monochromacy, cone degeneration, myopia, and Bornholm Eye Disease. Because the protein and splicing codes are carried by the same nucleotides, intermixing L and M genes can cause disease by affecting protein structure and splicing. Genetically engineered mice were created to allow investigation of the consequences of altered protein structure alone, and the effects on cone morphology were examined using immunohistochemistry. In humans and mice, cone function was evaluated using the electroretinogram (ERG) under L / M - or short (S) wavelength cone isolating conditions. Effects of LIAVA and LVAVA genes on splicing were evaluated using a minigene assay. ERGs and histology in mice revealed protein toxicity for the LVAVA but not for the LIAVA opsin. Minigene assays showed that the dominant messenger RNA (mRNA) was aberrantly spliced for both variants; however, the LVAVA gene produced a small but significant amount of full-length mRNA and LVAVA subjects had correspondingly reduced ERG amplitudes. In contrast, the LIAVA subject had no L / M cone ERG. Dramatic differences in phenotype can result from seemingly minor differences in genotype through divergent effects on the dual amino acid and splicing codes. The mechanism by which individual mutations contribute to clinical phenotypes provides valuable information for diagnosis and prognosis of vision disorders associated with L / M interchange mutations, and it informs strategies for developing therapies.

  15. A note about retinal structure and visual acuity. A light microscopic study of the cones in fovea centralis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Jørgen; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Primate eye, retina, fovea centralis, cone cells, non-shrinkage methods, light microscopy, resolution......Primate eye, retina, fovea centralis, cone cells, non-shrinkage methods, light microscopy, resolution...

  16. Chapter 51: How to Build a Simple Cone Search Service Using a Local Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, B. R.; Greene, G. R.

    The cone search service protocol will be examined from the server side in this chapter. A simple cone search service will be setup and configured locally using MySQL. Data will be read into a table, and the Java JDBC will be used to connect to the database. Readers will understand the VO cone search specification and how to use it to query a database on their local systems and return an XML/VOTable file based on an input of RA/DEC coordinates and a search radius. The cone search in this example will be deployed as a Java servlet. The resulting cone search can be tested with a verification service. This basic setup can be used with other languages and relational databases.

  17. Realization of Dirac Cones in Few Bilayer Sb(111) Films by Surface Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui; Wang, Xue-Sen

    2015-12-01

    We report the first-principle study on the recovery and linearization of Dirac cones in the electronic band structures of a few bilayer Sb(111) films (n-BL Sb) by surface modification. Due to the interaction between the surface states on the two surfaces of a free-standing film, the distorted Dirac cone in n-BL Sb(111) (n Dirac cone can be restored by functionalizing one surface with certain atoms including H, Ag, and Au, to reduce the inter-surface interaction. We further show that an ideal Dirac cone with linear dispersion of topological surface states near the zone center can be realized by functionalizing both surfaces of the film with oxygen, which enhances spin-orbital coupling. The realization of Dirac cone by surface functionalization shows promise for applications of topologic materials to spintronic devices and their operation in complicated conditions.

  18. Observation of an anisotropic Dirac cone reshaping and ferrimagnetic spin polarization in an organic conductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Michihiro; Ishikawa, Kyohei; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tamura, Masafumi; Berthier, Claude; Basko, Denis; Kobayashi, Akito; Matsuno, Genki; Kanoda, Kazushi

    2016-08-31

    The Coulomb interaction among massless Dirac fermions in graphene is unscreened around the isotropic Dirac points, causing a logarithmic velocity renormalization and a cone reshaping. In less symmetric Dirac materials possessing anisotropic cones with tilted axes, the Coulomb interaction can provide still more exotic phenomena, which have not been experimentally unveiled yet. Here, using site-selective nuclear magnetic resonance, we find a non-uniform cone reshaping accompanied by a bandwidth reduction and an emergent ferrimagnetism in tilted Dirac cones that appear on the verge of charge ordering in an organic compound. Our theoretical analyses based on the renormalization-group approach and the Hubbard model show that these observations are the direct consequences of the long-range and short-range parts of the Coulomb interaction, respectively. The cone reshaping and the bandwidth renormalization, as well as the magnetic behaviour revealed here, can be ubiquitous and vital for many Dirac materials.

  19. ‘Parabolic’ trapped modes and steered Dirac cones in platonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhedran, R. C.; Movchan, A. B.; Movchan, N. V.; Brun, M.; Smith, M. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the properties of flexural waves governed by the biharmonic operator, and propagating in a thin plate pinned at doubly periodic sets of points. The emphases are on the design of dispersion surfaces having the Dirac cone topology, and on the related topic of trapped modes in plates for a finite set (cluster) of pinned points. The Dirac cone topologies we exhibit have at least two cones touching at a point in the reciprocal lattice, augmented by another band passing through the point. We show that these Dirac cones can be steered along symmetry lines in the Brillouin zone by varying the aspect ratio of rectangular lattices of pins, and that, as the cones are moved, the involved band surfaces tilt. We link Dirac points with a parabolic profile in their neighbourhood, and the characteristic of this parabolic profile decides the direction of propagation of the trapped mode in finite clusters. PMID:27547089

  20. Differential function of Gγ13 in rod bipolar and ON cone bipolar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Hariharasubramanian; Dhingra, Anuradha; Tummala, Shanti R; Fina, Marie E; Li, Jian J; Lyubarsky, Arkady; Vardi, Noga

