WorldWideScience

Sample records for stable boundary structures

  1. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  2. Atomic-scale structure and properties of highly stable antiphase boundary defects in Fe3O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Keith P; Hofer, Florian; Gilks, Daniel; Lazarov, Vlado K; Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-10

    The complex and intriguing properties of the ferrimagnetic half metal magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) are of continuing fundamental interest as well as being important for practical applications in spintronics, magnetism, catalysis and medicine. There is considerable speculation concerning the role of the ubiquitous antiphase boundary (APB) defects in magnetite, however, direct information on their structure and properties has remained challenging to obtain. Here we combine predictive first principles modelling with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy to unambiguously determine the three-dimensional structure of APBs in magnetite. We demonstrate that APB defects on the {110} planes are unusually stable and induce antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent domains providing an explanation for the magnetoresistance and reduced spin polarization often observed. We also demonstrate how the high stability of the {110} APB defects is connected to the existence of a metastable bulk phase of Fe 3 O 4 , which could be stabilized by strain in films or nanostructures.

  3. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled:

    Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow

    H.A.M. Sterk

    Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015

    Summary

    The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs

  4. Modelling stable atmospheric boundary layers over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis entitled: Modelling Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers over Snow H.A.M. Sterk Wageningen, 29th of April, 2015 Summary The emphasis of this thesis is on the understanding and forecasting of the Stable Boundary Layer (SBL) over snow-covered surfaces. SBLs typically form at night and in polar

  5. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, David D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  6. Unconditionally stable perfectly matched layer boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2007-01-01

    A brief review is given of a systematic, product-formula based approach to construct unconditionally stable algorithms for solving the time-dependent Maxwell equations. The fundamental difficulties that arise when we want to incorporate uniaxial perfectly matched layer boundary conditions into this

  7. Effective search for stable segregation configurations at grain boundaries with data-mining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyohara, Shin; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2018-03-01

    Grain boundary segregation of dopants plays a crucial role in materials properties. To investigate the dopant segregation behavior at the grain boundary, an enormous number of combinations have to be considered in the segregation of multiple dopants at the complex grain boundary structures. Here, two data mining techniques, the random-forests regression and the genetic algorithm, were applied to determine stable segregation sites at grain boundaries efficiently. Using the random-forests method, a predictive model was constructed from 2% of the segregation configurations and it has been shown that this model could determine the stable segregation configurations. Furthermore, the genetic algorithm also successfully determined the most stable segregation configuration with great efficiency. We demonstrate that these approaches are quite effective to investigate the dopant segregation behaviors at grain boundaries.

  8. Turbulent heat flux measurements in thermally stable boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J.; van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable turbulent boundary layers are prevalent in the polar regions and nocturnal atmospheric surface layer but heat and momentum flux measurements in such flow are often difficult. Here, a new method is employed using a nanoscale cold-wire (T-NSTAP) adjacent to a 2D PIV light sheet to measure these fluxes within rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. This method combines the advantages of fast thermal frequency response with measurement of the spatial variation of the velocity field. Resolution is limited solely by the separation of the probe and the light sheet. The new technique is used to examine the applicability of Monin-Obukhov similarity over a range of Richardson numbers from weak to strongly stable. In addition, the velocity fields are conditionally averaged subject to strong deviations of temperature above and below the local average in an effort to determine the relationship between the coherent turbulent motions and the fluctuating temperature field. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  9. Boundary Between Stable and Unstable Regimes of Accretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blinova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the boundary between stable and unstable regimes of accretion and its dependence on different parameters. Simulations were performed using a “cubed sphere" code with high grid resolution (244 grid points in the azimuthal direction, which is twice as high as that used in our earlier studies. We chose a very low viscosity value, with alpha-parameter α=0.02. We observed from the simulations that the boundary strongly depends on the ratio between magnetospheric radius rm (where the magnetic stress in the magnetosphere matches the matter stress in the disk and corotation radius rcor (where the Keplerian velocity in the disk is equal to the angular velocity of the star. For a small misalignment angle of the dipole field, Θ = 5°, accretion is unstable if rcor/rm> 1.35, and is stable otherwise. In cases of a larger misalignment angle of the dipole, Θ = 20°, instability occurs at slightly larger values, rcor/rm> 1.41

  10. Improving Wind-Ramp Forecasts in the Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, David E.; Takle, Eugene S.; Gallus, William A.

    2017-06-01

    The viability of wind-energy generation is dependent on highly accurate numerical wind forecasts, which are impeded by inaccuracies in model representation of boundary-layer processes. This study revisits the basic theory of the Mellor, Yamada, Nakanishi, and Niino (MYNN) planetary boundary-layer parametrization scheme, focusing on the onset of wind-ramp events related to nocturnal low-level jets. Modifications to the MYNN scheme include: (1) calculation of new closure parameters that determine the relative effects of turbulent energy production, dissipation, and redistribution; (2) enhanced mixing in the stable boundary layer when the mean wind speed exceeds a specified threshold; (3) explicit accounting of turbulent potential energy in the energy budget. A mesoscale model is used to generate short-term (24 h) wind forecasts for a set of 15 cases from both the U.S.A. and Germany. Results show that the new set of closure parameters provides a marked forecast improvement only when used in conjunction with the new mixing length formulation and only for cases that are originally under- or over-forecast (10 of the 15 cases). For these cases, the mean absolute error (MAE) of wind forecasts at turbine-hub height is reduced on average by 17%. A reduction in MAE values on average by 26% is realized for these same cases when accounting for the turbulent potential energy together with the new mixing length. This last method results in an average reduction by at least 13% in MAE values across all 15 cases.

  11. Comments on deriving the equilibrium height of the stable boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the equilibrium height of the stable boundary layer received much attention in a series of papers by Zilitinkevich and co-workers. In these studies the stable boundary-layer height is derived in terms of inverse interpolation of different boundary-layer height scales, each representing a

  12. A stable boundary layer perspective on global temperature trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNider, R T; Christy, J R; Biazar, A

    2010-01-01

    temperatures in the stable boundary layer are not very robust measures of the heat content in the deep atmosphere and climate models do not predict minimum temperatures well, minimum temperatures should not be used as a surrogate for measures of deep atmosphere global warming.

  13. Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98) : a report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.; Terradelles, E.; Orbe, J.; Calvo, J.; Vilu-Guerau, de J.; Soler, M.R.; Infante, C.; Buenestado, P.; Espinalt, A.; Jorgensem, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable boundary

  14. Improved Atmospheric Stable Boundary Layer Formulations for Navy Seasonal Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Long-term goals are to develop methods, descriptions and parameterizations that will alleviate long-standing problems in basically all large-scale numerical atmospheric models in dealing with statically stable and/or very stable conditions, and to implement these for Navy extended forecasting

  15. Structure of acid-stable carmine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Naoki; Kawasaki, Yoko; Sato, Kyoko; Aoki, Hiromitsu; Ichi, Takahito; Koda, Takatoshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Maitani, Tamio

    2002-02-01

    Acid-stable carmine has recently been distributed in the U.S. market because of its good acid stability, but it is not permitted in Japan. We analyzed and determined the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine, in order to establish an analytical method for it. Carminic acid was transformed into a different type of pigment, named acid-stable carmine, through amination when heated in ammonia solution. The features of the structure were clarified using a model compound, purpurin, in which the orientation of hydroxyl groups on the A ring of the anthraquinone skeleton is the same as that of carminic acid. By spectroscopic means and the synthesis of acid-stable carmine and purpurin derivatives, the structure of the major pigment in acid-stable carmine was established as 4-aminocarminic acid, a novel compound.

  16. Mixed basin boundary structures of chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, E. Jr.; Ott, E.

    1999-01-01

    Motivated by recent numerical observations on a four-dimensional continuous-time dynamical system, we consider different types of basin boundary structures for chaotic systems. These general structures are essentially mixtures of the previously known types of basin boundaries where the character of the boundary assumes features of the previously known boundary types at different points arbitrarily finely interspersed in the boundary. For example, we discuss situations where an everywhere continuous boundary that is otherwise smooth and differentiable at almost every point has an embedded uncountable, zero Lebesgue measure set of points at which the boundary curve is nondifferentiable. Although the nondifferentiable set is only of zero Lebesgue measure, the curve close-quote s fractal dimension may (depending on parameters) still be greater than one. In addition, we discuss bifurcations from such a mixed boundary to a 'pure' boundary that is a fractal nowhere differentiable curve or surface and to a pure nonfractal boundary that is everywhere smooth. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  17. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Three-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators on unstructured grids are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite difference, finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  18. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite volume, finite difference, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  19. Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (SABLES 98): A report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuxart, J.; Yague, C.; Morales, G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment in Spain (SABLES 98), which took place over the northern Spanish plateau comprising relatively flat grassland, in September 1998. The main objectives of the campaign were to study the properties of the mid-latitude stable...

  20. Grain boundary atomic structure and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paidar, Václav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2002), s. 24-30 ISSN 1335-1532 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0916 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : atomic structures * grain boundary properties * phase transformations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  2. Intermittent turbulence and oscillations in the stable boundary layer over land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, van de B.

    2002-01-01

    As the title of this thesis indicates, our main subject of interest is: "Intermittent turbulence and oscillation in the stable boundary layer over land". As such, this theme connects the different chapters. Here, intermittent turbulence is defined as a sequence of events were 'burst' of

  3. A stable penalty method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations: I. Open boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesthaven, Jan; Gottlieb, D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present asymptotically stable open boundary conditions for the numerical approximation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. The treatment uses the conservation form of the Navier-Stokes equations and utilizes linearization...

  4. Towards a climatology of orographic induced wave drag in the stable boundary layer over real terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.A.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Nappo, C.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) is of particular interest for numerous environmental issues as air quality, aviation, fog forecasting, wind energy engineering, and climate modelling. Unfortunately the current understanding of the SBL is still rather poor, and progress is slow. The relatively poor

  5. Boundary layer structure of an explosive cyclone

    OpenAIRE

    Steeley, Glen D.

    1990-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited A detailed analysis of the horizontal boundary layer structure of the warm front of an open ocean explosive cyclone in Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 2 of the Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones in the Atlantic (ERICA) is conducted. Data for this study consists of aircraft data averaged over one minute supplimented by satellite and drifting buoy observations. Analysis of surface winds and fluxes was done using the Brown-Liu...

  6. Numerical study of aircraft wake vortex evolution near ground in stable atmospheric boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengda LIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The evolutions of aircraft wake vortices near ground in stable atmospheric boundary layer are studied by Large Eddy Simulation (LES. The sensitivity of vortex evolution to the Monin-Obukhov (M-O scale is studied for the first time. The results indicate that increasing stability leads to longer lifetimes of upwind vortices, while downwind vortices will decay faster due to a stronger crosswind shear under stable conditions. Based on these results, an empirical model of the vortex lifetime as a function of 10-m-high crosswind and the M-O scale is summarized. This model can provide an estimate of the upper boundary of the vortex lifetime according to the real-time crosswind and atmospheric stability. In addition, the lateral translation of vortices is also inspected. The results show that vortices can travel a furthest distance of 722 m in the currently-studied parameter range. This result is meaningful to safety analysis of airports that have parallel runways. Keywords: Aerodynamics, Aircraft, Aircraft wake vortex, Large eddy simulation, Stable atmosphere boundary layer

  7. How structurally stable are global socioeconomic systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Rohr, Rudolf P; Gilarranz, Luis J; Bascompte, Jordi

    2014-11-06

    The stability analysis of socioeconomic systems has been centred on answering whether small perturbations when a system is in a given quantitative state will push the system permanently to a different quantitative state. However, typically the quantitative state of socioeconomic systems is subject to constant change. Therefore, a key stability question that has been under-investigated is how strongly the conditions of a system itself can change before the system moves to a qualitatively different behaviour, i.e. how structurally stable the systems is. Here, we introduce a framework to investigate the structural stability of socioeconomic systems formed by a network of interactions among agents competing for resources. We measure the structural stability of the system as the range of conditions in the distribution and availability of resources compatible with the qualitative behaviour in which all the constituent agents can be self-sustained across time. To illustrate our framework, we study an empirical representation of the global socioeconomic system formed by countries sharing and competing for multinational companies used as proxy for resources. We demonstrate that the structural stability of the system is inversely associated with the level of competition and the level of heterogeneity in the distribution of resources. Importantly, we show that the qualitative behaviour of the observed global socioeconomic system is highly sensitive to changes in the distribution of resources. We believe that this work provides a methodological basis to develop sustainable strategies for socioeconomic systems subject to constantly changing conditions. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Dispersion of radionuclides released into a stable planetary boundary layer using a Monte Carlo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basit, Abdul; Raza, S Shoaib; Irfan, Naseem

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a Monte Carlo model for describing the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides (represented by Lagrangian particles/neutral tracers) continuously released into a stable planetary boundary layer is presented. The effect of variation in release height and wind directional shear on plume dispersion is studied. The resultant plume concentration and dose rate at the ground is also calculated. The turbulent atmospheric parameters, like vertical profiles of fluctuating wind velocity components and eddy lifetime, were calculated using empirical relations for a stable atmosphere. The horizontal and vertical dispersion coefficients calculated by a numerical Lagrangian model are compared with the original and modified Pasquill-Gifford and Briggs empirical σs. The comparison shows that the Monte Carlo model can successfully predict dispersion in a stable atmosphere using the empirical turbulent parameters. The predicted ground concentration and dose rate contours indicate a significant increase in the affected area when wind shear is accounted for in the calculations

  9. Estimation of stable boundary-layer height using variance processing of backscatter lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    Stable boundary layer (SBL) is one of the most complex and less understood topics in atmospheric science. The type and height of the SBL is an important parameter for several applications such as understanding the formation of haze fog, and accuracy of chemical and pollutant dispersion models, etc. [1]. This work addresses nocturnal Stable Boundary-Layer Height (SBLH) estimation by using variance processing and attenuated backscatter lidar measurements, its principles and limitations. It is shown that temporal and spatial variance profiles of the attenuated backscatter signal are related to the stratification of aerosols in the SBL. A minimum variance SBLH estimator using local minima in the variance profiles of backscatter lidar signals is introduced. The method is validated using data from HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany [2], under different atmospheric conditions. This work has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, FP7 People, ITN Marie Curie Actions Programme (2012-2016) in the frame of ITaRS project (GA 289923), H2020 programme under ACTRIS-2 project (GA 654109), the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness - European Regional Development Funds under TEC2015-63832-P project, and from the Generalitat de Catalunya (Grup de Recerca Consolidat) 2014-SGR-583. [1] R. B. Stull, An Introduction to Boundary Layer Meteorology, chapter 12, Stable Boundary Layer, pp. 499-543, Springer, Netherlands, 1988. [2] U. Löhnert, J. H. Schween, C. Acquistapace, K. Ebell, M. Maahn, M. Barrera-Verdejo, A. Hirsikko, B. Bohn, A. Knaps, E. O'Connor, C. Simmer, A. Wahner, and S. Crewell, "JOYCE: Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution," Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., vol. 96, no. 7, pp. 1157-1174, 2015.

  10. Computer generated structures of grain boundaries in Li2-type ordered alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHosson, J.Th.M.; Pestman, B.J.; Schapink, F.W.; Tichelaar, F.D.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the influence of the establishment of long-range order in cubic alloys on the structure of grain boundaries in Li 2 alloys has been considered. Thus, for example, for the Σ = 5 (310) tilt boundary the various possible structures have been investigated that are generated upon ordering, starting from plausible structures in the disordered state. However, apart from some rough energy estimates based upon nearest neighbor interactions, no reliable energy calculations have been performed of these different possible structures. In this paper, computer calculations based upon interatomic pair potentials constructed in such a way that the Li 2 structure is stable with respect to disordering, are reported for the Σ = 5 (310) boundary. The relative stability of various possible structures, with associated different boundary compositions, has been investigated

  11. DFT computations of the lattice constant, stable atomic structure and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the most stable atomic structure and lattice constant of Fullerenes (C60). FHI-aims DFT code was used to predict the stable structure and the computational lattice constant of C60. These were compared with known experimental structures and lattice constants of C60. The results obtained showed that ...

  12. On Hydroelastic Body-Boundary Condition of Floating Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jinzhu

    1996-01-01

    A general linear body boundary condition of hydroelastic analysis of arbitrary shaped floating structures generalizes the classic kinematic rigid-body (Timman-Newman) boundary condition for seakeeping problems. The new boundary condition is consistent with the existing theories under certain...

  13. Data Pipeline Development for Grain Boundary Structures Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bingxi

    2017-01-01

    Grain Boundaries govern many properties of polycrystalline materials, including the vast majority of engineering materials. Evolutionary algorithm can be applied to predict the grain boundary structures in different systems. However, the recognition and classification of thousands of predicted structures is a very challenging work for eye detection in terms of efficiency and accuracy. A data pipeline is developed to accelerate the classification and recognition of grain boundary structures pr...

  14. Testing stable boundary layer parameterizations against the BASE:ALFA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafè, G.; Tampieri, F.; di Giuseppe, F.; Caporaso, L.

    2010-09-01

    The Po valley in the Northern Italy is a large plain in a semi-closed basin surrounded by complex orography; the Alps to the North and Apennines to the South-East, and closed to the east by the Adriatic sea. As a flatland basin shielded by mountains, calm wind is very frequent and strong temperature inversions are often observed near the ground, during the night and in the winter period the occurrence of a extremely stable boundary layer is common. A complete set of surface and atmospheric measurements have been collected during a four month observational program carried out at San Pietro Capofiume meteo station, in the middle of the Po Valley. The long term dataset has been collected in the contest of the project BASE:ALFA with the main aim of creating a data pool of micro-meteorological /soil data to test and validate numerical weather prediction PBL schemes. The measurement periods span summer, winter and spring and allows to analyse a wide range of PBL stability conditions. Different parameterizations of first and second order moments of velocity and temperature are tested against the collected data. A particular focus is given to stable boundary layer and the values of its height obtained from Nieuwstadt 1984 and Zilitinkievich et al 2005 formulas will be provided and compared against radiosounding profile estimates.

  15. The relationship between grain boundary structure, defect mobility, and grain boundary sink efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Vernon, Louis J.; Martinez, Enrique; Voter, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline materials have received great attention due to their potential for improved functionality and have been proposed for extreme environments where the interfaces are expected to promote radiation tolerance. However, the precise role of the interfaces in modifying defect behavior is unclear. Using long-time simulations methods, we determine the mobility of defects and defect clusters at grain boundaries in Cu. We find that mobilities vary significantly with boundary structure and cluster size, with larger clusters exhibiting reduced mobility, and that interface sink efficiency depends on the kinetics of defects within the interface via the in-boundary annihilation rate of defects. Thus, sink efficiency is a strong function of defect mobility, which depends on boundary structure, a property that evolves with time. Further, defect mobility at boundaries can be slower than in the bulk, which has general implications for the properties of polycrystalline materials. Finally, we correlate defect energetics with the volumes of atomic sites at the boundary. PMID:25766999

  16. Effects of Boundary Layer Height on the Model of Ground-Level PM2.5 Concentrations from AOD: Comparison of Stable and Convective Boundary Layer Heights from Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengliang Zang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol optical depth (AOD from satellites or ground-based sun photometer spectral observations has been widely used to estimate ground-level PM2.5 concentrations by regression methods. The boundary layer height (BLH is a popular factor in the regression model of AOD and PM2.5, but its effect is often uncertain. This may result from the structures between the stable and convective BLHs and from the calculation methods of the BLH. In this study, the boundary layer is divided into two types of stable and convective boundary layer, and the BLH is calculated using different methods from radiosonde data and National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data for the station in Beijing, China during 2014–2015. The BLH values from these methods show significant differences for both the stable and convective boundary layer. Then, these BLHs were introduced into the regression model of AOD-PM2.5 to seek the respective optimal BLH for the two types of boundary layer. It was found that the optimal BLH for the stable boundary layer is determined using the method of surface-based inversion, and the optimal BLH for the convective layer is determined using the method of elevated inversion. Finally, the optimal BLH and other meteorological parameters were combined to predict the PM2.5 concentrations using the stepwise regression method. The results indicate that for the stable boundary layer, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of surface relative humidity, BLH, and surface temperature. These three factors can significantly enhance the prediction accuracy of ground-level PM2.5 concentrations, with an increase of determination coefficient from 0.50 to 0.68. For the convective boundary layer, however, the optimal stepwise regression model includes the factors of BLH and surface wind speed. These two factors improve the determination coefficient, with a relatively low increase from 0.65 to 0.70. It is found that the

  17. Computed Structure of Grain Boundaries Compared with TEM Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Heringa, J.R.; Schapink, F.W.; Evans, J.H.; Veen, A. van

    1984-01-01

    Employing computer simulation techniques several studies of the relaxation of atoms in coincidence type grain boundaries have been performed in recent years. Often it is difficult to obtain a clear representation of the relaxed boundary structure, especially in the case of small atomic

  18. Structure of a Stable G-Hairpin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajarský, M.; Zivkovic, M.L.; Stadlbauer, Petr; Pagano, B.; Fiala, R.; Amato, J.; Tomáška, L´.; Šponer, Jiří; Plavec, J.; Trantírek, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 10 (2017), s. 3591-3594 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28310S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13721S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : g-quadruplex structures * human telomeric dna * single-stranded- dna * g-triplex Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  19. High precision and stable structures for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Da Mota Silva, S; Hauviller, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The central detectors used in High Energy Physics Experiments require the use of light and stable structures capable of supporting delicate and precise radiation detection elements. These structures need to be highly stable under environmental conditions where external vibrations, high radiation levels, temperature and humidity gradients should be taken into account. Their main design drivers are high dimension and dynamic stability, high stiffness to mass ratio and large radiation length. For most applications, these constraints lead us to choose Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics ( CFRP) as structural element. The construction of light and stable structures with CFRP for these applications can be achieved by careful design engineering and further confirmation at the prototyping phase. However, the experimental environment can influence their characteristics and behavior. In this case, theuse of adaptive structures could become a solution for this problem. We are studying structures in CFRP with bonded piezoel...

  20. Influence of tall vegetation canopy on turbulence kinetic energy budget in the stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Karmen; Rotach, Mathias W.

    2017-04-01

    While a considerable amount of research has been done on turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) budget studies in the surface layer over horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surfaces, little research focused on budgets above heterogeneous and rough surfaces. Only few studies have investigated TKE budgets above fetch-limited forest focusing on statically neutral conditions, while studies in the stable boundary layer (SBL) are still scarce in the literature. Therefore, we present turbulence characteristics above tall, deciduous forest in the wintertime SBL and make a comparison with a well-known results of HHF terrain. Turbulence measurements performed at five levels above the canopy height (approximately h = 18 m) allowed the investigation of combined influence of the roughness sublayer (RSL) found above tall vegetation and the internal boundary layer (IBL) on the TKE budget terms. Each term of the TKE budget is investigated within the framework of local similarity theory. Kolomogorov's similarity hypothesis assumes local isotropy within the inertial subrange. Testing the local isotropy hypothesis more thoroughly resulted in a ratio of the horizontal spectral densities (Sv/Su) approaching the 4/3, while the ratio of the vertical to the longitudinal spectral density (Sw/Su) was less than 1 for all levels indicating an anisotropic turbulence above the canopy. As a consequence, estimated values of TKE dissipation rate (ɛ) for the vertical component (ɛw) were smaller (underestimated) compared to the ɛ estimates obtained from the horizontal velocity components. This finding has a direct influence on the applicability of classical Kansas spectral models valid for HHF terrain as well as on the budget of wind variances. Additionally, the dimensionless wind shear function associated with "Kolmogorov turbulence" (existence of a well-defined inertial subrange with -5/3 slopes) was found to depart from linear prediction suggesting that the stability is a stronger determinant of

  1. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1992-09-30

    Theoretical studies were pursued with supporting experimental investigations (In-Tl) on the statics, dynamics, and statistical mechanics of twin boundaries, twin bands, and pretransformation structural modulations in proper and improper ferroelastic martensites.

  2. Study of twist boundaries in aluminium. Structure and intergranular diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemuet, Daniel

    1981-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the study of grain boundaries in oriented crystals, and more particularly the systematic calculation of intergranular structures and energies of twist boundaries of <001> axis in aluminium, the determination of intergranular diffusion coefficients of zinc in a set of twist bi-crystals of same axis encompassing a whole range of disorientations, and the search for a correlation between these experimental results and calculated structures

  3. New Polymorph of Fe3O4 Stable at Core-Mantle Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, E.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetite Fe3O4 (and its high-pressure polymorphs) is one of the most studied iron bearing minerals. One reason for the interest in magnetite is that it contains both Fe2+ and Fe3+, which is especially important for understanding the physical and chemical properties of Earth's deep interior. Early studies on magnetite debated the nature of the structural phase transition at 35 GPa [1-4]. This high-pressure structure was shown to be of the CaTi2O4-type [5], but with Fe3+ occupying multiple sites. Furthermore, at pressures above 65 GPa a second structural transition to a Pmma space group was shown to take place [5], similar to that in Fe3-xTixO4 solid solution [6]. Other studies have focused on the P-T stability of Fe3O4. Early studies by Lazor et al. [7] predicted that Fe3O4 might disproportionate into FeO and h-Fe2O3 at 50 GPa. Other studies suggested that the high-pressure phase should be stable up to 100 GPa [3]. A more recent experimental study by Ricolleau and Fei [8] revealed that Fe3O4 is stable at least up to 103 GPa. Thus far, structural studies of Fe3O4 have been limited to pressures below 105 GPa. We have studied Fe3O4 up to pressures of 175 GPa and temperatures above 4000K, using diamond anvil cells in combination with synchrotron x-ray diffraction and an online pulsed laser-heating system to study the stability of Fe3O4 at relevant pressure-temperature conditions. Our results show that Fe3O4 is stable up to at least 176 GPa and 4200 K. We have discovered a new polymorph of Fe3O4 at these high P-T conditions. This new phase is stable in the pressure range of at least 100Review B 70, 174106 (2004). [5] Greenberg et al. Physical Review B 95, 195150 (2017). [6] Yamanaka et al. American Mineralogist 98, 736 (2013). [7] Lazor et al. Journal of Geophysical Research 109, B05201 (2004). [8] Ricolleau and Fei. American Mineralogist 101, 719 (2016).

  4. Influence of precipitating light elements on stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, J. G.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    Stable stratification below the core/mantle boundary is often invoked to explain anomalously low seismic velocities in this region. Diffusion of light elements like oxygen or, more slowly, silicon could create a stabilizing chemical gradient in the outermost core. Heat flow less than that conducted along the adiabatic gradient may also produce thermal stratification. However, reconciling either origin with the apparent longevity (>3.45 billion years) of Earth's magnetic field remains difficult. Sub-isentropic heat flow would not drive a dynamo by thermal convection before the nucleation of the inner core, which likely occurred less than one billion years ago and did not instantly change the heat flow. Moreover, an oxygen-enriched layer below the core/mantle boundary—the source of thermal buoyancy—could establish double-diffusive convection where motion in the bulk fluid is suppressed below a slowly advancing interface. Here we present new models that explain both stable stratification and a long-lived dynamo by considering ongoing precipitation of magnesium oxide and/or silicon dioxide from the core. Lithophile elements may partition into iron alloys under extreme pressure and temperature during Earth's formation, especially after giant impacts. Modest core/mantle heat flow then drives compositional convection—regardless of thermal conductivity—since their solubility is strongly temperature-dependent. Our models begin with bulk abundances for the mantle and core determined by the redox conditions during accretion. We then track equilibration between the core and a primordial basal magma ocean followed by downward diffusion of light elements. Precipitation begins at a depth that is most sensitive to temperature and oxygen abundance and then creates feedbacks with the radial thermal and chemical profiles. Successful models feature a stable layer with low seismic velocity (which mandates multi-component evolution since a single light element typically

  5. Stable High-Performance Perovskite Solar Cells via Grain Boundary Passivation

    KAUST Repository

    Niu, Tianqi

    2018-03-12

    The trap states at grain boundaries (GBs) within polycrystalline perovskite films deteriorate their optoelectronic properties, making GB engineering particularly important for stable high-performance optoelectronic devices. It is demonstrated that trap states within bulk films can be effectively passivated by semiconducting molecules with Lewis acid or base functional groups. The perovskite crystallization kinetics are studied using in situ synchrotron-based grazing-incidence X-ray scattering to explore the film formation mechanism. A model of the passivation mechanism is proposed to understand how the molecules simultaneously passivate the Pb-I antisite defects and vacancies created by under-coordinated Pb atoms. In addition, it also explains how the energy offset between the semiconducting molecules and the perovskite influences trap states and intergrain carrier transport. The superior optoelectronic properties are attained by optimizing the molecular passivation treatments. These benefits are translated into significant enhancements of the power conversion efficiencies to 19.3%, as well as improved environmental and thermal stability of solar cells. The passivated devices without encapsulation degrade only by ≈13% after 40 d of exposure in 50% relative humidity at room temperature, and only ≈10% after 24 h at 80 °C in controlled environment.

  6. Dynamics and control of twisting bi-stable structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Andres F.; van Gemmeren, Valentin; Anderson, Aaron J.; Weaver, Paul M.

    2018-02-01

    Compliance-based morphing structures have the potential to offer large shape adaptation, high stiffness and low weight, while reducing complexity, friction, and scalability problems of mechanism based systems. A promising class of structure that enables these characteristics are multi-stable structures given their ability to exhibit large deflections and rotations without the expensive need for continuous actuation, with the latter only required intermittently. Furthermore, multi-stable structures exhibit inherently fast response due to the snap-through instability governing changes between stable states, enabling rapid configuration switching between the discrete number of programmed shapes of the structure. In this paper, the design and utilisation of the inherent nonlinear dynamics of bi-stable twisting I-beam structures for actuation with low strain piezoelectric materials is presented. The I-beam structure consists of three compliant components assembled into a monolithic single element, free of moving parts, and showing large deflections between two stable states. Finite element analysis is utilised to uncover the distribution of strain across the width of the flange, guiding the choice of positioning for piezoelectric actuators. In addition, the actuation authority is maximised by calculating the generalised coupling coefficient for different positions of the piezoelectric actuators. The results obtained are employed to tailor and test I-beam designs exhibiting desired large deflection between stable states, while still enabling the activation of snap-through with the low strain piezoelectric actuators. To this end, the dynamic response of the I-beams to piezoelectric excitation is investigated, revealing that resonant excitations are insufficient to dynamically trigger snap-through. A novel bang-bang control strategy, which exploits the nonlinear dynamics of the structure successfully triggers both single and constant snap-through between the stable states

  7. Thermo-kinetic mechanisms for grain boundary structure multiplicity, thermal instability and defect interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burbery, N.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Das, R., E-mail: r.das@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Ferguson, W.G. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2016-08-15

    Grain boundaries (GBs) provide a source and/or a sink for crystal defects and store elastic energy due to the non-uniform atomic bonding structure of the GB core. GB structures are thermodynamically driven to transition to the lowest energy configuration possible; however to date there has been little evidence to explain why specific GB structures have a low energy state. Furthermore, there is little quantitative demonstration of the significance of physical and GB structure characteristics on the GB energy, thermal stability, and the effect of temporary local GB structure transformations on defect interactions. This paper evaluates the defect interactions and structure stability of multiple Σ5(310) GB structures in bi-crystals of pure aluminium, and systematically investigates the features at 0 K to characterise multiple metastable structures. Structure stability is evaluated by utilising unstable vacancy defects to initiate GB transformations, and using nudged elastic band simulations to quantify this with the activation energy. The emission of stable vacancy defects from the ‘stable’ and metastable grain boundaries is also evaluated in the same manner. A detailed analysis of dislocation nucleation at the atomistic scale demonstrates that local transformations of GB structure between stable and metastable intermediates can provide a mechanism to accommodate the generation of crystal defects. Kinetic (time-dependent) effects that compete with energetic driving forces for structural transformations of GBs are shown to cause a significant effect on the activation properties that may exceed the influence of GB potential energy. The results demonstrate that GB structural multiplicity can be associated with the generation and absorption of dislocations and vacancies. This paper demonstrates the suitability of atomistic simulations coupled with nudged elastic band simulations to evaluate fundamental thermodynamic properties of pure FCC metals. Overall, this paper

  8. Subgroup report on grain boundary and interphase boundary structure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balluffi, R.W.; Cannon, R.M.; Clarke, D.R.; Heuer, A.H.; Ho, P.S.; Kear, B.H.; Vitek, V.; Weertman, J.R.; White, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    In many high temperature structural applications, the performance characteristics of a materials system are largely controlled by the properties of its grain and interphase boundaries. Failure in creep and fatigue frequently occurs by cavitation, or cracking along grain boundaries. In a few special cases, this failure problem has been overcome by directional alignment of grain and interphase boundaries by various types of metallurgical processing such as directional solidification and directional recrystallization. A good example is to be found in the application of directionally aligned structures in high performance gas-turbine airfoils. However, where fine, equiaxed grain structures are desirable, other methods of controlling grain boundary properties have been developed. Important among these has been the introduction of improvements in primary melting practices, designed to control important impurities. This is of decisive importance because even traces of certain impurity elements present in grain boundaries in high temperature materials can seriously affect properties. Impurities are deleterious and need to be removed. However, in certain cases, (e.g., creep fracture) controlled impurity additions can be beneficial and result in improved properties

  9. Areal-averaged trace gas emission rates from long-range open-path measurements in stable boundary layer conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schäfer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of land-surface emission rates of greenhouse and other gases at large spatial scales (10 000 m2 are needed to assess the spatial distribution of emissions. This can be readily done using spatial-integrating micro-meteorological methods like flux-gradient methods which were evaluated for determining land-surface emission rates of trace gases under stable boundary layers. Non-intrusive path-integrating measurements are utilized. Successful application of a flux-gradient method requires confidence in the gradients of trace gas concentration and wind, and in the applicability of boundary-layer turbulence theory; consequently the procedures to qualify measurements that can be used to determine the flux is critical. While there is relatively high confidence in flux measurements made under unstable atmospheres with mean winds greater than 1 m s−1, there is greater uncertainty in flux measurements made under free convective or stable conditions. The study of N2O emissions of flat grassland and NH3 emissions from a cattle lagoon involves quality-assured determinations of fluxes under low wind, stable or night-time atmospheric conditions when the continuous "steady-state" turbulence of the surface boundary layer breaks down and the layer has intermittent turbulence. Results indicate that following the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST flux-gradient methods that assume a log-linear profile of the wind speed and concentration gradient incorrectly determine vertical profiles and thus flux in the stable boundary layer. An alternative approach is considered on the basis of turbulent diffusivity, i.e. the measured friction velocity as well as height gradients of horizontal wind speeds and concentrations without MOST correction for stability. It is shown that this is the most accurate of the flux-gradient methods under stable conditions.

  10. Adaptation of benthic invertebrates to food sources along marine-terrestrial boundaries as indicated by carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, G.; Haynert, K.; Dinter, T.; Scheu, S.; Kröncke, I.

    2018-01-01

    Frequent environmental changes and abiotic gradients of the Wadden Sea require appropriate adaptations of the local organisms and make it suitable for investigations on functional structure of macrozoobenthic communities from marine to terrestrial boundaries. To investigate community patterns and food use of the macrozoobenthos, a transect of 11 stations was sampled for species number, abundance and stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N) of macrozoobenthos and for stable isotope values of potential food resources. The transect was located in the back-barrier system of the island of Spiekeroog (southern North Sea, Germany). Our results show that surface and subsurface deposit feeders, such as Peringia ulvae and different oligochaete species, dominated the community, which was poor in species, while species present at the transect stations reached high abundance. The only exception was the upper salt marsh with low abundances but higher species richness because of the presence of specialized semi-terrestrial and terrestrial taxa. The macrozoobenthos relied predominantly on marine resources irrespective of the locality in the intertidal zone, although δ13C values of the consumers decreased from - 14.1 ± 1.6‰ (tidal flats) to - 21.5 ± 2.4‰ (salt marsh). However, the ubiquitous polychaete Hediste diversicolor showed a δ15N enrichment of 2.8‰ (an increase of about one trophic level) from bare sediments to the first vegetated transect station, presumably due to switching from suspension or deposit feeding to predation on smaller invertebrates. Hence, we conclude that changes in feeding mode represent an important mechanism of adaptation to different Wadden Sea habitats.

  11. Numerically stable fluid–structure interactions between compressible flow and solid structures

    KAUST Repository

    Grétarsson, Jón Tómas

    2011-04-01

    We propose a novel method to implicitly two-way couple Eulerian compressible flow to volumetric Lagrangian solids. The method works for both deformable and rigid solids and for arbitrary equations of state. The method exploits the formulation of [11] which solves compressible fluid in a semi-implicit manner, solving for the advection part explicitly and then correcting the intermediate state to time tn+1 using an implicit pressure, obtained by solving a modified Poisson system. Similar to previous fluid-structure interaction methods, we apply pressure forces to the solid and enforce a velocity boundary condition on the fluid in order to satisfy a no-slip constraint. Unlike previous methods, however, we apply these coupled interactions implicitly by adding the constraint to the pressure system and combining it with any implicit solid forces in order to obtain a strongly coupled, symmetric indefinite system (similar to [17], which only handles incompressible flow). We also show that, under a few reasonable assumptions, this system can be made symmetric positive-definite by following the methodology of [16]. Because our method handles the fluid-structure interactions implicitly, we avoid introducing any new time step restrictions and obtain stable results even for high density-to-mass ratios, where explicit methods struggle or fail. We exactly conserve momentum and kinetic energy (thermal fluid-structure interactions are not considered) at the fluid-structure interface, and hence naturally handle highly non-linear phenomenon such as shocks, contacts and rarefactions. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  12. The Impact of Wind Speed Changes on the Surface Stress in the Weak-wind Stable Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. K.

    2015-12-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. Howver, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships.

  13. Inverse boundary element calculations based on structural modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller

    2007-01-01

    The inverse problem of calculating the flexural velocity of a radiating structure of a general shape from measurements in the field is often solved by combining a Boundary Element Method with the Singular Value Decomposition and a regularization technique. In their standard form these methods sol...

  14. Document boundary determination using structural and lexical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghva, Kazem; Cartright, Marc-Allen

    2009-01-01

    The document boundary determination problem is the process of identifying individual documents in a stack of papers. In this paper, we report on a classification system for automation of this process. The system employs features based on document structure and lexical content. We also report on experimental results to support the effectiveness of this system.

  15. On boundaries among magnetic structures at the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishkov, V. N.; Linke, J.

    1990-10-01

    Results of an analysis of published observational data on large complex active regions (CARs) on the sun are briefly discussed. Boundaries detected in the lower region of the solar atmosphere are shown to reveal the separation of independently developing magnetic structures, which may interact to produce eruption effects such as flares, reconnection, and flux-tube cancelling, as proposed by Linke and Bachmann (1989). The characteristics of these boundaries are illustrated with diagrams based on CAR data for June-July 1982, July-August 1983, and October 1979.

  16. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T. R.; Busby, J. T.

    2013-10-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys.

  17. Grain boundary engineering for structure materials of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Allen, T.R.; Busby, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Grain boundary engineering (GBE), primarily implemented by thermomechanical processing, is an effective and economical method of enhancing the properties of polycrystalline materials. Among the factors affecting grain boundary character distribution, literature data showed definitive effect of grain size and texture. GBE is more effective for austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys compared to other structural materials of nuclear reactors, such as refractory metals, ferritic and ferritic–martensitic steels, and Zr alloys. GBE has shown beneficial effects on improving the strength, creep strength, and resistance to stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steels and Ni-base alloys

  18. Characteristics of the turbulence in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, J.; Zhang, L.; Yuan, G.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate determination of surface turbulent fluxes in a stable boundary layer is of great practical importance in weather prediction and climate simulations, as well as applications related to air pollution. To gain an insight into the characteristics of turbulence in a stable boundary layer over the complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, we analyzed the data from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University (SACOL). We proposed a method to identify and efficiently isolate nonstationary motions from turbulence series, and examined the characteristics of nonstationary motions (nonstationary motions refer to gusty events on a greater scale than local shear-generated turbulence). The occurrence frequency of nonstationary motions was found to depend on the mean flow, being more frequent in weak wind conditions and vanishing when the wind speed, U, was greater than 3.0 m s-1. When U exceeded the threshold value of 1.0 m s-1 for the gradient Richardson number Ri ≤ 0.3 and 1.5 m s-1 for Ri > 0.3, local shear-generated turbulence depended systematically on U with an average rate of 0.05 U. However, for the weak wind condition, neither the mean wind speed nor the stability was an important factor for local turbulence. Under the weak wind stable condition, affected by topography-induced nonstationary motions, the local turbulence was anisotropic with a strong horizontal fluctuation and a weak vertical fluctuation, resulting in weakened heat mixing in the vertical direction and stronger un-closure of energy. These findings accessed the validity of similarity theory in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain, and revealed one reason for the stronger un-closure of energy in the night.

  19. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 1. Oscillatory motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Stefan; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    ) Vortex tubes, essentially two-dimensional vortices close to the bed extending across the width of the boundary-layer flow, caused by an inflectional-point shear layer instability. The imprint of these vortices in the bed shear stress is a series of small, insignificant kinks and dips. (ii) Turbulent......This work concerns oscillatory boundary layers over smooth beds. It comprises combined visual and quantitative techniques including bed shear stress measurements. The experiments were carried out in an oscillating water tunnel. The experiments reveal two significant coherent flow structures: (i...... spots, isolated arrowhead-shaped areas close to the bed in an otherwise laminar boundary layer where the flow ‘bursts’ with violent oscillations. The emergence of the turbulent spots marks the onset of turbulence. Turbulent spots cause single or multiple violent spikes in the bed shear stress signal...

  20. Recent developments in low cost stable structures for space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, T.C.; Grastataro, C.; Smith, B.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in partnership with Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) is advancing the development of low cost, lightweight, composite technology for use in spacecraft and stable structures. The use of advanced composites is well developed, but the application of an all-composite tracker structure has never been achieved. This paper investigates the application of composite technology to the design and fabrication of an all-composite spacecraft bus for small satellites, using technology directly applicable to central tracking in a high luminosity environment. The satellite program Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) is the second in a series of satellites to be launched into orbit for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper will discuss recent developments in the area of low cost composites, used for either spacecraft or ultra stable applications in high energy physics (HEP) detectors. The use of advanced composites is a relatively new development in the area of HEP. The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) spawned a new generation of Trackers which made extensive use of graphite fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite systems. LANL has designed a structure employing new fabrication technology. This concept will lower the cost of composite structures to a point that they may now compete with conventional materials. This paper will discuss the design, analysis and proposed fabrication of a small satellite structure. Central tracking structures using advanced materials capable of operating in an adverse environment typical of that found in a high luminosity collider could use identical concepts

  1. The impact of non-stationary flows on the surface stress in the weak-wind stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Mahrt, Larry

    2016-04-01

    The behaviour of turbulent transport in the weak-wind stably stratified boundary layer is examined in terms of the non-stationarity of the wind field based upon field observations. Extensive sonic anemometer measurements from horizontal networks and vertical towers ranging from 12 to 20 m height and innovative fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing observations were collected from three field programs in moderately sloped terrain with a varying degree of surface heterogeneity, namely the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) and the Flow Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) II experiments in Colorado (USA), and the Advanced Canopy Resolution Experiment (ARCFLO) in Oregon (USA). The relationship of the friction velocity to the stratification and small non-stationary submeso motions is studied from several points of view and nominally quantified. The relationship of the turbulence to the stratification is less systematic than expected due to the important submeso-scale motions. Consequently, the roles of the wind speed and stratification are not adequately accommodated by a single non-dimensional combination, such as the bulk Richardson number. However, cause and effect relationships are difficult to isolate because the non-stationary momentum flux significantly modifies the profile of the non-stationary mean flow. The link between the turbulence and accelerations at the surface is examined in terms of the changing vertical structure of the wind profile and sudden increases of downward transport of momentum. The latter may be significant in explaining the small-scale weak turbulence during stable stratification and deviations from conventional flux-profile relationships. Contrary to expectations, the vertical coherence was strongest for weakest winds and declined fast with increasing velocities, which suggests that submeso-scale motions are much deeper than previously thought.

  2. A Study of stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer over highveld South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhunga, P; Djolov, G [University of Pretoria (South Africa); Esau, I, E-mail: george.djolov@up.ac.z

    2010-08-15

    The study is part of the South African - Norwegian Programme for Research and Co-operation Phase II 'Analysis and Possibility for Control of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Processes to Facilitate Adaptation to Environmental Changes'. The research strategy of the project is based on 4 legged approach. 1) Application and further development of contemporary atmospheric boundary layer theory. 2) Use of modeling based on large eddy simulation techniques. 3) Experimental investigation of turbulent fluxes. 4) Training and developing academics capable of dealing with the present and new challenges. The paper presents some preliminary results on the micrometeorological variability of the basic meteorological parameters and turbulent fluxes.

  3. Large-eddy simulation of stable atmospheric boundary layers to develop better turbulence closures for climate and weather models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Huang, Jing; Golaz, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-01

    A disconnect remains between our improved physical understanding of boundary layers stabilized by buoyancy and how we parameterize them in coarse atmospheric models. Most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing in such conditions to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. Using Large-eddy simulation, we revisit some of the basic challenges in parameterizing stable atmospheric boundary layers: eddy-viscosity closure is found to be more reliable due to an improved alignment of vertical Reynolds stresses and mean strains under stable conditions, but the dependence of the magnitude of the eddy viscosity on stability is not well represented by several models tested here. Thus, we propose a new closure that reproduces the different stability regimes better. Subsequently, tests of this model in the GFDL's single-column model (SCM) are found to yield good agreement with LES results in idealized steady-stability cases, as well as in cases with gradual and sharp changes of stability with time.

  4. Displaced-beam small aperture scintillometer test: CASES-99 stable boundary layer experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.; DeBruin, H.A.R.

    2002-01-01

    In this study we investigated the performance of a displaced-beam small aperture scintillometer (DBSAS) - operated over a path length of 112 m - under stable conditions using data gathered during the CASES-99 experiment in Kansas, USA. The DBSAS has the advantage over the eddy covariance method that

  5. Structure of reconnection boundary layers in incompressible MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnerup, B.U.Oe.; Wang, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The incompressible MHD equations with nonvanishing viscosity and resistivity are simplified by use of the boundary layer approximation to describe the flow and magnetic field in the exit flow regions of magnetic field reconnection configurations when the reconnection rate is small. The conditions are derived under which self-similar solutions exist of the resulting boundary layer equations. For the case of zero viscosity and resistivity, the equations describing such self-similar layers are then solved in terms of quadratures, and the resulting flow and field configurations are described. Symmetric solutions, relevant, for example, to reconnection in the geomagnetic tail, as well as asymmetric solutions, relevant to reconnection at the earth's magnetopause, are found to exist. The nature of the external solutions to which the boundary layer solutions should be matched is discussed briefly, but the actual matching, which is to occur at Alfven-wave characteristic curves in the boundary layer solutions, is not carried out. Finally, it is argued that the solutions obtained may also be used to describe the structure of the intense vortex layers observed to occur at magnetic separatrices in computer simulations and in certain analytical models of the reconnection process

  6. Acoustic emissions from unsteady transitional boundary layer flow structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marboe, Richard Chostner

    The acoustic radiation contribution of boundary layer flow structures has long been the subject of debate. The research described critically examines the popular approaches to modeling the radiation mechanisms and attempts to bring some degree of closure to the physical and practical significance of noise and pseudo-noise originating in the laminar-to-turbulent transition zone within a natural boundary layer. This includes improving models to include recent computational and experimental statistics, evaluation of model sensitivities to input parameters, and applicability to situations of engineering relevance. Prior efforts to model wall pressure fluctuation statistics resulting from boundary layer transition zone flow structures allow further development of direct radiation prediction codes. Several refinements were made to theoretical models for directly radiated noise based upon the Liepmann analogy for fluctuating displacement thickness including the incorporation of a semi- empirically derived space-time correlation function for the intermittency indicator. A similar two-fluids model uses a Lighthill acoustic analogy. Radiation by vortex structures and direct numerical simulation methods are reviewed to help define their useful role in predicting sound radiation from transition. The role of pressure gradient in axisymmetric body flows, flat plate flows, and over hydrofoils is investigated. A quiet airflow facility was developed to measure the direct acoustic radiation from a naturally transitioning boundary layer. Real-time acoustic intensity measurement instrumentation was developed if measurements of isolated spots in otherwise laminar flow had been necessary. This technique uses a hot film signal from the transition structure to obtain the coherent output intensity (COI). Model predictions are compared to the measured acoustic radiation from a naturally transitioning boundary layer. Radiated noise measurements isolating the direct transition zone radiation

  7. The role of snow-surface coupling, radiation, and turbulent mixing in modeling a stable boundary layer over Arctic sea ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, H.A.M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    To enhance the understanding of the impact of small-scale processes in the polar climate, this study focuses on the relative role of snow-surface coupling, radiation and turbulent mixing in an Arctic stable boundary layer. We extend the GABLS1 (GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Study 1) model

  8. Study of stable atmospheric boundary layer characterization over highveld region of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Luhunga, P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available : Earth and Environmental Science 13 (2010) 012012 doi:10.1088/1755-1315/13/1/012012 Businger JA, Wyngaard JC, Uzumi Y and EF Bradley, 1971, Flux-profile relationship in the atmospheric surface layer, J Atm Sci, 28, 181-189. Kolmogorov AN, 1941... ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER CHARACTERIZATION OVER HIGHVELD REGION OF SOUTH AFRICA Philbert Luhunga1, 2, 3, George Djolov1, Venkataraman Sivakumar1,4,5 1 University of Pretoria, Department of Geography Geoinformatics and Meterology, Lynnwood road, 0001...

  9. Inverse boundary element calculations based on structural modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Peter Møller

    2007-01-01

    The inverse problem of calculating the flexural velocity of a radiating structure of a general shape from measurements in the field is often solved by combining a Boundary Element Method with the Singular Value Decomposition and a regularization technique. In their standard form these methods solve...... for the unknown normal velocities of the structure at the relatively large number of nodes in the numerical model. Efficiently the regularization technique smoothes the solution spatially, since a fast spatial variation is associated with high index singular values, which is filtered out or damped...... in the regularization. Hence, the effective number of degrees of freedom in the model is often much lower than the number of nodes in the model. The present paper deals with an alternative formulation possible for the subset of radiation problems in which a (structural) modal expansion is known for the structure...

  10. Structures and growth textures of Japanese twin boundaries in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, K.; Nagase, T.; Kudoh, Y.; Kuribayashi, T.

    2008-12-01

    Growth textures and atomic configurations of Japanese twin boundaries in quartz were studied by the observation of natural samples and by computational simulations. Samples used in this study are collected from Narushima, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. The samples were first polished, and then etched by hydrofluoric acid for several minutes. The etched figures were observed by phase-contrast reflection microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. From these observations, high concentration of Brazil twin lamellae is found near the composition plane of Japanese twin. Observations of cathode luminescence images reveal that the development of Brazil twin lamellae at {112×2} composition plane of Japanese twin is directly related to the preferential growth of Japanese twin along the composition plane. Atomic configurations at {112×2} composition planes of Japanese twin were simulated by using molecular dynamics simulations and the energy minimization method. The simulated structures proved that {112×2} or {1×1×22} composition planes are the only composition planes that do not introduce unsatisfied bonding between Si and O atoms. When the composition plane is different from these planes, some kind of defect structures, like dislocations, are inevitably introduced. In the case of Brazil twin, screw dislocations are also known to be incorporated where orientation of Brazil twin boundary changes from one orientation to another. On the other hand, in the case where Brazil twin boundaries intersect with {112×2} composition planes of Japanese twin, we found that structures are kept coherently without any unsatisfied bonding. This result means that {112×2} composition planes of Japanese twin are the crystallographic sites having more than one possible stacking structures. Observations in this study indicate that {112×2} composition plane of Japanese twin serves as a source of Brazil twin during the course of crystal growth.

  11. On uniformly perfect boundary of stable domains in iteration of meromorphic functions II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Hua, Zheng

    2002-05-01

    We investigate uniform perfectness of the Julia set of a transcendental meromorphic function with finitely many poles and prove that the Julia set of such a meromorphic function is not uniformly perfect if it has only bounded components. The Julia set of an entire function is uniformly perfect if and only if the Julia set including infinity is connected and every component of the Fatou set is simply connected. Furthermore if an entire function has a finite deficient value in the sense of Nevanlinna, then it has no multiply connected stable domains. Finally, we give some examples of meromorphic functions with uniformly perfect Julia sets.

  12. Achieving Radiation Tolerance through Non-Equilibrium Grain Boundary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterick, Gregory A; Gruber, Jacob; Suri, Pranav K; Baldwin, Jon K; Kirk, Marquis A; Baldo, Pete; Wang, Yong Q; Misra, Amit; Tucker, Garritt J; Taheri, Mitra L

    2017-09-25

    Many methods used to produce nanocrystalline (NC) materials leave behind non-equilibrium grain boundaries (GBs) containing excess free volume and higher energy than their equilibrium counterparts with identical 5 degrees of freedom. Since non-equilibrium GBs have increased amounts of both strain and free volume, these boundaries may act as more efficient sinks for the excess interstitials and vacancies produced in a material under irradiation as compared to equilibrium GBs. The relative sink strengths of equilibrium and non-equilibrium GBs were explored by comparing the behavior of annealed (equilibrium) and as-deposited (non-equilibrium) NC iron films on irradiation. These results were coupled with atomistic simulations to better reveal the underlying processes occurring on timescales too short to capture using in situ TEM. After irradiation, NC iron with non-equilibrium GBs contains both a smaller number density of defect clusters and a smaller average defect cluster size. Simulations showed that excess free volume contribute to a decreased survival rate of point defects in cascades occurring adjacent to the GB and that these boundaries undergo less dramatic changes in structure upon irradiation. These results suggest that non-equilibrium GBs act as more efficient sinks for defects and could be utilized to create more radiation tolerant materials in future.

  13. Density effects on turbulent boundary layer structure: From the atmosphere to hypersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Owen J. H.

    This dissertation examines the effects of density gradients on turbulent boundary layer statistics and structure using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two distinct cases were examined: the thermally stable atmospheric surface layer characteristic of nocturnal or polar conditions, and the hypersonic bounder layer characteristic of high speed aircraft and reentering spacecraft. Previous experimental studies examining the effects of stability on turbulent boundary layers identified two regimes, weak and strong stability, separated by a critical bulk stratification with a collapse of near-wall turbulence thought to be intrinsic to the strongly stable regime. To examine the characteristics of these two regimes, PIV measurements were obtained in conjunction with the mean temperature profile in a low Reynolds number facility over smooth and rough surfaces. The turbulent stresses were found to scale with the wall shear stress in the weakly stable regime prior relaminarization at a critical stratification. Changes in profile shape were shown to correlate with the local stratification profile, and as a result, the collapse of near-wall turbulence is not intrinsic to the strongly stable regime. The critical bulk stratification was found to be sensitive to surface roughness and potentially Reynolds number, and not constant as previously thought. Further investigations examined turbulent boundary layer structure and changes to the motions that contribute to turbulent production. To study the characteristics of a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer at Mach 8, significant improvements were required to the implementation and error characterization of PIV. Limited resolution or dynamic range effects were minimized and the effects of high shear on cross-correlation routines were examined. Significantly, an examination of particle dynamics, subject to fluid inertia, compressibility and non-continuum effects, revealed that particle frequency responses to turbulence can be up to an

  14. The meteorology and chemistry of high nitrogen oxide concentrations in the stable boundary layer at the South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, William; Crawford, Jim; Buhr, Marty; Nicovich, John; Chen, Gao; Davis, Douglas

    2018-03-01

    Four summer seasons of nitrogen oxide (NO) concentrations were obtained at the South Pole (SP) during the Sulfur Chemistry in the Antarctic Troposphere (ISCAT) program (1998 and 2000) and the Antarctic Tropospheric Chemistry Investigation (ANTCI) in (2003, 2005, 2006-2007). Together, analyses of the data collected from these studies provide insight into the large- to small-scale meteorology that sets the stage for extremes in NO and the significant variability that occurs day to day, within seasons, and year to year. In addition, these observations reveal the interplay between physical and chemical processes at work in the stable boundary layer of the high Antarctic plateau. We found a systematic evolution of the large-scale wind system over the ice sheet from winter to summer that controls the surface boundary layer and its effect on NO: initially in early spring (Days 280-310) the transport of warm air and clouds over West Antarctica dominates the environment over the SP; in late spring (Days 310-340), the winds at 300 hPa exhibit a bimodal behavior alternating between northwest and southeast quadrants, which is of significance to NO; in early summer (Days 340-375), the flow aloft is dominated by winds from the Weddell Sea; and finally, during late spring, winds aloft from the southeast are strongly associated with clear skies, shallow stable boundary layers, and light surface winds from the east - it is under these conditions that the highest NO occurs. Examination of the winds at 300 hPa from 1961 to 2013 shows that this seasonal pattern has not changed significantly, although the last twenty years have seen an increasing trend in easterly surface winds at the SP. What has also changed is the persistence of the ozone hole, often into early summer. With lower total ozone column density and higher sun elevation, the highest actinic flux responsible for the photolysis of snow nitrate now occurs in late spring under the shallow boundary layer conditions optimum for

  15. Combined effect of boundary layer recirculation factor and stable energy on local air quality in pearl river delta over southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haowen; Wang, Baomin; Fang, Xingqin; Zhu, Wei; Fan, Qi; Liao, Zhiheng; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Asi; Fan, Shaojia

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) has a significant impact on the spatial and temporal distribution of air pollutants. In order to gain a better understanding of how ABL affects the variation of air pollutants, atmospheric boundary layer observations were performed at Sanshui in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region over Southern China during the winter of 2013. Two types of typical ABL status which could lead to air pollution were analyzed comparatively: weak vertical diffusion ability type (WVDAT) and weak horizontal transportation ability type (WHTAT). Results show: 1) WVDAT was featured with moderate wind speed, consistent wind direction, and thick inversion layer at 600 ~ 1000m above ground level (AGL), and air pollutants were restricted in the low altitude due to the stable atmospheric structure; 2) WHTAT was characterized with calm wind, varied wind direction and shallow intense ground inversion layer, and air pollutants accumulated in the local because of strong recirculation in the low ABL; 3) Recirculation Factor (RF) and Stable Energy (SE) were proved to be good indicators for horizontal transportation ability and vertical diffusion ability of the atmosphere, respectively. Combined utilization of RF and SE can be very helpful in the evaluation of air pollution potential of the ABL. Implications Air quality data from ground and meteorological data collected from radio sounding in Sanshui in Pearl River Delta show that local air quality was poor when wind reversal was pronounced or temperature stratification state is stable. It should take the combination of horizontal and vertical transportation ability of local atmosphere into consideration when evaluating local environmental bearing capacity for air pollution.

