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Sample records for stable artery disease

  1. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per...... minute or more. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine, added to standard background therapy, in 19,102 patients who had both stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure and a heart rate of 70 beats per minute or more (including 12...... without activity-limiting angina (P=0.02 for interaction). The incidence of bradycardia was higher with ivabradine than with placebo (18.0% vs. 2.3%, Pdisease without clinical heart failure, the addition of ivabradine to standard...

  2. Management standards for stable coronary artery disease in India.

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    Mishra, Sundeep; Ray, Saumitra; Dalal, Jamshed J; Sawhney, J P S; Ramakrishnan, S; Nair, Tiny; Iyengar, S S; Bahl, V K

    2016-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality globally, giving rise to more than 7 million deaths annually. An increasing burden of CAD in India is a major cause of concern with angina being the leading manifestation. Stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) is characterised by episodes of transient central chest pain (angina pectoris), often triggered by exercise, emotion or other forms of stress, generally triggered by a reversible mismatch between myocardial oxygen demand and supply resulting in myocardial ischemia or hypoxia. A stabilised, frequently asymptomatic phase following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is also classified as SCAD. This definition of SCAD also encompasses vasospastic and microvascular angina under the common umbrella. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Revascularisation versus medical treatment in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windecker, Stephan; Stortecky, Stefan; Stefanini, Giulio G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether revascularisation improves prognosis compared with medical treatment among patients with stable coronary artery disease. DESIGN: Bayesian network meta-analyses to combine direct within trial comparisons between treatments with indirect evidence from other trials...... stent, early generation paclitaxel eluting stent, sirolimus eluting stent, and zotarolimus eluting (Endeavor) stent, and new generation everolimus eluting stent, and zotarolimus eluting (Resolute) stent among patients with stable coronary artery disease. DATA SOURCES: Medline and Embase from 1980......: Among patients with stable coronary artery disease, coronary artery bypass grafting reduces the risk of death, myocardial infarction, and subsequent revascularisation compared with medical treatment. All stent based coronary revascularisation technologies reduce the need for revascularisation...

  4. Fractional flow reserve-guided PCI for stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruyne, Bernard; Fearon, William F; Pijls, Nico H J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that in patients with stable coronary artery disease and stenosis, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed on the basis of the fractional flow reserve (FFR) would be superior to medical therapy. METHODS: In 1220 patients with stable coronary artery disease, we...... years was lower in the PCI group than in the medical-therapy group (4.6% vs. 8.0%, P=0.04). Among registry patients, the rate of the primary end point was 9.0% at 2 years. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stable coronary artery disease, FFR-guided PCI, as compared with medical therapy alone, improved...

  5. Osteoprotegerin independently predicts mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Mette; Hilden, Jørgen; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To elucidate the prognostic power of serum osteoprotegerin (OPG) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: Serum OPG levels were measured in the CLARICOR trial cohort of 4063 patients with stable CAD on blood samples drawn at randomization. The follow-up was 2...

  6. YKL-40 a new biomarker in patients with acute coronary syndrome or stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Y.Z.; Ripa, R.S.; Johansen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background. YKL-40 is involved in remodelling and angiogenesis in non-cardiac inflammatory diseases. Aim was to quantitate plasma YKL-40 in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) or stable chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), and YKL-40 gene activation in human myocardium....... Methods and results. We included 73 patients: I) 20 patients with STEMI; II) 28 patients with stable CAD; III) 15 CAD patients referred for coronary by-pass surgery. YKL-40 mRNA expression was measured in myocardium subtended by stenotic or occluded arteries and areas with no apparent disease; and IV) 10...

  7. Serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T after exercise stress test in stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Ruwald, Martin Huth; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  8. Serum YKL-40 for monitoring myocardial ischemia after revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harutyunyan, Marina Jurjevna; Johansen, Julia S; Mygind, Naja D

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim was to investigate the inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 as a monitor of myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS: A total of 311 patients with stable CAD were included. Blood samples were taken at baseline, the day after coronary angiography and/or after...... percutaneous coronary intervention and after 6 months. RESULTS: A total of 148 (48%) patients were revascularized and 163 patients underwent only coronary angiography. In the entire population, serum YKL-40 increased significantly from baseline to 6 months (p = 0.05). This tendency was seen...... of disease progression but not of myocardial ischemia in patients with stable CAD....

  9. The effects of remote ischaemic preconditioning on coronary artery function in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, D.; Young, R.; Cialdella, P.; McCartney, P.; Bajrangee, A.; Hennigan, B.; Collison, D.; Carrick, D.; Shaukat, A.; Good, R.; Watkins, S.; McEntegart, M.; Watt, J.; Welsh, P.; Sattar, N.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Remote ischaemic preconditioning (RIPC) is a cardioprotective intervention invoking intermittent\\ud periods of ischaemia in a tissue or organ remote from the heart. The mechanisms of this effect are incompletely\\ud understood. We hypothesised that RIPC might enhance coronary vasodilatation by an endothelium-dependent\\ud mechanism.\\ud Methods: We performed a prospective, randomised, sham-controlled, blinded clinical trial. Patients with stable\\ud coronary artery disease (CAD) under...

  10. Association between uric acid and coronary collateral circulation in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Onur Kadir; Sahin, Durmus Yildiray; Duran, Mustafa; Turkoglu, Caner; Yildirim, Arafat; Elbasan, Zafer; Ozkan, Bugra; Tekin, Kamuran; Kunak, Aysegul Ulgen; Yilmaz, Yucel; Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Gur, Mustafa; Cayli, Murat

    2014-03-01

    Serum uric acid (SUA) levels have been proposed as a biomarker of coronary artery disease (CAD) and coronary collateral circulation (CCC). We investigated the association between SUA levels and development of CCC in patients with stable CAD. Consecutive patients (n = 480) with stable CAD who underwent coronary angiography and documented total occlusion in 1 of the major coronary arteries were included in this study. Levels of fasting blood glucose, white blood cell (WBC), creatinine, platelet count, and SUA were significantly higher in patients with poor CCC than in those with good CCC. After multivariate analysis, high levels of SUA were an independent predictor of CCC together with levels of fasting blood glucose and WBC. The receiver-operating characteristic analysis provided a cutoff value of 5.65 mg/dL for SUA to predict poor CCC with 60% sensitivity and 66% specificity. High levels of SUA may be associated with poor CCC in patients with stable CAD.

  11. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassio KAMPITS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Periodontal disease has been associated with elevations of blood cytokines involved in atherosclerosis in systemically healthy individuals, but little is known about this association in stable cardiovascular patients. The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal disease (exposure and blood cytokine levels (outcomes in a target population of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD. Material and Methods This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD and clinical attachment (CA loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. Results CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01, IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03, and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02. Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07 and PD (R2=0.06 were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05 and PD (R2=0.06 were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07. Conclusion Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients.

  12. Prognostic assessment of stable coronary artery disease as determined by coronary computed tomography angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene H; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To examine the 3.5 year prognosis of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) as assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) in real-world clinical practice, overall and within subgroups of patients according to age, sex, and comorbidity. Methods and results: This cohort study......, and comorbidity. Conclusion: Coronary artery disease determined by CCTA in real-world practice predicts the 3.5 year composite risk of late revascularization, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death across different groups of age, sex, or comorbidity burden....... included 16,949 patients (median age 57 years; 57% women) with new-onset symptoms suggestive of CAD, who underwent CCTA between January 2008 and December 2012. The endpoint was a composite of late coronary revascularization procedure >90 days after CCTA, myocardial infarction, and all-cause death...

  13. Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of the CLARIFY registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    Despite major advances in prevention and treatment, coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Whereas many sources of data are available on the epidemiology of acute coronary syndromes, fewer datasets reflect the contemporary management and outcomes of stable CAD patients. A worldwide contemporary registry would improve our knowledge about stable CAD. The main objectives are to describe the demographics, clinical profile, contemporary management and outcomes of outpatients with stable CAD; to identify gaps between evidence and treatment; and to investigate long-term prognostic determinants. CLARIFY (ProspeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease) is an ongoing international observational longitudinal registry. Stable CAD patients from 45 countries in Europe, Asia, America, Middle East, Australia and Africa were enrolled between November 2009 and June 2010. The inclusion criteria were previous myocardial infarction, evidence of coronary stenosis >50%, proven symptomatic myocardial ischemia or prior revascularization procedure. The main exclusion criteria were serious non-cardiovascular disease, conditions interfering with life expectancy or severe other cardiovascular disease (including advanced heart failure). Follow-up visits were planned annually for up to 5 years, interspersed with 6-month telephone calls. Of the 32,703 patients enrolled, most (77.6%) were male, age (mean ± SD) was 64.2 ± 10.5 years, and 71.0% were receiving treatment for hypertension; mean ± SD resting heart rate was 68.2 ± 10.6 bpm. Patients were enrolled based on a history of myocardial infarction >3 months earlier (57.7%), having at least one stenosis >50% on coronary angiography (61.1%), proven symptomatic myocardial ischemia on non-invasive testing (23.1%), or history of percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass graft (69.8%). Baseline characteristics were similar across the four

  14. Impact of Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

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    Kunimura, Ayako; Ishii, Hideki; Uetani, Tadayuki; Aoki, Toshijirou; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hirayama, Kenshi; Negishi, Yosuke; Shibata, Yohei; Sumi, Takuya; Kawashima, Kazuhiro; Tatami, Yosuke; Kawamiya, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Dai; Suzuki, Susumu; Amano, Tetsuya; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-01-01

    The association between malnutrition and cardiovascular prognosis in patients with stable coronary artery disease remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI), a simple tool to assess nutritional risk, and long-term outcomes after elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This study consisted of 802 patients (age, 70±10 years, male, 69%) who underwent elective PCI. GNRI was calculated at baseline as follows: GNRI=[14.89×serum albumin (g/dl)+[41.7×(body weight/body weight at body mass index of 22)

  15. Clopidogrel improves microvascular endothelial function in subjects with stable coronary artery disease.

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    Willoughby, Scott R; Luu, Lee-Jen; Cameron, James D; Nelson, Adam J; Schultz, Carlee D; Worthley, Stephen G; Worthley, Matthew I

    2014-06-01

    Clopidogrel therapy has recently been shown to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with stable vascular disease. This benefit may be due to effects not exclusively related to platelet aggregation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of clopidogrel therapy on microvascular endothelial function in subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Forty subjects with stable CAD were randomised to clopidogrel therapy (75mg/day) or control. Blood and endothelial function testing occurred at baseline, one week and three months following randomisation. Microvascular endothelial function was assessed via reactive hyperaemic index (RHI). Platelet function was assessed by adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced whole blood aggregation and the VerifyNow™ system. Plasma markers of endothelial function (asymmetric dimethylarginine, ADMA) and oxidative stress (myeloperoxidase, MPO) were also tested. The primary endpoint was endothelial function assessment (RHI) at three months. At one week RHI increased by 20±10% in the clopidogrel group; this effect was maintained at three months (21±9% increase from baseline; Pmicrovascular endothelial function in patients with stable CAD. This effect is independent of its effects on ADP-induced platelet reactivity. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thrombopoietin and platelet aggregation in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2017-12-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) may facilitate platelet activation and aggregation. However, data on the impact of TPO on platelet aggregation in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) are scarce. We aimed to investigate associations between TPO and platelet aggregation and activation in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied 900 stable CAD patients. Serum TPO was assessed by ELISA. Platelet aggregation was evaluated using the Multiplate Analyzer (agonists: arachidonic acid [AA] and collagen) and the VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. Platelet activation was evaluated by soluble (s)P-selectin. Cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition was evaluated by serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2). We found that TPO correlated weakly with platelet aggregation evaluated by Multiplate using AA (r = -0.09, p = 0.01) and collagen as agonists (r = -0.03, p = 0.43) and by VerifyNow (r = 0.07, p = 0.03). We found no correlation between TPO and sP-selectin (r = -0.01, p = 0.70). Independent predictors of AA-induced platelet aggregation by Multiplate included high levels of sP-selectin and serum TXB2, high platelet count, increasing age and body mass index, female sex, and active smoking. Independent predictors of TPO included low AA-induced platelet aggregation by Multiplate, high levels of hs-CRP, active smoking, and high platelet aggregation evaluated by VerifyNow. In conclusion, TPO levels did not correlate with platelet activation and only weak associations were found between TPO and platelet aggregation, suggesting that TPO did not substantially facilitate platelet aggregation in stable CAD patients.

  17. Long-term outcome of FFR-guided PCI for stable coronary artery disease in daily clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Biasco, Luigi; Lønborg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Our aim was to investigate the strength of fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) in daily practice. METHODS AND RESULTS: For this study, 3,512 patients with stable CAD and at least one 50-89% coronary stenosis...

  18. Diabetes does not influence treatment decisions regarding revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Breeman (Arno); H. Boersma (Eric); M.E. Bertrand (Michel); J.P. Ottervanger (Jan Paul); S.E. Hoeks (Sanne); M.J. Lenzen (Mattie); U. Sechtem (Udo); V.M.G. Legrand (Victor); M.J. de Boer (Menko Jan); W. Wijns (William)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - To evaluate whether in stable angina preference for coronary revascularization by either percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is influenced by diabetes status and whether this has prognostic implications. RESEARCH DESIGN AND

  19. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, Pcoronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Heart rate and B-blockade in stable coronary artery disease in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarouni, Eftihia; Voudris, Vassilis; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Hamilos, Michalis; Steg, Gabriel; Fox, Kim M; Greenlaw, Nicola; Vardas, Panos E

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a strong prognostic indicator in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is only limited evidence on HR and the use of b-blockers in patients with CAD in contemporary clinical practice. CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,283 patients from 45 countries were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010; of these, 559 patients were enrolled in Greece (age 62.3 ± 10.6 years, 84.44% men). HR measured by pulse was 68.3 ± 10.2 bpm and by electrocardiogram 67.6 ± 10.9, with an excellent correlation (r=0.91, p<0.001). Overall, 42.8% had HR70 bpm. B-blockers were prescribed in 74.2% of patients. Resting HR by pulse on b-blocker was 67.8 bpm and without b-blocker 69.6 bpm (p=0.069). HR70 bpm was independently associated with a lack of physical activity, higher systolic blood pressure, and a higher prevalence of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and carotid artery disease. Despite the use of HR lowering agents, the percentage of patients with HR70 bpm was high. It is likely that we can further improve HR control in Greek patients with stable CAD by both increasing the prescription of b-blockers and up-titrating their dose, as well as by using and up-titrating other available HR lowering agents.

  1. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Kazmi

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21, non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93, patients with unstable angina (n = 16, stable coronary artery disease (n = 14 and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207. We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6 and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7. In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN classification method (k = 3. The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  2. Determinants of reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs; Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Kristensen, Steen Dalby

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin is a cornerstone in management of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, considerable variability in the antiplatelet effect of aspirin has been reported. To investigate independent determinants of reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin in stable CAD patients. We performed a cross-sectional study including 900 stable, high-risk CAD patients. Among these, 795 (88%) had prior myocardial infarction, 250 (28%) had type 2 diabetes, and 170 (19%) had both. All patients received 75 mg aspirin daily as mono antiplatelet therapy. The antiplatelet effect of aspirin was assessed by measurement of platelet aggregation employing 1) multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA, Multiplate Analyzer) in whole blood anticoagulated with citrate or hirudin using arachidonic acid (AA) or collagen as agonists, and 2) VerifyNow Aspirin Assay. Compliance was assessed by measurement of serum thromboxane B2. Platelet count, prior myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes and body mass index were independent determinants of increased AA-induced MEA platelet aggregation in citrate and hirudin anticoagulated blood (p-values ≤ 0.045). Similar results were found with VerifyNow. Prior coronary artery bypass grafting, age, smoking (MEA, AA/citrate) and female gender (MEA, AA/hirudin) were also independent determinants of increased platelet aggregation (p-values ≤ 0.038). Compliance was confirmed by low serum thromboxane B2 levels in all patients (median [25%;75%]: 0.97 [0.52;1.97], range 0.02-26.44 ng/ml). Platelet count, prior myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes and body mass index were independent determinants of increased platelet aggregation, indicating that these characteristics may be key factors in reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin in stable CAD patients.

  3. Osteoprotegerin independently predicts mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease: the CLARICOR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerre, Mette; Hilden, Jørgen; Kastrup, Jens; Skoog, Maria; Hansen, Jørgen F; Kolmos, Hans J; Jensen, Gorm B; Kjøller, Erik; Winkel, Per; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Gluud, Christian

    2014-11-01

    To elucidate the prognostic power of serum osteoprotegerin (OPG) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Serum OPG levels were measured in the CLARICOR trial cohort of 4063 patients with stable CAD on blood samples drawn at randomization. The follow-up was 2.6 years for detailed cardiovascular events and 6 years for all-cause mortality. OPG levels were significantly increased in non-survivors (21%) compared to survivors (median [quartiles] 2092 ng/L [1636; 2800] compared to 1695 ng/L [1322; 2193, p < 0.0001]). The 2.6-year follow-up showed that OPG adds to the prediction of both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in combination with clinical risk factors (HR [one log10 unit increase] 6.1 [95% CI 2.4-15.6, p = 0.0001]) and HR 6.5 [95% CI 3.4-12.5, p < 0.0001], respectively). Similar, in the 6-year follow-up, OPG was found to be a strong predictor for all-cause mortality. Importantly, OPG remained an independent predictor of mortality even after adjustment for both clinical and conventional cardiovascular risk markers (HR 2.5 [95% CI 1.6-3.9, p < 0.0001]). Serum OPG has a long-lasting independent predictive power as to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death in patients with stable CAD.

  4. Functional Testing or Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads E; Andersson, Charlotte; Nørgaard, Bjarne L

    2017-01-01

    electrocardiography or nuclear stress testing) from 2009 to 2015. Further use of noninvasive testing, invasive procedures, medications, and medical costs within 120 days were evaluated. Risks of long-term mortality and myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed using adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS....... 9.1%), aspirin (12.7% vs. 8.5%), invasive coronary angiography (14.7% vs. 10.1%), and percutaneous coronary intervention (3.8% vs. 2.1%); all p ....05), and a lower risk of MI (hazard ratio: 0.71; 95% confidence interval: 0.61 to 0.82). CONCLUSIONS: In stable patients undergoing initial evaluation for suspected coronary artery disease, coronary CTA was associated with greater use of statins, aspirin, and invasive procedures, and higher costs than functional...

  5. The influence of contrast media on kidney function in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Simon Bertram; Harutyunyan, Marina; Mygind, Naja Dam

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the incidence of contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for elective coronary intervention following hydration routines. The reversibility of CIN was followed in a 6 month-period. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total...... of 447 patients referred for elective coronary intervention due to suspected CAD were included. Blood samples were collected before and 24 h after intervention and medical records were obtained. Patients had no drinking fluid restrictions and were routinely treated with a 1000 ml saline infusion. All...... coronary interventions. Kidney function and the amount of contrast media used was not a predictor of CIN development. The induced CIN was not completely normalized in a 6-month follow-up period....

  6. A genetic risk score predicts cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Nyegaard, Mette; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet

    Background. Genetic risk scores (GRSs) may predict cardiovascular risk in community-based populations. However, studies investigating the association with recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) are conflicting. Methods. We genotyped 879 patients...... with high-risk stable CAD and created a GRS based on 45 single nucleotide polymorphisms previously reported to be associated with CAD in genome-wide association studies. Patients were categorised into high or low GRS according to the median GRS and followed for recurrent cardiovascular events using national...... Danish registries. The primary endpoint was a composite of myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation, and cardiovascular death. Results. Median (interquartile range) follow-up time was 2.8 (2.4–3.8) years. The cumulative incidence proportions of the primary endpoint at 1 and 3 years were 6...

  7. Impact of aspirin according to type of stable coronary artery disease: insights from a large international cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavry, Anthony A; Gong, Yan; Handberg, Eileen M; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Aspirin is recommended in stable coronary artery disease based on myocardial infarction and stroke studies. However, benefit among stable coronary artery disease patients who have not suffered an acute ischemic event is uncertain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of aspirin in stable coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that aspirin's benefit would be attenuated among individuals with stable coronary artery disease but no prior ischemic event. An observational study was conducted from the INternational VErapamil-SR/Trandolapril STudy cohort. Ambulatory patients ≥ 50 years of age with clinically stable coronary artery disease requiring antihypertensive drug therapy (n = 22,576) were classified "ischemic" if they had a history of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, transient ischemic attack, or stroke at the baseline visit. All others were classified "non-ischemic." Aspirin use was updated at each clinic visit and considered as a time-varying covariate in a Cox regression model. The primary outcome was first occurrence of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke. At baseline, 56.7% of all participants used aspirin, which increased to 69.3% at study close out. Among the "non-ischemic" group (n = 13,091), aspirin was not associated with a reduction in risk (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.28; P = .13); however, among the "ischemic" group (n = 9485), aspirin was associated with a reduction in risk (HR 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77-0.99; P = .033). In patients with stable coronary artery disease and hypertension, aspirin use was associated with reduced risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes among those with prior ischemic events. Among patients with no prior ischemic events, aspirin use was not associated with a reduction in risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Determinants of heart rate turbulence in individuals without apparent heart disease and in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnacchio, Gaetano; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Stazi, Alessandra; Careri, Giulia; Coviello, Ilaria; Mollo, Roberto; Crea, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    To assess the characteristics and determinants of heart rate turbulence (HRT) in individuals without any apparent heart disease and in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Heart rate turbulence parameters, turbulence onset (TO), and turbulence slope (TS) were calculated on 24 h electrocardiogram recordings in 209 individuals without any heart disease (group 1) and in 157 CAD patients (group 2). In group 1, only age independently predicted abnormal TO (≥0%) [odds ratio (OR), 1.05; PCoronary artery disease group, however, did not predict abnormal HRT parameters in multivariable analyses, both in the whole population and when comparing two subgroups matched for age and gender. Age and (for TS) LVEF, indeed, were the only independent predictors of abnormal HRT. Age is a major HRT determinant both in subjects without any apparent heart disease and in stable CAD patients. Hypertension and LVEF contribute independently to HRT in these two groups, respectively. Coronary artery disease group was not by itself associated with abnormal HRT parameters in multivariable analyses. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Persistent psychological distress and mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ralph A H; Colquhoun, David M; Marschner, Simone L; Kirby, Adrienne C; Simes, John; Nestel, Paul J; Glozier, Nick; O'Neil, Adrienne; Oldenburg, Brian; White, Harvey D; Tonkin, Andrew M

    2017-12-01

    A single assessment of psychological distress, which includes depression and anxiety, has been associated with increased mortality in patients with coronary heart disease, but the prognostic importance of persistence of distress symptoms is less certain. To determine whether intermittent and/or persistent psychological distress is associated with long-term cardiovascular (CV) and total mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease. 950 participants in the Long-Term Intervention with Pravastatin in Ischaemic Disease (LIPID) trial completed at least four General Health Questionnaires (GHQ-30) at baseline and after ½, 1, 2 and 4 years. In a landmark analysis from 4 years, Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the risk of CV and total mortality by increasing levels of psychological distress: never distressed, sometimes any severity (GHQ score >5), persistent mild (GHQ score >5 on three or more occasions) and persistent moderate distress (GHQ score >10) on three or more occasions, over a median of 12.1 (IQR 8.6-12.5) years. The models were both unadjusted and adjusted for known baseline risk factors. Persistent moderate or greater psychological stress was reported on three or more assessments by 35 (3.7%) subjects. These patients had a higher risk of both CV death (adjusted HR 3.94, 95% CI 2.05 to 7.56, pcoronary artery disease, persistent psychological distress of at least moderate severity is associated with a substantial increase in CV and all-cause mortality. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The influence of contrast media on kidney function in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Simon Bertram; Harutyunyan, Marina; Mygind, Naja Dam; Jørgensen, Erik; Kastrup, Jens

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the incidence of contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) referred for elective coronary intervention following hydration routines. The reversibility of CIN was followed in a 6 month-period. A total of 447 patients referred for elective coronary intervention due to suspected CAD were included. Blood samples were collected before and 24 h after intervention and medical records were obtained. Patients had no drinking fluid restrictions and were routinely treated with a 1000 ml saline infusion. All patients were invited to a 6-month examination and collection of blood samples. A total of 19 patients (4.3%) developed CIN. CIN patients had a pre-investigation higher estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGRF), lower level of kidney failure and lower creatinine level than non-CIN patients. Kidney function was not normalized in CIN patients 6 months after the intervention. Two patients still met the definition of CIN. With no restriction in fluid intake and supplementary infusion of saline, only a few patients with stable CAD developed early indications of CIN during elective coronary interventions. Kidney function and the amount of contrast media used was not a predictor of CIN development. The induced CIN was not completely normalized in a 6-month follow-up period.

  11. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists and clinical outcomes in stable coronary artery disease without heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Labreuche, Julien; Simon, Tabassome; Delorme, Laurent; Danchin, Nicolas; Amarenco, Pierre; Goto, Shinya; Meune, Christophe; Eagle, Kim A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) use is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) but without heart failure (HF) receiving contemporary medical management. Using data from the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) registry, we examined, using propensity score approaches, relationships between cardiovascular outcomes and ACEI/ARB use (64.1% users) in 20 909 outpatients with stable CAD and free of HF at baseline. As internal control, we assessed the relation between statin use and outcomes. At 4-year follow-up, the risk of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke (primary outcome) was similar in ACEI/ARB users compared with non-users (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91-1.16; P = 0.66). Similarly, the risk of the primary outcome and cardiovascular hospitalization for atherothrombotic events (secondary outcome) was not reduced in ACEI/ARB users (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = 0.04), nor were the rates of any of its components. Analyses using propensity score matching yielded similar results, as did sensitivity analyses accounting for missing covariates, changes in medications over time, or analysing separately ACEI and ARB use. In contrast, in the same cohort, statin use was associated with lower rates for all outcomes. Use of ACEI/ARB was not associated with better outcomes in stable CAD outpatients without HF. The benefit of ACEI/ARB seen in randomized clinical trials was not replicated in this large contemporary cohort, which questions their value in this specific subset. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Heart rate and use of beta-blockers in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease.