    2015-01-01

    retinas, immunostaining for Gβ3 and for the GTPase activating proteins RGS7, RGS11, R9AP and Gβ5 decreased significantly in rod bipolar cells but not in ON cone bipolar cells. Staining for Gαo and certain other cascade elements decreased only slightly. Analysis of our ON bipolar cDNA library showed that these cells express mRNAs for Gγ5, Gγ10 and Gγ11. Quantitative RT-PCR of retinal cDNA showed greater values for these transcripts in retinas of KO mice, although the difference was not significant. Our results suggest that Gγ13 contributes to mGluR6 signalling in rod bipolar cells more than in ON cone bipolar cells, and that this contribution includes both coupling the receptor and maintaining a stable localization of the mGluR6-related cascade elements. PMID:25416620

  1. A fixed point theorem for uniformly locally contractive mappings in a C-chainable cone rectangular metric space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bessem Samet

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Azam, Arshad and Beg [ Banach contraction principle on cone rectangular metric spaces, Appl. Anal. Discrete Math. 2009] introduced the notion of cone rectangular metric spaces by replacing the triangular inequality of a cone metric space by a rectangular inequality. In this paper, we introduce the notion of c-chainable cone rectangular metric space and we establish a fixed point theorem for uniformly locally contractive mappings in such spaces. An example is given to illustrate our obtained result.

  2. Physical properties of new collimator cone system for stereotactic radiation therapy developed in samsung medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D Y; Ahn, Y C; Oh, D G; Choi, D R; Ju, S G; Yeo, I H; Huh, S J

    2000-09-01

    A new collimator cone system has been developed at the Samsung Medical Center that overcomes some of the limitations of present commercially supplied collimator cones. The physical properties of the newly developed cone system are described in this report. The new cones have relatively larger aperture sizes (3.0-7.0 cm in diameter) and are 16 cm in length. Each new cone is fabricated with cerrobend alloy melted and poured into a stainless steel housing that is permanently fixed to a mounting plate. The mounting plate of the new cone is designed to insert into the wedge mount slot of the gantry head. The mechanical accuracy of the central axis of the cone pointing to the isocenter was tested using film, a steel ball positioned at the isocenter by the mechanical isocenter device. For the evaluation of beam flatness and penumbra, off-axis ratios at 5 cm depth were measured by film dosimetry using polystyrene phantom. The average error of the mechanical isocenter was 0.27 mm (+/- 0.16 mm). The beam flatness was excellent in the central region of the beam, and the average penumbra width was 3.35 mm (+/- 0.25 mm). The new cone design has more clearance between the patient's head and the gantry, and can more easily be removed from the gantry head because it slides in and out of the wedge slot. This facilitates changing cone sizes during one treatment session, and makes the process of double exposure port films easier. A new collimator cone system for stereotactic radiation therapy has been developed. The mechanical accuracy and physical properties are satisfactory for clinical use, and the new design permits a wider range of clinical applications for stereotactic radiation therapy.

  3. Friedman tongue position and cone beam computed tomography in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Rebecca; O'Brien, Louise; Aronovich, Sharon; Shelgikar, Anita; Hoff, Paul; Palmisano, John; Stanley, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Evaluate the correlation between Friedman Tongue Position (FTP) and airway cephalometrics in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Retrospective review of adult patients with OSA undergoing Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). Collected data included age, sex, body mass index, apnea hypopnea index, FTP, and airway cephalometric parameters. Data analyses were performed using ANOVA, dichotomous t-testing, and linear regression. 203 patients were included in the analysis. (M:F 132:71). The mean posterior airway space (PAS) was inversely correlated (p = 0.001, r =.119) with higher FTP grades with means of 12.3 mm, 7.9 mm, 6.6 mm, and 4.3 mm, I-IV respectively. Minimal cross-sectional area for patients with FTP I-IV was 245.7, 179.8, 137.6, and 74.2 mm, 2 respectively (p = 0.002, r = .095). Mean hyoid-mandibular plane (H-MP) for FTP I-IV was 20.6 mm, 20.4 mm, 24.7 mm, and 28.9 mm respectively. No statistically significant difference between H-MP values when comparing patients with FTP I or II (p = 0.22). There were statistically significant differences when these two groups were individually compared to FTP III and IV (p = 0.002). Linear regression analysis confirmed an independent association between FTP and PAS (β = -2.06, p < 0.001), minimal cross-sectional area (β = -45.07, p = 0.02), and H-MP (β = 3.03, p = 0.01) controlling for BMI, age, AHI, and sex. Use of FTP is supported by objective CBCT cephalometric results, in particular the PAS, minimal cross-sectional area, and H-MP. Understanding the correlation between objective measurements of retroglossal collapse should allow Otolaryngologists to more confidently select patients who may require surgery to address the retroglossal area, particularly when the ability to perform cephalometric analysis is not possible. 4.