  16. Toward Isolation of Salient Features in Stable Boundary Layer Wind Fields that Influence Loads on Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkyoo Park

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neutral boundary layer (NBL flow fields, commonly used in turbine load studies and design, are generated using spectral procedures in stochastic simulation. For large utility-scale turbines, stable boundary layer (SBL flow fields are of great interest because they are often accompanied by enhanced wind shear, wind veer, and even low-level jets (LLJs. The generation of SBL flow fields, in contrast to simpler stochastic simulation for NBL, requires computational fluid dynamics (CFD procedures to capture the physics and noted characteristics—such as shear and veer—that are distinct from those seen in NBL flows. At present, large-eddy simulation (LES is the most efficient CFD procedure for SBL flow field generation and related wind turbine loads studies. Design standards, such as from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC, provide guidance albeit with simplifying assumptions (one such deals with assuming constant variance of turbulence over the rotor and recommend standard target turbulence power spectra and coherence functions to allow NBL flow field simulation. In contrast, a systematic SBL flow field simulation procedure has not been offered for design or for site assessment. It is instructive to compare LES-generated SBL flow fields with stochastic NBL flow fields and associated loads which we evaluate for a 5-MW turbine; in doing so, we seek to isolate distinguishing characteristics of wind shear, wind veer, and turbulence variation over the rotor plane in the alternative flow fields and in the turbine loads. Because of known differences in NBL-stochastic and SBL-LES wind fields but an industry preference for simpler stochastic simulation in design practice, this study investigates if one can reproduce stable atmospheric conditions using stochastic approaches with appropriate corrections for shear, veer, turbulence, etc. We find that such simple tuning cannot consistently match turbine target SBL load statistics, even though

  17. Between physics and metaphysics: structure as a boundary concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tau, Ramiro

    2015-03-01

    The notion of structure is found to be used in a great number of theories, scientific research programs and world views. However, its uses and definitions are as diverse as the objects of the scientific disciplines where it can be found. Without trying to recreate the structuralist aspiration from the mid XX century, which believed to have found in this notion a common transdisciplinary language, I discuss a specific aspect of this concept that could be considered a constant in different perspectives. This aspect refers to the location of the notions of structure as boundaries in the different scientific theories. With this, I try to argue that the definition or presentation of a structure configures in itself the frontier for scientific knowledge, defining at the same time implied ontological assumptions. In order to discuss this hypothesis, and taking into consideration the double origin of contemporary notions of structure -the mathematical and linguistic line-, I revise several theoretical perspectives which made explicit the relation between structures and knowledge, and their relation with the real: the arguments on physical knowledge by Eddington, structural anthropology, structural linguistics, Lacanian psychoanalysis and Piaget's genetic psychology.

  18. Highly stable thin film transistors using multilayer channel structure

    KAUST Repository

    Nayak, Pradipta K.

    2015-03-09

    We report highly stable gate-bias stress performance of thin film transistors (TFTs) using zinc oxide (ZnO)/hafnium oxide (HfO2) multilayer structure as the channel layer. Positive and negative gate-bias stress stability of the TFTs was measured at room temperature and at 60°C. A tremendous improvement in gate-bias stress stability was obtained in case of the TFT with multiple layers of ZnO embedded between HfO2 layers compared to the TFT with a single layer of ZnO as the semiconductor. The ultra-thin HfO2 layers act as passivation layers, which prevent the adsorption of oxygen and water molecules in the ZnO layer and hence significantly improve the gate-bias stress stability of ZnO TFTs.

  19. Lineage restriction maintains a stable organizer cell population at the zebrafish midbrain-hindbrain boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenberg, Tobias; Brand, Michael

    2005-07-01

    The vertebrate hindbrain is subdivided into segments, termed neuromeres, that are units of gene expression, cell differentiation and behavior. A key property of such segments is that cells show a restricted ability to mix across segment borders -- termed lineage restriction. In order to address segmentation in the midbrain-hindbrain boundary (mhb) region, we have analyzed single cell behavior in the living embryo by acquiring time-lapse movies of the developing mhb region in a transgenic zebrafish line. We traced the movement of hundreds of nuclei, and by matching their position with the expression of a midbrain marker, we demonstrate that midbrain and hindbrain cells arise from two distinct cell populations. Single cell labeling and analysis of the distribution of their progeny shows that lineage restriction is probably established during late gastrulation stages. Our findings suggest that segmentation as an organizing principle in early brain development can be extended to the mhb region. We argue that lineage restriction serves to constrain the position of the mhb organizer cell population.

  20. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface i...

  1. Three dimensional boundary displacement due to stable ideal kink modes excited by external n = 2 magnetic perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willensdorfer, M.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Birkenmeier, G.; Brida, D.; Cavedon, M.; Denk, S. S.; Igochine, V.; Giannone, L.; Kirk, A.; Kirschner, J.; Medvedeva, A.; Odstrčil, T.; Ryan, D. A.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-11-01

    In low-collisionality (ν\\star) scenarios exhibiting mitigation of edge localized mode (ELMs), stable ideal kink modes at the edge are excited by externally applied magnetic perturbation (MP)-fields. In ASDEX Upgrade these modes can cause three-dimensional (3D) boundary displacements up to the centimeter range. These displacements have been measured using toroidally localized high resolution diagnostics and rigidly rotating n=2 MP-fields with various applied poloidal mode spectra. These measurements are compared to non-linear 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibria calculated by VMEC. Comprehensive comparisons have been conducted, which consider for instance plasma movements due to the position control system, attenuation due to internal conductors and changes in the edge pressure profiles. VMEC accurately reproduces the amplitude of the displacement and its dependencies on the applied poloidal mode spectra. Quantitative agreement is found around the low field side (LFS) midplane. The response at the plasma top is qualitatively compared. The measured and predicted displacements at the plasma top maximize when the applied spectra is optimized for ELM-mitigation. The predictions from the vacuum modeling generally fails to describe the displacement at the LFS midplane as well as at the plasma top. When the applied mode spectra is set to maximize the displacement, VMEC and the measurements clearly surpass the predictions from the vacuum modeling by a factor of four. Minor disagreements between VMEC and the measurements are discussed. This study underlines the importance of the stable ideal kink modes at the edge for the 3D boundary displacement in scenarios relevant for ELM-mitigation.

  2. Coherent structures in the boundary plasma of EAST Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Ning

    -facing material, leading to intensive transient heat load and particle load on the local areas of both the divertor target plates and the first wall, which damages the material and causes enhanced recycling and impurity generation, then further pollutes the core plasma. In this project, we carried out experiment...... in the boundary plasma using multi-pin Langmuir probe in L-mode discharge. It was found that the coherent structures (Blobs and Holes) are created in the edge shear layer of poloidal flows where the plasma shows steep pressure gradient. Simulations have been performed using the ESEL code, which is a 2D fluid...... turbulence-simulation code based on the interchange instability as the main drive for the turbulence and structure motion in the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, with the input parameters from the EAST experiments. The simulations successfully reproduce the statistical characteristics of the SOL turbulence...

  3. Stable structural color patterns displayed on transparent insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsova, Ekaterina; Hansson, Christer; Janzen, Daniel H; Kjærandsen, Jostein

    2011-01-11

    Color patterns play central roles in the behavior of insects, and are important traits for taxonomic studies. Here we report striking and stable structural color patterns--wing interference patterns (WIPs)--in the transparent wings of small Hymenoptera and Diptera, patterns that have been largely overlooked by biologists. These extremely thin wings reflect vivid color patterns caused by thin film interference. The visibility of these patterns is affected by the way the insects display their wings against various backgrounds with different light properties. The specific color sequence displayed lacks pure red and matches the color vision of most insects, strongly suggesting that the biological significance of WIPs lies in visual signaling. Taxon-specific color patterns are formed by uneven membrane thickness, pigmentation, venation, and hair placement. The optically refracted pattern is also stabilized by microstructures of the wing such as membrane corrugations and spherical cell structures that reinforce the pattern and make it essentially noniridescent over a large range of light incidences. WIPs can be applied to map the micromorphology of wings through direct observation and are useful in several fields of biology. We demonstrate their usefulness as identification patterns to solve cases of cryptic species complexes in tiny parasitic wasps, and indicate their potentials for research on the genetic control of wing development through direct links between the transregulatory wing landscape and interference patterns we observe in Drosophila model species. Some species display sexually dimorphic WIPs, suggesting sexual selection as one of the driving forces for their evolution.

  4. What otolith microchemistry and stable isotope analysis reveal and conceal about anguillid eel movements across salinity boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Marie; Chiasson, Alyre G; Veinott, Geoff; Cairns, David K

    2014-08-01

    Otolith microchemistry studies indicate that growth-phase (yellow stage) anguillid eels commonly shift at irregular intervals between fresh and saline waters, but this technique has not detected regular seasonal migrations across salinity zones. We tested the ability of otolith microchemistry and stable isotope analysis to detect migrations of American eels (Anguilla rostrata) between salinity boundaries in two small stream-estuary systems in Canada's Bay of Fundy. Although the two methods showed concordant classifications of recent residence history, most eels caught in fresh water in spring (68.8-89.7%) and fall (78.8-83.3%) showed microchemical and isotopic signatures that reflected occupancy of saline waters. These eels were classified as migrants which had summered in saline waters and then migrated to freshwater wintering grounds where they retained their saline signatures. In summer, most eels (85.0-100.0%) captured in fresh and saline water had recent microchemical and isotopic signatures matching the habitat of capture. Our results suggest that lifetime otolith microchemistry profiles are unable to detect eel wintering migrations, a failure that is likely due to winter depression of otolith accretion. Elucidation of seasonal eel movements requires cross-seasonal and cross-site sampling for the microchemistry and stable isotope methods, or tagging studies. Seasonal saline-fresh eel migrations may be more common than previously appreciated, underlining the need for conservation of both habitats, and connectivity between the two.

  5. A Metal Stable Isotope Approach to Understanding Uranium Mobility Across Roll Front Redox Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. T.; Basu, A.; Christensen, J. N.; DePaolo, D. J.; Heikoop, J. M.; Reimus, P. W.; Maher, K.; Weaver, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary roll-front uranium (U) ore deposits are the principal source of U for nuclear fuel in the USA and an important part of the current all-of-the-above energy strategy. Mining of roll-front U ore in the USA is primarily by in situ alkaline oxidative dissolution of U minerals. There are significant environmental benefits to in situ mining including no mine tailings or radioactive dust, however, the long-term immobilization of U in the aquifer after the completion of mining remains uncertain. We have utilized the metal stable isotopes U, Se and Mo in groundwater from roll-front mines in Texas and Wyoming to quantify the aquifer redox conditions and predict the onset of U reduction after post mining aquifer restoration. Supporting information from the geochemistry of groundwater and aquifer sediments are used to understand the transport of U prior to and after in situ mining. Groundwater was collected across 4 mining units at the Rosita mine in the Texas coastal plain and 2 mining units at the Smith Ranch mine in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. In general, the sampled waters are moderately reducing and ore zone wells contain the highest aqueous U concentrations. The lowest U concentrations occur in monitoring wells downgradient of the ore zone. 238U/235U is lowest in downgradient wells and is correlated with aqueous U concentrations. Rayleigh distillation models of the 238U/235U are consistent with U isotope fractionation factors of 1.0004-1.001, similar to lab-based studies. Based on these results we conclude that redox reactions continue to affect U distribution in the ore zone and downgradient regions. We also measured aqueous selenium isotope (δ82Se) and molybdenum isotope (δ98Mo) compositions in the Rosita groundwater. Se(VI) primarily occurs in the upgradient wells and is absent in most ore zone and downgradient wells. Rayleigh distillation models suggest reduction of Se(VI) along the groundwater flow path and when superimposed on the U isotope data

  6. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure: Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Glišović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition. As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition demonstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs, especially below the Pacific. The evolution of subduction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique

  7. Nano-Scale Structure of Twin Boundaries in Shocked Zircon from the Vredefort Impact Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, T. G.; Cavosie, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    Shock deformation of zircon produces distinct microstructures that can be used as evidence of shock in natural samples. These deformation features include {112} twins that have been observed in naturally shocked samples from Vredefort and elsewhere [1-3]. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has shown that these twins are polysynthetic, generally crystallographic relation to the host zircon [2]. The structure and composition of these twin boundaries, and their effects on element mobility have not been explored previously. Here we use high-resolution TEM to investigate the nano-structure of a {112} twin in a shocked zircon crystal from the 2.0 Ga Vredefort impact structure [3]. Focused-ion-beam lift-out techniques were used to prepare a TEM foil with a 1 µm wide {112}-twin lamella. The foil was characterized by TEM imaging and electron diffraction using a FEI CM200-FEG transmission electron microscope. Selected area diffraction from the {112}-twin boundary, along a zone, showed no apparent evidence of twining. However, the domain boundaries displayed weak diffraction contrast in this orientation. High-resolution images show a 50-nm wide zone of heterogeneous structural disorder and locally amorphous domains along the twin boundaries that is inferred to be a localized metamict zone. The detailed lattice structure of the interface was not discernable because of this structural disorder. Diffraction and imaging along confirms that the {112}-twin composition plane is a mirror plane. The crystallographic relations observed along and are consistent with the 65°/ twin structure previously determined from EBSD [2]. Enhanced metamict disorder suggests a higher concentration of actinides along the twin boundaries and implies actinide mobility near twin boundaries. [1] Moser et al, 2011 Can J Earth Sci. [2] Erickson et al. 2013 Am Min. [3] Cavosie et al. 2015 Geol.

  8. Thermally-Stable High Strain Deployable Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is for the development of a thermally-stable composite made of carbon fibers and elastomeric resin. This combination of materials will allow...

  9. First observations of elevated ducts associated with intermittent turbulence in the stable boundary layer over Bosten Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Ning, Hui; Song, Shihui; Yan, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    Nocturnal radiative cooling is a main driver for atmospheric duct formation. Within this atmospheric process, the impacts of intermittent turbulence on ducting have seldom been studied. In this paper, we reported two confusing ducting events observed in the early morning in August 2014 over Bosten Lake, China, when a stable boundary layer (SBL) still survived, by using tethered high-resolution GPS radiosondes. Elevated ducts with strong humidity inversions were observed during the balloon ascents but were absent during observations made upon the balloon descents several minutes later. This phenomenon was initially hypothesized to be attributable to turbulence motions in the SBL, and the connection between the turbulence event and the radar duct was examined by the statistical Thorpe method. Turbulence patches were detected from the ascent profiles but not from the descent profiles. The possible reasons for the duct formation and elimination were discussed in detail. The turbulent transport of moisture in the SBL and the advection due to airflows coming from the lake are the most probable reasons for duct formation. In one case, the downward transport of moisture by turbulence mixing within a Kelvin-Helmholtz billow at the top of the low-level jet resulted in duct elimination. In another case, the passage of density currents originating from the lake may have caused the elimination of the duct. Few studies have attempted to associate intermittent turbulence with radar ducts; thus, this work represents a pioneering study into the connection between turbulent events and atmospheric ducts in a SBL.

  10. Grain boundary structure and solute segregation in titanium-doped sapphire bicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Seth Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Solute segregation to ceramic grain boundaries governs material processing and microstructure evolution, and can strongly influence material properties critical to engineering performance. Understanding the evolution and implications of grain boundary chemistry is a vital component in the greater effort to engineer ceramics with controlled microstructures. This study examines solute segregation to engineered grain boundaries in titanium-doped sapphire (Al2O3) bicrystals, and explores relationships between grain boundary structure and chemistry at the nanometer scale using spectroscopic and imaging techniques in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results demonstrate dramatic changes in solute segregation stemming from small fluctuations in grain boundary plane and structure. Titanium and silicon solute species exhibit strong tendencies to segregate to non-basal and basal grain boundary planes, respectively. Evidence suggests that grain boundary faceting occurs in low-angle twis t boundaries to accommodate nonequilibrium solute segregation related to slow specimen cooling rates, while faceting of tilt grain boundaries often occurs to expose special planes of the coincidence site lattice (CSL). Moreover, quantitative analysis of grain boundary chemistry indicates preferential segregation of charged defects to grain boundary dislocations. These results offer direct proof that static dislocations in ionic materials can assume a net charge, and emphasize the importance of interactions between charged point, line, and planar defects in ionic materials. Efforts to understand grain boundary chemistry in terms of space charge theory, elastic misfit and nonequilibrium segregation are discussed for the Al2O3 system.

  11. Grain boundary structure and solute segregation in titanium-doped sapphire bicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Seth T.

    2002-01-01

    Solute segregation to ceramic grain boundaries governs material processing and microstructure evolution, and can strongly influence material properties critical to engineering performance. Understanding the evolution and implications of grain boundary chemistry is a vital component in the greater effort to engineer ceramics with controlled microstructures. This study examines solute segregation to engineered grain boundaries in titanium-doped sapphire (Al2O3) bicrystals, and explores relationships between grain boundary structure and chemistry at the nanometer scale using spectroscopic and imaging techniques in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results demonstrate dramatic changes in solute segregation stemming from small fluctuations in grain boundary plane and structure. Titanium and silicon solute species exhibit strong tendencies to segregate to non-basal and basal grain boundary planes, respectively. Evidence suggests that grain boundary faceting occurs in low-angle twis t boundaries to accommodate nonequilibrium solute segregation related to slow specimen cooling rates, while faceting of tilt grain boundaries often occurs to expose special planes of the coincidence site lattice (CSL). Moreover, quantitative analysis of grain boundary chemistry indicates preferential segregation of charged defects to grain boundary dislocations. These results offer direct proof that static dislocations in ionic materials can assume a net charge, and emphasize the importance of interactions between charged point, line, and planar defects in ionic materials. Efforts to understand grain boundary chemistry in terms of space charge theory, elastic misfit and nonequilibrium segregation are discussed for the Al2O3 system

  12. Structure of boundary layers of plasmas confined by magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laval, G.; Pellat, R.

    1963-01-01

    The structure of a transition sheath between a magnetically confined plasma and vacuum is investigated. A one-dimensional, static solution of the collisionless Vlasov equation is sought. The two kinds of particles are assumed to have unequal masses, M- and M+, and temperatures, T- and T+; and the parameter λ 2 = (M-/M+) (T-/T+) = (R-/R+) (R-, R+ are Larmor radii) is introduced. For non-relativistic particles, the result is obtained that no physical solution can exist except for λ = 1 without trapped particles. The problem for Maxwellian distribution functions, no charge separation field λ = 1 + α with α small, and with trapped particles, is investigated. For negative α, only trapped ions are needed, and the distribution function of trapped particles that provides the thinnest sheath can be calculated. A complete solution of the problem with unequal masses, charge separation field, and trapped electrons is given. The sheath thickness is about four Larmor radii, a good physical picture if stable. (authors) [fr

  13. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbieu, Clara; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Couvreux, Fleur; Durand, Pierre; Pino, David; Patton, Ned; Nilsson, Erik; Blay-Carreras, Estel; Gioli, Beniamino

    2015-04-01

    The transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer raises several issues, which remain difficult to address from both modeling and observational perspectives. The well mixed convective boundary layer is mainly forced by buoyancy, with fully developed turbulence. The daily decrease of the surface buoyancy flux leads to the decay of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and a possible change of the structure of the turbulence before it reaches the stable regime, with more anisotropy and intermittency. It is important to better understand these processes, as they can impact on the dispersion of tracers in the atmosphere, and on the development of the nocturnal and daytime boundary layers of the following days. The presented work is based on both observations from the BLLAST (Boundary Layer Later Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) experiment and Large-Eddy Simulation (NCAR LES code). The field campaign took place in summer 2011 in France, on the northern side of the Pyrenean foothills. A well-documented cloud-free weak wind day is considered here to analyze in details the evolution of the turbulence along the day, from midday to sunset. The case study combines observations of the mean structure and of the turbulence. It is the base of a complementary idealized numerical study with a large eddy simulation. From both observations and numerical simulations, the turbulence is described, according to time and height, with the characteristics of the spectral energy density, especially the typical turbulence lengthscales and the sharpness of the transition from energy-containing eddies to the inertial subrange. An analytical model proposed by Kristensen and Lenschow (1988) for homogeneous nonisotropic turbulence is used to approximate the observed and LES-modeled spectra and estimate their characteristics. The study points out the LES ability to reproduce th­e turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. Two

  14. Acoustic Emissions from Unsteady Transitional Boundary Layer Flow Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marboe, R

    2000-01-01

    ...-empirically derived space-time correlation function for the intermittency indicator. A quiet airflow facility was developed to measure the direct acoustic radiation from a naturally transitioning boundary layer...

  15. Electrical sensing of the dynamical structure of the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, K. A.; Harrison, R. G.; Silva, H. G.; Salgado, R.; Melgâo, M.; Bortoli, D.

    2018-04-01

    Turbulent and convective processes within the planetary boundary layer are responsible for the transport of moisture, momentum and particulate matter, but are also important in determining the electrical charge transport of the lower atmosphere. This paper presents the first high resolution vertical charge profiles during fair weather conditions, obtained with instrumented radiosonde balloons over Alqueva, Portugal during the summer of 2014. The short intervals (4 h) between balloon flights enabled the diurnal variation in the vertical profile of charge within the boundary layer to be examined in detail, with much smaller charges (up to 20 pC m- 3) observed during stable night time periods than during the day. Following sunrise, the evolution of the charge profile was complex, demonstrating charged ultrafine aerosol, lofted upwards by daytime convection. This produced charge up to 92 pC m- 3 up to 500 m above the surface. The diurnal variation in the integrated column of charge above the site tracked closely with the diurnal variation in near surface charge as derived from a nearby electric field sensor, confirming the importance of the link between surface charge generation processes and aloft. The local aerosol vertical profiles were estimated using backscatter measurements from a collocated ceilometer. These were utilised in a simple model to calculate the charge expected due to vertical conduction current flow in the global electric circuit through aerosol layers. The analysis presented here demonstrates that charge can provide detailed information about boundary layer transport, particularly in regard to the ultrafine aerosol structure, that conventional thermodynamic and ceilometer measurements do not.

  16. Atomic structure of large angle grain boundaries determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Sass, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to determine the atomic structure of the Σ = 5 and 13 [001] twist boundaries in Au with a resolution of 0.09 Angstrom or better. The reciprocal lattices of these boundaries were mapped out using synchrotron radiation. The atomic structures were obtained by testing model structures against the intensity observations with a chi square analysis. The boundary structure were modeled using polyhedra, including octahedra, special configurations of tetrahedra and Archimedian anti-prisms, interwoven together by the boundary symmetry. The results of this work point to the possibility of obtaining general rules for grain boundary structure based on X-ray diffraction observations that give the atomic positions with high resolution

  17. An ALE formulation of embedded boundary methods for tracking boundary layers in turbulent fluid-structure interaction problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Charbel; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.

    2014-04-01

    Embedded Boundary Methods (EBMs) for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are usually constructed in the Eulerian setting. They are particularly attractive for complex Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) problems characterized by large structural motions and deformations. They are also critical for flow problems with topological changes and FSI problems with cracking. For all of these problems, the alternative Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods are often unfeasible because of the issue of mesh crossovers. However for viscous flows, Eulerian EBMs for CFD do not track the boundary layers around dynamic rigid or flexible bodies. Consequently, the application of these methods to viscous FSI problems requires either a high mesh resolution in a large part of the computational fluid domain, or adaptive mesh refinement. Unfortunately, the first option is computationally inefficient, and the second one is labor intensive. For these reasons, an alternative approach is proposed in this paper for maintaining all moving boundary layers resolved during the simulation of a turbulent FSI problem using an EBM for CFD. In this approach, which is simple and computationally reasonable, the underlying non-body-fitted mesh is rigidly translated and/or rotated in order to track the rigid component of the motion of the dynamic obstacle. Then, the flow computations away from the embedded surface are performed using the ALE framework, and the wall boundary conditions are treated by the chosen Eulerian EBM for CFD. Hence, the solution of the boundary layer tracking problem proposed in this paper can be described as an ALE implementation of a given EBM for CFD. Its basic features are illustrated with the Large Eddy Simulation using a non-body-fitted mesh of a turbulent flow past an airfoil in heaving motion. Its strong potential for the solution of challenging FSI problems at reasonable computational costs is also demonstrated with the simulation of turbulent flows past a family of

  18. The influence of the grain boundary structure on diffusional creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsen, P.A.

    1998-05-01

    An experiment was carried out to quantify the deformation in the diffusional creep domain. It was found that material had indisputably been deposited at grain boundaries in tension. A characterisation of 131 boundaries in terms of their misorientation was carried out and this was correlated to the observed deformation. Twin boundaries below a certain limit of deviation from an exact twin misorientation were totally inactive in the deformation. A large qualitative difference was found in the way general boundaries take part in the deformation. The experiments have taken place at Materials Research Department, Risoe National Laboratory at Roskilde. The present thesis has been submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree in physics at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen. Besides the results of the creep experiment the thesis contains a description of the theoretical background to diffusional creep models. Also, the results from an investigation of helium bubble formation in an irradiated copper sample is included. (au)

  19. Hygro-Thermal Transient Analysis for Highly Stable Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Da Mota Silva, S; Hauviller, Claude; Kanoute, P; Ribeiro, R

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained with the simulations of a sandwich rectangular plate made of carbon/epoxy composite when subjected to temperature and humidity cycles. Fickian diffusion process, moisture transport along the interfaces and damage caused by slipping and debonding between the components of the microscopic structure are considered. The application of the design methodology to a real structure is shown.

  20. A new first-order turbulence mixing model for the stable atmospheric boundary-layer: development and testing in large-eddy and single column models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J.; Bou-Zeid, E.; Golaz, J.

    2011-12-01

    Parameterization of the stably-stratified atmospheric boundary-layer is of crucial importance to different aspects of numerical weather prediction at regional scales and climate modeling at global scales, such as land-surface temperature forecasts, fog and frost prediction, and polar climate. It is well-known that most operational climate models require excessive turbulence mixing of the stable boundary-layer to prevent decoupling of the atmospheric component from the land component under strong stability, but the performance of such a model is unlikely to be satisfactory under weakly and moderately stable conditions. In this study we develop and test a general turbulence mixing model of the stable boundary-layer which works under different stabilities and for steady as well as unsteady conditions. A-priori large-eddy simulation (LES) tests are presented to motivate and verify the new parameterization. Subsequently, an assessment of this model using the GFDL single-column model (SCM) is performed. Idealized test cases including continuously varying stability, as well as stability discontinuity, are used to test the new SCM against LES results. A good match of mean and flux profiles is found when the new parameterization is used, while other traditional first-order turbulence models using the concept of stability function perform poorly. SCM spatial resolution is also found to have little impact on the performance of the new turbulence closure, but temporal resolution is important and a numerical stability criterion based on the model time step is presented.

  1. The structure and composition of olivine grain boundaries: 40 years of studies, status and current developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, K.; Faul, U. H.

    2018-02-01

    Interfaces in rocks, especially grain boundaries in olivine dominated rocks, have been subject to about 40 years of studies. The grain boundary structure to property relation is fundamental to understand the diverging properties of polycrystalline samples compared to those of single crystals. The number of direct structural observations is small, i.e. in range of 100 micrographs, and the number of measurements of properties directly linked to structural observations is even smaller. Bulk aggregate properties, such as seismic attenuation, rheology and electrical conductivity, are sensitive to grain size, and seem to show influences by grain boundary character distributions. In this context we review previous studies on grain boundary structure and composition and plausible relations to bulk properties. The grain boundary geometry is described using five independent parameters; generally, their structural width ranges between 0.4-1.2 nm and the commonly used 1 nm seems a good approximation. This region of enhanced disorder is often enriched in elements that are incompatible in the perfect crystal lattice. The chemical composition of grain boundaries depends on the bulk rock composition. We determined the 5 parameter grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) for polycrystaline Fo_{90} and studied structure and chemistry at the nm-scale to extend previous measurements. We find that grain boundary planes close to perpendicular to the crystallographic c-direction dominate the grain boundary network. We conclude that linking grain boundary structure in its full geometric parameter space to variations of bulk rock properties is now possible by GBCD determination using EBSD mapping and statistical analyses.

  2. Effect of boundary conditions on radial mode structure of whistlers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    The dispersion of the radical eigen modes of a cylindrical m=1 whistler wave with Ωsub(i) << ω << Ωsub(e) << ωsub(pe) are investigated for both conducting and insulating boundaries, where Ωsub(e) and Ωsub(i) are the electron and ion gyro frequencies, Ωsub(pe) is the electron plasma frequency. The effects of electron inertia and resistivity on the modes are discussed

  3. Dynamical structure of the turbulent boundary layer on rough surface

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uruba, Václav; Jonáš, Pavel; Hladík, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2011), s. 603-604 ISSN 1617-7061 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/08/1112; GA ČR GAP101/10/1230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : turbulent boundary layer * rough wall * hairpin vortex Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pamm.201110291/abstract

  4. Active structural control with stable fuzzy PID techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wen

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a detailed discussion of intelligent techniques to measure the displacement of buildings when they are subjected to vibration. It shows how these techniques are used to control active devices that can reduce vibration 60–80% more effectively than widely used passive anti-seismic systems. After introducing various structural control devices and building-modeling and active structural control methods, the authors propose offset cancellation and high-pass filtering techniques to solve some common problems of building-displacement measurement using accelerometers. The most popular control algorithms in industrial settings, PD/PID controllers, are then analyzed and then combined with fuzzy compensation. The stability of this combination is proven with standard weight-training algorithms. These conditions provide explicit methods for selecting PD/PID controllers. Finally, fuzzy-logic and sliding-mode control are applied to the control of wind-induced vibration. The methods described are support...

  5. An Energy stable Monolithic Eulerian Fluid-Structure Numerical Scheme *

    OpenAIRE

    Pironneau , Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The conservation laws of continuum mechanic written in an Eulerian frame make no difference between fluids and solids except in the expression of the stress tensors, usually with Newton's hypothesis for the fluids and Helmholtz potentials of energy for hyperelastic solids. By taking the velocities as unknown , monolithic methods for fluid structure interactions (FSI) are built. In this article such a formulation is analyzed when the fluid is compressible and the fluid is incompressible. The i...

  6. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  7. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites. [Proper and improper ferroelastic martensites; In-Tl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1992-09-30

    Theoretical studies were pursued with supporting experimental investigations (In-Tl) on the statics, dynamics, and statistical mechanics of twin boundaries, twin bands, and pretransformation structural modulations in proper and improper ferroelastic martensites.

  8. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Huang, Yin-Yan

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  9. Wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jinyul; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-11-01

    The wall-attached structures of streamwise velocity fluctuations (u) are explored using direct numerical simulation data of turbulent boundary layer at Reτ = 1000 . We identify the structures of u, which are extended close to the wall. Their height (ly) ranges from the near-wall region to the edge of turbulent boundary layer. They are geometrically self-similar in a sense that the length and width of the structures are proportional to the distance from the wall. The population density of the attached structures shows that the tall attached structures (290 wall. The wall-attached structures of u identified in the present work are a proper candidate for Townsend's attached eddy hypothesis and these structures exist in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives (No. 2017-013369) program of the National Research Foundation of Korea (MSIP) and supported by the Supercomputing Center (KISTI).

  10. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1990-01-15

    A comprehensive theoretical study with concurrent supporting experimental investigations is being carried out on coherent and semicoherent interfaces in ferroelastic martensites, including twin boundaries and twin bands, heterophase parent/product interfaces and inclusions, and transformation precursors. This work is motivated by the need for a new theoretical basis for investigating the martensite nucleation mechanism and for establishing the conditions for nonclassical nucleation. Soliton-like solutions of a dynamic Ginzburg-Landau continuum theory for ferroelastic martensites are being studied in order to determine the strain distribution, strain energy and dynamical behavior for various geometric configurations as a function of the material parameters, temperature and boundary conditions. Model parameters of the theory consist of the second and higher order elastic constants and the harmonic strain gradient coefficients in the parent phase. X-ray measurements of the transformation strain versus temperature, and ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements on biaxially stressed crystals in In{sub 1{minus}x}Tl{sub x} alloys for determining the second and higher order elastic constants in the single domain tetragonal state and for studying the morphology and the dynamic behavior of the martensite interfaces and transformation precursors are in progress.

  11. Boundary layer structure over areas of heterogeneous heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doran, J.C.; Barnes, F.J.; Coulter, R.L.; Crawford, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    In general circulation models (GCMs), some properties of a grid element are necessarily considered homogeneous. That is, for each grid volume there is associated a particular combination of boundary layer depth, vertical profiles of wind and temperature, surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat, etc. In reality, all of these quantities may exhibit significant spatial variations the grid area, and the larger the area the greater the likely variations. In balancing the benefits of higher resolution against increased computational time and expense, it is useful to consider what the consequences of such subgrid-scale variability may be. Moreover, in interpreting the results of a simulation, one must be able to define an appropriate average value over a grid. There are two aspects of this latter problem: (1) in observations, how does one take a set of discrete or volume-averaged measurements and relate these to properties of the entire domain, and (2) in computations, how can subgrid-scale features be accounted for in the model parameterizations? To address these and related issues, two field campaigns were carried out near Boardman, Oregon, in June 1991 and 1992. These campaigns were designed to measure the surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat over adjacent areas with strongly contrasting surface types and to measure the response of the boundary layer to those fluxes. This paper discusses some initial findings from those campaigns

  12. Spatial variations in food web structures with alternative stable states: evidence from stable isotope analysis in a large eutrophic lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunkai; Zhang, Yuying; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Shuo

    2017-05-01

    Food web structures are well known to vary widely among ecosystems. Moreover, many food web studies of lakes have generally attempted to characterize the overall food web structure and have largely ignored internal spatial and environmental variations. In this study, we hypothesize that there is a high degree of spatial heterogeneity within an ecosystem and such heterogeneity may lead to strong variations in environmental conditions and resource availability, in turn resulting in different trophic pathways. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes were employed for the whole food web to describe the structure of the food web in different sub-basins within Taihu Lake. This lake is a large eutrophic freshwater lake that has been intensively managed and highly influenced by human activities for more than 50 years. The results show significant isotopic differences between basins with different environmental characteristics. Such differences likely result from isotopic baseline differences combining with a shift in food web structure. Both are related to local spatial heterogeneity in nutrient loading in waters. Such variation should be explicitly considered in future food web studies and ecosystem-based management in this lake ecosystem.

  13. Improving protein structure similarity searches using domain boundaries based on conserved sequence information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madej Tom

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of protein domains plays an important role in protein structure comparison. Domain query size and composition are critical to structure similarity search algorithms such as the Vector Alignment Search Tool (VAST, the method employed for computing related protein structures in NCBI Entrez system. Currently, domains identified on the basis of structural compactness are used for VAST computations. In this study, we have investigated how alternative definitions of domains derived from conserved sequence alignments in the Conserved Domain Database (CDD would affect the domain comparisons and structure similarity search performance of VAST. Results Alternative domains, which have significantly different secondary structure composition from those based on structurally compact units, were identified based on the alignment footprints of curated protein sequence domain families. Our analysis indicates that domain boundaries disagree on roughly 8% of protein chains in the medium redundancy subset of the Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB. These conflicting sequence based domain boundaries perform slightly better than structure domains in structure similarity searches, and there are interesting cases when structure similarity search performance is markedly improved. Conclusion Structure similarity searches using domain boundaries based on conserved sequence information can provide an additional method for investigators to identify interesting similarities between proteins with known structures. Because of the improvement in performance of structure similarity searches using sequence domain boundaries, we are in the process of implementing their inclusion into the VAST search and MMDB resources in the NCBI Entrez system.

  14. Observations and modeling of the effects of waves and rotors on submeso and turbulence variability within the stable boundary layer over central Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez Mullins, Astrid

    Terrain-induced gravity waves and rotor circulations have been hypothesized to enhance the generation of submeso motions (i.e., nonstationary shear events with spatial and temporal scales greater than the turbulence scale and smaller than the meso-gamma scale) and to modulate low-level intermittency in the stable boundary layer (SBL). Intermittent turbulence, generated by submeso motions and/or the waves, can affect the atmospheric transport and dispersion of pollutants and hazardous materials. Thus, the study of these motions and the mechanisms through which they impact the weakly to very stable SBL is crucial for improving air quality modeling and hazard predictions. In this thesis, the effects of waves and rotor circulations on submeso and turbulence variability within the SBL is investigated over the moderate terrain of central Pennsylvania using special observations from a network deployed at Rock Springs, PA and high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model forecasts. The investigation of waves and rotors over central PA is important because 1) the moderate topography of this region is common to most of the eastern US and thus the knowledge acquired from this study can be of significance to a large population, 2) there have been little evidence of complex wave structures and rotors reported for this region, and 3) little is known about the waves and rotors generated by smaller and more moderate topographies. Six case studies exhibiting an array of wave and rotor structures are analyzed. Observational evidence of the presence of complex wave structures, resembling nonstationary trapped gravity waves and downslope windstorms, and complex rotor circulations, resembling trapped and jump-type rotors, is presented. These motions and the mechanisms through which they modulate the SBL are further investigated using high-resolution WRF forecasts. First, the efficacy of the 0.444-km horizontal grid spacing WRF model to reproduce submeso and meso

  15. Regional Comparisons of Oceanic Food Web Structure Using Stable Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, A.; Drazen, J.; Popp, B. N.; Robison, B. H.

    2016-02-01

    Food chain length, or the number of trophic steps between primary producers and apex predators within an ecosystem, is a key determinant of ecosystem structure, including overall efficiency, stability, and productivity. Here, we quantitatively estimate food chain length for three pelagic ecosystems characterized by distinct biogeochemical and oceanographic regimes: the Northern California Current (NCC), the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), and the Gulf of California (GoC). From each region, ecologically equivalent organisms were selected from each of four successive trophic steps, including zooplankton (primary consumers), zooplanktivores (secondary consumers), piscivores (tertiary consumers), and higher order predators. Bulk tissue δ15N values of the organisms from all four trophic steps spanned ranges of approximately 9.8‰ (NCC), 1.4‰ (NPSG), and 2.1‰ (GoC). Regional variations in nitrogen biogeochemistry, however, can alter isotopic baselines and food web dynamics, ultimately complicating bulk isotope measurements across regions. Thus, we apply amino acid nitrogen isotope measurements to quantitatively measure and compare food chain length across consumers from the three regions, accounting for biogeochemical disparities in isotopic baseline. Implications for ecosystem production and efficiency are discussed, including the potential for these different ecosystems to withstand environmental change, including shifting oxygen levels and surface productivity.

  16. Boundary values as Hamiltonian variables. II. Graded structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vladimir O.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the new formula for the field theory Poisson brackets arises naturally in the proposed extension of the formal variational calculus incorporating divergences. The linear spaces of local functionals, evolutionary vector fields, functional forms, multi-vectors and differential operators become graded with respect to divergences. The bilinear operations, such as the action of vector fields onto functionals, the commutator of vector fields, the interior product of forms and vectors and the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket are compatible with the grading. A definition of the adjoint graded operator is proposed and antisymmetric operators are constructed with the help of boundary terms. The fulfilment of the Jacobi identity for the new Poisson brackets is shown to be equivalent to vanishing of the Schouten-Nijenhuis bracket of the Poisson bivector with itself

  17. Refined boundary effect evaluation method for on-site damage inspection of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu

    This dissertation presents recent development and current capabilities of a dynamics-based and model-independent Boundary Effect Evaluation Method (BEEM) for damage inspection of structures. Damage introduces new boundaries to a structure, and influences of boundaries on steady-state high-frequency dynamic response are localized effects. The BEEM is a signal processing method that takes advantage of these localized effects to perform area-by-area extraction of damage-induced boundary effects from steady-state Operational Deflection Shapes (ODSs) to reveal damage locations. Steady-state ODSs of a structure can be measured using any full-field measurement tool, and the BEEM decomposes an ODS into central and boundary solutions using a sliding-window least-squares data-fitting technique. Numerical and experimental results show that boundary solutions are excellent damage indicators. Experimental results of many one- and two-dimensional structures validate the high sensitivity and accuracy of BEEM for detection and estimation of multiple small defects in structures.

  18. Extended Stable Boundary of LCL-Filtered Grid-Connected Inverter Based on An Improved Grid-Voltage Feedforward Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Minghui; Xin, Zhen; Wang, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    For the LCL-filtered grid-connected inverter, it has been reported that the digital time delays will narrow the stable region of current control loop when the inverter-side current is used for implementing the feedback control. A sufficient stable condition is that the filter resonance frequency....... Theoretical analysis is then provided to validate its feasibility and stability. Compared to other widely used active damping strategies, no extra sensors are needed because the filter capacitor voltage, which is used for voltage feedforward control, is also sampled for phase-locked loop in this paper...

  19. Vibration modeling of structural fuzzy with continuous boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    From experiments it is well known that the vibration response of a main structure with many attached substructures often shows more damping than structural losses in the components can account for. In practice, these substructures, which are not attached in an entirely rigid manner, behave like...... effect of the fuzzy with spatial memory is demonstrated by numerical simulations of a main beam structure with fuzzy attachments. It is shown that the introduction of spatial memory reduces the damping effect of the fuzzy and in certain cases the damping effect may even be eliminated completely....

  20. Defining a stable water isotope framework for isotope hydrology application in a large trans-boundary watershed (Russian Federation/Ukraine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vystavna, Yuliya; Diadin, Dmytro; Huneau, Frédéric

    2018-05-01

    Stable isotopes of hydrogen ( 2 H) and oxygen ( 18 O) of the water molecule were used to assess the relationship between precipitation, surface water and groundwater in a large Russia/Ukraine trans-boundary river basin. Precipitation was sampled from November 2013 to February 2015, and surface water and groundwater were sampled during high and low flow in 2014. A local meteoric water line was defined for the Ukrainian part of the basin. The isotopic seasonality in precipitation was evident with depletion in heavy isotopes in November-March and an enrichment in April-October, indicating continental and temperature effects. Surface water was enriched in stable water isotopes from upstream to downstream sites due to progressive evaporation. Stable water isotopes in groundwater indicated that recharge occurs mainly during winter and spring. A one-year data set is probably not sufficient to report the seasonality of groundwater recharge, but this survey can be used to identify the stable water isotopes framework in a weakly gauged basin for further hydrological and geochemical studies.

  1. A perspective on coherent structures and conceptual models for turbulent boundary layer physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stephen K.

    1990-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent boundary layers have been analyzed to develop a unified conceptual model for the kinematics of coherent motions in low Reynolds number canonical turbulent boundary layers. All classes of coherent motions are considered in the model, including low-speed streaks, ejections and sweeps, vortical structures, near-wall and outer-region shear layers, sublayer pockets, and large-scale outer-region eddies. The model reflects the conclusions from the study of the simulated boundary layer that vortical structures are directly associated with the production of turbulent shear stresses, entrainment, dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy, and the fluctuating pressure field. These results, when viewed from the perspective of the large body of published work on the subject of coherent motions, confirm that vortical structures may be considered the central dynamic element in the maintenance of turbulence in the canonical boundary layer. Vortical structures serve as a framework on which to construct a unified picture of boundary layer structure, providing a means to relate the many known structural elements in a consistent way.

  2. Structural optimisation based on the boundary element and level set methods.

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, B.; Trevelyan, J.; Matthews, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    A new method of structural topology optimisation is proposed in which an evolutionary approach is used with boundary element and level set methods. During the optimisation iterations, the proposed method automatically introduces internal cavities and does not rely on an initial guess topology with pre-existing holes. The zero level set contours describing both the external geometry and the internal cavities are converted to non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS) for smooth boundary element me...

  3. Interaction Between Aerothermally Compliant Structures and Boundary-Layer Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Zachary Bryce

    The use of thin-gauge, light-weight structures in combination with the severe aero-thermodynamic loading makes reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles prone to fluid-thermal-structural interactions. These interactions result in surface perturbations in the form of temperature changes and deformations that alter the stability and eventual transition of the boundary layer. The state of the boundary layer has a significant effect on the aerothermodynamic loads acting on a hypersonic vehicle. The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerothermodynamic loading, and surface conditions make the interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important area of study in high-speed flows. The goal of this dissertation is to examine the interaction between boundary layer transition and the response of aerothermally compliant structures. This is carried out by first examining the uncoupled problems of: (1) structural deformation and temperature changes altering boundary-layer stability and (2) the boundary layer state affecting structural response. For the former, the stability of boundary layers developing over geometries that typify the response of surface panels subject to combined aerodynamic and thermal loading is numerically assessed using linear stability theory and the linear parabolized stability equations. Numerous parameters are examined including: deformation direction, deformation location, multiple deformations in series, structural boundary condition, surface temperature, the combined effect of Mach number and altitude, and deformation mode shape. The deformation-induced pressure gradient alters the boundary-layer thickness, which changes the frequency of the most-unstable disturbance. In regions of small boundary-layer growth, the disturbance frequency modulation resulting from a single or multiple panels deformed into the flowfield is found to improve boundary-layer stability and potentially delay transition. For the

  4. First combined electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study of grain boundary structure of deformed quartzite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, N; Prior, D J; Wheeler, J

    2006-12-01

    The structures of boundaries in a deformed and dynamically recovered and recrystallized quartz polycrystal (mylonite) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, after the misorientation angles across the same grain boundaries had been analysed using electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. In this new approach, a specific sample area is mapped with electron backscatter diffraction, and the mapped area is then attached to a foil, and by the ion beam thinned for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Dislocations in grain boundaries were recognized as periodic and parallel fringes. The fringes associated with dislocations are observed in boundaries with misorientations less than 9 degrees , whereas such fringes cannot be seen in the boundaries with misorientations larger than 17 degrees . Some boundaries with misorientations between 9 degrees and 17 degrees generally have no structures associated with dislocation. One segment of a boundary with a misorientation of 13.5 degrees has structures associated with dislocations. It is likely that the transition from low-angle to high-angle boundaries occurs at misorientations ranging from approximately 9 degrees to 14 degrees . Change in the grain boundary structure presumably influences the mobility of the boundaries. In the studied deformed quartz vein, a relative dearth of boundaries between misorientation angles of theta = 2 degrees and theta = 15 degrees has previously been reported, and high-angle boundaries form cusps where they intersect low-angle boundaries, suggesting substantial mobility of high-angle boundaries.

  5. The Step-Type Contrast Structure for High Dimensional Tikhonov System with Neumann Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aifeng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the step-type contrast structure for high dimensional Tikhonov system with Neumann boundary conditions. We not only propose a key condition with the existence of the number of mutually independent first integrals under which there exists a step-type contrast structure, but also determine where an internal transition time is. Using the method of boundary function, we construct the formal asymptotic solution and give the analytical expression for the higher order terms. At the same time, the uniformly valid asymptotic expansion and the existence of such an available step-type contrast structure are obtained by sewing connection method.

  6. An Immersed Boundary Method for Solving the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations with Fluid Structure Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equation and the additional infrastructure that is needed to solve moving boundary problems and fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is described. All the methods described in this paper were implemented in NASA's LAVA solver framework. The underlying immersed boundary method is based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method that was previously introduced by the authors. In the present paper this method is extended to account for all aspects that are involved for fluid structure interaction simulations, such as fast geometry queries and stencil computations, the treatment of freshly cleared cells, and the coupling of the computational fluid dynamics solver with a linear structural finite element method. The current approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems in 2D and 3D. As part of the validation procedure, results from the second AIAA aeroelastic prediction workshop are also presented. The current paper is regarded as a proof of concept study, while more advanced methods for fluid structure interaction are currently being investigated, such as geometric and material nonlinearities, and advanced coupling approaches.

  7. Quantifying the Stable Boundary Layer Structure and Evolution during T-REX 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    outer 13.5 km and an inner 500 m can produce a much better evolution of the nocturnal low-level jet and especially in terms of the speed max. It also...that accurately capturing the synoptic condition was a critical player in this valley low-level jet event. Overall, the low-level nocturnal down-valley...Education, Research and Engineering: The number of undergraduates funded by your agreement who graduated during this period and intend to work for the

  8. Method of making quasi-grain boundary-free polycrystalline solar cell structure and solar cell structure obtained thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Franklin N.; Neugroschel, Arnost

    1984-02-14

    A new solar cell structure is provided which will increase the efficiency of polycrystalline solar cells by suppressing or completely eliminating the recombination losses due to the presence of grain boundaries. This is achieved by avoiding the formation of the p-n junction (or other types of junctions) in the grain boundaries and by eliminating the grain boundaries from the active area of the cell. This basic concept can be applied to any polycrystalline material; however, it will be most beneficial for cost-effective materials having small grains, including thin film materials.

  9. Numerical study of the effects of Planetary Boundary Layer structure on the pollutant dispersion within built-up areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Liu, Shuhua; Zheng, Yijia; Wang, Shu; Liu, Zhenxin; Zhang, Bihui

    2015-06-01

    The effects of different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) structures on pollutant dispersion processes within two idealized street canyon configurations and a realistic urban area were numerically examined by a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. The boundary conditions of different PBL structures/conditions were provided by simulations of the Weather Researching and Forecasting model. The simulated results of the idealized 2D and 3D street canyon experiments showed that the increment of PBL instability favored the downward transport of momentum from the upper flow above the roof to the pedestrian level within the street canyon. As a result, the flow and turbulent fields within the street canyon under the more unstable PBL condition are stronger. Therefore, more pollutants within the street canyon would be removed by the stronger advection and turbulent diffusion processes under the unstable PBL condition. On the contrary, more pollutants would be concentrated in the street canyon under the stable PBL condition. In addition, the simulations of the realistic building cluster experiments showed that the density of buildings was a crucial factor determining the dynamic effects of the PBL structure on the flow patterns. The momentum field within a denser building configuration was mostly transported from the upper flow, and was more sensitive to the PBL structures than that of the sparser building configuration. Finally, it was recommended to use the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) PBL scheme, which can explicitly output the needed turbulent variables, to provide the boundary conditions to the CFD simulation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP....

  11. Workshop on Coherent Structure of Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    closely the actual anemometry signal signatures of specific coherent motions and structures. There are several ways one can approach this; one " insane ...Side View, Vf 0. 23 U t+ 0 60 40 20 0 Figure 6b. Side View, Vf= 0.23 U +re t = 10 68 C. R. SMITH K 604-- 40 y + 20 0 Figure 6c. Side View, Ve 0.23 U...re t =20 60 40 20 Figure 6d. Side View, Vfef 0.23 U_ t +=27 69 C. R. SMITH +60 40 20+ 20 Figure 6e. Side View, Ve 0.23 U +re t =38 60 40 20 0 Figure

  12. Shear response of grain boundaries with metastable structures by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Cheng; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2018-04-01

    Grain boundaries (GBs) can play a role as the favored locations to annihilate point defects, such as interstitial atoms and vacancies. It is thus highly probable that different boundary structures can be simultaneously present in equilibrium with each other in the same GB, and thus the GB achieves a metastable state. However, the structural transition and deformation mechanism of such GBs are currently not well understood. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the multiple structures of a Σ5(310)/[001] GB in bicrystal Al and to investigate the effect of structural multiplicity on the mechanical and kinetic properties of such a GB. Different GB structures were obtained by changing the starting atomic configuration of the bicrystal model, and the GB structures had significantly different atomic density. For the Σ5(310) GB with metastable structures, GB sliding was the dominant mechanism at a low temperature (T = 10 K) under shear stress. The sliding mechanism resulted from the uncoordinated transformation of the inhomogeneous structural units. The nucleation of voids was observed during GB sliding at the low temperature, and the voids subsequently evolved to a nanocrack at the boundary plane. Increasing the temperature can induce the structural transition of local GB structures and can change their overall kinetic properties. GB migration with occasional GB sliding dominated the deformation mechanism at elevated temperatures (T = 300 and 600 K), and the migration process of the metastable GB structures is closely related to the thermally assisted diffusion mechanism.

  13. Grain boundaries of nanocrystalline materials - their widths, compositions, and internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fultz, B.; Frase, H.N.

    2000-01-01

    Nanocrystalline materials contain many atoms at and near grain boundaries. Sufficient numbers of Moessbauer probe atoms can be situated in grain boundary environments to make a clear contribution to the measured Moessbauer spectrum. Three types of measurements on nanocrystalline materials are reported here, all using Moessbauer spectrometry in conjunction with X-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, or small angle neutron scattering. By measuring the fraction of atoms contributing to the grain boundary component in a Moessbauer spectrum, and by knowing the grain size of the material, it is possible to deduce the average width of grain boundaries in metallic alloys. It is found that these widths are approximately 0.5 nm for fcc alloys and slightly larger than 1.0 nm for bcc alloys.Chemical segregation to grain boundaries can be measured by Moessbauer spectrometry, especially in conjunction with small angle neutron scattering. Such measurements on Fe-Cu and Fe 3 Si-Nb were used to study how nanocrystalline materials could be stabilized against grain growth by the segregation of Cu and Nb to grain boundaries. The segregation of Cu to grain boundaries did not stabilize the Fe-Cu alloys against grain growth, since the grain boundaries were found to widen and accept more Cu atoms during annealing. The Nb additions to Fe 3 Si did suppress grain growth, perhaps because of the low mobility of Nb atoms, but also perhaps because Nb atoms altered the chemical ordering in the alloy.The internal structure of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline materials prepared by high-energy ball milling is found to be unstable against internal relaxations at low temperatures. The Moessbauer spectra of the nanocrystalline samples showed changes in the hyperfine fields attributable to movements of grain boundary atoms. In conjunction with SANS measurements, the changes in grain boundary structure induced by cryogenic exposure and annealing at low temperature were found to be

  14. Structure and transport at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine: An atomic-scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantisi, Boris; Sator, Nicolas; Guillot, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Structure and transport properties at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine have been investigated at the atomic scale by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using an empirical ionocovalent interaction potential. On the time scale of the simulation (a few tens of nanoseconds for a system size of ∼650,000 atoms) grain boundaries and grain interior were identified by mapping the atomic displacements along the simulation run. In the investigated temperature range (1300-1700 K) the mean thickness of the grain boundary phase is evaluated between 0.5 and 2 nm, a value which depends on temperature and grain size. The structure of the grain boundary phase is found to be disordered (amorphous-like) and is different from the one exhibited by the supercooled liquid. The self-diffusion coefficients of major elements in the intergranular region range from ∼10-13 to 10-10 m2/s between 1300 and 1700 K (with DSigb viscosity has been evaluated from the Green-Kubo relation expressing the viscosity as function of the stress tensor time correlation function. In spite of a slow convergence of the calculation by MD, the grain boundary viscosity was estimated about ∼105 Pa s at 1500 K, a value in agreement with high-temperature viscoelastic relaxation data. An interesting information gained from MD is that sliding at grain boundaries is essentially controlled by the internal friction between the intergranular phase and the grain edges.

  15. Structure of stable degeneration of K3 surfaces into pairs of rational elliptic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yusuke

    2018-03-01

    F-theory/heterotic duality is formulated in the stable degeneration limit of a K3 fibration on the F-theory side. In this note, we analyze the structure of the stable degeneration limit. We discuss whether stable degeneration exists for pairs of rational elliptic surfaces. We demonstrate that, when two rational elliptic surfaces have an identical complex structure, stable degeneration always exists. We provide an equation that systematically describes the stable degeneration of a K3 surface into a pair of isomorphic rational elliptic surfaces. When two rational elliptic surfaces have different complex structures, whether their sum glued along a smooth fiber admits deformation to a K3 surface can be determined by studying the structure of the K3 lattice. We investigate the lattice theoretic condition to determine whether a deformation to a K3 surface exists for pairs of extremal rational elliptic surfaces. In addition, we discuss the configurations of singular fibers under stable degeneration. The sum of two isomorphic rational elliptic surfaces glued together admits a deformation to a K3 surface, the singular fibers of which are twice that of the rational elliptic surface. For special situations, singular fibers of the resulting K3 surface collide and they are enhanced to a fiber of another type. Some K3 surfaces become attractive in these situations. We determine the complex structures and the Weierstrass forms of these attractive K3 surfaces. We also deduce the gauge groups in F-theory compactifications on these attractive K3 surfaces times a K3. E 6, E 7, E 8, SU(5), and SO(10) gauge groups arise in these compactifications.

  16. Novel stable structure of Li3PS4 predicted by evolutionary algorithm under high-pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Iikubo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available By combining theoretical predictions and in-situ X-ray diffraction under high pressure, we found a novel stable crystal structure of Li3PS4 under high pressures. At ambient pressure, Li3PS4 shows successive structural transitions from γ-type to β-type and from β-type to α type with increasing temperature, as is well established. In this study, an evolutionary algorithm successfully predicted the γ-type crystal structure at ambient pressure and further predicted a possible stable δ-type crystal structures under high pressure. The stability of the obtained structures is examined in terms of both static and dynamic stability by first-principles calculations. In situ X-ray diffraction using a synchrotron radiation revealed that the high-pressure phase is the predicted δ-Li3PS4 phase.

  17. Assessment of Gradient-Based Similarity Functions in the Stable Boundary Layer Derived from a Large-Eddy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2017-06-01

    Gradient-based similarity functions, evaluated based on data generated by a large-eddy simulation model of the stably stratified boundary layer, are compared with analogous similarity functions, derived from field observations in the surface layer during the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) experiment in the Arctic. The comparison is performed in terms of explicit and implicit local scaling systems, for the temperature and momentum fluxes, standard deviations of the vertical velocity and of temperature, as well as dissipation rates for the turbulent kinetic energy and for the temperature variance. The comparison shows the best agreement of the SHEBA-based similarity functions with analogous functions evaluated using the large-eddy simulation data in the range of the Richardson number 0.01<{ Ri}< 0.1.