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    Ph Gabriel Steg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heart rate (HR is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is little contemporary data regarding HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta-blockers, among patients with stable CAD in routine clinical practice. The goal of the present analysis was to describe HR in such patients, overall and in relation to beta-blocker use, and to describe the determinants of HR. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis of >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,438 patients from 45 countries in Europe, the Americas, Africa, Middle East, and Asia/Pacific were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010. Most of the 33,177 patients included in this analysis were men (77.5%. Mean (SD age was 64.2 (10.5 years, HR by pulse was 68.3 (10.6 bpm, and by electrocardiogram was 67.2 (11.4 bpm. Overall, 44.0% had HR ≥ 70 bpm. Beta-blockers were used in 75.1% of patients and another 14.4% had intolerance or contraindications to beta-blocker therapy. Among 24,910 patients on beta-blockers, 41.1% had HR ≥ 70 bpm. HR ≥ 70 bpm was independently associated with higher prevalence and severity of angina, more frequent evidence of myocardial ischemia, and lack of use of HR-lowering agents. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a high rate of use of beta-blockers, stable CAD patients often have resting HR ≥ 70 bpm, which was associated with an overall worse health status, more frequent angina and ischemia. Further HR lowering is possible in many patients with CAD. Whether it will improve symptoms and outcomes is being tested.

  13. Platelet turnover in stable coronary artery disease - influence of thrombopoietin and low-grade inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne Bøjet Larsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Newly formed platelets are associated with increased aggregation and adverse outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. The mechanisms involved in the regulation of platelet turnover in patients with CAD are largely unknown. AIM: To investigate associations between platelet turnover parameters, thrombopoietin and markers of low-grade inflammation in patients with stable CAD. Furthermore, to explore the relationship between platelet turnover parameters and type 2 diabetes, prior myocardial infarction, smoking, age, gender and renal insufficiency. METHODS: We studied 581 stable CAD patients. Platelet turnover parameters (immature platelet fraction, immature platelet count, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet large cell-ratio were determined using automated flow cytometry (Sysmex XE-2100. Furthermore, we measured thrombopoietin and evaluated low-grade inflammation by measurement of high-sensitive CRP and interleukin-6. RESULTS: We found strong associations between the immature platelet fraction, immature platelet count, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet large cell ratio (r = 0.61-0.99, p<0.0001. Thrombopoietin levels were inversely related to all of the platelet turnover parameters (r = -0.17--0.25, p<0.0001. Moreover, thrombopoietin levels were significantly increased in patients with diabetes (p = 0.03 and in smokers (p = 0.003. Low-grade inflammation evaluated by high-sensitive CRP correlated significantly, yet weakly, with immature platelet count (r = 0.10, p = 0.03 and thrombopoietin (r = 0.16, p<0.001. Also interleukin-6 correlated with thrombopoietin (r = 0.10, p = 0.02. CONCLUSION: In stable CAD patients, thrombopoietin was inversely associated with platelet turnover parameters. Furthermore, thrombopoietin levels were increased in patients with diabetes and in smokers. However, low-grade inflammation did not seem to have a

  14. Incidence and angiographic predictors of collateral function in patients with stable coronary artery disease scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Jessica; Anthonio, Rutger L.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.; Tan, Eng-Shiong; Jessurun, Gillian A.; de Smet, Bart J. G. L.; DeJongste, Mike J. L.; Zijlstra, Felix

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the incidence and angiographic predictors of functional collateral perfusion in patients with stable coronary artery disease, scheduled for elective PCI. Background: Functional collateral perfusion is defined as a Pw/Pa ratio >= 0.24. Since this can only be measured

  15. Heart rate and use of β-blockers in Mexican stable outpatients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer-Gamba, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Sánchez, Carlos; Verdejo-Paris, Juan; Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim; Greenlaw, Nicola; Steg Philippe, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the use of β-blockers and to monitor heart rate in Mexican patients with coronary artery disease. CLARIFY is an outpatients registry with stable CAD. A total of 33,283 patients from 45 countries were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010 from which 1342 were Mexican patients. The mean HR pulse was 70 bpm (beats per minute). Patients in Mexico were compared with the remaining global CLARIFY population. Patients in Mexico had a higher incidence of acute myocardial infarction and percutaneous coronary intervention, and lower incidence of revascularization surgery compared with the remaining CLARIFY population. More often, Mexican patients presented with diabetes, but less often hypertension and stroke. These patients were split into three mutually exclusive groups of HR ≤ 60 (N=263), HR 61-69 (N=356) and HR ≥ 70 (N=722). Patients with elevated HR had a higher incidence of diabetes and higher diastolic blood pressure on average than those with controlled HR. Regarding the use of β-blockers, they were used in 63.3% of patients, 2.7% showed intolerance or contraindication to treatment to monitor heart rate, and ivabradine was used in 2.3%. Out of approximately 849 patients receiving treatment of β-blockers, 52.1% had ≥ 70 bpm HR. In a large proportion of Mexican patients with stable coronary disease the HR remain elevated, > 70 bpm, even with the use of β-blockers; this requires further attention. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional Testing or Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Mads E; Andersson, Charlotte; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Abdulla, Jawdat; Shreibati, Jacqueline B; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar H; Shaw, Richard E; Hlatky, Mark A

    2017-04-11

    The choice of either anatomical or functional noninvasive testing to evaluate suspected coronary artery disease might affect subsequent clinical management and outcomes. This study analyzed the association of initial noninvasive cardiac testing in outpatients with stable symptoms, with subsequent use of medications, invasive procedures, and clinical outcomes. We studied patients enrolled in a Danish nationwide register who underwent initial noninvasive cardiac testing with either coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) or functional testing (exercise electrocardiography or nuclear stress testing) from 2009 to 2015. Further use of noninvasive testing, invasive procedures, medications, and medical costs within 120 days were evaluated. Risks of long-term mortality and myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed using adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 86,705 patients underwent either functional testing (n = 53,744, mean age 57.4 years, 49% males) or coronary CTA (n = 32,961, mean age 57.4 years, 45% males), and were followed for a median of 3.6 years. Compared with functional testing, there was significantly higher use of statins (15.9% vs. 9.1%), aspirin (12.7% vs. 8.5%), invasive coronary angiography (14.7% vs. 10.1%), and percutaneous coronary intervention (3.8% vs. 2.1%); all p testing, invasive procedures, and medications were higher after coronary CTA ($995 vs. $718; p mortality (2.1% vs. 4.0%) and MI hospitalization (0.8% vs. 1.5%) were lower after coronary CTA than functional testing (both p mortality (hazard ratio: 0.96; 95% confidence interval: 0.88 to 1.05), and a lower risk of MI (hazard ratio: 0.71; 95% confidence interval: 0.61 to 0.82). In stable patients undergoing initial evaluation for suspected coronary artery disease, coronary CTA was associated with greater use of statins, aspirin, and invasive procedures, and higher costs than functional testing. Coronary CTA was associated with a lower risk of MI, but a similar risk

  17. Periodontal disease and inflammatory blood cytokines in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampits, Cassio; Montenegro, Marlon M; Ribeiro, Ingrid W J; Furtado, Mariana V; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Rösing, Cassiano K; Haas, Alex N

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study included 91 patients with stable CAD who had been under optimized cardiovascular care. Blood levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were measured by Luminex technology. A full-mouth periodontal examination was conducted to record probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment (CA) loss. Multiple linear regression models, adjusting for gender, body mass index, oral hypoglycemic drugs, smoking, and occurre:nce of acute myocardial infarction were applied. CAD patients that experienced major events had higher concentrations of IFN-γ (median: 5.05 pg/mL vs. 3.01 pg/mL; p=0.01), IL-10 (median: 2.33 pg/mL vs. 1.01 pg/mL; p=0.03), and TNF-α (median: 9.17 pg/mL vs. 7.47 pg/mL; p=0.02). Higher numbers of teeth with at least 6 mm of CA loss (R2=0.07) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly associated with higher IFN-γ log concentrations. Mean CA loss (R2=0.05) and PD (R2=0.06) were significantly related to IL-10 concentrations. Elevated concentrations of TNF-α were associated with higher mean CA loss (R2=0.07). Periodontal disease is associated with increased systemic inflammation in stable cardiovascular patients. These findings provide additional evidence supporting the idea that periodontal disease can be a prognostic factor in cardiovascular patients.

  18. Paradoxical protective effect of central obesity in patients with suspected stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlioulis, Aris; Vakalis, Konstantinos; Naka, Katerina K; Bourantas, Christos V; Papamichael, Nikolaos D; Kotsia, Anna; Tzimas, Thomas; Pappas, Konstantinos; Katsouras, Christos S; Michalis, Lampros K

    2013-03-01

    Increased body mass index (BMI) has been paradoxically inversely associated with the presence of angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD). Central obesity measures, considered to be more appropriate for assessing obesity-related cardiovascular risk, have been little studied in relation to the presence of CAD. The aim was to investigate the association of central obesity with the presence of angiographic CAD as well as the prognostic significance of obesity measures in CAD prediction when added to other cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with suspected stable CAD (n = 403, age 61 ± 10 years, 302 males) referred for diagnostic coronary angiography with documented anthropometric data were enrolled. Significant angiographic CAD was found in 51% of patients. Both BMI (OR = 0.64 per 1 SD increase, P = 0.001) and waist circumference (WC) (OR = 0.54 per 1 SD increase, P cardiovascular risk factors. In subgroup analysis, BMI and WC were significantly inversely associated with the presence of CAD in males, non diabetics, patients >60 years old and patients with Framingham risk score (FRS) >20% (P obesity were independently associated with a reduced prevalence of angiographic CAD, lending further credence to the existence of the 'obesity paradox'. Obesity measures may further improve risk discrimination for the presence of CAD when added in an established risk score such as FRS. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  19. Small high-density lipoprotein is associated with monocyte subsets in stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Kastl, Stefan P; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Pongratz, Thomas; Hofbauer, Sebastian L; Wonnerth, Anna; Katsaros, Katharina M; Goliasch, Georg; Gaspar, Ludovit; Huber, Kurt; Maurer, Gerald; Dostal, Elisabeth; Oravec, Stanislav; Wojta, Johann; Speidl, Walter S

    2014-12-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are heterogeneous in structure and function and the role of HDL subfractions in atherogenesis is not well understood. It has been suggested that small HDL may be dysfunctional in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Monocytes are considered to play a key role in atherosclerotic diseases. Circulating monocytes can be divided into three subtypes according to their surface expression of CD14 and CD16. Our aim was to examine whether monocyte subsets are associated with HDL subfractions in patients with atherosclerosis. We included 90 patients with angiographically stable CAD. Monocyte subsets were defined as classical monocytes (CD14++CD16-; CM), intermediate monocytes (CD14++CD16+; IM) and non-classical monocytes (CD14+CD16++; NCM). HDL subfractions were measured by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. Serum levels of small HDL correlated with circulating pro-inflammatory NCM and showed an inverse relationship to circulating CM independently from other lipid parameters, risk factors, inflammatory parameters or statin treatment regime, respectively. IM were not associated with small HDL. In particular, patients with small HDL levels in the highest tertile showed dramatically increased levels of NCM (14.7 ± 7% vs. 10.7 ± 5% and 10.8 ± 5%; p = 0.006) and a decreased proportion of CM (79.3 ± 7% vs. 83.7 ± 6% and 83.9 ± 6%; p = 0.004) compared to patients in the two lower tertiles. In contrast, intermediate HDL, large HDL and total HDL were not associated with monocyte subset distribution. Small HDL levels are associated with pro-inflammatory NCM and inversely correlated with CM. This may suggest that small HDL could have dysfunctional anti-inflammatory properties in patients with established CAD. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Current Role of Ivabradine in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Without Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Muñoz, Oscar C; Abbas, Aamer

    2016-02-01

    Increase in heart rate represents a significant contribution in the pathophysiology of coronary artery disease and heart failure, by promoting atherosclerotic process and endothelial dysfunction. Thus, it negatively influences cardiovascular risk in the general population. The aim of this review is to analyze the current, controversial, and future role of ivabradine as an anti-anginal agent in the setting of coronary artery disease without heart failure. Ivabradine represents a selective heart rate-lowering agent that increased diastolic perfusion time and improving energetics in the ischemic myocardium.

  1. Management of outpatients in France with stable coronary artery disease. Findings from the prospeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease (CLARIFY) registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchin, Nicolas; Ferrieres, Jean; Guenoun, Maxime; Cattan, Simon; Rushton-Smith, Sophie K; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in the treatment of coronary artery disease mean that an increasing number of patients survive acute cardiovascular events and live as outpatients with or without anginal symptoms. To determine the characteristics and management of contemporary outpatients with stable coronary artery disease in Western Europe, and to compare France with the other Western European countries. CLARIFY (prospeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease) is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal study. Between November 2009 and July 2010, 32,954 adult outpatients with stable coronary artery disease (defined as a history of documented myocardial infarction [of >3 months], prior coronary revascularization, chest pain with myocardial ischaemia, or coronary stenosis of>50% proven by angiography) were enrolled in 45 countries. The demographics and management of CLARIFY patients enrolled in France were compared with those enrolled in other Western European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the UK). Of the 14,726 patients enrolled in Western Europe (mean age 66.2 [10.2] years; 79.6% male), 2432 (16.5%) were from France. The use of aspirin was lower in France than in other Western European countries (74.5% vs. 86.9%, respectively), whereas use of thienopyridines (48.5% vs. 21.7%), oral anticoagulants (12.3% vs. 9.0%) and lipid-lowering drugs (95.8% vs. 92.5%) was higher. Beta-blockers were used in 73% of both groups. Angina was less prevalent in France (6.3% vs. 15.5%) and French patients showed higher levels of physical activity than their counterparts in Western Europe. The management of patients with stable CAD in France appears favourable, with good adherence to guideline-based therapies, but there remains room for improvement in terms of symptom and risk factor control. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and safety of ticagrelor in Chinese patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Guo, Jingchuan; Carlson, Glenn F; Teng, Renli

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess ticagrelor's effects on inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA), P2Y12 reaction units (PRU, measure of platelet P2Y12 receptor blockade), pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters and safety in Chinese patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). This was an open label, single centre, randomized study. Thirty-six patients on low dose aspirin (75-100 mg day(-1) ) received ticagrelor 45, 60 or 90 mg (single dose, days 1 and 7; twice daily, days 3-6). IPA (final extent), PRU and ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX plasma concentrations were determined. On day 1, peak IPA >80% occurred 2-6 h post-dose (all doses). PRU was markedly reduced at 1 h vs. baseline (all doses). With ticagrelor 45 and 90 mg twice daily, maximum IPA (mean, SD) was 91% (13%), and 99% (3%), and maximum PRU reduction from baseline (mean, SD) was 82% (17%) and 92% (9%), respectively. Approximate dose-proportional increases (mean [%CV]; 45 vs. 90 mg twice daily) in ticagrelor Cmax (616 [37] vs. 1273 [43] ng ml(-1) ) and AUC (3882 [42] vs. 8206 [51] ng ml(-1) h) and AR-C124910XX parameters were seen. Pharmacodynamic and PK differences between 45 and 60 mg were small. No safety issues were identified. In Chinese patients with CAD, ticagrelor (45, 60 and 90 mg) markedly reduced platelet aggregation. The IPA and PRU magnitude increased generally with increasing doses. However, the mean pharmacodynamic differences between 45 and 60 mg doses were small. Following single and multiple doses, the mean Cmax and AUC values of ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX increased approximately dose proportionally between 45 and 90 mg doses. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. G-CSF Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaros, Katharina M; Speidl, Walter S; Demyanets, Svitlana; Kastl, Stefan P; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Wonnerth, Anna; Zorn, Gerlinde; Tentzeris, Ioannis; Farhan, Serdar; Maurer, Gerald; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) induces mobilization of progenitor cells but may also exert pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic effects. Treatment with recombinant G-CSF after acute myocardial infarction is currently under examination and has been associated with in-stent restenosis. However, it is not known whether plasma levels of endogenous G-CSF are also associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Therefore we included 280 patients with angiographically proven stable coronary artery disease. G-CSF was measured by specific ELISA and patients were followed for a median of 30 months for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: death, myocardial infarction, re-hospitalization). Those with cardiac events during follow-up showed significant higher G-CSF levels (32.3 pg/mL IQR 21.4-40.5 pg/mL vs. 24.6 pg/mL IQR 16.4-34.9 pg/mL; p<0.05) at baseline. Patients with G-CSF plasma levels above the median had a 2-fold increased risk for MACE (p<0.05). This was independent from established cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, G-CSF above the median was a predictor of clinical in-stent restenosis after implantation of bare-metal stents (6.6% vs. 19.4%; p<0.05) but not of drug-eluting stents (7.7% vs. 7.6%; p = 0.98). This data suggests that endogenous plasma levels of G-CSF predict cardiovascular events independently from established cardiac risk factors and are associated with increased in-stent restenosis rates after implantation of bare metal stents.

  4. G-CSF Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina M Katsaros

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF induces mobilization of progenitor cells but may also exert pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic effects. Treatment with recombinant G-CSF after acute myocardial infarction is currently under examination and has been associated with in-stent restenosis. However, it is not known whether plasma levels of endogenous G-CSF are also associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Therefore we included 280 patients with angiographically proven stable coronary artery disease. G-CSF was measured by specific ELISA and patients were followed for a median of 30 months for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE: death, myocardial infarction, re-hospitalization. Those with cardiac events during follow-up showed significant higher G-CSF levels (32.3 pg/mL IQR 21.4-40.5 pg/mL vs. 24.6 pg/mL IQR 16.4-34.9 pg/mL; p<0.05 at baseline. Patients with G-CSF plasma levels above the median had a 2-fold increased risk for MACE (p<0.05. This was independent from established cardiovascular risk factors. In addition, G-CSF above the median was a predictor of clinical in-stent restenosis after implantation of bare-metal stents (6.6% vs. 19.4%; p<0.05 but not of drug-eluting stents (7.7% vs. 7.6%; p = 0.98. This data suggests that endogenous plasma levels of G-CSF predict cardiovascular events independently from established cardiac risk factors and are associated with increased in-stent restenosis rates after implantation of bare metal stents.

  5. Small high-density lipoprotein is associated with monocyte subsets in stable coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Kastl, Stefan P.; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Pongratz, Thomas; Hofbauer, Sebastian L.; Wonnerth, Anna; Katsaros, Katharina M.; Goliasch, Georg; Gaspar, Ludovit; Huber, Kurt; Maurer, Gerald; Dostal, Elisabeth; Oravec, Stanislav; Wojta, Johann; Speidl, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: High-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are heterogeneous in structure and function and the role of HDL subfractions in atherogenesis is not well understood. It has been suggested that small HDL may be dysfunctional in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Monocytes are considered to play a key role in atherosclerotic diseases. Circulating monocytes can be divided into three subtypes according to their surface expression of CD14 and CD16. Our aim was to examine whether mono...

  6. Heart rate modulation in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure: What we have already learned from SIGNIFY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Piero Perna

    2016-12-01

    In conclusion, heart rate is a marker of risk but is not a risk factor and/or a target of therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved ventricular systolic function. Standard doses of ivabradine are indicated for treatment of angina as an alternative or in addition to beta-blockers, but should not be administered in association with CYP3A4 inhibitors or heart rate-lowering calcium-channel blockers.

  7. Association of small dense LDL serum levels and circulating monocyte subsets in stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin A Krychtiuk

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is considered to be an inflammatory disease in which monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role. Circulating monocytes can be divided into three distinct subtypes, namely in classical monocytes (CM; CD14++CD16-, intermediate monocytes (IM; CD14++CD16+ and non-classical monocytes (NCM; CD14+CD16++. Low density lipoprotein particles are heterogeneous in size and density, with small, dense LDL (sdLDL crucially implicated in atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine whether monocyte subsets are associated with sdLDL serum levels.We included 90 patients with angiographically documented stable coronary artery disease and determined monocyte subtypes by flow cytometry. sdLDL was measured by an electrophoresis method on polyacrylamide gel.Patients with sdLDL levels in the highest tertile (sdLDL≥4mg/dL;T3 showed the highest levels of pro-inflammatory NCM (15.2±7% vs. 11.4±6% and 10.9±4%, respectively; p<0.01 when compared with patients in the middle (sdLDL=2-3mg/dL;T2 and lowest tertile (sdLDL=0-1mg/dL;T1. Furthermore, patients in the highest sdLDL tertile showed lower CM levels than patients in the middle and lowest tertile (79.2±8% vs. 83.9±7% and 82.7±5%; p<0.01 for T3 vs. T2+T1. Levels of IM were not related to sdLDL levels (5.6±4% vs. 4.6±3% vs. 6.4±3% for T3, T2 and T1, respectively. In contrast to monocyte subset distribution, levels of circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory markers were not associated with sdLDL levels.The atherogenic lipoprotein fraction sdLDL is associated with an increase of NCM and a decrease of CM. This could be a new link between lipid metabolism dysregulation, innate immunity and atherosclerosis.

  8. Association of small dense LDL serum levels and circulating monocyte subsets in stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Kastl, Stefan P; Pfaffenberger, Stefan; Lenz, Max; Hofbauer, Sebastian L; Wonnerth, Anna; Koller, Lorenz; Katsaros, Katharina M; Pongratz, Thomas; Goliasch, Georg; Niessner, Alexander; Gaspar, Ludovit; Huber, Kurt; Maurer, Gerald; Dostal, Elisabeth; Wojta, Johann; Oravec, Stanislav; Speidl, Walter S

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered to be an inflammatory disease in which monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages play a key role. Circulating monocytes can be divided into three distinct subtypes, namely in classical monocytes (CM; CD14++CD16-), intermediate monocytes (IM; CD14++CD16+) and non-classical monocytes (NCM; CD14+CD16++). Low density lipoprotein particles are heterogeneous in size and density, with small, dense LDL (sdLDL) crucially implicated in atherogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine whether monocyte subsets are associated with sdLDL serum levels. We included 90 patients with angiographically documented stable coronary artery disease and determined monocyte subtypes by flow cytometry. sdLDL was measured by an electrophoresis method on polyacrylamide gel. Patients with sdLDL levels in the highest tertile (sdLDL≥4mg/dL;T3) showed the highest levels of pro-inflammatory NCM (15.2±7% vs. 11.4±6% and 10.9±4%, respectively; p<0.01) when compared with patients in the middle (sdLDL=2-3mg/dL;T2) and lowest tertile (sdLDL=0-1mg/dL;T1). Furthermore, patients in the highest sdLDL tertile showed lower CM levels than patients in the middle and lowest tertile (79.2±8% vs. 83.9±7% and 82.7±5%; p<0.01 for T3 vs. T2+T1). Levels of IM were not related to sdLDL levels (5.6±4% vs. 4.6±3% vs. 6.4±3% for T3, T2 and T1, respectively). In contrast to monocyte subset distribution, levels of circulating pro- and anti-inflammatory markers were not associated with sdLDL levels. The atherogenic lipoprotein fraction sdLDL is associated with an increase of NCM and a decrease of CM. This could be a new link between lipid metabolism dysregulation, innate immunity and atherosclerosis.

  9. P-wave dispersion and its relationship with the severity of the disease in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Fatih; Firatli, Inci; Katkat, Fahrettin; Gurmen, Tevfik; Ayca, Burak; Kalyoncuoglu, Muhsin; Abaci, Okay; Sari, Mustafa; Ersanli, Murat; Kucukoglu, Serdar; Yigit, Zerrin

    2014-01-01

    P- wave dispersion (PD) is an indicator of inhomogeneous and discontinuous propagation of sinus impulses. In the present study we aimed to investigate the PD and its association with the severity of the disease. in patients with stable coronary artery disease. We prospectively analyzed 60 subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 25 subjects with nor-mal coronary angiograms (control group). The maximum and minimum P-wave duration and PD were measured from the 12-lead surface electrocardiograms. The CAD severity was assessed by the severity score (Gensini score) and the number of vessels involved (vessel score). P max was longer in CAD group compared with the control group (p<0.001). PD was greater in the CAD group, compared with the control group (p<0.001). However, P min did not differ between the two groups. In bi-variate correlation, increased PD was correlated with presence of diabetes mellitus (r=0.316, p=0.014), smoking (r=0.348, p=0.006), left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.372, p=0.003), vessel score (r=0.848, p=0.001), and Gensini score (r=0.825, p=0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that PD was independently associ¬ated with vessel score ((3=0.139, p=0.002) and Gensini score ((3=0.132, p=0.007). PD was greater in patients with CAD than in controls and it was associated with CAD severity.

  10. Relationships Between Components of Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Petiot, Emmanuelle; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ford, Ian; Ferrari, Roberto; Fox, Kim M; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, P Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Observational studies have shown a J-shaped relationship between diastolic blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular events in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease. We investigated whether the increased risk associated with low diastolic BP reflects elevated pulse pressure (PP). In 22 672 hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease from the CLARIFY registry (Prospective Observational Longitudinal Registry of Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease), followed for a median of 5.0 years, BP was measured annually and averaged. The relationships between PP and diastolic BP, alone or combined, and the primary composite outcome (cardiovascular death or myocardial infarction) were analyzed using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. Adjusted hazard ratios for the primary outcome were 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-1.87), 1.00 (ref), 1.07 (95% CI, 0.94-1.21), 1.54 (95% CI, 1.32-1.79), and 2.34 (95% CI, 1.95-2.81) for PPhypertensive patients with coronary artery disease persists in patients within the lowest-risk PP range and is therefore unlikely to be solely the consequence of an increased PP reflecting advanced vascular disease. URL: http://www.clarify-registry.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN43070564. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 on endothelial function in type 2 diabetes patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyström, Thomas; Gutniak, Mark K; Zhang, Qimin

    2004-01-01

    (I)) in two groups: 1) 12 type 2 diabetes patients with stable coronary artery disease and 2) 10 healthy subjects with normal endothelial function and S(I). Subjects underwent infusion of recombinant GLP-1 or saline in a random crossover study. Endothelial function was measured by postischemic FMD of brachial...... artery, using ultrasonography. S(I) [in (10(-4) dl.kg(-1).min(-1))/(muU/ml)] was measured by hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic clamp technique. In type 2 diabetic subjects, GLP-1 infusion significantly increased relative changes in brachial artery diameter from baseline FMD(%) (3.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.6 +/- 1.0%, P...... FMD(%) (11.9 +/- 0.9 vs. 10.3 +/- 1.0%, P = NS) nor S(I) (14.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 11.6 +/- 2.0, P = NS). We conclude that GLP-1 improves endothelial dysfunction...