  4. [Minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Sun, Taicun; Huang, Yonghui

    2010-01-01

    To summarize the recent minimally invasive approach for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The recent literature at home and abroad concerning minimally invasive approach for CSR was reviewed and summarized. There were two techniques of minimally invasive approach for CSR at present: percutaneous puncture techniques and endoscopic techniques. The degenerate intervertebral disc was resected or nucleolysis by percutaneous puncture technique if CSR was caused by mild or moderate intervertebral disc herniations. The cervical microendoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy was an effective minimally invasive approach which could provide a clear view. The endoscopy techniques were suitable to treat CSR caused by foraminal osteophytes, lateral disc herniations, local ligamentum flavum thickening and spondylotic foraminal stenosis. The minimally invasive procedure has the advantages of simple handling, minimally invasive and low incidence of complications. But the scope of indications is relatively narrow at present.

  5. Minimal Cells-Real and Imagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, John I; Merryman, Chuck; Wise, Kim S; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O

    2017-12-01

    A minimal cell is one whose genome only encodes the minimal set of genes necessary for the cell to survive. Scientific reductionism postulates the best way to learn the first principles of cellular biology would be to use a minimal cell in which the functions of all genes and components are understood. The genes in a minimal cell are, by definition, essential. In 2016, synthesis of a genome comprised of only the set of essential and quasi-essential genes encoded by the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides created a near-minimal bacterial cell. This organism performs the cellular functions common to all organisms. It replicates DNA, transcribes RNA, translates proteins, undergoes cell division, and little else. In this review, we examine this organism and contrast it with other bacteria that have been used as surrogates for a minimal cell. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  6. Maternal Uniparental Isodisomy of Chromosome 6 Reveals a TULP1 Mutation as a Novel Cause of Cone Dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Baere, E. de; Collin, R.W.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Leroy, B.P.; Moll-Ramirez, N. van; Venselaar, H.; Riemslag, F.C.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klaver, C.C.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: The majority of the genetic causes of autosomal recessive (ar) cone dystrophy (CD) and cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) are currently unknown. We used a high-resolution homozygosity mapping approach in a cohort of patients with CD or CRD to identify new genes for ar cone disorders. DESIGN: Case

  7. Seed production and cone-feeding insects of Pinus pumila on the Kamtchatka Peninsula: aspect's of coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr A. Khomentovsky; L. S. Efremova

    1991-01-01

    Insects attacking seeds and cones of trees are significant for their economic consequences as well as for the ecological role in vegetation dynamics. Currently much is known about seed and cone insects feeding on upright trees (see Roques, this volume), but almost nothing is known about cone inhabitants of prostrate pines Pinus pumila (Pall.) Rgl.,...

  8. Development of Efficient Sludge Collection Cones for Concentration of Raceway-Derived Solids in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Laursen, Jesper; McLean, E

    2004-01-01

    scale model. Based on this calibrated CFD model, five different principal designs of cones were evaluated. The results suggest that adjusting cone geometry can significantly enhance the efficiency of sludge collection in raceways. More efficient cone design will not only result in optimized solids...

  9. Minimizing Ports During Robotic Partial Nephrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argun, Omer Burak; Tufek, Ilter; Obek, Can; Tuna, Mustafa Bilal; Keskin, Selcuk; Kural, Ali Riza

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Robotic upper urinary tract surgery is in most of the cases performed utilizing a standard 5 port configuration. Fewer ports can potentially produce a less invasive operation. Taking in consideration the above we report a novel technique for robot assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy utilizing fewer ports and we test its feasibility and safety profile. Methods: Data on 11 robot-assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomies performed by using our technique from February 2015 through June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The robotic platform used was DaVinci Xi (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, California, USA) with a 3-arm setup. The AirSeal system (SurgiQuest, Milford, Connecticut, USA) was used as a port allowing simultaneous introduction of 2 instruments for the bedside surgeon, obviating the need for an additional (fourth) robotic arm. A long suction-and-irrigation device and atraumatic grasping forceps were used. Both instruments were introduced through the trocar of the AirSeal system, making simultaneous introduction and use possible. We preferred the long suction-and-irrigation device, because it minimizes collision of the instruments. Results: Mean age and BMI of the patients were 55 ±14.6 y and 29.18 ± 6.85, respectively. Seven tumors were on the right side and 4 were on the left. The mean size of the tumors was 32.45 mm (± 11.31). Surgical time was 132.2 minutes (±37.17), with an estimated blood loss and ischemia time of 103.63 mL (±65.92) and 16.72 minutes (±9.52), respectively. One patient had postoperative bleeding that was resolved without transfusion. The median hospitalization period was 3.9 d (±0.53). Loss of intra-abdominal pressure was not observed, and pressure was stable at 10 mm Hg. Conclusion: The AirSeal System and its valveless trocar eliminated the need for an additional port placement in our series. The technique is feasible, safe, and reproducible; therefore, it may be implemented in selected

  10. Exploring Isothermal Layers in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    Simulating the stable atmospheric boundary-layer presents a significant challenge to numerical models due to the interactions of several processes with widely varying scales. The goal of this project is to more clearly define the cause of isothermal layers observed during the Meteorological Experiment in Arizona's Meteor Crater and to test the National Taiwan University/Purdue University (NTU/P) model in stable environments with complex terrain. The NTU/P model is able to utilize the actual terrain data with minimal smoothing for stability. We have found that isothermal profiles can be generated by the standing wave that develops due to weak wind flowing over the crater. However, the horizontal heterogeneity is greater than observed. Continued effort will explore enhancing horizontal mixing due to turbulence and radiative transfer. Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation Program, Summer Research Opportunities Program.