  18. Carbon stable isotopes and ammonite biochronostratigraphy across the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary in the Lusitanian Basin, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Luís V.; José Comas-Rengifo, Maria; Silva, Ricardo L.; Paredes, Ricardo; Goy, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Here, we present an integrated stratigraphical study across the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian interval cropping out into the Portuguese reference section of S. Pedro de Moel (Lusitanian Basin). Characterized by marl-limestone alternations belonging to the Água de Madeiros Formation (subdivided into Polvoeira and Praia da Pedra Lisa members), this unit is particularly dominated by organic-rich facies (black shales) and represented by a large diversity of benthic and nektonic macrofossils. Using this stratigraphic and sedimentary setting, we developed a high-resolution carbon isotopic study, involving new ammonite biochronostratigraphic precisions and other palaeontological data. The analysis of the collected ammonite specimens facilitated the characterization of Oxynotum and Raricostatum chronozones and the definition of Raricostatum, Macdonnelli and Aplanatum subchronozones to accurately identify the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary in the western Iberian margin. The characterization of the carbon isotope evolution in bulk carbonate (δ13Ccarb) was performed in 351 samples, representing the Oxynotum - earliest Jamesoni chronozone interval. In this interval, the carbon-isotope values exhibited a large range of results, varying between +2.85o (Oxynotum Subchronozone) to strong negative values observed in some limestone beds from the Raricostatum Subchronozone (lowest reaching -6.7 ), a variation clearly controlled through lithological and facies changes. Despite these strong anomalous isotopically light values (below -1), clearly associated with organic matter degradation and early diagenesis, the δ13Ccarb curve shows a long-term negative trend across the Oxynotum to the early Taylori subchronozone interval. This tendency is reversed around 5 meters above the Sinemurian-Pliensbachian boundary, and the δ13Ccarb value becomes positive with the absence of organic matter and argillaceous sediments in the series (in the limestones of Praia da Pedra Lisa Member). Rather

  19. Nanocomposites with thermosetting matrix: structure formation at the interphase boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composites with thermosetting matrix are often characterized by elevated values of operational properties – flexural and compressive strength, resistance to aggressive environments, etc. At the same time the cost of most thermosets (particularly – epoxy resins is quite high. Because of this the area of application of polymer composites in construction is limited. One of such application is the creation of multifunctional coatings. The high cost of resin dictates the need to improve the operational properties to ensure economic efficiency. So far, the known way to improve the operational properties is to produce nanoscale interfacial layer between fine filler and matrix in block. This way proved to be effective, but mechanism of the improvement is still uncertain. There areat least two different theories – so-called «adhesion theory» and «theory of deformable layer». The investigation is complicated by the variety of oligomers, hardeners (crosslinking agents and precursors of nanomodifiers. It is becoming more common lately to use adducts of aliphatic amines and epoxy oligomers as hardeners. As precursors of nanomodifiers the organosilicon compounds with siloxane bond in the main chain can be successfully used. In this paper we present results of investigation of a model system comprised of oligomer, crosslinking agent and precursor. The analysis of structure is carried out by means of Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. It is shown that at gelation point modifier has no significant effect on the chemical composition of the curing products; nevertheless, the admixture of modifier reduces the regularity of the emerging three-dimensional spatial net of thermoset. After completion of curing process the irregular spatial grid is still present. This indicates that in composites admixture of organosilicon precursors may lead to the formation of transition layer with reduced modulus of elasticity. Such layer, in turn, causes stress

  20. Electronic structure and switching behavior of the metastable silicene domain boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtek; Cho, Yeonchoo; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Lee, Junsu; Jeon, Insu; Ko, Wonhee; Kim, Hyo Won; Ku, JiYeon; Kim, Gunn; Suh, Hwansoo; Hwang, Sung Woo

    2017-06-01

    Silicene, a silicon allotrope with a buckled honeycomb lattice, has been extensively studied in the search for materials with graphene-like properties. Here, we study the domain boundaries of a silicene 4 × 4 superstructure on an Ag(111) surface at the atomic resolution using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) along with density functional theory calculations. The silicene domain boundaries (β-phases) are formed at the interface between misaligned domains (α-phases) and show a bias dependence, forming protrusions or depressions as the sample bias changes. In particular, the STM topographs of the silicene-substrate system at a bias of ˜2.0 V show brightly protruding domain boundaries, which can be explained by an energy state originating from the Si 3s and 3pz orbitals. In addition, the topographs depicting the vicinity of the domain boundaries show that the structure does not follow the buckled geometry of the atomic ball-and-stick model. Inside the domain, STS data showed a step-up at ˜0.4 V, which originated from the Si 3p orbitals. We found this step-up to have shifted, which may be attributed to the strain effect at the interface regions between silver and silicene and between the domain and its boundary upon performing spatially resolved STS measurements. The metastable characteristic of the domain boundary (β-phase) causes changes, such as creation or annihilation, in the buckling structures (switching behavior). The observed low activation energy for the buckling change between distinct states may find applications in the electronic control of properties related to domain boundary structures in silicene.

  1. Stable preparations of tyrosine hydroxylase provide the solution structure of the full-length enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezem, Maria T.; Baumann, Anne; Skjærven, Lars; Meyer, Romain; Kursula, Petri; Martinez, Aurora; Flydal, Marte I.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of catecholamine neurotransmitters. TH is a highly complex enzyme at mechanistic, structural, and regulatory levels, and the preparation of kinetically and conformationally stable enzyme for structural characterization has been challenging. Here, we report on improved protocols for purification of recombinant human TH isoform 1 (TH1), which provide large amounts of pure, stable, active TH1 with an intact N-terminus. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged maltose-binding protein on amylose resin was representative of the iron-bound functional enzyme, showing high activity and stabilization by the natural feedback inhibitor dopamine. TH1 purified through fusion with a His-tagged ZZ domain on TALON is remarkably stable, as it was partially inhibited by resin-derived cobalt. This more stable enzyme preparation provided high-quality small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data and reliable structural models of full-length tetrameric TH1. The SAXS-derived model reveals an elongated conformation (Dmax = 20 nm) for TH1, different arrangement of the catalytic domains compared with the crystal structure of truncated forms, and an N-terminal region with an unstructured tail that hosts the phosphorylation sites and a separated Ala-rich helical motif that may have a role in regulation of TH by interacting with binding partners. PMID:27462005

  2. Stable isotopes in the atmospheric marine boundary layer water vapour over the Atlantic Ocean, 2012–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Marion; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Reverdin, Gilles; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árný Erla; Aloisi, Giovanni; Berkelhammer, Max B.; Bourlès, Bernard; Bourras, Denis; de Coetlogon, Gaëlle; Cosgrove, Ann; Faber, Anne-Katrine; Grelet, Jacques; Hansen, Steffen Bo; Johnson, Rod; Legoff, Hervé; Martin, Nicolas; Peters, Andrew J.; Popp, Trevor James; Reynaud, Thierry; Winther, Malte

    2017-01-01

    The water vapour isotopic composition (1H216O, H218O and 1H2H16O) of the Atlantic marine boundary layer has been measured from 5 research vessels between 2012 and 2015. Using laser spectroscopy analysers, measurements have been carried out continuously on samples collected 10–20 meter above sea level. All the datasets have been carefully calibrated against the international VSMOW-SLAP scale following the same protocol to build a homogeneous dataset covering the Atlantic Ocean between 4°S to 63°N. In addition, standard meteorological variables have been measured continuously, including sea surface temperatures using calibrated Thermo-Salinograph for most cruises. All calibrated observations are provided with 15-minute resolution. We also provide 6-hourly data to allow easier comparisons with simulations from the isotope-enabled Global Circulation Models. In addition, backwards trajectories from the HYSPLIT model are supplied every 6-hours for the position of our measurements. PMID:28094798

  3. Cs/CsPbX3 (X = Br, Cl) epitaxial heteronanocrystals with magic-angle stable/metastable grain boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumeng; Fan, Baolu; Wu, Wenhui; Fan, Jiyang

    2017-05-01

    Metal-semiconductor heteronanostructures are crucial building blocks of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the lattice misfit remains a challenge in constructing heteronanostructures. Perovskite nanocrystals are superior candidates for constructing nanodevices owing to excellent optical, ferroelectric, and superconducting properties. We report the epitaxial growth of lattice-matched Cs/CsPbBr3 metal-semiconductor heteronanocrystals in a liquid medium. The well-crystallized ultrathin Cs layers grow epitaxially on the surfaces of colloidal CsPbBr3 nanocrystals, forming heteronanocrystals with interface diameters of several nanometers. Most of them are pseudomorphic with coherent interfaces free from dislocations, and the others exhibit discrete high-angle grain boundaries. The model based on the calculation of the elastic potential energy of the epilayer and analysis of the near-coincidence sites explains well the experimental result. The analysis shows that the excellent lattice match between the metal and the semiconductor ensures the ideal epitaxial-growth of both Cs/CsPbBr3 and Cs/CsPbCl3 heteronanocrystals. Such metal/semiconductor heteronanocrystals pave the way for developing perovskite-based nanodevices.

  4. Effect of boundary conditions on magnetocapacitance effect in a ring-type magnetoelectric structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juanjuan

    2017-12-01

    By considering the nonlinear magneto-elastic coupling relationships of magnetostrictive materials, an analytical model is proposed. The resonance frequencies can be accurately predicted by this theoretical model, and they are in good agreement with experimental data. Subsequently, the magnetocapacitance effect in a ring-type magnetoelectric (ME) structure with different boundary conditions is investigated, and it is found that various mechanical boundaries, the frequency, the magnetic field, the geometric size, and the interface bonding significantly affect the capacitance of the ME structure. Further, additional resonance frequencies can be predicted by considering appropriate imperfect interface bonding. Finally, the influence of an external force on the capacitance is studied. The result shows that an external force on the boundary changes the capacitance, but has only a weak influence on the resonance frequency.

  5. Grain Boundary Structures and Collective Dynamics of Inversion Domains in Binary Two-Dimensional Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Doaa; Mkhonta, S. K.; Elder, K. R.; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2017-06-01

    Understanding and controlling the properties and dynamics of topological defects is a lasting challenge in the study of two-dimensional materials, and is crucial to achieve high-quality films required for technological applications. Here grain boundary structures, energies, and dynamics of binary two-dimensional materials are investigated through the development of a phase field crystal model that is parametrized to match the ordering, symmetry, energy, and length scales of hexagonal boron nitride. Our studies reveal some new dislocation core structures for various symmetrically and asymmetrically tilted grain boundaries, in addition to those obtained in previous experiments and first-principles calculations. We also identify a defect-mediated growth dynamics for inversion domains governed by the collective atomic migration and defect core transformation at grain boundaries and junctions, a process that is related to inversion symmetry breaking in binary lattice.

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundaries in ZrB2: Structure, Energetics, and Thermal Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Squire, Thomas H.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of ab initio, atomistic and finite element methods (FEM) were used to investigate the structures, energetics and lattice thermal conductance of grain boundaries for the ultra high temperature ceramic ZrB2. Atomic models of idealized boundaries were relaxed using density functional theory. Information about bonding across the interfaces was determined from the electron localization function. The Kapitza conductance of larger scale versions of the boundary models were computed using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. The interfacial thermal parameters together with single crystal thermal conductivities were used as parameters in microstructural computations. FEM meshes were constructed on top of microstructural images. From these computations, the effective thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline structure was determined.

  7. Vertical structure of the boundary layer. a comparison between land and sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Sadhuram, Y.

    The structure and the energetics of the boundary layer have been studied simultaneously over land and sea off Goa Coast just before the onset of south west monsoon. The Radiosonde data obtained at 00 GMT (0530 IST) are used in the present...

  8. Structure And Mobilities Of Tungsten Grain Boundaries Calculated From Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies and mobilities of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  9. Transducer placement for robustness to variations in boundary conditions for active structural acoustic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprofera, Joseph D.; Clark, Robert L.; Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-10-01

    The study of control strategies aimed at the reduction of turbulent boundary layer noise transmission into the fuselage of an aircraft has been a topic of academic and industrial research for several years. In this work we focus on an approach that will attempt to address a practical application issue: the impact of uncertainty in boundary conditions on the choice of actuator and sensor locations for structural acoustic control. The selection of an optimized set of transducers and the creation of a suitably adjustable test system is used to demonstrate that robustness to bounded variations in boundary conditions of a plate is achievable in active structural acoustic control. This robustness is achieved through the optimization of transducer placement with respect to maximizing control of structural acoustic radiation over the desired range of boundary conditions. This project incorporates energy based modeling of the structure, electromechanical piezo coupling, radiation filter modeling, and control analysis through the use of Hankel Singular Value (HSV) estimates and optimization based upon the genetic algorithm. Testing in a transmission loss facility will be used to validate the selected transducer placements and demonstrate a reduction in radiated sound power. [Work supported by NASA.

  10. An Observational Study of the Structure of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, Larry; Heald, R. C.; Lenschow, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    In an effort to describe the basic vertical structure of the nocturnal boundary layer, observations from four experiments are analyzed. During the night, the depth of significant cooling appears to increase with time while the depth of the turbulence and height of the low level wind maximum tend ...

  11. Embodied memory: effective and stable perception by combining optic flow and image structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jing Samantha; Bingham, Ned; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2013-12-01

    Visual perception studies typically focus either on optic flow structure or image structure, but not on the combination and interaction of these two sources of information. Each offers unique strengths in contrast to the other's weaknesses. Optic flow yields intrinsically powerful information about 3D structure, but is ephemeral. It ceases when motion stops. Image structure is less powerful in specifying 3D structure, but is stable. It remains when motion stops. Optic flow and image structure are intrinsically related in vision because the optic flow carries one image to the next. This relation is especially important in the context of progressive occlusion, in which optic flow provides information about the location of targets hidden in subsequent image structure. In four experiments, we investigated the role of image structure in "embodied memory" in contrast to memory that is only in the head. We found that either optic flow (Experiment 1) or image structure (Experiment 2) alone were relatively ineffective, whereas the combination was effective and, in contrast to conditions requiring reliance on memory-in-the-head, much more stable over extended time (Experiments 2 through 4). Limits well documented for visual short memory (that is, memory-in-the-head) were strongly exceeded by embodied memory. The findings support J. J. Gibson's (1979/1986, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception, Boston, MA, Houghton Mifflin) insights about progressive occlusion and the embodied nature of perception and memory.

  12. Unconditionally stable methods for simulating multi-component two-phase interface models with Peng-Robinson equation of state and various boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we consider multi-component dynamic two-phase interface models, which are formulated by the Cahn-Hilliard system with Peng-Robinson equation of state and various boundary conditions. These models can be derived from the minimum problems of Helmholtz free energy or grand potential in the realistic thermodynamic systems. The resulted Cahn-Hilliard systems with various boundary conditions are fully coupled and strongly nonlinear. A linear transformation is introduced to decouple the relations between different components, and as a result, the models are simplified. From this, we further propose a semi-implicit unconditionally stable time discretization scheme, which allows us to solve the Cahn-Hilliard system by a decoupled way, and thus, our method can significantly reduce the computational cost and memory requirements. The mixed finite element methods are employed for the spatial discretization, and the approximate errors are also analyzed for both space and time. Numerical examples are tested to demonstrate the efficiency of our proposed methods. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  13. Prediction of Stable Ruthenium Silicides from First-Principles Calculations: Stoichiometries, Crystal Structures, and Physical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzhao; Kuang, Xiaoyu; Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Cheng; Zhou, Dawei; Li, Peifang; Bao, Gang; Hermann, Andreas

    2015-12-09

    We present results of an unbiased structure search for stable ruthenium silicide compounds with various stoichiometries, using a recently developed technique that combines particle swarm optimization algorithms with first-principles calculations. Two experimentally observed structures of ruthenium silicides, RuSi (space group P2(1)3) and Ru2Si3 (space group Pbcn), are successfully reproduced under ambient pressure conditions. In addition, a stable RuSi2 compound with β-FeSi2 structure type (space group Cmca) was found. The calculations of the formation enthalpy, elastic constants, and phonon dispersions demonstrate the Cmca-RuSi2 compound is energetically, mechanically, and dynamically stable. The analysis of electronic band structures and densities of state reveals that the Cmca-RuSi2 phase is a semiconductor with a direct band gap of 0.480 eV and is stabilized by strong covalent bonding between Ru and neighboring Si atoms. On the basis of the Mulliken overlap population analysis, the Vickers hardness of the Cmca structure RuSi2 is estimated to be 28.0 GPa, indicating its ultra-incompressible nature.

  14. Interaction of slip with grain boundary in the Li2 ordered structure - A Σ = 9 tilt boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, M.H.; King, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The role of slip/grain boundary interaction in intergranular fracture has been analyzed for a Σ = 9 tilt boundary in Li 2 ordered alloys by use of the anisotropic elasticity theory of dislocations and fracture. Screw superpartials cross slip easily at the boundary onto the (1 bar 11) and the (001) planes for low and high temperatures, respectively. Transmission of primary slip dislocations onto the conjugate slip system occurs with some difficulty, which is eased by localized disordering. Unless a symmetric double pile-up occurs simultaneously, cleavage fracture is predicted to occur on the (bar 1 11) plane, not intergranular fracture. Absorption (or emission ) of superpartials occurs only when the boundary region is disordered. The inherent weakness of grain boundaries in Ni 3 Al and its improvement by boron segregation are discussed

  15. On nonlinear wave-structure interaction using an immersed boundary method in 2D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontos, Stavros; Bingham, Harry B.; Lindberg, Ole

    2016-01-01

    . The structure geometry is introduced using an Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) and the body boundary condition (BC) is satisfied with a Weighted Least Squares (WLS) approximation [7]. This allows complex geometries to be represented with high accuracy. The stability of the scheme is ensured by adopting...... the Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory (WENO) scheme [8] together with a Lax-Friedrichs type flux applied to the free surface conditions in Hamilton-Jacobi form. This work can be viewed as a novel extension of the flexible order finite difference potential flow solver OceanWave3D [2] to include the presence...

  16. Algebraic structures in generalized Clifford analysis and applications to boundary value problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Játem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article has a threefold purpose: First it is a survey of the algebraic structures of generalized Clifford-type algebras and shows the main results of the corresponding Clifford-type analysis and its application to boundary value problems known so far. Second it is aimed to implement algorithms to provide the fast and accurate computation of boundary value problems for inhomogeneous equations in the framework of the generalized Clifford analysis. Finally it is also aimed to encourage the development of a generalized discrete Clifford analysis.

  17. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  18. Stable isotope applications in biomolecular structure and mechanisms. A meeting to bring together producers and users of stable-isotope-labeled compounds to assess current and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trewhella, J.; Cross, T.A.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Knowledge of biomolecular structure is a prerequisite for understanding biomolecular function, and stable isotopes play an increasingly important role in structure determination of biological molecules. The first Conference on Stable Isotope Applications in Biomolecular Structure and Mechanisms was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 27--31, 1994. More than 120 participants from 8 countries and 44 institutions reviewed significant developments, discussed the most promising applications for stable isotopes, and addressed future needs and challenges. Participants focused on applications of stable isotopes for studies of the structure and function of proteins, peptides, RNA, and DNA. Recent advances in NMR techniques neutron scattering, EPR, and vibrational spectroscopy were highlighted in addition to the production and synthesis of labeled compounds. This volume includes invited speaker and poster presentations as well as a set of reports from discussion panels that focused on the needs of the scientific community and the potential roles of private industry, the National Stable Isotope Resource, and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in serving those needs. This is the leading abstract. Individual papers are processed separately for the database

  19. Dipolar Quinoidal Acene Analogues as Stable Isoelectronic Structures of Pentacene and Nonacene

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xueliang

    2015-10-08

    Quinoidal thia-acene analogues, as the respective isoelectronic structures of pentacene and nonacene, were synthesized and an unusual 1,2-sulfur migration was observed during the Friedel-Crafts alkylation reaction. The analogues display a closed-shell quinoidal structure in the ground state with a distinctive dipolar character. In contrast to their acene isoelectronic structures, both compounds are stable because of the existence of more aromatic sextet rings, a dipolar character, and kinetic blocking. They exhibit unique packing in single crystals resulting from balanced dipole-dipole and [C-H⋯π]/[C-H⋯S] interactions.

  20. The structure of turbulent jets, vortices and boundary layer: laboratory and field observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekula, E.; Redondo, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of this work is research, understand and describe key aspects of the turbulent jets and effects connected with them such as boundary layer interactions on the effect of a 2D geometry. Work is based principally on experiments but there are also some comparisons between experimental and field results. A series of experiments have been performed consisting in detailed turbulent measurements of the 3 velocity components to understand the processes of interaction that lead to mixing and mass transport between boundaries and free shear layers. The turbulent wall jet configuration occurs often in environmental and industrial processes, but here we apply the laboratory experiments as a tool to understand jet/boundary interactions in the environment. We compare the structure of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images of coastal jets and vortices and experimental jets (plumes) images searching for the relationship between these two kinds of jets at very different Reynolds numbers taking advantage of the self-similarity of the processes. In order to investigate the structure of ocean surface detected jets (SAR) and vortices near the coast, we compare wall and boundary effects on the structure of turbulent jets (3D and 2D) which are non-homogeneous, developing multifractal and spectral techniques useful for environmental monitoring in space.

  1. Segregation and structural transformations at Σ = 3 grain boundaries in NiAl: A Monte-Carlo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.A.; Mishin, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Grain boundary structure and grain boundary segregation in stoichiometric and Ni-rich compositions of NiAl are studied by molecular statics and grand-canonical Monte-Carlo simulations in conjunction with an embedded-atom potential. Significant Ni segregation is found at the Σ = 3(1 1 1) and Σ = 3(2 1 1) grain boundaries, with segregation isotherms showing a saturation effect. The amount of Ni segregation increases and the excess free energy of the grain boundaries decreases with increased Ni bulk concentration. In strongly Ni-rich bulk compositions, both boundaries undergo transformations to new structures capable of accommodating more excess Ni atoms than the initial structures. The structural transformation is clearly manifested by a non-monotonic behavior of the segregation isotherm. In the Σ = 3(2 1 1) grain boundary, the transformation is accompanied by a relative tangential translation of the grains

  2. Attractor of Beam Equation with Structural Damping under Nonlinear Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danxia Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously, considering the viscous effect of material, damping of medium, and rotational inertia, we study a kind of more general Kirchhoff-type extensible beam equation utt-uxxtt+uxxxx-σ(∫0l‍(ux2dxuxx-ϕ(∫0l‍(ux2dxuxxt=q(x, in  [0,L]×R+ with the structural damping and the rotational inertia term. Little attention is paid to the longtime behavior of the beam equation under nonlinear boundary conditions. In this paper, under nonlinear boundary conditions, we prove not only the existence and uniqueness of global solutions by prior estimates combined with some inequality skills, but also the existence of a global attractor by the existence of an absorbing set and asymptotic compactness of corresponding solution semigroup. In addition, the same results also can be proved under the other nonlinear boundary conditions.

  3. CATHEDRAL: a fast and effective algorithm to predict folds and domain boundaries from multidomain protein structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver C Redfern

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We present CATHEDRAL, an iterative protocol for determining the location of previously observed protein folds in novel multidomain protein structures. CATHEDRAL builds on the features of a fast secondary-structure-based method (using graph theory to locate known folds within a multidomain context and a residue-based, double-dynamic programming algorithm, which is used to align members of the target fold groups against the query protein structure to identify the closest relative and assign domain boundaries. To increase the fidelity of the assignments, a support vector machine is used to provide an optimal scoring scheme. Once a domain is verified, it is excised, and the search protocol is repeated in an iterative fashion until all recognisable domains have been identified. We have performed an initial benchmark of CATHEDRAL against other publicly available structure comparison methods using a consensus dataset of domains derived from the CATH and SCOP domain classifications. CATHEDRAL shows superior performance in fold recognition and alignment accuracy when compared with many equivalent methods. If a novel multidomain structure contains a known fold, CATHEDRAL will locate it in 90% of cases, with <1% false positives. For nearly 80% of assigned domains in a manually validated test set, the boundaries were correctly delineated within a tolerance of ten residues. For the remaining cases, previously classified domains were very remotely related to the query chain so that embellishments to the core of the fold caused significant differences in domain sizes and manual refinement of the boundaries was necessary. To put this performance in context, a well-established sequence method based on hidden Markov models was only able to detect 65% of domains, with 33% of the subsequent boundaries assigned within ten residues. Since, on average, 50% of newly determined protein structures contain more than one domain unit, and typically 90% or more of these

  4. Adaptive nonlinear polynomial neural networks for control of boundary layer/structural interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, B. Eugene, Jr.; Cellucci, Richard L.; Abbott, Dean W.; Barron, Roger L.; Jordan, Paul R., III; Poor, H. Vincent

    1993-01-01

    The acoustic pressures developed in a boundary layer can interact with an aircraft panel to induce significant vibration in the panel. Such vibration is undesirable due to the aerodynamic drag and structure-borne cabin noises that result. The overall objective of this work is to develop effective and practical feedback control strategies for actively reducing this flow-induced structural vibration. This report describes the results of initial evaluations using polynomial, neural network-based, feedback control to reduce flow induced vibration in aircraft panels due to turbulent boundary layer/structural interaction. Computer simulations are used to develop and analyze feedback control strategies to reduce vibration in a beam as a first step. The key differences between this work and that going on elsewhere are as follows: that turbulent and transitional boundary layers represent broadband excitation and thus present a more complex stochastic control scenario than that of narrow band (e.g., laminar boundary layer) excitation; and secondly, that the proposed controller structures are adaptive nonlinear infinite impulse response (IIR) polynomial neural network, as opposed to the traditional adaptive linear finite impulse response (FIR) filters used in most studies to date. The controllers implemented in this study achieved vibration attenuation of 27 to 60 dB depending on the type of boundary layer established by laminar, turbulent, and intermittent laminar-to-turbulent transitional flows. Application of multi-input, multi-output, adaptive, nonlinear feedback control of vibration in aircraft panels based on polynomial neural networks appears to be feasible today. Plans are outlined for Phase 2 of this study, which will include extending the theoretical investigation conducted in Phase 2 and verifying the results in a series of laboratory experiments involving both bum and plate models.

  5. CLUSTER encounters with the high altitude cusp: boundary structure and magnetic field depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from the four spacecraft Cluster mission during a high altitude cusp crossing on 13 February 2001 are presented. The spacecraft configuration has one leading spacecraft, with the three trailing spacecraft lying in a plane that corresponds roughly to the nominal magnetopause surface. The typical spacecraft separation is approximately 600km. The encounter occurs under conditions of strong and steady southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF. The cusp is identified as a seven-minute long depression in the magnetic field, associated with ion heating and a high abundance of He+. Cusp entry involves passage through a magnetopause boundary that has undergone very significant distortion from its nominal shape, is moving rapidly, and exhibits structure on scales of the order of the spacecraft separation or less. This boundary is associated with a rotation of the magnetic field, a normal field component, and a plasma flow into the cusp of approximately 35 km/s. However, it cannot be identified positively as a rotational discontinuity. Exit from the cusp into the lobe is through a boundary that is initially sharp, but then retreats tailward at a few km/s. As the leading spacecraft passes through this boundary, there is a plasma flow out of the cusp of approximately 30km/s, suggesting that this is not a tangential discontinuity. A few minutes after exit from the cusp, the three trailing the spacecraft see a single cusp-like signature in the magnetic field. There is an associated temperature increase at two of the three trailing spacecraft. Timing measurements indicate that this is due to cusp-like regions detaching from the rear of the cusp boundary, and moving tailward. The magnetic field in the cusp is highly disordered, with no obvious relation between the four spacecraft, indicative of structure on scales Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics

  6. Direct Determination of Atomic Structure and Magnetic Coupling of Magnetite Twin Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlin; Li, Hongping; Seki, Takehito; Yin, Deqiang; Sanchez-Santolino, Gabriel; Inoue, Kazutoshi; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2018-03-27

    Clarifying how the atomic structure of interfaces/boundaries in materials affects the magnetic coupling nature across them is of significant academic value and will facilitate the development of state-of-the-art magnetic devices. Here, by combining atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomistic spin-polarized first-principles calculations, and differential phase contrast imaging, we conduct a systematic investigation of the atomic and electronic structures of individual Fe 3 O 4 twin boundaries (TBs) and determine their concomitant magnetic couplings. We demonstrate that the magnetic coupling across the Fe 3 O 4 TBs can be either antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic, which directly depends on the TB atomic core structures and resultant electronic structures within a few atomic layers. Revealing the one-to-one correspondence between local atomic structures and magnetic properties of individual grain boundaries will shed light on in-depth understanding of many interesting magnetic behaviors of widely used polycrystalline magnetic materials, which will surely promote the development of advanced magnetic materials and devices.

  7. Hexamethylenetetramine-mediated growth of grain-boundary-passivation CH3NH3PbI3 for highly reproducible and stable perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Li, Xi-Tao; Zhao, Er-Fei; Lv, Xin-Ding; Meng, Fan-Li; Peng, Chao; Lai, Xue-Sen; Huang, Meilan; Cao, Guozhong; Tao, Xia; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2018-02-01

    Simultaneously achieving the long-term device stability and reproducibility has proven challenging in perovskite solar cells because solution-processing produced perovskite film with grain boundary is sensitive to moisture. Herein, we develop a hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA)-mediated one-step solution-processing deposition strategy that leads to the formation of high-purity and grain-boundary-passivation CH3NH3PbI3 film and thereby advances cell optoelectronic performance. Through morphological and structural characterizations and theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that HMTA fully occupies the moisture-exposed surface to build a bridge across grain boundary and coordinates with Pb ions to inhibit the formation of detrimental PbI2. Such HMTA-mediated grown CH3NH3PbI3 films achieves a decent augmentation of power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 12.70% to 17.87%. A full coverage of PbI2-free CH3NH3PbI3 surface on ZnO also boosts the device's stability and reproducibility.

  8. Stable algorithm for the computation of the electromagnetic field distribution of eigenmodes of periodic diffraction structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezus, Evgeni A; Doskolovich, Leonid L

    2012-11-01

    In the present work, a stable algorithm for the calculation of the electromagnetic field distributions of the eigenmodes of one-dimensional diffraction gratings is presented. The proposed approach is based on the method for the computation of the propagation constants of Bloch waves of such structures previously presented by Cao et al.[J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 19, 335 (2002)] and uses a modified S-matrix algorithm to ensure numerical stability.

  9. Boundary layer structure and decoupling from synoptic scale flow during NAMBLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Norton

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the meteorology and planetary boundary layer structure observed during the NAMBLEX field campaign to aid interpretation of the chemical and aerosol measurements. The campaign has been separated into five periods corresponding to the prevailing synoptic condition. Comparisons between meteorological measurements (UHF wind profiler, Doppler sodar, sonic aneometers mounted on a tower at varying heights and a standard anemometer and the ECMWF analysis at 10m and 1100 m identified days when the internal boundary layer was decoupled from the synoptic flow aloft. Generally the agreement was remarkably good apart from during period one and on a few days during period four when the diurnal swing in wind direction implies a sea/land breeze circulation near the surface. During these periods the origin of air sampled at Mace Head would not be accurately represented by back trajectories following the winds resolved in ECMWF analyses. The wind profiler observations give a detailed record of boundary layer structure including an indication of its depth, average wind speed and direction. Turbulence statistics have been used to assess the height to which the developing internal boundary layer, caused by the increased surface drag at the coast, reaches the sampling location under a wide range of marine conditions. Sampling conducted below 10 m will be impacted by emission sources at the shoreline in all wind directions and tidal conditions, whereas sampling above 15 m is unlikely to be affected in any of the wind directions and tidal heights sampled during the experiment.

  10. The origin and structure of streak-like instabilities in laminar boundary layer flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollner, Michael; Miller, Colin; Tang, Wei; Finney, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Streamwise streaks are consistently observed in wildland fires, at the base of pool fires, and in other heated flows within a boundary layer. This study examines both the origin of these structures and their role in influencing some of the macroscopic properties of the flow. Streaks were reproduced and characterized via experiments on stationary heated strips and liquid and gas-fueled burners in laminar boundary layer flows, providing a framework to develop theory based on both observed and measured physical phenomena. The incoming boundary layer was established as the controlling mechanism in forming streaks, which are generated by pre-existing coherent structures, while the amplification of streaks was determined to be compatible with quadratic growth of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities, providing credence to the idea that the downstream growth of streaks is strongly tied to buoyancy. These local instabilities were also found to affect macroscopic properties of the flow, including heat transfer to the surface, indicating that a two-dimensional assumption may fail to adequately describe heat and mass transfer during flame spread and other reacting boundary layer flows. This work was supported by NSF (CBET-1554026) and the USDA-FS (13-CS-11221637-124).

  11. Muon-Substituted Malonaldehyde: Transforming a Transition State into a Stable Structure by Isotope Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2016-02-12

    Isotope substitutions are usually conceived to play a marginal role on the structure and bonding pattern of molecules. However, a recent study [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 13706-13709; Angew. Chem. 2014, 126, 13925-13929] further demonstrates that upon replacing a proton with a positively charged muon, as the lightest radioisotope of hydrogen, radical changes in the nature of the structure and bonding of certain species may take place. The present report is a primary attempt to introduce another example of structural transformation on the basis of the malonaldehyde system. Accordingly, upon replacing the proton between the two oxygen atoms of malonaldehyde with the positively charged muon a serious structural transformation is observed. By using the ab initio nuclear-electronic orbital non-Born-Oppenheimer procedure, the nuclear configuration of the muon-substituted species is derived. The resulting nuclear configuration is much more similar to the transition state of the proton transfer in malonaldehyde rather than to the stable configuration of malonaldehyde. The comparison of the "atoms in molecules" (AIM) structure of the muon-substituted malonaldehyde and the AIM structure of the stable and the transition-state configurations of malonaldehyde also unequivocally demonstrates substantial similarities of the muon-substituted malonaldehyde to the transition state. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Structural Evolution of the R-T Phase Boundary in KNN-Based Ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Lv, Xiang

    2017-10-04

    Although a rhombohedral-tetragonal (R-T) phase boundary is known to substantially enhance the piezoelectric properties of potassium-sodium niobate ceramics, the structural evolution of the R-T phase boundary itself is still unclear. In this work, the structural evolution of R-T phase boundary from -150 °C to 200 °C is investigated in (0.99-x)K0.5Na0.5Nb1-ySbyO3-0.01CaSnO3-xBi0.5K0.5HfO3 (where x=0~0.05 with y=0.035, and y=0~0.07 with x=0.03) ceramics. Through temperature-dependent powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Raman spectra, the structural evolution was determined to be Rhombohedral (R, <-125 °C) → Rhombohedral+Orthorhombic (R+O, -125 °C to 0 °C) → Rhombohedral+Tetragonal (R+T, 0 °C to 150 °C) → dominating Tetragonal (T, 200 °C to Curie temperature (TC)) → Cubic (C, >TC). In addition, the enhanced electrical properties (e.g., a direct piezoelectric coefficient (d33) of ~450±5 pC/N, a conversion piezoelectric coefficient (d33*) of ~580±5 pm/V, an electromechanical coupling factor (kp) of ~0.50±0.02, and TC~250 °C), fatigue-free behavior, and good thermal stability were exhibited by the ceramics possessing the R-T phase boundary. This work improves understanding of the physical mechanism behind the R-T phase boundary in KNN-based ceramics and is an important step towards their adoption in practical applications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Biogeographical boundaries, functional group structure and diversity of Rocky Shore communities along the Argentinean coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie A Wieters

    Full Text Available We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10's km and local (10's m scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3-4 main 'groups' of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or "insurance", against

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Thin Ionomer Films: a Key to A Stable Fuel Cell Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perahia, Dvora

    2000-03-01

    The technology for solid polymeric electrolytic membranes for a fuel cells, calls for the thinnest film which is electrochemically stable. At present, none supported polymeric solid state fuel cell membranes, thinner than 50 microns, fail mechanically during fuel cell operation. When approaching the thin film limits, interfacial effects become significant to structure dynamics and consequently, the stability of the membranes. Our work focuses on understanding the interfacial effects on thin per-fluorinated ionomer films, including interfacial effects on the thin films themselves and nanotubes-thin film complexes, mimicking the catalyst-ionomer complexes. In particular we investigated the dynamics and structure in 500 angstrom and less, films made by several perfluorinated ionomers, cast on a solid support. Both the films and their parent solutions were investigated with the goal of resolving the factors that affect the stability in the ultra thin regime. AFM/STM and X-ray and neutron reflectivity were used to investigate the thin films and small angle neutron scattering was utilized to the study of the solutions. Films were both spin-coated and self assembles from solutions on a model oxidized single crystal silicon wafer, treated with HF. When coated from molecular solutions, the films tend to dewet on a time scale of minutes to hours. With increasing concentrations, above the critical micellar concentration of the ionomers in water/alcohol, stable films on the order of 200-500 angstroms were formed. While self-assembled films were found to be stable at temperatures close to Tg of the ionomer, spin-coated ones partially dewet. The surface structure obtained, exhibit periodicity on different length scales, depending on the concentration of the polymer in the solution from which the film was assembled. In the ultra dilute regime, micelles were detected at the solid interface. Films formed from dilute solutions exhibit fractal nature with a fractal dimension varying

  15. Silicon Σ13(5 0 1) grain boundary interface structure determined by bicrystal Bragg rod X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howes, P.B.; Rhead, S.; Roy, M.; Nicklin, C.L.; Rawle, J.L.; Norris, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic structure of the silicon Σ13(5 0 1) symmetric tilt grain boundary interface has been determined using Bragg rod X-ray scattering. In contrast to conventional structural studies of grain boundary structure using transmission electron microscopy, this approach allows the non-destructive measurement of macroscopic samples. The interface was found to have a single structure that is fully fourfold coordinated. X-ray diffraction data were measured at Beamline I07 at the Diamond Light Source

  16. Depth Dependant Variations in Benthic Foraminiferal Assemblages and Stable Isotopes Across the P-E Boundary, Walvis Ridge (ODP Leg 208)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarren, H. K.; Thomas, E.; Zachos, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) ( ˜55 Ma), was characterized by extreme global warming, a negative carbon isotope excursion, intensified carbonate dissolution, and a severe mass extinction of benthic foraminifera. The lack of continuous, undisturbed cores over a wide depth range has limited efforts to place constraints on key aspects of the PETM event, such as changes in ocean redox and carbon chemistry, and depth dependent patterns of the benthic extinction. The P-E boundary was recovered in multiple holes at 5 sites from Walvis Ridge in the southeastern Atlantic (ODP Leg 208). We document changes in benthic assemblages and stable isotopes across the PETM at ODP Leg 208, and compare these with data from other PE boundary sections, including DSDP Sites 525 and 527 previously drilled on Walvis Ridge. Faunal assemblage analyses show a distinct drop in diversity coincident with the base of the clay layer at all sites. There is a clear relationship between water depth and magnitude of the benthic foraminifera isotope excursion along the Walvis Ridge depth transect. Site 1263 (2717m) records excursion values of -2.2 δ 13C and -2.5 δ 18O; whereas Site 1262 (4759m) has values of -0.2 δ 13C and -0.8 δ 18O at the height of the excursion. This difference implies truncation of the record at deeper sites by carbonate dissolution, possibly as well as a depth dependent difference in water mass chemistry and temperature during the PETM. Several benthic foraminiferal species such as Nuttallides truempyi and various abyssaminid species that may indicate low nutrient availability increase in abundance at the onset of the isotope excursion, while the percentage of biserial and triserial species, used as high food/low oxygen indicators, decreases. There are thus distinct changes in ocean chemistry over the 2.3 km paleodepth range of the Walvis Ridge transect during the PETM event.

  17. A physical model of the turbulent boundary layer consonant with mean momentum balance structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, Joe; Fife, Paul; Wei, Tie; McMurtry, Pat

    2007-03-15

    Recent studies by the present authors have empirically and analytically explored the properties and scaling behaviours of the Reynolds averaged momentum equation as applied to wall-bounded flows. The results from these efforts have yielded new perspectives regarding mean flow structure and dynamics, and thus provide a context for describing flow physics. A physical model of the turbulent boundary layer is constructed such that it is consonant with the dynamical structure of the mean momentum balance, while embracing independent experimental results relating, for example, to the statistical properties of the vorticity field and the coherent motions known to exist. For comparison, the prevalent, well-established, physical model of the boundary layer is briefly reviewed. The differences and similarities between the present and the established models are clarified and their implications discussed.

  18. Simulation of crack propagation in anisotropic structures using the boundary element shape sensitivities and optimisation techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Tafreshi, Azam

    2011-01-01

    Using the boundary element shape sensitivities of multi-region domains coupled with an optimisation algorithm and an automatic mesh generator, the crack kink angle and propagation path in anisotropic elastic solids are predicted. The maximum strain energy release rate criterion, best suited for the composite structures, has been employed. In contrast to the J-integral method, which would require the computation of stresses and strains at a series of internal points, here by direct differentia...

  19. Clarifying boundaries of binge eating disorder and psychiatric comorbidity: A latent structure analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hilbert, Anja; Pike, Kathleen M.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Fairburn, Christopher G.; Dohm, Faith-Anne; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.

    2011-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) presents with substantial psychiatric comorbidity. This latent structure analysis sought to delineate boundaries of BED given its comorbidity with affective and anxiety disorders. A population-based sample of 151 women with BED, 102 women with affective or anxiety disorders, and 259 women without psychiatric disorders was assessed with clinical interviews and self-report questionnaires. Taxometric analyses were conducted using DSM-IV criteria of BED and of affectiv...

  20. Family boundary structures and child adjustment: the indirect role of emotional reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Kristin M; Bregman, Hallie R; Malik, Neena M

    2012-12-01

    Structural and system theories propose that disruptions in family subsystem functioning increase risk for youth maladjustment. While there is growing evidence to support this proposition, studies that specifically focus on the larger family system remain relatively rare. Furthermore, the pathways that connect problems in family subsystem alliances to externalizing or internalizing problems in youth are as yet largely unexplored. This study examined youth emotional reactivity (anger and sadness) to family conflict as an indirect pathway of the association between family boundary disturbances and youth adjustment in a sample of two-parent families (N = 270). Observational coding was used to group families into Balanced, Dyadic, or Disengaged family alliance structures and to assess youth emotional reactivity, and parent-report was used to assess youth psychopathology. Structural equation modeling indicated both anger and sadness served as indirect pathways through which family boundary disturbances are linked with youth adjustment. In addition, gender was tested as a moderator and important gender differences were found. Specifically, boys were directly impacted by dyadic disturbances while girls were directly impacted by family disengagement. The findings help target goals for intervention and indicate that worthwhile objectives may include realigning family subsystem boundaries, changing family communication patterns, and improving affective coping skills for youth. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. CLUSTER encounters with the high altitude cusp: boundary structure and magnetic field depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Cargill

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Data from the four spacecraft Cluster mission during a high altitude cusp crossing on 13 February 2001 are presented. The spacecraft configuration has one leading spacecraft, with the three trailing spacecraft lying in a plane that corresponds roughly to the nominal magnetopause surface. The typical spacecraft separation is approximately 600km. The encounter occurs under conditions of strong and steady southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF. The cusp is identified as a seven-minute long depression in the magnetic field, associated with ion heating and a high abundance of He+. Cusp entry involves passage through a magnetopause boundary that has undergone very significant distortion from its nominal shape, is moving rapidly, and exhibits structure on scales of the order of the spacecraft separation or less. This boundary is associated with a rotation of the magnetic field, a normal field component, and a plasma flow into the cusp of approximately 35 km/s. However, it cannot be identified positively as a rotational discontinuity. Exit from the cusp into the lobe is through a boundary that is initially sharp, but then retreats tailward at a few km/s. As the leading spacecraft passes through this boundary, there is a plasma flow out of the cusp of approximately 30km/s, suggesting that this is not a tangential discontinuity. A few minutes after exit from the cusp, the three trailing the spacecraft see a single cusp-like signature in the magnetic field. There is an associated temperature increase at two of the three trailing spacecraft. Timing measurements indicate that this is due to cusp-like regions detaching from the rear of the cusp boundary, and moving tailward. The magnetic field in the cusp is highly disordered, with no obvious relation between the four spacecraft, indicative of structure on scales <<600km. However, the plasma moments show only a gradual change over many minutes. A similar cusp crossing on 20 February 2001 also

  2. Relations and interactions between twinning and grain boundaries in hexagonal close-packed structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Christopher Duncan

    Improving the formability and crashworthiness of wrought magnesium alloys are the two biggest challenges in current magnesium technology. Magnesium is the best material candidate for enabling required improvements in fuel economy of combustion engines and increases in ranges of electric vehicles. In hexagonal closed-packed (HCP) structures, effects of grain size/morphology and crystallographic texture are particularly important. Prior research has established a general understanding of the dependences of strength and strain anisotropy on grain morphology and texture. Unfortunately, deformation, recrystallization, and grain growth strategies that control the microstructures and textures of cubic metals and alloys have not generally worked for HCPs. For example, in Magnesium, the deformation texture induced by primary forming operations (rolling, extrusion, etc.) is not randomized by recrystallization and may strengthen during grain growth. A strong texture reduces formability during secondary forming (stamping, bending, hemming etc.) Thus, the inability to randomize texture has impeded the implementation of magnesium alloys in engineering applications. When rare earth solutes are added to magnesium alloys, distinct new textures are derived. However, `rare earth texture' derivation remains insufficiently explained. Currently, it is hypothesized that unknown mechanisms of alloy processing are at work, arising from the effects of grain boundary intrinsic defect structures on microstructural evolution. This dissertation is a comprehensive attempt to identify formal methodologies of analyzing the behavior of grain boundaries in magnesium. We focus particularly on twin boundaries and asymmetric tilt grain boundaries using molecular dynamics. We begin by exploring twin nucleation in magnesium single crystals, elucidating effects of heterogeneities on twin nucleation and their relationships with concurrent slip. These efforts highlighted the necessity of imperfections to

  3. Stable Encoding of Task Structure Coexists With Flexible Coding of Task Events in Sensorimotor Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuo; Liu, Jun; Hu, Dan; DeCoteau, William E.; Eden, Uri T.; Smith, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    The sensorimotor striatum, as part of the brain's habit circuitry, has been suggested to store fixed action values as a result of stimulus-response learning and has been contrasted with a more flexible system that conditionally assigns values to behaviors. The stability of neural activity in the sensorimotor striatum is thought to underlie not only normal habits but also addiction and clinical syndromes characterized by behavioral fixity. By recording in the sensorimotor striatum of mice, we asked whether neuronal activity acquired during procedural learning would be stable even if the sensory stimuli triggering the habitual behavior were altered. Contrary to expectation, both fixed and flexible activity patterns appeared. One, representing the global structure of the acquired behavior, was stable across changes in task cuing. The second, a fine-grain representation of task events, adjusted rapidly. Such dual forms of representation may be critical to allow motor and cognitive flexibility despite habitual performance. PMID:19625536

  4. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  5. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The search for the most stable structures of silicon-carbon monolayer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Zhou, Rulong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-10-21

    The most stable structures of two-dimensional (2D) silicon-carbon monolayer compounds with different stoichiometric compositions (i.e., Si : C ratio = 2 : 3, 1 : 3 and 1 : 4) are predicted for the first time based on the particle-swarm optimization (PSO) technique combined with density functional theory optimization. Although the 2D Si-C monolayer compounds considered here are rich in carbon, many of the low-energy metastable and the lowest-energy silicon-carbon structures are not graphene (carbon monolayer) like. Phonon-spectrum calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were also performed to confirm the dynamical stability of the predicted most stable 2D silicon-carbon structures as well their thermal stability at elevated temperature. The computed electronic band structures show that all three predicted silicon-carbon compounds are semiconductors with direct or indirect bandgaps. Importantly, their bandgaps are predicted to be close to those of bulk silicon or bulk germanium. If confirmed in the laboratory, these 2D silicon-carbon compounds with different stoichiometric compositions may be exploited for future applications in nanoelectronic devices.

  7. Structural insights into methanol-stable variants of lipase T6 from Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Adi; Kanteev, Margarita; Kagan, Irit; Gihaz, Shalev; Shahar, Anat; Fishman, Ayelet

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic production of biodiesel by transesterification of triglycerides and alcohol, catalyzed by lipases, offers an environmentally friendly and efficient alternative to the chemically catalyzed process while using low-grade feedstocks. Methanol is utilized frequently as the alcohol in the reaction due to its reactivity and low cost. However, one of the major drawbacks of the enzymatic system is the presence of high methanol concentrations which leads to methanol-induced unfolding and inactivation of the biocatalyst. Therefore, a methanol-stable lipase is of great interest for the biodiesel industry. In this study, protein engineering was applied to substitute charged surface residues with hydrophobic ones to enhance the stability in methanol of a lipase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus T6. We identified a methanol-stable variant, R374W, and combined it with a variant found previously, H86Y/A269T. The triple mutant, H86Y/A269T/R374W, had a half-life value at 70 % methanol of 324 min which reflects an 87-fold enhanced stability compared to the wild type together with elevated thermostability in buffer and in 50 % methanol. This variant also exhibited an improved biodiesel yield from waste chicken oil compared to commercial Lipolase 100L® and Novozyme® CALB. Crystal structures of the wild type and the methanol-stable variants provided insights regarding structure-stability correlations. The most prominent features were the extensive formation of new hydrogen bonds between surface residues directly or mediated by structural water molecules and the stabilization of Zn and Ca binding sites. Mutation sites were also characterized by lower B-factor values calculated from the X-ray structures indicating improved rigidity.

  8. Buckling of Monopod Bucket Foundations – Influence of Boundary Conditions and Soil-structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren; Pinna, Rodney; Randolph, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Using large monopod bucket foundations as an alternative to monopiles for offshore wind turbines offers the potential for large cost savings compared to typical piled foundations. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out to assess the risk of structural buckling during installation of...... is investigated. The effects of including soil restraint and soil–structure interaction on the buckling analysis are also addressed.......Using large monopod bucket foundations as an alternative to monopiles for offshore wind turbines offers the potential for large cost savings compared to typical piled foundations. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out to assess the risk of structural buckling during installation...... of large-diameter bucket foundations. Since shell structures are generally sensitive to initially imperfect geometries, eigenmode-affine imperfections are introduced in a nonlinear finite-element analysis. The influence of modelling the real lid structure compared to classic boundary conditions...

  9. Boundary Inheritance Codec for high-accuracy structured light three-dimensional reconstruction with comparative performance evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Lam Quang; Lee, Sukhan

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents a new method of structured light-based 3D reconstruction, referred to here as Boundary Inheritance Codec, that provides high accuracy and low noise in projector-camera correspondence. The proposed method features (1) real-boundary recovery: the exact locations of region boundaries, defined by a coded pattern, are identified in terms of their real coordinates on the image plane. To this end, a radiance independent recovery of accurate boundaries and a disambiguation of true and false boundaries are presented. (2) Boundary inheritance: the consistency among the same boundaries of different layers in pattern hierarchy is exploited to further enhance the accuracy of region correspondence and boundary estimation. Extensive experimentations are carried out to verify the performance of the proposed Boundary Inheritance Codec, especially, in comparison with a number of well-known methods currently available, including Gray-code (GC) plus line/phase shift (LS/PS). The results indicate that the proposed method of recovering real boundaries with boundary inheritance is superior in accuracy and robustness to Gray-code inverse (GCI), GC+LS/PS. For instance, the error standard deviation and the percentile of outliers of the proposed method were 0.152 mm and 0.089%, respectively, while those of GCI were 0.312 mm and 3.937%, respectively, and those of GC+LS/PS were 0.280/0.321 mm and 0.159/7.074%, respectively.

  10. Simulation of the structure of vacancies in high angle grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bristowe, P.D.; Brokman, A.; Spaepen, F.; Balluffi, R.W.

    1980-06-01

    Since the modeling approach used in an earlier work is used at an atomic level, this is the most appropriate and reliable technique available. To complement this study, however, we have also employed a hard sphere dynamic model and a bubble raft model because in the past they have provided useful qualitative insight into the structure of a variety of defects in two-dimensional crystalline and amorphous systems. The computed results form part of a wider investigation of vacancies and interstitials in various grain boundaries in which the binding energies are analyzed and related to the defect structure and form of the interatomic potential

  11. Structurally stable gel bead containing entrapped enzyme and method for manufacture thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-08

    This research provides a structurally stable gel bead containing an entrapped enzyme and a method for its manufacture. The enzyme is covalently cross-linked to gelatin in the presence of glutaraldehyde prior to the formation of the gel bead, to prevent leakage of the enzyme. Propylene glycol alginate is then added to the mixture. Once the gel beads are formed, they are then soaked in glutaraldehyde, which imparts structural stability to the gel beads. This method can be used with many types of enzymes, such as proteases, carbohydrases, proteases, ligases, isomerases, oxidoreductases, and specialty enzymes. These and other enzymes can be immobilized in the gel beads and utilized in a number of enzymatic processes. Exogenously added ions are not required to maintain the structural stability of these gel beads. 7 figs.

  12. Influence of Fluid–Thermal–Structural Interaction on Boundary Layer Flow in Rectangular Supersonic Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyani Bhide

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to highlight the significance of Fluid–Thermal–Structural Interaction (FTSI as a diagnosis of existing designs, and as a means of preliminary investigation to ensure the feasibility of new designs before conducting experimental and field tests. The novelty of this work lies in the multi-physics simulations, which are, for the first time, performed on rectangular nozzles. An existing experimental supersonic rectangular converging/diverging nozzle geometry is considered for multi-physics 3D simulations. A design that has been improved by eliminating the sharp throat is further investigated to evaluate its structural integrity at design Nozzle Pressure Ratio (NPR 3.67 and off-design (NPR 4.5 conditions. Static structural analysis is performed by unidirectional coupling of pressure loads from steady 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD and thermal loads from steady thermal conduction simulations, such that the simulations represent the experimental set up. Structural deformation in the existing design is far less than the boundary layer thickness, because the impact of Shock wave Boundary Layer Interaction (SBLI is not as severe. FTSI demonstrates that the discharge coefficient of the improved design is 0.99, and its structural integrity remains intact at off-design conditions. This proves the feasibility of the improved design. Although FTSI influence is shown for a nozzle, the approach can be applied to any product design cycle, or as a prelude to building prototypes.

  13. LocARNA-P: Accurate boundary prediction and improved detection of structural RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Will, Sebastian; Joshi, Tejal; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2012-01-01

    Current genomic screens for noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) predict a large number of genomic regions containing potential structural ncRNAs. The analysis of these data requires highly accurate prediction of ncRNA boundaries and discrimination of promising candidate ncRNAs from weak predictions. Existing......ARNA/LocARNA-P, and the software package, including documentation and a pipeline for refining screens for structural ncRNA, at http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Supplements/LocARNA-P/.......Current genomic screens for noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) predict a large number of genomic regions containing potential structural ncRNAs. The analysis of these data requires highly accurate prediction of ncRNA boundaries and discrimination of promising candidate ncRNAs from weak predictions. Existing...... methods struggle with these goals because they rely on sequence-based multiple sequence alignments, which regularly misalign RNA structure and therefore do not support identification of structural similarities. To overcome this limitation, we compute columnwise and global reliabilities of alignments based...

  14. Rich stoichiometries of stable Ca-Bi system: Structure prediction and superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xu; Fan, Changzeng

    2015-03-01

    Using a variable-composition ab initio evolutionary algorithm implemented in the USPEX code, we have performed a systematic search for stable compounds in the Ca-Bi system at different pressures. In addition to the well-known tI12-Ca2Bi and oS12-CaBi2, a few more structures were found by our calculations, among which phase transitions were also predicted in Ca2Bi (tI12 --> oI12 --> hP6), Ca3Bi2 (hP5 --> mC20 --> aP5) and CaBi (tI2 --> tI8), as well as a new phase (Ca3Bi) with a cF4 structure. All the newly predicted structures can be both dynamically and thermodynamically stable with increasing pressure. The superconductive properties of cF4-CaBi3, tI2-CaBi and cF4-Ca3Bi were studied and the superconducting critical temperature Tc can be as high as 5.16, 2.27 and 5.25 K, respectively. Different superconductivity behaviors with pressure increasing have been observed by further investigations.

  15. Entropy stable high order discontinuous Galerkin methods for ideal compressible MHD on structured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Shu, Chi-Wang; Zhang, Mengping

    2018-02-01

    We present a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) scheme with suitable quadrature rules [15] for ideal compressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations on structural meshes. The semi-discrete scheme is analyzed to be entropy stable by using the symmetrizable version of the equations as introduced by Godunov [32], the entropy stable DG framework with suitable quadrature rules [15], the entropy conservative flux in [14] inside each cell and the entropy dissipative approximate Godunov type numerical flux at cell interfaces to make the scheme entropy stable. The main difficulty in the generalization of the results in [15] is the appearance of the non-conservative "source terms" added in the modified MHD model introduced by Godunov [32], which do not exist in the general hyperbolic system studied in [15]. Special care must be taken to discretize these "source terms" adequately so that the resulting DG scheme satisfies entropy stability. Total variation diminishing / bounded (TVD/TVB) limiters and bound-preserving limiters are applied to control spurious oscillations. We demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of this new scheme on standard MHD examples.

  16. DHMPIV and Tomo-PIV measurements of three-dimensional structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, O.; Atkinson, C.; Soria, J.

    In turbulent boundary layers, a large portion of total turbulence production happens in the near wall region, y/δ memory intensive reconstruction algorithm. It is based on a multiplicative line-of-sight (MLOS) estimation that determines possible particle locations in the volume, followed by simultaneous iterative correction. Application of MLOS-SART and MART to a turbulent boundary layer at Refθ=2200 using a 4 camera Tomo-PIV system with a volume of 1000×1000×160 voxels is discussed. In addition, near wall velocity measurement attempt made by digital holographic microscopic particle image velocimetry (DHMPIV). The technique provides a solution to overcome the poor axial accuracy and the low spatial resolution which are common problems in digital holography [5]. By reducing the depth of focus by at least one order of magnitude as well as increasing the lateral spatial resolution, DHMPIV provides the opportunity to resolve the small-scale structures existing in near wall layers.

  17. Use of systematics in the interpretation of nuclear structure far from the beta-stable region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The use of systematics in the interpretation of nuclear structure far from the beta-stable region is discussed. In particular, a set of rules for the use of systematics is presented together with some experimental criteria that need to be fulfilled for radioactive decay scheme studies in order that all states up to a given spin-parity and energy are located. Illustrative examples are taken from the region 180 < A < 210, with particular emphasis on the odd-mass Au and Hg nuclei. 6 figures

  18. Stable isotopes provide insight into population structure and segregation in eastern North Atlantic sperm whales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrell, Asunción; Velásquez Vacca, Adriana; Pinela, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    highly mobile, shows indication of structuring in the eastern North Atlantic, an ocean basin in which a single population is believed to occur. To do so, we examined stable isotope values in sequential growth layer groups of teeth from individuals sampled in Denmark and NW Spain. In each layer we...... measured oxygen-isotope ratios (delta O-18) in the inorganic component (hydroxyapatite), and nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios (delta N-15: delta C-13) in the organic component (primarily collagenous). We found significant differences between Denmark and NW Spain in delta N-15 and delta O-18 values...

  19. Structure-Guided Redesign Increases the Propensity of HIV Env To Generate Highly Stable Soluble Trimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenaga, Javier; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; de Val, Natalia; Sharma, Shailendra K; Carrette, Barbara; Ward, Andrew B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2015-12-30

    Due to high viral diversity, an effective HIV-1 vaccine will likely require Envs derived from multiple subtypes to generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Soluble Env mimics, like the native flexibly linked (NFL) and SOSIP trimers, derived from the subtype A BG505 Env, form homogeneous, stable native-like trimers. However, other Env sequences, such as JRFL and 16055 from subtypes B and C, do so to a lesser degree. The high-resolution BG505 SOSIP crystal structures permit the identification and redesign of Env elements involved in trimer stability. Here, we identified structure trimer-derived (TD) residues that increased the propensity of the subtype B JRFL and subtype C 16055 Env sequences to form well-ordered, homogenous, and highly stable soluble trimers. The generation of these spike mimics no longer required antibody-based selection, positive or negative. Using the redesigned subtype B and C trimer representatives as respective foundations, we further stabilized the NFL TD trimers by engineering an intraprotomer disulfide linkage in the prebridging sheet, I201C-A433C (CC), that locks the gp120 in the receptor nontriggered state. We demonstrated that this disulfide pair prevented CD4 induced-conformational rearrangements in NFL trimers derived from the prototypic subtype A, B, and C representatives. Coupling the TD-based design with the engineered disulfide linkage, CC, increased the propensity of Env to form soluble highly stable spike mimics that are resistant to CD4-induced changes. These advances will allow testing of the hypothesis that such stabilized immunogens will more efficiently elicit neutralizing antibodies in small-animal models and primates. HIV-1 displays unprecedented global diversity circulating in the human population. Since the envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the target of neutralizing antibodies, Env-based vaccine candidates that address such diversity are needed. Soluble well-ordered Env mimics, typified by NFL and SOSIP trimers

  20. Slip, twinning, and fracture at a grain boundary in the L1/sub 2/ ordered structure: A. sigma. = 9 tilt boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, M.H.; King, A.H.