  12. Stable angina pectoris with no obstructive coronary artery disease is associated with increased risks of major adverse cardiovascular events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lasse; Hvelplund, Anders; Abildstrøm, Steen Z

    2012-01-01

    (MACE), defined as cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure, and all-cause mortality. Significantly more women (65%) than men (32%) had no obstructive CAD (Pdiabetes, smoking, and use of lipid...... arteries and 1.85 (1.51-2.28) for patients with diffuse non-obstructive CAD compared with the reference population. For all-cause mortality, normal coronary arteries and diffuse non-obstructive CAD were associated with HRs of 1.29 (1.07-1.56) and 1.52 (1.24-1.88), respectively.......ConclusionPatients with stable angina and normal coronary arteries or diffuse non-obstructive CAD have elevated risks of MACE and all-cause mortality compared with a reference population without ischaemic heart disease....

  13. Management of stable coronary artery disease: from evidence to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Gerloni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic heart disease, the leading cause of death, is extremely diffuse among patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine ward so that Internist should be able to manage correctly this disease. The following review revises the most recent literature and offers a practical clinical guide to be confident on this topic. After having emphasized that clinical overview remains essential, it briefly mentions advantages and limits of different investigations, reminds readers of possible alternative etiopathogeneses of ischemic heart disease (cardiac syndrome X, reports the most appropriate medical therapy, and gives the opportunity to understand appropriateness of specialist strategies such as coronary artery by-pass grafting and percutaneous coronary intervention. Finally, it illustrates a rational and evidence-based follow-up of these patients, considering that only a small part of them should be followed by a Cardiologist. The aim of a correct management of ischemic heart disease remains to reduce mortality and improve the quality of life.

  14. A genetic risk score predicts cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Nyegaard, Mette; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic risk scores (GRSs) may predict cardiovascular risk in community-based populations. However, studies investigating the association with recurrent cardiovascular events in patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) are conflicting. METHODS: We genotyped 879 patients...... Danish registries. The primary endpoint was a composite of myocardial infarction, coronary revascularisation, and cardiovascular death. RESULTS: Median (interquartile range) follow-up time was 2.8 (2.4-3.8)years. The cumulative incidence proportions of the primary endpoint at 1 and 3years were 6...... GRS was observed on coronary revascularisations (adjusted HR 2.10 [95% CI 1.08-4.07]). Risks of cardiovascular death (adjusted HR 1.07 [95% CI 0.46-2.48]) and all-cause death (adjusted HR 1.15 [95% CI 0.65-2.03]) were unaffected. CONCLUSIONS: A GRS predicts recurrent cardiovascular events in high...

  15. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Sonia S; Bosch, Jackie; Eikelboom, John W

    2018-01-01

    . The use of the rivaroxaban plus aspirin combination increased major bleeding compared with the aspirin alone group (77 [3%] of 2492 vs 48 [2%] of 2504; HR 1·61, 95% CI 1·12-2·31, p=0·0089), which was mainly gastrointestinal. Similarly, major bleeding occurred in 79 (3%) of 2474 patients with rivaroxaban 5...... mg, and in 48 (2%) of 2504 in the aspirin alone group (HR 1·68, 95% CI 1·17-2·40; p=0·0043). INTERPRETATION: Low-dose rivaroxaban taken twice a day plus aspirin once a day reduced major adverse cardiovascular and limb events when compared with aspirin alone. Although major bleeding was increased......, fatal or critical organ bleeding was not. This combination therapy represents an important advance in the management of patients with peripheral artery disease. Rivaroxaban alone did not significantly reduce major adverse cardiovascular events compared with asprin alone, but reduced major adverse limb...

  16. Long-term effects of cardiac rehabilitation in elderly individuals with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Sandra; Stevens, Emily; Hodge, Claire; Brown, Casey; Walker, Robert; Body, Dianne; Barclay, Leanne; Nye, Edwin R; Williams, Michael J A

    2016-01-01

    To compare exercise capacity and cardiovascular response to exercise in elderly individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) who attend ongoing community-based maintenance cardiac rehabilitation (CR) versus age- and gender-matched healthy "very active" (HVA; ≥ 2000 kcal/week) and healthy "less active" (HLA; cardiovascular function during exercise; (2) walking tests; (3) physical function; (4) anthropometry and (5) 12-month physical activity recall. The CR group achieved 98% (range: 73-154%) of age- and gender-predicted peak oxygen consumption for healthy individuals. Peak oxygen consumption was lower in CR compared to HVA but not HLA group (VO2peak: CR: 19.0 ± 4.5, HVA: 23.7 ± 2.9, HLA: 20.7 ± 4.7 ml ·kg(-1)ċmin(-1), p = 0.001 versus HVA; p = 0.390 versus HLA). Peak heart rate was lower in CR compared to both HVA and HLA. Walking test results and cardiovascular and physical function were not different between the groups. Elderly individuals with CAD participating in maintenance CR have similar exercise capacity and cardiorespiratory response to exercise compared to their age- and gender-matched less active healthy peers. The findings support referral of elderly patients to community-based CR. Fitness benefits of long-term maintenance cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs remain unknown. Elderly individuals with coronary artery disease participating in maintenance CR have exercise capacity and cardiorespiratory response to exercise similar to their less active healthy peers. Maintenance CR may play an important role prolonging independent living in elderly individuals.

  17. Can mean platelet component be used as an index of platelet activity in stable coronary artery disease?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, John

    2009-04-01

    Acute coronary syndrome is associated with intracoronary thrombosis secondary to platelet activation. Previous groups have investigated platelet activation in both stable and unstable vascular disease. Most measures of platelet activation are not routinely available or easily adaptable to large scale clinical use. Recently, measurement of the mean platelet component (MPC) has become part of the routine data provided by an automated full blood count analyser, the Advia 120. MPC measures platelet density which changes on platelet activation. Our objectives were to determine if platelet activation, as measured by MPC, is increased in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and to determine if MPC could be useful in differentiating people with stable CAD from controls on an everyday clinical basis. Three hundred and forty-five consecutive patients attending for elective coronary angiography had full blood count analysis and MPC measurement performed using an ADVIA-120 analyser. Three hundred and twenty-four were analysed in our final dataset. Two hundred and fifty-three (78%) had CAD. Patients with CAD were significantly (p<0.001) older than those without (63.8 versus 56.0 years). Results failed to demonstrate a difference (p=0.467) in MPC between patients with CAD and those with normal coronary arteries (25.8 versus 26.0). Likewise, there was no correlation between MPC and the severity of CAD (Kendall\\'s tau b=-0.086, p=0.04). MPC is not a useful index of platelet activity in stable CAD when used in everyday clinical practice.

  18. Can mean platelet component be used as an index of platelet activity in stable coronary artery disease?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, John

    2012-01-31

    Acute coronary syndrome is associated with intracoronary thrombosis secondary to platelet activation. Previous groups have investigated platelet activation in both stable and unstable vascular disease. Most measures of platelet activation are not routinely available or easily adaptable to large scale clinical use. Recently, measurement of the mean platelet component (MPC) has become part of the routine data provided by an automated full blood count analyser, the Advia 120. MPC measures platelet density which changes on platelet activation. Our objectives were to determine if platelet activation, as measured by MPC, is increased in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and to determine if MPC could be useful in differentiating people with stable CAD from controls on an everyday clinical basis. Three hundred and forty-five consecutive patients attending for elective coronary angiography had full blood count analysis and MPC measurement performed using an ADVIA-120 analyser. Three hundred and twenty-four were analysed in our final dataset. Two hundred and fifty-three (78%) had CAD. Patients with CAD were significantly (p<0.001) older than those without (63.8 versus 56.0 years). Results failed to demonstrate a difference (p=0.467) in MPC between patients with CAD and those with normal coronary arteries (25.8 versus 26.0). Likewise, there was no correlation between MPC and the severity of CAD (Kendall\\'s tau b=-0.086, p=0.04). MPC is not a useful index of platelet activity in stable CAD when used in everyday clinical practice.

  19. Reduced Antiplatelet Effect of Aspirin Does Not Predict Cardiovascular Events in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Neergaard-Petersen, Søs

    2017-01-01

    , 0.3-1.1], P=0.08) or Multiplate using arachidonic acid (hazard ratio: 1.0 [95% CI, 0.5-2.1], P=0.92) or collagen (hazard ratio: 1.4 [95% CI, 0.7-2.8], P=0.38). Similar results were found for the composite secondary end point (nonfatal myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, stent thrombosis, and all-cause...... events in stable coronary artery disease patients treated with aspirin. METHODS AND RESULTS: We included 900 stable coronary artery disease patients with either previous myocardial infarction, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or both. All patients received single antithrombotic therapy with 75 mg aspirin daily...... myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and cardiovascular death. At 3-year follow-up, 78 primary end points were registered. The primary end point did not occur more frequently in patients with high platelet-aggregation levels (first versus fourth quartile) assessed by VerifyNow (hazard ratio: 0.5 [95% CI...

  20. Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A as a marker for myocardial infarction and death in patients with stable coronary artery disease: A prognostic study within the CLARICOR Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kasper K; Teisner, Børge; Winkel, Per

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is a potential new marker for vulnerable plaques in the coronary arteries only examined in stable coronary disease (CAD) in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Here we address the prognostic value of serum PAPP-A in unselected stable...

  1. The influence of statin treatment on the inflammatory biomarkers YKL-40 and HsCRP in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Naja Dam; Harutyunyan, Marina J; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 is elevated and associated with mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim was to investigate the influence of statin treatment and lipid status on serum YKL-40 and Hs-CRP in patients with stable CAD. DESIGN: Serum YKL-40,...

  2. The diagnostic value of mean platelet volume in males with premature atherosclerotic coronary artery disease having stable angina pectoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgül Malçok Gürel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate whether platelet count and mean platelet volume (MPV could be new biomarkers addition to classical risk factors in premature coronary artery disease (CAD. Methods: Totally 124 male patients (mean age: 45.8±13.0 year; range of age: 27-78 year, with stable angina pectoris, were included. Clinical and laboratory findings (whole blood cell count, glucose, creatinine, lipid profile were recorded. Automatic blood counter was used for hematological parameters. Conventional coronary angiography was performed. Patients having acute coronary syndrome within the last six months, with severe valvular, structural or congenital heart disease, thyroid and hepatic dysfunction or signs of any infection were excluded. Results: The study population were separated into three groups by coronary angiography: 51 with stable CAD aged ≤40 years (premature CAD, 38 with stable CAD older than 40 (mature CAD and 35 with the normal coronary arteries (NCA. No significant difference was found in MPV values between premature CAD and mature CAD and also between premature CAD and NCA (p>0.05. A significant negative correlation was found between MPV and platelet count in premature CAD (r=-0.419, p=0.002. Both in premature CAD and mature CAD groups, higher MPV values was found in critical CAD subgroup than noncritical CAD subgroup, but the difference was not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in MPV between premature and mature male CAD patients compared to NCA group. A positive but non-significant correlation was found between the MPV values and the severity of CAD. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 381-385

  3. [Diagnostics and therapy of chronic stable coronary artery disease : new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, A; Sechtem, U

    2014-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease published in 2013 give practical recommendations for diagnostics and therapy. The approach depends on the clinical picture and symptoms of the patient, the severity and extent of ischemia, the degree and location of coronary stenoses, additional cardiac findings and finally on non-cardiac comorbidities. The selection of suitable diagnostic tools is based on the tabulated pretest probability for the presence of coronary artery disease which plays an important and central role in the diagnostic algorithm. An invasive approach is recommended only in patients with severe angina, i.e. a Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina grading scale of ≥ CCS3 or in patients who are at high risk for death or myocardial infarction based on the results of the test used for detection of ischemia. Detailed therapeutic recommendations are given for medicinal and interventional or surgical therapy. Medicinal therapy includes drugs both for relief of symptoms and prevention of cardiovascular events. Recommendations are also given for the use of new antianginal drugs. A PCI is only indicated in vessels causing ischemia which can be verified by using fractional flow reserve measurements. The indications for PCI now also include patients with a low SYNTAX score and multivessel disease or left main stenosis; however, the optimal strategy should be individually determined in heart team discussions.

  4. Women and men with stable coronary artery disease have similar clinical outcomes: insights from the international prospective CLARIFY registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steg, Ph Gabriel; Greenlaw, Nicola; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Ford, Ian; Kääb, Stefan; Abergel, Hélène; Fox, Kim M.; Ferrari, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Aims Men and women differ in terms of presentation and management in coronary artery disease (CAD). Whether these differences translate into different clinical outcomes in stable CAD is unclear. We analysed data from the international prospective CLARIFY registry to compare cardiovascular clinical outcomes in men and women with stable CAD. Methods and results We analysed 1-year outcomes in 30 977 outpatients with stable CAD [23 975 (77.4%) men; 7002 (22.6%) women]. Women were older than men, more likely to have hypertension and diabetes, and less likely to exercise or smoke. They had more frequent angina, but were less likely to have undergone diagnostic non-invasive testing or coronary angiography. Women received less optimized treatment for stable CAD. One-year outcomes were similar for men and women for the composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or stroke [adjusted rates 1.7 vs. 1.8%, respectively, odds ratio (OR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75–1.15]; all-cause death (adjusted 1.5 vs. 1.6%, OR: 0.91, 95% CI: 0.72–1.13); fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction (adjusted 1.0 vs. 0.9%, OR: 0.81, 95 CI: 0.60–1.08); and cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (adjusted 1.4 vs. 1.4%, OR: 0.89, 95% CI: 0.70–1.12). Fewer women underwent revascularization (2.6 vs. 2.2%, OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.64–0.93), although appropriateness was not analysed. Conclusion The risk profiles of women and men with stable CAD differ substantially. However, 1-year outcomes were similar. Fewer women underwent revascularization. Further research is needed to better understand gender determinants of outcome and devise strategies to minimize bias in the management and treatment of women. PMID:22922505

  5. Prognostic Value of Plasma Pentraxin-3 Levels in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease after Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is an inflammatory marker thought to be more specific to cardiovascular inflammation than C-reactive protein (CRP. Our aim was to assess the prognostic value of PTX3 in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD after drug eluting stent (DES implantation. Plasma PTX3 levels were measured before percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI and at 24 h post-PCI in 596 consecutive patients with stable CAD. Patients were followed up for a median of 3 years (range 1–5 for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs. We found that the post-PCI plasma PTX3 levels were significantly higher at 24 h after PCI than pre-PCI, patients with MACEs had higher post-PCI PTX3 levels compared with MACEs-free patients, patients with higher post-PCI PTX3 levels (median > 4.384 ng/mL had a higher risk for MACEs than those with PTX3 < 4.384 ng/mL, and post-PCI PTX3, cTnI, multiple stents, and age but not high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP were independently associated with the prevalence of MACEs after DES implantation. The present study shows that post-PCI PTX3 may be a more reliable inflammatory predictor of long-term MACEs in patients with stable CAD undergoing DES implantation than CRP. Measurement of post-PCI PTX3 levels could provide a rationale for risk stratification of patients with stable CAD after DES implantation.

  6. Impact of chronic kidney disease on use of evidence-based therapy in stable coronary artery disease: a prospective analysis of 22,272 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Kalra

    Full Text Available To assess the frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD, define the associated demographics, and evaluate its association with use of evidence-based drug therapy in a contemporary global study of patients with stable coronary artery disease.22,272 patients from the ProspeCtive observational LongitudinAl RegIstry oF patients with stable coronary arterY disease (CLARIFY were included. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was calculated (CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration formula and patients categorised according to CKD stage: >89, 60-89, 45-59 and <45 mL/min/1.73 m2.Mean (SD age was 63.9±10.4 years, 77.3% were male, 61.8% had a history of myocardial infarction, 71.9% hypertension, 30.4% diabetes and 75.4% dyslipidaemia. Chronic kidney disease (eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 was seen in 22.1% of the cohort (6.9% with eGFR<45 mL/min/1.73 m2; lower eGFR was associated with increasing age, female sex, cardiovascular risk factors, overt vascular disease, other comorbidities and higher systolic but lower diastolic blood pressure. High use of secondary prevention was seen across all CKD stages (overall 93.4% lipid-lowering drugs, 95.3% antiplatelets, 75.9% beta-blockers. The proportion of patients taking statins was lower in patients with CKD. Antiplatelet use was significantly lower in patients with CKD whereas oral anticoagulant use was higher. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use was lower (52.0% overall and inversely related to declining eGFR, whereas angiotensin-receptor blockers were more frequently prescribed in patients with reduced eGFR.Chronic kidney disease is common in patients with stable coronary artery disease and is associated with comorbidities. Whilst use of individual evidence-based medications for secondary prevention was high across all CKD categories, there remains an opportunity to improve the proportion who take all three classes of preventive therapies. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were used less frequently

  7. G-CSF Predicts Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Katsaros, Katharina M.; Speidl, Walter S.; Svitlana Demyanets; Kastl, Stefan P.; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Anna Wonnerth; Gerlinde Zorn; Ioannis Tentzeris; Serdar Farhan; Gerald Maurer; Johann Wojta; Kurt Huber

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony-stimulating-factor (G-CSF) induces mobilization of progenitor cells but may also exert pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic effects. Treatment with recombinant G-CSF after acute myocardial infarction is currently under examination and has been associated with in-stent restenosis. However, it is not known whether plasma levels of endogenous G-CSF are also associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Therefore we included 280 patients with angiographically proven stable c...

  8. Extent of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing angiography for stable or acute coronary syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Marini

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Patients undergoing coronary angiography for ACS or stable CAD presented with a similar extent of angiographic CAD, although patients with ACS had a higher prevalence of significant lesions in the presence of a better cardiovascular risk profile and higher inflammation levels. The extent of angiographic CAD in both the groups shared common determinants such as hsCRP, age, and hyperglycemia, but these appeared to explain only a small part of the variation of coronary atherosclerosis.

  9. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... but also to the worsening of the disease. Obstructive peripheral arterial disease most commonly develops in the arteries of the legs, including the two branches of the aorta (iliac arteries), main arteries of the thighs (femoral arteries), of ... arterial disease may also develop in the part ...

  10. Opposing Effects of Beta-Blockers and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Development of New Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vardeny, Orly; Uno, Hajime; Braunwald, Eugene; Rouleau, Jean Lucien; Gersh, Bernard; Maggioni, Aldo P; Domanski, Michael; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    We utilized data from patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) to assess the risk of new onset diabetes (NOD) with beta-blockers, and to determine whether angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition would modify this risk. The Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) trial randomized 8290 patients with stable CAD to trandolapril or placebo. The presence of NOD was assessed at each study visit over a median follow-up time of 4.8 years. We examined...

  11. The rationale and design of the perindopril genetic association study (PERGENE): A pharmacogenetic analysis of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Brugts (Jasper); M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); H. Boersma (Eric); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M.E. Bertrand (Michel); W.J. Remme (Willem); K.M. Fox (Kim); R. Ferrari (Roberto); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); M.L. Simoons (Maarten)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce clinical symptoms and improve outcome in patients with hypertension, heart failure, and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and are among the most frequently used drugs in these patient groups. For hypertension, treatment

  12. The rationale and design of the PERindopril GENEtic association study (PERGENE): a pharmacogenetic analysis of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugts, J. J.; de Maat, M. P. M.; Boersma, E.; Witteman, J. C. M.; van Duijn, C.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Bertrand, M.; Remme, W.; Fox, K.; Ferrari, R.; Danser, A. H. J.; Simoons, M. L.; Remme, W. J.; Aldershville, J.; Hildebrandt, P.; Bassand, J. P.; Cokkinos, D.; Toutouzas, P.; Eha, J.; Erhardt, L.; Erikssen, J.; Grybauskas, R.; Kalnins, U.; Karsch, K.; Sechtem, U.; Keltai, M.; Klein, W.; Luescher, T.; Mulcahy, D.; Nieminen, M.; Oto, A.; Ozsaruhan, O.; Paulus, W.; Providencia, L.; Riecansky, I.; Ruzyllo, W.; Santini, U.; Tavazzi, L.; Soler-Soler, J.; Widimsky, P.; Julian, D.; Dargie, H.; Kobler, W.; Duprez, D.; Steg, G.; Thygesen, K.; Drexel, H.; Gombotz, G.; Stoeckl, G.; Heyndrickx, G. H.; Legrand, V.; Materne, P.; van Mieghem, W.; Bocek, P.; Branny, M.; Cech, M.; Charouzek, J.; Drazka, J.; Fabik, L.; Florian, J.; Francek, L.; Groch, L.; Havranek, P.; Herman, A.; Hradec, J.; Jansky, P.; Jirmar, R.; Jokl, I.; Krejcova, H.; Kvasnak, M.; Maratka, T.; Marcinek, G.; Moravcova, J.; Nedbal, P.; Peterka, K.; Povolny, J.; Rosolova, H.; Semrad, B.; Sochor, K.; Spacek, R.; Spinar, J.; Stipal, R.; Stuchlik, K.; Sulda, M.; Ulman, J.; Vaclavicek, A.; Vojtisek, P.; Bjerregard Andersen, H.; Dorff, B.; Kristensen, K.; Madsen, J. K.; Markenvard, J.; Meibom, J.; Norgaard, A.; Scheibel, M.; Leht, A.; Teesalu, R.; Vahulaa, V.; Itkonen, A.; Juvonen, J.; Karmakoski, J.; Kilkki, E.; Koskela, E.; Kotila, M. J.; Melin, J.; Nieminen, M. S.; Savola, R.; Terho, T.; Voipio Pulkki, L. M.; Apffel, F.; Attali, P.; Baron, B.; Berthier, Y.; Dambrine, P.; Danchin, N.; Decoulx, E.; Deshayes, P.; Fouche, R.; Genest, M.; Godard, S.; Guillot, J. P.; Hanania, G.; Lelguen, C.; Leroy, F.; Mansourati, J.; Mery, D.; Michel, A. N.; Quiret, J. C.; Raynaud, P.; Rondepierre, D.; Roynard, J. L.; van Belle, E.; Veyrat, A.; Gaudron, P.; Karsch, K. R.; Lauer, B.; Rettig Stsrmer, G.; Riessen, R.; Rutsch, W.; Sigel, H. A.; Simon, R.; Stork, S.; von Schacky, C.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Christakos, S.; Feggos, S.; Geleris, P.; Georgiadis, S.; Gialafos, J.; Goudevenos, I.; Kardara, D.; Kardaras, F.; Karidis, C.; Kelesides, C.; Kyriakidis, M.; Koliopoulos, N.; Kremastinos, D.; Liberi, S.; Manolis, A. N.; Pyrgakis, V.; Papasteriadis, E.; Papazoglou, N.; Skoufas, P.; Stamatelopoulos, S.; Stambola, S.; Stavridis, A.; Syribeis, S.; Vardas, P.; Vassiliadis, I.; Voudris, V.; Zacharoulis, A.; Zobolos, S.; Zouras, C.; Berenyi, I.; Bocsa, Z.; Csendes, E.; Edes, I.; Gelesz, E.; Janosi, A.; Kalo, E.; Karpati, P.; Kornel, S.; Pap, I.; Pinter, I.; Polak, G.; Reiber, I.; Rusznak, M.; Simon, A.; Tarjan, J.; Tihanyi, L.; Timar, S.; Toth, K.; Veress, G.; Barton, J.; Crean, P.; Daly, K.; Kearney, P.; Meany, T. B.; Quigley, P.; Azzolini, P.; Barone, G.; Barsotti, A.; Bellone, E.; Borghetti, A.; Branzi, A.; Brunelli, C.; Capponi, E.; Capucci, A.; Casaccia, M.; Casali, G.; Cecchetti, E.; Ceci, V.; Celegon, L.; Chimini, C.; Colombo, A.; Corsini, G.; Cucchini, F.; Dalla Volta, S.; de Luca, I.; de Servi, S.; Delise, P.; Di Donato, M.; Di Giacomo, U.; Di Pasquale, G.; Fiorentini, C.; Gaddi, O.; Giannetto, M.; Giannuzzi, P.; Giordano, A.; Giovannini, E.; Iacono, A.; Inama, G.; Ippoliti, G.; Leghissa, R.; Lorusso, R.; Marzilli, M.; Minutiello, L.; Moretti, G.; Mosele, G. M.; Pasotti, C.; Pettinati, G.; Pezzano, A.; Polimeni, M. R.; Portaluppi, F.; Proto, C.; Riva, S.; Sanguinetti, M.; Santini, M.; Severi, S.; Sinagra, G.; Tantalo, L.; Vajola, S. F.; Vincenzi, M.; Volterrani, M.; Zavatteri, G.; Zogno, M.; Gailiss, E.; Gersamija, A.; Ozolina, M. A.; Skards, J.; Baubiniene, A.; Berukstis, E.; Grigoniene, L.; Grybauskas, A. N.; Kibarskis, A.; Kirkutis, A.; Marcinkus, R.; Milvidaite, I.; Vasiliauskas, D.; Aalders, J. C. A.; Bruggeling, W. A. J.; Bucx, J. J. J.; de Feyter, P. J.; de Leeuw, M. J.; de Waard, D. E. P.; de Weerd, G. J.; de Zwaan, C.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Droste, H. T.; Freericks, M. P.; Hagoort Kok, A. W.; Jap, W. T. J.; Jochemsen, G. M.; Kiemeney, K.; Kuijer, P. J. P.; Mannaerts, H. F. J.; Piek, J. J.; Saelman, J. P. M.; Slob, F. D.; Smits, W. C. G.; Spierenburg, H. A. M.; Suttorp, M. J.; Tan, T. B.; van Beek, G. J.; van Daele, M. E. R. M.; van den Merkhof, L. F. M.; van den Toren, E. W.; van Hessen, M. W. J.; van Langeveld, R. A. M.; van Loo, L. W. H.; van Nierop, P. R.; van Rey, F. J. W.; van Straalen, M. J.; Vos, J.; Werner, H. A.; Westendorp, J. J. C.; Zwiers, G.; Achremczyk, P.; Adamus, J.; Baska, J.; Bolinska Soltysiak, H.; Bubinski, R.; Ceremuzynski, L.; Cieslinski, A.; Dariusz, D.; Deptulski, T.; Drewla, P.; Drozdowski, P.; Dubiel, J. S.; Dudek, D.; Galewicz, M.; Ghlebus, K.; Halawa, B.; Jakubowska Majnigier, M.; Janion, M.; Jaworska, K.; Kaszewska, I.; Kleinrok, A.; Kornacewicz Jach, Z.; Krawczyk, W.; Krynicki, R.; Krzciuk, M.; Krzeminska Pakula, M.; Kuch, J.; Kuzniar, J.; Legutko, J.; Liszewska Pfejfer, D.; Loboz Grudzien, K.; Musial, W.; Opolski, G.; Pasyk, S.; Piwowarska, W.; Pulkowski, G.; Radziszewski, B.; Romanski, B.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Skura, M.; Slowinski, S.; Smielak Korombel, W.; Targonski, R.; Templin, W.; Tendera, M.; Tracz, W.; Trusz Gluza, M.; Turek, P.; Tyminska Sedek, K.; Wodniecki, J.; Zalewski, M.; Zinka, E.; Carrageta, M.; Coelho, J.; Ferreira Gil, R.; Leitao Marques, A.; Santos Andrade, C. M.; Seabra Gomes, R.; Bada, V.; Belicova, M.; Buksarova, E.; Dukat, A.; Gonsorcik, J.; Jonas, P.; Kamensky, G.; Karvaj, M.; Micko, K.; Mikes, Z.; Palinsky, M.; Pella, D.; Renker, B.; Sefara, P.; Sojka, G.; Sulej, P.; Szakacs, M.; Szentivanyi, M.; Aguirre Salcedo, J. M.; Alonso Orcajo, N.; Ancillo Garcia, P.; Auge Sanpera, J. M.; Ayuela Azcarate, J.; Bardaji Mayor, J. L.; Bertomeu Martinez, V.; Blanco Coronado, J. L.; Bros Caimari, R.; Bruguera Cortada, J.; Caparros Valderrama, J.; DeArmas Trujillo, D.; del Rio Ligorit, A.; Espinosa Caliani, J. S.; Fernandez Aviles, F.; Garcia Guerrero, J. J.; Garcia Lopez, D.; Gonzalez Cocina, E.; Guallar Urena, C.; Jodar Lorente, L.; Lopez Garcia, Aranda V.; MacayaDeMiguel, C.; Maroto Montero, J.; Martinez Romero, P.; Navarro Lopez, F.; Noriega Peiro, F.; Olague de Ros, J.; Orellana Mas, J.; Paz Bermejo, M. A.; Placer Peralta, L. J.; Rodriguez Padial, L.; Salvador Sanz, A.; Segui Bonnin, J.; Simarro Martin, E.; Sobrino Daza, J.; Valles Belsue, F.; Ekdahl, S.; Forslund, L.; Ohlin, H.; Persson, S.; Pieper, M.; Moccetti, T.; Acartsrk, E.; Guzelsoy, D.; TMZsaruhan, O.; Ozturk, M.; Sansoy, V.; Turkoglu, C.; Ysksel, H.; Adgey, A. A. J.; Ahsan, A.; Al Khafaji, M.; Ball, S. G.; Birkhead, J.; Boon, N.; Bowker, T.; Brack, M.; Bridges, A.; Buchalter, M.; Buchalter, B.; Calder, B.; Cooke, R. A.; Corr, L.; Cowell, R.; Curzen, N. P.; Davidson, C.; Davies, E.; Davies, J.; de Belder, M.; Dhiya, L.; Doig, J. C.; Findlay, I. N.; Francis, C. M.; Glancy, J. M.; Glen, S.; Greenwood, T. W.; Groves, P.; Hall, A. S.; Hamilton, G.; Hillman, R.; Holdright, D.; Hubbard, W.; Travill, C.; Hutton, I.; Ilsley, C.; Innes, M.; James, M.; Jennings, K.; Jones, C. J. H.; Joy, M.; Keeling, P.; Kooner, J.; Lawson, C.; Levy, R. D.; Lip, G.; Lorimer, A. R.; Marshall, H.; Mclachlan, B.; Montgomery, H.; Morley, C.; Murdoch, D. L.; Muthusamy, R.; Oakley, G. D.; Penny, W.; Pohl, J. E. F.; Purvis, J.; Pye, M.; Ramsdale, D.; Reid, D.; Roberts, D. H.; Rowlands, D.; Rozkovec, A.; Saltissi, S.; Schofield, P. M.; Scott, M.; Shapiro, L. M.; Silke, B.; Stephens, J.; Sutherland, S.; Swan, J. W.; Shakespeare, C.; Tildesley, G.; Watson, R. D. S.; Wilkinson, P.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors reduce clinical symptoms and improve outcome in patients with hypertension, heart failure, and stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and are among the most frequently used drugs in these patient groups. For hypertension, treatment is guided