  11. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass - discharge; MIDCAB - discharge; Robot assisted coronary artery bypass - discharge; RACAB - discharge; Keyhole heart surgery - discharge; Coronary artery disease - MIDCAB discharge; CAD - ...

  12. Minimally invasive approaches to the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestre, Paul C; Pazmiño, Pablo R; Mikhael, Mark M; Wolf, Christopher F; Feldman, Lacey A; Lauryssen, Carl; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive approaches and operative techniques are becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of cervical spine disorders. Minimally invasive spine surgery attempts to decrease iatrogenic muscle injury, decrease pain, and speed postoperative recovery with the use of smaller incisions and specialized instruments. This article explains in detail minimally invasive approaches to the posterior spine, the techniques for posterior cervical foraminotomy and arthrodesis via lateral mass screw placement, and anterior cervical foraminotomy. Complications are also discussed. Additionally, illustrated cases are presented detailing the use of minimally invasive surgical techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracting respiratory signals from thoracic cone beam CT projections

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Hao; Yin, Wotao; Pan, Tinsu; Ahmad, Moiz; Mou, Xuanqin; Cervino, Laura; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2012-01-01

    Patient respiratory signal associated with the cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is important for lung cancer radiotherapy. In contrast to monitoring an external surrogate of respiration, such signal can be extracted directly from the CBCT projections. In this paper, we propose a novel local principle component analysis (LPCA) method to extract the respiratory signal by distinguishing the respiration motion-induced content change from the gantry rotation-induced content change in the CBCT projections. The LPCA method is evaluated by comparing with three state-of-the-art projection-based methods, namely, the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) method, the intensity analysis (IA) method, and the Fourier-transform based phase analysis (FT-p) method. The clinical CBCT projection data of eight patients, acquired under various clinical scenarios, were used to investigate the performance of each method. We found that the proposed LPCA method has demonstrated the best overall performance for cases tested and thus is a promising tech...

  14. Mathematical Modelling of Fluid Flow in Cone and Cavitation Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada KOZUBKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem of cavitation is the undesirable phenomena occuring in the fluid flow in many hydraulic application (pumps, turbines, valves, etc.. Therefore this is in the focus of interest using experimental and mathematical methods. Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience [1], [2], [4], following problem described as the water flow at the outlet from turbine blade wheel was solved. Primarily the problem is simplified into modelling of water flow in cone. Profiles of axial, radial and tangential velocity are defined on inlet zone. The value of pressure is defined on the outlet. Boundary conditions were defined by main investigator of the grant project – Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan’s Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The value of air volume was insignificant. Cavitation was solved by Singhal model of cavitation.

  15. Comparing cone beam laminographic system trajectories for composite NDT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil O'Brien

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We compare the quality of reconstruction obtainable using various laminographic system trajectories that have been described in the literature, with reference to detecting defects in composite materials in engineering. We start by describing a laminar phantom representing a simplified model of composite panel, which models certain defects that may arise in such materials, such as voids, resin rich areas, and delamination, and additionally features both blind and through holes along multiple axes. We simulate ideal cone-beam projections of this phantom with the different laminographic trajectories, applying both Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique (SIRT and Conjugate Gradient Least Squares (CGLS reconstruction algorithms. We compare the quality of the reconstructions with a view towards optimising the scan parameters for defect detectability in composite NDT applications.

  16. Interpretation of Seismic Cone Penetration Testing in Silty Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmsgaard, Rikke; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2016-01-01

    Five Seismic Cone Penetration Tests (SCPT) were conducted at a test site in northern Denmark where the subsoil consists primarily of sandy silt with clay bands. A portion of the test data were collected every 0.5 m to compare the efficacy of closely-spaced down-hole data collection...... on the computation of shear wave velocity. A minimum of eight seismic tests were completed at each depth in order to examine the reliability of shear wave velocity data, as well as to assess the impact of the time interval between CPT termination and seismic test initiation on SCPT results. The shear wave velocity...... was computed using three different methods: cross-over, cross-correlation and cross-correlation “trimmed with window”. In the “trimmed with window” technique the latter part of the signal is clipped off by setting the amplitude to zero. The result showed that more closely-spaced test intervals actually...

  17. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Inverted Mesiodentes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sehaibany, Fares S; Marzouk, Hazem M; Salama, Fouad S

    2016-01-01

    A mesiodens is the most common type of supernumerary teeth. The purpose of this report is to present a rare occurrence of non-syndromic impacted inverted mesiodentes in an 8.5-year-old boy who presented with a chief complaint of delayed eruption of his permanent maxillary left central incisor. Occlusal and panoramic radiographs, as well as cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction image, confirmed that one supernumerary tooth had perforated the nasal fossa floor and the other was in close approximation to the to the same site. Surgical removal of both mesiodentes was indicated. Radiographic evidence of complete healing was observed 12 months following surgical removal. The use of CBCT with a 3-D reconstruction image as a tool in diagnosis and evaluation of healing after surgical removal is recommended.

  18. Exact Interior Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangbo Ye

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the backprojection filtration (BPF and filtered backprojection (FBP approaches, respectively, we prove that with cone-beam CT the interior problem can be exactly solved by analytic continuation. The prior knowledge we assume is that a volume of interest (VOI in an object to be reconstructed is known in a subregion of the VOI. Our derivations are based on the so-called generalized PI-segment (chord. The available projection onto convex set (POCS algorithm and singular value decomposition (SVD method can be applied to perform the exact interior reconstruction. These results have many implications in the CT field and can be extended to other tomographic modalities, such as SPECT/PET, MRI.