    1988-09-01

    The role of interaction between slip dislocations and a ..sigma.. = 9 tilt boundary in localized microplastic deformation, cleavage, or intergranular fracture in the L1/sub 2/ ordered structure has been analyzed by using the anisotropic elasticity theory of dislocations and fracture. Screw superpartials cross slip easily at the boundary onto the (11-bar1) and the (001) planes at low and high temperatures, respectively. Transmission of primary slip dislocations onto the conjugate slip system occurs with a certain degree of difficulty, which is eased by localized disordering. When the transmission is impeded, cleavage fracture on the (1-bar11) plane is predicted to occur, not intergranular fracture, unless a symmetric double pileup occurs simultaneously. Absorption (or emission) of superpartials occurs only when the boundary region is disordered. Slip initiation from pre-existing sources near the boundary can occur under the local stress concentration. Implications of the present result on the inherent brittleness of grain boundaries in Ni/sub 3/ Al and its improvement by boron segregation are discussed.

  1. Wake structures of two side by side spheres in a tripped boundary layer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canli Eyüb

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two independent spheres were placed in a side by side arrangement and flow structure in the wake region of the spheres was investigated with a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV system when the spheres were in a boundary layer over a flat plate as a special case. Reynolds number was 5000 based on the sphere diameter which was 42.5 mm. Boundary layer was tripped 8mm away from the leading edge of the flat plate with a 5 mm trip wire. The thickness of the hydrodynamically developed boundary layer was determined as 63mm which was larger than the sphere diameter of D=42.5mm. Wake region of the spheres was examined from point of flow physics for the different sphere locations in the ranges of 0≤G/D ≤1.5 and 0≤S/D ≤1.5 where G and S were the distance between the spheres and the distance between the bottom point of the spheres and the flat plate surface, respectively. Depending on the different sphere locations, instantaneous and time averaged vorticity data, scalar values of time-averaged velocity components and their root mean square (rms values and time averaged vorticity data are presented in the study for the evaluation of wake region of the spheres. It is demonstrated that the gap between the two spheres and the interaction between the gap and the boundary layer greatly affects flow pattern, especially when spheres are located near to the flat plate surface, i.e. S/D=0.1 for 0≤G/D ≤1.5. Different distances between the spheres resulted in various flow patterns as the spheres were approached to the flat plate. The distance S/D=0.1 for all gap values has the strongest effect on the wake structures. Beyond G/D=1.0, the sphere wakes tend to be similar to single sphere case. The instantaneous vorticity fields of the side by side arrangements comprised wavy structures in higher level comparing to an individual sphere case. The gap flow intensifies the occurrence of small scale eddies in the wake region. The submersion rate of the spheres

  2. How diking affects the longer-term structure and evolution of divergent plate boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Trippanera, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Recurrent diking episodes along divergent plate boundaries, as at Dabbahu (2005, Afar) or at Bardarbunga (2014, Iceland) , highlight the possibility to have m-wide opening in a short time (days to weeks). This suggests a prominent role of magma enhancing transient plate separations. However, the role of diking on a longer term (> 102 years) and its influence on the structure and the evolution of a divergent plate boundary is still poorly investigated. Here we use field surveys along the oceanic Icelandic and continental Ethiopian plate boundaries, along five eruptive fissures and four rift segments. Field observations have also been integrated with analogue and numerical models of dike emplacement to better understand the effect of dike emplacement at depth and at the surface. Our results show that the dike-fed eruptive fissures are systematically associated with graben structures formed by inward dipping normal faults having throws up to 10 m and commonly propagating downward. Moreover, rift segments (i.e. mature rift zones), despite any asymmetry and repetition, are characterized by the same features as the eruptive fissures, the only difference lying in the larger size (higher fault throws, up to 40 m, and wider deformation zones). Analogue and numerical models of dike intrusion confirm that all the structural features observed along the rift segments may be dike-induced; these features include downward propagating normal faults bordering graben structures, contraction at the base of the hanging walls of the faults and upward propagating faults. Simple calculations based on the deeper structure of the eroded rift segments in eastern and western Iceland also suggest that all the fault slip in the active rift segments may result from diking. These results suggest that the overall deformation pattern of eruptive fissures and rift segments may be explained only by dike emplacement. In a magmatic rift, the regional tectonic stress may rarely be high enough to be

  3. Trophic structure in a seabird host-parasite food web: insights from stable isotope analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gómez-Díaz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ecological studies on food webs rarely include parasites, partly due to the complexity and dimensionality of host-parasite interaction networks. Multiple co-occurring parasites can show different feeding strategies and thus lead to complex and cryptic trophic relationships, which are often difficult to disentangle by traditional methods. We analyzed stable isotope ratios of C ((13C/(12C, delta(13C and N ((15N/(14N, delta(15N of host and ectoparasite tissues to investigate trophic structure in 4 co-occurring ectoparasites: three lice and one flea species, on two closely related and spatially segregated seabird hosts (Calonectris shearwaters. delta(13C isotopic signatures confirmed feathers as the main food resource for the three lice species and blood for the flea species. All ectoparasite species showed a significant enrichment in delta(15N relatively to the host tissue consumed (discrimination factors ranged from 2 to 5 per thousand depending on the species. Isotopic differences were consistent across multiple host-ectoparasite locations, despite of some geographic variability in baseline isotopic levels. Our findings illustrate the influence of both ectoparasite and host trophic ecology in the isotopic structuring of the Calonectris ectoparasite community. This study highlights the potential of stable isotope analyses in disentangling the nature and complexity of trophic relationships in symbiotic systems.

  4. Structural Health Monitoring of Steel Pipes under Different Boundary Conditions and Choice of Signal Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rais Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided wave technique is an efficient method for monitoring structural integrity by detecting and forecasting possible damages in distributed pipe networks. Efficient detection depends on appropriate selection of guided wave modes as well as signal processing techniques. Fourier analysis and wavelet analysis are two popular signal processing techniques that provide a flexible set of tools for solving various fundamental problems in science and engineering. In this paper, effective ways of using Fourier and Wavelet analyses on guided wave signals for detecting defects in steel pipes are discussed for different boundary conditions. This research investigates the effectiveness of Fourier transforms and Wavelet analysis in detecting defects in steel pipes. Cylindrical Guided waves are generated by piezo-electric transducers and propagated through the pipe wall boundaries in a pitch-catch system. Fourier transforms of received signals give information regarding the propagating guided wave modes which helps in detecting defects by selecting appropriate modes that are affected by the presence of defects. Continuous wavelet coefficients are found to be sensitive to defects. Several types of mother wavelet functions such as Daubechies, Symlet, and Meyer have been used for the continuous wavelet transform to investigate the most suitable wavelet function for defect detection. This research also investigates the effect of different boundary conditions on wavelet transforms for different mother wavelet functions.

  5. Ultra-Stable Zero-CTE HoneySiC and H2CMN Mirror Support Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA MSFC, GSFC and JPL are interested in Ultra-Stable Mirror Support Structures for Exoplanet Missions. Telescopes with Apertures of 4-meters or larger and using an...

  6. Ultra-Stable Zero-CTE HoneySiC and H2CMN Mirror Support Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA MSFC, GSFC and JPL are interested in Ultra-Stable Mirror Support Structures for Exoplanet Missions. Telescopes with Apertures of 4-meters or larger and using an...

  7. An optimal control method for fluid structure interaction systems via adjoint boundary pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirco, L.; Da Vià, R.; Manservisi, S.

    2017-11-01

    In recent year, in spite of the computational complexity, Fluid-structure interaction (FSI) problems have been widely studied due to their applicability in science and engineering. Fluid-structure interaction systems consist of one or more solid structures that deform by interacting with a surrounding fluid flow. FSI simulations evaluate the tensional state of the mechanical component and take into account the effects of the solid deformations on the motion of the interior fluids. The inverse FSI problem can be described as the achievement of a certain objective by changing some design parameters such as forces, boundary conditions and geometrical domain shapes. In this paper we would like to study the inverse FSI problem by using an optimal control approach. In particular we propose a pressure boundary optimal control method based on Lagrangian multipliers and adjoint variables. The objective is the minimization of a solid domain displacement matching functional obtained by finding the optimal pressure on the inlet boundary. The optimality system is derived from the first order necessary conditions by taking the Fréchet derivatives of the Lagrangian with respect to all the variables involved. The optimal solution is then obtained through a standard steepest descent algorithm applied to the optimality system. The approach presented in this work is general and could be used to assess other objective functionals and controls. In order to support the proposed approach we perform a few numerical tests where the fluid pressure on the domain inlet controls the displacement that occurs in a well defined region of the solid domain.

  8. Coherent structures in stratocumulus topped boundary layer: sensitivity to surface fluxes, radiative cooling and vertical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davini, Paolo; D'Andrea, Fabio; Park, Seung-bu; Gentine, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    The representation of stratocumulus clouds in global climate models is still a concern for the climate modelling community. This is due to the low efficacy of current parametrization to simulate the full set of phenomena that governs the stratocumulus topped boundary layer (STBL), but also by the inaccurate knowledge of the sensitivities of the STBL dynamics to external large scale forcing. Here we show that making of a series of high-resolution LES simulations, we are able to detect and track coherent structures such as updrafts, downdrafts and their returning shells (i.e. both ascending and subsiding), together with the entraining air from the inversion layer or the free troposphere in a non-precipitating marine nighttime STBL. This is done with a new classification method based on octant analysis - using vertical velocity and two passive scalars - which defines the structures also in cloud-free regions. We are thus able to quantify the geometrical and thermodynamic characteristics (e.g. areal fraction, temperature, liquid and total water mixing ratio, buoyancy, etc.) of those structures, highlighting the single contributions to the turbulent transport of mass, heat and moisture. It is thus possible to estimate the sensitivity of the turbulent fluxes to the intensity of the cloud-top radiative cooling, to the surface latent and sensible fluxes and to the strength of the vertical stability is explored. Indeed, this analysis lays the foundation for a new parametrization of stratocumulus-topped boundary layer for global climate models.

  9. Thinned crustal structure and tectonic boundary of the Nansha Block, southern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Miao; Wu, Shi-Guo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-12-01

    The southern South China Sea margin consists of the thinned crustal Nansha Block and a compressional collision zone. The Nansha Block's deep structure and tectonic evolution contains critical information about the South China Sea's rifting. Multiple geophysical data sets, including regional magnetic, gravity and reflection seismic data, reveal the deep structure and rifting processes. Curie point depth (CPD), estimated from magnetic anomalies using a windowed wavenumber-domain algorithm, enables us to image thermal structures. To derive a 3D Moho topography and crustal thickness model, we apply Oldenburg algorithm to the gravity anomaly, which was extracted from the observed free air gravity anomaly data after removing the gravity effect of density variations of sediments, and temperature and pressure variations of the lithospheric mantle. We found that the Moho depth (20 km) is shallower than the CPD (24 km) in the Northwest Borneo Trough, possibly caused by thinned crust, low heat flow and a low vertical geothermal gradient. The Nansha Block's northern boundary is a narrow continent-ocean transition zone constrained by magnetic anomalies, reflection seismic data, gravity anomalies and an interpretation of Moho depth (about 13 km). The block extends southward beneath a gravity-driven deformed sediment wedge caused by uplift on land after a collision, with a contribution from deep crustal flow. Its southwestern boundary is close to the Lupar Line defined by a significant negative reduction to the pole (RTP) of magnetic anomaly and short-length-scale variation in crustal thickness, increasing from 18 to 26 km.

  10. Structure of the marine boundary layer over north western Indian Ocean during 1983 summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Michael, G.S.; Rao, L.V.G.

    stream_size 21289 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Bound_Layer_Meteorol_52_177.pdf.txt stream_source_info Bound_Layer_Meteorol_52_177.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... parts of the Arabian Sea. Pant (1976) studied the structure of the Boundary-Layer Meteorology 52: 177-191, 1990. © 1990 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. , , ~, ~o_ -( ~NOfA i N=twat Stall t:l.O00.O00 / Y ~COTRA % 4...

  11. Self-similar spectral structures and edge-locking hierarchy in open-boundary spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haque, Masudul

    2010-01-01

    For an anisotropic Heisenberg (XXZ) spin chain, we show that an open boundary induces a series of approximately self-similar features at different energy scales, high up in the eigenvalue spectrum. We present a nonequilibrium phenomenon related to this fractal structure, involving states in which a connected block near the edge is polarized oppositely to the rest of the chain. We show that such oppositely polarized blocks can be 'locked' to the edge of the spin chain and that there is a hierarchy of edge-locking effects at various orders of the anisotropy. The phenomenon enables dramatic control of quantum-state transmission and magnetization control.

  12. Effects of air pollution on thermal structure and dispersion in an urban planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskanta, R.; Johnson, R. O.; Bergstrom, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The short-term effects of urbanization and air pollution on the transport processes in the urban planetary boundary layer (PBL) are studied. The investigation makes use of an unsteady two-dimensional transport model which has been developed by Viskanta et al., (1976). The model predicts pollutant concentrations and temperature in the PBL. The potential effects of urbanization and air pollution on the thermal structure in the urban PBL are considered, taking into account the results of numerical simulations modeling the St. Louis, Missouri metropolitan area.

  13. Morphology, molecular structure, and stable carbon isotopic composition of black carbon (BC) in urban topsoils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yutong; Xiao, Qing; Lu, Shenggao

    2018-02-01

    Urban soils contain significant amounts of black carbon (BC) from biomass and fossil fuel combustion and regard to be a pool of BC. BC in urban soils has multiple effects on environmental processes in urban system, such as global climate change, air quality, and public health. Urban topsoil samples (0-10 cm) were collected from Anshan, Liaoning Province, northeast China, which is one of the most important old steel industrial bases in China. The BC in urban topsoils was extracted using the density method. Their chemical composition, morphology, molecular structure, and stable carbon isotopic composition were examined using elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C). Elemental analysis shows that carbon content in the BC of studied soils ranged from 64.5 to 78.4%, with the average more than 70%. The O/C atomic ratio of BC is on average 0.18. The BC particle displays different morphology, including porous spherical, irregular porous fragmentary, and blocky shapes. The porous spherical BC particles has atomic molar O/C ratio determined by SEM-EDS ranging from 0.04 to 0.37. XRD indicates that BC exists in mainly combining with mineral phases hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ), kaolinite (Al 2 Si 2 O 5 (OH) 4 ), quartz (SiO 2 ), and calcite (CaCO 3 ). The FTIR spectra of BC particles show major bands at approximately 3400 cm -1 (O-H), 2920 cm -1 (C = H), 1600 cm -1 (C = C), 1230 cm -1 (C = O), and 1070 cm -1 (C = O). The stable carbon isotope (δ 13 C) of BC ranges from -24.48 to -23.18‰ with the average of -23.79 ± 0.39‰. The concentration of BC in the industrial area is significantly (p fuel combustion. Results indicated that a combination of atomic O/C ratio, porous structure, and stable carbon isotopic (δ 13 C) of BC could reflect effectively the origin of BC

  14. Grain boundary structures in La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D. J.; Lin, Y.-K.; Vlasko-Vlasov, V.; Welp, U.

    1999-01-01

    As with many other oxide-based compounds that exhibit electronic behavior, structural defects have a strong influence on the electronic properties of the CMR manganites. In this work, the authors have studied the effect of grain boundaries on the transport properties and on the local orientation of magnetization. Thin films of the perovskite-related La 2/3 Ca 1/3 MnO 3 compound were deposited onto bicrystal substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Transport measurements showed some enhancement of magnetoresistance across the grain boundary. The structure of the boundary was evaluated by electron microscopy. In contrast with the highly meandering boundaries typically observed in bicrystals of high temperature superconductors, the boundaries in these films are relatively straight and well defined. However, magneto-optical imaging showed that the local magnetization was oriented out of the plane at the grain boundary while it was oriented within the plane in the grains on either side. This coordinated reorientation of local magnetization near the grain boundary leads to enhanced magnetoresistance across the boundary in low fields

  15. Effect of surface texture and structure on the development of stable fluvial armors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Stephane; Friedrich, Heide

    2018-04-01

    Stable fluvial armors are found in river systems under conditions of partial sediment transport and limited sediment supply, a common occurrence in nature. Stable armoring is also readily recreated in experimental flumes. Initially, this bed stabilizing phenomenon was examined for different flow discharges and solely related to surface coarsening and bedload transport reduction. The models developed suggest a specific armor composition (i.e., texture) dependent on the parent bed material and formative discharge. Following developments in topographic remote sensing, recent research suggests that armor structure is an important control on bed stability and roughness. In this paper, replicated flume runs during which digital elevation models (DEMs) were collected from both exposed and flooded gravel beds are used to interpret armoring manifestations and to assess their replicability. A range of methodologies was used for the analysis, providing information on (i) surface grain size and orientation, (ii) bed-elevation distributions, (iii) the spatial coherence of the elevations at the grain-scale, (iv) surface slope and aspect, (v) grain imbrication and (vi) the spatial variability in DEM properties. The bed-surface topography was found to be more responsive than bed-material size to changes in flow strength. Our experimental results also provide convincing evidence that gravel-beds' response to water-work during parallel degradation is unique (i.e., replicable) given the formative parameters. Based on this finding, relationships between the armors' properties and formative parameters are proposed, and are supported by adding extensive data from previous research.

  16. Determination of Trophic Structure in Selected Freshwater Ecosystems by using Stable Isotope Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainordin, 'Amila Faqhira; Ab Hamid, Suhaila

    2017-07-01

    Stable isotope analysis has been used extensively to establish trophic relationships in many ecosystems. Present study utilised stable isotope signatures of carbon and nitrogen to identify trophic structure of aquatic food web in river and rice field ecosystems in Perak, northern peninsular Malaysia. The mean δ 13 C values of all producers ranged from -35.29 ± 0.21 to -26.00 ± 0.050‰. The greatest δ 15 N values noted was in zenarchopterid fish with 9.68 ± 0.020‰. The δ 15 N values of aquatic insects ranged between 2.59 ± 0.107 in Elmidae (Coleoptera) and 8.11 ± 0.022‰ in Nepidae (Hemiptera). Correspondingly, with all the δ 13 C and δ 15 N values recorded, it can be deduced that there are four trophic levels existed in the freshwater ecosystems which started with the producer (plants), followed by primary consumer (aquatic insects and non-predatory fish), secondary consumer (invertebrate predators) and lastly tertiary consumer (vertebrate predators).

  17. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  18. Structure and dynamics of turbulent boundary layer flow over healthy and algae-covered corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocking, Jonathan B.; Rippe, John P.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2016-09-01

    Fine-scale velocity measurements over healthy and algae-covered corals were collected in situ to characterize combined wave-current boundary layer flow and the effects of algal canopies on turbulence hydrodynamics. Data were collected using acoustic Doppler velocimetry and particle image velocimetry. Flow over healthy corals is well described by traditional wall-bounded shear layers, distinguished by a logarithmic velocity profile, a local balance of turbulence production and dissipation, and high levels of bed shear stress. Healthy corals exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity in boundary layer flow structure resulting from variations in large-scale coral topography. By contrast, the turbulence structure of algae-covered corals is best represented by a plane mixing layer, with a sharp inflection point in mean velocity at the canopy top, a large imbalance of turbulence production and dissipation, and strongly damped flow and shear stresses within the canopy. The presence of an algal canopy increases turbulent kinetic energy within the roughness sublayer by ~2.5 times compared to healthy corals while simultaneously reducing bed shear stress by nearly an order of magnitude. Reduced bed shear at the coral surface and within-canopy turbulent stresses imply reduced mass transfer of necessary metabolites (e.g., oxygen, nutrients), leading to negative impacts on coral health.

  19. Influence of Boundary Conditions on the Simulation of a Diamond-Type Lattice Structure: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Terriault

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergent additive manufacturing processes allow the use of metallic porous structures in various industrial applications. Because these structures comprise a large number of ordered unit cells, their design using conventional modeling approaches, such as finite elements, becomes a real challenge. A homogenization technique, in which the lattice structure is simulated as a fully dense volume having equivalent material properties, can then be employed. To determine these equivalent material properties, numerical simulations can be performed on a single unit cell of the lattice structure. However, a critical aspect to consider is the boundary conditions applied to the external faces of the unit cell. In the literature, different types of boundary conditions are used, but a comparative study is definitely lacking. In this publication, a diamond-type unit cell is studied in compression by applying different boundary conditions. If the porous structure’s boundaries are free to deform, then the periodic boundary condition is found to be the most representative, but constraint equations must be introduced in the model. If, instead, the porous structure is inserted in a rigid enclosure, it is then better to use frictionless boundary conditions. These preliminary results remain to be validated for other types of unit cells loaded beyond the yield limit of the material.

  20. Emergence of three-dimensional flow structures in shock boundary layer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gs, Sidharth; Dwivedi, Anubhav; Nichols, Joseph; Jovanovic, Mihailo; Candler, Graham

    2017-11-01

    Experiments and computations point to the emergence of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures in laminar shock boundary layer interactions in various configurations. We examine a Mach 5 flow over a double compression ramp and reveal the presence of a bifurcation from a steady 2D to a steady 3D flow state. This is done by varying the relative angle of the two ramps which increases the interaction strength. We employ global linear stability analysis and direct numerical simulation to characterize this bifurcation and demonstrate that global instability induces 3D flow structures. We use the direct and adjoint linear equations to further investigate the origin of this instability and examine the influence of uncertainty (including the effect of geometric irregularities in the ramp and free-stream disturbances in wind tunnel) on this bifurcation. This work was supported by Office of Naval Research through Grant Number N00014-15-1-2522.

  1. Simultaneous visualization of graphene grain boundaries and wrinkles with structural information by gold deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Uk; Park, Beomjin; Cho, Yeonchoo; Hyun, Seung; Kim, Jin Kon; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-08-26

    Although line defects such as grain boundaries (GBs) and wrinkles are unavoidable in graphene, difficulties in identification preclude studying their impact on electronic and mechanical properties. As previous methods focus on a single type of line defect, simultaneous measurements of both GBs and wrinkles with detailed structural information have not been reported. Here, we introduce effective visualization of both line defects by controlled gold deposition. Upon depositing gold on graphene, single lines and double lines of gold nanoparticles (NPs) are formed along GBs and wrinkles, respectively. Moreover, it is possible to analyze whether a GB is stitched or overlapped, whether a wrinkle is standing or folded, and the width of the standing collapsed wrinkle. Theoretical calculations show that the characteristic morphology of gold NPs is due to distinct binding energies of line defects, which are correlated to disrupting diffusion of NPs. Our approach could be further exploited to investigate the defect structures of other two-dimensional materials.

  2. Near-wall structure of a turbulent boundary layer with riblets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwing-So

    1989-11-01

    A detailed wind tunnel study has been carried out on the near-wall turbulence structure over smooth and riblet wall surfaces under zero pressure gradient. Time-average quantities as well as conditionally sampled profiles were obtained using hot-wire/film anemometry, along with a simultaneous flow visualization using the smoke-wire technique and a sheet of laser light. The experimental results indicated a significant change of the structure in the turbulent boundary layer near the riblet surface. The change was confined within a small volume of the flow close to the wall surface. A conceptual model for the sequence of the bursts was then proposed based on an extensive study of the flow visualization, and was supported by the results of conditionally sampled velocity fields. A possible mechanism of turbulent drag reduction by riblets is discussed.

  3. Magnetic field structure near the plasma boundary in helical systems and divertor tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Kazunobu; Itoh, Kimitaka

    1990-02-01

    Magnetic field structure of the scrape off layer (SOL) region in both helical systems and divertor tokamaks is studied numerically by using model fields. The connection length of the field line to the wall is calculated. In helical systems, the connection length, L, has a logarithmic dependence on the distance from the outermost magnetic surface or that from the residual magnetic islands. The effect of axisymmetric fields on the field structure is also determined. In divertor tokamaks, the connection length also has logarithmic properties near the separatrix. Even when the perturbations, which resonate to rational surfaces near the plasma boundary, are added, logarithmic properties still remain. We compare the connection length of torsatron/helical-heliotron systems with that of divertor tokamaks. It is found that the former is shorter than the latter by one order magnitude with similar aspect ratio. (author)

  4. Anti-phase boundaries and magnetic domain structures in Ni{sub 2}MnGa-type Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswaran, S.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Nuhfer, N.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); De Graef, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)]. E-mail: degraef@cmu.edu

    2007-05-15

    The microstructure and magnetic domain structure of austenitic Heusler Ni{sub 2}MnGa are investigated as a function of heat treatment to study the interplay of anti-phase boundaries and magnetic domain walls. Conventional electron microscopy observations on arc-melted polycrystalline samples show that anti-phase boundaries in this system are invisible for standard two-beam imaging conditions, due to the large extinction distance of the Heusler superlattice reflections. Lorentz Fresnel and Foucault observations on quenched samples reveal a wavy magnetic domain morphology, reminiscent of curved anti-phase boundaries. A close inspection of the domain images indicates that the anti-phase boundaries have a magnetization state different from that of the matrix. Fresnel image simulations for a simple magnetization model are in good agreement with the observations. Magnetic coercivity measurements show a decrease in coercivity with annealing, which correlates with the microscopy observations of reduced anti-phase boundary density for annealed samples.

  5. Stable anilinyl radicals coordinated to nickel: X-ray crystal structure and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochem, Amélie; Gellon, Gisèle; Leconte, Nicolas; Baptiste, Benoit; Philouze, Christian; Jarjayes, Olivier; Orio, Maylis; Thomas, Fabrice

    2013-12-02

    Two anilinosalen and a mixed phenol-anilinosalen ligands involving sterically hindered anilines moieties were synthesized. Their nickel(II) complexes 1, 2, and 3 were prepared and characterized. They could be readily one-electron oxidized (E(1/2)=-0.30, -0.26 and 0.10 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc, respectively) into anilinyl radicals species [1](+), [2](+), and [3](+), respectively. The radical complexes are extremely stable and were isolated as single crystals. X-ray crystallographic structures reveal that the changes in bond length resulting from oxidation do not exceed 0.02 Å within the ligand framework in the symmetrical [1](+) and [2](+). No quinoid bond pattern was present. In contrast, larger structural rearrangements were evidenced for the unsymmetrical [3](+), with shortening of one C(ortho)-C(meta) bond. Radical species [1](+) and [2](+) exhibit a strong absorption band at around 6000 cm(-1) (class III mixed valence compounds). This band is significantly less intense than [3](+), consistent with a rather localized anilinyl radical character, and thus a classification of this species as class II mixed-valence compound. Magnetic and electronic properties, as well as structural parameters, have been computed by DFT methods. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Highly active and stable oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na⁺ pump complex for structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Michio; Li, Xiaodan

    2015-11-01

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase primary Na(+) pump (Oad) produces energy for the surviving of some pathogenic bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Oad composes of three subunits: Oad-α, a biotinylated soluble subunit and catalyzes the decarboxylation of oxaloacetate; Oad-β, a transmembrane subunit and functions as a Na(+) pump; and Oad-γ, a single transmembrane α-helical anchor subunit and assembles Oad-α/β/γ complex. The molecular mechanism of Oad complex coupling the exothermic decarboxylation to generate the Na(+) electrochemical gradient remains unsolved. Our biophysical and biochemical studies suggested that the stoichiometry of Oad complex from Vibrio cholerae composed of α, β, γ in 4:2:2 stoichiometry not that of 4:4:4. The high-resolution structure determination of the Oad complex would reveal the energetic transformation mechanism from the catalytical soluble α subunit to membrane β subunit. Sufficient amount stable, conformational homogenous and active Oad complex with the right stoichiometry is the prerequisite for structural analysis. Here we report an easy and reproducible protocol to obtain high quantity and quality Oad complex protein for structural analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation and improvement of the WRF mesoscale model for the stable boundary layer and the representation of the low level jet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.A.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Correct forecasting of the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is of key importance for many applications like for wind energy, weather forecasting and climate, agriculture and air quality. Previous research has shown models are very sensitive to the selected boundary-layer

  8. Exploring the role of wave drag in the stable stratified oceanic and atmospheric bottom boundary layer in the cnrs-toulouse (cnrm-game) large stratified water flume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleczek, M.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Paci, A.; Calmer, R.; Belleudy, A.; Canonici, J.C.; Murguet, F.; Valette, V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a laboratory experiment in the CNRM-GAME (Toulouse) stratified water flume of a stably stratified boundary layer, in order to quantify the momentum transfer due to orographically induced gravity waves by gently undulating hills in a boundary layer flow. In a stratified fluid, a

  9. Modeling of the Gecko's skin microfibrillar structures using the Immersed Boundary method via DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Isnardo; Carrasquillo, Kenneth; Leonardi, Stefano; Araya, Guillermo; Hussain, Fazle; Castillo, Luciano

    2013-11-01

    There is a current interest in surfaces that mimic the skin of some species (i.e., sharks, dolphins and geckos) in order to achieve drag reduction. The surface considered is based on the microfribrillar structures of a gecko's skin (Aksak et al. 2008). The structures are modeled by means of the immersed boundary method proposed by Fadlun et al. (2000). Direct simulations are performed to predict flow dynamics with a Reynolds number of 7000 based on the height of the channel and centerline velocity. The ratio of the height of the structure with respect to the height of the channel is approximately 0.05. The main motivation is to study how the microfribillar structures affect the momentum transfer from the viscous layer to the outer layer. The surface shows a reduction of the area affected by the shear stress due to the cavities formed by the pattern. As expected, the cavities create a low velocity zone thus decreasing the Reynolds shear stresses. Lambda-2 and Q-criterion were implemented to identify the elongated streamwise vortices. The results show that when compared to a flat channel the microfribillar structures tend to preserve these streamwise vortices instead of bursting into the outer layer which is a source of drag increase.

  10. Aedes aegypti has spatially structured and seasonally stable populations in Yogyakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rašić, Gordana; Endersby-Harshman, Nancy; Tantowijoyo, Warsito; Goundar, Anjali; White, Vanessa; Yang, Qiong; Filipović, Igor; Johnson, Petrina; Hoffmann, Ary A; Arguni, Eggi

    2015-12-01

    Dengue fever, the most prevalent global arboviral disease, represents an important public health problem in Indonesia. Control of dengue relies on the control of its main vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, yet nothing is known about the population history and genetic structure of this insect in Indonesia. Our aim was to assess the spatio-temporal population genetic structure of Ae. aegypti in Yogyakarta, a densely populated region on Java with common dengue outbreaks. We used multiple marker systems (microsatellites, nuclear and mitochondrial genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms generated via Restriction-site Associated DNA sequencing) to analyze 979 Ae. aegypti individuals collected from the Yogyakarta city and the surrounding hamlets during the wet season in 2011 and the following dry season in 2012. We employed individual- and group-based approaches for inferring genetic structure. We found that Ae. aegypti in Yogyakarta has spatially structured and seasonally stable populations. The spatial structuring was significant for the nuclear and mitochondrial markers, while the temporal structuring was non-significant. Nuclear markers identified three main genetic clusters, showing that hamlets have greater genetic isolation from each other and from the inner city sites. However, one hamlet experienced unrestricted mosquito interbreeding with the inner city, forming a single genetic cluster. Genetic distance was poorly correlated with the spatial distance among mosquito samples, suggesting stronger influence of human-assisted gene flow than active mosquito movement on spatial genetic structure. A star-shaped mitochondrial haplotype network and a significant R(2) test statistic (R(2) = 0.0187, P = 0.001) support the hypothesis that Ae. aegypti in Yogyakarta originated from a small or homogeneous source and has undergone a relatively recent demographic expansion. We report the first insights into the spatio-temporal genetic structure and the underlying

  11. Evaluation Study of Boundary and Depth of the Soil Structure for Geotechnical Site Investigation using MASW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arisona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the correlation between the experimental Rayleigh dispersion curve and the Vp & Vs ground model versus depth. Six samples of stations A , B , C , D ,  E  and  F  were used in the experiment.The geophone spacing used was set 1 m and total length of each line was 23 m. The result shows positive significance (best fit of R2 that ranges from 0.80 to 0.90. The fk (frequency-wave number method dispersion curves analysis confirmed that the soil structure investigated is divided into three zones: (1 Unsaturated soil zone (clay soil, in which the layer is dominated by soil with typically alluvial clayey silt and sand. The Vp ranges from 240 m/s to 255 m/s at a depth of 2 to 8 m. (2 The intermediate zone (stiff soil, in which the layer is dominated by sand, silt, clayey sand, sandy clay and clay of low plasticity. This structure is interpreted as partially saturated soil zone, the soil is typically very dense. It contains soft rock typically fill with cobble, sand, slight gravel and highly weathered at depth of 18 to 30 m with Vp of  255 to 300 m/s. (3 Saturated soil zone at a depth of  8 to 18 m with Vp of 300 to 390 m/s. There is a very good agreement between wave-number (k and phase velocity (Vw  produced. Both the two parameters shows similar pattern in the topsoil and subsurface layer, which constitute boundary field of soil structure. Moreover, relationship between phase velocity versus wave-length shows best fit of model from inversion with measured value (observed in  implementation of the boundary and depth of each layer.

  12. A stochastic immersed boundary method for fluid-structure dynamics at microscopic length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzberger, Paul J.; Kramer, Peter R.; Peskin, Charles S.

    2007-01-01

    In modeling many biological systems, it is important to take into account flexible structures which interact with a fluid. At the length scale of cells and cell organelles, thermal fluctuations of the aqueous environment become significant. In this work, it is shown how the immersed boundary method of [C.S. Peskin, The immersed boundary method, Acta Num. 11 (2002) 1-39.] for modeling flexible structures immersed in a fluid can be extended to include thermal fluctuations. A stochastic numerical method is proposed which deals with stiffness in the system of equations by handling systematically the statistical contributions of the fastest dynamics of the fluid and immersed structures over long time steps. An important feature of the numerical method is that time steps can be taken in which the degrees of freedom of the fluid are completely underresolved, partially resolved, or fully resolved while retaining a good level of accuracy. Error estimates in each of these regimes are given for the method. A number of theoretical and numerical checks are furthermore performed to assess its physical fidelity. For a conservative force, the method is found to simulate particles with the correct Boltzmann equilibrium statistics. It is shown in three dimensions that the diffusion of immersed particles simulated with the method has the correct scaling in the physical parameters. The method is also shown to reproduce a well-known hydrodynamic effect of a Brownian particle in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits an algebraic (τ -3/2 ) decay for long times [B.J. Alder, T.E. Wainwright, Decay of the Velocity Autocorrelation Function, Phys. Rev. A 1(1) (1970) 18-21]. A few preliminary results are presented for more complex systems which demonstrate some potential application areas of the method. Specifically, we present simulations of osmotic effects of molecular dimers, worm-like chain polymer knots, and a basic model of a molecular motor immersed in fluid subject to a

  13. A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid Metal Structures and Electronic Equilibrium - 154041

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0027 A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal Structures and...to 16 Dec 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal...Air Force Research Laboratory for accurately predicting compositions of new amorphous alloys specifically based on aluminium with properties superior

  14. Velocity-vorticity correlation structures (VVCS) in spatially developing compressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi-Yao; She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Jun

    2017-11-01

    A velocity-vorticity correlation structure (VVCS) analysis is applied to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL) at Mach numbers, Ma = 2.25 , 4.50 and 6.0 . It is shown that the VVCS analysis captures the geometry variation in the streamwise direction during the transition and in the wall-normal direction in the fully developed regime. Specifically, before transition, the VVCS captures the instability wave number, while in the transition region it displays a distinct scaling change of the dimensions. The fully developed turbulence regime is characterized by a nearly constant spatial extension of the VVCS. Particularly, after turbulence is well developed, a multi-layer structure in the wall normal direction is observed in the maximum correlation coefficient and in the length scales of the VVCS, as expected from a recent symmetry-based theory, the ensemble structure dynamics (SED). The most interesting outcome is an observed linear dependence of the length scale of the VVCS from y+ 50 to 200, which is a direct support to Townsend's attached-eddy theory. In conclusion, the VVCS analysis quantifies the geometrical characteristics of the coherent structures in turbulent compressible shear flows throughout the whole domain. Supported by NSFC (11172006, 11221062, 11452002) and by MOST (China) 973 project (2009CB724100).

  15. Systematic technique for the study of interphase boundaries in structural phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatch, D.M.; Hu, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Saxena, A. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Barsch, G.R. [Materials Research Laboratory and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    1996-02-01

    We present a group theoretic technique based on the concepts of the direction of the order parameter (OP) and the OP isotropy group to study systematically the interphase boundaries in materials undergoing displacive transitions and construct all independent OP gradient invariants, determine primary and secondary OP profiles, domain wall energy, stability, and the phonon dispersion in the vicinity of the soft mode wave vector. We illustrate the technique for an improper ferroelastic {ital O}{sup 1}{sub {ital h}}-{ital D}{sub 4{ital h}}{sup 17} transition driven by a soft {ital M}{sub 5}{sup {minus}} mode observed in alloys with CsCl structure. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  16. The Perfectly Matched Layer absorbing boundary for fluid-structure interactions using the Immersed Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jubiao; Yu, Feimi; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy T

    2018-01-01

    In this work, a non-reflective boundary condition, the Perfectly Matched Layer (PML) technique, is adapted and implemented in a fluid-structure interaction numerical framework to demonstrate that proper boundary conditions are not only necessary to capture correct wave propagations in a flow field, but also its interacted solid behavior and responses. While most research on the topics of the non-reflective boundary conditions are focused on fluids, little effort has been done in a fluid-structure interaction setting. In this study, the effectiveness of the PML is closely examined in both pure fluid and fluid-structure interaction settings upon incorporating the PML algorithm in a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction framework, the Immersed Finite Element Method. The performance of the PML boundary condition is evaluated and compared to reference solutions with a variety of benchmark test cases including known and expected solutions of aeroacoustic wave propagation as well as vortex shedding and advection. The application of the PML in numerical simulations of fluid-structure interaction is then investigated to demonstrate the efficacy and necessity of such boundary treatment in order to capture the correct solid deformation and flow field without the requirement of a significantly large computational domain.

  17. Crustal structure of the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary across the Gloria Fault, North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luis; Hübscher, Christian; Terrinha, Pedro; Matias, Luis; Afilhado, Alexandra; Lüdmann, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    The oceanic crustal and uppermost lithospheric mantle structure across the Gloria Fault (GF) transcurrent plate boundary between Africa and Eurasia in the Northeast Atlantic is investigated based on seismic reflection, seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection data. This experiment used 18 ocean bottom stations along an N-S 150 km long traverse together with acquisition of a multichannel seismic reflection profile. Modeling of P and S seismic waves and gravimetric anomalies allowed estimation of P- and S-wave velocities, density, Poisson's ratio and discussion of a compositional model. A five-layer model is proposed in which layers 1-3 correspond to normal sediments through typical oceanic crust layers 2 and 3. Layer 5 yielded mantle velocities above 7.9 km s-1. Layer 4 with 4 km of thickness has Vp velocities between 7.1 and 7.4 km s-1 and is clearly separated from typical oceanic crust and mantle layers. Comparison with natural analogues and published lab measurements suggest that layer 4 can be a mix of lithologies that comply with the estimated P and S velocities and computed Poisson's ratio and densities, such as, olivine cumulates, peridotite, gabbro and hydrated mantle. We favour the tectonic process that produces secondary porosity from which results serpentinization due to sea water circulation in fractures. Structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the reflection profile shows that Neogene to recent tectonic deformation on this segment of the plate boundary concentrated on the southern side of the GF, that is, the Africa plate.

  18. Fracture mechanics analysis approach to assess structural integrity of the first confinement boundaries in ITER Generic Upper Port Plug structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guirao, Julio, E-mail: julio@natec-ingenieros.com [Numerical Analysis Technologies S.L. (NATEC), Gijon (Spain); Iglesias, Silvia; Vacas, Christian; Udintsev, Victor [CHD, Diagnostic Division, ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Pak, Sunil [Diagnostic and Control Team, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Maquet, Philippe [CHD, Diagnostic Division, ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Rodriguez, Eduardo; Roces, Jorge [Department of Construction and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Oviedo, Gijon (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • A parametric submodel of the spot under study is developed. • The associated macro has the capability to successively re-build the submodel implementing the crack with the geometry of the updated crack front as a function of the predicted increments of length in the apexes of the crack from the calculated stress intensity factor at the crack front. • The analysis incorporates the crack behavior model to predict the evolution of the postulated defect under the application of the different transients. • The analysis is based on the Elasto-Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) theory to account for the ductility of the materials (316LN type stainless steel). - Abstract: This paper demonstrates structural integrity of the first confinement boundary in Generic Upper Port Plug structures against cracking during service. This constitutes part of the justification to demonstrate that the non-aggression to the confinement barrier requirement may be compatible with the absent of a specific in-service inspections (ISI) program in the trapezoidal section. Since the component will be subjected to 100% volumetric inspections it can be assumed that no defects below the threshold of applied Nondestructive Evaluation techniques will be present before its commissioning. Cracks during service would be associated to defects under Code acceptance limit. This limit can be reasonably taken as 2 mm. Using elastic–plastic fracture mechanics an initial defect is postulated at the worst location in terms of probability and impact on the confinement boundary. Its evolution is simulated through finite element analysis and final dimension at the end of service is estimated. Applying the procedures in RCC-MR 2007 (App-16) the stability of the crack is assessed. As relative high safety margin was achieved, a complementary assessment postulating an initial defect of 6 mm was also conducted. New margin calculated provides a more robust design.

  19. Structure of stable binary neutron star merger remnants: Role of initial spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastaun, W.; Ciolfi, R.; Endrizzi, A.; Giacomazzo, B.

    2017-08-01

    We present general relativistic numerical simulations of binary neutron star (BNS) mergers with different initial spin configurations. We focus on models with stars of mass 1.4 M⊙ each, which employ the equation of state (EOS) by Shen, Horowitz, and Teige, and which result in stable NSs as merger remnants. For comparison, we consider two irrotational equal mass (M =1.35 M⊙) and unequal mass (M =1.29 , 1.42 M⊙ ) BNS models using the APR4 EOS, which result in a supramassive merger remnant. We present visualizations of the fluid flow and temperature distribution and find a strong impact of the spin on vortex structure and nonaxisymmetric deformation. We compute the radial mass distribution and the rotation profile in the equatorial plane using recently developed measures independent of spatial gauge, revealing slowly rotating cores that can be well approximated by the cores of spherical stars. We also study the influence of the spin on the inspiral phase and the gravitational wave (GW) signal. Using a newly developed analysis method, we further show that gravitational waveforms from BNS mergers can exhibit one or more phase jumps after merger, which occur together with minima of the strain amplitude. We provide a natural explanation in terms of the remnant's quadrupole moment, and show that cancellation effects due to phase jumps can have a strong impact on the GW power spectrum. Finally, we discuss the impact of the spin on the amount of ejected matter.

  20. Exploration of stable compounds, crystal structures, and superconductivity in the Be-H system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyin Yu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles variable-composition evolutionary methodology, we explored the high-pressure structures of beryllium hydrides between 0 and 400 GPa. We found that BeH2 remains the only stable compound in this pressure range. The pressure-induced transformations are predicted as I b a m → P 3 ̄ m 1 → R 3 ̄ m → C m c m → P 4 / n m m , which occur at 24, 139, 204 and 349 GPa, respectively. P 3 ̄ m 1 and R 3 ̄ m structures are layered polytypes based on close packings of H atoms with Be atoms filling all octahedral voids in alternating layers. Cmcm and P4/nmm contain two-dimensional triangular networks with each layer forming a kinked slab in the ab-plane. P 3 ̄ m 1 and R 3 ̄ m are semiconductors while Cmcm and P4/nmm are metallic. We have explored superconductivity of both metal phases, and found large electron-phonon coupling parameters of λ = 0.63 for Cmcm with a Tc of 32.1-44.1 K at 250 GPa and λ = 0.65 for P4/nmm with a Tc of 46.1-62.4 K at 400 GPa. The dependence of Tc on pressure indicates that Tc initially increases to a maximum of 45.1 K for Cmcm at 275 GPa and 97.0 K for P4/nmm at 365 GPa, and then decreases with increasing pressure for both phases.

  1. Structure of stable binary neutron star merger remnants: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastaun, W.; Ciolfi, R.; Giacomazzo, B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we study the merger of two neutron stars with a gravitational mass of 1.4 M⊙ each, employing the Shen-Horowitz-Teige equation of state. This equation of state is a corner case, allowing the formation of a stable neutron star with the given total baryonic mass of 3.03 M⊙. We investigate in unprecedented detail the structure of the remnant, in particular the mass distribution, the thermal structure, and the rotation profile. We also compute fluid trajectories both inside the remnant and those relevant for the formation of the disk. We find a peanut-shaped fluid flow inside the remnant following a strong m =2 perturbation. Moreover, the flow is locally compressive, causing the appearance of dynamic hot spots. Further, we introduce new diagnostic measures that are easy to implement in numeric simulations and that allow one to quantify mass and compactness of merger remnants in a well-defined way. As in previous studies of supra- and hypermassive stars, we find a remnant with a slowly rotating core and an outer envelope rotating at nearly Keplerian velocity. We compute a Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff star model which agrees well with that of the remnant in the core, while the latter possesses extensive outer layers rotating close to Kepler velocity. Finally, we extract the gravitational wave signal and discuss the detectability with modern observatories. This study has implications for the interpretation of gravitational wave detections from the postmerger phase and is relevant for short gamma-ray burst models.

  2. Analysis of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer during structured electrodeposition of copper in high magnetic gradient fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Jörg; Tschulik, Kristina; Büttner, Lars; Uhlemann, Margitta; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-03-19

    To experimentally reveal the correlation between electrodeposited structure and electrolyte convection induced inside the concentration boundary layer, a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field, generated by a magnetized Fe-wire, has been applied to an electrochemical system. The influence of Lorentz and magnetic field gradient force to the local transport phenomena of copper ions has been studied using a novel two-component laser Doppler velocity profile sensor. With this sensor, the electrolyte convection within 500 μm of a horizontally aligned cathode is presented. The electrode-normal two-component velocity profiles below the electrodeposited structure show that electrolyte convection is induced and directed toward the rim of the Fe-wire. The measured deposited structure directly correlates to the observed boundary layer flow. As the local concentration of Cu(2+) ions is enhanced due to the induced convection, maximum deposit thicknesses can be found at the rim of the Fe-wire. Furthermore, a complex boundary layer flow structure was determined, indicating that electrolyte convection of second order is induced. Moreover, the Lorentz force-driven convection rapidly vanishes, while the electrolyte convection induced by the magnetic field gradient force is preserved much longer. The progress for research is the first direct experimental proof of the electrolyte convection inside the concentration boundary layer that correlates to the deposited structure and reveals that the magnetic field gradient force is responsible for the observed structuring effect.

  3. Impacts of synoptic condition and planetary boundary layer structure on the trans-boundary aerosol transport from Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region to northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Zhao, Chun; Li, Xiaolan; Zhang, Gen; Wei, Wei; Ma, Yanjun

    2018-05-01

    The northeastern China frequently experiences severe aerosol pollution in winter under unfavorable meteorological conditions. How and to what extent the meteorological factors affect the air quality there are not yet clearly understood. Thus, this study investigated the impacts of synoptic patterns on the aerosol transport and planetary boundary layer (PBL) structure in Shenyang from 1 to 3 December 2016, using surface observations, sounding measurements, satellite data, and three-dimensional simulations. Results showed that the aerosol pollution occurred in Shenyang was not only related to the local emissions, but also contributed by trans-boundary transport of aerosols from the Beiijng-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region. In the presence of the westerly and southwesterly synoptic winds, the aerosols emitted from BTH could be brought to Shenyang. From December 2 to 3, the aerosols emitted from BTH accounted for ∼20% of near-surface PM2.5 in Shenyang. In addition, the large-scale synoptic forcings could affect the vertical mixing of pollutants through modulating the PBL structure in Shenyang. The westerly and southwesterly synoptic winds not only brought the aerosols but also the warmer air masses from the southwest regions to Shenyang. The strong warm advections above PBL could enhance the already existing thermal inversion layers capping over PBL in Shenyang, leading to the suppressions of PBL. Both the trans-boundary transport of aerosols and the suppressions of PBL caused by the large-scale synoptic forcings should be partly responsible for the poor air quality in Shenyang, in addition to the high pollutant emissions. The present study revealed the physical mechanisms underlying the aerosol pollution in Shenyang, which has important implications for better forecasting and controlling the aerosols pollution.

  4. Self-Sustained Localized Structures in a Boundary-Layer Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duguet, Y.; Schlatter, P.; Henningson, D.S.; Eckhardt, B.E.

    2012-01-01

    When a boundary layer starts to develop spatially over a flat plate, only disturbances of sufficiently large amplitude survive and trigger turbulence subcritically. Direct numerical simulation of the Blasius boundary-layer flow is carried out to track the dynamics in the region of phase space

  5. Cellular automata segmentation of the boundary between the compacta of vertebral bodies and surrounding structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Nimsky, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Due to the aging population, spinal diseases get more and more common nowadays; e.g., lifetime risk of osteoporotic fracture is 40% for white women and 13% for white men in the United States. Thus the numbers of surgical spinal procedures are also increasing with the aging population and precise diagnosis plays a vital role in reducing complication and recurrence of symptoms. Spinal imaging of vertebral column is a tedious process subjected to interpretation errors. In this contribution, we aim to reduce time and error for vertebral interpretation by applying and studying the GrowCut - algorithm for boundary segmentation between vertebral body compacta and surrounding structures. GrowCut is a competitive region growing algorithm using cellular automata. For our study, vertebral T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans were first manually outlined by neurosurgeons. Then, the vertebral bodies were segmented in the medical images by a GrowCut-trained physician using the semi-automated GrowCut-algorithm. Afterwards, results of both segmentation processes were compared using the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) and the Hausdorff Distance (HD) which yielded to a DSC of 82.99+/-5.03% and a HD of 18.91+/-7.2 voxel, respectively. In addition, the times have been measured during the manual and the GrowCut segmentations, showing that a GrowCutsegmentation - with an average time of less than six minutes (5.77+/-0.73) - is significantly shorter than a pure manual outlining.

  6. Phylogeography, geographic structure, genetic variation, and potential species boundaries in Philippine slender toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguila, Marites Bonachita; Siler, Cameron D; Diesmos, Arvin C; Nuñeza, Olga; Brown, Rafe M

    2011-11-01

    We investigated phylogeography of Philippine slender toads (genus Ansonia) and used a temporal framework for diversification, statistical tests of alternate topologies, and Bayesian approaches to test previous hypotheses concerning dispersal to, and colonization routes within, the southern Philippine island of Mindanao. Two species of Ansonia previously have been documented, with ranges separated by an east-west split corresponding to the approximate boundaries of Mindanao's paleoisland precursors. We present new mtDNA sequence data (1946 bp from genes encoding ND1, 16S rRNA and tRNALeu) for 105 Ansonia specimens sampled from 20 localities on Mindanao Island. Our data suggest that Philippine Ansonia is composed of at least eight, well-supported population lineages, structured into a minimum of four highly divergent mtDNA clades. One clade corresponds to Ansonia mcgregori, a range-restricted species apparently limited to the distal portion of the Zamboanga Peninsula of western Mindanao. Two morphologically indistinguishable, but genetically divergent, lineages possibly are undescribed cryptic species from western Mindanao. We recognize the five remaining lineages as Ansonia muelleri pending data from morphology or bioacoustics that might diagnose separate species among these lineages. Regardless of their species status, the five allopatric lineages of A. muelleri should be viewed as important genetic units for future genetic conservation planning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma structure near the low-latitude boundary layer: A rebuttal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sckopke, N.

    1991-01-01

    A recent reanalysis of a well-documented interval of plasma and magnetic field data led its authors to offer a new model for the structure of the outer magnetosphere and the magnetosheath on the northern dawnside. On November 6, 1977, ISEE 1 and 2 had observed a series of quasi-periodic pulses of magnetosheath-like plasma on northward oriented magnetic field lines which were originally interpreted as repeated encounters of a pulsed low-latitude boundary layer inside a smooth magnetopause followed by a single outward crossing of the magnetopause. D.G. Sibeck and coworkers reinterpreted the ISEE observations as being due to quasi-periodic magnetopause motion causing the satellites to repeatedly exit the magnetosphere and to observe draped northward magnetosheath magnetic field lines in the plasma depletion layer. Their model is based on qualitative arguments concerning the amount of field line draping in the magnetosheath as well as the behavior of energetic electrons near the magnetopause. It is shown in this paper that both arguments are not in accordance with the available evidence

  8. Hairpin packet structure of a turbulent boundary layer in inclined wall-normal/spanwise planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hwa; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2009-11-01

    Turbulent coherent structures associated with hairpin packet motions have been scrutinized using the instantaneous flow fields obtained from the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a turbulent boundary layer (TBL). The Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness was varied in the range Reθ=890˜2560. This study focused on the hairpin packet motions in inclined wall-normal/spanwise planes. The hairpin vortex signature associated with the hairpin leg components in the vertical inclined plane consists of a counter-rotating vortex pair, upward and downward motions and a stagnation point induced by the Q2 and Q4 events. These hairpin signatures were observed in the instantaneous flow field, in the two-point correlations and in the conditionally averaged flow fields, respectively. We considered three inclined planes (45^o, 90^o, and 135^o) to investigate the spatial characteristics of the hairpin packet motions in the log and wake regions. The statistical flow fields showed that significantly different flow patterns are induced by the intersections of the three inclined planes with the hairpin packet motions.

  9. THE EFFECT OF RECONNECTION ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE SUN’S OPEN–CLOSED FLUX BOUNDARY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontin, D. I.; Wyper, P. F.

    2015-01-01

    Global magnetic field extrapolations are now revealing the huge complexity of the Sun's corona, and in particular the structure of the boundary between open and closed magnetic flux. Moreover, recent developments indicate that magnetic reconnection in the corona likely occurs in highly fragmented current layers, and that this typically leads to a dramatic increase in the topological complexity beyond that of the equilibrium field. In this paper we use static models to investigate the consequences of reconnection at the open–closed flux boundary (“interchange reconnection”) in a fragmented current layer. We demonstrate that it leads to efficient mixing of magnetic flux (and therefore plasma) from open and closed field regions. This corresponds to an increase in the length and complexity of the open–closed boundary. Thus, whenever reconnection occurs at a null point or separator of this open–closed boundary, the associated separatrix arc of the so-called S-web in the high corona becomes not a single line but a band of finite thickness within which the open–closed boundary is highly structured. This has significant implications for the acceleration of the slow solar wind, for which the interaction of open and closed field is thought to be important, and may also explain the coronal origins of certain solar energetic particles. The topological structures examined contain magnetic null points, separatrices and separators, and include a model for a pseudo-streamer. The potential for understanding both the large scale morphology and fine structure observed in flare ribbons associated with coronal nulls is also discussed

  10. Structural vibration a uniform accurate solution for laminated beams, plates and shells with general boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Guoyong; Su, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This book develops a uniform accurate method which is capable of dealing with vibrations of laminated beams, plates and shells with arbitrary boundary conditions including classical boundaries, elastic supports and their combinations. It also provides numerous solutions for various configurations including various boundary conditions, laminated schemes, geometry and material parameters, which fill certain gaps in this area of reach and may serve as benchmark solutions for the readers. For each case, corresponding fundamental equations in the framework of classical and shear deformation theory are developed. Following the fundamental equations, numerous free vibration results are presented for various configurations including different boundary conditions, laminated sequences and geometry and material properties. The proposed method and corresponding formulations can be readily extended to static analysis.

  11. Census Bureau Regional Office Boundaries : New Structure as of January 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The Census Bureau has six regional offices to facilitate data collection, data dissemination and geographic operations within their boundary. The surveys these...

  12. A new 3D immersed boundary method for non-Newtonian fluid-structure-interaction with application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Luoding

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by fluid-structure-interaction (FSI) phenomena in life sciences (e.g., motions of sperm and cytoskeleton in complex fluids), we introduce a new immersed boundary method for FSI problems involving non-Newtonian fluids in three dimensions. The non-Newtonian fluids are modelled by the FENE-P model (including the Oldroyd-B model as an especial case) and numerically solved by a lattice Boltzmann scheme (the D3Q7 model). The fluid flow is modelled by the lattice Boltzmann equations and numerically solved by the D3Q19 model. The deformable structure and the fluid-structure-interaction are handled by the immersed boundary method. As an application, we study a FSI toy problem - interaction of an elastic plate (flapped at its leading edge and restricted nowhere else) with a non-Newtonian fluid in a 3D flow. Thanks to the support of NSF-DMS support under research Grant 1522554.

  13. Backscattered electron technique used for studying the grain boundary structure in polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Luiz Carlos Rolim; Thomson, Chris Boyd; Randle, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In this work the electron backscatter diffraction technique has been used to study the grain boundary character distribution in a austenitic steel and a ordered intermetallic Fe Al. For the first material it has been found that the hot rolling and solubilization process produce grain boundary character distribution with 1/4 of Σ = 3 interface. For the intermetallic Fe Al it was found that Σ = 1 and Σ = 5 interfaces to do not show tendency to show intergranular cracking. (author)

  14. Boundary integral equations of time harmonic wave scattering at complex structures

    OpenAIRE

    Claeys, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The first chapter will be a brief recapitulation of well known results concerning layer potentials in the context of wave propagation in harmonic regime. In Chapter 2, we give an overview of the Rumsey reaction principle that is the most popular boundary integral formulation for multi-subdomain scattering, and we present a new alternative integral formulation that seems to be the first boundary integral formulation of the second kind for multi-subdomain scattering in geometrical configuration...

  15. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, Ondřej; Ječná, K.; Leigh, M. B.; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomáš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 407, č. 12 (2009), s. 3611-3619 ISSN 0048-9697 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 2B08031 Program:2B Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA-based stable isotope probing * microbial diversity * bioremediation Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 2.905, year: 2009

  16. Boundary Conditions in 2D Numerical and 3D Exact Models for Cylindrical Bending Analysis of Functionally Graded Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Tornabene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cylindrical bending condition for structural models is very common in the literature because it allows an incisive and simple verification of the proposed plate and shell models. In the present paper, 2D numerical approaches (the Generalized Differential Quadrature (GDQ and the finite element (FE methods are compared with an exact 3D shell solution in the case of free vibrations of functionally graded material (FGM plates and shells. The first 18 vibration modes carried out through the 3D exact model are compared with the frequencies obtained via the 2D numerical models. All the 18 frequencies obtained via the 3D exact model are computed when the structures have simply supported boundary conditions for all the edges. If the same boundary conditions are used in the 2D numerical models, some modes are missed. Some of these missed modes can be obtained modifying the boundary conditions imposing free edges through the direction perpendicular to the direction of cylindrical bending. However, some modes cannot be calculated via the 2D numerical models even when the boundary conditions are modified because the cylindrical bending requirements cannot be imposed for numerical solutions in the curvilinear edges by definition. These features are investigated in the present paper for different geometries (plates, cylinders, and cylindrical shells, types of FGM law, lamination sequences, and thickness ratios.