  13. Effects of direct renin inhibition on atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irons, Brian K; Trujillo, Alex; Seifert, Charles F; Simoni, Jan S; Doctolero, Susan; Abo-Salem, Elsayed; Meyerrose, Gary E

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate whether the direct renin inhibitor, aliskiren, has a more favorable effect compared to amlodipine on atherosclerotic biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease and diabetes currently receiving standard secondary prevention therapy. A total of 38 patients were randomly assigned initially to either aliskiren (150 mg daily) or amlodipine (5 mg daily) for 2 weeks after which the dose of either medication was increased to its maximum daily dose for 4 additional weeks. Baseline and 6-week blood samples were analyzed for changes from baseline and between treatment groups for vascular and intracellular cell adhesion molecule, C-reactive protein, nitric oxide, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, 8-isoprostane, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Thirty-one patients completed the study. More of the dropouts occurred in patients receiving aliskiren. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both treatment arms with no differences between the groups being noted. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, nitric oxide, and C-reactive protein concentrations increased in both groups from baseline but changes from baseline or between groups were not significant. Vascular and intracellular cell adhesion molecule, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and isoprostane concentrations decreased in each treatment arm from baseline, but these changes were not significant and no differences were noted between the groups. Treatment with either aliskiren or amlodipine did not significantly alter surrogate biomarkers of atherosclerosis in patients with both diabetes and established cardiovascular disease already receiving appropriate secondary cardiovascular prevention therapy. The study is limited in its size and duration to see an effect.

  14. Medical History for Prognostic Risk Assessment and Diagnosis of Stable Patients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James K.; Dunning, Allison; Gransar, Heidi; Achenbach, Stephan; Lin, Fay Y.; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cademartiri, Filippo; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J. W.; D’Agostino, Ralph; DeLago, Augustin; Friedman, John; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Hayes, Sean; Kaufmann, Philipp; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Thomson, Louise; Villines, Todd; Cury, Ricardo C.; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Berman, Daniel S.; Pencina, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aims To develop a clinical cardiac risk algorithm for stable patients with suspected CAD based upon angina typicality and CAD risk factors. Methods and Results Between 2004 and 2011, 14,004 adults with suspected CAD referred for cardiac imaging were followed: 1) 9,093 patients for CCTA (CCTA-1) followed for 2.0 years; 2) 2,132 patients for CCTA (CCTA-2) followed for 1·6 years, and 3) 2,779 patients for exercise myocardial perfusion scintigraphy followed for 5.0 years. A best-fit model from CCTA-1 for prediction of death or myocardial infarction (MI) was developed, with integer values proportional to regression coefficients. Discrimination was assessed using C-statistic. The validated model was also tested for estimation of the likelihood of obstructive CAD, defined as ≥50% stenosis, as compared to method of Diamond and Forrester (D-F). Primary outcomes included all-cause mortality and non-fatal MI. Secondary outcomes included prevalence of angiographically obstructive CAD. In CCTA-1, best-fit model discriminated individuals at risk of death or MI (C-statistic 0·76). The integer model ranged from 3-13, and corresponded to 3-year death risk or MI of 0·25% to 53·8%. When applied to the CCTA-2 and MPS, the model demonstrated C-statistics of 0·71 and 0·77. Both best-fit (C=0·76, 95% CI 0·746-0·771) and integer model (C=0·71, 95% CI 0·693-0·719) performed better than D-F (C=0·64; 95% CI, 0·628-0·659) for estimating obstructive CAD. Conclusions For stable symptomatic patients with suspected CAD, we developed a history-based method for prediction of death and obstructive CAD. PMID:25865923

  15. Evaluation of a train-the-trainer program for stable coronary artery disease management in community settings: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiyun; Jiang, Changying; Chen, Liqun

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting a train-the-trainer (TTT) program for stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) management in community settings. The study involved two steps: (1) tutors trained community nurses as trainers and (2) the community nurses trained patients. 51 community nurses attended a 2-day TTT program and completed questionnaires assessing knowledge, self-efficacy, and satisfaction. By a feasibility and non-randomized control study, 120 SCAD patients were assigned either to intervention group (which received interventions from trained nurses) or control group (which received routine management). Pre- and post-intervention, patients' self-management behaviors and satisfaction were assessed to determine the program's overall impact. Community nurses' knowledge and self-efficacy improved (Pmanagement behaviors (Pmanagement in community settings in China was generally feasible and effective, but many obstacles remain including patients' noncompliance, nurses' busy work schedules, and lack of policy supports. Finding ways to enhance the motivation of community nurses and patients with SCAD are important in implementing community-based TTT programs for SCAD management; further multicenter and randomized control trials are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolic therapy in the comprehensive treatment of patients with comorbidity of chronic pancreatitis and stable coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Babinets

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic therapy is one of the few ways to restore normal functions of all the vital organs and systems. The goal of the research was to explore the effectiveness of a course of treatment using metabolic drug Vazonat (meldonium dihydrate to correct prooxidant-antioxidant and trophological disorders in patients with comorbid course of chronic pancreatitis (CP and stable coronary artery disease (SCAD. The study included 90 patients with CP in combination with SCAD, who were divided into two groups (depending on the treatment program: I group (45 patients received conventional treatment (CT; group II (45 patients in addition to CT received Vazonat as follows: 5 ml intravenous bolus injection 1 time a day for 10 days followed by administration of 1 capsule (250 mg, 2 times per day for one month. It has been shown that the addition of Vazonat to the treatment of patients with comorbidity of CP and SCAD is more conducive to improving the performance and trophological prooxidant-antioxidant status than the standard basic therapy.

  17. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, Stuart J; Eikelboom, John W; Bosch, Jackie

    2018-01-01

    with aspirin alone (411 [5%] of 8250 vs 460 [6%] of 8261; HR 0·89, 95% CI 0·78-1·02, p=0·094). Combined rivaroxaban plus aspirin treatment resulted in more major bleeds than treatment with aspirin alone (263 [3%] of 8313 vs 158 [2%] of 8261; HR 1·66, 95% CI 1·37-2·03, pbleeds were...... seen in the rivaroxaban alone group than in the aspirin alone group (236 [3%] of 8250 vs 158 [2%] of 8261; HR 1·51, 95% CI 1·23-1·84, pbleeding was gastrointestinal, occurring in 130 [2%] patients who received combined rivaroxaban plus aspirin, in 84 [1...... disease, addition of rivaroxaban to aspirin lowered major vascular events, but increased major bleeding. There was no significant increase in intracranial bleeding or other critical organ bleeding. There was also a significant net benefit in favour of rivaroxaban plus aspirin and deaths were reduced by 23...

  18. Correlation between early revascularization and major cardiac events demonstrated by ischemic myocardium in Japanese patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Shunichi; Hori, Yusuke; Hayase, Misa; Mineki, Takashi; Hatta, Takumi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2018-01-01

    There is no report on correlation between early revascularization and the occurrence of major cardiac events (MCEs) except severe heart failure in Japanese patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to determine whether early revascularization affected the incidence of MCEs in Japanese patients with stable CAD. We retrospectively investigated 3581 stable CAD patients who underwent rest 201Tl and stress 99mTc-tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and provided three-year-prognostic data. The endpoint was the onset of MCEs consisting of cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and unstable angina pectoris. On the basis of estimated propensity scores, patients who underwent revascularization within the first 60 days after the SPECT and those who did not were matched in a 1:1 ratio (n=450 per group). We compared MCE rates in relation to the amount of ischemic myocardium detected with the SPECT between the two groups. The overall incidence of MCEs was not significantly different between the early-revascularization and no-early-revascularization groups (6.7% vs. 8.7%, p=0.2598). Nevertheless, the incidence of MCEs in the patients with ≤5% ischemia was significantly higher in the early-revascularization group than in the no-early-revascularization group (5.8% vs. 0.8%, p=0.0226). In contrast, the incidence of MCEs in the patients with >10% ischemia was significantly lower in the early-revascularization group than in the no-early-revascularization group (7.0% vs. 16.8%, p=0.0036). The incidence of MCEs in the patients with 6-10% ischemia, however, was not significantly different between the early-revascularization and no-early-revascularization groups (6.9% vs. 4.1%, p=0.3235). Early revascularization possibly leads to the occurrence of MCEs related to the treatment procedure but may be a therapeutic strategy leading to improvement in prognosis in patients with moderate to severe ischemia

  19. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow or blocked, usually because ... other substances found in the blood. Carotid artery disease is serious because it can block the blood ...

  20. [Status of β-blocker use and heart rate control in Chinese patients with stable coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yihong; Yu, Jinming; Hu, Dayi

    2016-01-01

    To observe the current status of β-blocker (BB) use and heart rate control in Chinese patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD) based on subgroup data of the prospective observational longitudinal registry of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CLARIFY). The CLARIFY study is an international prospective observational registry of outpatients with SCAD. From November 2009 to July 2010, patients with SCAD were enrolled, and demographic information, clinical indicators, medication and blood flow reconstruction were collected. Patients were divided in three mutually exclusive categories by baseline pulse palpation heart rate(HR)≤60 beats per minute (bpm)(n=397), 61-69 bpm(n=782), and ≥70 bpm(n=1 443). The patients were also divided into taking BB or not taking BB groups. The aim of present study is to describe and analyze the current status and factors related to the HR control and BB use in the Chinese subgroup of CLARIFY. A total of 2 622 patients were enrolled from 56 centers across China. The mean age was (63.6±10.3) years old with 75.6% (1 983) male patients, 55.0% (1 443) patients had HR≥70 bpm. Mean HR measure by electrocardiogram(ECG) was (69.4±10.2)bpm, 50.9% (1 334 cases) patients had myocardial infarction(MI) history. A total of 21.9%(575 cases) patients had anginal symptoms; coronary angiography was performed in 88.8%(2 327 cases) of the patients. 76.2%(1 997 cases) patients were treated with BB (any molecule and any dose), 2.7% (70 cases) with digoxin or derivatives, 3.9% (103 cases) with verapamil or diltiazem, and 1.8% (47 cases) with amiodarone or dronedarone and 0.1%(2 cases) received ivabradine. BB use was similar among 3 HR groups(P>0.05). The independent risk factors associated with HR≥70 bpm were diabetes(OR=1.31), current smoker(OR=1.57), chronic heart failure(CHF) with NYHA Ⅲ (OR=2.13) and increased diastolic blood pressure (OR=1.30). Conversely, high physical activity (OR=0.61), former smoker (OR=0.76) and history

  1. Relation of Leukocytes and Its Subsets Counts with the Severity of Stable Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Diabetic Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Song-Hui; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Qing, Ping; Xu, Rui-Xia; Wu, Na-Qiong; Jiang, Li-Xin; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Both coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with inflammation. However, whether and which leukocytes can predict the presence and extent of CAD in patients with DM has not been investigated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of leukocyte and its subsets counts with the severity of CAD in patients with DM. Methods and Findings Three hundred and seventy-three diabetic patients who were scheduled for coronary angiography due to typical stable angina pectoris were enrolled in this study. They were classified into the three groups according to tertiles of Gensini score (GS, low group 28, n = 121). The relationship between the leukocyte and its subsets counts with the severity of CAD were evaluated. The data indicated that there were significant correlations between leukocyte and neutrophil counts with GS (r = 0.154 and 0.156, respectively, all Pleukocyte and neutrophil counts were 0.61 and 0.60 respectively (95%CI: 0.55–0.67, all P = 0.001) for predicting high GS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that leukocyte count was an independent predictor for high GS patients with DM (OR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.03–1.39, P = 0.023) after adjusting for conventional risk factors of CAD. Conclusions Compared with its subsets, leukocyte count appeared to be an independent predictor for the severity of CAD and the optimal cut-off value for predicting high GS (>28 points) was 5.0×109 cells/L in diabetic patients. PMID:24599246

  2. Guidelines in review: Comparison of ESC and ACC/AHA guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jubin; Velasco, Alejandro; Hage, Fadi G; Reyes, Eliana

    2017-09-07

    In 2012, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) Task Force on Practice Guidelines jointly with the American College of Physicians, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons produced a set of recommendations intended to assist physicians in the diagnosis and management of patients with stable ischemic heart disease. Two years later, a focused update on the 2012 guidelines was published. A year before this update, The Task Force on the management of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) issued a guideline on the management of stable CAD. This document brings together European and American recommendations that include the use of stress testing and non-invasive imaging for the diagnosis and management of patients with known or suspected stable CAD.

  3. Depression and anxiety as predictors of 2-year cardiac events in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Lespérance, François

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are associated with mechanisms that promote atherosclerosis. Most recent studies of emotional disturbances in coronary artery disease (CAD) have focused on depression only. To assess the 2-year cardiac prognostic importance of the DSM-IV-based diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and self-report measures of anxiety and depression and their co-occurrence. Two-year follow-up of 804 patients with stable CAD (649 men) assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II), the anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-A), and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (masked to self-reports) 2 months after acute coronary syndromes. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, or nonelective revascularization) in the 2 years after baseline. Of the 804 patients, 57 (7.1%) met the criteria for MDD [major depressive disorder] and 43 (5.3%) for GAD [generalized anxiety disorder] (11 [1.4%] had comorbidity); 220 (27.4%) had elevated BDI-II [Beck Depression Inventory II] scores (≥14), and 333 (41.4%) had elevated HADS-A [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale] scores (≥8), with 21.1% overlap. Major depressive disorder (odds ratio [OR], 2.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-4.73), GAD (OR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.23-4.97), elevated BDI-II (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.20-2.73), elevated HADS-A score (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.12-2.47), and continuous standardized scores on the BDI-II (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.05-1.62) and the HADS-A (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.19-1.73) all predicted MACEs [major adverse cardiac events]. [correction]. After covariate control, only the P value associated with the continuous BDI-II score increased to above .10. Most of the risk associated with elevated symptoms was in patients with psychiatric disorders. However, patients with comorbid MDD and GAD or elevated anxiety and depression symptoms were not at greater MACE risk than

  4. HMGB1 is associated with atherosclerotic plaque composition and burden in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrassy

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The role of inflammation in atherosclerosis is widely appreciated. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, an injury-associated molecular pattern molecule acting as a mediator of inflammation, has recently been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we sought to investigate the association of plasma HMGB1 with coronary plaque composition in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD. DESIGN: HMGB1, high sensitive troponin T (hsTnT and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP were determined in 152 consecutive patients with suspected or known stable CAD who underwent clinically indicated 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA. Using CCTA, we assessed 1 coronary calcification, 2 non-calcified plaque burden and 3 the presence of vascular remodeling in areas of non-calcified plaques. RESULTS: Using univariate analysis, hsCRP, hsTnT and HMGB1 as well as age, and atherogenic risk factors were associated with non-calcified plaque burden (r = 0.21, p = 0.009; r = 0.48, p<0.001 and r = 0.34, p<0.001, respectively. By multivariate analysis, hsTnT and HMGB1 remained independent predictors of the non-calcified plaque burden (r = 0.48, p<0.01 and r = 0.34, p<0.001, respectively, whereas a non-significant trend was noticed for hs-CRP (r = 0.21, p = 0.07. By combining hsTnT and HMGB1, a high positive predictive value for the presence of non-calcified and remodeled plaque (96% and 77%, respectively was noted in patients within the upper tertiles for both biomarkers, which surpassed the positive predictive value of each marker separately. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to hs-TnT, a well-established cardiovascular risk marker, HMGB1 is independently associated with non-calcified plaque burden in patients with stable CAD, while the predictive value of hs-CRP is lower. Complementary value was observed for hs-TnT and HMGB1 for the prediction of complex coronary plaque.

  5. A randomised trial of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel in Hispanic patients with stable coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Matthew J; Clavijo, Leonardo; Angiolillo, Dominick J.; Carlson, Glenn; Caplan, Richard; Teng, Renli; Maya, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) effects of ticagrelor with clopidogrel among subjects of Hispanic ethnicity, as the PD and PK effects of antiplatelet agents among Hispanics are not specifically known. This was a randomised, open-label, crossover PD/PK study of 40 Hispanic subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects were allocated to either ticagrelor 180?mg loading dose (LD)/90?mg twice-daily maintenance dose (MD) followed by clo...

  6. Coronary artery disease (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the coronary arteries narrow, the flow of blood to the ...

  7. Increased membrane lipid peroxidation and decreased Na+/K+-ATPase activity in erythrocytes of patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Gholamreza; Jamshidi Rad, Sabieh; Attar, Ahmad Movahedian; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Naderi, Gholamali; Pourfarzam, Morteza

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to determine erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation levels and Na/K-ATPase activity in patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD) documented by coronary angiography. A total of 144 patients who had undergone coronary angiography were divided into a CAD group (n=82) and a non-CAD group (control group, n=62) according to the results of coronary angiography. Lipid peroxide levels in plasma and the erythrocyte membrane were measured using a fluorimetric method. Total antioxidant status and Na/K-ATPase activity in plasma were determined using spectrophotometric methods. Lipid peroxidation levels were significantly higher in the erythrocyte membrane of CAD patients compared with controls, whereas Na/K-ATPase activity was significantly lower in the erythrocyte membrane of CAD patients compared with controls. The coronary artery scores were correlated positively with membrane lipid peroxidation (r=0.324, Plipid peroxidation and Na/K-ATPase activity are correlated with the severity of CAD.

  8. The relationship between serum thyroid hormone levels, subclinical hypothyroidism, and coronary collateral circulation in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballı, Mehmet; Çetin, Mustafa; Taşolar, Hakan; Uysal, Onur Kadir; Yılmaz, Mahmut; Durukan, Mine; Elbasan, Zafer; Çaylı, Murat

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid disease is a common endocrine disease with important effects on the cardiovascular system. As an adaptive response to myocardial ischemia, coronary collateral circulation (CCC) plays an important role in obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). The association between serum thyroid hormone levels and development of CCC was investigated in the present study. In total, 430 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography procedure and had documented total occlusion in at least 1 major coronary artery were investigated retrospectively. Degree of CCC was classified according to Cohen-Rentrop method. Serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were assessed by the chemiluminescence immunoassay technique. In spite of diabetes mellitus (p=0.019), smoking (p<0.001), and TSH (p<0.001), FT3 (p<0.001), FT4 (p=0.015), and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) (p<0.001) ratios were significantly different between groups. In regression analysis, SCH (p=0.024), DM (p=0.021), smoking (p<0.001), and heart failure (p=0.029) were independent predictors of poor CCC development in multivariate model 1. When regression analyses were performed based on multivariate model 2, TSH (p<0.001), FT3 (p<0.001), heart failure (p=0.022), smoking (p<0.001), and hyperlipidemia (HPL) (p=0.046) were independent predictors of poor CCC development. In addition to traditional risk factors, SCH, higher serum TSH, and lower FT3 levels were associated with development of poor CCC in patients with obstructive CA.

  9. Clinical proteomics identifies urinary CD14 as a potential biomarker for diagnosis of stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays a key role in coronary artery disease (CAD and other manifestations of atherosclerosis. Recently, urinary proteins were found to be useful markers for reflecting inflammation status of different organs. To identify potential biomarker for diagnosis of CAD, we performed one-dimensional SDS-gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. Among the proteins differentially expressed in urine samples, monocyte antigen CD14 was found to be consistently expressed in higher amounts in the CAD patients as compared to normal controls. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to analyze the concentrations of CD14 in urine and serum, we confirmed that urinary CD14 levels were significantly higher in patients (n = 73 with multi-vessel and single vessel CAD than in normal control (n = 35 (P < 0.001. Logistic regression analysis further showed that urinary CD14 concentration level is associated with severity or number of diseased vessels and SYNTAX score after adjustment for potential confounders. Concomitantly, the proportion of CD14+ monocytes was significantly increased in CAD patients (59.7 ± 3.6% as compared with healthy controls (14.9 ± 2.1% (P < 0.001, implicating that a high level of urinary CD14 may be potentially involved in mechanism(s leading to CAD pathogenesis. By performing shotgun proteomics, we further revealed that CD14-associated inflammatory response networks may play an essential role in CAD. In conclusion, the current study has demonstrated that release of CD14 in urine coupled with more CD14+ monocytes in CAD patients is significantly correlated with severity of CAD, pointing to the potential application of urinary CD14 as a novel noninvasive biomarker for large-scale diagnostic screening of susceptible CAD patients.

  10. Diagnostic Value of Electrocardiographic T Wave Inversion in Lead aVL in Diagnosing Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Chronic Stable Angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem L. Farhan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The clinical value of T wave inversion in lead aVL in diagnosing coronary artery disease (CAD remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the correlation between aVL T wave inversion and CAD in patients with chronic stable angina.Methods: Electrocardiograms (ECGs of 257 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography were analyzed. All patients had chronic stable angina. All patients with secondary T wave inversion had been excluded (66 patients. The remaining 191 patients constituted the study population. Detailed ECG interpretation and coronary angiographic findings were conducted by experienced cardiologists.Results: T wave inversion in aVL was identified in 89 ECGs (46.8% with definite ischemic Q-ST-T changes in different leads in 97 ECGs (50.8%. Stand alone aVL T wave inversion was found in 27 ECGs (14.1% while ischemic changes in other leads with normal aVL were identified in 36 ECGs (18.8%. The incidence of CAD was 86.3%. Single, two- and multi-vessel CAD were found in 38.8%, 28.5% and 32.7% of cases respectively. The prevalence of left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex and right coronary arteries were 4.7%, 61.2%, 29.3% and 44.5%, respectively. T wave inversion in aVL was found to be the only ECG variable significantly predicting mid segment left anterior descending artery (LAD lesions (Odds Ratio 2.93, 95% Confidence Interval 1.59-5.37, p=0.001.Conclusion: This study provides new information relating to T wave inversion in lead aVL to mid segment LAD lesions. Implication of this simple finding may help in bedside diagnosis of CAD typically mid LAD lesions. However, further studies are needed to corroborate this finding.