  19. Diagnostic Applications of Cone-Beam CT for Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This paper aims to review the diagnostic application of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the field of periodontology. Data. Original articles that reported on the use of CBCT for periodontal disease diagnosis were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1990 to January 2014), PubMed (using medical subject headings), and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “CBCT,” “volumetric CT,” “periodontal disease ,” and “periodontitis.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. Bony defects, caters, and furcation involvements seem to be better depicted on CBCT, whereas bone quality and periodontal ligament space scored better on conventional intraoral radiography. CBCT does not offer a significant advantage over conventional radiography for assessing the periodontal bone levels. PMID:24803932

  20. Laser spectroscopy with an electrostatic ConeTrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S., E-mail: sam.kelly@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Campbell, P. [University of Manchester, Nuclear Physics Group, Schuster Laboratory, Brunswick Street (United Kingdom); Cheal, B., E-mail: Bradley.Cheal@Liverpool.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Geldhof, S.; Jokinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A. [JYFL, University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    A compact electrostatic trap has been designed and installed as part of the recent upgrades to the IGISOL IV facility. The ConeTrap provides an in vacuo optical pumping site for low energy (800 eV) ionic ensembles available for interaction periods of 10-100 ms. At present, 6.7(3) % of injected mass A=98 ions can be trapped, stored for 5 ms, extracted and transported to a laser-ion interaction region. This fraction represents those ions for which no perturbation to total energy or energy spread is observed. Proposed enhancements to the trap are designed to improve the trapping efficiency by up to a factor of 5. Differential pumping and reduction in background pressure below the present 10{sup −6} mbar will extend storage times beyond 100 ms.

  1. Partial Resolution of Complex Cones over Fano ℬ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Dwivedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In our recent paper, we systematized an inverse algorithm to obtain quiver gauge theory living on the M2-branes probing the singularities of a special kind of Calabi-Yau fourfold which were complex cones over toric Fano ℙ3, ℬ1, ℬ2, ℬ3. These quiver gauge theories cannot be given a dimer tiling presentation. We use the method of partial resolution to show that the toric data of ℂ4 and Fano ℙ3 can be embedded inside the toric data of Fano ℬ theories. This method indirectly justifies that the two-node quiver Chern-Simons theories corresponding to ℂ4, Fano ℙ3, and their orbifolds can be obtained by higgsing matter fields of the three-node parent quiver corresponding to Fano ℬ1, ℬ2, ℬ3, ℬ4 threefold.

  2. Using cone beam computed tomography images to diagnose multiple taurodontisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Mamede-Neto, Iussif; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; Pedro, Fabio Luis Miranda; Bueno, Mike Reis; Estrela, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Taurodontism is a developmental anomaly that manifests as an alteration in a patient's internal morphology and is characterized by the lack of constriction at the level of the cementoenamel junction, which results in an apical extension of the pulp chamber that extends into the root area of a multiradicular tooth. This report presents a case of an otherwise healthy patient with 12 hypertaurodontic teeth, which were detected by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). It is essential to emphasize the importance of routine imaging examinations for diagnosing developmental dental anomalies such as taurodontism, as this condition is generally not found by routine oral examination, and is not necessarily restricted to syndromic patients. CBCT images contribute to the diagnosis of and treatment plan for taurodontism.

  3. Fossa navicularis magna detection on cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Ali Z. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland(United States); Mupparapu, Mel [Div. of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Herein, we report and discuss the detection of fossa navicularis magna, a close radiographic anatomic variant of canalis basilaris medianus of the basiocciput, as an incidental finding in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The CBCT data of the patients in question were referred for the evaluation of implant sites and to rule out pathology in the maxilla and mandible. CBCT analysis showed osseous, notch-like defects on the inferior aspect of the clivus in all four cases. The appearance of fossa navicularis magna varied among the cases. In some, it was completely within the basiocciput and mimicked a small rounded, corticated, lytic defect, whereas it appeared as a notch in others. Fossa navicularis magna is an anatomical variant that occurs on the inferior aspect of the clivus. The pertinent literature on the anatomical variations occurring in this region was reviewed.

  4. Endodontic practice management with cone-beam computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyank Sethi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, conventional periapical radiology formed the backbone of endodontics for diagnosis, treatment planning, and management. One of the major associated gripes being the technique created two-dimensional images of three-dimensional (3D structures, suffered magnification, superimposition, and distortion, leading to compromised diagnostic information. The need to analyze the area of interest in all the possible planes led to the introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, a novel modality specifically designed to produce precise, undistorted 3D reconstructed images of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT is increasingly being embraced by various fields in dentistry, remarkably in endodontic practice. A systematic literature-based and book-based review was conducted using the keywords “CBCT in endodontics” and “endodontic applications of CBCT.” This article hereby discusses the prospects of CBCT in endodontics with an emphasis on its application in diagnosis and management along with treatment outcome assessment.

  5. Diagnostic Applications of Cone-Beam CT for Periodontal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A. AlJehani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims to review the diagnostic application of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT in the field of periodontology. Data. Original articles that reported on the use of CBCT for periodontal disease diagnosis were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1990 to January 2014, PubMed (using medical subject headings, and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “CBCT,” “volumetric CT,” “periodontal disease ,” and “periodontitis.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. Bony defects, caters, and furcation involvements seem to be better depicted on CBCT, whereas bone quality and periodontal ligament space scored better on conventional intraoral radiography. CBCT does not offer a significant advantage over conventional radiography for assessing the periodontal bone levels.