  17. Structural and chemical analysis of grain boundaries and tellurium precipitates in commercial Cd1-xZnxTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffelfinger, J.R.; Medlin, D.L.; James, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    The structure and chemistry of grain boundaries in commercial Cd 1-x Zn x Te, prepared by the high-pressure Bridgman technique, have been analyzed using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, infrared-light microscopy and visible-light microscopy. These analyses show that the grain boundaries inside the Cd 1-x Zn x Te materials are decorated with tellurium precipitates. Analysis of a tellurium precipitate at a grain boundary by transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction found the precipitate to consist of a single, saucer-shaped grain. Electron diffraction from the precipitate was consistent with the trigonal phase of tellurium (space group P3 1 21), which is the equilibrium phase at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. This precipitate was found to be aligned with one of the adjacent CZT grains such that the tellurium (0 bar 111) planes were nearly parallel to the CZT (111) planes. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the Te/Cd 1-x Zn x Te interface showed no tertiary phase at the interface. The structures of the grain boundaries and the Te/Cd 1-x Zn x Te interface are discussed and related to their possible implications on Cd 1-x Zn x Te gamma-ray detector performance

  18. A chemically stable electrolyte with a novel sandwiched structure for proton-conducting solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Bi, Lei

    2013-11-01

    A chemically stable electrolyte structure was developed for proton-conducting SOFCs by using two layers of stable BaZr0.7Pr 0.1Y0.2O3 -δ to sandwich a highly-conductive but unstable BaCe0.8Y0.2O 3 -δ electrolyte layer. The sandwiched electrolyte structure showed good chemical stability in both CO2 and H2O atmosphere, indicating that the BZPY layers effectively protect the inner BCY electrolyte, while the BCY electrolyte alone decomposed completely under the same conditions. Fuel cell prototypes fabricated with the sandwiched electrolyte achieved a relatively high performance of 185 mW cm- 2 at 700 C, with a high electrolyte film conductivity of 4 × 10- 3 S cm- 1 at 600 C. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Closed Pore Structured NiCo2O4-Coated Nickel Foams for Stable and Effective Oil/Water Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Xi; Yan, Zhanheng; Tian, Dongliang; Ma, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaofang; Jiang, Lei

    2017-08-30

    To solve the serious problem caused by oily wastewater pollution, unique interface designs, for example, membranes with superwetting properties such as superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity and superhydrophilicity/underwater superoleophobicity, provide a good way to achieve oil/water separation. Here, inspired by the liquid storage property of the honeycomb structure, we propose a strategy to fabricate NiCo 2 O 4 -coated nickel foams for stable and efficient oil/water separation. NiCo 2 O 4 with a closed-pore structure was formed by assembling nanoflakes with a micro/nanoscale hierarchical structure. Compared with nickel foam coated by NiCo 2 O 4 with an open-pore structure (NiCo 2 O 4 nanowires), the enclosed nanostructure of NiCo 2 O 4 nanoflakes can firmly hold water for a more stable superhydrophilic/underwater superoleophobic interface. As a consequence, the NiCo 2 O 4 -nanoflake-coated nickel foam has a larger oil breakthrough pressure than the NiCo 2 O 4 -nanowire-coated nickel foam because of a slightly larger oil advancing angle and a lower underwater oil adhesion force, which makes it more stable and efficient for oil/water separation. Moreover, the NiCo 2 O 4 -coated nickel foams have excellent chemical and mechanical stability, and they are reusable for oil-water separation. This work will be beneficial for the design and development of stable underwater superoleophobic self-cleaning materials and related device applications, such as oil/water separation.

  20. Numerical study of the atomic and electronic structure of some silicon grain boundaries; Etude numerique de la structure atomique et electronique de quelques joints de grains du silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, M

    1996-07-01

    This work contributes to the theoretical study of extended defects in covalent materials. The study is especially devoted to the tilt grain boundaries in silicon as a model material. The theoretical model is based on the self-consistent tight-binding approximation and is applied within two numerical techniques: the fast 'order N' density-matrix method and the diagonalization technique which allows the sampling of the reciprocal space. Total energy parameters of the model have been fitted in order to reproduce the silicon band structure (with a correct gap value) and the transferability of crystalline and mechanical properties of this material. A new type of boundary conditions is proposed and tested. These conditions, named 'ante-periodic' or 'Moebius', allow only one grain boundary per box instead of two and decrease the CPU time by a factor of two. The model is then applied to the study of the {sigma}=25 [001] (710) grain boundary. The results show the possible presence in this boundary of low energy non-reconstructed atomic structures which are electrically active. This confirms what had been suggested by some experimental observations. The same study is also performed for the {sigma}=13 [001] (510) grain boundary. In order to compare the intrinsic electrical activity in the previous grain boundaries with the one induced by impurities, a total energy parametrization for the silicon-nickel bond is achieved and used in preliminary calculations. Finally the two variants of the {sigma}=11 [011] (2-33) interface are studied, especially their respective interfacial energies. The result disagrees with previous calculations using phenomenological potentials. (author)

  1. Reynolds stress structures in a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer at the verge of separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.; Sekimoto, A.; Jiménez, J.; Soria, J.

    2018-04-01

    Mean Reynolds stress profiles and instantaneous Reynolds stress structures are investigated in a self-similar adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer (APG-TBL) at the verge of separation using data from direct numerical simulations. The use of a self-similar APG-TBL provides a flow domain in which the flow gradually approaches a constant non-dimensional pressure gradient, resulting in a flow in which the relative contribution of each term in the governing equations is independent of streamwise position over a domain larger than two boundary layer thickness. This allows the flow structures to undergo a development that is less dependent on the upstream flow history when compared to more rapidly decelerated boundary layers. This APG-TBL maintains an almost constant shape factor of H = 2.3 to 2.35 over a momentum thickness based Reynolds number range of Re δ 2 = 8420 to 12400. In the APG-TBL the production of turbulent kinetic energy is still mostly due to the correlation of streamwise and wall-normal fluctuations, 〈uv〉, however the contribution form the other components of the Reynolds stress tensor are no longer negligible. Statistical properties associated with the scale and location of sweeps and ejections in this APG-TBL are compared with those of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer developing from the same inlet profile, resulting in momentum thickness based range of Re δ 2 = 3400 to 3770. In the APG-TBL the peak in both the mean Reynolds stress and the production of turbulent kinetic energy move from the near wall region out to a point consistent with the displacement thickness height. This is associated with a narrower distribution of the Reynolds stress and a 1.6 times higher relative number of wall-detached negative uv structures. These structures occupy 5 times less of the boundary layer volume and show a similar reduction in their streamwise extent with respect to the boundary layer thickness. A significantly lower percentage

  2. Experimental evidence of structural transition at the crystal-amorphous interphase boundary between Al and Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Z.Q.; He, L.L.; Zhao, S.J.; Ye, H.Q.

    2002-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations on the structure of the interphase boundary between crystalline Al and amorphous Al 2 O 3 coating reveal that an interfacial melting transition of Al occurs at 833 K, which is distinctly lower than the bulk melting point of Al. The crystalline lattice planes of Al near the interface bend or small segments of crystalline Al deviated from the matrix Al grains are formed. Stand-off dislocations formed at the interphase boundary are also observed. The amorphous Al 2 O 3 coating plays an important role in retaining the evidence for structural transition at high temperature to room temperature, which makes it possible to make experimental observations. (author)

  3. Finding the Stable Structures of WxN1-x with an ab-initio High-Throughput Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-13

    properties must be energetically stable against decomposition into other compounds. This stability can only be found after the determination of the...polarized. However, in every structure the self-consistent magnetic moment was negligible, and the final calculations were all done assuming no moment. The...of NaCl) we looked at all 255 combinations. We found 34 unique structures, including NbO itself, CsCl, S3U4, ReO3,[59] cubic perovskite (with formula

  4. Changing the boundaries of the firm - Adopting and designing efficient management control structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosselman, E.G.J.; van der Meer-Kooistra, J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose - To develop a model in which alternative patterns of management control are confronted with situational and institutional features in the context of transactional relationships. The model could be of use to managers in making rational decisions regarding the boundaries of the organization.

  5. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boriani, Elena; Esposito, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment...

  6. Efficiently solving morphodynamics in complex geometies using a mass conservative immersed boundary method on a structured grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canestrelli, A.; Jagers, B.; Spruyt, A.; Borsboom, M.; Slingerland, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we propose an efficient approach to solve morphodynamics in complex river geometries, with a particular emphasis for river deltas. We use a novel immersed boundary method of solution in Delft3D, an open source hydrodynamic model that employs a Cartesian structured grid. Our approach employs a hybrid cut-cell/ghost-cell method: ghost cells are used for the flow momentum equations in order to prescribe the correct boundary condition at the immersed boundary, while cut-cells are used in the continuity equation in order to conserve mass. The resulting scheme is robust, does not suffer any time step limitation for small cut cells and conserves fluid mass up to machine precision. The model has been coupled with the existing Delft3D morphodynamic module, adapted for the presence of immersed irregular boundaries cutting through the regular grid. A cut-cell technique is proposed for both the bed-load and suspended load components. The bed-load component, without any modification, turns out to trigger bed instability in small cut-cells, especially for high values of the morphodynamic factor. We therefore propose a simple "virtual merging technique" that guarantees stability even for very high values of the morphodynamic factor. A bank erosion module provides for lateral displacement of the immersed boundaries in proportion to excess bank shear stress. The model has been tested against different analytical and reference solutions. Moreover, morphodynamic simulations of river deltas show that deltas with various channel networks arise as a consequence of jet momentum and stability, and sediment size and geotechnical properties.

  7. Stable feature selection for clinical prediction: exploiting ICD tree structure using Tree-Lasso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamkar, Iman; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Phung, Dinh; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2015-02-01

    Modern healthcare is getting reshaped by growing Electronic Medical Records (EMR). Recently, these records have been shown of great value towards building clinical prediction models. In EMR data, patients' diseases and hospital interventions are captured through a set of diagnoses and procedures codes. These codes are usually represented in a tree form (e.g. ICD-10 tree) and the codes within a tree branch may be highly correlated. These codes can be used as features to build a prediction model and an appropriate feature selection can inform a clinician about important risk factors for a disease. Traditional feature selection methods (e.g. Information Gain, T-test, etc.) consider each variable independently and usually end up having a long feature list. Recently, Lasso and related l1-penalty based feature selection methods have become popular due to their joint feature selection property. However, Lasso is known to have problems of selecting one feature of many correlated features randomly. This hinders the clinicians to arrive at a stable feature set, which is crucial for clinical decision making process. In this paper, we solve this problem by using a recently proposed Tree-Lasso model. Since, the stability behavior of Tree-Lasso is not well understood, we study the stability behavior of Tree-Lasso and compare it with other feature selection methods. Using a synthetic and two real-world datasets (Cancer and Acute Myocardial Infarction), we show that Tree-Lasso based feature selection is significantly more stable than Lasso and comparable to other methods e.g. Information Gain, ReliefF and T-test. We further show that, using different types of classifiers such as logistic regression, naive Bayes, support vector machines, decision trees and Random Forest, the classification performance of Tree-Lasso is comparable to Lasso and better than other methods. Our result has implications in identifying stable risk factors for many healthcare problems and therefore can

  8. Radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman Area, Idaho, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M.; Campbell, L.J.

    1996-09-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, sampled 17 sites as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radionuclides, stable isotopes, inorganic constituents, and organic compounds. The samples were collected from 11 irrigation wells, 2 domestic wells, 2 stock wells, 1 spring, and 1 public-supply well. Two quality assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. None of the radionuclide, inorganic constituents, or organic compound concentrations exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide and inorganic constituent concentrations were greater than their respective reporting levels. All samples analyzed for dissolved organic carbon had concentrations that were greater than the minimum reporting level

  9. Sonochemical synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of air-stable Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wei; He Quanguo; Chen Hong; Tang Jianxin; Nie Libo

    2007-01-01

    Air-stable nanoparticles of Fe 3 O 4 /Au were prepared via sonolysis of a solution mixture of hydrogen tetrachloroaureate(III) trihydrate (HAuCl 4 ) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES)-coated Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles with further drop-addition of sodium citrate. The Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Nanoparticles of Fe 3 O 4 /Au obtained under appropriate conditions possess a very high saturation magnetization of about 63 emu g -1 and their average diameter is about 30 nm

  10. On the Global Structure of the Set of Positive Solutions of Some Semilinear Elliptic Boundary Value Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, J. M.; Lopezgomez, J.; Delis, J. C.

    1995-11-01

    In this work we analyze the structure of the set of positive solutions of a class of semilinear boundary value problems. It is shown that the global continuum of positive solutions emanating from the trivial equilibrium at the principal eigenvalue of the linearization is constituted by a regular curve if the slope of the kinetic at the trivial solution is large enough and Ω is convex. The same result holds if the support region of the species is a bounded simply connected domain of R2 close to a convex domain, in a sense to be precised later. To prove these results we have to find out the exact width of the boundary layer of a singular perturbation problem. The results about the singular perturbation problem are new and of great interest by themselves.

  11. The Azimuthally Averaged Boundary Layer Structure of a Numerically Simulated Major Hurricane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-14

    to the turbulent momentum flux divergence associated with the near-surface vertical shear and the surface drag stress at high Reynolds number. In com... Williams et al., 2013; Williams , 2015; Slocum et al., 2014]. Other work argues that a quasi-linear generaliza- tion of Ekman theory suffices for obtaining...comprises a balance between three horizontal forces: Coriolis, pressure gradient, and friction. The boundary layer flow is characterized by a large Reynolds

  12. Imaging the Structure of Grains, Grain Boundaries, and Stacking Sequences in Single and Multi-Layer Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, David

    2012-02-01

    Graphene can be produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrates on up to meter scales [1, 2], making their polycrystallinity [3,4] almost unavoidable. By combining aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and dark-field transmission electron microscopy, we image graphene grains and grain boundaries across six orders of magnitude. Atomic-resolution images of graphene grain boundaries reveal that different grains can stitch together via pentagon-heptagon pairs. We use diffraction-filtered electron imaging to map the shape and orientation of several hundred grains and boundaries over fields of view of a hundred microns. Single, double and multilayer graphene can be differentiated, and the stacking sequence and relative abundance of sequences can be directly imaged. These images reveal an intricate patchwork of grains with structural details depending strongly on growth conditions. The imaging techniques enabled studies of the structure, properties, and control of graphene grains and grain boundaries [5]. [4pt] [1] X. Li et al., Science 324, 1312 (2009).[0pt] [2] S. Bae et al., Nature Nanotechnol. 5, 574 (2010).[0pt] [3] J. M. Wofford, et al., Nano Lett., (2010).[0pt] [4] P. Y. Huang, et al., Nature 469, 389--392 (2011); arXiv:1009.4714, (2010)[0pt] [5] In collaboration with Pinshane Y. Huang, C. S. Ruiz-Vargas, A. M. van der Zande, A. W. Tsen, L. Brown, R. Hovden, F. Ghahari, W. S. Whitney, M.P. Levendorf, J. W. Kevek, S. Garg, J. S. Alden, C. J. Hustedt, Y. Zhu, N. Petrone, J. Hone, J. Park, P. L. McEuen

  13. Benthic Food Web Structure across the Canadian Arctic Ocean: Insights from stable isotopes and the IP25 biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friscourt, N.; Archambault, P.; Masse, G.; Nozais, C.

    2016-02-01

    In recent decades, the Arctic Ocean has undergone unprecedented changes, such as an increase in the surface temperature and a reduction of sea ice cover. These changes may cause variations in the intensity and spatial distribution of primary production and the nature of pelagic-benthic coupling. This could affect the amount and quality of organic matter that settles onto the seafloor, and the benthic communities that feed upon it. The objectives of this study were i) to describe the trophic structure and resilience of regional benthic food webs using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses and ii) to evaluate the significance of ice algae in the diet of benthic communities using the sea ice proxy IP25. The study area extends from the North Water Polynya to the Chukchi Sea across five geographic regions (North Water Polynya, Canadian Archipelago, Amundsen Gulf, Beaufort Sea and Chukchi Sea) based on environmental factors. To reach these objectives, we collected particulate organic matter (POM), sediments and zoobenthic samples from July to October 2014 aboard the CCGS Amundsen. Stable isotope and IP25 data, the trophic structure within regions and comparison between regions will be presented. Potential impacts of climate change and human activities on benthic ecosystems in the Arctic are still difficult to assess because of the lack of baseline data. The baseline data once provided will enable us to make further predictions on how these changes may affect benthic food web structure.

  14. Local-scale structures across the morphotropic phase boundary in PbZr1−xTixO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead zirconate titanate (PZT is one of the most widely studied piezoelectric materials, mainly because of its `mysterious' relationship between the so-called morphotropic phase boundary (MPB and its strong piezoelectric coupling factor. Using results from a pair distribution function analysis, this paper examines how the complex local structure in PZT affects the long-range average structure across the MPB. A monoclinic MC type structure is discovered in PZT. A first-order transformation between the monoclinic MA and MC components in both the average and local structures explains the sudden change in piezoelectric effect around these compositions. The role of polarization rotation in the enhancement of the piezoelectric properties is discussed with respect to the composition of PZT. The structure–property relationship that is revealed by this study explains the unique properties of PZT, and may be applicable in the design of new MPB-type functional materials.

  15. Soil structure stability and distribution of carbon in water-stable aggregates in different tilled and fertilized Haplic Luvisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Šimanský

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of tillage and fertilization on soil structure stability and the distribution of carbon in water-stable aggregates of loamy Haplic Luvisol were studied. Soil samples from the locality of Dolná Malanta (experimental station of SUA Nitra were collected (in 2007–2009 from a depth of 0–0.2 m in two tillage variants: (1. conventional tillage, 2. minimal tillage and three treatments of fertilization: (1. without fertilization, 2. crop residues and NPK fertilizers, 3. NPK fertilizers. The minimal tillage system has a positive effect on both the aggregation processes and sequestration of carbon in size fractions of water-stable aggregates, as well as ploughing of crop residues together with NPK fertilizers. On the other hand, application of only NPK fertilizers had a negative effect on SOM content. Under the minimal tillage system and in treatment with crop residues together with NPK fertilizers, what has been observed is a statistically significant increase in the total organic carbon contents by increasing size fractions of water-stable aggregates. Organic carbon did not influence the aggregation processes with dependence on tillage systems. Under conventional tillage as well as in treatment with ploughing crop residues with NPK fertilizers, a very important effect on aggregation had bivalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+.

  16. Variations in stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in atmospheric water vapor in the marine boundary layer across a wide latitude range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfeng; Xiao, Cunde; Ding, Minghu; Ren, Jiawen

    2014-11-01

    The newly-developed cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy analyzer with special calibration protocols has enabled the direct measurement of atmospheric vapor isotopes at high spatial and temporal resolution. This paper presents real-time hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope data for atmospheric water vapor above the sea surface, over a wide range of latitudes spanning from 38°N to 69°S. Our results showed relatively higher values of δ(18)O and δ(2)H in the subtropical regions than those in the tropical and high latitude regions, and also a notable decreasing trend in the Antarctic coastal region. By combining the hydrogen and oxygen isotope data with meteoric water line and backward trajectory model analysis, we explored the kinetic fractionation caused by subsiding air masses and related saturated vapor pressure in the subtropics, and the evaporation-driven kinetic fractionation in the Antarctic region. Simultaneous observations of meteorological and marine variables were used to interpret the isotopic composition characteristics and influential factors, indicating that d-excess is negatively correlated with humidity across a wide range of latitudes and weather conditions worldwide. Coincident with previous studies, d-excess is also positively correlated with sea surface temperature and air temperature (Tair), with greater sensitivity to Tair. Thus, atmospheric vapor isotopes measured with high accuracy and good spatial-temporal resolution could act as informative tracers for exploring the water cycle at different regional scales. Such monitoring efforts should be undertaken over a longer time period and in different regions of the world. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Thermodynamic structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL over the Indian monsoon region during CAIPEEX campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Mehta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability in the convective boundary layer (CBL height for the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX study period are examined using the data collected from high-resolution radiosondes during May–September 2009 over the Indian monsoon region. In total, 57 radiosonde launchings were carried out at ∼ 11:00–17:00 IST over six different stations covering a large geographical region, ranging from latitude ∼ 13 to 32° N and longitude 73 to 92° E. Of the total 57 launchings, 17 were made during cloudy conditions during which relative humidity (RH was found to be greater than 83 % for an ∼ 1.0 km layer at various altitudes below 6 km. Within the layer the difference between saturated equivalent potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature is small, and it satisfies the condition that RH > 83 % for about 1 km is considered as the cloudy layer. There are eight cases when the cloud-topped boundary layer (CTBL and 19 cases when fair-weather boundary layer (FWBL is observed. The CBL heights are obtained using thermodynamic profiles, which vary from ∼ 0.4 to 2.5 km a. g. l.  The formation of the cloud layers above the boundary layer generally lowers the CBL height and is responsible for its day-to-day variability. The development of the cloud beneath the boundary layer generally elevates the CBL, which is also responsible for the large day-to-day variability in the CBL. The FWBL identified using relative invariance of the thermodynamic profiles varies from ∼ 2.0 to 5.5 km, which is clearly marked by a local minimum in the refractivity gradient. During cloudy days, the CBL is found to be shallow and the surface temperature lower when compared to clear-sky days. The CBL and the lifting condensation level (LCL heights are randomly related and are found to be at a lower height during cloudy days when compared to clear-sky days

  18. Responses of partially immersed elastic structures using a symmetric formulation for coupled boundary element and finite element methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pei-Tai; Lin, Chorng-Shyan; Yang, Tachung

    2002-09-01

    Using a coupled BEM/FEM, this work describes a numerical method to compute the response and acoustic radiation for structures partially immersed in fluid. The structures and their responses are assumed to be symmetric about a symmetric plane. A symmetric complex matrix derived from the BEM and a reciprocal principle for surface acoustics is also used to represent the acoustic loading against the structures. In addition, selecting a proper Green's function based on image source method satisfies the boundary conditions of pressure release on the fluid surface and null normal velocity on the symmetric plane. Moreover, a boundary integral equation emerges when the field point approaches the structural surface where the normal derivative of the Green's function over partial, infinitesimal spheres is evaluated. These limiting values depend on locations of the field point on the surface. Owing to the symmetry of the acoustic loading matrix, the matrix for the coupled BEM/FEM is a banded, symmetric one, thereby allowing us to employ a variable banded storage method and invert of the matrix. Doing so markedly increases computational efficiency. Furthermore, an analytical solution of a spherical thin shell with the lower semi-sphere immersed in water is carried out by characteristic function expansions for shell equation and acoustic loading. These analytical solutions compare with the results obtained from the proposed numerical method. A good correlation for low frequencies is obtained and minor discrepancies are observed with an increasing frequency.

  19. DNA-based stable isotope probing: a link between community structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Jecna, Katerina; Leigh, Mary Beth; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    DNA-based molecular techniques permit the comprehensive determination of microbial diversity but generally do not reveal the relationship between the identity and the function of microorganisms. The first direct molecular technique to enable the linkage of phylogeny with function is DNA-based stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP). Applying this method first helped describe the utilization of simple compounds, such as methane, methanol or glucose and has since been used to detect microbial communities active in the utilization of a wide variety of compounds, including various xenobiotics. The principle of the method lies in providing 13C-labeled substrate to a microbial community and subsequent analyses of the 13C-DNA isolated from the community. Isopycnic centrifugation permits separating 13C-labeled DNA of organisms that utilized the substrate from 12C-DNA of the inactive majority. As the whole metagenome of active populations is isolated, its follow-up analysis provides successful taxonomic identification as well as the potential for functional gene analyses. Because of its power, DNA-SIP has become one of the leading techniques of microbial ecology research. But from other point of view, it is a labor-intensive method that requires careful attention to detail during each experimental step in order to avoid misinterpretation of results.

  20. Conjugated organic framework with three-dimensionally ordered stable structure and delocalized π clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jia; Xu, Yanhong; Jin, Shangbin; Chen, Long; Kaji, Toshihiko; Honsho, Yoshihito; Addicoat, Matthew A.; Kim, Jangbae; Saeki, Akinori; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Seki, Shu; Irle, Stephan; Hiramoto, Masahiro; Gao, Jia; Jiang, Donglin

    2013-01-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a class of crystalline organic porous materials that can utilize π–π-stacking interactions as a driving force for the crystallization of polygonal sheets to form layered frameworks and ordered pores. However, typical examples are chemically unstable and lack intrasheet π-conjugation, thereby significantly limiting their applications. Here we report a chemically stable, electronically conjugated organic framework with topologically designed wire frameworks and open nanochannels, in which the π conjugation-spans the two-dimensional sheets. Our framework permits inborn periodic ordering of conjugated chains in all three dimensions and exhibits a striking combination of properties: chemical stability, extended π-delocalization, ability to host guest molecules and hole mobility. We show that the π-conjugated organic framework is useful for high on-off ratio photoswitches and photovoltaic cells. Therefore, this strategy may constitute a step towards realizing ordered semiconducting porous materials for innovations based on two-dimensionally extended π systems. PMID:24220603

  1. Measurement of the Flow Over Two Parallel Mountain Ridges in the Nighttime Stable Boundary Layer With Scanning Lidar Systems at the Perdigão 2017 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildmann, N.; Kigle, S.; Gerz, T.; Bell, T.; Klein, P. M.

    2017-12-01

    For onshore wind energy production, the highest wind potential is often found on exposed spots like hilltops, mountain ridges or escarpments with heterogeneous land cover. The understanding of the flow field in such complex terrain in the relevant heights where wind power is generated is an ongoing field of research. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) contributed to the NEWA (New European Wind Atlas) experiment in the province of Perdigão (Portugal) with three long-range Doppler wind lidar of type Leosphere Windcube-200S from May to June 2017. In the experiment, a single wind energy converter (WEC) of type Enercon E82 is situated on a forested mountain ridge. In main wind direction, which is from South-West and almost perpendicular to the ridge, a valley and then a second mountain ridge in a distance of approximately 1.4 km follow. Two of the DLR lidar instruments are placed downstream and in line with the main wind direction and the WEC. One of these instruments is placed in the valley, and the other one on the distant mountain ridge. This line-up allows coplanar scanning of the flow in the valley and over the ridge tops and thus the determination of horizontal and vertical wind components. The third DLR system, placed on the WEC ridge, and an additional scanning lidar from the University of Oklahoma, placed in the valley, are used to determine the cross-wind component of the flow. Regular flow features that were observed with this lidar setup in the six weeks of the intensive operation period are jet-like layers of high wind speeds that occur during the night from a North-Easterly direction. These jets are found to have wind speeds up to 13 m s-1 and are very variable with regards to their maximum speed, height and broadness. Depending on the Froude number of the flow, waves are forming over the two mountain ridges with either a stable wavelength that equals the mountain ridge distance, or more dynamic higher frequency oscillations. All of these flow features are

  2. Optimized multi-step NMR-crystallography approach for structural characterization of a stable quercetin solvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Xenia; Miclaus, Maria; Martin, Flavia; Filip, Claudiu; Grosu, Ioana Georgeta

    2017-05-10

    Herein we report the preparation and solid state structural investigation of the 1,4-dioxane-quercetin solvate. NMR crystallography methods were employed for crystal structure determination of the solvate from microcrystalline powder. The stability of the compound relative to other reported quercetin solvates is discussed and found to be in perfect agreement with the hydrogen bonding networks/supra-molecular architectures formed in each case. It is also clearly shown that NMR crystallography represents an ideal analytical tool in such cases when hydrogen-bonding networks are required to be constrained at a high accuracy level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A hypoplastic constitutive model for clays with meta-stable structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašín, David

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 3 (2007), s. 363-375 ISSN 0008-3674 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200710605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : constitutive relations * hypoplasticity * clays * structure of soils Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 0.542, year: 2007

  4. Structurally stable design of output regulation for a class of nonlinear systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villanueva-Novelo, C.; Čelikovský, Sergej; Castillo-Toledo, B.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 5 (2001), s. 517-561 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/99/1368 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1075907 Keywords : nonlinear systems * structural stability * output regulation Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.316, year: 2001

  5. Flutter Sensitivity to Boundary Layer Thickness, Structural Damping, and Static Pressure Differential for a Shuttle Tile Overlay Repair Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the aeroelastic stability of an on-orbit installable Space Shuttle patch panel. CFD flutter solutions were obtained for thick and thin boundary layers at a free stream Mach number of 2.0 and several Mach numbers near sonic speed. The effect of structural damping on these flutter solutions was also examined, and the effect of structural nonlinearities associated with in-plane forces in the panel was considered on the worst case linear flutter solution. The results of the study indicated that adequate flutter margins exist for the panel at the Mach numbers examined. The addition of structural damping improved flutter margins as did the inclusion of nonlinear effects associated with a static pressure difference across the panel.

  6. Influence of the added mass effect and boundary conditions on the dynamic response of submerged and confined structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentín, D; Presas, A; Egusquiza, E; Valero, C

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic response of submerged and confined disk-like structures is of interest in the flied of hydraulic machinery, especially in hydraulic turbine runners. This response is difficult to be estimated with accuracy due to the strong influence of the boundary conditions. Small radial gaps as well as short axial distances to rigid surfaces greatly modify the dynamic response because the fact of the added mass and damping effects. Moreover, the effect of the shaft coupling is also important for certain mode-shapes of the structure. In the present study, the influence of the added mass effect and boundary conditions on the dynamic behavior of a submerged disk attached to a shaft is evaluated through experimental tests and structural- acoustic coupling numerical simulations. For the experimentation, a test rig has been developed. It consists of a confined disk attached to a shaft inside a cylindrical container full of water. The disk can be fixed at different axial positions along the shaft. Piezoelectric patches are used to excite the disk and the response is measured with submersible accelerometers. For each configuration tested, the natural frequencies of the disk and the shaft are studied. Numerical results have been compared with experimental results

  7. Structural changes, market concentration and vertical integration: would they lead to more stable markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahmassebi, H.

    1991-01-01

    This communication is concerned with three major developments that are likely to have significant impact on the future structure of world oil markets: oil company mergers and acquisitions, shift of exploration and production activity from the United States to overseas, and joint venture agreements between producing countries and oil companies aimed at further downstream integration by OPEC. The last two developments are likely to contribute substantially to price and market stability in the future

  8. Change in the magnetic structure of (Bi,SmFeO3 thin films at the morphotropic phase boundary probed by neutron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Maruyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the evolution of the magnetic structure of BiFeO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates as a function of Sm doping. We determined the magnetic structure using neutron diffraction. We found that as Sm increases, the magnetic structure evolves from a cycloid to a G-type antiferromagnet at the morphotropic phase boundary, where there is a large piezoelectric response due to an electric-field induced structural transition. The occurrence of the magnetic structural transition at the morphotropic phase boundary offers another route towards room temperature multiferroic devices.

  9. Change in the magnetic structure of (Bi,Sm)FeO3 thin films at the morphotropic phase boundary probed by neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Shingo; Anbusathaiah, Varatharajan; Fennell, Amy; Enderle, Mechthild; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ratcliff, William D.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the evolution of the magnetic structure of BiFeO3 thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates as a function of Sm doping. We determined the magnetic structure using neutron diffraction. We found that as Sm increases, the magnetic structure evolves from a cycloid to a G-type antiferromagnet at the morphotropic phase boundary, where there is a large piezoelectric response due to an electric-field induced structural transition. The occurrence of the magnetic structural transition at the morphotropic phase boundary offers another route towards room temperature multiferroic devices.

  10. Breaking Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . As a fundamental human experience, liminality transmits cultural practices, codes, rituals, and meanings in-between aggregate structures and uncertain outcomes. As a methodological tool it is well placed to overcome disciplinary boundaries, which often direct attention to specific structures or sectors of society....... Its capacity to provide explanatory accounts of seemingly unstructured situations provides an opportunity to link experience-based and culture-oriented approaches not only to contemporary problems but also to undertake comparisons across historical periods. From a perspective of liminality...

  11. Stable isotope evidence of long-term changes in North Sea food web structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2008-01-01

    coast. Porpoises collected after ~1960 had significantly lower d15N than porpoises collected earlier. This change in d15N implies that fundamental changes in food web structure in, or nutrient availability to, the North Sea have taken place over the last ~150 yr and that most of the change occurred over...... reported here may be a reflection of a change in the isotope signature of nitrogen entering the food web. Regardless of its underlying cause, the recorded change in isotopic signature in harbour porpoises is noteworthy as it represents the first fisheries-independent documentation of a long-term temporal...

  12. Structuring of turbulence and its impact on basic features of Ekman boundary layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Esau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent Ekman boundary layer (EBL has been studied in a large number of theoretical, laboratory and modeling works since F. Nansen's observations during the Norwegian Polar Expedition 1893–1896. Nevertheless, the proposed analytical models, analysis of the EBL instabilities, and turbulence-resolving numerical simulations are not fully consistent. In particular, the role of turbulence self-organization into longitudinal roll vortices in the EBL and its dependence on the meridional component of the Coriolis force remain unclear. A new set of large-eddy simulations (LES are presented in this study. LES were performed for eight different latitudes (from 1° N to 90° N in the domain spanning 144 km in the meridional direction. Geostrophic winds from the west and from the east were used to drive the development of EBL turbulence. The emergence and growth of longitudinal rolls in the EBL was simulated. The simulated rolls are in good agreement with EBL stability analysis given in Dubos et al. (2008. The destruction of rolls in the westerly flow at low latitude was observed in simulations, which agrees well with the action of secondary instability on the rolls in the EBL. This study quantifies the effect of the meridional component of the Coriolis force and the effect of rolls in the EBL on the internal EBL parameters such as friction velocity, cross-isobaric angle, parameters of the EBL depth and resistance laws. A large impact of the roll development or destruction is found. The depth of the EBL in the westerly flow is about five times less than it is in the easterly flow at low latitudes. The EBL parameters, which depend on the depth, also exhibit large difference in these two types of the EBL. Thus, this study supports the need to include the horizontal component of the Coriolis force into theoretical constructions and parameterizations of the boundary layer in models.

  13. Framework to Define Structure and Boundaries of Complex Health Intervention Systems: The ALERT Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Boriani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Health intervention systems are complex and subject to multiple variables in different phases of implementation. This constitutes a concrete challenge for the application of translational science in real life. Complex systems as health-oriented interventions call for interdisciplinary approaches with carefully defined system boundaries. Exploring individual components of such systems from different viewpoints gives a wide overview and helps to understand the elements and the relationships that drive actions and consequences within the system. In this study, we present an application and assessment of a framework with focus on systems and system boundaries of interdisciplinary projects. As an example on how to apply our framework, we analyzed ALERT [an integrated sensors and biosensors’ system (BEST aimed at monitoring the quality, health, and traceability of the chain of the bovine milk], a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary project based on the application of measurable biomarkers at strategic points of the milk chain for improved food security (including safety, human, and ecosystem health (1. In fact, the European food safety framework calls for science-based support to the primary producers’ mandate for legal, scientific, and ethical responsibility in food supply. Because of its multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approach involving human, animal, and ecosystem health, ALERT can be considered as a One Health project. Within the ALERT context, we identified the need to take into account the main actors, interactions, and relationships of stakeholders to depict a simplified skeleton of the system. The framework can provide elements to highlight how and where to improve the project development when project evaluations are required.

  14. Impact of interfacial imperfection on transverse wave in a functionally graded piezoelectric material structure with corrugated boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Singh, Abhishek; Kumar, Santan; Kumari, Richa

    2018-03-01

    The propagation behavior of Love-type wave in a corrugated functionally graded piezoelectric material layered structure has been taken into account. Concretely, the layered structure incorporates a corrugated functionally graded piezoelectric material layer imperfectly bonded to a functionally graded piezoelectric material half-space. An analytical treatment has been employed to determine the dispersion relation for both cases of electrically open condition and electrically short condition. The phase velocity of the Love-type wave has been computed numerically and its dependence on the wave number has been depicted graphically for a specific type of corrugated boundary surfaces for both said conditions. The crux of the study lies in the fact that the imperfect bonding of the interface, the corrugated boundaries present in the layer, and the material properties of the layer and the half-space strongly influence the phase velocity of the Love-type wave. It can be remarkably noted that the imperfect bonding of the interface reduces the phase velocity of the Love-type wave significantly. As a special case of the problem, it is noticed that the procured dispersion relation for both cases of electrically open and electrically short conditions is in accordance with the classical Love wave equation.

  15. Bacterioplankton communities of Crater Lake, OR: Dynamic changes with euphotic zone food web structure and stable deep water populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, E.; Vergin, K.L.; Larson, G.L.; Giovannoni, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of bacterial and archaeal species in Crater Lake plankton varies dramatically over depth and with time, as assessed by hybridization of group-specific oligonucleotides to RNA extracted from lakewater. Nonmetric, multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis of relative bacterial phylotype densities revealed complex relationships among assemblages sampled from depth profiles in July, August and September of 1997 through 1999. CL500-11 green nonsulfur bacteria (Phylum Chloroflexi) and marine Group I crenarchaeota are consistently dominant groups in the oxygenated deep waters at 300 and 500 m. Other phylotypes found in the deep waters are similar to surface and mid-depth populations and vary with time. Euphotic zone assemblages are dominated either by ??-proteobacteria or CL120-10 verrucomicrobia, and ACK4 actinomycetes. MDS analyses of euphotic zone populations in relation to environmental variables and phytoplankton and zooplankton population structures reveal apparent links between Daphnia pulicaria zooplankton population densities and microbial community structure. These patterns may reflect food web interactions that link kokanee salmon population densities to community structure of the bacterioplankton, via fish predation on Daphnia with cascading consequences to Daphnia bacterivory and predation on bacterivorous protists. These results demonstrate a stable bottom-water microbial community. They also extend previous observations of food web-driven changes in euphotic zone bacterioplankton community structure to an oligotrophic setting. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. Pyridine and phosphonate containing ligands for stable lanthanide complexation. An experimental and theoretical study to assess the solution structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato-Iglesias, Marta; Balogh, Edina; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Tóth, Eva; de Blas, Andrés; Rodríguez Blas, Teresa

    2006-12-07

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the stability and solution structure of lanthanide complexes with two novel ligands containing pyridine units and phosphonate pendant arms on either ethane-1,2-diamine (L2) or cyclohexane-1,2-diamine (L3) backbones. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the protonation constants of the ligands and the stability constants of the complexes with Gd(III) and the endogenous metal ions Zn(II) and Cu(II). While the stability constant of the GdL2 complex is too high to be determined by direct pH-potentiometric titrations, the cyclohexyl derivative GdL3 has a lower and assessable stability (log K(GdL3)=17.62). Due to the presence of the phosphonate groups, various protonated species can be detected up to pH approximately 8 for both ligands and all metal ions studied. The molecular clusters [Ln(L)(H2O)](3-).19H2O (Ln=La, Nd, Ho or Lu; L=L2 or L3) were characterized by theoretical calculations at the HF level. Our calculations provide two minimum energy geometries where the ligand adopts different conformations: twist-wrap (tw), in which the ligand wraps around the metal ion by twisting the pyridyl units relative to each other, and twist-fold (tf), where the slight twisting of the pyridyl units is accompanied by an overall folding of the two pyridine units towards one of the phosphonate groups. The relative free energies of the tw and tf conformations of [Ln(L)(H2O)]3- (L=L2, L3) complexes calculated in aqueous solution (C-PCM) by using the B3LYP model indicate that the tw form is the most stable one along the whole lanthanide series for the complexes of L3, while for those of L2 only the Gd(III) complex is more stable in the tf conformation by ca. 0.5 kcal mol-1. 1H NMR studies of the Eu(III) complex of L3 show the initial formation of the tf complex in aqueous solution, which slowly converts to the thermodynamically stable tw form. The structures calculated for the Nd(III) complexes are in reasonably

  17. The Effects of Land Surface Heating And Roughness Elements on the Structure and Scaling Laws of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khaled

    The atmospheric boundary-layer is the lowest 500-2000 m of the Earth's atmosphere where much of human life and ecosystem services reside. This layer responds to land surface (e.g. buoyancy and roughness elements) and slowly evolving free tropospheric (e.g. temperature and humidity lapse rates) conditions that arguably mediate and modulate biosphere-atmosphere interactions. Such response often results in spatially- and temporally-rich turbulence scales that continue to be the subject of inquiry given their significance to a plethora of applications in environmental sciences and engineering. The work here addresses key aspects of boundary layer turbulence with a focus on the role of roughness elements (vegetation canopies) and buoyancy (surface heating) in modifying the well-studied picture of shear-dominated wall-bounded turbulence. A combination of laboratory channel experiments, field experiments, and numerical simulations are used to explore three distinct aspects of boundary layer turbulence. These are: • The concept of ergodicity in turbulence statistics within canopies: It has been long-recognized that homogeneous and stationary turbulence is ergodic, but less is known about the effects of inhomogeneity introduced by the presence of canopies on the turbulence statistics. A high resolution (temporal and spatial) flume experiment is used here to test the convergence of the time statistics of turbulent scalar concentrations to their ensemble (spatio-temporal) counterpart. The findings indicate that within-canopy scalar statistics have a tendency to be ergodic, mostly in shallow layers (close to canopy top) where the sweeping flow events appear to randomize the statistics. Deeper layers within the canopy are dominated by low-dimensional (quasi-deterministic) von Karman vortices that tend to break ergodicity. • Scaling laws of turbulent velocity spectra and structure functions in near-surface atmospheric turbulence: the existence of a logarithmic scaling in the

  18. Mean flow structure of non-equilibrium boundary layers with adverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marušic and Perry for non-equilibrium adverse pressure gradient layers. It is observed that structure of turbulence for this flow is well-described by these two laws. From the known structure of turbulence eddy viscosity for the flow under consideration is calculated. Self similarity in eddy viscosity is observed in the wall region.

  19. Global population structure of the stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) inferred by mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsouli-Aymes, N; Michaux, J; De Stordeur, E; Couloux, A; Veuille, M; Duvallet, G

    2011-03-01

    Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae: Stomoxyini), a synanthropic fly with a worldwide distribution, is recognized to have an important medical and veterinary impact. We conducted a phylogeographic analysis based on several populations from five major zoogeographic regions of the world in order to analyse population genetic structure of S. calcitrans and to trace its global dispersion. Results from mitochondrial (COI, Cyt-b and ND1-16S) and nuclear (ITS2) DNA show a substantial differentiation of Oriental populations (first lineage) from the Afrotropical, Palearctic, Nearctic, Neotropical and Oceanian populations (second lineage). The divergence time analyses suggest the separation between the two lineages approximately in mid-Pleistocene. Oriental populations are isolated and would not have participated in the colonization of other regions, unlike the Afrotropical one which seems to be the source of S. calcitrans dispersion towards other regions. Demographic analyses indicate that Oriental, Afrotropical and Palearctic regions have undergone a population expansion during late Pleistocene-early Holocene. The expansion time of this cosmopolitan species could have been influenced by continental human expansions and by animal domestication. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Peculiarities of the fundamental mode structure in stable-resonator lasers upon spatially inhomogeneous amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunkov, Mikhail V; Kostryukov, P V; Telegin, L S; Tunkin, V G; Yakovlev, D V

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the fundamental mode of a laser is calculated by the iteration Fox-Li method in the case of inhomogeneous unsaturated amplification produced by axially symmetric longitudinal pumping. The calculation is performed for different parameters g 1 and g 2 of the resonator within the entire stability region. It is shown that in the case of inhomogeneous amplification, the fundamental mode considerably deviates from the Gaussian mode of an empty resonator only in the so-called critical configurations of the resonator, when the quantity [arccos(g 1 g 2 ) 1/2 ]/π is zero or takes a number of values expressed by irreducible fractions m/n. For the Fresnel number N F = 9, configurations with m/n = 1/2, 2/5, 3/8, 1/3, 3/10, 1/4, 1/5, 1/6, 1/8, and 1/10 are pronounced. As N F increases, the number of critical configurations increases. The expansion in a system of Laguerre-Gaussian beams shows that the fundamental mode in critical configurations is formed by a set of beams with certain radial indices p phased in the active medium. (resonators. modes)

  1. The structure of mAG, a monomeric mutant of the green fluorescent protein Azami-Green, reveals the structural basis of its stable green emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebisawa, Tatsuki; Yamamura, Akihiro; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG) from G. fascicularis was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first known monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a variant of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). These two green fluorescent proteins are only 27% identical in their amino-acid sequences. mAG is more similar in its amino-acid sequence to four fluorescent proteins: Dendra2 (a green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein), Dronpa (a bright-and-dark reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein), KikG (a tetrameric green-emitting fluorescent protein) and Kaede (another green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein). To reveal the structural basis of stable green emission by mAG, the 2.2 Å crystal structure of mAG has been determined and compared with the crystal structures of avGFP, Dronpa, Dendra2, Kaede and KikG. The structural comparison revealed that the chromophore formed by Gln62-Tyr63-Gly64 (QYG) and the fixing of the conformation of the imidazole ring of His193 by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts involving His193, Arg66 and Thr69 are likely to be required for the stable green emission of mAG. The crystal structure of mAG will contribute to the design and development of new monomeric fluorescent proteins with faster maturation, brighter fluorescence, improved photostability, new colours and other preferable properties as alternatives to avGFP and its variants

  2. Synthesis, structure and topological analysis of glycine templated highly stable cadmium sulfate framework: A New Lewis Acid catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Avijit Kumar

    2018-04-01

    One new open-framework two-dimensional layer, [Cd(NH3CH2COO)(SO4)], I, has been synthesized using amino acid as templating agent. Single crystal structural analysis shows that the compound crystallizes in monoclinic cell with non-centrosymmetric space group P21, a = 4.9513(1) Å, b = 7.9763(2) Å, c = 8.0967(2) Å, β = 105.917(1)° and V = 307.504(12) Å3. The compound has connectivity between the Cd-centers and the sulfate units forming a two-dimensional layer structure. Sulfate unit is coordinated to metal center with η3, μ4 mode possessing a coordination free oxygen atom. The zwitterionic form of glycine molecule is present in the structure bridging with two metal centers through μ2-mode by carboxylate oxygens. The topological analysis reveals that the two-dimensional network is formed with a novel 4- and 6-connected binodal net of (32,42,52)(34,44,54,63) topology. Although one end of the glycine molecule is free from coordination, the structure is highly stable up to 350 °C. Strong N-H⋯ O hydrogen bonding interactions play an important role in the stabilization and formation of three-dimensional supramolecular structure. The cyanosilylation of imines using the present compounds as heterogeneous catalyst indicates good catalytic behavior. The present study illustrates the usefulness of the amino acid for the structure building in less studied sulfate based framework materials as well as designing of new heterogeneous catalysts for the broad application. The compound has also been characterized through elemental analysis, PXRD, IR, SEM and TG-DT studies.

  3. Ultrahigh-pressure structure of GeO2 glass with coordination number >6: implications for structure of magma at the core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Y.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Ikuta, D.; Shibazaki, Y.; Wang, Y.; Shen, G.

    2016-12-01

    Silicate magma at the core-mantle boundary is one of the most important components in understanding nature and evolution of the Earth's deep interior. However, structure and properties of silicate magmas at the pressure condition of the core-mantle boundary remain poorly understood, because of experimental challenges. Pioneering work by Murakami and Bass (2010) showed a kink in the pressure dependence of shear-wave velocity in SiO2 glass around 140 GPa, which was interpreted as evidence of ultrahigh pressure structural transition. However, no structural information is available under such high pressures. Here we show new experimental evidence of ultrahigh pressure structural transition in GeO2 glass with Ge-O coordination number (CN) significantly greater than 6, investigated using a newly developed double-stage large volume cell combined with multi-angle energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique for in situ amorphous structure measurement (Kono et al., 2016). The Ge-O coordination number (CN) is found to remain constant at 6 between 22.6 and 37.9 GPa. At higher pressures, CN begins to increase rapidly to 6.4 at 49.4 GPa and reaches 7.4 at 91.7 GPa. The structural change to CN higher than 6 is closely associated with the change in oxygen packing fraction (OPF). This transformation begins when the OPF in GeO2 glass is close to the maximal dense packing state (the Kepler conjecture= 0.74), which provides new insights into structural changes in network-forming glasses and liquids with CN higher than 6 at ultrahigh pressure conditions. For example, extrapolation of OPF-pressure trend in SiO2 glass shows that OPF of SiO2glass reaches to 0.74 around 108 GPa, where structural change to CN higher than 6 is expected. The data imply that silicate magma at the core-mantle boundary may possess ultrahigh-pressure structure with CN higher than 6. References Kono, Y., Kenney-Benson, C., Ikuta, D., Shibazaki, Y., Wang, Y., & Shen, G. (2016). Ultrahigh-pressure polyamorphism in

  4. The effect of temperature on generic stable periodic structures in the parameter space of dissipative relativistic standard map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Ana C. C.; Albuquerque, Holokx A.; Manchein, Cesar

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized changes in the dynamics of a two-dimensional relativistic standard map in the presence of dissipation and specially when it is submitted to thermal effects modeled by a Gaussian noise reservoir. By the addition of thermal noise in the dissipative relativistic standard map (DRSM) it is possible to suppress typical stable periodic structures (SPSs) embedded in the chaotic domains of parameter space for large enough temperature strengths. Smaller SPSs are first affected by thermal effects, starting from their borders, as a function of temperature. To estimate the necessary temperature strength capable to destroy those SPSs we use the largest Lyapunov exponent to obtain the critical temperature (TC) diagrams. For critical temperatures the chaotic behavior takes place with the suppression of periodic motion, although the temperature strengths considered in this work are not so large to convert the deterministic features of the underlying system into a stochastic ones.

  5. Stable isotopes indicate population structuring in the southwest Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena australis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgana Vighi

    Full Text Available From the early 17th century to the 1970s southern right whales, Eubalaena australis, were subject to intense exploitation along the Atlantic coast of South America. Catches along this coast recorded by whalers originally formed a continuum from Brazil to Tierra del Fuego. Nevertheless, the recovery of the population has apparently occurred fragmentarily, and with two main areas of concentration, one off southern Brazil (Santa Catarina and another off central Argentina (Peninsula Valdés. This pattern suggests some level of heterogeneity amongst the population, which is apparently contradicted by records that traced individuals moving throughout the whole geographical extension covered by the species in the Southwest Atlantic. To test the hypothesis of the potential occurrence of discrete subpopulations exploiting specific habitats, we investigated N, C and O isotopic values in 125 bone samples obtained from whaling factories operating in the early 1970s in southern Brazil (n=72 and from contemporary and more recent strandings occurring in central Argentina (n=53. Results indicated significant differences between the two sampling areas, being δ13C and δ18O values significantly higher in samples from southern Brazil than in those from central Argentina. This variation was consistent with isotopic baselines from the two areas, indicating the occurrence of some level of structure in the Southwest Atlantic right whale population and equally that whales more likely feed in areas commonly thought to exclusively serve as nursing grounds. Results aim at reconsidering of the units currently used in the management of the southern right whale in the Southwest Atlantic Ocean. In the context of the current die-off affecting the species in Peninsula Valdés, these results also highlight the necessity to better understand movements of individuals and precisely identify their feeding areas.

  6. Stable isotopes indicate population structuring in the southwest Atlantic population of right whales (Eubalaena australis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vighi, Morgana; Borrell, Asunción; Crespo, Enrique A; Oliveira, Larissa R; Simões-Lopes, Paulo C; Flores, Paulo A C; García, Néstor A; Aguilar, Alex; Aguilar, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    From the early 17th century to the 1970s southern right whales, Eubalaena australis, were subject to intense exploitation along the Atlantic coast of South America. Catches along this coast recorded by whalers originally formed a continuum from Brazil to Tierra del Fuego. Nevertheless, the recovery of the population has apparently occurred fragmentarily, and with two main areas of concentration, one off southern Brazil (Santa Catarina) and another off central Argentina (Peninsula Valdés). This pattern suggests some level of heterogeneity amongst the population, which is apparently contradicted by records that traced individuals moving throughout the whole geographical extension covered by the species in the Southwest Atlantic. To test the hypothesis of the potential occurrence of discrete subpopulations exploiting specific habitats, we investigated N, C and O isotopic values in 125 bone samples obtained from whaling factories operating in the early 1970s in southern Brazil (n=72) and from contemporary and more recent strandings occurring in central Argentina (n=53). Results indicated significant differences between the two sampling areas, being δ13C and δ18O values significantly higher in samples from southern Brazil than in those from central Argentina. This variation was consistent with isotopic baselines from the two areas, indicating the occurrence of some level of structure in the Southwest Atlantic right whale population and equally that whales more likely feed in areas commonly thought to exclusively serve as nursing grounds. Results aim at reconsidering of the units currently used in the management of the southern right whale in the Southwest Atlantic Ocean. In the context of the current die-off affecting the species in Peninsula Valdés, these results also highlight the necessity to better understand movements of individuals and precisely identify their feeding areas.

  7. The effect of atmospheric stability on the energetic contribution of the large scale structures in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Michele; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2011-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layer measurements in wind tunnels and in the near neutral atmospheric surface layer outlined a significant contribution of the large scale motions to turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stresses for a wide range of Reynolds number, providing evidence of complex scale interactions across the wall region. In order to understand the effect of the large scales on the near wall turbulence and extend the predictive models of amplitude modulation to more realistic atmospheric conditions, different thermal stability conditions must be explored. In this study, experiments are performed in the atmospheric wind tunnel of the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory independently controlling air flow and floor temperatures. Measurements of fluctuating temperature simultaneously with the streamwise and wall normal velocity components are obtained with an ad hoc calibrated and customized triple-wire sensor. Scaling quantities and the dominant terms in the turbulent kinetic energy and temperature variance budget equations are estimated and discussed. A comparative analysis of the weakly stable, convective and neutral conditions based on the power spectra of the streamwise, wall normal and Reynolds stress contributions is presented. Appreciable differences in the energetic contributions of the large scales were observed.

  8. Linking lowermost mantle structure, core-mantle boundary heat flux and mantle plume formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingming; Zhong, Shijie; Olson, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of Earth's lowermost mantle exert significant control on the formation of mantle plumes and the core-mantle boundary (CMB) heat flux. However, it is not clear if and how the variation of CMB heat flux and mantle plume activity are related. Here, we perform geodynamic model experiments that show how temporal variations in CMB heat flux and pulses of mantle plumes are related to morphologic changes of the thermochemical piles of large-scale compositional heterogeneities in Earth's lowermost mantle, represented by the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). We find good correlation between the morphologic changes of the thermochemical piles and the time variation of CMB heat flux. The morphology of the thermochemical piles is significantly altered during the initiation and ascent of strong mantle plumes, and the changes in pile morphology cause variations in the local and the total CMB heat flux. Our modeling results indicate that plume-induced episodic variations of CMB heat flux link geomagnetic superchrons to pulses of surface volcanism, although the relative timing of these two phenomena remains problematic. We also find that the density distribution in thermochemical piles is heterogeneous, and that the piles are denser on average than the surrounding mantle when both thermal and chemical effects are included.

  9. Boundary element method in dynamic interaction of structures with multilayers media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalache, N.; Poterasu, V.F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents the problems of dynamic interaction between the multilayers media and structure by means of B.E.M., using Green's functions. The structure considered by the authors as a particular problem concerns a reinforced concrete shear wall and soil foundation of three layers having different thickness and mechanical characteristics. The authors will present comparatively the stresses and the displacements in static and dynamic regime interaction response of the structure. Theoretical part of the paper presents: Green's functions for the multilayers media in dynamic regime, stiffness matrices, stresses and displacements in the multilayers media exprimed by means of the Green's functions induced by the shear and horizontal forces, computer program, consideration for dynamic, structure-foundation-multilayers soil foundation interaction. (author)

  10. Hybrid Element Method for Compsoite Structures Subjected to Boundary Layer Loading Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In many situations, aerospace structures are subjected to a wide frequency spectrum of mechanical and/or acoustic excitations and therefore, there is a need for the...

  11. On the complexity of the boundary layer structure and aerosol vertical distribution in the coastal Mediterranean regions: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giandomenico Pace

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The planetary boundary layer structure in the coastal areas, and particularly in complex orography regions such as the Mediterranean, is extremely intricate. In this study, we show the evolution of the planetary boundary layer based on in situ airborne measurements and ground-based remote sensing observations carried out during the MORE (Marine Ozone and Radiation Experiment campaign in June 2010. The campaign was held in a rural coastal Mediterranean region in Southern Italy. The study focuses on the observations made on 17 June. Vertical profiles of meteorological parameters and aerosol size distribution were measured during two flights: in the morning and in the afternoon. Airborne observations were combined with ground-based LIDAR, SODAR, microwave and visible radiometer measurements, allowing a detailed description of the atmospheric vertical structure. The analysis was complemented with data from a regional atmospheric model run with horizontal resolutions of 12, 4 and 1 km, respectively; back-trajectories were calculated at these spatial resolutions. The observations show the simultaneous occurrence of dust transport, descent of mid-tropospheric air and sea breeze circulation on 17 June. Local pollution effects on the aerosol distribution, and a possible event of new particles formation were also observed. A large variability in the thermodynamical structure and aerosol distribution in the flight region, extending by approximately 30 km along the coast, was found. Within this complex, environment-relevant differences in the back-trajectories calculated at different spatial resolutions are found, suggesting that the description of several dynamical processes, and in particular the sea breeze circulation, requires high-resolution meteorological analyses. The study also shows that the integration of different observational techniques is needed to describe these complex conditions; in particular, the availability of flights and their timing

  12. Atmospheric boundary layer structures associated with the Ora del Garda wind in the Alps as revealed from airborne and surface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiti, Lavinia; Zardi, Dino; de Franceschi, Massimiliano; Rampanelli, Gabriele

    2013-10-01

    The paper investigates a coupled lake-breeze and valley-wind system, known as Ora del Garda. The latter typically originates on clear-sky days over the northern shore of Lake Garda in the Alps. After channelling into the nearby Sarca Valley and Lakes Valley, this airflow finally breaks out, through an elevated saddle, into the adjacent Adige Valley, where it strongly interacts with the local valley wind. Two flights of an instrumented motorglider explored, under different synoptic conditions, the thermal structure of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) associated with this wind at selected vertical sections-namely over the lake shore, at mid-valley, and at the junction with the Adige Valley. Data from airborne measurements, as well as from weather stations disseminated along the valley floor, provided the basis for mapping 3D fields of potential temperature over high-resolution grids by means of a Residual Kriging (RK) technique. This representation allowed the identification of site-specific ABL features associated with the Ora del Garda. In particular, a typical daytime coastal-breeze structure is detected in the lake shore region, where the advection of colder air tends to stabilize the atmosphere throughout the ABL depth. Mid-valley vertical profiles from both flights display shallow convective mixed layers, surmounted by deeper weakly stable layers. On the other hand, RK-gridded temperature maps show cross-valley thermal asymmetries, amenable to the complex topography and to the inhomogeneous surface coverage, as well as to a curvature of the valley axis. Finally, in the area where the upper Lakes Valley joins the Adige Valley, specific features associated with the complex interaction between the Ora del Garda and the local up-valley wind are found.