  11. Cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography angiography for clinical imaging of stable coronary artery disease. Diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosoglou, Grigorios; Giusca, Sorin; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Erbel, Christian; Katus, Hugo A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in the pharmacologic and interventional treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD), atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death in Western societies. X-ray coronary angiography has been the modality of choice for diagnosing the presence and extent of CAD. However, this technique is invasive and provides limited information on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) have emerged as promising non-invasive techniques for the clinical imaging of CAD. Hereby, CCTA allows for visualization of coronary calcification, lumen narrowing and atherosclerotic plaque composition. In this regard, data from the CONFIRM Registry recently demonstrated that both atherosclerotic plaque burden and lumen narrowing exhibit incremental value for the prediction of future cardiac events. However, due to technical limitations with CCTA, resulting in false positive or negative results in the presence of severe calcification or motion artifacts, this technique cannot entirely replace invasive angiography at the present time. CMR on the other hand, provides accurate assessment of the myocardial function due to its high spatial and temporal resolution and intrinsic blood-to-tissue contrast. Hereby, regional wall motion and perfusion abnormalities, during dobutamine or vasodilator stress, precede the development of ST-segment depression and anginal symptoms enabling the detection of functionally significant CAD. While CT generally offers better spatial resolution, the versatility of CMR can provide information on myocardial function, perfusion, and viability, all without ionizing radiation for the patients. Technical developments with these 2 non-invasive imaging tools and their current implementation in the clinical imaging of CAD will be presented and discussed herein. PMID:25147526

  12. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  13. Impact of hyperaemic microvascular resistance on fractional flow reserve measurements in patients with stable coronary artery disease: insights from combined stenosis and microvascular resistance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Hoef, Tim P; Nolte, Froukje; EchavarrÍa-Pinto, Mauro; van Lavieren, Martijn A; Damman, Peter; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Voskuil, Michiel; Verberne, Hein J; Henriques, José P S; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L F; Koch, Karel T; de Winter, Robbert J; Spaan, Jos A E; Siebes, Maria; Tijssen, Jan G P; Meuwissen, Martijn; Piek, Jan J

    2014-06-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) aims to identify the extent of epicardial disease, but may be obscured by involvement of the coronary microvasculature. We documented the impact of hyperaemic stenosis resistance (HSR) and hyperaemic microvascular resistance (HMR) on FFR, and its relationship with myocardial ischaemia in patients with stable coronary artery disease. We evaluated 255 coronary arteries with stenoses of intermediate severity by means of intracoronary pressure and flow measurements to determine FFR, HSR and HMR. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) was performed to identify inducible myocardial ischaemia. In 178 patients, HMR was additionally determined in a reference coronary artery. Target vessel HMR was stratified according to reference vessel HMR tertiles. The diagnostic OR for inducible ischaemia on MPS of a positive compared with a negative FFR was significantly higher only in the presence of a high HMR (at the 0.75 and 0.80 FFR cut-off). Among stenoses with a positive FFR, the prevalence of ischaemia was significantly higher when HMR was high despite equivalent FFR across the HMR groups. This was paralleled by a concomitant significant increase in HSR with increasing HMR across groups. The relation between FFR and HSR (r(2)=0.54, pdisease of equivalent severity, FFR increased with increasing HMR. Identification of epicardial disease severity by FFR is partly obscured by the microvascular resistance, which illustrates the necessity of combined pressure and flow measurements in daily practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Plasma big endothelin-1 levels at admission and future cardiovascular outcomes: A cohort study in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Yang; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Gao, Ying; Qing, Ping; Li, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Yao; Dong, Qian; Liu, Geng; Xu, Rui Xia; Cui, Chuan-Jue; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Big endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been proposed as a novel prognostic indicator of acute coronary syndrome, while its predicting role of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is unclear. A total of 3154 consecutive patients with stable CAD were enrolled and followed up for 24months. The outcomes included all-cause death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, stroke and unplanned revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting). Baseline big ET-1 was measured using sandwich enzyme immunoassay method. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to evaluate the prognostic value of big ET-1 on cardiovascular outcomes. One hundred and eighty-nine (5.99%) events occurred during follow-up. Patients were divided into two groups: events group (n=189) and non-events group (n=2965). The results indicated that the events group had higher levels of big ET-1 compared to non-events group. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that big ET-1 was positively and statistically correlated with clinical outcomes (Hazard Ratio: 1.656, 95% confidence interval: 1.099-2.496, p=0.016). Additionally, the Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that patients with higher big ET-1 presented lower event-free survival (p=0.016). The present study firstly suggests that big ET-1 is an independent risk marker of cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable CAD. And more studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Blood level of CD45+ platelets and development of restenosis after drug-eluting stent implantation in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Kozlov, Sergey; Byazrova, Svetlana; Saburova, Olga; Melnikov, Ivan; Caprnda, Martin; Curilla, Eduard; Gaspar, Ludovit; Kruzliak, Peter; Smirnov, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess CD45-positive platelets (CD45+ platelets) involvement in restenosis development after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The study comprised 126 male and female patients with stable angina pectoris, who underwent elective coronary stenting with DES and follow-up angiography within 6-12 months. The patients were assigned to the group with restenosis (n = 53) or group without restenosis (n = 73) according to the follow-up angiograms. In both groups we compared the level in blood of CD45+ platelets, the clinical, laboratory and angiographic variables, which may affect the development of restenosis. We have also constructed a logit regression model for prognosis of restenosis occurrence after DES implantation. The blood count of CD45+ platelets was higher in patients with restenosis than in patients without: 0.82 % (0.58; 1.12) vs. 0.34 % (0.20; 0.68), p binary comparisons of more than 35 different clinical, laboratory and angiographic variables we identified 8 significant risk factors for the development of stent restenosis after DES. In order to define the risk of the development of restenosis, we have built a logit regression model. The resulting logit regression equation included the level of CD45+ platelets, the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), small diameter arteries stenting and the number of simultaneously implanted stents in one patient. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis has demonstrated the high prognostic value of the resulting logit regression equation with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.91 % (p < 0.001). The acquired data indicate the presence of a close relationship between circulating CD45+ platelets and restenosis development after DES implantation in patients with stable CAD.

  16. The effects of implementation of guideline-directed medical therapy on relief of angina in patients with stable coronary artery disease in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adherence to proposed lifestyle changes and prescribed medication in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCAD is poor. Objective. We sought to investigate the influence of adjusting guideline proposed medications on relief of angina in a large group of patients with SCAD in Serbia. Methods. The study included a total of 3,490 patients from 15 cardiology clinics with symptoms of stable angina and at least one of the following criteria: abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG, history of myocardial infarction (MI, positive stress test, significant coronary artery disease on coronary angiogram or previous revascularization. All the patients underwent comprehensive evaluation at initial visit and after two months. The relief of angina was study end-point defined as any reduction in Canadian Cardiology Society (CCS class, number of angina attacks per week and/or number of tablets of short-acting nitrates per week. Results. Most patients were included based on abnormal ECG (48.4%. At Visit 1, the average number of prescribed classes of medications to a single patient increased from 4.16 ± 1.29 to 4.63 ± 1.57 (p < 0.001. At the follow-up, the patients had significantly lower blood pressure (141 ± 19 / 85 ± 11 vs. 130 ± 12 / 80 ± 8 mmHg; p < 0.001 and most of them reported CCS class I (63.3%. The average weekly number of angina attacks was reduced from 2.82 ± 2.50 at Visit 1 to 1.72 0 ± 1.66 at Visit 2, as well as average weekly use of short-acting nitrates to treat these attacks (2.69 ± 2.53 to 1.74 ± 1.47 tablets; p < 0.001 for all. Conclusion. Adjustment of prescribed medications to guideline recommendations in a large Serbian patient population with prevalent risk factors led to significant relief of angina.

  17. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the legs, feet, and toes Painful, non-bleeding sores on the feet or toes (most often black) that are slow ... block small arteries Coronary artery disease Impotence Open sores ... (gangrene) The affected leg or foot may need to be amputated

  18. Identification of new biosignatures for clinical outcomes in stable coronary artery disease - The study protocol and initial observations of a prospective follow-up study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Hsin-Bang; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Wu, Yen-Wen; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-I; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Wang, Ji-Hung; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2017-01-28

    Either classic or novel biomarkers have not been well investigated for clinical outcomes of coronary artery disease (CAD) in Asian people especially ethnic Chinese. We reported here a prospective national-based follow-up study that aims to elucidate the clinical profiles and to identify the new biosignatures (especially the non-lipid profile and inflammatory biomakers) for future clinical outcomes in a sizable cohort of stable CAD patients in Taiwan. A total of 2500 CAD patients under stable condition after successful percutaneous coronary intervention will be enrolled for clinical data collection and blood/urine sampling in northern, southern, western, or eastern part of Taiwan between 2012 and 2017. They will be regularly followed up at least annually for 5 years to assess all cause deaths, hard clinical events (including cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke), and total cardiovascular events (including hard events, unplanned revascularization procedures, unplanned hospitalization for refractory or unstable angina, and for other causes such as stroke, transient ischemic attack, heart failure, or peripheral arterial occlusive disease). The classic and newly defined biosignatures will be compared in patients with and without clinical events during follow-up. The novel biomarkers will be identified via metabolomics analyses. Additionally, psychological personality and lifestyle data will be incorporated to explore the new dimensional views of the complex mechanisms of the disease. Till December 2014, the initial 1663 patients have been successfully enrolled. Among them, 85.93% are male; 36.22% have type 2 diabetes; 64.82% have hypertension; 56.04% are smokers and 20.44% have a family history of CAD. Their lipid profiles are under contemporary medical control with a mean plasma total cholesterol level of 163.51 ± 36.99 mg/dL and a mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 95.21 ± 29.98 mg/dL. This nationwide study

  19. Ticagrelor Versus Clopidogrel in Black Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Prospective, Randomized, Open-Label, Multiple-Dose, Crossover Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waksman, Ron; Maya, Juan; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Carlson, Glenn F; Teng, Renli; Caplan, Richard J; Ferdinand, Keith C

    2015-07-01

    The burden of coronary artery disease (CAD) is high in blacks, highlighting the need for clinical research of antiplatelet agents in this population. We sought to evaluate platelet reactivity during loading and maintenance dosing of ticagrelor versus clopidogrel, and the pharmacokinetic profile of ticagrelor and its metabolite AR-C124910XX, in black patients with stable CAD taking low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). In a multicenter, randomized, open-label, crossover study, 34 blacks with stable CAD receiving acetylsalicylic acid 75 to 100 mg/d were randomized to clopidogrel (600 mg, then 75 mg QD for 7-9 days) or ticagrelor (180 mg, then 90 mg BID for 7-9 days). After washout 10 to 14 days, patients switched regimens. The primary end point was platelet reactivity 2 hours post loading dose (P2Y12 reactivity units [PRU] measured by the VerifyNow assay). Least-squares mean PRU at 2 hours post loading dose was lower with ticagrelor (27.6) versus clopidogrel (211.2); least-squares mean difference was -183.6 (95% confidence interval, -213.9 to -153.3; Pticagrelor versus clopidogrel. At 2 hours post dose, the prevalence of high on-treatment platelet reactivity (≥208 PRU) was lower with ticagrelor (0%) than with clopidogrel (57.1%). Pharmacokinetic profiles of ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX were consistent with previous reports in stable CAD populations. In black patients with stable CAD receiving low-dose acetylsalicylic acid, ticagrelor provided a faster onset and greater degree of platelet inhibition than clopidogrel. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01523392. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. [Effects of exercise therapy at the intensity of anaerobic threshold for exercise tolerance in patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Lin; Gong, Zhu; Jiang, Jin-fa; Xu, Wen-jun; Deng, Bing; Xu, Jia-hong; Yan, Wen-wen; Zhang, Qi-ping; Wang, Le-min

    2011-06-28

    To investigate the effects of exercise therapy at the intensity of anaerobic threshold (AT) for exercise tolerance in patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease. Forty-three patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease (3 patients after coronary arterial bypass graft (CABG) surgery, 22 patients with old myocardial infarction and 18 unstable angina pectoris undergoing successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) finished twice cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) and followed their rehabilitation program for 3 months. Thirty-two patients finished their aerobic exercise therapy based on their individual anaerobic thresholds while 11 patients had no exercise therapy. The heart rate at AT intensity (97 ± 9/min) was lower than their traditional minimal target heart rate (112 ± 7/min) and lower than heart rate (115 ± 11/min) at ischemic threshold post-CPET. The O(2) consumption (10.7 ± 2.4 to 12.6 ± 2.9 ml×min(-1)×kg(-1)) (P = 0.04) and workload (37 ± 18 to 47 ± 13 J/s) (P = 0.04) at AT level and the O(2) consumption (15.3 ± 3.1 to 20.6 ± 4.2 ml×min(-1)×kg(-1), P = 0.02) and workload(68 ± 12 and 87 ± 14 J/s, P = 0.01) at peak level markedly increased after 3 months in the exercise group. And the O(2) consumption (15.3 ± 2.9 to 16.2 ± 3.1 ml×min(-1)×kg(-1)) and workload (65 ± 13 to 73 ± 16 J/s) at peak level mild increased after 3 months in the non-exercise group, but their O(2) consumption (11.0 ± 2.7 to 11.3 ± 2.8 ml×min(-1)×kg(-1)) and workload (38 ± 11 to 37 ± 9 J/s) at AT level had no obvious change. AT exercise intensity was lower than ischemic threshold post-CPET. Exercise therapy at the intensity of anaerobic threshold can improve oxygen capacity and exercise tolerance.

  1. Impact of coronary revascularization vs medical therapy on ischemia among stable patients with or suspected coronary artery disease undergoing serial myocardial perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudi, Francesco; Di Belardino, Natale; Versaci, Francesco; Pinto, Annamaria; Procaccini, Enrica; Neri, Giandomenico; Vetere, Maurizio; Frati, Giacomo; Peruzzi, Mariangela; Schillaci, Orazio; Gaspardone, Achille; Tomai, Fabrizio; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Randomized trials have challenged the role of revascularization in stable coronary artery disease. We aimed to appraise the impact of revascularization on ischemia in patients undergoing serial myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). We queried our institutional database for stable subjects undergoing serial MPS and appraised the impact of revascularization on changes in ischemia. A total of 3631 patients were included: 967 (27%) undergoing revascularization and 2664 (73%) receiving medical therapy only. Patients treated with revascularization had a significantly lower burden of myocardial ischemia at follow-up (odds ratio = 0.577 [95% confidence interval 0.483-0.689] vs medical therapy, P revascularization was associated with a follow-up prevalence of 80% for no, minimal, or mild ischemia and 20% for moderate or severe ischemia, vs 43% and 57% for medical therapy (P revascularization was associated with a significantly lower prevalence of moderate or severe ischemia at follow-up (respectively P Revascularization appears superior to medical therapy in reducing ischemic burden and normalizing myocardial perfusion among subjects with moderate or severe ischemia at baseline.

  2. Predictive value of non-fasting remnant cholesterol for short-term outcome of diabetics with new-onset stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Li-Feng; Yan, Xiao-Ni; Lu, Zhen-Hua; Fan, Ying; Ye, Fei; Wu, Qiong; Luo, Song-Hui; Yang, Bo; Li, Jian-Jun

    2017-01-13

    The relationship between non-fasting remnant cholesterol and cardiovascular outcome in the era of potent statin therapy remained to be elucidated. A cohort study of three hundred and twenty eight diabetics diagnosed with new-onset stable coronary artery disease (CAD) by coronary angiography were enrolled. All cases were followed up for an average duration of twelve months. The association between baseline remnant cholesterol levels and major cardiovascular outcomes were evaluated using the receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. During a period of 12-month's follow-up, 14.3% patients (47/328) underwent pre-specified adverse outcomes. The remnant cholesterol associated with high sensitivity C-reactive protein, neutrophil count and fibrinogen (R (2) = 0.20, 0.12 and 0.14; P = 0.000, 0.036 and 0.010 respectively). Area under the ROC curves (AUC) indicated discriminatory power of the remnant cholesterol to predict the adverse outcomes for this population (AUC = 0.64, P cholesterol showed relatively lower cardiac events for diabetic patients with stable CAD (Log rank X (2) = 8.94, P = 0.04). However, according to multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression, apart from hemoglobin A1C (Hazard ratio [H.R.] =1.38, 95% CI: 1.14-1.66, P = 0.001) and Gensini scores (H.R. = 1.00, 95% CI: 1.00-1.02; P = 0.035), remnant cholesterol did not qualify as an independent predictor of adverse prognosis in these settings (H.R. = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.46-2.37, P = 0.909). Non-fasting remnant cholesterol was associated with inflammatory biomarkers and high incidence of revascularization, but not qualified as an independent predictor for short-term prognosis of diabetics with new-onset stable coronary artery disease.

  3. Microvascular Coronary Artery Spasm Presents Distinctive Clinical Features With Endothelial Dysfunction as Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Matsubara, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Morihisa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    Background Angina without significant stenosis, or nonobstructive coronary artery disease, attracts clinical attention. Microvascular coronary artery spasm (microvascular CAS) can cause nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We investigated the clinical features of microvascular CAS and the therapeutic efficacy of calcium channel blockers. Methods and Results Three hundred seventy consecutive, stable patients with suspected angina presenting nonobstructive coronary arteries (

  4. Individualized Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme (ACE)-Inhibitor Therapy in Stable Coronary Artery Disease Based on Clinical and Pharmacogenetic Determinants: The PERindopril GENEtic (PERGENE) Risk Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oemrawsingh, Rohit M; Akkerhuis, K Martijn; Van Vark, Laura C; Redekop, W Ken; Rudez, Goran; Remme, Willem J; Bertrand, Michel E; Fox, Kim M; Ferrari, Roberto; Danser, A H Jan; de Maat, Moniek; Simoons, Maarten L; Brugts, Jasper J; Boersma, Eric

    2016-03-28

    Patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) constitute a heterogeneous group in which the treatment benefits by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor therapy vary between individuals. Our objective was to integrate clinical and pharmacogenetic determinants in an ultimate combined risk prediction model. Clinical, genetic, and outcomes data were used from 8726 stable CAD patients participating in the EUROPA/PERGENE trial of perindopril versus placebo. Multivariable analysis of phenotype data resulted in a clinical risk score (range, 0-21 points). Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (rs275651 and rs5182 in the angiotensin-II type I-receptor gene and rs12050217 in the bradykinin type I-receptor gene) were used to construct a pharmacogenetic risk score (PGXscore; range, 0-6 points). Seven hundred eighty-five patients (9.0%) experienced the primary endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, nonfatal myocardial infarction or resuscitated cardiac arrest, during 4.2 years of follow-up. Absolute risk reductions ranged from 1.2% to 7.5% in the 73.5% of patients with PGXscore of 0 to 2. As a consequence, estimated annual numbers needed to treat ranged from as low as 29 (clinical risk score ≥10 and PGXscore of 0) to 521 (clinical risk score ≤6 and PGXscore of 2). Furthermore, our data suggest that long-term perindopril prescription in patients with a PGXscore of 0 to 2 is cost-effective. Both baseline clinical phenotype, as well as genotype determine the efficacy of widely prescribed ACE inhibition in stable CAD. Integration of clinical and pharmacogenetic determinants in a combined risk prediction model demonstrated a very wide range of gradients of absolute treatment benefit. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Opposing Effects of Beta-Blockers and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors on Development of New Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardeny, Orly; Uno, Hajime; Braunwald, Eugene; Rouleau, Jean Lucien; Gersh, Bernard; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Domanski, Michael; Pfeffer, Marc A.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2011-01-01

    We utilized data from patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) to assess the risk of new onset diabetes (NOD) with beta-blockers, and to determine whether angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition would modify this risk. The Prevention of Events with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibition (PEACE) trial randomized 8290 patients with stable CAD to trandolapril or placebo. The presence of NOD was assessed at each study visit over a median follow-up time of 4.8 years. We examined the risk of NOD associated with beta-blockers use with Cox regression models, adjusting for 25 baseline covariates, and tested whether this risk was modified by randomization to the ACE inhibitor. Of 6910 patients without diabetes mellitus at enrollment (1179 females/5731 males, mean age 64 ± 8 years), 4147 (60%) were taking beta blockers, and 733 (8.8%) developed NOD. We observed a significant interaction between beta-blocker use and randomization to ACE inhibitor with respect to new onset diabetes (p = 0.028). Participants taking beta-blockers assigned to the placebo group (N=2090) were at increased risk for NOD adjusting for baseline covariates (HR 1.63, 95% confidence interval 1.29, 2.05, p<0.001, while this risk was attenuated in those assigned to trandolapril (N=2057) (HR 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.87, 1.42; p=0.39). Beta blocker use was associated with increased risk for NOD in patients with stable CAD, and this risk was reduced in patients treated concurrently with an ACE inhibitor. In conclusion, these data suggest that ACE inhibition may attenuate the risk for glucose abnormalities observed in patients taking beta blockers. PMID:21507365

  6. Differential associations of circulating asymmetric dimethylarginine and cell adhesion molecules with metformin use in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicka, Olga; Chyrchel, Bernadeta; Golay, Alain; Surdacki, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Metformin, the drug of first choice in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), reduces cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality in part independently of improved glycemic control and changes in traditional risk factors. However, there are discordant reports on the effects of metformin on endothelial function in T2DM. Our aim was to compare biochemical endothelial markers in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and T2DM stratified by metformin use. We studied 70 patients (29 women, age 68 ± 9 years) with established T2DM referred for elective coronary angiography owing to stable angina who were receiving a standard CV medication and metformin or other oral antidiabetic drugs. Exclusion criteria included heart failure and other relevant coexistent disorders. Biochemical indices of endothelial dysfunction and activation at admission were compared according to metformin use for at least 1 year prior to index hospitalization. Clinical characteristics were similar in patients receiving metformin (n = 40) vs. those on other oral antidiabetic agents (n = 30). Plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) was lower (553 ± 148 vs. 668 ± 170 µg/L, P = 0.004) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) higher (0.53 ± 0.09 vs. 0.48 ± 0.08 µM, P = 0.01) in subjects on metformin, which was maintained in multivariate analysis. Symmetric dimethylarginine, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and E-selectin did not differ across the groups. The results were substantially unchanged after exclusion of insulin users. Thus, metformin use appears differentially associated with sVCAM-1 and ADMA in patients with T2DM and stable CAD. Whether this observation may reflect different prognostic effects of these endothelial markers in diabetes remains to be studied.

  7. Heart rate and the use of beta-blockers in stable outpatients with coronary artery disease: Polish baseline results of the CLARIFY registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępińska, Janina; Marona, Miłosz; Greenlaw, Nicola; Steg, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) is an important risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). However, there is little contemporary data on HR and the use of HR-lowering medications, particularly beta-blockers, among patients with stable CAD in routine clinical practice. To describe HR in the Polish population of the CLARIFY registry, overall and in relation to beta-blocker use, and to assess the determinants of HR. CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as either prior myocardial infarction or revascularisation procedure, or evidence of coronary stenosis of at least 50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischaemia. A total of 33,438 patients from 45 countries in Europe, the Americas, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia/Pacific were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010. In Poland, 1,004 patients were enrolled between February and June 2010, which was the largest population among countries from Eastern Europe. Most patients were men (72.8%). Mean ± standard deviation age was 62.1 ± 9.1 years. HR determined by pulse was 69.3 ± 9.4 bpm and by electrocardiogram was 68.2 ± 10.6 bpm. Beta-blockers were used in 89.9% of patients. Resting HR ≥ 70 bpm was noted in 49.3% of all patients and in 48.6% of patients on beta-blockers. Resting HR ≥ 70 bpm was significantly more frequent among younger patients, and in those with diabetes, those being treated for arterial hypertension, and who lacked regular physical activity. Patients with HR ≥ 70 bpm at rest had more frequent symptoms of angina and more frequently needed hospitalisation due to heart failure. Despite a very high rate of beta-blocker use, almost 50% of patients with stable CAD had a resting HR ≥ 70 bpm, which was associated with more frequent angina and ischaemia. Further HR lowering is possible in many patients with CAD. Whether or not this will improve symptoms and outcomes is under investigation.