  6. Feature Scaling via Second-Order Cone Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizheng Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature scaling has attracted considerable attention during the past several decades because of its important role in feature selection. In this paper, a novel algorithm for learning scaling factors of features is proposed. It first assigns a nonnegative scaling factor to each feature of data and then adopts a generalized performance measure to learn the optimal scaling factors. It is of interest to note that the proposed model can be transformed into a convex optimization problem: second-order cone programming (SOCP. Thus the scaling factors of features in our method are globally optimal in some sense. Several experiments on simulated data, UCI data sets, and the gene data set are conducted to demonstrate that the proposed method is more effective than previous methods.

  7. Accidental degeneracy of double Dirac cones in a phononic crystal

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ze-Guo

    2014-04-09

    Artificial honeycomb lattices with Dirac cone dispersion provide a macroscopic platform to study the massless Dirac quasiparticles and their novel geometric phases. In this paper, a quadruple-degenerate state is achieved at the center of the Brillouin zone in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice phononic crystal, which is a result of accidental degeneracy of two double-degenerate states. In the vicinity of the quadruple-degenerate state, the dispersion relation is linear. Such quadruple degeneracy is analyzed by rigorous representation theory of groups. Using method, a reduced Hamiltonian is obtained to describe the linear Dirac dispersion relations of this quadruple-degenerate state, which is well consistent with the simulation results. Near such accidental degeneracy, we observe some unique properties in wave propagating, such as defect-insensitive propagating character and the Talbot effect.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography: A boon for maxillofacial imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Rao Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day to day practice, the radiographic techniques used individually or in combination suffer from some inherent limits of all planar two-dimensional (2D projections such as magnification, distortion, superimposition, and misrepresentation of anatomic structures. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region, heralds a major shift from 2D to three-dimensional (3D approach. It provides a complete 3D view of the maxilla, mandible, teeth, and supporting structures with relatively high resolution allowing a more accurate diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring, and analysis of outcomes than conventional 2D images, along with low radiation exposure to the patient. CBCT has opened up new vistas for the use of 3D imaging as a diagnostic and treatment planning tool in dentistry. This paper provides an overview of the imaging principles, underlying technology, dental applications, and in particular focuses on the emerging role of CBCT in dentistry.

  9. Maximally Supersymmetric Theories In Light-cone Superspace

    CERN Document Server

    Ananth, S

    2005-01-01

    Reduced supersymmetric field theories retain a great deal of information regarding their higher-dimensional progenitors. In this dissertation, we describe how the ( N = 4, d = 4) SuperYang-Mills theory may be 'oxidized' into its parent theory, the fully ten- dimensional N = 1 Yang- Mills. Remarkably, this is achieved by adding a single term to the four-dimensional transverse space derivatives. We work in light-cone superspace which is entirely free of auxiliary fields. Very similar in structure to ( N = 4, d = 4) Yang-Mills is the maximally supersymmetric ( N = 8, d = 4) Supergravity. This theory is obtained by reduction from eleven-dimensional N = 1 Supergravity. We show that this four-dimensional Supergravity theory may be restored to eleven dimensions in a very similar fashion.

  10. Intra-stand variation of cone structure and seed production in Siberian stone pine: pattern and use for breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Akimov

    2013-12-01

     traits remains relatively stable from year to year. Consequently, even in the years of big crops even the most productive trees fully use its potential. A considerable increase in seed production by means of artificial selection of the best genotypes is therefore possible without a visible decrease in the crop quality and without intensification of the cone-bearing irregularity. Criteria and method of selection of the initial material for the Siberian stone pine breeding as nut-bearing species have been suggested.

  11. Mitochondria Maintain Distinct Ca2+Pools in Cone Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarmarco, Michelle M; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Sloat, Stephanie R; Hurley, James B; Brockerhoff, Susan E

    2017-02-22

    Ca 2+ ions have distinct roles in the outer segment, cell body, and synaptic terminal of photoreceptors. We tested the hypothesis that distinct Ca 2+ domains are maintained by Ca 2+ uptake into mitochondria. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy of zebrafish cones revealed that nearly 100 mitochondria cluster at the apical side of the inner segment, directly below the outer segment. The endoplasmic reticulum surrounds the basal and lateral surfaces of this cluster, but does not reach the apical surface or penetrate into the cluster. Using genetically encoded Ca 2+ sensors, we found that mitochondria take up Ca 2+ when it accumulates either in the cone cell body or outer segment. Blocking mitochondrial Ca 2+ uniporter activity compromises the ability of mitochondria to maintain distinct Ca 2+ domains. Together, our findings indicate that mitochondria can modulate subcellular functional specialization in photoreceptors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ca 2+ homeostasis is essential for the survival and function of retinal photoreceptors. Separate pools of Ca 2+ regulate phototransduction in the outer segment, metabolism in the cell body, and neurotransmitter release at the synaptic terminal. We investigated the role of mitochondria in compartmentalization of Ca 2+ We found that mitochondria form a dense cluster that acts as a diffusion barrier between the outer segment and cell body. The cluster is surprisingly only partially surrounded by the endoplasmic reticulum, a key mediator of mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake. Blocking the uptake of Ca 2+ by mitochondria causes redistribution of Ca 2+ throughout the cell. Our results show that mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake in photoreceptors is complex and plays an essential role in normal function. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/372061-12$15.00/0.