  13. Wavelet phase analysis of two velocity components to infer the structure of interscale transfers in a turbulent boundary-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keylock, Christopher J; Nishimura, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Scale-dependent phase analysis of velocity time series measured in a zero pressure gradient boundary layer shows that phase coupling between longitudinal and vertical velocity components is strong at both large and small scales, but minimal in the middle of the inertial regime. The same general pattern is observed at all vertical positions studied, but there is stronger phase coherence as the vertical coordinate, y, increases. The phase difference histograms evolve from a unimodal shape at small scales to the development of significant bimodality at the integral scale and above. The asymmetry in the off-diagonal couplings changes sign at the midpoint of the inertial regime, with the small scale relation consistent with intense ejections followed by a more prolonged sweep motion. These results may be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with the action of low speed streaks and hairpin vortices near the wall, with large scale motions further from the wall, the effect of which penetrates to smaller scales. Hence, a measure of phase coupling, when combined with a scale-by-scale decomposition of perpendicular velocity components, is a useful tool for investigating boundary-layer structure and inferring process from single-point measurements. (paper)

  14. Bulk Single Crystal-Like Structural and Magnetic Characteristics of Epitaxial Spinel Ferrite Thin Films with Elimination of Antiphase Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit V; Khodadadi, Behrouz; Mohammadi, Jamileh Beik; Keshavarz, Sahar; Mewes, Tim; Negi, Devendra Singh; Datta, Ranjan; Galazka, Zbigniew; Uecker, Reinhard; Gupta, Arunava

    2017-08-01

    Spinel ferrite NiFe 2 O 4 thin films have been grown on three isostructural substrates, MgAl 2 O 4 , MgGa 2 O 4 , and CoGa 2 O 4 using pulsed laser deposition. These substrates have lattice mismatches of 3.1%, 0.8%, and 0.2%, respectively, with NiFe 2 O 4 . As expected, the films grown on MgAl 2 O 4 substrate show the presence of the antiphase boundary defects. However, no antiphase boundaries (APBs) are observed for films grown on near-lattice-matched substrates MgGa 2 O 4 and CoGa 2 O 4 . This demonstrates that by using isostructural and lattice-matched substrates, the formation of APBs can be avoided in NiFe 2 O 4 thin films. Consequently, static and dynamic magnetic properties comparable with the bulk can be realized. Initial results indicate similar improvements in film quality and magnetic properties due to the elimination of APBs in other members of the spinel ferrite family, such as Fe 3 O 4 and CoFe 2 O 4 , which have similar crystallographic structure and lattice constants as NiFe 2 O 4 . © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Fundamental interactions of vortical structures with boundary layers in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1991-01-01

    The effect of no-slip walls on the evolution of coherent, vortical structures in two-dimensional flows is studied by numerical calculations. The calculations are based on an accurate and efficient spectral scheme which has been developed for the solution of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations in the v......The effect of no-slip walls on the evolution of coherent, vortical structures in two-dimensional flows is studied by numerical calculations. The calculations are based on an accurate and efficient spectral scheme which has been developed for the solution of the 2D Navier-Stokes equations...... down of vortex dipoles by "vortex shielding"....

  16. Mean flow structure of non-equilibrium boundary layers with adverse ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... From the known structure of turbulence eddy viscosity for the flow under consideration is calculated. ... by the office of Indian Academy of Sciences, including those of the staff, the journals, various programmes, and Current Science, has changed from 'ias.ernet.in' (or 'academy.ias.ernet.in') to 'ias.ac.in'.

  17. Extending the boundaries of native mass spectrometry to study virus structure and assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, J.

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool to study the composition and quaternary structure of protein complexes over a wide range of size and mass. As an analytical tool, native MS offers unmatched specificity and precision to pinpoint the stoichiometry of biomolecular complexes. It has been

  18. Simple vibration modeling of structural fuzzy with continuous boundary by including two-dimensional spatial memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Lars; Ohlrich, Mogens

    2008-01-01

    is considered as one or more fuzzy substructures that are known in some statistical sense only. Experiments have shown that such fuzzy substructures often introduce a damping in the master which is much higher than the structural losses account for. A special method for modeling fuzzy substructures with a one...

  19. Hierarchical population structure in greater sage-grouse provides insight into management boundary delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd B. Cross; David E. Naugle; John C. Carlson; Michael K. Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Understanding population structure is important for guiding ongoing conservation and restoration efforts. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a species of concern distributed across 1.2 million km2 of western North America. We genotyped 1499 greater sagegrouse from 297 leks across Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota using a 15 locus...

  20. Stable phase CdS nanoparticles for optoelectronics: a study on surface morphology, structural and optical characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Suresh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a study on the surface morphology, structure and optical behavior of stable phase cadmium sulphide (CdS nanoparticles synthesized via co-precipitation technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis has been employed to study a cluster formation in the aggregated nanoparticles. An image analysis approach using ImageJ has been used to measure the size of nanoparticles from the SEM micrographs. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FT-IR analysis identified absorption peaks of Cd–S stretching along with moisture content. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis showed that CdS nanoparticles crystallized in wurtzite structure with a preferential orientation along (0 0 2 plane. The particle size, microstrain and lattice constants have been evaluated using XRD data. The lattice parameters of these nanoparticles were found to be shorter than the bulk value which led to lattice contraction. The optical absorption study showed a blue shift in the fundamental absorption edge indicating a quantum size effect.

  1. Impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure of eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes: insights from stable isotope analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Glaz

    Full Text Available Perturbations on ecosystems can have profound immediate effects and can, accordingly, greatly alter the natural community. Land-use such as forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. We measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes values for aquatic primary producers, terrestrial detritus, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis over a three-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes. Four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes sampled at the same time. Stable isotope mixing models showed leaf-litter to be the main food source for benthic primary consumers in both perturbed and unperturbed lakes, suggesting no logging impact on allochthonous subsidies to the littoral food web. Brook trout derived their food mainly from benthic predatory macroinvertebrates in unperturbed lakes. However, in perturbed lakes one year after harvesting, zooplankton appeared to be the main contributor to brook trout diet. This change in brook trout diet was mitigated two years after harvesting. Size-related diet shift were also observed for brook trout, indicating a diet shift related to size. Our study suggests that carbon from terrestrial habitat may be a significant contribution to the food web of oligotrophic Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. Forest harvesting did not have an impact on the diet of benthic primary consumers. On the other hand, brook trout diet composition was affected by logging with greater zooplankton contribution in perturbed lakes, possibly induced by darker-colored environment in these lakes one year after logging.

  2. Impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure of eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes: insights from stable isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaz, Patricia; Sirois, Pascal; Archambault, Philippe; Nozais, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Perturbations on ecosystems can have profound immediate effects and can, accordingly, greatly alter the natural community. Land-use such as forestry activities in the Canadian Boreal region have increased in the last decades, raising concerns about their potential impact on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of forest harvesting on trophic structure in eastern Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. We measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes values for aquatic primary producers, terrestrial detritus, benthic macroinvertebrates, zooplankton and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) over a three-year period in eight eastern Boreal Shield lakes. Four lakes were studied before, one and two years after forest harvesting (perturbed lakes) and compared with four undisturbed reference lakes (unperturbed lakes) sampled at the same time. Stable isotope mixing models showed leaf-litter to be the main food source for benthic primary consumers in both perturbed and unperturbed lakes, suggesting no logging impact on allochthonous subsidies to the littoral food web. Brook trout derived their food mainly from benthic predatory macroinvertebrates in unperturbed lakes. However, in perturbed lakes one year after harvesting, zooplankton appeared to be the main contributor to brook trout diet. This change in brook trout diet was mitigated two years after harvesting. Size-related diet shift were also observed for brook trout, indicating a diet shift related to size. Our study suggests that carbon from terrestrial habitat may be a significant contribution to the food web of oligotrophic Canadian Boreal Shield lakes. Forest harvesting did not have an impact on the diet of benthic primary consumers. On the other hand, brook trout diet composition was affected by logging with greater zooplankton contribution in perturbed lakes, possibly induced by darker-colored environment in these lakes one year after logging.

  3. Population-Level Metrics of Trophic Structure Based on Stable Isotopes and Their Application to Invasion Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michelle C.; Donohue, Ian; Jackson, Andrew L.; Britton, J. Robert; Harper, David M.; Grey, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Biological invasions are a significant driver of human-induced global change and many ecosystems sustain sympatric invaders. Interactions occurring among these invaders have important implications for ecosystem structure and functioning, yet they are poorly understood. Here we apply newly developed metrics derived from stable isotope data to provide quantitative measures of trophic diversity within populations or species. We then use these to test the hypothesis that sympatric invaders belonging to the same functional feeding group occupy a smaller isotopic niche than their allopatric counterparts. Two introduced, globally important, benthic omnivores, Louisiana swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) and carp (Cyprinus carpio), are sympatric in Lake Naivasha, Kenya. We applied our metrics to an 8-year data set encompassing the establishment of carp in the lake. We found a strong asymmetric interaction between the two invasive populations, as indicated by inverse correlations between carp abundance and measures of crayfish trophic diversity. Lack of isotopic niche overlap between carp and crayfish in the majority of years indicated a predominantly indirect interaction. We suggest that carp-induced habitat alteration reduced the diversity of crayfish prey, resulting in a reduction in the dietary niche of crayfish. Stable isotopes provide an integrated signal of diet over space and time, offering an appropriate scale for the study of population niches, but few isotope studies have retained the often insightful information revealed by variability among individuals in isotope values. Our population metrics incorporate such variation, are robust to the vagaries of sample size and are a useful additional tool to reveal subtle dietary interactions among species. Although we have demonstrated their applicability specifically using a detailed temporal dataset of species invasion in a lake, they have a wide array of potential ecological applications. PMID:22363724

  4. Analysis of defect structure in silicon. Effect of grain boundary density on carrier mobility in UCP material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J.; Stringfellow, G. B.; Natesh, R.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships between hole mobility and grain boundary density were studied. Mobility was measured using the van der Pauw technique, and grain boundary density was measured using a quantitative microscopy technique. Mobility was found to decrease with increasing grain boundary density.

  5. Low-Energy Dislocation Structure (LEDS) character of dislocation boundaries aligned with slip planes in rolled aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe; Hong, Chuanshi; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2015-01-01

    For the specific slip geometry of two sets of coplanar systems (a total of four systems) in fcc metals, the range of dislocation networks in boundaries aligned with one of the two active slip planes is predicted from the Frank equation for boundaries free of long-range elastic stresses. Detailed...... by dislocation reactions. Cross slip plays a role in the boundary formation process....

  6. The vertical structure of airflow turbulence characteristics within a boundary layer during wind blown sand transport over a beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z. S.; Baas, A. C.; Jackson, D.; Cooper, J. A.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested the significant role of boundary layer turbulence and coherent flow structures on sand transport by wind over beaches and desert dunes. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated a move beyond the basic monitoring of shear velocities and bulk sediment transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a small-scale point-location field study of boundary layer turbulence and shear stresses conducted under obliquely onshore winds over a beach at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. High-frequency (25 Hz) 3D wind vector measurements were collected at five different heights between 0.13 and 1.67 metres above the bed using sonic anemometry for durations of several hours, and the associated sand transport response was measured using an array of Safires. The wind data are used to investigate the vertical structure of Reynolds shear stresses and burst-sweep event characteristics, as well as a comparison with the standard logarithmic (law-of-the-wall) wind profile. The study explores the identification and selection of a characteristic event duration based on integral time-scales as well as spectral analysis, and includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u’, v’, w’). Results show how the contributions to shear stress and the average pitch of bursts and sweeps changes as a function of height above the bed, indicating the transformation of top-down turbulent eddies as they travel toward the surface. A comparison between the turbulence data and the synchronous sand transport events, meanwhile, reveals the potential effects of enhanced saltation layer roughness feedback on eddies close to the bed.

  7. The implications of turbulent coherent structures on Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in a dry convective boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Gentine, P.; Mellado, J. P.; Mccoll, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    According to Townsend's hypothesis, so-called `wall-attached' eddies are believed to be the main contributors to turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer. This is also the cornerstone for one of the assumptions of Monin-Oubkhov similarity theory (MOST). However, previous evidence shows that the outer-scale eddies can interact and impact the surface layer, resulting in deviations from the classic MOST scaling. We conduct large-eddy simulations and direct numerical simulations of a dry convective boundary layer to investigate the impact of buoyancy on coherent structures in the surface layer. The turbulent coherent structures are identified by releasing a height-dependent passive tracer and categorized as updrafts and subsidence. The MOST similarity functions computed from the simulation results indicate a larger deviation of φ_m from φ_m (-z/L)^{1/4} than the corresponding temperature similarity function (φ_h), consistent with other previous simulations results. Analyses of turbulent coherent structures show that as instability increases, there is a general change in the structure of updrafts and subsidence. Updrafts act as active eddies and are the dominant contributor in the surface layer for different stabilities. Subsidence, which comprises eddies that originate from aloft, contribute increasingly to the transport of temperature but less so for momentum with increasing instability. Such differences can be attributed to the pressure effect on momentum, which results in significant structural difference in the spatial variability of u' in subsidence. These results demonstrate the mechanism for deviation from MOST might be the involvement of stronger subsidence, relating the possible cause of distinction between and to the difference in turbulent structures.

  8. A Hybrid Finite Element-Fourier Spectral Method for Vibration Analysis of Structures with Elastic Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-You Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel hybrid method, which simultaneously possesses the efficiency of Fourier spectral method (FSM and the applicability of the finite element method (FEM, is presented for the vibration analysis of structures with elastic boundary conditions. The FSM, as one type of analytical approaches with excellent convergence and accuracy, is mainly limited to problems with relatively regular geometry. The purpose of the current study is to extend the FSM to problems with irregular geometry via the FEM and attempt to take full advantage of the FSM and the conventional FEM for structural vibration problems. The computational domain of general shape is divided into several subdomains firstly, some of which are represented by the FSM while the rest by the FEM. Then, fictitious springs are introduced for connecting these subdomains. Sufficient details are given to describe the development of such a hybrid method. Numerical examples of a one-dimensional Euler-Bernoulli beam and a two-dimensional rectangular plate show that the present method has good accuracy and efficiency. Further, one irregular-shaped plate which consists of one rectangular plate and one semi-circular plate also demonstrates the capability of the present method applied to irregular structures.

  9. High spatial resolution measurements of large-scale three-dimensional structures in a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Buchmann, Nicolas; Kuehn, Matthias; Soria, Julio

    2011-11-01

    Large-scale three-dimensional (3D) structures in a turbulent boundary layer at Reθ = 2000 are examined via the streamwise extrapolation of time-resolved stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) measurements in a wall-normal spanwise plane using Taylor's hypothesis. Two overlapping SPIV systems are used to provide a field of view similar to that of direct numerical simulations (DNS) on the order of 50 δ × 1 . 5 δ × 3 . 0 δ in the streamwise, wall-normal and spanwise directions, respectively, with an interrogation window size of 40+ ×20+ ×60+ wall units. Velocity power spectra are compared with DNS to examine the effective resolution of these measurements and two-point correlations are performed to investigate the integral length scales associated with coherent velocity and vorticity fluctuations. Individual coherent structures are detected to provide statistics on the 3D size, spacing, and angular orientation of large-scale structures, as well as their contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds shear stress. The support of the ARC through Discovery (and LIEF) grants is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Delineating the boundary and structure of higher trophic level assemblages in the western North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Takehiro; Kiyota, Masashi; Yonezaki, Shiroh; Murakami, Chisato; Kato, Yoshiki; Sakai, Mitsuo; Wakabayashi, Toshie; Okazaki, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the community structure of oceanic higher trophic level (HTL) organisms (e.g., sharks, tunas, salmons, and squids) is fundamental to management of marine resources in a way that ensures their sustainable use and maintains marine ecosystem functionality and biodiversity. We analyzed the spatial structure of HTL assemblages in the western North Pacific Ocean using driftnet survey data collected at latitudes of 35-46 °N along transect lines at 144 °E, 155 °E, and 175.5 °E longitude in July and August 2011. We proposed a new dissimilarity metric segmentation procedure (Dissimilarity Segmentation) based on the differences of mean Bray-Curtis dissimilarity indices between two individual driftnet hauls within the same subarea or among different subareas. Dissimilarity Segmentation allowed us to divide the western North Pacific Ocean into three subareas: a northern subarea (>41 °N including 41 °N on the 175.5 °E transect), a transition subarea (37-41 °N), and a southern subarea (<37 °N). The HTL biomass in the northern subarea was high, and the species diversity was low; dominant and common species accounted for most of the biomass. The HTL assemblage in the southern subarea was composed of many species that were uncommon or rare; the biomass was lower, and the species diversity was higher than in the northern subarea. In the transition subarea, neon flying squid accounted for most of the biomass, and although the biomass was intermediate, species diversity was highest among the three subareas. Canonical correspondence analysis with oceanic environmental variables, principally chlorophyll a, sea surface salinity, and sea surface height, as the explanatory variables accounted for 43.6% of the variance of the HTL pelagic species composition. This result suggests that the HTL pelagic community in the western North Pacific is influenced largely by productivity and oceanic physical structure. These results suggest that an analytical approach based on

  11. Deep crustal structure and continent-ocean boundary along the Galicia continental margin (NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druet, María; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Carbó, Andrés; Acosta, Juan; Granja Bruña, José Luis; Llanes, Pilar; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Ercilla, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    The Galicia continental margin is a magma-poor rifted margin with an extremely complex structure. Its formation involves several rifting episodes during the Mesozoic in the vicinity of a ridge triple junction, which produces a change in the orientation of the main structures. In addition, there is an overimposed Cenozoic partial tectonic inversion along its northern border. Although this continental margin has been widely studied since the 70's, most studies have focused on its western part in the transition to the Iberia Abyssal Plain, and there is a significant lack of information on the north and northwestern flanks of this margin. This fact, along with its great structural complexity, has resulted in the absence of a previous comprehensive regional geodynamic model integrating all the processes observed. In the present study we integrate a large volume of new geophysical data (gravity, swath bathymetry and 2D multichannel reflection seismic). Data come from the systematic mapping of the Spanish EEZ project which provides a dense grid of gravity data and full seafloor coverage with swath bathymetry, and from the ERGAP project which provides serially-arranged 2D seismic reflection profiles across the NW Iberia margin. The combined interpretation and modelling of this new information has arisen significant constraints on the origin, the deep crustal structure and the physiographic complexity of the margin, as well as on the characterization of the along- and across-strike variation of the ocean-continent transition along NW Iberia margin. The analysis of this information leads us to propose a conceptual model for the initiation of the tectonic inversion of a magma-poor rifted margin. Finally, a framework for the geodynamic evolution of the Galicia margin has been constructed, involving three main stages: A) an early stage from the end of rifting and oceanic drift in the Bay of Biscay (Santonian); B) an intermediate stage with the beginning of tectonic inversion in

  12. Trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico revealed by gut content and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain-Counts, Jennifer P.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Ross, Steve W.

    2017-01-01

    Mesopelagic fishes represent an important component of the marine food web due to their global distributions, high abundances and ability to transport organic material throughout a large part of the water column. This study combined stable isotope (SIAs) and gut content analyses (GCAs) to characterize the trophic structure of mesopelagic fishes in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, this study examined whether mesopelagic fishes utilized chemosynthetic energy from cold seeps. Specimens were collected (9–25 August 2007) over three deep (>1,000 m) cold seeps at discrete depths (surface to 1,503 m) over the diurnal cycle. GCA classified 31 species (five families) of mesopelagic fishes into five feeding guilds: piscivores, large crustacean consumers, copepod consumers, generalists and mixed zooplanktivores. However, these guilds were less clearly defined based on stable isotope mixing model (MixSIAR) results, suggesting diets may be more mixed over longer time periods (weeks–months) and across co-occurring species. Copepods were likely important for the majority of mesopelagic fishes, consistent with GCA (this study) and previous literature. MixSIAR results also identified non-crustacean prey items, including salps and pteropods, as potentially important prey items for mesopelagic fishes, including those fishes not analysed in GCA (Sternoptyx spp. and Melamphaidae). Salps and other soft-bodied species are often missed in GCAs. Mesopelagic fishes had δ13C results consistent with particulate organic matter serving as the baseline organic carbon source, fueling up to three trophic levels. Fishes that undergo diel vertical migration were depleted in 15N relative to weak migrators, consistent with depth-specific isotope trends in sources and consumers, and assimilation of 15N-depleted organic matter in surface waters. Linear correlations between fish size and δ15N values suggested ontogenetic changes in fish diets for several species. While there was

  13. Spanwise vorticity and wall normal velocity structure in the inertial region of turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Bautista, Juan Carlos; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; White, Christopher; Chini, Gregory; Klewicki, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    The Reynolds shear stress gradient is a leading order mechanism on the inertial domain of turbulent wall-flows. This quantity can be described relative to the sum of two velocity-vorticity correlations, vωz and wωy . Recent studies suggest that the first of these correlates with the step-like structure of the instantaneous streamwise velocity profile on the inertial layer. This structure is comprised of large zones of uniform momentum segregated by slender regions of concentrated vorticity. In this talk we study the contributions of the v and ωz motions to the vorticity transport (vωz) mechanism through the use of experimental data at large friction Reynolds numbers, δ+. The primary contributions to v and ωz were estimated by identifying the peak wavelengths of their streamwise spectra. The magnitudes of these peaks are of the same order, and are shown to exhibit a weak δ+ dependence. The peak wavelengths of v, however, exhibit a strong wall-distance (y) dependence, while the peak wavelengths of ωz show only a weak y dependence, and remain almost O (√{δ+}) in size throughout the inertial domain. This research was partially supported by the National Science Foundation and partially supported by the Australian Research Council.

  14. Fine-Scale Human Population Structure in Southern Africa Reflects Ecogeographic Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Caitlin; Kim, Minju; Martin, Alicia R; Bobo, Dean; Gignoux, Christopher R; van Helden, Paul D; Möller, Marlo; Hoal, Eileen G; Henn, Brenna M

    2016-09-01

    Recent genetic studies have established that the KhoeSan populations of southern Africa are distinct from all other African populations and have remained largely isolated during human prehistory until ∼2000 years ago. Dozens of different KhoeSan groups exist, belonging to three different language families, but very little is known about their population history. We examine new genome-wide polymorphism data and whole mitochondrial genomes for >100 South Africans from the ≠Khomani San and Nama populations of the Northern Cape, analyzed in conjunction with 19 additional southern African populations. Our analyses reveal fine-scale population structure in and around the Kalahari Desert. Surprisingly, this structure does not always correspond to linguistic or subsistence categories as previously suggested, but rather reflects the role of geographic barriers and the ecology of the greater Kalahari Basin. Regardless of subsistence strategy, the indigenous Khoe-speaking Nama pastoralists and the N|u-speaking ≠Khomani (formerly hunter-gatherers) share ancestry with other Khoe-speaking forager populations that form a rim around the Kalahari Desert. We reconstruct earlier migration patterns and estimate that the southern Kalahari populations were among the last to experience gene flow from Bantu speakers, ∼14 generations ago. We conclude that local adoption of pastoralism, at least by the Nama, appears to have been primarily a cultural process with limited genetic impact from eastern Africa. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. An infinite-dimensional generalization of Shilov boundary and infinite-dimensional analytic structures in the spectrum of a uniform algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonev, T.V.

    1986-02-01

    We introduce a generalization of classical Shilov boundary of a commutative Banach algebra, that is suitable for investigation of infinite-dimensional analytic structures living in the maximal ideal space (the spectrum) of a uniform algebra. The one-dimensional case, created (for the boundary) by Shilov and (for analytic structures in the spectrum) by Bishop, was carried over to n-dimensions by Sibony and Basener (for the boundary), and for n-dimensional analytic structures in the spectrum by Basener, Sibony, Kramm and others. Another, simpler definition as well as a detailed investigation of Sibony-Basener's generalization of Shilov boundary, based on the class of all nonvanishing continuous mappings from the spectrum into slash-Csup(n) has also been given. In other references this definition was carried out for the case of some classes of continuous mappings from the spectrum to a normed space. Here we interpret these results for the case of the Banach space lsup(infinity), dropping at the same time the continuity condition from the base class of mappings, connected with the corresponding infinity-generalization of Shilov boundary. In Sec. 3 an infinity-dimensional generalization of Bishop's and Basener's results about existence of analytic structure in the spectrum of a uniform algebra is given. (author)

  16. Structure of the tsunamigenic plate boundary and low-frequency earthquakes in the southern Ryukyu Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Kodaira, Shuichi; Kaiho, Yuka; Nakanishi, Ayako; Fujie, Gou; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Ishihara, Yasushi; Miura, Seiichi; Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that even weakly coupled subduction zones may cause large interplate earthquakes leading to destructive tsunamis. The Ryukyu Trench is one of the best fields to study this phenomenon, since various slow earthquakes and tsunamis have occurred; yet the fault structure and seismic activity there are poorly constrained. Here we present seismological evidence from marine observation for megathrust faults and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). On the basis of passive observation we find LFEs occur at 15–18 km depths along the plate interface and their distribution seems to bridge the gap between the shallow tsunamigenic zone and the deep slow slip region. This suggests that the southern Ryukyu Trench is dominated by slow earthquakes at any depths and lacks a typical locked zone. The plate interface is overlaid by a low-velocity wedge and is accompanied by polarity reversals of seismic reflections, indicating fluids exist at various depths along the plate interface. PMID:27447546

  17. Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework: 3. Land Use and Field Boundary Database Development and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Mark D; James, David E; Sandoval-Green, Claudette M J

    2017-05-01

    Conservation planning information is important for identifying options for watershed water quality improvement and can be developed for use at field, farm, and watershed scales. Translation across scales is a key issue impeding progress at watershed scales because watershed improvement goals must be connected with implementation of farm- and field-level conservation practices to demonstrate success. This is particularly true when examining alternatives for "trap and treat" practices implemented at agricultural-field edges to control (or influence) water flows through fields, landscapes, and riparian corridors within agricultural watersheds. We propose that database structures used in developing conservation planning information can achieve translation across conservation-planning scales, and we developed the Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework (ACPF) to enable practical planning applications. The ACPF comprises a planning concept, a database to facilitate field-level and watershed-scale analyses, and an ArcGIS toolbox with Python scripts to identify specific options for placement of conservation practices. This paper appends two prior publications and describes the structure of the ACPF database, which contains land use, crop history, and soils information and is available for download for 6091 HUC12 watersheds located across Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, and parts of Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Wisconsin and comprises information on 2.74 × 10 agricultural fields (available through /). Sample results examining land use trends across Iowa and Illinois are presented here to demonstrate potential uses of the database. While designed for use with the ACPF toolbox, users are welcome to use the ACPF watershed data in a variety of planning and modeling approaches. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  18. Étude expérimentale de structures stables en turbulence bidimensionnelle, comparaison avec une théorie de mécanique statistique

    OpenAIRE

    DENOIX , Marie-Alice

    1992-01-01

    We create two-dimensional flows within a thin layer of mercury, horizontal and subjected to a vertical uniform magnetic field. The fluid is set in motion by injecting electrical currents. We are interested in the inertial organization into stable structures of two-dimensional turbulence. With the experimental conditions in two areas of initial vorticity, we get axisymmetric structures, elliptical, or eccentric. We study these structures using visualizations and also measurements by potential ...

  19. BOLIVAR: Crustal Structure Across the Caribbean-South American Plate Boundary at 70W: Results from Refraction and Reflection Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedez, M. C.; Zelt, C. A.; Magnani, M. B.; Levander, A.; Christeson, G. L.; Sawyer, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    The active-seismic component of the BOLIVAR project (Broadband Ocean and Land Investigations of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) was completed in June 2004. Among the goals of BOLIVAR is to study the structure of the South America-Caribbean plate boundary as a site of likely continental growth by island arc accretion of the Leeward Antilles arc to the South American continent. In the west end of the Venezuelan basin the complex motion across the plate boundary is poorly understood. Other studies have concluded that the Caribbean Plate is subducting beneath the South American Plate and the Leeward Antilles arc is being accreted to older continental crust. Complicating this picture, the Maracaibo block is being displaced northward along the Bocono and Santa Marta strike-slip faults, while the Oca fault is a paleo-strand of the large right-lateral strike-slip system of the plate boundary. We present results of analyses of refraction and reflection seismic data along a 450 km long onshore-offshore profile at 70oW, extending from 10oN to 14.3oN. The refraction data include 40 Ocean Bottom Seismometer (OBS) and 348 Reftek Texan land seismometers that recorded the R/V Ewing airgun shots. The land stations also recorded two large landshots to provide reversed refraction coverage onshore. A 2-D velocity model obtained from travel time inversion of first arrivals shows that the Caribbean crust is anomalously thick, typical of oceanic plateau, ~ 15-20 km. Low velocity sediments, on the Caribbean oceanic plateau, are observed subducting beneath the South-Caribbean deformed belt over a distance of 75-100 km. We also observe low velocities associated with the Paraguana/Falcon basin extending from onshore to offshore depths of 3 km. We observe localized high compressional velocities spatially associated with the Oca fault. Similar high velocity bodies are observed on other BOLIVAR transects (see Avé Lallemant et al., this session). A migrated stack of the marine reflection

  20. Impact of aerosol intrusions on sea-ice melting rates and the structure Arctic boundary layer clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, W.; Carrio, G.; Jiang, H.

    2003-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory sea-ice model (LANL CICE) was implemented into the real-time and research versions of the Colorado State University-Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS@CSU). The original version of CICE was modified in its structure to allow module communication in an interactive multigrid framework. In addition, some improvements have been made in the routines involved in the coupling, among them, the inclusion of iterative methods that consider variable roughness lengths for snow-covered ice thickness categories. This version of the model also includes more complex microphysics that considers the nucleation of cloud droplets, allowing the prediction of mixing ratios and number concentrations for all condensed water species. The real-time version of RAMS@CSU automatically processes the NASA Team SSMI F13 25km sea-ice coverage data; the data are objectively analyzed and mapped to the model grid configuration. We performed two types of cloud resolving simulations to assess the impact of the entrainment of aerosols from above the inversion on Arctic boundary layer clouds. The first series of numerical experiments corresponds to a case observed on May 4 1998 during the FIRE-ACE/SHEBA field experiment. Results indicate a significant impact on the microstructure of the simulated clouds. When assuming polluted initial profiles above the inversion, the liquid water fraction of the cloud monotonically decreases, the total condensate paths increases and downward IR tends to increase due to a significant increase in the ice water path. The second set of cloud resolving simulations focused on the evaluation of the potential effect of aerosol concentration above the inversion on melting rates during spring-summer period. For these multi-month simulations, the IFN and CCN profiles were also initialized assuming the 4 May profiles as benchmarks. Results suggest that increasing the aerosol concentrations above the boundary layer increases sea-ice melting

  1. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    propagation under changing structural boundary conditions can be monitored reliably. The method is not limited by the properties of the structure, and thus it is feasible to be applied to composite structure. PMID:26927115

  2. An Improved Gaussian Mixture Model for Damage Propagation Monitoring of an Aircraft Wing Spar under Changing Structural Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Fang, Fang

    2016-02-26

    propagation under changing structural boundary conditions can be monitored reliably. The method is not limited by the properties of the structure, and thus it is feasible to be applied to composite structure.

  3. Structurally Deformed MoS2 for Electrochemically Stable, Thermally Resistant, and Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Chang; Lu, Ang-Yu; Lu, Ping; Yang, Xiulin; Jiang, Chang-Ming; Mariano, Marina; Kaehr, Bryan; Lin, Oliver; Taylor, André; Sharp, Ian D; Li, Lain-Jong; Chou, Stanley S; Tung, Vincent

    2017-11-01

    The emerging molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) offers intriguing possibilities for realizing a transformative new catalyst for driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the trade-off between catalytic activity and long-term stability represents a formidable challenge and has not been extensively addressed. This study reports that metastable and temperature-sensitive chemically exfoliated MoS 2 (ce-MoS 2 ) can be made into electrochemically stable (5000 cycles), and thermally robust (300 °C) while maintaining synthetic scalability and excellent catalytic activity through physical-transformation into 3D structurally deformed nanostructures. The dimensional transition enabled by a high throughput electrohydrodynamic process provides highly accessible, and electrochemically active surface area and facilitates efficient transport across various interfaces. Meanwhile, the hierarchically strained morphology is found to improve electronic coupling between active sites and current collecting substrates without the need for selective engineering the electronically heterogeneous interfaces. Specifically, the synergistic combination of high strain load stemmed from capillarity-induced-self-crumpling and sulfur (S) vacancies intrinsic to chemical exfoliation enables simultaneous modulation of active site density and intrinsic HER activity regardless of continuous operation or elevated temperature. These results provide new insights into how catalytic activity, electrochemical-, and thermal stability can be concurrently enhanced through the physical transformation that is reminiscent of nature, in which properties of biological materials emerge from evolved dimensional transitions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Structural, physiological, and stable carbon isotopic evidence that the enigmatic Paleozoic fossil Prototaxites formed from rolled liverwort mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Linda E; Cook, Martha E; Hanson, David T; Pigg, Kathleen B; Graham, James M

    2010-02-01

    New structural, nutritional, and stable carbon isotope data may resolve a long-standing mystery-the biological affinities of the fossil Prototaxites, the largest organism on land during the Late Silurian to Late Devonian (420-370 Ma). The tree trunk-shaped specimens, of varying dimensions but consistent tubular anatomy, first formed prior to vascular plant dominance. Hence, Prototaxites has been proposed to represent giant algae, fungi, or lichens, despite incompatible biochemical and anatomical observations. Our comparative analyses instead indicate that Prototaxites formed from partially degraded, wind-, gravity-, or water-rolled mats of mixotrophic liverworts having fungal and cyanobacterial associates, much like the modern liverwort genus Marchantia. We propose that the fossil body is largely derived from abundant, highly degradation-resistant, tubular rhizoids of marchantioid liverworts, intermixed with tubular microbial elements. Our concept explains previously puzzling fossil features and is consistent with evidence for liverworts and microbial associates in Ordovician-Devonian deposits, extensive ancient and modern marchantioid mats, and modern associations of liverworts with cyanobacteria and diverse types of fungi. Our interpretation indicates that liverworts were important components of Devonian ecosystems, that some macrofossils and microfossils previously attributed to "nematophytes" actually represent remains of ancient liverworts, and that mixotrophy and microbial associations were features of early land plants.

  5. Structurally Deformed MoS2 for Electrochemically Stable, Thermally Resistant, and Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yen-Chang

    2017-10-12

    The emerging molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) offers intriguing possibilities for realizing a transformative new catalyst for driving the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, the trade-off between catalytic activity and long-term stability represents a formidable challenge and has not been extensively addressed. This study reports that metastable and temperature-sensitive chemically exfoliated MoS2 (ce-MoS2) can be made into electrochemically stable (5000 cycles), and thermally robust (300 °C) while maintaining synthetic scalability and excellent catalytic activity through physical-transformation into 3D structurally deformed nanostructures. The dimensional transition enabled by a high throughput electrohydrodynamic process provides highly accessible, and electrochemically active surface area and facilitates efficient transport across various interfaces. Meanwhile, the hierarchically strained morphology is found to improve electronic coupling between active sites and current collecting substrates without the need for selective engineering the electronically heterogeneous interfaces. Specifically, the synergistic combination of high strain load stemmed from capillarity-induced-self-crumpling and sulfur (S) vacancies intrinsic to chemical exfoliation enables simultaneous modulation of active site density and intrinsic HER activity regardless of continuous operation or elevated temperature. These results provide new insights into how catalytic activity, electrochemical-, and thermal stability can be concurrently enhanced through the physical transformation that is reminiscent of nature, in which properties of biological materials emerge from evolved dimensional transitions.

  6. Highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings based on gradient structure design and fast regeneration from physical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zao; Liu, Xiaojiang; Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Guan, Zisheng

    2015-12-01

    Optical transparency, mechanical flexibility, and fast regeneration are important factors to expand the application of superhydrophobic surfaces. Herein, we fabricated highly transparent, stable, and superhydrophobic coatings through a novel gradient structure design by versatile dip-coating of silica colloid particles (SCPs) and diethoxydimethysiliane cross-linked silica nanoparticles (DDS-SNPs) on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film and glass, followed by the modification of octadecyltrichlorosiliane (OTCS). When the DDS concentration reached 5 wt%, the modified SCPs/DDS-SNPs coating exhibited a water contact angle (WCA) of 153° and a sliding angle (SA) superhydrophobic coating on PET film and glass was increased by 2.7% and 1% in the visible wavelength, respectively. This superhydrophobic coating also showed good robustness and stability against water dropping impact, ultrasonic damage, and acid solution. Moreover, the superhydrophobic PET film after physical damage can quickly regain the superhydrophobicity by one-step spray regenerative solution of dodecyltrichlorosilane (DTCS) modified silica nanoparticles at room temperature. The demonstrated method for the preparation and regeneration of superhydrophobic coating is available for different substrates and large-scale production at room temperature.

  7. Microbial communities of the Lemon Creek Glacier show subtle structural variation yet stable phylogenetic composition over space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Springer Sheik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are geologically important yet transient ecosystems that support diverse, biogeochemically significant microbial communities. During the melt season glaciers undergo dramatic physical, geochemical and biological changes that exert great influence on downstream biogeochemical cycles. Thus, we sought to understand the temporal melt-season dynamics of microbial communities and associated geochemistry at the terminus of Lemon Creek Glacier (LCG in coastal southern Alaska. Due to late season snowfall, sampling of LCG occurred in three interconnected areas: proglacial Lake Thomas, the lower glacial outflow stream and the glacier’s terminus. LCG associated microbial communities were phylogenetically diverse and varied by sampling location. However, Betaproteobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes dominated communities at all sampling locations. Strict anaerobic groups such as methanogens, SR1, and OP11 were also recovered from glacier outflows, indicating anoxic conditions in at least some portions of the LCG subglacial environment. Microbial community structure was significantly correlated with sampling location and sodium concentrations. Microbial communities sampled from terminus outflow waters exhibited day-to-day fluctuation in taxonomy and phylogenetic similarity. However, these communities were not significantly different from randomly constructed communities from all three sites. These results indicate that glacial outflows share a large proportion of phylogenetic overlap with downstream environments and that the observed significant shifts in community structure are driven by changes in relative abundance of different taxa, and not complete restructuring of communities. We conclude that LCG glacial discharge hosts a diverse and relatively stable microbiome that shifts at fine taxonomic scales in response to geochemistry and likely water residence time.

  8. An algorithm for the visualization of stochastically generated colour images of reservoir attributes, structural information and reservoir boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, O.G.; Intevep, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    Visualization of reservoir models, integration of a variety of relevant information and generation of final maps on both computer screen and paper, are important parts of reservoir modelling work. The automation of the map generation process enhances the visualization of models integrating multiple geological features, improves quality and reduces time requirements. This paper presents an image processing algorithm, developed on workstations, which enhances the integration of information used in visualizing and representing reservoir models and related geological-engineering characteristics. The algorithm can integrate images of: (1) Stochastically generated colour maps of reservoir attributes. (2) Scanned structural reservoir maps including faults as well as borehole locations and names. (3) Scanned maps of reservoir boundaries. This information is digitally integrated into a single colour map that can be manipulated on the screen or printed on paper. Part of the work is developed to extend the visualization of two dimensional maps such as structural maps into three dimensions without relying on digitizer tables. The practical aspects and visualization capabilities of the algorithm are demonstrated with examples.

  9. Geological and Structural evolution of the Eurasia Africa plate boundary in the Gulf of Cadiz Central Eastern Atlantic Sea.

    OpenAIRE

    D’Oriano, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    Iberia Africa plate boundary, cross, roughly W-E, connecting the eastern Atlantic Ocean from Azores triple junction to the Continental margin of Morocco. Relative movement between the two plate change along the boundary, from transtensive near the Azores archipelago, through trascurrent movement in the middle at the Gloria Fracture Zone, to transpressive in the Gulf of Cadiz area. This study presents the results of geophysical and geological analysis on the plate boundary area offshore Gibral...

  10. Latitude-energy structure of multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS data in plasma sheet boundary layer and boundary plasma sheet below 6 RE radial distance: basic properties and statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Velocity dispersed ion signatures (VDIS occurring at the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL are a well reported feature. Theory has, however, predicted the existence of multiple ion beamlets, similar to VDIS, in the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, i.e. at latitudes below the PSBL. In this study we show evidence for the multiple ion beamlets in Polar/TIMAS ion data and basic properties of the ion beamlets will be presented. Statistics of the occurrence frequency of ion multiple beamlets show that they are most common in the midnight MLT sector and for altitudes above 4 RE, while at low altitude (≤3 RE, single beamlets at PSBL (VDIS are more common. Distribution functions of ion beamlets in velocity space have recently been shown to correspond to 3-dimensional hollow spheres, containing a large amount of free energy. We also study correlation with ~100 Hz waves and electron anisotropies and consider the possibility that ion beamlets correspond to stable auroral arcs.

  11. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  12. Stable States of Biological Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.; Yukalova, E. P.; Henry, J.-Y.; Cobb, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A novel model of biological organisms is advanced, treating an organism as a self-consistent system subject to a pathogen flux. The principal novelty of the model is that it describes not some parts, but a biological organism as a whole. The organism is modeled by a five-dimensional dynamical system. The organism homeostasis is described by the evolution equations for five interacting components: healthy cells, ill cells, innate immune cells, specific immune cells, and pathogens. The stability analysis demonstrates that, in a wide domain of the parameter space, the system exhibits robust structural stability. There always exist four stable stationary solutions characterizing four qualitatively differing states of the organism: alive state, boundary state, critical state, and dead state.

  13. Alaskan crustal thickness variations from P receiver functions provide insight into both inherited and active plate boundary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. S.; O'Driscoll, L.; Porritt, R.; Roeske, S.

    2017-12-01

    The geologic mosaic of terranes, adjacent multi-phase plate boundary in the south, rapid lateral topographic variations, and heterogeneous distribution of strain throughout Alaska all suggest strong heterogeneity of crustal architecture. We present the first wide-scale model of crustal thickness based on broadband seismic data across the region that is primarily constrained where seismic instrumentation has been deployed - dense coverage in the south-central region and more sparse coverage in the northern, western, and arctic regions from EarthScope Transportable Array (TA) stations. P receiver functions (PRF) were calculated for 2070 events at 465 stations, which yielded a final 22,886 total RFs. The resulting 3D CCP stacked model and individual receiver functions at remote stations reproduce many of the Moho depth variations previously modeled by both more concentrated studies using receiver functions and tomographic imaging. However, these new results provide more detailed images of the entire state that illustrate the active and inherited crustal structures that have persisted throughout the tectonic history in the region. The continental growth by accretion and strike-slip displacement of oceanic and pericratonic terranes is documented in discrete changes in crustal thicknesses that are observed across the terranes of the northern Cordillera in Alaska and there are distinct changes across major, active and inactive faults. Analysis of P receiver functions provides the first detailed look at the crust and upper mantle structures across Alaska. These images show variability that reflects inherited thickness from Mesozoic convergent and extension events, which in some regions is being extensively modified by ongoing convergence and collision, particularly along the active southern margin. The 4D interpretation of the Alaskan crust and Moho structure will continue to evolve as the full USArray Transportable Array is deployed and geologic studies are combined with

  14. Grain Boundary Segregation in Metals

    CERN Document Server

    Lejcek, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Grain boundaries are important structural components of polycrystalline materials used in the vast majority of technical applications. Because grain boundaries form a continuous network throughout such materials, their properties may limit their practical use. One of the serious phenomena which evoke these limitations is the grain boundary segregation of impurities. It results in the loss of grain boundary cohesion and consequently, in brittle fracture of the materials. The current book deals with fundamentals of grain boundary segregation in metallic materials and its relationship to the grain boundary structure, classification and other materials properties.

  15. Investigations of structure parameters and their similarity relationships in the convective boundary layer by means of large-eddy simulations and comparison with measurement data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maronga, B.; Moene, A.F.; Dinther, van D.; Raasch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent fluctuations of the refractive index (n) in the atmospheric boundary layer are related to local fluctuations in the air density, which can be expressed by the refractive-index structure parameter (Cn2). Since these fluctuations depend mainly on temperature and humidity, it is possible to

  16. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    2001-05-01

    precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  17. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    electrons and isotropic ion precipitation (AO is mapped to the dawn periphery of the Central Plasma Sheet (CPS; the soft small scale structured precipitation (SSSL is mapped to the outer magnetosphere close to the magnetopause, i.e. the Low Latitude Boundary Layer (LLBL. In the near-noon sector, earthward fluxes of soft electrons, which cause the Diffuse Red Aurora (DRA, are observed. The ion energies decrease with increasing latitude. The plasma spectra of the DRA regime are analogous to the spectra of the Plasma Mantle (PM. In the dawn sector, the large-scale field-aligned currents flow into the ionosphere at the SSSL latitudes (Region 1 and flow out at the AO or DAZ latitudes (Region 2. In the dawn and dusk sectors, the large-scale Region 1 and Region 2 FAC generation occurs in different plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere. The dawn and dusk FAC connection to the traditional Region 1 and Region 2 has only formal character, as FAC generating in various magnetospheric plasma domains integrate in the same region (Region 1 or Region 2. In the SSSL, there is anti-sunward convection; in the DAZ and the AO, there is the sunward convection. At PM latitudes, the convection is controlled by the azimuthal IMF component (By . It is suggested to extend the notation of the plasma pattern boundaries, as proposed by Newell et al. (1996, for the nightside sector of the auroral oval to the dawn sector.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (current systems; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasma convection

  18. Stable and High OSNR Compound Linear-Cavity Single-Longitudinal-Mode Erbium-Doped Silica Fiber Laser Based on an Asymmetric Four-Cavity Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Ting; Yan Feng-Ping; Li Qi; Peng Wan-Jing; Feng Su-Chun; Wen Xiao-Dong; Tan Si-Yu; Liu Peng

    2012-01-01

    We propose a stable and high optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) compound linear-cavity single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) erbium-doped silica fiber laser. It consists of three uniform fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and two fiber couplers to form a simple asymmetric four-cavity structure to select the longitudinal mode. The stable SLM operation at the wavelength of 1544.053 nm with a 3 dB bandwidth of 0.014 nm and an OSNR of ∼60 dB was verified experimentally. Under laboratory conditions, a power fluctuation performance of less than 0.05 dB for 5 h and wavelength variation of less than 0.01 nm for about 150 min is demonstrated. Finally, the characteristic of laser output power as a function of pump power is investigated. The proposed system provides a simple and cost-effective approach to realize a stable SLM fiber laser

  19. Variability in the combustion-derived fraction of urban humidity in Salt Lake City winter estimated from stable water vapor isotopes and its relationship to atmospheric stability and inversion structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorella, R.; Bares, R.; Lin, J. C.; Strong, C.; Bowen, G. J.

    2017-12-01

    Water released from the combustion of fossil fuels, while a negligible part of the global hydrological cycle, may be a significant contributor to urban humidity as fossil fuel emissions are strongly concentrated in space and time. The fraction of urban humidity comprised of combustion-derived vapor (CDV) cannot be observed through humidity measurements alone. However, the distinct stable isotopic composition of CDV, which arises from the reaction of 18O-enriched atmospheric O2 with 2H-depleted organic molecules, represents a promising method to apportion observed humidity between CDV and advected vapor. We apply stable water vapor isotopes to investigate variability in CDV amount and its relationship to atmospheric conditions in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Salt Lake Valley experiences several periods of atmospheric stratification during winter known as cold air pools, during which concentrations of CDV and pollutants can be markedly elevated due to reduced atmospheric mixing. Therefore, the SLV during winter is an ideal place to investigate variability in CDV fraction across a spectrum of boundary layer conditions, ranging from well-mixed to very stable. We present water vapor isotope data from four winters (2013-2017) from the top of a 30 m building on the University of Utah (U of U) Campus. Additionally, we present water vapor isotope data from the summit of Hidden Peak from the 2016-2017 winter, 25 km SE and 2000 m above the U of U site. The Hidden Peak site is consistently above the cold air pool emplaced in the SLV during stable events. We find the expression of the CDV signal in the valley is related to the atmospheric structure of the cold air pools in the SLV, and that the fraction of CDV inferred in the valley is likely related to the mixing height within the cold air pool. Furthermore, we find that patterns between the Hidden Peak and U of U sites during inversion events may record the large-scale atmospheric dynamics promoting emplacement of the cold air

  20. 2,6,10-Tris(dialkylamino)-trioxatriangulenium Ions. Synthesis, Structure, and Properties of Exceptionally Stable Carbenium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bo W.; Krebs, Frederik C; Nielsen, Merete F.

    1998-01-01

    is expressed as the pK(R+) value, which is determined in strongly basic nonaqueous solution on-the basis of a new acidity function C-. The pK(R+) value of 5a is measured to be 19.7, which is 10 orders of magnitude higher than the values found for the most stable carbenium ions previously reported...

  1. Rheological structure of a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary zone, decoded from EBSD analysis of mantle xenoliths from Ichinomegata, NE Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Ozawa, K.

    2017-12-01

    Mantle xenoliths are fragments of mantle materials entrapped in alkali basalts or kimberlites and transported to the surface (Nixon, 1987). They provide information on rheological, thermal, chemical, petrological structures of the upper mantle (e.g. Green et al., 2010; McKenzie and Bickle, 1988; O'Reilly and Griffin, 1996). They potentially represent materials from a boundary zone of lithosphere and asthenosphere (LABZ), where the heat transportation mechanism changes from convection to conduction (Sleep, 2005, 2006). However, difficulties in geobarometry for spinel peridotite (e.g. O'Reilly et al., 1997) have hampered our understanding of shallow LABZ. Ichinomegata located in the back-arc side of NE Japan is a latest Pleistocene andesitic-dacitic volcano yielding spinel peridotite xenoliths (Katsui et al., 1979). Through our works (Sato and Ozawa, 2016, 2017a, 2017b), we have overcome difficulties in geobarometry of spinel peridotites and gained accurate thermal structure (0.74-1.60 GPa, 832-1084 °C) from eight of the nine examined xenoliths. The rheological and chemical features suggest drastic changes: undeformed (granular), depleted, subsolidus mantle representing lithospheric mantle (ca. 28-35 km) and deformed (porphyroclastic), fertile, hydrous supersolidus mantle representing rheological LABZ (ca. 35-54 km). We investigate depth dependent variation of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of constituent minerals of the xenoliths by electron back-scattered diffraction analysis (using JSM-7000F with a CCD detector and the CHANNEL5 software at the University of Tokyo). A shallower (ca. 32 km) sample with tabulargranular texture and coarse olivine size (0.92 mm) has A-type olivine CPO with [100] maximum as reported by Satsukawa and Michibayashi (2014) (hereafter SM14), whereas a deep (ca. 51 km) sample with porphyroclastic texture and finer olivine size (0.46 mm) has CPO with weaker fabric intensity characterized by a [100] girdle similar to AG-type and

  2. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction analysis based on the boundary-element method in time domain with application to embedded foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, J.P.; Darbre, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    The computational procedure of the so-called truncated indirect boundary-element method is derived. The latter, which is non-local in space and time, represents a rigorous generally applicable procedure for taking into account a layered halfspace in a non-linear soil-structure interaction analysis. As an example, the non-linear soil-structure interaction analysis of a structure embedded in a halfspace with partial uplift of the basement and separation of the side wall is investigated. (orig.)

  3. Negotiating boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Ballegaard, Stinne Aaløkke

    2010-01-01

    to maintain the order of the home when managing disease and adopting new healthcare technology. In our analysis we relate this boundary work to two continuums of visibility-invisibility and integration-segmentation in disease management. We explore five factors that affect the boundary work: objects......To move treatment successfully from the hospital to that of technology assisted self-care at home, it is vital in the design of such technologies to understand the setting in which the health IT should be used. Based on qualitative studies we find that people engage in elaborate boundary work......, activities, places, character of disease, and collaboration. Furthermore, the processes are explored of how boundary objects move between social worlds pushing and shaping boundaries. From this we discuss design implications for future healthcare technologies for the home....

  4. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors...... in the period of post-acquisition when their organization is being integrated into the acquiring MNC. The paper contributes to the literature on boundary spanning in three ways: First, by illustrating that boundary spanning is performed by numerous organizational actors in a variety of positions in MNCs......, inclusively by locals in subsidiaries. Second, by showing that boundary spanning is ‘situated’ in the sense that its result depends on the kind of knowledge to be transmitted and the attitude of the receivers. A third contribution is methodological. The study illustrates that combining bottom-up grounded...

  5. Acousto-optical and SAW propagation characteristics of temperature stable multilayered structures based on LiNbO3 and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandilya, Swati; Sreenivas, K; Gupta, Vinay

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical studies on the surface acoustic wave (SAW) properties of c-axis oriented LiNbO 3 /IDT/diamond and diamond/IDT/128 0 rotated Y-X cut LiNbO 3 multilayered structures have been considered. Both layered structures exhibit a positive temperature coefficient of delay (TCD) characteristic, and a zero TCD device is obtained after integrating with an over-layer of either tellurium dioxide (TeO 2 ) or silicon dioxide (SiO 2 ). The presence of a TeO 2 over-layer enhanced the electromechanical coupling coefficients of both multilayered structures, which acts as a better temperature compensation layer than SiO 2 . The temperature stable TeO 2 /LiNbO 3 /IDT/diamond layered structure exhibits good electromechanical coefficient and higher phase velocity for SAW device applications. On the other hand, a high acousto-optical (AO) figure of merit (30-37) x 10 -15 s 3 kg -1 has been obtained for the temperature stable SiO 2 /diamond/IDT/LiNbO 3 layered structure indicating a promising device structure for AO applications

  6. Stable structures of Al510–800 clusters and lowest energy sequence of truncated octahedral Al clusters up to 10,000 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xia; He, Chengdong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The stable structures of Al 510–800 clusters are obtained with the NP-B potential. ► Al 510–800 clusters adopt truncated octahedral (TO) growth pattern based on complete TOs at Al 405 , Al 586 , and Al 711 . ► The lowest energy sequence of complete TOs up to the size 10,000 is proposed. -- Abstract: The stable structures of Al 510–800 clusters are obtained using dynamic lattice searching with constructed cores (DLSc) method by the NP-B potential. According to the structural growth rule, octahedra and truncated octahedra (TO) configurations are adopted as the inner cores in DLSc method. The results show that in the optimized structures two complete TO structures are found at Al 586 and Al 711 . Furthermore, Al 510–800 clusters adopt TO growth pattern on complete TOs at Al 405 , Al 586 , and Al 711 , and the configurations of the surface atoms are investigated. On the other hand, Al clusters with complete TO motifs are studied up to the size 10,000 by the geometrical construction method. The structural characteristics of complete TOs are denoted by the term “family”, and the growth sequence of Al clusters is investigated. The lowest energy sequence of complete TOs is proposed.

  7. Structural observations and U-Pb mineral ages from igneous rocks at the Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary in the Salahmi Schist Belt, central Finland: constraints on tectonic evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietikäinen, K.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The study area in Vieremä, central Finland, contains part of Archaean-Palaeoproterozoic boundary. In the east, the area comprises Archaean gneiss and the Salahmi Schist Belt. The rocks of the schist belt are turbiditic metagreywackes, with well-preserved depositional structures, occurring as Proterozoic wedge-shaped blocks, and staurolite schists, the latter representing higher-strained and metamorphosed equivalents of the metagreywackes. In the west of the area there is an Archaean gneiss block, containing strongly elongated structures, and deformed Svecofennian supracrustal rocks, which are cut by deformed granitoids. These are juxtaposed with the schist belt. The boundaries of these tectonometamorphic blocks are narrow, highly strained mylonites and thrust zones. The metamorphic grade of the supracrustal rocks increases from east to west, the increase being stepwise across the mylonitic block boundaries. The rocks are more deformed from east to west with younger structures overprinting. In the staurolite schists of the Salahmi Schist Belt, the most prominent structure is a lineation (L2 that overprints the bedding and axial plane foliation. In Sorronmäki quarry, at the western boundary of the schist belt, this Palaeoproterozoic lineation dominates all the structures in tonalite gneiss, which gives a U-Pb age of 2731±6 Ma. Southeast of the quarry, at the same boundary, the Salahmi schists have been overturned towards the northeast, suggesting that the Archaean gneiss at Sorronmäki has been thrust towards the northeast over these rocks. In the western part of the study area, the Leppikangas granodiorite that intrudes the Svecofennian supracrustal rocks gives a U-Pb age of 1891+6 Ma. In the granodiorite, a strong lineation formed by the intersection of two foliations, which maybe L2 is associated with thrusting towards the northeast. The monazite age of the Archaean Sorronmäki gneiss is 1817+3 Ma, and the titanite age of the Svecofennian

  8. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  9. Application of Nitrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) to Quantify Food Chain Length and Trophic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, Matthew J.; McDonald, Robbie A.; van Veen, F. J. Frank; Kelly, Simon D.; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ(15)N, and carbon range (CR) using δ(13)C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of kn...

  10. Auditory Temporal Structure Processing in Dyslexia: Processing of Prosodic Phrase Boundaries Is Not Impaired in Children with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Eveline; Kjelgaard, Margaret; Christodoulou, Joanna A.; Cyr, Abigail; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Reading disability in children with dyslexia has been proposed to reflect impairment in auditory timing perception. We investigated one aspect of timing perception--"temporal grouping"--as present in prosodic phrase boundaries of natural speech, in age-matched groups of children, ages 6-8 years, with and without dyslexia. Prosodic phrase…

  11. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphas...

  12. Structural Evolution of the India-Arabia Plate Boundary from Miocene to Present-Day (NW Indian Ocean) and Comparison with the Dead Sea Fault (Eastern Mediterranean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Chamot Rooke, N.; Fournier, M.; Delescluse, M.; Ben Avraham, Z.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    Arabia is bounded by the Dead Sea Transform (DST) to the west and by the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) to the east. These present-day major strike-slip fault systems activated during the Plio-Pleistocene, which contrasts with the age of inception of strike-slip motion, assumed to begin around 13-18 Ma for the DST and around 20 Ma at the edge of the Owen-Murray Ridge (OMR) for the India-Arabia plate boundary. This discrepancy between the age of the active strike-slip systems and the age of inception of strike-slip motion raises the question of the kinematic driver for the transition between successive generations of strike-slip faults. Using a recent mutibeam and seismic dataset crossing the OFZ and the OMR, we provide a new geodynamic framework for the Miocene to present-day structural evolution of the India-Arabia plate boundary, and highlight some similarities with the structural evolution of the DST. We first document a Late Miocene episode of uplift of the OMR uplift along the Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary. The onset of this uplift is coeval with a plate reorganization event marked by the onset of intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean. The OFZ emplaced around 3 Ma, with major pull-apart basins opening (20°N Basin, Dalrymple Trough) dated at 2.4 Ma by far-field correlation with ODP Sites. The opening of pull-apart basins is coeval with the last structural reorganization of the Makran accretionnary wedge, marked by the regional M-unconformity, and with a major intensification of the Indian monsoon. A Late Miocene episode of folding is also recognized at the Lebanon ranges prior to the onset of the present-day DST, which occurred in the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene. The similarities between the geological history of the India-Arabia plate boundary and the DST in the Late Miocene and the Late Pliocene-Early Pleistocene suggest that both plate boundaries recorded the same kinematic changes. Late Miocene (i.e. Tortonian) deformation is widely

  13. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McInnes, K.L. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Mordialloc (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  14. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    The paper explores how locals span boundaries between corporate and local levels. The aim is to better comprehend potentialities and challenges when MNCs draws on locals’ culture specific knowledge. The study is based on an in-depth, interpretive case study of boundary spanning by local actors in...... approach with pattern matching is a way to shed light on the tacit local knowledge that organizational actors cannot articulate and that an exclusively inductive research is not likely to unveil....