  8. Serum levels of C-reactive protein in patients with stable coronary artery disease: JUPITER in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saely, Christoph H; Rein, Philipp; Vonbank, Alexander; Drexel, Heinz

    2010-10-29

    The JUPITER trial has recently demonstrated an outstanding reduction of cardiovascular events by 20 mg rosuvastatin/day in subjects with high CRP who were apparently healthy at baseline. However, absence of atherosclerosis in JUPITER was based on the subjects' history and not proven objectively. To put the results of JUPITER in perspective, we evaluated serum CRP in a consecutive series of 703 statin-naïve Caucasian patients with angiographically proven stable CAD. From these stable CAD patients, only 69.2% met the ≥2.0 mg/l serum CRP inclusion criterion of the JUPITER trial. Median CRP [interquartile range] in our CAD patients was 3.3 [1.6-6.6] mg/l, which was significantly (pJUPITER (4.2 mg/l). Our results point to considerable subclinical atherosclerosis in the patients studied in JUPITER. The impressive results of that trial may not be generalizable to healthy populations all over the world. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ivabradine and Bisoprolol on Doppler-derived Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: Beyond the Heart Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliamonte, Ercole; Cirillo, Teresa; Rigo, Fausto; Astarita, Costantino; Coppola, Antonino; Romano, Carlo; Capuano, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) is an important prognostic marker in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Beta-blockers and ivabradine have been shown to improve CFVR in patients with stable CAD, but their effects were never compared. The aim of the current study was to compare the effects of bisoprolol and ivabradine on CFVR in patients with stable CAD. Patients in sinus rhythm with stable CAD were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, double-blind trial. Patients had to be in a stable condition for at least 15 days before enrollment, on their usual therapy. Patients who were receiving beta-blockers or ivabradine entered a 2-week washout period from these drugs before randomization. Transthoracic Doppler-derived CFVR was assessed in left anterior descending coronary artery, and was calculated as the ratio of hyperemic to baseline diastolic coronary flow velocity (CFV). Hyperemic CFV was obtained using dipyridamole administration using standard protocols. After CFVR assessment, patients were randomized to ivabradine or bisoprolol and entered an up-titration phase, and CFVR was assessed again 1 month after the end of the up-titration phase. Fifty-nine patients (38 male, 21 female; mean age 69 ± 9 years) were enrolled. Transthoracic Doppler-derived assessment of CFV and CFVR was successfully performed in all patients. Baseline characteristics were similar between the bisoprolol and ivabradine groups. No patient dropped out during the study. At baseline, rest and hyperemic peak CFV as well as CFVR was not significantly different in the ivabradine and bisoprolol groups. After the therapy, resting peak CFV significantly decreased in both the ivabradine and bisoprolol groups, but there was no significant difference between the groups (ivabradine group 20.7 ± 4.6 vs. 22.8 ± 5.2, P < 0.001; bisoprolol group 20.1 ± 4.1 vs. 22.1 ± 4.3, P < 0.001). However, hyperemic peak CFV significantly increased in both groups, but to a

  10. Soluble P-selectin level correlates with acetylsalicylic acid but not with clopidogrel response in patients with stable coronary artery disease after a percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Jan; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Kappert, Kai; Urban, Daniel; Meyborg, Heike; Hauptmann, Tobias; Müller, Aline; Meixner, Martin; Graf, Kristof; Fleck, Eckart; Stawowy, Philipp

    2013-06-01

    Impaired response to dual antiplatelet therapy is associated with worse cardiovascular outcome. Besides antiplatelet effects, there is evidence that both clopidogrel and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) have anti-inflammatory properties. However, little is known about the relationship between platelet function and inflammation under dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease. The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlation of platelet function with soluble (s)P-selectin and soluble (s)CD40L in patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention. Poor response to ASA and clopidogrel could lead to increased levels of inflammatory markers. A total of 148 patients were included. Eighty percent of the patients were on 100 mg ASA and all patients were clopidogrel naive. They underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and received a loading dose of 600 mg clopidogrel. Platelet function was assessed by light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein analysis at baseline, 24 h after loading, and after 1 month of maintenance therapy, respectively. Plasma levels of sP-selectin and sCD40L were measured. To classify low responders to clopidogrel, patients were screened for genetic variants determining clopidogrel absorption and metabolization. sP-selectin levels correlated with LTA findings after stimulation with arachidonic acid (P=0.012). Further, in addition to decreased platelet reactivity observed on LTA, lower sP-selectin levels were seen in patients under ASA therapy (P=0.004). CYP2C19*2 allele carriers had a higher platelet reactivity after clopidogrel loading measured by adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation in LTA (P=0.008) and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (P=0.035); however, there was no difference in the inflammatory markers. Multiple regression analysis showed that variables significantly related to sP-selectin plasma levels were sCD40L (Pacid (P<0

  11. Diagnosing coronary artery disease by sound analysis from coronary stenosis induced turbulent blood flow: diagnostic performance in patients with stable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Simon; Schmidt, Samuel Emil; Holm, Niels Ramsing; Toft, Egon; Struijk, Johannes Jan; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Bøttcher, Morten

    2016-02-01

    Optimizing risk assessment may reduce use of advanced diagnostic testing in patients with symptoms suggestive of stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Detection of diastolic murmurs from post-stenotic coronary turbulence with an acoustic sensor placed on the chest wall can serve as an easy, safe, and low-cost supplement to assist in the diagnosis of CAD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of an acoustic test (CAD-score) to detect CAD and compare it to clinical risk stratification and coronary artery calcium score (CACS). We prospectively enrolled patients with symptoms of CAD referred to either coronary computed tomography or invasive coronary angiography (ICA). All patients were tested with the CAD-score system. Obstructive CAD was defined as more than 50 % diameter stenosis diagnosed by quantitative analysis of the ICA. In total, 255 patients were included and obstructive CAD was diagnosed in 63 patients (28 %). Diagnostic accuracy evaluated by receiver operating characteristic curves was 72 % for the CAD-score, which was similar to the Diamond-Forrester clinical risk stratification score, 79 % (p = 0.12), but lower than CACS, 86 % (p < 0.01). Combining the CAD-score and Diamond-Forrester score, AUC increased to 82 %, which was significantly higher than the standalone CAD-score (p < 0.01) and Diamond-Forrester score (p < 0.05). Addition of the CAD-score to the Diamond-Forrester score increased correct reclassification, categorical net-reclassification index = 0.31 (p < 0.01). This study demonstrates the potential use of an acoustic system to identify CAD. The combination of clinical risk scores and an acoustic test seems to optimize patient selection for diagnostic investigation.

  12. A randomised trial of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic effects of ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel in Hispanic patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew J; Clavijo, Leonardo; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Carlson, Glenn; Caplan, Richard; Teng, Renli; Maya, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to compare the pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) effects of ticagrelor with clopidogrel among subjects of Hispanic ethnicity, as the PD and PK effects of antiplatelet agents among Hispanics are not specifically known. This was a randomised, open-label, crossover PD/PK study of 40 Hispanic subjects with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects were allocated to either ticagrelor 180 mg loading dose (LD)/90 mg twice-daily maintenance dose (MD) followed by clopidogrel 600 mg LD/75 mg once-daily MD with an intervening washout period, or vice versa. The primary endpoint was on-treatment reactivity (OTR) at 2 h post-LD according to the VerifyNow P2Y12 test. OTR was significantly lower at 2 h post-LD with ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel (34 PRU vs. 201 PRU, least square means difference = -167 PRU [95 % CI, -197, -137], P ticagrelor at 30 min and 8 h post-LD (P ticagrelor persisted after 7 days of MD (52 PRU [95 % CI, 30, 73] vs. 182 PRU [95 % CI, 160, 205], P ticagrelor and its active metabolite were greatest at 2 h post-LD, with similar levels at 2 h post-MD after 7 days of MD. Among Hispanic subjects with stable CAD, ticagrelor provides a more rapid onset of platelet inhibition and a significantly greater antiplatelet effect compared with clopidogrel during both the loading and maintenance phases of treatment.

  13. Intensive statin therapy stabilizes C-reactive protein, but not chemokine in stable coronary artery disease treated with an everolimus-eluting stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Anzai, Atsushi; Kodaira, Masaki; Takei, Makoto; Sano, Fumiya; Ueda, Ikuko; Kawakami, Takashi; Hayashida, Kentaro; Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Abe, Takayuki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2016-08-01

    Besides its potent plasma cholesterol-lowering activity, statin treatment has several other important effects, including lowering high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), levels, and stabilizing risk factors of atherosclerosis, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. Our aim in this study was to identify how intensive statin therapy can affect plasma levels of inflammatory markers over the long term. We used a prospective, randomized, open blinded-endpoint design. A total of 30 patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with everolimus-eluting stent implantation were randomized to receive rosuvastatin 2.5 (standard therapy group) or 10 mg (intensive therapy group) for 12 months. Plasma levels of hs-CRP, pentraxin-3, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and CXC chemokine ligand 4 were measured after a percutaneous coronary intervention, at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Levels of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL cholesterol were also measured. We investigated short-term and long-term clinical outcomes. After 12 months of therapy, the intensive therapy group had lower levels of LDL-C than the standard therapy group. Plasma levels of hs-CRP largely fluctuated in the standard therapy group, whereas they were stable in the intensive therapy group during the follow-up period. There were no significant differences in serum pentraxin-3, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and CXC chemokine ligand 4 levels, or in the incidence of any clinical adverse events, between the standard and the intensive therapy groups. Intensive rosuvastatin therapy stabilizes hs-CRP levels, but not chemokine levels, besides lowering LDL-C levels. Thus, this therapy may inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis by stably inhibiting the inflammatory cascade.

  14. Effects of the glucagon-like peptide-1receptor agonist liraglutide on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumarathurai, Preman; Anholm, Christian; Fabricius-Bjerre, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    -one patients with type 2 diabetes and stable coronary artery disease were randomized to receive liraglutide or placebo to a backbone therapy of metformin in this double-blind, placebo-controlled 12 along with 12 weeks crossover study. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed at the start......Objective: The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide has been shown to reduce blood pressure (BP) in clinical trials using office BP measurements. However, the effects of liraglutide on 24-h BP and on the diurnal variation in BP have not been explored sufficiently. Methods: Forty.......17)]. Twenty-four-hour BP profiles revealed a trend for increase in evening SBP and DBP [+9.2mmHg (95% CI: 1.1-17.2) and R9.7mmHg (95% CI: 3.9-15.5), respectively]. Mean heart rate significantly increased after liraglutide [R7.6 bpm (95% CI: 2.56-12.62)]. Liraglutide did not affect the BP variability...

  15. Prognostic impact of nutritional status assessed by the Controlling Nutritional Status score in patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Hideki; Dohi, Tomotaka; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Doi, Shinichiro; Konishi, Hirokazu; Naito, Ryo; Tsuboi, Shuta; Ogita, Manabu; Kasai, Takatoshi; Okazaki, Shinya; Isoda, Kikuo; Suwa, Satoru; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    Recently, malnutrition has been shown to be related to worse clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. However, the association between nutritional status and clinical outcomes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) remains unclear. We investigated the prognostic value of malnutrition assessed by the Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT; range 0-12, higher = worse, consisting of serum albumin, cholesterol and lymphocytes) score in patients with CAD. The CONUT score was measured on admission in a total of 1987 patients with stable CAD who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between 2000 and 2011. Patients were divided into two groups according to their CONUT score (0-1 vs. ≥2). The incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), including all-cause death and non-fatal myocardial infarction, was evaluated. The median CONUT score was 1 (interquartile range 0-2). During the median follow-up of 7.4 years, 342 MACE occurred (17.2%). Kaplan-Meier curves revealed that patients with high CONUT scores had higher rates of MACE (log-rank p Nutritional status assessed by the CONUT score was significantly associated with long-term clinical outcomes in patients with CAD. Pre-PCI assessment of the CONUT score may provide useful prognostic information.

  16. Plasma renin level and aldosterone to renin ratio are associated with presence of carotid plaques in patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Yi; Lai, Wen-Ter

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to determine the association between plasma aldosterone and renin levels as well as their ratios with carotid plaques in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque score were evaluated in 111 patients with stable CAD. Plasma renin and aldosterone levels were measured in all patients. Aldosterone to renin ratio (ARR) was calculated. All patients were categorized into: Group 1 (normal coronary angiography), Group 2 (patients had CAD but without carotid plaque) and Group 3 (patients had CAD and at least one carotid plaque). Renin levels are significantly higher in Group 3 than in Group 1 and 2. ARR was significantly lower in Group 3 than in Group 1 and 2. Renin levels were found to be positively correlated with carotid IMT and plaque score but ARR was inversely associated with carotid IMT and plaque score. Renin levels and ARR are independently associated with presence of carotid plaque in CAD patients (OR 1.124, CI 1.021-1.237, p = 0.017 and OR 0.906, CI 0.839-0.978, p = 0.011, adjusted for age, respectively). Plasma renin and ARR but not aldosterone are independently associated with presence of carotid plaques in CAD patients. Hence, the linkage between aldosterone and renin plays a more important role than aldosterone alone in carotid atherosclerosis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Blood pressure reverse dipping may associate with stable coronary artery disease in patients with essential hypertension: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bin; Sun, Lu; Gao, Ya; Guo, Qi; Guo, Litao; Wang, Xue; Wang, Gang

    2016-05-03

    The dipping variations of circadian blood pressure (BP) correlate closely with target-organ damages and cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between BP reverse dipping and the prevalence of stable coronary artery disease (sCAD) in hypertensive patients. Clinical data and the results of 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) were obtained from 718 hypertensive patients (390 males, mean age 59.6 ± 13.8 years) in a single centre in Northern China. Reverse dipping pattern was defined as nocturnal systolic BP (SBP) was higher than daytime SBP. A logistic regression model was applied to explore the independent risk factors of sCAD. The patients with BP reverse dipping accounted for 31.5% in sCAD group and 19.5% in control group (P reverse dipping remained significantly associated with the prevalence of sCAD (Odds ratio [OR], 1.772; p = 0.027). Furthermore, the circadian decline rate of SBP was independently associated with sCAD (OR, 0.975; p = 0.043). The hypertensive patients with reverse BP dipping were found to be more frequently suffering from sCAD. BP reverse dipping examined with 24-hour ABPM may indicate sCAD.

  18. Clinical presentation and management of stable coronary artery disease: insights from the international prospective CLARIFY registry - results from the Greek national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbarouni, Eftihia; Voudris, Vassilis; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Hamilos, Michalis; Steg, P Gabriel; Fox, Kim M; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Vardas, Panos E

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is highly prevalent worldwide, yet there is a paucity of data regarding the clinical characteristics and management of outpatients with stable CAD. In this paper, we report the baseline data of the Greek cohort and we compare our national data with the global results of the entire registry, as well as the results from the western European countries. CLARIFY is an international, prospective, observational, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable CAD, defined as prior myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure, evidence of coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with proven myocardial ischemia. A total of 33,283 patients from 45 countries in 4 continents were enrolled between November 2009 and July 2010; of these, 14,726 were from western European countries (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) and 559 patients were enrolled in Greece. Compared to their counterparts in western Europe and the entire cohort, Greeks were younger (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, respectively), more predominantly male (p<0.0039, p<0.0001), with a higher body mass index (p<0.0002, p<0.0001) and a larger waist circumference (p<0.0001, p<0.0001), as well as a higher prevalence of family history of CAD (p<0.0008, 0.0005), hyperlipidemia (p<0.0001, p<0.0001) and smoking (p<0.0001, p<0.0001). Noninvasive testing (p<0.0001, p<0.0001, respectively) and coronary angiography (p<0.0001, 0.0013) along with surgical revascularization (CABG) (p<0.0001, 0.0088) were performed more often in Greece. Antiplatelets, b-blockers and lipid lowering medications were used to an equal extent in Greece as in the other two cohorts. There are substantial differences in demographics, clinical profiles and treatment in patients with stable CAD within the data set, which are also observed for Greek data. Interestingly, these differences are consistent in relation to the global

  19. Comparison of clinical efficacy and cost of a cardiac imaging strategy versus a traditional exercise test strategy for the investigation of patients with suspected stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ozan M; Bashir, Abdullah; Marshall, Kathy; Douglas, Martina; Wasan, Balvinder; Plein, Sven; Alfakih, Khaled

    2015-06-15

    We evaluated the clinical efficacy and cost of a cardiac imaging strategy versus a traditional exercise tolerance test (ETT) strategy for the investigation of suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We retrospectively collected data of consecutive patients seen in rapid access chest pain clinics at 2 UK hospitals for a period of 12 months. Hospital A investigated patients by performing ETT. Hospital B investigated patients using cardiac imaging test; 483 patients from hospital A and 295 from hospital B were included. In hospital A, 209 patients (43.3%) had contraindication to ETT. Of those who had ETT, 151 (55.1%) had negative ETT, 68 (24.8%) had equivocal ETT, and 55 (20.1%) had positive ETT, of which 53 (96.4%) had invasive coronary angiography (ICA), and of these 23 (43.4%) had obstructive CAD. In hospital B, 26 patients (8.8%) with low pretest probability had calcium score and 3 (11.5%) were positive leading to computed tomography coronary angiography; 98 patients (33.2%) with intermediate pretest probability had computed tomography coronary angiography and 5 (5.1%) were positive; 77 patients (26.1%) had stress echocardiogram and 6 (7.8%) were positive; and 57 patients (19.3%) had myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and 11 (19.3%) were positive. Hospital A performed 127 ICA (26.3% of population) and 52 (40.9%) had obstructive CAD. Hospital B performed 63 ICA (21.4% of population) and 32 (50.8%) had obstructive CAD. The average cost per patient in hospital A was £566.6 ± 490.0 ($875 ± 758) and in hospital B was £487.9 ± 469.6 ($750 ± 725) (p <0.001). In conclusion, our results suggest that a cardiac imaging pathway leads to fewer ICA and a higher yield of obstructive CAD at lower cost per patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antiplatelet Efficacy of Fixed-Dose Aspirin-Clopidogrel Combination in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease Treated with Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sungmin; Kim, Pum Joon; Baek, Chunyeong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Koh, Yoon Seok; Park, Hun-Jun; Kim, Hee-Yeol; Chang, Kiyuk; Chung, Wook Sung; Seung, Ki-Bae

    2015-12-01

    A fixed-dose combination (FDC) of aspirin and clopidogrel bisulfate may improve medication adherence. However, the absence of data on the relative antiplatelet efficacy of FDC and separate dual pills (SDP) of aspirin and clopidogrel in real-world patients with stable coronary artery disease is a major factor retarding clinical introduction of such an FDC. This was a single-centre, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, non-inferiority trial. Patients who maintained a regimen of separate aspirin and clopidogrel pills for at least 1 year after drug-eluting stent implantation without adverse events were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to either the FDC group or the SDP group. Antiplatelet efficacy and tolerability were assessed at baseline and at 4 weeks. Of the 93 enrolled patients, 83 (FDC group: n = 42; SDP group: n = 41) completed the study. The difference in the changes in P2Y12 percentage inhibition did not exceed the predetermined value for inferiority [mean difference -1.7; 95 % confidence interval (CI) -6.9 to 4.5, p aspirin reaction units (ARU) (mean difference -2.3 ARU, p = 0.88) did not differ significantly between the treatment groups. The tolerability of the FDC formulation was similar to that of SDP therapy (p = 0.68). In patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention, the antiplatelet efficacy of the aspirin/clopidogrel FDC was non-inferior to that of SDP and the tolerability of the two regimens was similar after 4 weeks of treatment.

  1. Gender-Specific Associations between Circulating T-Cadherin and High Molecular Weight-Adiponectin in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas W Schoenenberger

    Full Text Available Close relationships exist between presence of adiponectin (APN within vascular tissue and expression of T-cadherin (T-cad on vascular cells. APN and T-cad are also present in the circulation but here their relationships are unknown. This study investigates associations between circulating levels of high molecular weight APN (HMW-APN and T-cad in a population comprising 66 women and 181 men with angiographically proven stable coronary artery disease (CAD. Plasma HMW-APN and T-cad were measured by ELISA and analysed for associations with baseline clinical characteristics and with each other. In multivariable analysis BMI and HDL were independently associated with HMW-APN in both genders, while diabetes and extent of coronary stenosis were independently associated with T-cad in males only. Regression analysis showed no significant association between HMW-APN and T-cad in the overall study population. However, there was a negative association between HMW-APN and T-cad (P=0.037 in a subgroup of young men (age <60 years, had no diabetes and no or 1-vessel CAD which persisted after multivariable analysis with adjustment for all potentially influential variables (P=0.021. In the corresponding subgroup of women there was a positive association between HMW-APN and T-cad (P=0.013 which disappeared after adjustment for HDL. After exclusion of the young men, a positive association (P=0.008 between HMW-APN and T-cad was found for the remaining participants of the overall population which disappeared after adjustment for HDL and BMI. The existence of opposing correlations between circulating HMW-APN and T-cad in male and female patient populations underscores the necessity to consider gender as a confounding variable when evaluating biomarker potentials of APN and T-cad.