  12. Suture With Resorbable Cones: Histology and Physico-Mechanical Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consiglio, Fabio; Pizzamiglio, Roberto; Parodi, Pier Camillo; De Biasio, Fabrizio; Machin, Pier Nicola; Di Loreto, Carla; Gamboa, Mabel

    2016-03-01

    Silhouette Sutures (Kolster Methods, Inc., Corona, CA) exhibit different biological characteristics at various time points after their placement. The goals of this study were to understand the biological reactions of Silhouette Sutures in human tissues at different time intervals and to determine the index of resistance of the sutures in subcutaneous tissue. Histologic examination was performed on section soft tissue containing the sutures at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after suture placement. The study comprised 8 patients, each of whom received 4 sutures in the lower abdomen under local anesthesia. The sutures were placed exactly 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year before planned post-bariatric abdominal surgery. Dynamometric evaluation was performed on a never-used suture and on sutures removed from 1 year after placement. The scar process around the threads was also examined. A progressive increase in scar tissue around the sutures was observed. One year after placement, there was a reduction of 16.7% in yield and tensile strength and a reduction of 14.29% in elongation at break, relative to the never-used suture. By 1 year, the cones in polylactic and glycolic acids had been replaced by scar tissue. Fibrous tissue around the sutures increased progressively over time, and was most prominent at the level of the nodes. Cones were completely resorbed within 6 months. A reduction in the index of resistance of the suspension sutures occurred over 1 year. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Topografia do cone medular do quati (Nasua nasua Linnaeus, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika Branco

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2010v23n2p173 A anestesia epidural é uma das técnicas anestésicas regionais mais utilizadas e com boa margem de segurança, sendo aplicada a mais de 80 anos através de inúmeras metodologias ensaiadas com o objetivo de anestesiar nervos espinhais da região lombar e sacral. Para tanto, faz-se necessário o conhecimento não só dos procedimentos anestésicos como também dos conhecimentos anatômicos da espécie a ser manipulada. Assim, este trabalho teve por objetivo determinar a topografia do cone medular do quati, subsidiando a realização de técnicas anestésicas nesta espécie de carnívoro silvestre. Foram utilizados três animais adultos, machos, provenientes do Criatório Científico – CECRIMPAS, da Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária do Centro Universitário da Fundação de Ensino Octávio Bastos – UNIFEOB. Os animais foram fixados e dissecados em toda sua extensão medular. O cone medular tem sua base entre a 5ª e 6ª vértebras lombares e ápice na 3ª vértebra sacral, com comprimento total variando entre 5,2cm e 5,8cm. Assim, concluímos que o local mais adequado para a realização de anestesia epidural no quati é na região sacrocaudal.

  14. Topografia do cone medular da preguiça

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Lima

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A anestesia caudal foi proposta pela primeira vez em 1926 e diversas técnicas foram desenvolvidas para anestesiar os nervos espinhais lombares e sacrais. Os métodos para anestesia epidural exigem conhecimento da anatomia da região envolvida. Desta forma, objetivou-se determinar a topografia do cone medular da preguiça (Bradipus variegatus, para fornecer recursos aos profissionais da área clínica para que, desta forma, seja possível a realização de anestesia epidural nesta espécie silvestre de nossa fauna. Foram dissecados quatro exemplares adultos de preguiça, dois machos e duas fêmeas que foram a óbito por causas naturais e obtidos junto ao Parque Zoobotânico do Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi, Belém/Pará. Após a dissecação observou-se que o cone medular encontra-se entre as vértebras L3 e S1 com comprimento médio de 2,7cm, e a intumescência lombar apresentou comprimento médio de 1,0cm, estando localizada entre L1 e L3 nos quatro animais estudados. Desta forma, conclui-se que o melhor local para a realização de anestesia epidural na preguiça está entre as vértebras L1 e L3

  15. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K. (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)), E-mail: aste.sovik@nvh.no; Roedal, Jan (Dept. of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway)); Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik (Dept. of Medical Physics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway))

    2010-10-15

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  16. Thermally stable imaging channeled spectropolarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven-Jones, Julia; Way, Brandyn M.; Hunt, Jeff; Kudenov, Michael W.; Mercier, Jeffrey A.

    2013-09-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry can measure the complete polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Typically, a channeled spectropolarimeter uses high order retarders made of uniaxial crystal to amplitude modulate the measured spectrum with the spectrally-dependent Stokes polarization information. A primary limitation of conventional channeled spectropolarimeters is related to the thermal variability of the retarders. Thermal variation often forces frequent system recalibration, particularly for field deployed systems. However, implementing thermally stable retarders results in an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter that relieves the need for frequent recalibration. Past work has addressed this issue by developing athermalized retarders using two or more uniaxial crystals. Recently, a retarder made of biaxial KTP and cut at a thermally insensitive angle was used to produce an athermal channeled spectropolarimeter. This paper presents the results of the biaxial crystal system and compares the two thermal stabilization techniques in the context of producing an imaging thermally stable channeled spectropolarimeter. A preliminary design for a snapshot imaging channeled spectropolarimeter is also presented.