  15. Fractal basin boundaries generated by basin cells and the geometry of mixing chaotic flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusse, HE; Yorke, JA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computations indicate that mixing in chaotic flows generates certain coherent spatial structures. Lf a two-dimensional basin has a basin cell (a trappings region whose boundary consists of pieces of the stable and unstable manifold of some periodic orbit) then the basin consists of a

  16. Synthesis and characterization of highly efficient and stable Pr6O11/Ag3PO4/Pt ternary hybrid structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jiatao; Liu, Lin; Niu, Tongjun; Sun, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Visible-light-driven Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt photocatalysts were prepared. • Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt showed highly efficient and stable photocatalystic activity. • The photocatalytic mechanism of Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt composite was given. - Abstract: Ag 3 PO 4 is an excellent photocatalyst with high efficiency and quantum yield, but suffers from the fast recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and photo-corrosion. Hereby, the highly efficient and stable visible-light-driven Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt photocatalyst were prepared via a three-step wet chemical approach. The as-prepared Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, US-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra and transient photocurrent as well. Comparing with single Pr 6 O 11 or Ag 3 PO 4 , the prepared Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt composite exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity and stability for the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation (>420 nm). The enhanced photocatalytic performance of Pr 6 O 11 /Ag 3 PO 4 /Pt composite has been attributed to the efficient separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs through a scheme system composed of Pr 6 O 11, Ag 3 PO 4 and Pt.

  17. Highly stable new organic-inorganic perovskite (CH₃NH₃)₂PdBr₄: synthesis, structure and physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xixia; Huang, Tang Jiao; Zhang, Liuyang; Tang, Baoshan; Zhang, Nengduo; Shi, Diwen; Gong, Hao

    2018-01-11

    Lead halide perovskite has attracted striking attention recently due to their appealing properties. However, toxicity and stability are two main factors restricting its application. In this work, we experimentally synthesized less toxic and highly stable Pd-based hybrid perovskite after exploring different experimental conditions. This new hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite (CH₃NH₃)₂PdBr₄ was found to be an orthorhombic crystal (Cmce, Z=4) with lattice parameters a=8.00 Å, b=7.99 Å, c= 18.89 Å. The Cmce symmetry and lattices parameters were confirmed using Pawley refinement. The atoms positions were testified based on DFT calculation. This perovskite compound was determined to be a p-type semiconductor, with a resistivity of 102.9 kΩ*cm, a carrier concentration of 3.4 ×1012 /cm³ and a mobility of 23.4 cm² /(V*S). Interestingly, XRD and UV-vis measurements indicated that the phase of this new perovskite was maintained with an optical gap of 1.91 eV after leaving in air with a high humidity of 60% for 4 days, and unchanged for months in N₂ ambiance, much more stable than most existing organic-inorganic perovskites. The synthesis and various characterizations of this work further the understanding of this (CH₃NH₃)₂PdBr₄ organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite material. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets, with a few more additions - with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers - exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the foree of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc. (orig.)

  19. Stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samios, N.P.

    1993-01-01

    I have been asked to review the subject of stable particles, essentially the particles that eventually comprised the meson and baryon octets. with a few more additions -- with an emphasis on the contributions made by experiments utilizing the bubble chamber technique. In this activity, much work had been done by the photographic emulsion technique and cloud chambers-exposed to cosmic rays as well as accelerator based beams. In fact, many if not most of the stable particles were found by these latter two techniques, however, the forte of the bubble chamber (coupled with the newer and more powerful accelerators) was to verify, and reinforce with large statistics, the existence of these states, to find some of the more difficult ones, mainly neutrals and further to elucidate their properties, i.e., spin, parity, lifetimes, decay parameters, etc

  20. The structure of a three-dimensional boundary layer subjected to streamwise-varying spanwise-homogeneous pressure gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentaleb, Y.; Leschziner, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We study a spatially-evolving three-dimensional boundary layer. • We impose a streamwise-varying spanwise-homogeneous pressure gradient. • A collateral flow is formed close to the wall, and this is investigated alongside the skewed upper part of the boundary layer. • A wide range of flow-physical properties have been studied. -- Abstract: A spatially-evolving three-dimensional boundary layer, subjected to a streamwise-varying spanwise-homogeneous pressure gradient, equivalent to a body force, is investigated by way of direct numerical simulation. The pressure gradient, prescribed to change its sign half-way along the boundary layer, provokes strong skewing of the velocity vector, with a layer of nearly collateral flow forming close to the wall up to the position of maximum spanwise velocity. A wide range of flow-physical properties have been studied, with particular emphasis on the near-wall layer, including second-moments, major budget contributions and wall-normal two-point correlations of velocity fluctuations and their angles, relative to wall-shear fluctuations. The results illustrate the complexity caused by skewing, including a damping in turbulent mixing and a significant lag between strains and stresses. The study has been undertaken in the context of efforts to develop and test novel hybrid LES–RANS schemes for non-equilibrium near-wall flows, with an emphasis on three-dimensional near-wall straining. Fundamental flow-physical issues aside, the data derived should be of particular relevance to a priori studies of second-moment RANS closure and the development and validation of RANS-type near-wall approximations implemented in LES schemes for high-Reynolds-number complex flows

  1. Connecting Tropical Marine Cloud Structures to Boundary Layer Properties and the Effect of Sea State on Whitecap Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of...2007, we noticed that tradewind cumulus clouds in the area near Christmas Island sometimes appeared unordered, and other times in cloud streets . This...through as unorganized, dendritic, or rolls (also called cloud streets .) Figure 1 shows typical examples. We looked at how boundary layer depth, winds

  2. Crustal Structure of the Caribbean-South American Diffuse Plate Boundary: Subduction Zone Migration and Polarity Reversal Along BOLIVAR Profile 64W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. A.; Levander, A.; Magnani, M.; Zelt, C. A.; Sawyer, D. S.; Ave Lallemant, H. G.

    2005-12-01

    The BOLIVAR (Broadband Ocean-Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region) project is an NSF funded, collaborative seismic experiment in the southeast Caribbean region. The purpose of the project is to understand the diffuse plate boundary created by the oblique collision between the Caribbean and South American plates. Profile 64W of the BOLIVAR experiment, a 450 km-long, N-S transect onshore and offshore Venezuela located at ~64°W longitude, images the deep crustal structures formed by this collision. The active source components of profile 64W include 300 km of MCS reflection data, 33 coincident OBSs, and 344 land seismic stations which recorded 7500 offshore airgun shots and 2 explosive land shots. Results from the reflection and refraction seismic data along 64W show complex crustal structure across the entire span of the diffuse plate boundary. The onshore portion of 64W crosses the fold and thrust belt of the Serrania del Interior, which formed at ~16 Ma by collision of the Caribbean forearc with the northern South American passive margin. Underlying the Serrania del Interior is a south-vergent, remnant Lesser Antillean subduction zone. As this Lesser Antilles subduction impinged on continental crust, it caused a polarity reversal and jump offshore to the north. Convergence was initially localized in the closure and inversion of the Grenada Basin. However, subduction could not develop because of the ~20-km-thick crust of the Aves Ridge; instead, north-vergent subduction initiated further to the north, where ~12-km-thick Caribbean oceanic crust of the Venezuela Basin began to subduct beneath the Aves Ridge in the Pliocene (~4 Ma) and appears to continue subducting today. Between the remnant subduction zone and the modern one, the El Pilar and Coche dextral strike-slip faults accommodate most of the transform motion of the plate boundary. From the Serrania del Interior to the Aves Ridge, ~260 km of accreted orogenic float comprises the diffuse

  3. Buckling control of morphing composite airfoil structure using multi-stable laminate by piezoelectric sensors/actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareie, Shahin; Zabihollah, Abolghassem; Azizi, Aydin

    2011-04-01

    In the present work, an unsymmetric laminated plate with surface bonded piezoelectric sensors, and actuators has been considered. Piezoelectric sensor were used to monitor the load and deformation bifurcation occurs. Monitoring the shape and load of a morphing structure is essential to ascertain that the structure is properly deployed and it is not loaded excessively ,thus, preventing structural to failure. A piezoceramic actuator is used to provide activation load and to force the structure to change its stability state from one to another. A non-linear finite element model based on the layerwise displacement theory considering the electro-mechanical coupling effects of piezoelectric elements has been developed for simulation purposes. A control mechanism is also employed to actively control the shape of the structure. It is observed that, utilizing multistable composite to design a morphing structure may significantly reduce the energy required for changing the shape. Further controlling the buckling phenomena using piezoelectric sensor and actuator along with an ON/OFF controller can effectively and efficiency enhance the performance of the morphing structure during manoeuver.

  4. Boundary dynamics in dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.R.; Mukherji, S.

    1994-06-01

    We study the dynamics of the boundary in two dimensional dilaton gravity coupled to N massless scalars. We rederive the boundary conditions of [1] and [3] in a way which makes the requirement of reparametrization invariance and the role of conformal anomaly explicit. We then study the semiclassical behaviour of the boundary in the N=24 theory in the presence of an incoming matter wave with a constant energy flux spread over a finite interval. There is a critical value of the matter energy density below which the boundary is stable and all the matter is reflected back. For energy densities greater than this critical value there is a similar behaviour for small values of the total energy thrown in. However, when the total energy exceeds another critical value the boundary exhibits a runaway behaviour and the spacetime develops in singularities and horizons. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs

  5. Blurring Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Ulla; Nielsen, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    of welfare functions into EU law both from an internal market law and a constitutional law perspective. The main problem areas covered by the Blurring Boundaries project were studied in sub-projects on: 1) Internal market law and welfare services; 2) Fundamental rights and non-discrimination law aspects......; and 3) Services of general interest. In the Blurring Boundaries project, three aspects of the European Social Model have been particularly highlighted: the constitutionalisation of the European Social Model, its multi-level legal character, and the clash between market access justice at EU level...... and distributive justice at national level....

  6. Stable beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Stable beams: two simple words that carry so much meaning at CERN. When LHC page one switched from "squeeze" to "stable beams" at 10.40 a.m. on Wednesday, 3 June, it triggered scenes of jubilation in control rooms around the CERN sites, as the LHC experiments started to record physics data for the first time in 27 months. This is what CERN is here for, and it’s great to be back in business after such a long period of preparation for the next stage in the LHC adventure.   I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again. This was a great achievement, and testimony to the hard and dedicated work of so many people in the global CERN community. I could start to list the teams that have contributed, but that would be a mistake. Instead, I’d simply like to say that an achievement as impressive as running the LHC – a machine of superlatives in every respect – takes the combined effort and enthusiasm of everyone ...

  7. Thermally Stable and Electrically Conductive, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube/Silicon Infiltrated Composite Structures for High-Temperature Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qi Ming; Deng, Lei Min; Li, Da Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Golgir, Hossein Rabiee; Keramatnejad, Kamran; Fan, Li Sha; Jiang, Lan; Silvain, Jean-Francois; Lu, Yong Feng

    2017-10-25

    Traditional ceramic-based, high-temperature electrode materials (e.g., lanthanum chromate) are severely limited due to their conditional electrical conductivity and poor stability under harsh circumstances. Advanced composite structures based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) and high-temperature ceramics are expected to address this grand challenge, in which ceramic serves as a shielding layer protecting the VACNTs from the oxidation and erosive environment, while the VACNTs work as a conductor. However, it is still a great challenge to fabricate VACNT/ceramic composite structures due to the limited diffusion of ceramics inside the VACNT arrays. In this work, we report on the controllable fabrication of infiltrated (and noninfiltrated) VACNT/silicon composite structures via thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) [and laser-assisted CVD]. In laser-assisted CVD, low-crystalline silicon (Si) was quickly deposited at the VACNT subsurfaces/surfaces followed by the formation of high-crystalline Si layers, thus resulting in noninfiltrated composite structures. Unlike laser-assisted CVD, thermal CVD activated the precursors inside and outside the VACNTs simultaneously, which realized uniform infiltrated VACNT/Si composite structures. The growth mechanisms for infiltrated and noninfiltrated VACNT/ceramic composites, which we attributed to the different temperature distributions and gas diffusion mechanism in VACNTs, were investigated. More importantly, the as-farbicated composite structures exhibited excellent multifunctional properties, such as excellent antioxidative ability (up to 1100 °C), high thermal stability (up to 1400 °C), good high velocity hot gas erosion resistance, and good electrical conductivity (∼8.95 Sm -1 at 823 K). The work presented here brings a simple, new approach to the fabrication of advanced composite structures for hot electrode applications.

  8. 2,6,10-Tris(dialkylamino)trioxatriangulenium ions. Synthesis, structure, and properties of exceptionally stable carbenium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, B.W.; Krebs, Frederik C; Nielsen, M.F.

    1998-01-01

    A general synthetic route to a novel type of triamino-substituted planar carbenium ions (5) is reported. The synthetic method is based on a facile and selective nucleophilic aromatic substitution on the 4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)carbenium ion (1) with amines and gives access to a wide variety of more...... complex amino-substituted carbenium ions. X-ray crystallography shows that the cis(N-pyrrolidinyl)-4,8,12-trioxatriangulenium ion (5b) is planar and forms segregated stacks of cations and PF6 anions in the solid phase. The stability of the 2,6, 0-tris(diethylamino)- 4,8,12-trioxatriangulenium ion 5a...... is expressed as the pK(R+) value, which is determined in strongly basic nonaqueous solution on-the basis of a new acidity function C-. The pK(R+) value of 5a is measured to be 19.7, which is 10 orders of magnitude higher than the values found for the most stable carbenium ions previously reported...

  9. More Stable Ties or Better Structure? An Examination of the Impact of Co-author Network on Team Knowledge Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingze Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the influence of co-author network on team knowledge creation. Integrating the two traditional perspectives of network relationship and network structure, we examine the direct and interactive effects of tie stability and structural holes on team knowledge creation. Tracking scientific articles published by 111 scholars in the research field of human resource management from the top 8 American universities, we analyze scholars’ scientific co-author networks. The result indicates that tie stability changes the teams’ information processing modes and, when graphed, results in an inverted U-shape relationship between tie stability and team knowledge creation. Moreover, structural holes in co-author network are proved to be harmful to team knowledge sharing and diffusion, thereby impeding team knowledge creation. Also, tie stability and structural hole interactively influence team knowledge creation. When the number of structural hole is low in the co-author network, the graphical representation of the relationship between tie stability and team knowledge creation tends to be a more distinct U-shape.

  10. The use of protein structure/activity relationships in the rational design of stable particulate delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.B. Costa

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant heat shock protein (18 kDa-hsp from Mycobacterium leprae was studied as a T-epitope model for vaccine development. We present a structural analysis of the stability of recombinant 18 kDa-hsp during different processing steps. Circular dichroism and ELISA were used to monitor protein structure after thermal stress, lyophilization and chemical modification. We observed that the 18 kDa-hsp is extremely resistant to a wide range of temperatures (60% of activity is retained at 80ºC for 20 min. N-Acylation increased its ordered structure by 4% and decreased its ß-T1 structure by 2%. ELISA demonstrated that the native conformation of the 18 kDa-hsp was preserved after hydrophobic modification by acylation. The recombinant 18 kDa-hsp resists to a wide range of temperatures and chemical modifications without loss of its main characteristic, which is to be a source of T epitopes. This resistance is probably directly related to its lack of organization at the level of tertiary and secondary structures.

  11. Stable loop in the crystal structure of the intercalated four-stranded cytosine-rich metazoan telomere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, C.; Berger, I.; Lockshin, C.; Ratliff, R.; Moyzis, R.; Rich, A.

    1995-01-01

    In most metazoans, the telomeric cytosine-rich strand repeating sequence is d(TAACCC). The crystal structure of this sequence was solved to 1.9-A resolution. Four strands associate via the cytosine-containing parts to form a four-stranded intercalated structure held together by C.C+ hydrogen bonds. The base-paired strands are parallel to each other, and the two duplexes are intercalated into each other in opposite orientations. One TAA end forms a highly stabilized loop with the 5' thymine Hoogsteen-base-paired to the third adenine. The 5' end of this loop is in close proximity to the 3' end of one of the other intercalated cytosine strands. Instead of being entirely in a DNA duplex, this structure suggests the possibility of an alternative conformation for the cytosine-rich telomere strands.

  12. Dependence of local electronic structure in p-type GaN on crystal polarity and presence of inversion domain boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, X; Yu, E T; Green, D S; Speck, J S

    2006-01-01

    Scanning probe techniques including scanning capacitance microscopy, scanning capacitance spectroscopy, scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy, and atomic force microscopy have been used to assess structure and local electronic properties of Ga-face and N-face p-type GaN and of inversion domain boundaries in p-type GaN. Epitaxial layers of p-type GaN were grown by molecular-beam epitaxy, and by adjustment of the Ga:N flux ratio samples containing both Ga-face and N-face material were obtained...

  13. Twin boundaries, interfaces and modulated structures in martensites: Annual progress report No. 4, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsch, G.R.

    1989-03-15

    A comprehensive theoretical study with concurrent supporting experimental investigations is being carried out on coherent and semicoherent interfaces in ferroelastic martensites, including twin boundaries and twin bands, heterophase parent/product interfaces and inclusions, and transformation precursors. This work is motivated by the need for a new theoretical basis for investigating the martensite nucleation mechanism and for establishing the conditions for nonclassical nucleation. Soliton-like solutions of a dynamic Ginzburg-Landau continuum theory for ferroelastic martensites are being studied in order to determine the strain distribution, strain energy and dynamical behavior for various geometric configurations as a function of the material parameters, temperature and boundary conditions. Model parameters of the theory consist of the second and higher order elastic constants and the harmonic strain gradient coefficients in the parent phase. X-ray measurements of the transformation strain versus temperature, and ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements on biaxially stressed crystals in In/sub 1-x/Tl/sub x/ alloys for determining the second and higher order elastic constants in the single domain tetragonal state and for studying the morphology and the dynamic behavior of the martensite interfaces and transformation precursors are in progress. 6 refs.

  14. Probing Grain-Boundary Chemistry and Electronic Structure in Proton-Conducting Oxides by Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel R; Zhu, Huayang; Diercks, David R; Ricote, Sandrine; Kee, Robert J; Almansoori, Ali; Gorman, Brian P; O'Hayre, Ryan P

    2016-11-09

    A laser-assisted atom-probe-tomographic (LAAPT) method has been developed and applied to measure and characterize the three-dimensional atomic and electronic nanostructure at an yttrium-doped barium zirconate (BaZr 0.9 Y 0.1 O 3-δ , BZY10) grain boundary. Proton-conducting perovskites, such as BZY10, are attracting intense interest for a variety of energy conversion applications. However, their implementation has been hindered, in part, because of high grain-boundary (GB) resistance that is attributed to a positive GB space-charge layer (SCL). In this study, LAAPT is used to analyze BZY10 GB chemistry in three dimensions with subnanometer resolution. From this analysis, maps of the charge density and electrostatic potential arising at the GBs are derived, revealing for the first time direct chemical evidence that a positive SCL indeed exists at these GBs. These maps reveal new insights on the inhomogeneity of the SCL region and produce an average GB potential barrier of approximately 580 mV, agreeing with previous indirect electrochemical measurements.

  15. Magnetopause boundary structure deduced from the high-time resolution particle experiment on the Equator-S spacecraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Parks

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available An electrostatic analyser (ESA onboard the Equator-S spacecraft operating in coordination with a potential control device (PCD has obtained the first accurate electron energy spectrum with energies ≈7 eV–100 eV in the vicinity of the magnetopause. On 8 January, 1998, a solar wind pressure increase pushed the magnetopause inward, leaving the Equator-S spacecraft in the magnetosheath. On the return into the magnetosphere approximately 80 min later, the magnetopause was observed by the ESA and the solid state telescopes (the SSTs detected electrons and ions with energies ≈20–300 keV. The high time resolution (3 s data from ESA and SST show the boundary region contains of multiple plasma sources that appear to evolve in space and time. We show that electrons with energies ≈7 eV–100 eV permeate the outer regions of the magnetosphere, from the magnetopause to ≈6Re. Pitch-angle distributions of ≈20–300 keV electrons show the electrons travel in both directions along the magnetic field with a peak at 90° indicating a trapped configuration. The IMF during this interval was dominated by Bx and By components with a small Bz.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; solar wind · magnetosphere interactions

  16. Facile synthesis of stable structured MoS{sub 2}-Mo-CNFs heteroarchitecture with enhanced hydrogen evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Qionghua [Research Institute for New Materials Technology, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Faculty of Material and Energy, South West University, Chongqing 400700 (China); Yao, Yucen [Research Institute for New Materials Technology, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Liu, Bitao, E-mail: liubitao007@163.com [Research Institute for New Materials Technology, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Peng, Lingling; Yan, Hengqing; Hou, Zhupei; Wang, Jun [Research Institute for New Materials Technology, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Lin, Yue, E-mail: linyue@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2017-06-01

    3D structured MoS{sub 2} are grown in-situ on Mo particles embedded carbon nanofibers (CNFs) via a hydrothermal method. Due to this special structure, the bonding and effective electron delivery between CNFs and MoS{sub 2} are both enhanced, and which will exhibits a better hydrogen evolution activity. The onset potential of this MoS{sub 2}-Mo-CNFs catalyst will decreased to 60 mV compared to the 90 mV for the MoS{sub 2}-CNFs. And its current density nearly no change with 5000 cycles which is better than the 32.3% decrease of MoS{sub 2}-CNFs at η = 300 mV (V vs RHE). - Highlights: • Newly structured MoS{sub 2}-Mo-CNFs with effectively connection between MoS{sub 2} and CNFs successfully synthesized. • This structure can enhance the charge transfer and significantly increase electrocatalytic efficiency. • Nearly no HER activity loss after 5000 CV cycles.

  17. Microbial food web mapping: linking carbon cycling and community structure in soils through pyrosequencing enabled stable isotope probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Daniel H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Soil represents a massive reservoir of active carbon and climate models vary dramatically in predicting how this carbon will respond to climate change over the coming century. A major cause of uncertainty is that we still have a very limited understand the microorganisms that dominate the soil carbon cycle. The vast majority of soil microbes cannot be cultivated in the laboratory and the diversity of organisms and enzymes that participate in the carbon cycle is staggeringly complex. We have developed a new toolbox for exploring the carbon cycle and the metabolic and ecological characteristics of uncultivated microorganisms. The high-resolution nucleic acid stable isotope probing approach that we have developed makes it possible to characterize microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil. The approach allows us to track multiple 13C-labeled substrates into thousands of microbial taxa over time. Using this approach we have discovered several major lineages of uncultivated microorganisms that participate in cellulose metabolism and are found widely in soils (including Verrucomicrobia and Chloroflexi, which have not previously been implicated as major players in the soil carbon cycle). Furthermore, isotopic labelling of nucleic acids enables community genomics and permits genome fragment binning for a majority of these cellulolytic microorganisms allowing us to explore the metabolic underpinnings of cellulose degradation. This approach has allowed us to describe unexpected dynamics of carbon metabolism with different microbial taxa exhibiting characteristic patterns of carbon substrate incorporation, indicative of distinct ecological strategies. The data we describe allows us to characterize the activity of novel microorganisms as they occur in the environment and these data provide a basis for understanding how the physiological traits of discrete microorganisms sum to govern the complex responses of the soil carbon cycle.

  18. Modeling food web structure and selenium biomagnification in Lake Macquarie, New South Wales, Australia, using stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Larissa; Maher, William A; Potts, Jaimie; Taylor, Anne M; Batley, Graeme E; Krikowa, Frank; Chariton, Anthony A; Gruber, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    As a consequence of coal-fired power station operations, elevated selenium concentrations have been reported in the sediments and biota of Lake Macquarie (New South Wales, Australia). In the present study, an ecosystem-scale model has been applied to determine how selenium in a seagrass food web is processed from sediments and water through diet to predators, using stable isotopes (δ(13) C and δ(15) N) to establish the trophic position of organisms. Trophic position, habitat, and feeding zone were examined as possible factors influencing selenium bioaccumulation. Selenium concentrations ranged from 0.2 μg/g dry weight in macroalgae species to 12.9 μg/g in the carnivorous fish Gerres subfasciatus. A mean magnification factor of 1.39 per trophic level showed that selenium is biomagnifying in the seagrass food web. Habitat and feeding zone influenced selenium concentrations in invertebrates, whereas feeding zone was the only significant factor influencing selenium concentrations in fish. The sediment-water partitioning coefficient (Kd ) of 4180 showed that partitioning of selenium entering the lake to particulate organic material (POM) is occurring, and consequently availability to food webs from POM is high. Trophic transfer factors (invertebrate = 1.9; fish = 1.2) were similar to those reported for other water bodies, showing that input source is not the main determinant of the magnitude of selenium bioaccumulation in a food web, but rather the initial partitioning of selenium into bioavailable POM. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:608-617. © 2014 SETAC. © 2014 SETAC.

  19. Dynamic reorganization of chromatin structure and selective DNA demethylation prior to stable enhancer complex formation during differentiation of primary hematopoietic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagoh, Hiromi; Melnik, Svitlana; Lefevre, Pascal; Chong, Suyinn; Riggs, Arthur D; Bonifer, Constanze

    2004-04-15

    In order to gain insights in the true molecular mechanisms involved in cell fate decisions, it is important to study the molecular details of gene activation where such decisions occur, which is at the level of the chromatin structure of individual genes. In the study presented here we addressed this issue and examined the dynamic development of an active chromatin structure at the chicken lysozyme locus during the differentiation of primary myeloid cells from transgenic mouse bone marrow. Using in vivo footprinting we found that stable enhancer complex assembly and high-level gene expression are late events in cell differentiation. However, even before the onset of gene expression and stable transcription factor binding, specific chromatin alterations are observed. This includes changes in DNA topology and the selective demethylation of CpG dinucleotides located in the cores of critical transcription factor binding sites, but not in flanking DNA. These results firmly support the idea that epigenetic programs guiding blood cell differentiation are engraved into the chromatin of lineage-specific genes and that such chromatin changes are implemented before cell lineage specification.

  20. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, ZhiQiang; Lin, Weili; Zhang, Hongliang; Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiaobin; Fuentes, Jose D.; Xue, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (∼ 1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O 3 pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events. - Highlights: • Low mixed layer exacerbates air pollution over the North China Plain (NCP) • Warm advection from the Loess

  1. Impact of the Loess Plateau on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality in the North China Plain: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, ZhiQiang; Lin, Weili; Zhang, Hongliang; Hu, Jianlin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiaobin; Fuentes, Jose D; Xue, Ming

    2014-11-15

    The North China Plain (NCP), to the east of the Loess Plateau, experiences severe regional air pollution. During the daytime in the summer, the Loess Plateau acts as an elevated heat source. The impacts of such a thermal effect on meteorological phenomena (e.g., waves, precipitation) in this region have been discussed. However, its impacts on the atmospheric boundary layer structure and air quality have not been reported. It is hypothesized that the thermal effect of the Plateau likely modulates the boundary layer structure and ambient concentrations of pollutants over the NCP under certain meteorological conditions. Thus, this study investigates such effect and its impacts using measurements and three-dimensional model simulations. It is found that in the presence of daytime westerly wind in the lower troposphere (~1 km above the NCP), warmer air above the Loess Plateau was transported over the NCP and imposed a thermal inversion above the mixed boundary layer, which acted as a lid and suppressed the mixed layer growth. As a result, pollutants accumulated in the shallow mixed layer and ozone was efficiently produced. The downward branch of the thermally-induced Mountain-Plains Solenoid circulation over the NCP contributed to enhancing the capping inversion and exacerbating air pollution. Previous studies have reported that low mixed layer, a factor for elevated pollution in the NCP, may be caused by aerosol scattering and absorption of solar radiation, frontal inversion, and large scale subsidence. The present study revealed a different mechanism (i.e., westerly warm advection) for the suppression of the mixed layer in summer NCP, which caused severe O3 pollution. This study has important implications for understanding the essential meteorological factors for pollution episodes in this region and forecasting these severe events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Geometry and structure of the pull-apart basins developed along the western South American-Scotia plate boundary (SW Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, F. D.; Tassone, A.; Isola, J. I.; Lodolo, E.; Menichetti, M.

    2018-04-01

    The South American-Scotia plate boundary is a left-lateral fault system which runs roughly E-W for more than 3000 km across the SW Atlantic Ocean and the Tierra del Fuego Island, reaching to the west the southern Chile Trench. Analyses of a large dataset of single- and multi-channel seismic reflection profiles acquired offshore has allowed to map the trace of the plate boundary from Tierra del Fuego to the Malvinas Trough, a tectonic depression located in the eastern part of the fault system, and to reconstruct the shape and geometry of the basins formed along the principal displacement zone of the fault system. Three main Neogene pull-apart basins that range from 70 to 100 km in length, and from 12 to 22 km in width, have been identified along this segment of the plate boundary. These basins have elongated shapes with their major axes parallel to the ENE-WSW direction of the fault zone. The sedimentary architecture and the infill geometry of the basins suggest that they represent mostly strike-slip dominated transtension basins which propagated from E to W. The basins imaged by seismic data show in some cases geometrical and structural features linked to the possible reactivation of previous wedge-top basins and inherited structures pertaining to the external front of the Magallanes fold-and-thrust compression belt, along which the South American-Scotia fault system has been superimposed. It is suggested that the sequence of the elongated basins occur symmetrically to a thorough going strike-slip fault, in a left-stepping geometrical arrangement, in a manner similar to those basins seen in other transcurrent environments.

  3. Fundamental understanding of oxygen reduction and reaction behavior and developing high performance and stable hetero-structured cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2016-11-14

    New unique hetero-structured cathode has been developed in this project. La2NiO4+δ (LNO) as a surface catalyst with interstitial oxygen defects was introduced onto the state-of-the-art (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathode to enhance the surface-limited ORR kinetics on SOFC cathode. Furthermore, the hetero-structured cathode surface maintains high activity under electrode polarization with much less negative effects from surface cation segregation of Sr, which is known to cause degradation issues for conventional LSCF and LSC cathodes, thus improving the cathode long-term stability. The interface chemistry distribution and oxygen transport properties have been studied to prove the enhancement of power out and stability of LNO-infiltrated LSCF cathode. The further investigation demonstrates that CeO2 & La2-xNiO4+δ (x=0-0.2) co-infiltration is a simple and cost-effective method to improve both performance and stability of LSCF cathode by limiting nano-particles growth/delamination and further improve the surface stability. For the first time, a physical model is proposed to illustrate how unique interstitial species on hetero-structured cathode surface work to regulate the exchange rate of the incorporation reaction. Meanwhile, fundamental investigation of the surface oxygen exchange and bulk oxygen transport properties under over-potential conditions across cathode materials have been carried out in this project, which were discussed and compared to the Nernst equation that is generally applied to treat any oxide electrodes under equilibrium.

  4. Atomic structure of a stable high-index Ge surface: G2(103)-(4x1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seehofer, L.; Bunk, O.; Falkenberg, G.

    1997-01-01

    Based on scanning tunneling microscopy and surface X-ray diffraction, we propose a complex structural model for the Ge(103)-(4 x 1) reconstruction. Each unit cell contains two (103) double steps, which gives rise to the formation of stripes of Ge atoms oriented in the [] direction....... The stripes and the spaces between them are covered with threefold-coordinated Ge adatoms. Charge is transferred from the bulk-like edge atoms of the double steps to the adatoms. The formation of the reconstruction can be explained in terms of stress relief, charge transfer, and minimization of the dangling...

  5. Fitted-Stable Finite Difference Method for Singularly Perturbed Two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fitted-stable central difference method is presented for solving singularly perturbed two point boundary value problems with the boundary layer at one end (left or right) of the interval. A fitting factor is introduced in second order stable central difference scheme (SCD Method) and its value is obtained using the theory of ...

  6. Discovering the Role of Grain Boundary Complexions in Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmer, Martin P. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    2015-03-19

    Grain boundaries are inherently an area of disorder in polycrystalline materials which define the transport and various other material properties. The relationship between the interfacial chemistry, structure and the material properties is not well understood. Among the various taxonomies for grain boundaries, Grain Boundary Complexion is a relatively new conceptual scheme that relates the structure and kinetic properties of grain boundaries. In this classification scheme, grain boundaries are considered to be distinct three dimensional (the thickness being considerably smaller as compared to the other two dimensions but nonetheless discernible) equilibrium thermodynamic phases abutted between two crystalline phases. The stability and structure of these interfacial phases are dictated by various thermodynamic variables such as temperature, stress (pressure), interfacial chemistry (chemical potential) and most importantly by the energies of the adjoining crystal surfaces. These phases are only stable within the constraint of the adjoining grains. Although these interfacial phases are not stable in bulk form, they can transform from one complexion to another as a function of various thermodynamic variables analogous to the behavior of bulk phases. Examples of different complexions have been reported in various publications. However, a systematic investigation exploring the existence of grain boundary complexions in material systems other than alumina remains to be done. Although the role of interfacial chemistry on grain boundary complexions in alumina has been addressed, a clear understanding of the underlying thermodynamics governing complexion formation is lacking. Finally, the effects of grain boundary complexions in bulk material properties are widely unknown. Factors above urge a thorough exploration of grain boundary complexions in a range of different materials systems The purpose of the current program is to verify the existence of grain boundary complexion

  7. Stable structures and potential energy surface of the metallic clusters: Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xia; Sun, Yan

    2017-06-01

    Metallic clusters have been widely studied due to their special electrical, optical, and catalytic properties. The many-body Gupta potential is applied to describe the interatomic interaction of Ni, Cu, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt clusters, and their global minimal structures within 100 atoms are optimized using dynamic lattice searching (DLS) method. The configurational distribution of global minima is analyzed, and the geometrical difference among these clusters is demonstrated. Results show that the dominant motif of Ni and Cu clusters is the icosahedron, and in Ag and Au clusters the number of decahedra is slightly larger than that of the icosahedra. However, more face-centered cubic (fcc), stacking fault fcc, and amorphous structures are formed in Au clusters than in Ag clusters. Furthermore, the main motif of Pd and Pt clusters is the decahedron. In particular, Ni98 adopts a Leary tetrahedral motif, and Pt54 is a central vacant icosahedron. The difference related to the potential parameters of these metallic clusters is further investigated by energy analysis. Moreover, the potential energy surfaces (PES) of 38-atom metallic clusters is characterized in terms of conformational analysis. It was found that the sequence of the number of local minima on the PES from large to low is Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, Pd, and Au.

  8. Structural and photoluminescence behavior of thermally stable Eu3+activated CaWO4 nanophosphors via Li+ incorporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, P. V.; Lakshmana Rao, T.; Singh, Arvind; Benarji, B.; Dash, S.

    2017-12-01

    We have studied the structural and photo physical analogue of Eu3+ activated CaWO4 nanophosphors via Lithium (Li+ = 2, 5 7 and 10 at.%) ion incorporation. As-prepared (APS) samples were annealed at 900 °C to eliminate unwanted organic moieties present in the sample and to improve crystallinity. The samples are characterized employing X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-VIS spectroscopy, photoluminescence studies and lifetime decay studies. FTIR features an absorption band at ∼832 cm-1, which correspond to its antisymmetric vibrations into Osbnd Wsbnd O band in the WO42- tetrahedron. CaWO4 having the scheelite type structure with C4h point group and I41/a space group. The surface morphology of the samples are studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Lithium Co-doped CaWO4:Eu3+ nanoparticles show red luminescence because of strong host contribution and different energy transfer rates from host to Eu3+ ions under 266 nm excitations. Lithium ion enhances the crystallinity and radiative transition rate thus results in higher emissive property. Calculated CIE co-ordinates of these Li+ doped 900 °C annealed samples under 266 nm excitation is x = 0.65 & y = 0.34, which are closer to the standard of NTSC (x = 0.67 & y = 0.33). This material may be potential candidates for white light emitting diodes.

  9. The high Andes, gene flow and a stable hybrid zone shape the genetic structure of a wide-ranging South American parrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer H Martin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the gene flow in some organisms is strongly affected by physical barriers and geographical distance, other highly mobile species are able to overcome such constraints. In southern South America, the Andes (here up to 6,900 m may constitute a formidable barrier to dispersal. In addition, this region was affected by cycles of intercalating arid/moist periods during the Upper/Late Pleistocene and Holocene. These factors may have been crucial in driving the phylogeographic structure of the vertebrate fauna of the region. Here we test these hypotheses in the burrowing parrot Cyanoliseus patagonus (Aves, Psittaciformes across its wide distributional range in Chile and Argentina. Results Our data show a Chilean origin for this species, with a single migration event across the Andes during the Upper/Late Pleistocene, which gave rise to all extant Argentinean mitochondrial lineages. Analyses suggest a complex population structure for burrowing parrots in Argentina, which includes a hybrid zone that has remained stable for several thousand years. Within this zone, introgression by expanding haplotypes has resulted in the evolution of an intermediate phenotype. Multivariate regressions show that present day climatic variables have a strong influence on the distribution of genetic heterogeneity, accounting for almost half of the variation in the data. Conclusions Here we show how huge barriers like the Andes and the regional environmental conditions imposed constraints on the ability of a parrot species to colonise new habitats, affecting the way in which populations diverged and thus, genetic structure. When contact between divergent populations was re-established, a stable hybrid zone was formed, functioning as a channel for genetic exchange between populations.

  10. PP3 forms stable tetrameric structures through hydrophobic interactions via the C-terminal amphipathic helix and undergoes reversible thermal dissociation and denaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Lise R L; Nielsen, Søren B; Hansted, Jon G; Petersen, Torben E; Otzen, Daniel E; Sørensen, Esben S

    2012-01-01

    The milk protein proteose peptone component 3 (PP3), also called lactophorin, is a small phosphoglycoprotein that is expressed exclusively in lactating mammary tissue. The C-terminal part of the protein contains an amphipathic helix, which, upon proteolytic liberation, shows antibacterial activity. Previous studies indicate that PP3 forms multimeric structures and inhibits lipolysis in milk. PP3 is the principal component of the proteose peptone fraction of milk. This fraction is obtained by heating and acidifying skimmed milk, and in the dairy industry milk products are also typically exposed to treatments such as pasteurization, which potentially could result in irreversible denaturation and inactivation of bioactive components. We show here, by the use of CD, that PP3 undergoes reversible thermal denaturation and that the α-helical structure of PP3 remains stable even at gastric pH levels. This suggests that the secondary structure survives treatment during the purification and possibly some of the industrial processing of milk. Finally, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering reveal that PP3 forms a rather stable tetrameric complex, which dissociates and unfolds in guanidinium chloride. The cooperative unfolding of PP3 was completely removed by the surfactant n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside and by oleic acid. We interpret this to mean that the PP3 monomers associate through hydrophobic interactions via the hydrophobic surface of the amphipathic helix. These observations suggest that PP3 tetramers act as reservoirs of PP3 molecules, which in the monomeric state may stabilize the milk fat globule. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  11. The analytical solution to the problem on the temperature field in a structural element of rectangular profile for third kind boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulich, N.V.; Nemtsev, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The analytical solution to the problem on the stationary temperature field in an infinite structural element of rectangular profile characteristic of the conjugation points of a vessel and a tube sheet of a heat exchanger (or of a finned surface) at the third-kind boundary conditions has been obtained by the methods of the complex variable function theory. With the help of the obtained analytical dependences the calculations of the given element of the design and the comparison with the known data have been conducted. The proposed analytical solution can be effectively used in calculations of temperature fields in finned surfaces and structural elements of the power equipment of the considered profile and the method is applied for solution of the like problems

  12. Arctic boundary layer properties and its influence on cloud occurrence frequency, phase and structure in autumn season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, S.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, autumnal boundary layer characteristics and cloud properties have been investigated using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement North Slope of Alaska (ARM NSA) site from January 2002 to December 2008. We found that both cloud and planetary boundary layer (PBL) properties can be well distinguished by surface wind directions. When the ARM NSA site is dominated by a northerly wind during the period September- November, the PBL is at near saturation for all three months; while the maximum RH layer varies from low and thin in September, to higher and thicker in October, and then it becomes close to surface again in November. Both the ceilometer and the MPL derived cloud base heights coincide well with the RH maximum layer in the PBL for all three autumnal months. The frequencies of occurrence of mixed phase clouds in September and October are around 60-80% under a northerly wind, which are about 1.5 times higher than those during a southerly wind. Under northerly wind, the PDFs of PBL temperature and specific humidity are narrow and unimodal, with a peak probability around 0.4-0.5. Under a southerly wind, on the other hand, the PBL is both warmer and wetter than northerly wind profiles, which result in lower RH values (10-15% lower) in September and October; and the PDFs of PBL temperature and specific humidity are more evenly distributed with larger distribution range and lower PDF peak values (PBL is more favorable for mixed phase cloud formation, cloud occurrence frequency decreases from 90% to 60% as PBL temperature and specific humidity increase. In October, the frequency of occurrence of mixed phase clouds also decreases from 90% to 50-60% as PBL temperature increases. While in November, it increases first and then decreases with increasing PBL temperature and specific humidity. The frequency of occurrence of mixed phase clouds is linearly correlated to PBL RH values: for all three months, it increases from 20-90% as PBL RH value

  13. Collaboration in Healthcare Through Boundary Work and Boundary Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna

    2015-01-01

    . In highly specialized, knowledge-intensive organizations such as healthcare organizations, organizational, professional, and disciplinary boundaries mark the formal structure and division of work. Collaboration and coordination across these boundaries are essential to minimizing gaps in patient care......, but also may be challenging to achieve in practice. By drawing on data from an ethnographic study of two hospital wards, this article investigates practices of cross-disciplinary and professional collaboration and adds to our knowledge of how this kind of boundary work is produced in context. Moreover......, it adds to existing boundary literature by exploring the fast-paced, situational, micro-interactions in which boundaries are drawn, maintained, and dissolved. These mundane, brief exchanges are essential to the practice of collaboration through boundary work. I consider the implications of these findings...

  14. On relevant boundary perturbations of unitary minimal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recknagel, A.; Roggenkamp, D.; Schomerus, V.

    2000-01-01

    We consider unitary Virasoro minimal models on the disk with Cardy boundary conditions and discuss deformations by certain relevant boundary operators, analogous to tachyon condensation in string theory. Concentrating on the least relevant boundary field, we can perform a perturbative analysis of renormalization group fixed points. We find that the systems always flow towards stable fixed points which admit no further (non-trivial) relevant perturbations. The new conformal boundary conditions are in general given by superpositions of 'pure' Cardy boundary conditions

  15. Visualization and manipulation of meta-stable polarization variants in multiferroic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonkyu Park

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Here we demonstrate the role of meta-stable polarization variants in out-of-plane polarization switching behavior in epitaxially grown BiFeO3 thin films using angle-resolved piezoresponse force microscopy (AR-PFM. The out-of-plane polarization switching mainly occurred at the boundary between meta-stable and stable polarization domains, and was accompanied by a significant change in in-plane domain configuration from complicated structure with 12 polarization variants to simple stripe structure with 4 polarization variants. These results imply that the biased tip rearranges the delicately balanced domain configuration, which is determined by the competition between electrostatic and strain energies, into simple interweaving one that is more thermodynamically stable.

  16. Exchange Processes in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Serafin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The exchange of heat, momentum, and mass in the atmosphere over mountainous terrain is controlled by synoptic-scale dynamics, thermally driven mesoscale circulations, and turbulence. This article reviews the key challenges relevant to the understanding of exchange processes in the mountain boundary layer and outlines possible research priorities for the future. The review describes the limitations of the experimental study of turbulent exchange over complex terrain, the impact of slope and valley breezes on the structure of the convective boundary layer, and the role of intermittent mixing and wave–turbulence interaction in the stable boundary layer. The interplay between exchange processes at different spatial scales is discussed in depth, emphasizing the role of elevated and ground-based stable layers in controlling multi-scale interactions in the atmosphere over and near mountains. Implications of the current understanding of exchange processes over mountains towards the improvement of numerical weather prediction and climate models are discussed, considering in particular the representation of surface boundary conditions, the parameterization of sub-grid-scale exchange, and the development of stochastic perturbation schemes.

  17. Ultra-stable Molecule-Surface Architectures at Metal Oxides: Structure, Bonding, and Electron-transfer Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, Robert John

    2013-12-07

    Research funded by this project focused on the development of improved strategies for functionalization of metal oxides to enhance charge-transfer processes relevant to solar energy conversion. Initial studies included Fe2O3, WO3, TiO2, SnO2, and ZnO as model oxide systems; these systems were chosen due to differences in metal oxidation state and chemical bonding types in these oxides. Later studies focused largely on SnO2 and ZnO, as these materials show particularly promising surface chemistry, have high electron mobility, and can be readily grown in both spherical nanoparticles and as elongated nanorods. New molecules were synthesized that allowed the direct chemical assembly of novel nanoparticle ?dyadic? structures in which two different oxide materials are chemically joined, leading to an interface that enhances the separation of of charge upon illumination. We demonstrated that such junctions enhance photocatalytic efficiency using model organic compounds. A separate effort focused on novel approaches to linking dye molecules to SnO2 and ZnO as a way to enhance solar conversion efficiency. A novel type of surface binding through

  18. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  19. Boundary Migration in Rutile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliss, S.R.; Ravishankar, N.; Farrer, J.K.; Carter, C.B.

    2003-08-01

    TiO{sub 2} is a vital material in several technologies including, photocatalysis, gas sensing, biomaterials and optical coatings. Among the several crystal structures of this oxide, rutile has the highest density and microhardness, the highest index of refraction and the highest temperature stability. The processing of dense polycrystalline materials often includes the addition of a liquid-forming phase at higher temperatures. This technique is known as liquid-phase sintering and has been studied extensively. Rutile boundaries containing an amorphous phase have been used to study boundary migration and grain-boundary grooving. Visible-light (VLM), scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in addition to electron-backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and a focused-ion beam (FIB) tool were used to characterize boundary migration in rutile. EBSD analysis was carried out on a Philips XL30 FEG SEM equipped with a DigiView 1612 high-resolution, high-speed CCD camera. A 2.5 cm sample-to-camera distance was used and {approx}70{sup o} sample tilt. A Philips CM30 operated at 300 kV was used for TEM characterization and an FEI DB235 was used for FIB work. Pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) has been used to deposit thin films ({approx}100 nm thick) of silica glass on single-crystals of rutile. The film/substrate assembly is then fabricated into bicrystals of known boundary-plane orientation by hot pressing. Bicrystals were fabricated with boundary planes of nominal surface orientation of (001) and (110). After diffusion bonding a surface perpendicular to the interface is cut and polished. Bicrystals are then heat treated in air at 1650 C for varying lengths of time. Figure 1 is a VLM image of a rutile bicrystal which as been heat treated for 4 hours. During this heat treatment migration of the boundary initiates at parallel grooves contained in the crystal on the right-hand side. EBSD analysis shows that this parallel set of grooves is due to the presence of 3{sup

  20. Functional Aspects of the Solution Structure and Dynamics of PAF, a Highly Stable Antifungal Protein from Penicillium chrysogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Gyula; Barna, Teréz; Gáspári, Zoltán; Sándor, Szabolcs; Kövér, Katalin E.; Binder, Ulrike; Sarg, Bettina; Kaiserer, Lydia; Chhillar, Anil Kumar; Eigentler, Andrea; Leiter, Éva; Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Pócsi, István; Lindner, Herbert; Marx, Florentine

    2015-01-01

    Summary PAF is a promising antimycotic without toxic effects on mammalian cells and therefore may be a drug candidate against the often lethal Aspergillus infections in human. The pathogenesis of PAF on sensitive fungi involves G-protein coupled signaling followed by apoptosis. Here, the solution structure of this small, cationic, antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum is determined by solution NMR. We proved that PAF belongs to the SCOP fold class of its closest homologue AFP from Aspergillus giganteus. PAF comprises five β—strands forming two orthogonally packed β—sheets sharing a common interface. The ambiguity in the assignment of two disulfide bonds of three was investigated by NMR dynamics combined with restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The clue could not be resolved: two ensembles with different disulfide patterns and the one with no S-S bond exhibit essentially the same fold. 15N relaxation dispersion and interference experiments did not reveal disulfide bond rearrangements via slow exchange. The measured order parameters and the 3.0 ns correlation time is appropriate for a compact monomeric protein of this size. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that the highly conserved and positively charged lysine-rich domain region on the surface enhances the toxicity of PAF. However, the efficacy of the OB fold is reduced in PAF compared to AFP, due to less solvent exposed aromatic regions explaining the absence of chitobiose binding. The present work lends further support to the understanding of the documented substantial differences between the mode of action of two highly homologous antifungal proteins. PMID:19459942

  1. Bleeding boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristian Møller; Petersen, Michael Nebeling

    2018-01-01

    Hook-up apps such as Grindr and Scruff have become important sites for the negotiation of sex between men, in that they shape the ways intimacy cultures are practised and become visible (Mowlabocus, 2010; Race, 2014; Duguay et al., 2016). While such apps enable different intimacy cultures......, they also come paired with anxieties. In the epigraph the interview participant James1 expresses concerns about the how the hook-up app Scruff might restructure the boundaries of privacy and make him vulnerable to exposure. Such technological ambivalence is central to domestication theory, which focuses...

  2. Boundary issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Porder, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    What is our point of no return? Caesar proclaimed 'the die is cast' while crossing the Rubicon, but rarely does modern society find so visible a threshold in our continued degradation of ecosystems and the services they provide. Humans have always used their surroundings to make a living— sometimes successfully, sometimes not (Diamond 2005)—and we intuitively know that there are boundaries to our exploitation. But defining these boundaries has been a challenge since Malthus first prophesied that nature would limit the human population (Malthus 1798). In 2009, Rockström and colleagues tried to quantify what the 6.8 billion (and counting) of us could continue to get away with, and what we couldn't (Rockström et al 2009). In selecting ten 'planetary boundaries', the authors contend that a sustainable human enterprise requires treating a number of environmental thresholds as points of no return. They suggest we breach these Rubicons at our own peril, and that we've already crossed three: biodiversity loss, atmospheric CO2, and disruption of the global nitrogen (N) cycle. As they clearly hoped, the very act of setting targets has provoked scientific inquiry about their accuracy, and about the value of hard targets in the first place (Schlesinger 2009). Such debate is a good thing. Despite recent emphasis on the science of human-ecosystem interactions, understanding of our planetary boundaries is still in its infancy, and controversy can speed scientific progress (Engelhardt and Caplan 1987). A few weeks ago in this journal, Carpenter and Bennett (2011) took aim at one of the more controversial boundaries in the Rockström analysis: that for human alteration of the global phosphorus (P) cycle. Rockström's group chose riverine P export as the key indicator, suggesting that humans should not exceed a value that could trigger widespread marine anoxic events—and asserting that we have not yet crossed this threshold. There are defensible reasons for a marine

  3. SEM observation of grain boundary structures in quartz-iron oxide rocks deformed at intermediate metamorphic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Lagoeiro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the effect of a second phase on the distribution of fluid phase and dissolution of quartz grains. However, as most observations came from aggregates deformed under hydrostatic stress conditions and mica-bearing quartz rocks, 3-D distribution of pores on quartz-quartz (QQB and quartz-hematite boundaries (QHB has been studied. Several fracture surfaces oriented according to finite strain ellipsoid were analyzed. The pore distribution characterizes the porosity and grain shape as highly anisotropic, which results from the nature and orientation of boundaries. QHB have physical/chemical properties very different from QQB, once the hematite plates have strong effect on wetting behavior of fluid, likewise micas in quartzites. They are pore-free flat surfaces, normal to compression direction, suggesting that they were once wetted with a continuous fluid film acting as faster diffusion pathway. At QQB, the pores are faceted, isolated, close to its edges reflecting the crystallographic control and an interconnected network of fluid along grain junctions. The QQB facing the extension direction are sites of fluid concentration. As consequence, the anisotropic dissolution and grain growth were responsible for the formation of hematite plates and tabular quartz grains significantly contributing for the generation of the foliation observed in the studied rocks.Muitos estudos têm demonstrado o efeito de uma segunda fase sobre a distribuição de fase fluida e dissolução de grãos de quartzo. Entretanto, como a maioria das observações vêm de agregados deformados sob condições de tensão hidrostática e em rochas quartzosas ricas em mica, a distribuição 3D de poros e bordas quartzo-quartzo (BQQ e quartzo-hematita (BQH tem sido estudada. Várias superfícies de fraturas orientadas segundo o elipsóide de deformação finita foram analisadas. A distribuição dos poros caracteriza a porosidade e a forma dos grãos como

  4. BOLIVAR: Crustal structure of the Caribbean-South America plate boundary between 60W and 70W from wide-angle seismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelt, C. A.; Christeson, G. L.; Magnani, M. B.; Clark, S. A.; Guedez, M. C.; Bezada, M.; Levander, A.; Schmitz, M.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results from five wide-angle seismic profiles collected onshore and offshore Venezuela in 2004 as part of the Broadband Ocean Land Investigation of Venezuela and the Antilles arc Region project (BOLIVAR). The study area is the diffuse plate boundary between South America (SA) and the SE Caribbean plate (CAR) covering roughly 1000 km by 500 km. Over the past 55 My the Leeward Antilles island arc that borders the CAR plate has been colliding obliquely with the SA continent resulting in a collision front that has migrated from west to east. The five wide-angle profiles sample different stages of the time-transgressive margin from west to east, each crossing the margin roughly perpendicularly. The main purpose of this presentation is to contrast and compare the crustal velocity structure along these profiles to better understand the tectonic processes that are responsible for the evolution and present-day configuration of the plate boundary. Each of the wide-angle profiles is about 500 km in length and includes both onshore and offshore shots and receivers, except the easternmost profile, which is entirely offshore. The dense wide-angle data were modeled in the same way along each profile using a two-step, layer-stripping approach: (1) the first-arrival times were tomographically inverted for a smooth velocity model, and (2) the lower crust, Moho, and uppermost mantle were determined by simultaneous inversion of the PmP refection and Pn refraction phases while keeping the upper and middle crust from the first step fixed. The five models show tremendous lateral heterogeneity, as they cross features such as normal oceanic crust, oceanic plateau crust, an accretionary wedge, active and remnant island arcs, forearc and foreland basins, a major strike-slip system, a fold and thrust belt, and the edge of cratonic continental crust. Two of the main contributions of the wide-angle models to the BOLIVAR project, and the focus of this presentation, are the Moho

  5. Boundary layer structure and scavenging effect during a typical winter haze-fog episode in a core city of BTH region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suqin; Liu, Jingle; Hao, Tianyi; Zhang, Yufen; Li, Peiyan; Yang, Jianbo; Wang, Qinliang; Cai, Ziying; Yao, Qing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xiujun

    2018-04-01

    The vertical distribution of PM2.5 and meteorological parameters from ground to upper levels were observed simultaneously using meteorological tower, tethered balloons and aerosol laser radar in Dec of 2016 in the urban area of Tianjin and its southern district, Jinghai. The influence of the vertical structure of boundary layer on a typical haze-fog episode was analyzed. There existed long distance transport of PM in the high layers before the haze formed in Tianjin and the downward airflows brought the PM from the high layer to the ground. In the early stages of this episode, periodic temperature inversions occurred, leading to conspicuous diurnal variations in the vertical profile of the PM2.5. In the middle and late stages of this episode, strong inversion and thick humidity layer were sustained below 400 m, and there were no big daily changes in the vertical profiles of the PM2.5. During the rapid formation period of the fog, the inversion layer was damaged and turbulence was strengthened. During the stationary phase of the fog process, wind and turbulence in the boundary layer became weak again. Rime was the main weather-related, wet cleaning mechanism that lowered pollutants concentration during this fog episode. High concentrations of water soluble ions in the rime samples and the concentrations of those ions in ambient PM2.5 appeared significant decrease during the rime period, which illustrated the scavenging effect of rime.

  6. Ab initio study of symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in bcc Fe: structural units, magnetic moments, interfacial bonding, local energy and local stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Somesh Kr; Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori; Shiihara, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    We present first-principle calculations on symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc Fe. Using density functional theory (DFT), we studied the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Σ3(111) and Σ11(332) GBs formed by rotation around the [110] axis. The optimized structures, GB energies and GB excess free volumes are consistent with previous DFT and classical simulation studies. The GB configurations can be interpreted by the structural unit model as given by Nakashima and Takeuchi (2000 ISIJ 86 357). Both the GBs are composed of similar structural units of three- and five-membered rings with different densities at the interface according to the rotation angle. The interface atoms with larger atomic volumes reveal higher magnetic moments than the bulk value, while the interface atoms with shorter bond lengths have reduced magnetic moments in each GB. The charge density and local density of states reveal that the interface bonds with short bond lengths have more covalent nature, where minority-spin electrons play a dominant role as the typical nature of ferromagnetic Fe. In order to understand the structural stability of these GBs, we calculated the local energy and local stress for each atomic region using the scheme of Shiihara et al (2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 075441). In each GB, the interface atoms with larger atomic volumes and enhanced magnetic moments reveal larger local energy increase and tensile stress. The interface atoms constituting more covalent-like bonds with reduced magnetic moments have lower local energy increase, contributing to the stabilization, while compressive stress is generated at these atoms. The relative stability between the two GBs can be understood by the local energies at the structural units. The local energy and local stress analysis is a powerful tool to investigate the structural properties of GBs based on the behavior of valence electrons. (paper)

  7. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jau-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied

  8. Vertical variations in the turbulent structure of the surface boundary layer over vineyards under unstable atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to their highly-structured canopy, turbulent characteristics within and above vineyards, may not conform to those typically exhibited by other agricultural and natural ecosystems. Using data collected as a part of the Grape Remote sensing and Atmospheric Profiling and Evapotranspiration Experime...

  9. Observed development of the vertical structure of the marine boundary layer during the LASIE experiment in the Ligurian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Schiano, M.E.; Pensieri, S.

    2010-01-01

    sensors mounted on the buoy ODAS Italia1 located in the centre of the Gulf of Genoa. The evolution of the height (zi) of the MABL was monitored using radiosondes and a ceilometer on board of the N/O Urania. Here, we present the database and an uncommon case study of the evolution of the vertical structure...