  2. The BEAUTIFUL study: randomized trial of ivabradine in patients with stable coronary artery disease and left ventricular systolic dysfunction - baseline characteristics of the study population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, R.; Ford, I.; Fox, K.; Steg, P. G.; Tendera, M.; Cohen Arazi, H.; Nul, D. R.; Ahuad Guerrero, R. A.; Luciardi, H. L.; Sinisi, V. A.; Perna, E. R.; Schygiel, P. O.; Sanjurjo, M. S.; Fernandez, A. A.; del Valle Lobo Marquez, L. L.; Fuselli, J. J.; Hasbani, E.; Ibañez, J. O.; Cartasegna, L. R.; Lembo, L. A.; Thierer, J.; Varini, S.; Buscema, J. J.; Orlandini, A. D.; Bustos, B.; Guzmán, L. A.; Luquez, H. A.; Amuchastegui, M.; Allall, O. A.; Iglesias, R. M.; Sokn, F. J.; Montaña, O. R.; Sanchez, A.; Vogel, D.; Eber, B.; Huber, K.; Lang, I.; Pichler, A. N.; Dendale, P. A. C.; Vanderheyden, M.; van Mieghem, W.; Chenu, P.; Friart, A.; Missault, L.; Vachiery, J. L.; Materne, P.; François, B. A. A.; Sirakova, V.; Penkov, N.; Georgiev, B.; Grigorov, M.; Taseva, T.; Nachev, C.; Guenova, D.; Perchev, I.; Denchev, S.; Donova, T.; Torbova, S.; Goudev, A.; Raev, D.; Gotchev, D.; Tzekova, M.; Chompalova, B.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Kamenova, Z.; Dzhurzdhev, A.; Tardif, J. C.; Talbot, P.; Yao, L.; Ma, P.; Constance, C.; Bernstein, V.; Heath, J.; Lalani, A.; Haddad, H.; To, T. B.; Pandey, S.; Desrochers, D.; Fortin, C.; Poirier, P.; Savard, D.; Baird, M.; Lonn, E.; Coutu, B.; Vertes, G. E.; Rebane, T.; Kouz, S.; Raco, D.; Rajda, M.; Parker, J. O.; Glanz, A.; Lepage, S.; Parker, J. D.; Klinke, W. P.; Rupka, D.; Hill, L. L.; Nawaz, S.; Chehayeb, R.; Lauzon, C.; Matangi, M.; Syan, G. S.; Hu, D.; Lv, S.; Yan, X.; Gai, L.; Ge, J. B.; Dong, Y.; Sun, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X.; Wang, W.; Hradec, J.; Florian, J.; Sulda, M.; Spinar, J.; Fábik, L.; Stípal, R.; Kaislerová, M.; Vitovec, J.; Vojtísek, P.; Krejcova, H.; Maratka, T.; Sochor, K.; Marcinek, G.; Povolný, J.; Jerábek, O.; Karetová, D.; Vojacek, J.; Lavicka, V.; Vencour, D.; Kotík, L.; Kuchar, J.; Drazka, J.; Penicka, M.; Kryza, R.; Soucek, M.; Ballek, L.; Spacek, R.; Brønnum Schou, J.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Nielsen, T.; Markenvard, J.; Tuxen, C.; Hildebrandt, P.; Sejersen, H.; Rokkedal, J.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Agner, E.; Skagen, K.; Roseva Nielsen, N.; Vigholt, E.; Dodt, K. K.; Lind Rasmussen, L.; Pedersen, L.; Stentebjerg, S. E.; Asklund, M.; Klarlund, K.; Haghfelt, T.; Gøtzsche, L.; Rickers, H.; Køber, L.; Jensen, G.; Dahlstrøm, C. G.; Gøtzsche, O.; Egstrup, K.; Petersen, J.; Larsen, J.; McNair, A.; Jakobsen, T.; Larsen, C. T.; Eha, J.; Vahula, V.; Averina, O.; Viigimaa, M.; Sildmäe, S.; Kolbassova, O.; Melin, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Harjola, V. P.; Luoma, J.; Ovize, M.; Sellier, P.; Barthelemy, J. C.; Beaune, J.; Magnin, D.; Dambrine, P.; Khalife, K.; Wolf, J. E.; Roudaut, R.; Gabrovescu, M.; Dubois-Rande, J. L.; Galinier, M.; Genest, M.; Mansourati, J.; Aliot, E.; Carlioz, R.; Cherbi, C.; Slama, M.; Colin, P.; Decoulx, E.; Escande, M.; Fournier, P. Y.; Galley, D.; Khanoyan, P.; Jaboureck, O.; Leborgne, L.; Mann, H.; Pierre-Justin, E.; Roynard, J. L.; Soto, F. X.; Bourdon, A.; Bauer, F.; Belin, A.; Boudahne, A.; Bouvier, J. M.; Chati, Z.; Chevalier, J. M.; Chevrier, J.; Doucet, B.; Drawin, T.; Mansour, N. El; Funck, F.; Godenir, J. P.; Guillot, J. P.; Gully, C.; Habib, G.; Kahn, J. C.; Koenig, A.; Martelet, M.; Matina, D.; Gay, A.; Meurice, T.; Perret, T.; Riou, A.; Thisse, J. Y.; Demarcq, J. M.; Bodur, G.; Claudon, O.; Lemoine, C.; Roul, G.; Olive, T. G.; Huyghe de Mahenge, A.; Meinertz, T.; Baumann, G.; Böhm, M.; Cieslinski, G.; Figulla, H. R.; Gonska, B. D.; Hasenfuss, G.; Heckel, D.; Hoppe, U.; Katus, H.; Kombächer, H. D.; Müller, O.; Münzel, T.; Nienaber, C.; Oeff, M.; Rupprecht, H. J.; von Schacky, C.; Schmidt, J.; Schreckenberg, A.; Schuler, G.; Schultheiss, H. P.; Seidl, K.; Steindorf, J.; Strasser, R.; Werdan, K.; Hengstenberg, C.; Haverkamp, W.; Windstetter, U.; Al-Zoebi, A.; Pötsch, T.; Proskynitopoulos, N.; Baar, M.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Jeserich, M.; Tammen, A.; Appel, K. F.; Fries, P.; Ammer, K.; Droese, A. N.; Bergmann, K.; Bott, J.; Lange, R.; Taggeselle, J.; Rummel, R.; Kleinertz, K.; Deissner, M.; Drescher, T.; Zahorsky, R.; Schenkenberger, I.; Grooterorst, P.; Frick, H. M.; Spengler, U.; Jahnke, N.; Bauknecht, C.; Lehmann, G.; Spanier, C.; Wolde, C. H.; Natour, M.; Bosch, R.; Rüdell, U.; Gola, G.; Hering, R.; Heuer, H.; Gärtner, J.; Vardas, P.; Kremastinos, D.; Anastasiou-Nana, M.; Kallikazaros, I.; Theodorakis, G.; Kyriakides, Z.; Pyrgakis, V. N.; Siogas, K.; Kapordelis, C.; Apostolou, T.; Karvounis, H.; Papadopoulos, C.; Tziakas, D.; Tryposkiadis, F.; Koliopoulos, N.; Alexopoulos, D.; Fotiadis, I.; Kolettis, T.; Manolis, A.; Pras, A.; Lee, K.; Borbola, J.; Préda, U.; Tomcsányi, J.; Edes, I.; Nagy, A.; Lippai, J.; Regos, L.; Tóth, K.; Takács, J.; Cziráki, A.; Matoltsy, A.; Sidó, Z.; Nagy, L.; Nyárádi, A.; Mohay, A.; Rumi, G.; Polgár, P.; Zámolyi, K.; Tahy, A.; Piros, G.; Veress, G.; Barsi, B.; Kovács, A.; Sereg, M.; Pálinkás, A.; Sármán, P.; Juhász, A.; Mohácsi, A.; Harmati, L.; Lupkovics, G.; Dézsi, C. A.; Nagy, K.; Vegh, G.; Váradi, A.; Farsang, C.; Lakatos, F.; Barton, J.; Crean, P.; Foley, D.; Daly, K.; de Luca, I.; Urbinati, S.; Zanetta, M.; Porcu, M.; Cocchieri, M.; Buia, E.; Minneci, C.; Leghissa, R.; Della Cassa, S.; Pizzimenti, G.; Ingrilli, F.; Fuscaldo, G.; Bellone, E.; Pulitano, G.; Santini, M.; Uguccioni, M.; Carbonieri, E.; Barbuzzi, S.; Alberti, E.; Proto, C.; Pettinati, G.; Cosmi, F.; Colombo, A.; de Cristofaro, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Maresta, A.; de Matteis, C.; Mos, L.; Giustiniani, S.; Paparoni, S.; Proietti, G.; Giannuzzi, P.; Cardona, N.; Perna, B.; Gavazzi, A.; Capucci, A.; Reggianini, L.; Zanini, R.; Keisa, M.; Erglis, A.; Ozolina, M. A.; Gersamija, A.; Gailiss, E.; Volans, E.; Stoma, M.; Libins, A.; Grabauskiene, V.; Petrulioniene, Z.; Berukstis, E.; Kibarskis, A.; Zaliunas, R.; Marcinkeviciene, J.; Naudziunas, A.; Kirkutis, A.; Varoneckas, G.; Cornel, J. H.; Hamer, B. J. B.; Hoedemaker, G.; van den Berg, B. J.; Somer, S. T.; van der Veen, M.; van Rossum, P.; Bartels, G. L.; van Vlies, B.; Lionarons, R. J.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Wesdorp, J. C. L.; Kragten, J. A.; Fast, J.; de Milliano, P. A. R.; van Rugge, F. P.; Hoogslag, P. A. M.; Göbel, E. J. A.; Leenders, C. M.; van der Heijden, R.; Swart, H.; van Beek, G. J.; van der Zwaan, C.; Holwerda, N. J.; Winter, J. B.; Galema, T. W.; Voors, A. A.; Kirkels, J. H.; Jaarsma, W.; Zwart, P. A. G.; Thijssen, H.; Linssen, G. C. M.; Verheul, J. A.; Maas, A. H. E. M.; Willems, A. R.; Nagelsmit, M. J.; Freericks, M. P.; Pinto, Y. M.; Bruning, T. A.; Michels, H. M.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; Jap Tjoen San, W. T. J.; Robles de Medina, R.; Nierop, P. R.; Daniels, M. C. G.; van Kempen, L. H. J.; Herrman, J. P. R.; van Wijk, L. M.; Atar, D.; Myhre, E. P.; Dickstein, K.; Musial, W.; Pulkowski, G.; Sinkiewicz, W.; Kubica, J.; Janik, K.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Miekus, P.; Szpajer, M.; Zadrozna, Z.; Krzeminska-Pakula, M.; Goch, J.; Krynicki, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Janion, M.; Zinka, E.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, K.; Piwowarska, W.; Piotrowski, W.; Bloch, C.; Trojnar, R.; Targonski, R.; Pluta, W.; Krzciuk, M.; Achremczyk, P.; Kuzniar, J.; Baska, J.; Ruszkowski, P.; Drozdowski, P.; Kurowski, M.; Krupa, E.; Slowinski, S.; Skura, M.; Pusz, T.; Jaworska, K.; Dluzniewski, M.; Opolski, G.; Piepiorka, M.; Andrzejak, R.; Wrabec, K.; Ponikowski, P.; Loboz-Grudzien, K.; Wodniecki, J.; Kalarus, Z.; Tracz, W.; Kozlowski, A.; Ruzyllo, W.; Mazurek, W.; Szolkiewicz, M.; Paisana Lopes, J. P.; Carvalho, N.; Teixeira, M.; Ferreira Da Silva, G.; Aguiar, J.; Lousada, N.; Salgado, A.; Providencia, L. A.; Freitas, J.; Oliveira Soares, A.; Capalneanu, R.; Macarie, C.; Bruckner, I.; Cinteza, M.; Nanea, T.; Dorobantu, M.; Vintila, M.; Dan, G. A.; Dimulescu, D. R.; Arsenescu, C.; Ionescu, D. D.; Dragulescu, I. S.; Avram, R.; Opris, M.; Manitiu, I.; Craiu, E.; Babes, K.; Tase, A.; Tintoiu, I.; Apetrei, E.; Olinic, N. C.; Radoi, M.; Minescu, B.; Tanaseanu, C. M.; Sinescu, C. J.; Tomescu, M.; Loariu, C.; Carasca, E.; Datcu, M. D.; Dumitrascu, D. L.; Ionascu-Fometescu, C. R.; Pop, C.; Radu, I.; Vladoianu, M.; Kiss, L.; Toplnitchi, L.; Aroutiounov, G. P.; Beloussov, Y. B.; Vasyuk, Y. A.; Vertkine, A. L.; Zadionchenko, V. S.; Zateyshchikov, D. A.; Ya Ivleva, A.; Karpov, Y. A.; Kisliak, O. A.; Kobalava, J. D.; Yu Konyakhin, A.; Kukes, V. G.; Yu Mareev, V.; Mkrtchyan, V. R.; Orlov, V. A.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Stryuk, R. I.; Tereschenko, S. N.; Shpektor, A. V.; Pozdnyakov, Y. M.; Khrustalev, O. A.; Yakusevich, V. V.; Yakushin, S. S.; Azarin, O. G.; Karpov, Y. B.; Moiseeva, O. M.; Perepech, N. B.; Sayganov, S. A.; Svistov, A. S.; Sorokin, L. A.; Shlyakhto, E. V.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Kuimov, A. D.; Tsyba, L. P.; Yakhontova, P. K.; Chumakova, G. A.; Barbarsh, O. L.; Bart, B. Y.; Bychkova, L.; Golukhova, E.; Zhilyaev, E. V.; Rodoman, G. V.; Rudnev, D. V.; Tankhilevich, B. M.; Shostak, N. A.; Kastanaian, A. A.; Pimenov, L. T.; Murín, J.; Kamenský, G.; Gonsorcík, J.; Bada, V.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Vahala, P.; Bugán, V.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Rakovec, P.; Kanic, V.; Skrabl-Mocnik, F.; Slemenik-Pusnik, C.; Melihen-Bartolic, C.; Markez, J.; Macaya de Miguel, C.; Grande, A.; Jimenez Navarro, M.; Romero Hinojosa, J. A.; Bertomeu Martinez, V.; Paz Bermejo, M. A.; Illa Gay, J.; Gusi Tragant, G.; Calvo Gomez, C.; Iglesias Cubero, G.; Balaguer Recena, J.; López García-Aranda, V.; Caparos Valderrama, J.; Iglesias Alonso, L. F.; San Román Calvar, A.; Fernanez Aviles, F.; Perez Villa, F.; Bruguera Cortada, J.; Fernandez Alvarez, R.; Noriega Peiro, F.; Calvo Iglesias, F.; Sevilla Toral, B.; López Bescós, L.; Garcia de Burgos, F.; Sola Casado, R.; Galve, E.; Casares Garcia, G.; Delborg, M.; Herlitz, J.; Ullman, B.; Blomgren, J.; Bandh, S.; Ohlin, H.; Dubach, P.; Gallino, A.; Hess, O.; Moccetti, T.; Eeckhout, E.; Vontobel, H.; Delabays, A.; Erol, K.; Kozan, O.; Mutlu, B.; Ergene, O.; Acarturk, E.; Yilmaz, H.; Ural, D.; Parkhomenko, O.; Polyvoda, S.; Dyadyk, A.; Vatutin, M.; Karpenko, O.; Kubyshkin, V.; Rudenko, L.; Putintsev, V.; Krayz, I.; Kovalsky, I.; Rudyk, Y.; Yurlov, V.; Mostovoy, Y.; Rishko, M.; Barna, O.; Slyvka, Y.; Perepelytsya, M.; Seredyuk, N.; Bazylevych, A.; Glushko, L.; Tashchuk, V.; Girina, O.; Vizir, V.; Pertseva, T.; Vlasenko, M.; Goloborodko, B.; Kolomiets, S.; Dzyak, G.; Sharuk, O.; Storozhuk, B.; Kovalenko, V.; Khomazyuk, T.; Soldatchenko, S.; Lutay, M.; Zharinov, O.; Serkova, V.; Korkushko, O.; Korzh, O.; Netyazheko, V.; Sakharchuck, I.; Stadnyuk, L.; Bereznyakov, I.; Semidotska, Z.; Kolchin, Y.; Voronkov, L.; Tseluyko, V.; Amosova, K.; Batuschkin, V.; Hall, A.; Lindsay, S.; Moriarty, A.; Kadr, H.; Francis, C. M.; Saltissi, S.; Rozkovec, A.; Groves, P.; Crook, J. R.; Purvis, J.; Brooksby, P.; Stewart, M.; Dutka, D.; Timmis, A.; Baig, M. W.; Brady, A.; Williams, S.; Brooks, N.; Greaves, K.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ivabradine is a selective heart rate-lowering agent that acts by inhibiting the pacemaker current If in sinoatrial node cells. Patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction are at high risk of death and cardiac events, and the BEAUTIFUL study was designed to

  3. Diabetes, glycemic control, and new-onset heart failure in patients with stable coronary artery disease : data from the heart and soul study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Melle, J.P.; Bot, M.; de Jonge, P.; de Boer, R.A.; van Veldhuisen, D.J.; Whooley, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes is a predictor of both coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure. It is unknown to what extent the association between diabetes and heart failure is influenced by other risk factors for heart failure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We evaluated the association of diabetes and

  4. The BEAUTIFUL study: randomized trial of ivabradine in patients with stable coronary artery disease and left ventricular systolic dysfunction - baseline characteristics of the study population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NN, NN; Ferrari, R; Ford, I

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ivabradine is a selective heart rate-lowering agent that acts by inhibiting the pacemaker current If in sinoatrial node cells. Patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular dysfunction are at high risk of death and cardiac events, and the BEAUTIFUL study was designed to e...

  5. Sex Differences in Demographics, Risk Factors, Presentation, and Noninvasive Testing in Stable Outpatients with Suspected Coronary Artery Disease: Insights from the PROMISE Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemal, Kshipra; Pagidipati, Neha J.; Coles, Adrian; Dolor, Rowena J.; Mark, Daniel B.; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Hoffmann, Udo; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Daubert, Melissa A.; Shah, Svati H.; Ariani, Kevin; Bullock-Palmer, Renee; Martinez, Beth; Lee, Kerry L.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2016-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether presentation, risk assessment, testing choices, and results differ by sex in stable symptomatic outpatients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Background Although established CAD presentations differ by sex, little is known about stable, suspected CAD. Methods Characteristics of 10,003 men and women in the Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain (PROMISE) trial were compared using chi-square and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Sex differences in test selection and predictors of test positivity were examined using logistic regression. Results Women were older (62.4 years vs. 59.0) and more likely to be hypertensive (66.6% vs. 63.2%), dyslipidemic (68.9% vs. 66.3%), and to have a family history of premature CAD (34.6% vs. 29.3) (all p-values<0.005). Women were less likely to smoke (45.6% vs. 57.0%; p<0.001), while diabetes prevalence was similar (21.8% vs. 21.0%; p=0.30). Chest pain was the primary symptom in 73.2% of women vs. 72.3% of men (p=0.30) and was characterized as “crushing/pressure/squeezing/tightness” in 52.5% of women vs. 46.2% of men (p<0.001). Compared to men, all risk scores characterized women as lower risk, and providers were more likely to characterize women as having low (<30%) pre-test probability for CAD (40.7% vs. 34.1%; p<0.001). Compared with men, women were more often referred to imaging tests (adjusted OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.01–1.44) than non-imaging tests. Women were less likely to have a positive test (9.7% vs. 15.1%; p<0.001). Although univariate predictors of test positivity were similar, in multivariable models, age, BMI, and Framingham risk score were predictive of a positive test in women, while Framingham and Diamond and Forrester risk scores were predictive in men. Conclusion Patient sex influences the entire diagnostic pathway for possible CAD, from baseline risk factors and presentation to noninvasive test outcomes. These differences highlight the

  6. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ticagrelor in patients with stable coronary artery disease: results from the ONSET-OFFSET and RESPOND studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husted, Steen E; Storey, Robert F; Bliden, Kevin; Tantry, Udaya S; Høimark, Lene; Butler, Kathleen; Wei, Cheryl; Teng, Renli; Gurbel, Paul A

    2012-06-01

    Ticagrelor, the first reversibly binding oral P2Y(12) receptor antagonist, improves outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) compared with clopidogrel. In the ONSET-OFFSET study (parallel group trial) and the RESPOND study (crossover trial), the pharmacodynamic effects of ticagrelor were compared with clopidogrel in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We now report the pharmacokinetic analyses of ticagrelor, and the exposure-inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA) relationships from these studies. Patients were treated with ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose, 90 mg twice daily maintenance dose) or clopidogrel (600 mg loading dose, 75 mg once daily maintenance dose) in addition to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) [75-100 mg once daily]. Ticagrelor administration was for 6 weeks in ONSET-OFFSET. In RESPOND, ticagrelor was given for 14 days before or after 2 weeks of clopidogrel in patients classified as clopidogrel responders or non-responders. Pharmacokinetics and IPA were evaluated following the loading and last maintenance doses. Exposure-IPA relationships were evaluated using a sigmoid maximum effect (E(max)) model. The outcome measures were ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX (active metabolite) pharmacokinetics and exposure-IPA relationships in both trials, including the effect of prior clopidogrel exposure, and effects in clopidogrel responders and non-responders in RESPOND. In ONSET-OFFSET, maximum (peak) plasma concentration (C(max)), time to C(max) (t(max)) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time 0 to 8 hours (AUC(8)) for ticagrelor were 733 ng/mL, 2.0 hours and 4130 ng · h/mL, respectively; and for AR-C124910XX were 210 ng/mL, 2.1 hours and 1325 ng · h/mL, respectively. E(max) estimates were IPA >97%. Trough plasma ticagrelor (305 ng/mL) and AR-C124910XX (121 ng/mL) concentrations were 5.2 and 7.7 times higher than respective concentration producing 50% of maximum effect (EC(50)) estimates

  7. Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh

    2017-01-01

    A family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) is an important risk factor for adverse coronary events, in particular if the disease has an early onset. The risk of CAD is influenced by genetic and environmental factors with a greater genetic contribution earlier in life. Through recent years......), and to characterize and quantify subclinical atherosclerosis in their relatives. Furthermore, the aim was to explore the impact of common genetic risk variants on the age of onset, familial clustering and disease severity. In study I, 143 patients with early- onset CAD were recruited from the Western Denmark Heart...... burden compared with late-onset CAD patients and healthy controls; however, the burden did not associate with familial clustering of CAD. Additionally, familial clustering seemed to be stronger associated with CAD disease severity than the polygenetic burden. Our findings emphasize the hereditary...

  8. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent or slow the progression of coronary artery disease. A heart-healthy diet, exercise, and other lifestyle choices are the basic steps to keeping your heart strong and healthy. Coronary artery disease begins when fatty deposits (plaques) containing cholesterol build ...

  9. Epigenetics and Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golledge, Jonathan; Biros, Erik; Bingley, John; Iyer, Vikram; Krishna, Smriti M

    2016-04-01

    The term epigenetics is usually used to describe inheritable changes in gene function which do not involve changes in the DNA sequence. These typically include non-coding RNAs, DNA methylation and histone modifications. Smoking and older age are recognised risk factors for peripheral artery diseases, such as occlusive lower limb artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysm, and have been implicated in promoting epigenetic changes. This brief review describes studies that have associated epigenetic factors with peripheral artery diseases and investigations which have examined the effect of epigenetic modifications on the outcome of peripheral artery diseases in mouse models. Investigations have largely focused on microRNAs and have identified a number of circulating microRNAs associated with human peripheral artery diseases. Upregulating or antagonising a number of microRNAs has also been reported to limit aortic aneurysm development and hind limb ischemia in mouse models. The importance of DNA methylation and histone modifications in peripheral artery disease has been relatively little studied. Whether circulating microRNAs can be used to assist identification of patients with peripheral artery diseases and be modified in order to improve the outcome of peripheral artery disease will require further investigation.

  10. Rationale and design of the long-Term rIsk, clinical manaGement, and healthcare Resource utilization of stable coronary artery dISease in post-myocardial infarction patients (TIGRIS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Dirk; Goodman, Shaun G; Nicolau, José C; Requena, Gema; Maguire, Andrew; Chen, Ji Yan; Granger, Christopher B; Grieve, Richard; Pocock, Stuart J; Blankenberg, Stefan; Vega, Ana Maria; Yasuda, Satoshi; Simon, Tabassome; Brieger, David

    2017-12-01

    The long-term progression of coronary artery disease as defined by the natural disease course years after a myocardial infarction (MI) is an important but poorly studied area of clinical research. The long-Term rIsk, clinical manaGement, and healthcare Resource utilization of stable coronary artery dISease in post-myocardial infarction patients (TIGRIS) study was designed to address this knowledge gap by evaluating patient management and clinical outcomes following MI in different regions worldwide. TIGRIS (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01866904) is a multicenter, observational, prospective, longitudinal study enrolling patients with history of MI 1 to 3 years previously and high risk of developing atherothrombotic events in a general-practice setting. The primary objective of TIGRIS is to evaluate clinical events (time to first occurrence of any event from the composite cardiovascular endpoint of MI, unstable angina with urgent revascularization, stroke, or death from any cause), and healthcare resource utilization associated with hospitalization for these events (hospitalization duration and procedures) during follow-up. Overall, 9225 patients were enrolled between June 2013 and November 2014 and are being followed in 369 different centers worldwide. This will allow for the description of regional differences in patient characteristics, risk profiles, medical treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and healthcare resource utilization. Patients will be followed for up to 3 years. Here we report the rationale, design, patient distribution, and selected baseline characteristics of the TIGRIS study. TIGRIS will describe real-world management, quality of life (self-reported health), and healthcare resource utilization for patients with stable coronary artery disease ≥1 year post-MI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Coronary Collateral Growth Induced by Physical Exercise: Results of the Impact of Intensive Exercise Training on Coronary Collateral Circulation in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease (EXCITE) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius-Winkler, Sven; Uhlemann, Madlen; Adams, Volker; Sandri, Marcus; Erbs, Sandra; Lenk, Karsten; Mangner, Norman; Mueller, Ulrike; Adam, Jennifer; Grunze, Martin; Brunner, Susanne; Hilberg, Thomas; Mende, Meinhard; Linke, Axel P; Schuler, Gerhard

    2016-04-12

    A well-developed coronary collateral circulation provides a potential source of blood supply in coronary artery disease. However, the prognostic importance and functional relevance of coronary collaterals is controversial with the association between exercise training and collateral growth still unclear. This prospective, open-label study randomly assigned 60 patients with significant coronary artery disease (fractional flow reserve ≤0.75) to high-intensity exercise (group A, 20 patients) or moderate-intensity exercise (group B, 20 patients) for 4 weeks or to a control group (group C, 20 patients). The primary end point was the change of the coronary collateral flow index (CFI) after 4 weeks. Analysis was based on the intention to treat. After 4 weeks, baseline CFI increased significantly by 39.4% in group A (from 0.142±0.07 at beginning to 0.198±0.09 at 4 weeks) in comparison with 41.3% in group B (from 0.143±0.06 to 0.202±0.09), whereas CFI in the control group remained unchanged (0.7%, from 0.149±0.09 to 0.150±0.08). High-intensity exercise did not lead to a greater CFI than moderate-intensity training. After 4 weeks, exercise capacity, Vo2 peak and ischemic threshold increased significantly in group A and group B in comparison with group C with no difference between group A and group B. A significant improvement in CFI was demonstrated in response to moderate- and high-intensity exercise performed for 10 hours per week. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01209637. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Effects of Pycnogenol on endothelial function in patients with stable coronary artery disease: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enseleit, Frank; Sudano, Isabella; Périat, Daniel; Winnik, Stephan; Wolfrum, Mathias; Flammer, Andreas J; Fröhlich, Georg M; Kaiser, Priska; Hirt, Astrid; Haile, Sarah R; Krasniqi, Nazmi; Matter, Christian M; Uhlenhut, Klaus; Högger, Petra; Neidhart, Michel; Lüscher, Thomas F; Ruschitzka, Frank; Noll, Georg

    2012-07-01

    Extracts from pine tree bark containing a variety of flavonoids have been used in traditional medicine. Pycnogenol is a proprietary bark extract of the French maritime pine tree (Pinus pinaster ssp. atlantica) that exerts antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-platelet effects. However, the effects of Pycnogenol on endothelial dysfunction, a precursor of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events, remain still elusive. Twenty-three patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) completed this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Patients received Pycnogenol (200 mg/day) for 8 weeks followed by placebo or vice versa on top of standard cardiovascular therapy. Between the two treatment periods, a 2-week washout period was scheduled. At baseline and after each treatment period, endothelial function, non-invasively assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound, biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation, platelet adhesion, and 24 h blood pressure monitoring were evaluated. In CAD patients, Pycnogenol treatment was associated with an improvement of FMD from 5.3 ± 2.6 to 7.0 ± 3.1 (P Pycnogenol treatment, while no change was observed in the placebo group (mean difference 0.06 pg/mL with an associated 95% CI (0.01, 0.11), P = 0.012]. Inflammation markers, platelet adhesion, and blood pressure did not change after treatment with Pycnogenol or placebo. This study provides the first evidence that the antioxidant Pycnogenol improves endothelial function in patients with CAD by reducing oxidative stress.

  13. Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart. It also helps you lose weight, control diabetes and reduce stress. Limit alcohol. Control chronic conditions. Managing conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure helps protect your arteries. ...

  14. Peripheral Artery Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Peripheral Artery Disease & Diabetes Updated:Jan 26,2016 People with diabetes are ... life. This content was last reviewed January 2016. Diabetes • Home • About Diabetes • Why Diabetes Matters Introduction Cardiovascular ...

  15. Weight loss is superior to exercise in improving the atherogenic lipid profile in a sedentary, overweight population with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Anholm, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dyslipidemia and low-grade inflammation are integral in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We aim to compare the effects of a considerable weight loss and intensive exercise training on lipid atherogenicity and low-grade inflammation in a high-risk population with coronary artery...... disease (CAD). METHODS: Seventy non-diabetic participants with CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2), age 45-75 years were randomized to 12 weeks' aerobic interval training (AIT) at 85-90% of peak heart rate three times/week or a low energy diet (LED, 800-1000 kcal/day) for 8-10 weeks followed by 2-4 weeks' weight...... profile curve. LED was superior to AIT in decreasing atherogenicity reflected by increased LDL (between-group: 1.0 Å {0.4; 1.7},P = 0.003) and high-density lipoprotein (between-group: 1.2 Å {0.2; 2.4},P = 0.026) particle size and a decreased proportion of total lipoprotein constituted by the small, dense...

  16. Complete revascularization determined by myocardial perfusion imaging could improve the outcomes of patients with stable coronary artery disease, compared with incomplete revascularization and no revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehui; Yang, Xiubin; Tian, Yueqin; Wei, Hongxing; Hacker, Marcus; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2017-12-06

    To compare the outcomes among patients treated by complete coronary revascularization (CCR) or incomplete coronary revascularization (ICR) and no coronary revascularization (NCR) by myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), as well as to evaluate the impact of severity of ischemia on patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) by different therapy strategies. Using myocardial ischemia severity determined by MPI guiding treatment strategies for CAD patients still lacks strong clinical evidences. Consecutive patients (N = 286) underwent clinical stress-rest SPECT MPI and were retrospectively followed-up. For assessment of outcome of treatment, all patients were classified into three groups (CCR, ICR, and NCR), and further divided into two subgroups as mild ischemia (revascularization (MACE) as the secondary endpoint. Two-hundred eighty-six patients were followed-up for 46 ± 21 months. Thirty deaths and 65 MACEs were recorded. Patients treated by revascularization had significantly lower MACE (P  .05). Multivariate regression Cox analysis revealed that summed difference score [death: HR 1.09 (1.03, 1.15), P = .004] was an independent risk factor and CCR was an independent negative predictor [death: HR 0.31 (0.12, 0.81), P = .017; MACE: HR 0.30 (0.16, 0.57), P < .001]. Outcomes of patients treated by CCR were most likely more promising in comparison with treatment of ICR and NCR, especially when patients had over 10% ischemic myocardium.

  17. Rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of the Study assessInG the morbidity-mortality beNefits of the If inhibitor ivabradine in patients with coronarY artery disease (SIGNIFY trial): a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ivabradine in patients with stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Ferrari, Roberto

    2013-10-01

    Elevated heart rate in stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with worse outcomes, particularly increased risk of myocardial infarction. Heart rate reduction with the If inhibitor ivabradine confers symptomatic benefits in angina pectoris and reduces coronary events in patients with stable CAD and left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction, with a resting heart rate of ≥70 beats/min. The SIGNIFY trial is testing the hypothesis that heart rate reduction using ivabradine reduces mortality and cardiovascular events in patients with stable CAD, but without clinical heart failure. The SIGNIFY trial is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, event-driven study in patients with stable CAD (1,139 centers, 51 countries). Participants are 55 years or older, with stable CAD and an LV ejection fraction >40%, in sinus rhythm, with a baseline resting heart rate of ≥70 beats/min, and with at least 1 additional cardiovascular risk factor. At inclusion, patients receive ivabradine 7.5 mg twice a day or matching placebo, which is adjusted at every visit to a heart rate target of 60 beats/min. Participants should receive the best possible background treatment for stable CAD. The primary end point is a composite of cardiovascular death or nonfatal myocardial infarction. Recruitment lasted from October 2009 to April 2012. The SIGNIFY trial has recruited 19,102 patients (age 65.0 ± 7.2 years, resting heart rate 77.2 ± 7.0 beats/min, 72% male) with no evidence for LV dysfunction (ejection fraction 56.5% ± 8.6%). The SIGNIFY trial will shed further light on the role of heart rate lowering with ivabradine in patients with stable CAD without clinical heart failure. The study is expected to end in 2014. © 2013.