  17. Detecting natural changes of cone-excitation ratios in simple and complex coloured images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, S M; Foster, D H

    1997-09-22

    Ratios of excitations in each cone-photoreceptor class produced by light reflected from pairs of surfaces in a scene are almost invariant under natural illuminant changes. The stability of these spatially defined ratios may explain the remarkable ability of human observers to efficiently discriminate illuminant changes from changes in surface reflectances. Spatial cone-excitation ratios are not, however, exactly invariant. This study is concerned with observers' sensitivity to these invariance violations. Simulations of Mondrian paintings with either 49 or two natural surfaces under Planckian illuminants were presented as images on a computer-controlled display in a two-interval experimental design: in one interval, the surfaces underwent an illuminant change; in the other interval, the surfaces underwent the same change but the images were then corrected so that, for each cone class, ratios of excitations were preserved exactly. Although the intervals with corrected images corresponded individually to highly improbable natural events, observers systematically misidentified them as containing the illuminant changes, the probability of error increasing as the violation of invariance in the other interval increased. For the range of illuminants and surfaces tested, sensitivity to violations of invariance was found to depend on cone class: it was greatest for long-wavelength-sensitive cones and least for short-wavelength-sensitive cones. Spatial cone-excitation ratios, or some closely related quantities, seem to be the cues preferred by observers for making inferences about surface illuminant changes.

  18. Synaptojanin 1 is required for endolysosomal trafficking of synaptic proteins in cone photoreceptor inner segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley A George

    Full Text Available Highly polarized cells such as photoreceptors require precise and efficient strategies for establishing and maintaining the proper subcellular distribution of proteins. The signals and molecular machinery that regulate trafficking and sorting of synaptic proteins within cone inner segments is mostly unknown. In this study, we show that the polyphosphoinositide phosphatase Synaptojanin 1 (SynJ1 is critical for this process. We used transgenic markers for trafficking pathways, electron microscopy, and immunocytochemistry to characterize trafficking defects in cones of the zebrafish mutant, nrc(a14 , which is deficient in phosphoinositide phosphatase, SynJ1. The outer segments and connecting cilia of nrc(a14 cone photoreceptors are normal, but RibeyeB and VAMP2/synaptobrevin, which normally localize to the synapse, accumulate in the nrc(a14 inner segment. The structure of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in nrc(a14 mutant cones is normal. Golgi develop normally, but later become disordered. Large vesicular structures accumulate within nrc(a14 cone photoreceptor inner segments, particularly after prolonged incubation in darkness. Cone inner segments of nrc (a14 mutants also have enlarged acidic vesicles, abnormal late endosomes, and a disruption in autophagy. This last pathway also appears exacerbated by darkness. Taken altogether, these findings show that SynJ1 is required in cones for normal endolysosomal trafficking of synaptic proteins.

  19. Convergent evolution within the genus Solanum: the specialised anther cone develops through alternative pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Beverley J; Bunnewell, Sue; Martin, Cathie

    2004-04-28

    Many angiosperm species produce cones of anthers which release pollen through pores in response to vibration by pollinating bees ("buzz-pollination"). Anther cones of varying degrees of strength are a defining morphological trait for the genus Solanum. Anthers arranged in a robust ('pepper pot') cone are restricted to a single clade within the genus, and may therefore be assumed to be monophyletic. We show that in some species within this clade, such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the anther cone is held together by interlocking hairs (trichomes) along the edges of the anthers. In other species within the clade, such as woody nightshade (Solanum dulcamara), the expanded anther surfaces are closely appressed to form the tightly bound cone, strengthened by extracellular secretions. Ectopic expression of the MIXTA gene from Antirrhinum majus in S. dulcamara results in the formation of ectopic trichomes on the anthers which cause the cone to disintegrate. Therefore, these two species produce the same macroscopic structure through two mutually exclusive developmental routes and the robust anther cone is derived differently within the clade. This example demonstrates that convergence between closely related species can be easily mistaken for homology, and may thus be underestimated.

  20. Disinfection of artificially contaminated Resilon cones with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite at different time exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumani, Aysin; Yoldas, Oguz; Isci, A Sehnaz; Köksal, Fatih; Kayar, Begüm; Polat, Esra

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of chlorhexidine (CHX) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions on Resilon cones that were artificially contaminated with microbial samples of Enterococcus faecalis or Candida albicans at various concentrations and time exposures. Resilon cones artificially contaminated with E faecalis or C albicans were left in contact with 1% NaOCl, 5% NaOCl, and 2% CHX disinfecting solutions for 1 and 5 minutes. The cones were then individually transferred to the test tubes, which contained 10 mL of thioglycollate media, and were incubated at 37 degrees C for 7 days. The antimicrobial activities of tested agents were determined by microbial growth. All of the Resilon cones contaminated with E faecalis or C albicans could be disinfected with 1% and 5% NaOCl for 1 and 5 minutes and with 2% CHX for 5 minutes. Three of 7 Resilon cones contaminated with E faecalis and 1 of 7 Resilon cones contaminated with C albicans could not be disinfected with 2% CHX at 1 minute of treatment. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that 1% and 5% NaOCl solutions are effective agents for disinfecting Resilon cones in 1- or 5-minute treatments. Two percent CHX was only effective after 5 minutes of treatment.