  10. Ferroelectric nanostructure having switchable multi-stable vortex states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I [Fayetteville, AR; Bellaiche, Laurent M [Fayetteville, AR; Prosandeev, Sergey A [Fayetteville, AR; Ponomareva, Inna V [Fayetteville, AR; Kornev, Igor A [Fayetteville, AR

    2009-09-22

    A ferroelectric nanostructure formed as a low dimensional nano-scale ferroelectric material having at least one vortex ring of polarization generating an ordered toroid moment switchable between multi-stable states. A stress-free ferroelectric nanodot under open-circuit-like electrical boundary conditions maintains such a vortex structure for their local dipoles when subject to a transverse inhomogeneous static electric field controlling the direction of the macroscopic toroidal moment. Stress is also capable of controlling the vortex's chirality, because of the electromechanical coupling that exists in ferroelectric nanodots.

  11. The uranium valence in the Cs-U-O system: crystal structures and thin layers contribution to the physico-chemical study of grain boundaries in irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Berghe, S.

    2002-01-01

    The document is an abstract of a PhD thesis. The PhD thesis investigates the way in which cesium, through its effect on oxygen, modifies the uranium environment and in consequence the valence state of the uranium atom itself. To this end, the crystallographic structure and local uranium environment of several uranium uranates has been determined by Rietveld refinement of neutron and X-ray diffraction data. Thin layers of stoichiometric uranium dioxide were prepared using sputter deposition techniques and used to model interactions on the grain boundaries. They were covered with cesium and exposed to controlled amounts of oxygen, while the uranium valence state was monitored with Ultraviolet Photoelectron Spectroscopy and XPS

  12. Grain boundaries in Ni3Al. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.; Sass, S.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the dislocation structure of small angle tilt and twist boundaries in ordered Ni 3 Al, with and without boron, investigated using transmission electron microscopy. Dislocation with Burgers vectors that correspond to anti-phase boundary (APB)-coupled superpartials were found in small angle twist boundaries in both boron-free and boron-doped Ni 3 Al, and a small angle tilt boundary in boron-doped Ni 3 Al. The boundary structures are in agreement with theoretical models proposed by Marcinkowski and co-workers. The APB energy determined from the dissociation of the grain boundary dislocations was lower than values reported for isolated APBs in Ni 3 Al. For small angle twist boundaries the presence of boron reduced the APB energy at the interface until it approached zero. This is consistent with the structure of these boundaries containing small regions of increased compositional disorder in the first atomic plane next to the interface

  13. On the Influence of Grid Resolution and Domain Size on the Structure and Evolution of the Stratocumulus-Topped Boundary Layer: A Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, J. G.; Malinowski, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Improved understanding of processes related to the evolution of stratocumulus clouds is needed, e.g. for more accurate prediction of weather and climate. As a supplement to measurements, numerical simulation is a widely used and valuable tool in stratocumulus studies. However, due to limited computational resources, simulations are often run at resolutions too coarse to account for the smallest eddies involved in e.g. the entrainment process, and possibly in computational domains too small to contain the largest relevant flow structures in the boundary layer. Here we investigate how changes in domain size and spatial resolution affect key parameters such as cloud cover and liquid water path in large-eddy simulations of the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer (STBL). Details of the entrainment process and subsequent mixing within the STBL is studied by adding a passive scalar to the flow. We use a modified version of the 3D nonhydrostatic anelastic Eulerian-semi-Lagrangian (EULAG) model, and perform both simulations including an explicit sub-grid scale turbulence model and simulations in which the effect of unresolved turbulence is accounted for implicitly by the applied numerical scheme. The simulations are based on measurements from the second Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS-II) and Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST) field campaigns. We show how refining the horizontal resolution facilitate development of small-scale turbulence in the cloud-top region, which enhance entrainment and tends to dissolve the cloud. Refining the vertical grid spacing, on the other hand, allows for stronger vertical temperature gradients which tend to strengthen the capping inversion and inhibit entrainment. The statistics of the flow and the evolution of the cloud is found to be more sensitive to changes in resolution than to changes in domain size. We do however observe still larger flow structures as the horizontal extent of the computational domain is

  14. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15N and δ(13C to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Perkins

    Full Text Available Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15N and carbon (δ(13C are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR using δ(15N, and carbon range (CR using δ(13C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15N or δ(13C from source to consumer between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰, and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority

  15. Application of Nitrogen and Carbon Stable Isotopes (δ15N and δ13C) to Quantify Food Chain Length and Trophic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Matthew J.; McDonald, Robbie A.; van Veen, F. J. Frank; Kelly, Simon D.; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ15N, and carbon range (CR) using δ13C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ15N or δ13C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ15N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ13C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ13C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of ecological systems

  16. Application of nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) to quantify food chain length and trophic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Matthew J; McDonald, Robbie A; van Veen, F J Frank; Kelly, Simon D; Rees, Gareth; Bearhop, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, stable isotope ratios of nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) are used to quantify trophic structure, though relatively few studies have tested accuracy of isotopic structural measures. For laboratory-raised and wild-collected plant-invertebrate food chains spanning four trophic levels we estimated nitrogen range (NR) using δ(15)N, and carbon range (CR) using δ(13)C, which are used to quantify food chain length and breadth of trophic resources respectively. Across a range of known food chain lengths we examined how NR and CR changed within and between food chains. Our isotopic estimates of structure are robust because they were calculated using resampling procedures that propagate variance in sample means through to quantified uncertainty in final estimates. To identify origins of uncertainty in estimates of NR and CR, we additionally examined variation in discrimination (which is change in δ(15)N or δ(13)C from source to consumer) between trophic levels and among food chains. δ(15)N discrimination showed significant enrichment, while variation in enrichment was species and system specific, ranged broadly (1.4‰ to 3.3‰), and importantly, propagated variation to subsequent estimates of NR. However, NR proved robust to such variation and distinguished food chain length well, though some overlap between longer food chains infers a need for awareness of such limitations. δ(13)C discrimination was inconsistent; generally no change or small significant enrichment was observed. Consequently, estimates of CR changed little with increasing food chain length, showing the potential utility of δ(13)C as a tracer of energy pathways. This study serves as a robust test of isotopic quantification of food chain structure, and given global estimates of aquatic food chains approximate four trophic levels while many food chains include invertebrates, our use of four trophic level plant-invertebrate food chains makes our findings relevant for a majority of

  17. Progress in Understanding the Impacts of 3-D Cloud Structure on MODIS Cloud Property Retrievals for Marine Boundary Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Werner, Frank; Miller, Daniel; Platnick, Steven; Ackerman, Andrew; DiGirolamo, Larry; Meyer, Kerry; Marshak, Alexander; Wind, Galina; Zhao, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Theory: A novel framework based on 2-D Tayler expansion for quantifying the uncertainty in MODIS retrievals caused by sub-pixel reflectance inhomogeneity. (Zhang et al. 2016). How cloud vertical structure influences MODIS LWP retrievals. (Miller et al. 2016). Observation: Analysis of failed MODIS cloud property retrievals. (Cho et al. 2015). Cloud property retrievals from 15m resolution ASTER observations. (Werner et al. 2016). Modeling: LES-Satellite observation simulator (Zhang et al. 2012, Miller et al. 2016).

  18. Meteorological observations of the coastal boundary layer structure by remote measurement methods for determining the impact of meteorological conditions on the breeze circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barantiev, D.

    2010-09-01

    Continuous measurements of the characteristics of atmospheric boundary layer and the characteristics of breeze circulation were initiated at the meteorological observatory of Ahtopol on the Black Sea coast (south-east Bulgaria) under a Bulgarian-Russian collaborative programme. Research observations started in July 2008 and go on. These observations are the start of high resolution atmospheric boundary layer vertical structure climatology at a Bulgarian Black Sea coastal site. Automatic weather station «MK-15» with an acoustic anemometer (mounted at 4,5m height) and Flat Array Sodar without RASS extension «Scintec» were installed on polygon of Ahtopol. A preliminary analysis was made of the experimental data on the thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer in the coastal zone. Vertical profiles of wind speed, direction and spatio-temporal sectional were constructed according to the sodar data. Graphs of temporal variations of the direction and modulus of wind velocity, vertical velocity, the standard deviation of the acoustic temperature and time variation of air temperature (at a height of 2m - standard synoptic measurements) were constructed according MK-15. The momentum u* = " - w-'u' and sensible heat H = w'T' surface turbulent fluxes were calculated from MK-15 raw data. Prevailing weather conditions contributing to breeze circulation in the area were investigated. Blurred pressure field of high pressure with warm air mass, clear and (or) the overcast weather was characterized for treatment cases. The average wind speed near the ground was did not exceed 3 m/s, with a ripple rate of up to 4 m/s according to MK-15. The nature of the wind changed direction during the day has been practically the same (i.e., diurnal repeats) in all cases. The breeze front location was also detected based on standard measurements in the surface layer (mean values of temperature at 2 m and wind speed and direction from MK-15). In the zone of the front the wind

  19. Towards tricking a pathogen's protease into fighting infection: the 3D structure of a stable circularly permuted onconase variant cleavedby HIV-1 protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Callís

    Full Text Available Onconase® is a highly cytotoxic amphibian homolog of Ribonuclease A. Here, we describe the construction of circularly permuted Onconase® variants by connecting the N- and C-termini of this enzyme with amino acid residues that are recognized and cleaved by the human immunodeficiency virus protease. Uncleaved circularly permuted Onconase® variants are unusually stable, non-cytotoxic and can internalize in human T-lymphocyte Jurkat cells. The structure, stability and dynamics of an intact and a cleaved circularly permuted Onconase® variant were determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and provide valuable insight into the changes in catalytic efficiency caused by the cleavage. The understanding of the structural environment and the dynamics of the activation process represents a first step toward the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of diseases related to pathogens expressing a specific protease. By taking advantage of the protease's activity to initiate a cytotoxic cascade, this approach is thought to be less susceptible to known resistance mechanisms.

  20. Structure of an incommensurate 90{sup 0} Si grain boundary resolved with the help of a Cs-corrector for illumination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouviere, J L; Rousseau, K; Jouneau, P H [CEA, INAC/SP2M/LEMMA, Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Lancon, F; Caliste, D [CEA Grenoble, INAC/SP2M/L-SIM (France); Fournel, F, E-mail: jean-luc.rouviere@cea.f [CEA Grenoble, LETI - Minatec (France)

    2010-02-01

    The atomic structure of an incommensurate (001)/(110) Si grain boundary (GB) or 90{sup 0} Si GB has been studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and refined by atomistic simulations (Stillinger-Weber potential). Samples were made by bonding one (001) Si wafer with one (110) Si wafer and carefully orienting the 2 wafers in order that they have a common [11-bar 0] direction. In the interfacial direction perpendicular to [11-bar 0], the [110]{sub I} direction of grain I is parallel to the [001]{sub II} direction of grain II and, as the ratio of these 2 vectors is sqrt2, it is impossible to find 2 integers n and m such that n[110]{sub I}=m[001]{sub II}. The structure is incommensurate in this direction. Z-contrast images obtained in an FEI-Titan microscope equipped with a probe Cs-corrector easily resolve the Si dumb-bells in the two grains and allow us to determine the complex atomic structures of the interface. On the other hand, near on-axis high resolution TEM images obtained in a JEOL 4000EX microscope are very efficient to analyse the long range order of the interface.

  1. Phase boundary between cubic B1 and rhombohedral structures in (Mg,Fe)O magnesiowüstite determined by in situ X-ray diffraction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymshits, Anna M.; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Shatskiy, Anton; Chanyshev, Artem D.; Podborodnikov, Ivan V.; Higo, Yuji

    2018-01-01

    The phase relations and equation of state of (Mg0.08Fe0.92)O magnesiowüstite (Mw92) have been studied using the Kawai-type high-pressure apparatus coupled with synchrotron radiation. To determine the phase boundary between the NaCl-type cubic (B1) and rhombohedral ( rB1) structures in Mw92, in situ X-ray observations were carried out at pressures of 0-35 GPa and temperatures of 300-1473 K. Au and MgO were used as the internal pressure markers and metallic Fe as oxygen fugacity buffer. The phase boundary between B1 and rB1 structures was described by a linear equation P (GPa) = 1.6 + 0.033 × T (K). The Clapeyron slope (d P/d T) determined in this study is close to that obtained at pressures above 70 GPa but steeper than that obtained for FeO. An addition of MgO to FeO structure expands the stability field of the rB1 phase to lower pressures and higher temperatures. Thus, the rB1 phase may be stabilized with respect to the B1 phase at a lower pressures. The pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of B1-Mw92 was determined up to 30 GPa and 1473 K. Fitting the hydrostatic compression data up to 30 GPa with the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EoS) yielded: unit cell volume ( V 0, T0), 79.23 ± 4 Å3; bulk modulus ( K 0, T0), 183 ± 4 GPa; its pressure derivative ( K' T ), 4.1 ± 0.4; (∂ K 0, T /∂ T) = -0.029 ± 0.005 GPa K‒1; a = 3.70 ± 0.27 × 10-5 K-1 and b = 0.47 ± 0.49 × 10-8 K-2, where α0, T = a + bT is the volumetric thermal expansion coefficient. The obtained bulk modulus of Mw92 is very close to the value expected for stoichiometric iron-rich (Mg,Fe)O. This result confirms the idea that the bulk modulus of (Mg,Fe)O is greatly affected by the actual defect structure, caused by either Mg2+ or vacancies.

  2. Breaking Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    produce desperate attempts to maintain old or create new differences. Political and sociological research into these complex processes has been mainly guided by structural and normative concerns. Faced with growing evidence about the instability of world order and domestic social structures alike, policy...

  3. Preliminary examination of food web structure of Nicola Lake (Taim Hydrological System, south Brazil using dual C and N stable isotope analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre M. Garcia

    Full Text Available Taim Ecological Reserve is located within the Taim Hydrological System and was created to protect a heterogeneous and productive landscape harboring exceptional biological diversity in southern Brazil. Using stable isotope ratio analyses of carbon (delta13C and nitrogen (delta15N, we provide a preliminary description of the food web structure, including estimates of production sources supporting fish populations and vertical trophic structure, within a representative lake of this system. A total of 21 organisms (5 macrophytes, 3 mollusks and 13 adult fishes representing 16 species were collected for isotope analysis. Fishes had delta13C values ranging from -24.30º/oo to -28.31º/oo , showing concordance with the range of values observed for macrophytes (-25.49 to -27.10º/oo, and suggesting that these plants could be a major carbon source supporting these fishes. delta13C signatures of Corbicula (-30.81º/oo and Pomacea (-24.26º/oo indirectly suggest that phytoplankton and benthic algae could be alternative carbon sources for some consumers. Nitrogen isotope ratios indicated approximately three consumer trophic levels. The pearl cichlid Geophagus brasiliensis was a primary consumer. Two catfishes (Trachelyopterus lucenai and Loricariichthys anus were secondary consumers. Two congeneric pike cichclids (Crenicichla lepidota and C. punctata, a catfish (Pimelodus maculatus and the characids Astyanax fasciatus and Oligosarcus robustus were tertiary consumers. Further studies including additional primary producers and consumers and greater sample numbers should be conducted to provide a more complete and detailed description of food web structure and dynamics within the reserve.

  4. Solution of moving boundary problems with implicit boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyano, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm that solves numerically a model for studying one dimensional moving boundary problems, with implicit boundary condition, is described. Landau's transformation is used, in order to work with a fixed number of nodes at each instant. Then, it is necessary to deal with a parabolic partial differential equation, whose diffusive and convective terms have variable coefficients. The partial differential equation is implicitly discretized, using Laasonen's scheme, always stable, instead of employing Crank-Nicholson sheme, as it has been done by Ferris and Hill. Fixed time and space steps (Δt, Δξ) are used, and the iteration is made with variable positions of the interface, i.e. varying δs until a boundary condition is satisfied. The model has the same features of the oxygen diffusion in absorbing tissue. It would be capable of estimating time variant radiation treatments of cancerous tumors. (Author) [es

  5. Pressure effect on grain boundary diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, E.S.; Chuvil'deev, V.N.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on grain boundary diffusion and grain boundary migration in metallic materials is theoretically investigated. The model is suggested that permits describing changes in activation energy of grain boundary self-diffusion and diffusion permeability of grain boundaries under hydrostatic pressure. The model is based on the ideas about island-type structure of grain boundaries as well as linear relationship of variations in grain boundary free volume to hydrostatic pressure value. Comparison of theoretical data with experimental ones for a number of metals and alloys (α-Zr, Sn-Ge, Cu-In with Co, In, Al as diffusing elements) shows a qualitative agreement

  6. Grain Boundary Engineering of Electrodeposited Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein

    Grain boundary engineering aims for a deliberate manipulation of the grain boundary characteristics to improve the properties of polycrystalline materials. Despite the emergence of some successful industrial applications, the mechanism(s) by which the boundary specific properties can be improved...... to engineer new materials. In this study, one of the most widely used electrolytes for electrodeposition is chosen for the synthesis of nickel films and based on thorough characterization of the boundaries the potentials in grain boundary engineering are outlined. The internal structure of the nickel films...... of the favorable boundaries that break the network of general grain boundaries. Successful dedicated synthesis of a textured nickel film fulfilling the requirements of grain boundary engineered materials, suggests improved boundary specific properties. However, the textured nickel film shows fairly low...

  7. Structure of the Heliotail from Interstellar Boundary Explorer Observations: Implications for the 11-year Solar Cycle and Pickup Ions in the Heliosheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Heerikhuisen, J.; Zank, G. P.; Pogorelov, N. V. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Funsten, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Reisenfeld, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States); Schwadron, N. A., E-mail: ejz@princeton.edu [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2017-02-20

    Interstellar Boundary Explorer ( IBEX ) measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from the heliotail show a multi-lobe structure of ENA fluxes as a function of energy between ∼0.71 and 4.29 keV. Below ∼2 keV, there is a single structure of enhanced ENA fluxes centered near the downwind direction. Above ∼2 keV, this structure separates into two lobes, one north and one south of the solar equatorial plane. ENA flux from these two lobes can be interpreted as originating from the fast solar wind (SW) propagating through the inner heliosheath (IHS). Alternatively, a recently published model of the heliosphere suggests that the heliotail may split into a “croissant-like” shape, and that such a geometry could be responsible for the heliotail ENA feature. Here we present results from a time-dependent simulation of the heliosphere that produces a comet-like heliotail, and show that the 11-year solar cycle leads to the formation of ENA lobes with properties remarkably similar to those observed by IBEX . The ENA energy at which the north and south lobes appear suggests that the pickup ion (PUI) temperature in the slow SW of the IHS is ∼10{sup 7} K. Moreover, we demonstrate that the extinction of PUIs by charge-exchange is an essential process required to create the observed global ENA structure. While the shape and locations of the ENA lobes as a function of energy are well reproduced by PUIs that cross the termination shock, the results appear to be sensitive to the form of the distribution of PUIs injected in the IHS.

  8. Efficient and stable, structurally inverted poly(3-hexylthiopen): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester heterojunction solar cells with fibrous like poly(3-hexylthiopen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandara, Jayasundera; Shankar, Karthik; Grimes, Craig A.; Thelakkat, Mukundan

    2011-01-01

    We investigated an inverted organic photovoltaic device structure in which a densely packed ∼ 100 nm thin TiO 2 layer on fluorine doped conducting glass serves as anode and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate)/Au layer on top of the active layer serves as cathode. The active layer is comprised of a blend of poly(3-hexylthiopene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The rectification behavior of such a device is improved significantly and injection losses are minimized compared to devices without any compact TiO 2 layer. Moreover, nanostructured P3HT active layer was achieved in-situ by spin coating concentrated pure P3HT and P3HT:PCBM blend and solar cell performances on thickness of the active layer were also investigated. For the inverted solar cells constructed with different concentrations of P3HT and PCBM keeping the P3HT:PCBM ratio 1:0.8 (wt.%), the highest short circuit current and efficiency was observed when the P3HT and PCBM concentration was equal to 1.5 (wt.%) and 1.2 (wt.%) respectively. This leads to highly stable and reproducible power conversion efficiency above 3.7% at 100 mW/cm 2 light intensity under AM 1.5 conditions.

  9. Synthesis and X-ray Crystal Structure of a Stable cis-1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinoethene Monodentate Thiolate Platinum Complex and TGA Studies of its Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaz Rodrigo H.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The stable Pt(II complex [Pt(SPh2(dppen (4, (dppen, Ph2PCH=CHPPh2 was obtained from [PtCl(SPh2(SnPh3cod] (1 (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene by reductive elimination reaction of SnClPh3 and substitution of the cod ligand by the diphosphine, albeit in low yields. Yields of 80% were obtained when [Pt(SPh2cod] (3 was used as the starting material instead. The viability of these reactions was suggested by a TG study, performed on the starting materials. Complex 4 was characterized by multinuclear NMR (195Pt, 31P, ¹H and 13C and IR spectroscopies and elemental analysis. The molecular structure, solved by an X-ray diffraction study, exhibted a slightly distorted square-planar geometry and short C=C and Pt-P bond distances which were interpreted in terms of a p interaction between the double bond and the metal-ligand bond, as observed for other diphosphine compounds described previously.

  10. Synergetic effects of solution-processable fluorinated graphene and PEDOT as a hole-transporting layer for highly efficient and stable normal-structure perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jae-Hun; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Joh, Han-Ik; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Na, Seok-In

    2017-11-16

    We demonstrate that a bi-interlayer consisting of water-free poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and fluorinated reduced graphene oxide (FrGO) noticeably enhances the efficiency and the stability of the normal-structure perovskite solar cells (PeSCs). With simple and low temperature solution-processing, the PeSC employing the PEDOT + FrGO interlayer exhibits a significantly improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.9%. Comprehensive investigations indicate that the enhanced PCE is mostly attributed to the retarded recombination in the devices. The minimized recombination phenomena are related to the interfacial dipoles at the PEDOT/FrGO interface, which facilitates the electron-blocking and the higher built-in potential in the devices. Furthermore, the PEDOT + FrGO device shows a better stability by maintaining 70% of the initial PCE over the 30 days exposure to ambient conditions. This is because the more hydrophobic graphitic sheets of the FrGO on the PEDOT further protect the perovskite films from oxygen/water penetration. Consequently, the introduction of composite interfacial layers including graphene derivatives can be an effective and versatile strategy for high-performing, stable, and cost-effective PeSCs.

  11. Evidence of stable genetic structure across a remote island archipelago through self-recruitment in a widely dispersed coral reef fish

    KAUST Repository

    Priest, Mark

    2012-11-19

    We used microsatellite markers to assess the population genetic structure of the scribbled rabbitfish Siganus spinus in the western Pacific. This species is a culturally important food fish in the Mariana Archipelago and subject to high fishing pressure. Our primary hypothesis was to test whether the individuals resident in the southern Mariana Island chain were genetically distinct and hence should be managed as discrete stocks. In addition to spatial sampling of adults, newly-settled individuals were sampled on Guam over four recruitment events to assess the temporal stability of the observed spatial patterns, and evidence of self-recruitment. We found significant genetic structure in S. spinus across the western Pacific, with Bayesian analyses revealing three genetically distinct clusters: the southernMariana Islands, east Micronesia, and the west Pacific; with the southern Mariana Islands beingmore strongly differentiated fromthe rest of the region. Analyses of temporal samples from Guam indicated the southern Mariana cluster was stable over time, with no genetic differentiation between adults versus recruits, or between samples collected across four separate recruitment events spanning 11 months. Subsequent assignment tests indicated seven recruits had self-recruited from within the Southern Mariana Islands population. Our results confirm the relative isolation of the southern Mariana Islands population and highlight how local processes can act to isolate populations that, by virtue of their broad-scale distribution, have been subject to traditionally high gene flows. Our results add to a growing consensus that self-recruitment is a highly significant influence on the population dynamics of tropical reef fish. 2012 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The atomic structure and chemistry of Fe-rich steps on antiphase boundaries in Ti-doped Bi0.9Nd0.15FeO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian MacLaren

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Stepped antiphase boundaries are frequently observed in Ti-doped Bi0.85Nd0.15FeO3, related to the novel planar antiphase boundaries reported recently. The atomic structure and chemistry of these steps are determined by a combination of high angle annular dark field and bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging, together with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The core of these steps is found to consist of 4 edge-sharing FeO6 octahedra. The structure is confirmed by image simulations using a frozen phonon multislice approach. The steps are also found to be negatively charged and, like the planar boundaries studied previously, result in polarisation of the surrounding perovskite matrix.

  13. Crustal structure of a Proterozoic craton boundary: east Albany-Fraser Orogen, Western Australia, imaged with passive seismic and gravity anomaly data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippl, Christian; Brisbout, Lucy; Spaggiari, Catherine; Gessner, Klaus; Tkalcic, Hrvoje; Kennett, Brian; Murdie, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    We use passive seismic and gravity data to characterize the crustal structure and the crust-mantle boundary of the east Albany-Fraser Orogen in Western Australia, a Proterozoic orogen that reworked the southern and southeastern margin of the Archean Yilgarn Craton. The crustal thickness pattern retrieved from receiver functions shows a belt of substantially thickened crust - about 10 km thicker than the surrounding regions - that follows the trend of the orogen, but narrows to the southwest. Common conversion point profiles show a clear transition from a wide, symmetric Moho trough in the northeast to a one-sided, north-western Moho dip in the southwest, where the Moho appears to underthrust the craton towards its interior. The change from a Moho trough to an underthrust Moho appears to coincide with the inferred trace of the Ida Fault, a major terrane boundary within the Yilgarn Craton. Bulk crustal vp/vs ratios are mostly in the felsic to intermediate range, with clearly elevated values (≥1.8) at stations in the Fraser Zone granulite facies, dominantly mafic metamorphic rocks. Forward modelling of gravity anomaly data using the retrieved Moho geometry as a geometric constraint shows that a conspicuous, elongated gravity low on the northwestern side of the eastern Albany-Fraser Orogen is almost certainly caused by thickened Archean crust. To obtain a model that resembles the regional gravity pattern the following assumptions are necessary: high-density rocks occur in the upper crustal portion of the Fraser Zone, at depth inside the Moho trough and in parts of the eastern Nornalup Zone east of the Moho trough. Although our gravity models do not constrain at which crustal level these high-density rocks occur, active deep seismic surveys suggest that large extents of the east Albany-Fraser Orogen's lower crust include a Mesoproterozoic magmatic underplate known as the Gunnadorrah Seismic Province. The simplest interpretation of the imaged crustal structure is that

  14. Scalar self-energy for a charged particle in global monopole spacetime with a spherical boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Mello, E R Bezerra; Saharian, A A

    2012-01-01

    We analyze combined effects of the geometry produced by a global monopole and a concentric spherical boundary on the self-energy of a point-like scalar charged test particle at rest. We assume that the boundary is outside the monopole's core with a general spherically symmetric inner structure. An important quantity to this analysis is the three-dimensional Green function associated with this system. For both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions obeyed by the scalar field on the sphere, the Green function presents a structure that contains contributions due to the background geometry of the spacetime and the boundary. Consequently, the corresponding induced scalar self-energy also presents a similar structure. For points near the sphere, the boundary-induced part dominates and the self-force is repulsive/attractive with respect to the boundary for Dirichlet/Neumann boundary condition. In the region outside the sphere at large distances from it, the boundary-free part in the self-energy dominates and the corresponding self-force can be either attractive or repulsive with dependence of the curvature coupling parameter for scalar field. In particular, for the minimal coupling we show the presence of a stable equilibrium point for the Dirichlet boundary condition. In the region inside the sphere, the nature of the self-force depends on the specific model for the monopole's core. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, we shall consider two distinct models, namely the flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen ones. (paper)

  15. Stable Isotope Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tissue samples (skin, bone, blood, muscle) are analyzed for stable carbon, stable nitrogen, and stable sulfur analysis. Many samples are used in their entirety for...

  16. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  17. Adaptation of the Boundary Violations Scale Developed Based on Structural Family Therapy to the Turkish Context: A Study of Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Rasit; Çolakkadioglu, Oguzhan; Öz, Aysegül Sükran; Akbas, Turan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt "The Boundary Violations Scale" (Madden et al., 2002), which was created to measure the intergenerational boundary violations in families from the perspective of children, to Turkish and to test the validity and reliability of the Turkish version of this instrument. This instrument was developed…

  18. High hardness BaCb-(BxOy/BN) composites with 3D mesh-like fine grain-boundary structure by reactive spark plasma sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Badica, Petre; Grasso, Salvatore; Sakka, Yoshio; Tok, Alfred; Su, Liap Tat; Bosman, Michael; Ma, Jan

    2012-02-01

    Boron carbide B4C powders were subject to reactive spark plasma sintering (also known as field assisted sintering, pulsed current sintering or plasma assisted sintering) under nitrogen atmosphere. For an optimum hexagonal BN (h-BN) content estimated from X-ray diffraction measurements at approximately 0.4 wt%, the as-prepared BaCb-(BxOy/BN) ceramic shows values of Berkovich and Vickers hardness of 56.7 +/- 3.1 GPa and 39.3 +/- 7.6 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than for the vacuum SPS processed B4C pristine sample and the h-BN -mechanically-added samples. XRD and electronic microscopy data suggest that in the samples produced by reactive SPS in N2 atmosphere, and containing an estimated amount of 0.3-1.5% h-BN, the crystallite size of the boron carbide grains is decreasing with the increasing amount of N2, while for the newly formed lamellar h-BN the crystallite size is almost constant (approximately 30-50 nm). BN is located at the grain boundaries between the boron carbide grains and it is wrapped and intercalated by a thin layer of boron oxide. BxOy/BN forms a fine and continuous 3D mesh-like structure that is a possible reason for good mechanical properties.

  19. Structural and Tectonic Map Along the Pacific-North America Plate Boundary in Northern Gulf of California, Sonora Desert and Valle de Mexicali, Mexico, from Seismic Reflection Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Escobar, M.; Suarez-Vidal, F.; Mendoza-Borunda, R.; Martin Barajas, A.; Pacheco-Romero, M.; Arregui-Estrada, S.; Gallardo-Mata, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, C.; Chanes-Martinez, J.

    2012-12-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) carried on an intense exploration program in the northern Gulf of California, the Sonora Desert and the southern part of the Mexicali Valley. This program was supported by a seismic reflection field operation. The collected seismic data was 2D, with travel time of 6 s recording, in 48 channels, and the source energy was: dynamite, vibroseis and air guns. Since 2007 to present time, the existing seismic data has been re-processing and ire-interpreting as part of a collaboration project between the PEMEX's Subdirección de Exploración (PEMEX) and CICESE. The study area is located along a large portion of the Pacific-North America plate boundary in the northern Gulf of California and the Southern part of the Salton Trough tectonic province (Mexicali Valley). We present the result of the processes reflection seismic lines. Many of the previous reported known faults were identify along with the first time described located within the study region. We identified regions with different degree of tectonic activity. In structural map it can see the location of many of these known active faults and their associated seismic activity, as well as other structures with no associated seismicity. Where some faults are mist placed they were deleted or relocated based on new information. We included historical seismicity for the region. We present six reflection lines that cross the aftershocks zone of the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake of April 4, 2010 (Mw7.2). The epicenter of this earthquake and most of the aftershocks are located in a region where pervious to this earthquake no major earthquakes are been reported. A major result of this study is to demonstrate that there are many buried faults that increase the seismic hazard.

  20. Vortex-like plasma flow structures observed by Cluster at the boundary of the outer radiation belt and ring current: A link between the inner and outer magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Q.-G.; Wang, Y. F.; Yang, B.; Zhang, H.; Tian, A. M.; Dunlop, M.; Fritz, T. A.; Kistler, L. M.; Korth, A.; Daly, P. W.; Pedersen, A.

    2009-10-01

    Two vortex-like plasma flow structures have been observed at the outer radiation belt and/or the ring current region on 11 April 2002, from 0415 to 0635 UT, when the Cluster fleet entered (in the Southern Hemisphere) and exited (in the Northern Hemisphere) the boundary layer of the inner magnetosphere near 2130 MLT. On 11 April 2002 during the period of interest, the solar wind speed was high, and the geomagnetic activity was moderate. These two vortices have opposite rotation directions and are characterized by bipolar signatures in the flow V x components with peak-to-peak amplitudes of about 40 km/s. The inflection points of the plasma flow coincide precisely with the local maxima of the duskward core flow V y (30 km/s) which exceed the surrounding flow by 3-4 times in magnitude for both vortices. A pair of bidirectional current sheets and bipolar electric fields (E y ) are found to be closely associated with these vortices. Whereas magnetic field disturbances are observed only in B x and B y components, the magnetic magnitude stays almost unchanged. Vortices observed both inbound and outbound at the boundary of the radiation belt at nearly the same location (L shell and latitude), suggesting they may last for more than 140 min. The scale sizes of the two vortices are about 810 km and 1138 km, respectively. Interestingly, it is found that Earth's ionospheric singly charged oxygen are precipitating in the vortex dynamic process, having energies less than 1 keV and having a strong field-aligned pitch angle distribution. These plasma flow vortices are suggested to be formed at the interface between the enhanced ionospheric outflow stream from the polar ionosphere and a sudden braking and/or azimuthal deflection of bursty bulk flows generated by the tail reconnection. These observed flow vortices provide a link among the inner magnetosphere, the tail plasma sheet, and the Earth's ionosphere by coupling magnetic shear stresses and plasma flow momentum.

  1. The carbonaceous phyllite rock-hosted Pedra Verde copper mine, Borborema Province, Brazil: Stable isotope constraints, structural controls and metallogenic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Nogueira de Matos, José Henrique; Saraiva dos Santos, Ticiano José; Virgínia Soares Monteiro, Lena

    2017-12-01

    The Pedra Verde Copper Mine is located in the Viçosa do Ceará municipality, State of Ceará, NE Brazil. The copper mineralization is hosted by the Pedra Verde Phyllite, which is a carbonaceous chlorite-calcite phyllite with subordinate biotite. It belongs to the Neoproterozoic Martinópole Group of the Médio Coreaú Domain, Borborema Province. The Pedra Verde deposit is stratabound and its ore zoning is conspicuous, according to the following sequence, from bottom to top: marcasite/pyrite, native silver, chalcopyrite, bornite, chalcocite, native copper and hematite. Barite and carbonaceous material are reported in ore zones. Zoning reflects the ore formation within a redox boundary developed due to the interaction between oxidized copper- and sulfate-bearing fluids and the reduced phyllite. Structural control on mineralization is evidenced by the association of the ore minerals with veins, hinge folds, shadow pressures, and mylonitic foliation. It was mainly exercised by a dextral transcurrent shear zone developed during the third deformational stage identified in the Médio Coreaú Domain between 590 Ma and 570 Ma. This points to the importance of epigenetic, post-metamorphic deformational events for ore formation. Oxygen isotopic composition (δ18OH2O = 8.94 to 11.28‰, at 250 to 300 °C) estimated for the hydrothermal fluids in equilibrium with calcite indicates metamorphic or evolved meteoric isotopic signatures. The δ13CPDB values (-2.60 to -9.25‰) obtained for hydrothermal calcite indicate mixing of carbon sources derived from marine carbonate rocks and carbonaceous material. The δ34SCDT values (14.88 to 36.91‰) of sulfides suggest evaporites as sulfate sources or a closed system in relation to SO42- availability to form H2S. Carbonaceous matter had a key role in thermochemical sulfate processes and sulfide precipitation. The Pedra Verde Copper Mine is considered the first stratabound meta-sedimentary rock-hosted copper deposit described in Brazil

  2. The transactional approach in company boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chaihuaque Dueñas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the relationship between market and firms through the theory of transactional cost and the relationsthat determine the structure and boundaries of the firm. Using the assumptions from the transactional cost approach,this article proposes some variables that determine optimal organizational structures and their boundaries.

  3. Influence of orographically induced transport process on the structure of the atmospheric boundary layer and on the distribution of trace gases; Einfluss orographisch induzierter Transportprozesse auf die Struktur der atmosphaerischen Grenzschicht und die Verteilung von Spurengasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossmann, M.

    1998-04-01

    The influence of terrain on the structure of the atmospheric boundary-layer and the distribution of trace gases during periods of high atmospheric pressure was studied by means of meteorological and air-chemical data collected in September 1992 during the TRACT experiment in the transition area between the upper Rhine valley and the northern Black Forest. The emphasis was on the investigation of the development of the convective boundary layer, the formation of thermally induced circulation systems, and the orographic exchange between the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere. Thanks to the extensive measurements, phenomena not yet described in literature could be verified by case studies, and processes that had only been established qualitatively could be quantified. (orig.)

  4. Stable convergence and stable limit theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Häusler, Erich

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a concise but complete exposition of the mathematical theory of stable convergence and give various applications in different areas of probability theory and mathematical statistics to illustrate the usefulness of this concept. Stable convergence holds in many limit theorems of probability theory and statistics – such as the classical central limit theorem – which are usually formulated in terms of convergence in distribution. Originated by Alfred Rényi, the notion of stable convergence is stronger than the classical weak convergence of probability measures. A variety of methods is described which can be used to establish this stronger stable convergence in many limit theorems which were originally formulated only in terms of weak convergence. Naturally, these stronger limit theorems have new and stronger consequences which should not be missed by neglecting the notion of stable convergence. The presentation will be accessible to researchers and advanced students at the master's level...

  5. Task reports on developing techniques for scattering by 3D composite structures and to generate new solutions in diffraction theory using higher order boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    There are two tasks described in this report. First, an extension of a two dimensional formulation is presented for a three dimensional body of revolution. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and magnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and an exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that it leads to convolutional boundary operators for low O(n) memory demand. Second, rigorous uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) diffraction coefficients are presented for a coated convex cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions. Ray solutions are obtained which remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly those in the deep lit and shadow regions. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder.

  6. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, James R.; Tinto, Kirsty J.; Bell, Robin E.

    2015-05-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5-1.7 with 80-100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. The copyright line for this article was changed on 5 JUN 2015 after original online publication.

  7. Herbivory of Omnivorous Fish Shapes the Food Web Structure of a Chinese Tropical Eutrophic Lake: Evidence from Stable Isotope and Fish Gut Content Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that, unlike the situation in temperate lakes, high biomasses of omnivorous fish are maintained in subtropical and tropical lakes when they shift from a turbid phytoplankton-dominated state to a clear water macrophyte-dominated state, and the predation pressure on large-bodied zooplankton therefore remains high. Whether this reflects a higher degree of herbivory in warm lakes than in temperate lakes is debatable. We combined food web studies using stable isotopes with gut content analyses of the most dominant fish species to elucidate similarities and differences in food web structure between a clear water macrophyte-dominated basin (MDB and a turbid phytoplankton-dominated basin (PDB of Huizhou West Lake, a shallow tropical Chinese lake. The δ13C–δ15N biplot of fish and invertebrates revealed community-wide differences in isotope-based metrics of the food webs between MDB and PDB. The range of consumer δ15N (NR was lower in MDB than in PDB, indicating shorter food web length in MDB. The mean nearest neighbor distance (MNND and standard deviation around MNND (SDNND were higher in MDB than in PDB, showing a markedly low fish trophic overlap and a more uneven packing of species in niches in MDB than in PDB. The range of fish δ13C (CR of consumers was more extensive in MDB than in PDB, indicating a wider feeding range for fish in MDB. Mixing model results showed that macrophytes and associated periphyton constituted a large fraction of basal production sources for the fish in MDB, while particulate organic matter (POM contributed a large fraction in PDB. In MDB, the diet of the dominant fish species, crucian carp (Carassius carassius, consisted mainly of vegetal matter (macrophytes and periphyton and zooplankton, while detritus was the most important food item in PDB. Our results suggest that carbon from macrophytes with associated periphyton may constitute an important food resource for omnivorous fish, and this may strongly

  8. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, D.V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Van Nieuwenhuizen, P. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States). C.N. Yang Inst. for Theoretical Physics

    2008-01-15

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  9. Rigid supersymmetry with boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaev, D.V.; Van Nieuwenhuizen, P.

    2008-01-01

    We construct rigidly supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary actions, both in x-space and in superspace. For each standard supersymmetric bulk action a minimal supersymmetric bulk-plus-boundary action follows from an extended F- or D-term formula. Additional separately supersymmetric boundary actions can be systematically constructed using co-dimension one multiplets (boundary superfields). We also discuss the orbit of boundary conditions which follow from the Euler-Lagrange variational principle. (orig.)

  10. Tuning the Structure and Ionic Interactions in a Thermochemically Stable Hybrid Layered Titanate-Based Nanocomposite for High Temperature Solid Lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.; Lubbers, Roy; Veldhuis, Sjoerd; Narygina, Olga; Lette, Walter; Schipper, Dirk J.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2017-01-01

    Solid inorganic lubricants are thermally stable but they are often limited by their lack of deformability, while organic lubricants have limitations in terms of thermal stability. In this study, a novel solid organic–inorganic nanocomposite lubricant that synergistically combines the

  11. Eutectic Gallium-Indium (EGaIn) : A Liquid Metal Alloy for the Formation of Stable Structures in Microchannels at Room Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dickey, Michael D.; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Larsen, Ryan J.; Weiss, Emily A.; Weitz, David A.; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the rheological behavior of the liquid metal eutectic gallium-indium (EGaIn) as it is injected into microfluidic channels to form stable microstructures of liquid metal. EGaIn is well-suited for this application because of its rheological properties at room temperature: it

  12. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  13. stableGP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The code in the stableGP package implements Gaussian process calculations using efficient and numerically stable algorithms. Description of the algorithms is in the...

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Boundary Roughness in Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jun

    variable to obtain information of local structural variations such as protrusions and retrusions formed on recrystallization boundaries. The AII value is directionindependent allowing unbiased characterization of morphological irregularities with both closed and non-closed boundary profiles. The length...... structural aspects into account, a detailed characterization is essential of partly recrystallized microstructures focusing on the local shapes of the boundaries, in particular on whether protrusions and retrusions are formed or not. Quantification of the “amount” of boundary roughness in the form...... scale at which the rough features are characterized is determined by a parameter termed sampling radius used to measure the AII values. A number of roughness parameters are developed based on the AII dataset for a boundary or boundary segment, whose local morphological characteristics are represented...

  15. Boundary effect in electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, X L; Yang, F; Xuan, S H; Zong, L H; Zhu, W; Jiang, W Q

    2011-12-01

    The effect of the boundary friction coefficient on the rheological properties of the electrorheological (ER) fluids in quasistatic and dynamic states is investigated by computer simulation. The relation between the shear stress and the boundary friction coefficient in quasistatic and dynamic states is discussed qualitatively and quantitatively, and the trend matches the previously reported experimental results well. The flow curves of ER fluids, under different friction coefficients, are calculated, and it is found that the friction coefficient affects the flow curves. In two dimensions, the transitions in structure corresponding to the shear stress variations are presented to understand the mechanism of ER fluids.

  16. Prediction of dislocation boundary characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe

    orientation of the grain [1]. For selected boundaries it has been experimentally verified that the boundaries consist of fairly regular networks of dislocations, which come from the active slip systems [2]. The networks have been analyzed within the framework of Low-Energy-Dislocation-Structures (LEDS......, such as the dislocation content and misorientation. The prediction is based on the expected active slip systems and assumptions of mutual stress screening. In general, networks of dislocations with three linearly independent Burgers vectors fulfilling the criterion of mutual stress screening may form on any plane...

  17. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  18. HUD GIS Boundary Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The HUD GIS Boundary Files are intended to supplement boundary files available from the U.S. Census Bureau. The files are for community planners interested in...

  19. State Agency Administrative Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database comprises 28 State agency boundaries and point of contact. The Kansas Geological Survey collected legal descriptions of the boundaries for various...

  20. Political State Boundary (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — State boundaries with political limit - boundaries extending into the ocean (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an...

  1. Boundary layer physics over snow and ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Anderson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the unique chemical environment over snow and ice in recent decades, particularly in the polar regions, have stimulated increasing interest in the boundary layer processes that mediate exchanges between the ice/snow interface and the atmosphere. This paper provides a review of the underlying concepts and examples from recent field studies in polar boundary layer meteorology, which will generally apply to atmospheric flow over snow and ice surfaces. It forms a companion paper to the chemistry review papers in this special issue of ACP that focus on processes linking halogens to the depletion of boundary layer ozone in coastal environments, mercury transport and deposition, snow photochemistry, and related snow physics. In this context, observational approaches, stable boundary layer behavior, the effects of a weak or absent diurnal cycle, and transport and mixing over the heterogeneous surfaces characteristic of coastal ocean environments are of particular relevance.

  2. Negotiating Cluster Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacomin, Valeria

    2017-01-01

    Palm oil was introduced to Malay(si)a as an alternative to natural rubber, inheriting its cluster organizational structure. In the late 1960s, Malaysia became the world’s largest palm oil exporter. Based on archival material from British colonial institutions and agency houses, this paper focuses...... on the governance dynamics that drove institutional change within this cluster during decolonization. The analysis presents three main findings: (i) cluster boundaries are defined by continuous tug-of-war style negotiations between public and private actors; (ii) this interaction produces institutional change...... within the cluster, in the form of cumulative ‘institutional rounds’ – the correction or disruption of existing institutions or the creation of new ones; and (iii) this process leads to a broader inclusion of local actors in the original cluster configuration. The paper challenges the prevalent argument...

  3. Environmentalists without Boundaries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... Environmentalists without Boundaries. Setting Boundaries is a popular strategy in child development programs. But as children mature into young adults, it dawns on many that certain boundaries must be crossed to explore rich opportunities outside the safe closet of their teachers or parents' watchful eyes.

  4. Preface: GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary-layer Study (GABLS) on Stable Boundary Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) is a program initiated by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) to observe, understand and model the hydrological cycle and the related energy fluxes in the atmosphere, at the land surface and in the upper oceans. Consequently the

  5. ABOUT SOLUTION OF MULTIPOINT BOUNDARY PROBLEMS OF TWO-DIMENSIONAL STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE USE OF COMBINED APPLICATION OF FINITE ELEMENT METHOD AND DISCRETE-CONTINUAL FINITE ELEMENT METHOD PART 2: SPECIAL ASPECTS OF FINITE ELEMENT APPROXIMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel A. Akimov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As is well known, the formulation of a multipoint boundary problem involves three main components: a description of the domain occupied by the structure and the corresponding subdomains; description of the conditions inside the domain and inside the corresponding subdomains, the description of the conditions on the boundary of the domain, conditions on the boundaries between subdomains. This paper is a continuation of another work published earlier, in which the formulation and general principles of the approximation of the multipoint boundary problem of a static analysis of deep beam on the basis of the joint application of the finite element method and the discrete-continual finite element method were considered. It should be noted that the approximation within the fragments of a domain that have regular physical-geometric parameters along one of the directions is expedient to be carried out on the basis of the discrete-continual finite element method (DCFEM, and for the approximation of all other fragments it is necessary to use the standard finite element method (FEM. In the present publication, the formulas for the computing of displacements partial derivatives of displacements, strains and stresses within the finite element model (both within the finite element and the corresponding nodal values (with the use of averaging are presented. Boundary conditions between subdomains (respectively, discrete models and discrete-continual models and typical conditions such as “hinged support”, “free edge”, “perfect contact” (twelve basic (basic variants are available are under consideration as well. Governing formulas for computing of elements of the corresponding matrices of coefficients and vectors of the right-hand sides are given for each variant. All formulas are fully adapted for algorithmic implementation.

  6. Duplex structural differences and not 2′-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA–DNA versus DNA–DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3′ recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA–DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA–DNA. Replacing 2′- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2′-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hy...

  7. The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N. R.; Rodriguez, M.; Petit, C.; Huchon, P.; Beslier, M.; Hazard, B.

    2009-12-01

    Since the advent of Plate Tectonics, tectonic plate boundaries were explored on land as at sea for search of active faults where the destructive energy of earthquakes is released. Yet, some plate boundaries, less active or considered as less dangerous to humankind, escaped general attention and remained unknown to a large extent. Among them, the boundary between two major tectonic plates: Arabia and India. The Arabia-India motion is currently accommodated along the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ) in the NW Indian Ocean, which connects the spreading centers of the Sheba and Carlsberg ridge system to the Makran subduction zone. We recently surveyed this fracture zone onboard the R/V Beautemps-Beaupré (Owen Cruise, March 2009) using a high-resolution deep-water multibeam echo-sounder. Bathymetric data reveal a spectacular submarine fault system running over a distance of 800 km between the Arabia-India-Somalia triple junction to the south and the Dalrymple Trough to the north. The morphology of the active faults is well preserved on the seafloor where fault scarps can be followed over hundreds of kilometres. The surficial trace of the faults is not obscured by the sediments of the aggrading deep-sea fan of the Indus River. The fault system is segmented in five main segments connected by pull apart basins. The length of the individual, apparently uninterrupted, segments is between 100 km and 220 km. The largest pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N (20°N-Basin) corresponds to a right step-over of about 12 km between two fault segments. The 20°N-Basin is bounded by a normal fault scarp with a throw of 450-500 m. Numerous minor normal faults cutting the floor of the basin attest to recent activity. The 20°N-Basin is directly supplied in turbidity-current deposits by an active channel of the Indus fan. The preservation of tectonic features indicates that the dip-slip motion has exceeded the rate of burial by sediments. Some compressional structures are also deduced from

  8. The new boundaries of the "boundaryless" company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, L; Gilmore, T

    1992-01-01

    In an economy founded on innovation and change, one of the premier challenges of management is to design more flexible organizations. For many executives, a single metaphor has come to embody this managerial challenge and to capture the kind of organization they want to create: the "corporation without boundaries." According to Larry Hirschhorn and Thomas Gilmore of the Wharton Center for Applied Research, managers are right to break down the boundaries that make organizations rigid and unresponsive. But they are wrong if they think that doing so eliminates the need for boundaries altogether. Once the traditional boundaries of hierarchy, function, and geography disappear, a new set of boundaries becomes important. These new boundaries are more psychological than organizational. They aren't drawn on a company's organizational chart but in the minds of its managers and employees. And instead of being reflected in a company's structure, they must be "enacted" over and over again in a manager's relationships with bosses, subordinates, and peers. In this article, Hirschhorn and Gilmore provide a guide to the boundaries that matter in the "boundaryless" company. They explain how these new boundaries are essential for both managers and employees in coping with the demands of flexible work. They describe the typical mistakes that managers make in their boundary relationships. And they show how executives can become effective boundary managers by paying attention to a source of data they have often overlooked in the past: their own gut feelings about work and the people with whom they do it.

  9. Event boundaries and memory improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Kyle A; Thompson, Alexis N; Tamplin, Andrea K; Krawietz, Sabine A; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-03-01

    The structure of events can influence later memory for information that is embedded in them, with evidence indicating that event boundaries can both impair and enhance memory. The current study explored whether the presence of event boundaries during encoding can structure information to improve memory. In Experiment 1, memory for a list of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated by having participants walk through a doorway, or not, halfway through the word list. In Experiment 2, memory for lists of words was tested in which event structure was manipulated using computer windows. Finally, in Experiments 3 and 4, event structure was manipulated by having event shifts described in narrative texts. The consistent finding across all of these methods and materials was that memory was better when the information was distributed across two events rather than combined into a single event. Moreover, Experiment 4 demonstrated that increasing the number of event boundaries from one to two increased the memory benefit. These results are interpreted in the context of the Event Horizon Model of event cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Technology for Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a study of an organisation, which is undergoing a process transforming organisational and technological boundaries. In particular, we shall look at three kinds of boundaries: the work to maintain and change the boundary between the organisation and its customers; boundaries...... between competencies within the organisation; and boundaries between various physical locations of work, in particular between what is done in the office and what is done on site. Maintaining and changing boundaries are the processes through which a particular community sustains its identity and practice...... on the one hand, and where it is confronted with the identity and practices on the other.The organisation being studied employs a multitude of IT systems that support and maintain these boundaries in a particular manner that are in many ways inappropriate to the current needs of the organisation...

  11. The Role of Grain Boundary Energy on Grain Boundary Complexion Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojarski, Stephanie A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Rohrer, Gregory S. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2014-09-01

    Grain boundary complexions are distinct equilibrium structures and compositions of a grain boundary and complexion transformations are transition from a metastable to an equilibrium complexion at a specific thermodynamic and geometric conditions. Previous work indicates that, in the case of doped alumina, a complexion transition that increased the mobility of transformed boundaries and resulted in abnormal grain growth also caused a decrease in the mean relative grain boundary energy as well as an increase in the anisotropy of the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). The current work will investigate the hypothesis that the rates of complexion transitions that result in abnormal grain growth (AGG) depend on grain boundary character and energy. Furthermore, the current work expands upon this understanding and tests the hypothesis that it is possible to control when and where a complexion transition occurs by controlling the local grain boundary energy distribution.

  12. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  13. Evolutionary Stable Strategy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    After Maynard-Smith and Price [1] mathematically derived why a given behaviour or strategy was adopted by a certain proportion of the population at a given time, it was shown that a strategy which is currently stable in a population need not be stable in evolutionary time (across generations). Additionally it was sug-.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of highly efficient and stable Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt ternary hybrid structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jiatao; Liu, Lin; Niu, Tongjun; Sun, Xiaosong, E-mail: sunxs@scu.edu.cn

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Visible-light-driven Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt photocatalysts were prepared. • Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt showed highly efficient and stable photocatalystic activity. • The photocatalytic mechanism of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt composite was given. - Abstract: Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is an excellent photocatalyst with high efficiency and quantum yield, but suffers from the fast recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and photo-corrosion. Hereby, the highly efficient and stable visible-light-driven Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt photocatalyst were prepared via a three-step wet chemical approach. The as-prepared Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, US-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectra and transient photocurrent as well. Comparing with single Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} or Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, the prepared Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt composite exhibited much higher photocatalytic activity and stability for the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light irradiation (>420 nm). The enhanced photocatalytic performance of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}/Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4}/Pt composite has been attributed to the efficient separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs through a scheme system composed of Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11,} Ag{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Pt.

  15. Ferroelectric domain continuity over grain boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantri, Sukriti; Oddershede, Jette; Damjanovic, Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Formation and mobility of domain walls in ferroelectric materials is responsible for many of their electrical and mechanical properties. Domain wall continuity across grain boundaries has been observed since the 1950's and is speculated to affect the grain boundary-domain interactions, thereby...... techniques in manipulating the micro-structure and domain structure to result in desired interactions between neighbouring grains could prove to be beneficial for future polycrystalline ferroelectric materials....

  16. Two stable steady states in the Hodgkin-Huxley axons

    OpenAIRE

    Aihara, K.; Matsumoto, G.

    1983-01-01

    Two stable steady states were found in the numerical solution of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations for the intact squid axon bathed in potassium-rich sea water with an externally applied inward current. Under the conditions the two stable steady-states exist, the Hodgkin-Huxley equations have a complex bifurcation structure including, in addition to the two stable steady-states, a stable limit cycle, two unstable equilibrium points, and one asymptotically stable equilibrium point. It was also conc...

  17. New insight in the structural features of haloadaptation in α-amylases from halophilic Archaea following homology modeling strategy: folded and stable conformation maintained through low hydrophobicity and highly negative charged surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorgani, Mohamed Amine; Patron, Kevin; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2014-07-01

    Proteins from halophilic archaea, which live in extreme saline conditions, have evolved to remain folded, active and stable at very high ionic strengths. Understanding the mechanism of haloadaptation is the first step toward engineering of halostable biomolecules. Amylases are one of the main enzymes used in industry. Yet, no three-dimensional structure has been experimentally resolved for α-amylases from halophilic archaea. In this study, homology structure modeling of α-amylases from the halophilic archaea Haloarcula marismortui, Haloarcula hispanica, and Halalkalicoccus jeotgali were performed. The resulting models were subjected to energy minimization, evaluation, and structural analysis. Calculations of the amino acid composition, salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were also performed and compared to a set of non-halophilic counterparts. It clearly appeared that haloarchaeal α-amylases exhibited lower propensities for helix formation and higher propensities for coil-forming regions. Furthermore, they could maintain a folded and stable conformation in high salt concentration through highly negative charged surface with over representation of acidic residues, especially Asp, and low hydrophobicity with increase of salt bridges and decrease in hydrophobic interactions on the protein surface. This study sheds some light on the stability of α-amylases from halophilic archaea and provides strong basis not only to understand haloadaptation mechanisms of proteins in microorganisms from hypersalines environments but also for biotechnological applications.

  18. Partitioning of water between point defects, dislocations, and grain boundaries in olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielke, J. A.; Mecklenburgh, J.; Mariani, E.; Wheeler, J.

    2017-12-01

    Estimates of the storage capacity of water in the interior of the Earth and other terrestrial planets vary significantly. One interpretation is that water in planetary interiors exists primarily as hydrogen ions, dissociated from liquid water, that are associated with point defects in the crystal structure of nominally anhydrous minerals. However, dislocations and grain boundaries may contribute significantly to the storage capacity of water in planetary interiors, but hydrogen concentrations in dislocations and grain boundaries are difficult to quantify. To measure the water storage capacity of dislocations and grain boundaries, we are analyzing results from high-temperature and high-pressure experiments where deuterium, a stable isotope of hydrogen, was incorporated into olivine, the dominate phase in the upper mantle. Compared to hydrogen, deuterium concentrations can be determined at much higher spatial resolution using secondary-ion mass spectroscopy. The concentration of deuterium in the samples will also be quantified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for comparison to results for hydrogen-bearing olivine. The spatial distribution of regions with different densities of geometrically-necessary dislocations and the locations of grain boundaries will be determined using electron-backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses. Correlation of the concentration of deuterium with dislocation densities and grain boundaries will be used to examine the partitioning of water-derived species between the different types of defects. Ultimately, these data will be used to place more realistic bounds on the storage capacity of water in the interior of Earth and of other terrestrial planets.

  19. Diffusion mechanisms in grain boundaries in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    A critical review is given of our current knowledge of grain-boundary diffusion in solids. A pipe mechanism of diffusion based on the well-established dislocation model seems most appropriate for small-angle boundaries. Open channels, which have atomic configurations somewhat like dislocation cores, probably play a major role in large-angle grain-boundary diffusion. Dissociated dislocations and stacking faults are not efficient paths for grain-boundary diffusion. The diffusion and computer modeling experiments are consistent with a vacancy mechanism of diffusion by a rather well-localized vacancy. The effective width of a boundary for grain-boundary diffusion is about two atomic planes. These general features of grain-boundary diffusion, deduced primarily from experiments on metals, are thought to be equally applicable for pure ceramic solids. The ionic character of many ceramic oxides may cause some differences in grain-boundary structure from that observed in metals, resulting in changes in grain-boundary diffusion behavior. 72 references, 5 figures

  20. Grain boundary character dependence of oxygen grain boundary diffusion in α-Al2O3 bicrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsubasa; Nishimura, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Isao; Shibata, Naoya; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    We measured oxygen diffusion coefficients (D gb ) along five grain boundaries (GBs) in alumina bicrystals by tracing 18 O by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Although all boundaries are classified as coincident site lattice boundaries with relatively ordered structures, D gb varied up to 10 3 times among them. On the other hand, the boundaries with identical boundary planes had relatively similar diffusivities as well as similar structures, regardless of Σ values. These results suggest that D gb are related to GB atomic structures and hence the GB character, especially GB planes.