  18. Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Signs and Symptoms of Artery Disease Past Issues / ... narrows or blocks these arteries—a condition called coronary artery disease (CAD) or coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs. A ...

  19. Effects of Community-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation on Body Composition and Physical Function in Individuals with Stable Coronary Artery Disease: 1.6-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mandic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine long-term changes in physical function and body composition in coronary artery disease (CAD patients participating in ongoing community-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR. Design. Thirty-four individuals (69.7±8.2 years; 79% men participated in this longitudinal observational study. Baseline and follow-up assessments included incremental shuttle walk, short physical performance battery, handgrip strength, chair stands, body composition, last year physical activity, and CR attendance. Results. Participants attended 38.5±30.3% sessions during 1.6±0.2 year followup. A significant increase in 30-second chair stands (17.0±4.7 to 19.6±6.4, P<0.001, body weight (75.8±11.1 to 77.2±12.1 kg, P=0.001, and body fat (27.0±9.5 to 29.1±9.6%, P<0.001 and a decline in handgrip strength (36.4±9.4 to 33.0±10.6 kg·f, P<0.001 and muscle mass (40.8±5.6 to 39.3±5.8%, P<0.001 were observed during followup. There was no significant change in shuttle walk duration. CR attendance was not correlated to observed changes. Conclusions. Elderly CAD patients participating in a maintenance CR program improve lower-body muscle strength but experience a decline in handgrip strength and unfavourable changes in body composition, irrespective of CR attendance.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Peripheral arterial disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arterial disease is confirmed by its adverse prognostic significance for coronary and cerebrovascular events.2. •. 5. ·. 8 ABPI has been found to be an independent predictor even when the effects of advanced age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and pre-existing cardiovascular disease have been taken into account using ...

  1. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with stable coronary artery disease: a prognostic study within the CLARICOR Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harutyunyan, Marina J; Mathiasen, Anders B; Winkel, Per

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) have a poor prognosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the extent to which serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) measurement alone or together could......-proBNP was significantly associated with MI (hazard ratio (HR), 1. 65 (refers to a 2.72 fold increase in serum level, p = 0.0005), CVD (HR, 2.42, p CRP, NT-proBNP was still significantly associated with MI (HR, 1.63, p = 0.0005), CVD (HR, 2.36, p ....0005) and non-CVD (HR, 1.66, p CRP was compared to NT-proBNP less associated with MI (HR, 1.20, p = 0.001), CVD (HR, 1.39, p CRP was only associated with non-CVD (HR, 1.51, p

  2. Diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of non-invasive imaging tests in patients presenting with chronic stable chest pain with suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waardhuizen, Claudia N; Langhout, Marieke; Ly, Felisia; Braun, Loes; Genders, Tessa S S; Petersen, Steffen E; Fleischmann, Kirsten E; Nieman, Koen; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2014-01-01

    Several non-invasive imaging techniques are currently in use for the diagnostic workup of adult patients with stable chest pain suspected of having coronary artery disease (CAD). In this paper, we present a systematic overview of the evidence on diagnostic performance and comparative cost-effectiveness of new modalities in comparison to established technologies. A literature search for English language studies from 2009 to 2013 was performed, and two investigators independently extracted data on patient and study characteristics. The reviewed published evidence on diagnostic performance and cost-effectiveness support a strategy of CTCA as a rule out (gatekeeper) test of CAD in low- to intermediate-risk patients since it has excellent diagnostic performance and as initial imaging test is cost-effective under different willingness-to-pay thresholds. More cost-effectiveness research is needed in order to define the role and choice of cardiac stress imaging tests.

  3. Ivabradine for patients with stable coronary artery disease and left-ventricular systolic dysfunction (BEAUTIFUL): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, P. Gabriel; Tendera, Michal; Ferrari, Roberto; Grancelli, H.; Freedman, B.; Eber, B.; Vanoverschelde, J. L.; Finkov, B.; Yotov, Y.; Tardif, J. C.; Hu, D.; Lau, C.; Hradec, J.; Hildebrandt, P.; Eha, J.; Peuhkurinen, K.; Danchin, N.; Steg, P. G.; Meinertz, T.; Vardas, P.; Borbola, J.; Mulcahy, D.; Maggioni, A.; Erglis, A.; Jirgensons, J.; Kalnins, U.; Laucevicius, A.; Dickstein, K.; Ruzyllo, W.; Tendera, M.; Seabra-Gomes, R.; Capalneanu, R.; Belenkov, Y.; Mareev, Y.; Murin, J.; Rakovec, P.; Macaya, C.; Dellborg, M.; Lüscher, T. U.; van Gilst, W.; Oto, A.; Ford, I.; Fox, K.; Hall, A.; Parkhomenko, A.; Robertson, M.; Weir, C.; Aziz, J.; Kean, S.; Wilson, R.; Thygesen, K.; Frenneaux, M.; Jondeau, G.; Camm, A. J.; Dargie, H.; Kjekshus, J.; Murray, G.; Ahuad Guerrero, R. A.; Allall, O. A.; Amuchastegui, M.; Buscema, J. J.; Bustos, B.; Cartasegna, L. R.; Cohen Arazi, H.; Fernandez, A. A.; Fuselli, J. J.; Guzmén, L. A.; Hasbani, E.; Ibañez, J. O.; Iglesias, R. M.; Lembo, L. A.; Luciardi, H. L.; Luquez, H. A.; Montaña, O. R.; Nul, D. R.; Orlandini, A. D.; Perna, E. R.; Sanchez, A.; Sanjurjo, M. S.; Schygiel, P. O.; Sinisi, V. A.; Sokn, F. J.; Thierer, J.; del Valle Lobo Marquez, L. L.; Varini, S.; Vogel, D.; Alford, K.; Amerena, J.; Arnolda, L.; Atherton, J.; Bradley, J.; Cameron, J.; Colquhoun, D.; Counsell, J.; Fitzpatrick, A.; Horowitz, J.; Ireland, M.; Karrasch, J.; Kaye, D.; Lattimore, J. D.; Marwick, T.; O'Shea, J.; Owensby, D.; de Pasquale, C.; Prior, D.; Rogers, J.; Sindone, A.; Singh, B. B.; Stickland, J.; Szto, G.; Tofler, G.; Vogl, E.; Waites, J.; Walsh, W.; Eber, E.; Huber, K.; Lang, I.; Pichler, M.; Chenu, P.; Dendale, P. A. C.; François, P. A. A.; Friart, A.; Goethals, M.; Materne, P.; van Mieghem, W.; Missault, L.; Vachiery, J. L.; Vanderheyden, M.; Chompalova, B.; Denchev, S.; Donova, T.; Dzhurzdhev, A.; Georgiev, B.; Gotchev, D.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Guenova, D.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Kamenova, Z.; Nachev, C.; Penkov, N.; Perchev, I.; Raev, D.; Sirakova, V.; Taseva, T.; Torbova, S.; Tzekova, M.; Baird, M.; Bernstein, V.; Chehayeb, R.; Constance, C.; Coutu, B.; Desrochers, D.; Fortin, C.; Glanz, A.; Haddad, H.; Heath, J.; Hill, L. L.; Klinke, W. P.; Kouz, S.; Lalani, A.; Lauzon, C.; Lepage, S.; Lonn, E.; Ma, P.; Matangi, M.; Nawaz, S.; Pandey, S.; Parker, J. D.; Parker, J. O.; Poirier, P.; Raco, D.; Rajda, M.; Rebane, T.; Rupka, D.; Savard, D.; Syan, G. S.; Talbot, P.; To, T. B.; Vakani, M. T.; Vertes, G. E.; Yao, L.; Dong, Y.; Gai, L.; Ge, J. B.; Lv, S.; Sun, Y.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Yan, X.; Yuan, Z.; Zhang, F.; Ballek, L.; Drazka, J.; Fébik, L.; Florian, J.; Kaislerová, M.; Karetová, D.; Jerábek, O.; Kotík, L.; Krejcova, H.; Kryza, R.; Kuchar, J.; Lavicka, V.; Maratka, T.; Marcinek, G.; Penicka, M.; Povolný, J.; Sochor, K.; Soucek, M.; Spacek, R.; Spinar, J.; Stípal, R.; Sulda, M.; Vencour, D.; Vitovec, J.; Vojacek, J.; Vojtísek, P.; Agner, E.; Asklund, M.; Brønnum Schou, J.; Dahlstrøm, C. G.; Dodt, K. K.; Egstrup, K.; Gøtzsche, L.; Gøtzsche, O.; Haghfelt, T.; Jakobsen, T.; Jensen, G.; Klarlund, K.; Køber, L.; Larsen, C. T.; Larsen, J.; Lind Rasmussen, S.; Lysko Svendsen, T.; Markenvard, J.; McNair, A.; Nielson, H.; Pedersen, L.; Petersen, J.; Ralfkiaer, N.; Rickers, H.; Rokkedal, J.; Romer, F.; Roseva Nielsen, N.; Scheibel, M.; Sejersen, H.; Skagen, K.; Stentebjerg, S. E.; Torp-Pedersen, C.; Tuxen, C.; Vigholt, E.; Averina, O.; Kolbassova, O.; Sildmäe, S.; Vahula, V.; Viigimaa, M.; Harjola, V. P.; Luoma, J.; Melin, J.; Aliot, E.; Barthelemy, J. C.; Bauer, F.; Beaune, J.; Belin, A.; Bodur, G.; Boudahne, A.; Bourdon, A.; Bouvier, J. M.; Carlioz, R.; Chati, Z.; Cherbi, C.; Chevalier, J. M.; Chevrier, J.; Claudon, O.; Colin, P.; Dambrine, P.; Decoulx, E.; Demarcq, J. M.; Doucet, B.; Drawin, T.; Dubois-Rande, J. L.; El Mansour, N.; Escande, M.; Fournier, P. Y.; Funck, F.; Gabrovescu, M.; Galinier, M.; Galley, D.; Gay, A.; Genest, M.; Godenir, J. P.; Guillot, J. P.; Gully, C.; Habib, G.; Huyghe de Mahenge, A.; Jaboureck, O.; Kahn, J. C.; Khalife, K.; Khanoyan, P.; Koenig, A.; Leborgne, L.; Lemoine, C.; Magnin, D.; Mann, H.; Mansourati, J.; Martelet, M.; Matina, D.; Meurice, T.; Olive, T. G.; Ovize, M.; Perret, T.; Pierre-Justin, E.; Riou, A.; Roudaut, R.; Roul, G.; Roynard, J. L.; Sellier, P.; Slama, M.; Soto, F. X.; Thisse, J. Y.; Wolf, J. E.; Ammer, K.; Appel, K. F.; Baar, M.; Bauknecht, C.; Baumann, G.; Bergmann, K.; Böhm, M.; Bosch, R.; Bott, J.; Cieslinski, G.; Deissner, M.; Drescher, T.; Droese, K.; Figulla, H. R.; Frick, H. M.; Fries, P.; Gärtner, J.; Gola, G.; Gonska, B. D.; Grooterhorst, P.; Hasenfuss, G.; Haverkamp, W.; Heckel, D.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hering, R.; Heuer, H.; Hoppe, U.; Jahnke, N.; Jeserich, M.; Katus, H.; Kleinertz, K.; Kombächer, H. D.; Lange, R.; Lehmann, G.; Müller, O.; Münzel, T.; Natour, M.; Nienaber, C.; Oeff, M.; Pötsch, T.; Proskynitopoulos, N.; Rüdell, U.; Rummel, R.; Rupprecht, H. J.; von Schacky, C.; Schenkenberger, I.; Schmidt, J.; Schreckenberg, A.; Schuler, G.; Schultheiss, H. P.; Seidl, K.; Spanier, C.; Spengler, U.; Steindorf, J.; Strasser, R.; Taggeselle, J.; Tammen, A.; Werdan, K.; Windstetter, U.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Wolde, C. H.; Zahorsky, R.; Al-Zoebi, A.; Alexopoulos, D.; Anastasiou-Nana, M.; Apostolou, T.; Fotiadis, I.; Hatzinikolaou-Kotsakou, E.; Kallikazaros, I.; Kapordelis, C.; Karvounis, H.; Kolettis, T.; Koliopoulos, N.; Kremastinos, D.; Kyriakides, Z.; Manolis, A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pras, A.; Pyrgakis, V. N.; Siogas, K.; Theodorakis, G.; Tryposkiadis, F.; Tziakas, D.; Lee, K.; Barsi, B.; Cziráki, A.; Dézsi, C. A.; Edes, I.; Farsang, C.; Harmati, L.; Juhász, A.; Kovács, A.; Lakatos, F.; Lippai, J.; Lupkovics, G.; Matoltsy, A.; Mohácsi, A.; Mohay, A.; Nagy, A.; Nagy, K.; Nagy, L.; Nyárádi, A.; Pálinkás, A.; Piros, G.; Polgár, P.; Préda, I.; Regos, L.; Rumi, G.; Sármán, P.; Sereg, M.; Sidó, Z.; Tahy, A.; Takács, J.; Tomcsányi, J.; Tóth, K.; Váradi, A.; Vegh, G.; Veress, G.; Zámolyi, K.; Barton, J.; Crean, P.; Daly, K.; Foley, D.; Alberti, E.; Ambrosio, G.; Barbuzzi, S.; Bellone, E.; Buia, E.; Capucci, A.; Carbonieri, E.; Cardona, N.; Della Casa, S.; Cocchieri, M.; Colombo, A.; Cosmi, F.; de Cristofaro, M.; Ferrari, R.; Fuscaldo, G.; Gavazzi, A.; Giannuzzi, P.; Giustiniani, S.; Ingrilli, F.; Leghissa, R.; de Luca, I.; Maresta, A.; de Matteis, C.; Minneci, C.; Mos, L.; Paparoni, S.; Perna, B.; Pettinati, G.; Pinelli, G.; Pizzimenti, G.; Porcu, M.; Proietti, G.; Proto, C.; Pulitano, G.; Reggianini, L.; Santini, M.; Uguccioni, M.; Urbinati, S.; Zanetta, M.; Zanini, R.; Gailiss, E.; Gersamija, A.; Keisa, M.; Libins, A.; Ozolina, M. A.; Stoma, M.; Volans, E.; Berukstis, E.; Grabauskiene, V.; Kibarskis, A.; Kirkutis, A.; Marcinkeviciene, J.; Naudziunas, A.; Petrulioniene, Z.; Varoneckas, G.; Zaliunas, R.; Bartels, G. L.; van Beek, G. J.; van den Berg, B. J.; Bruning, T. A.; Cornel, J. H.; Daniels, M. C. G.; Dijkgraaf, R.; Fast, J.; Freericks, M. P.; Galema, T. W.; Göbel, E. J. A.; Hamer, L. H. J.; van der Heijden, R.; Herrman, J. P. R.; Hoedemaker, G.; Holwerda, N. J.; Hoogslag, P. A. M.; Jaarsma, W.; Jap Tjoen San, W. T. J.; van Kempen, L. H. J.; Kirkels, J. H.; Kragten, J. A.; Leenders, C. M.; Linssen, G. C. M.; Lionarons, R. J.; Maas, A. H. E. M.; Michels, H. M.; de Milliano, P. A. R.; Nagelsmit, M. J.; Nierop, P. R.; Pinto, Y. M.; Robles de Medina, R.; van Rossum, P.; van Rugge, F. P.; Somer, S. T.; Swart, H.; Thijssen, H.; van der Veen, M.; Verheul, J. A.; van Vlies, B.; Voors, A. A.; Wesdorp, J. C. L.; van Wijk, L. M.; Willems, A. R.; Winter, J. B.; Withagen, A. J. A. M.; van der Zwaan, C.; Zwart, P. A. G.; Atar, D.; Myhre, E. P.; Achremczyk, P.; Andrzejak, R.; Baska, J.; Bloch, C.; Dluzniewski, M.; Drozdowski, P.; Goch, J. H.; Janik, K.; Janion, M.; Jaworska, K.; Kalarus, Z.; Kawecka-Jaszcz, K.; Kozlowski, A.; Krupa, E.; Krynicki, R.; Krzciuk, M.; Krzeminska-Pakula, M.; Kubica, J.; Kurowski, M.; Kuzniar, J.; Loboz-Grudzien, K.; Mazurek, W.; Miekus, P.; Musial, W.; Opolski, G.; Piepiorka, M.; Piotrowski, W.; Piwowarska, W.; Pluta, W.; Ponikowski, P.; Pulkowski, G.; Pusz, T.; Ruszkowski, P.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Sinkiewicz, W.; Skura, M.; Slowinski, S.; Szolkiewicz, M.; Szpajer, M.; Targonski, R.; Tracz, W.; Trojnar, R.; Trusz-Gluza, M.; Wodniecki, J.; Wrabec, K.; Zadrozna, Z.; Zinka, E.; Aguiar, J.; Carvalho, N.; Ferreira Da Silva, G.; Freitas, J.; Lousada, N.; Oliveira Soares, A.; Paisana Lopes, J. P.; Providencia, L. A.; Salgado, A.; Teixeira, M.; Apetrei, E.; Arsenescu, C.; Avram, R.; Babes, K.; Bruckner, I.; Carasca, E.; Cinteza, M.; Craiu, E.; Dan, G. A.; Datcu, M. D.; Dimulescu, D. R.; Dorobantu, M.; Dragomor, D.; Dragulescu, I. S.; Dumitrascu, D. L.; Georgescu, I. M.; Ionescu, D. D.; Ionascu-Fometescu, C. R.; Kiss, L.; Macarie, C.; Manitiu, I.; Minescu, B.; Nanea, T.; Olariu, C.; Olinic, N. C.; Opris, M.; Pop, C.; Radoi, M.; Radu, I.; Sinescu, C. J.; Tanaseanu, C. M.; Tase, A.; Tintoiu, I.; Tomescu, M.; Topolnitchi, L.; Vintila, M.; Vladoianu, M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Aroutiounov, G. P.; Azarin, O. G.; Barbarash, O. L.; Bart, B. Y.; Beloussov, Y. B.; Bychkova, L.; Chumakova, G. A.; Glezer, M. G.; Golukhova, E.; Gorbachenkov, A. A.; Gordeev, I. G.; Ivleva, A. Ya; Karpov, Y. A.; Karpov, Y. B.; Kastanaian, A. A.; Kisliak, O. A.; Kobalava, J. D.; Konyakhin, A. Yu; Khrustalev, O. A.; Kuimov, A. D.; Kukes, A. G.; Lopatin, Y. M.; Mareev, V. Yu; Moiseeva, O. M.; Mkrtchyan, V. R.; Nedogoda, S. V.; Orlov, V. A.; Perepech, N. B.; Pimenov, L. T.; Pozdnyakov, Y. M.; Rodoman, G. V.; Rudnev, D. V.; Sayganov, S. A.; Shlyakhto, E. V.; Shostak, N. A.; Shpektor, A. V.; Sidorenko, B. A.; Sorokin, L. A.; Stryuk, R. I.; Svistov, A. S.; Tankhilevich, B. M.; Tereschenko, S. N.; Tsyba, L. P.; Vasyuk, Y. A.; Vertkine, A. L.; Yakhontova, P. K.; Yakusevich, V. V.; Yakushin, S. S.; Zadionchenko, V. S.; Zateyshchikov, D. A.; Zhilyaev, E. V.; Bada, V.; Bugán, V.; Gonsorcík, J.; Kamenský, G.; Kmec, J.; Micko, K.; Murín, J.; Pella, D.; Sojka, G.; Vahala, P.; Bombek, M.; Kanic, V.; Markez, J.; Melihen-Bartolic, C.; Rakove, P.; Skrabl-Mocnik, F.; Slemenik-Pusnik, C.; Balaguer Recena, J.; Bertomeu Martinez, V.; Bruguera Cortada, J.; Calvo Gomez, C.; Calvo Iglesias, F.; Caparros Valderrama, J.; Casares Garcia, G.; Fernandez Alvarez, R.; Galve, E.; Garcia de Burgos, F.; Grande, A.; Gusi Tragant, G.; Iglesias Alonso, L. F.; Iglesias Cubero, G.; Illa Gay, J.; Jimenez Navarro, M.; López Bescós, L.; López García-Aranda, V.; Macaya de Miguel, C.; Noriega Peiro, F.; Paz Bermejo, M. A.; Perez Villa, F.; Romero Hinojosa, J. A.; San Román Calvar, A.; Sevilla Toral, B.; Sola Casado, R.; Bandh, A.; Blomgren, J.; Herlitz, J.; Ohlin, H.; Ullman, B.; Delabays, A.; Dubach, P.; Eeckhout, E.; Gallino, A.; Hess, O.; Moccetti, T.; Vontobel, H.; Acarturk, E.; Ergene, O.; Erol, K.; Kozan, O.; Mutlu, B.; Ural, D.; Yilmaz, H.; Amosova, K.; Barna, O.; Batushkin, V.; Bazylevych, A.; Bereznyakov, I.; Dyadyk, A.; Dzyak, G.; Girina, O.; Glushko, L.; Goloborodko, B.; Karpenko, O.; Khomazyuk, T.; Kolchin, Y.; Kolomiets, S.; Korkushko, O.; Korzh, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kovalsky, I.; Krayz, I.; Kubyshkin, V.; Lutay, M.; Mostovoy, Y.; Netyazhenko, V.; Perepelytsya, M.; Pertseva, T.; Polyvoda, S.; Putintsev, V.; Rishko, L. M.; Rudyk, Y.; Sakharchuk, I.; Semidotska, Z.; Seredyuk, N.; Serkova, V.; Sharuk, O.; Slyvka, Y.; Soldatchenko, S.; Stadnyuk, L.; Storozhuk, B.; Tashchuk, V.; Tseluyko, V.; Vatutin, M.; Vizir, V.; Vlasenko, M.; Voronkov, L.; Yurlov, V.; Zharinov, O.; Baig, M. W.; Brady, A.; Brooks, N.; Brooksby, P.; Crook, J. R.; Dutka, D.; Francis, C. M.; Greaves, K.; Groves, P.; Kadr, H.; Lindsay, S.; Moriarty, A.; Purvis, J.; Rozkovec, A.; Saltissi, S.; Stewart, M.; Timmis, A.; Williams, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ivabradine specifically inhibits the I(f) current in the sinoatrial node to lower heart rate, without affecting other aspects of cardiac function. We aimed to test whether lowering the heart rate with ivabradine reduces cardiovascular death and morbidity in patients with coronary artery

  4. The effect of periodontal therapy on C-reactive protein, endothelial function, lipids and proinflammatory biomarkers in patients with stable coronary artery disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffi, Marco Aurélio Lumertz; Furtado, Mariana Vargas; Montenegro, Márlon Munhoz; Ribeiro, Ingrid Webb Josephson; Kampits, Cassio; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Haas, Alex Nogueira

    2013-09-06

    Scarce information exists regarding the preventive effect of periodontal treatment in the recurrence of cardiovascular events. Prevention may be achieved by targeting risk factors for recurrent coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with previous history of cardiovascular events. The aim of this trial is to compare the effect of two periodontal treatment approaches on levels of C-reactive protein, lipids, flow-mediated dilation and serum concentrations of proinflammatory and endothelial markers in stable CAD patients with periodontitis over a period of 12 months. This is a randomized, parallel design, examiner blinded, controlled clinical trial. Individuals from both genders, 35 years of age and older, with concomitant diagnosis of CAD and periodontitis will be included. CAD will be defined as the occurrence of at least one of the following events 6 months prior to entering the trial: documented history of myocardial infarction; surgical or percutaneous myocardial revascularization and lesion >50% in at least one coronary artery assessed by angiography; presence of angina and positive noninvasive testing of ischemia. Diagnosis of periodontitis will be defined using the CDC-AAP case definition (≥2 interproximal sites with clinical attachment loss ≥6 mm and ≥1 interproximal site with probing depth ≥5 mm). Individuals will have to present at least ten teeth present to be included. One hundred individuals will be allocated to test (intensive periodontal treatment comprised by scaling and root planing) or control (community periodontal treatment consisting of one session of supragingival plaque removal only) treatment groups. Full-mouth six sites per tooth periodontal examinations and subgingival biofilm samples will be conducted at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment. The primary outcome of this study will be C-reactive protein changes over time. Secondary outcomes include levels of total cholesterol, LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF

  5. The use of bioresorbable vascular scaffold Absorb BVS® in patients with stable coronary artery disease: one-year results with special focus on the hybrid bioresorbable vascular scaffolds and drug eluting stents treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Robert J; Bil, Jacek; Pawłowski, Tomasz; Yuldashev, Nabijon; Kołakowski, Leszek; Jańczak, Jacek; Jabłoński, Wojciech; Paliński, Piotr

    The number of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) with bioresorbable vascular scaffolds (BVS) is in-creasing because these procedures offer additional benefits compared to PCI with classical drug eluting stents (DES) made of permanent metallic prostheses. To present the current experience of using BVS in a real life scenario in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD), with a special focus on the assessment of safety and effectiveness of the hybrid strategy (single stage BVS and DES implantation). We performed a one-arm prospective registry, which enrolled patients with stable CAD in five interventional cardiology centres in Poland. All patients who met inclusion and exclusion criteria and had received at least one BVS stent during index PCI were included. The primary endpoint was the cumulative rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), consist-ing of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), and clinically-driven target lesion revascularisation (TLR) at 12 months. The analysis was performed in the whole population as well as in the subgroup with the hybrid treatment (BVS + DES). Between August 2013 and April 2014 139 patients were enrolled. The mean age was 59.5 ± 5.5 years, and 34.5% of the population were women. The target vessel was located in the left anterior descending artery in most cases (65.5%). The device success rate was 100%. At 12 months, in the whole population the cumulative MACE incidence was 7.2% (n = 10), while the clinically-driven TLR rate was 5.0% (n = 7). In further analysis, in the hybrid subgroup there was no death, MI, or stent thrombosis, and only one case of clinically-driven TLR (4.5%). The obtained data enable us to say that in particular clinical scenarios the simultaneous use of BVS and DES might be safe and effective.

  6. Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McPherson, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute importantly to the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), and in the past decade, there has been major progress in this area. The tools applied include genome-wide association studies encompassing >200,000 individuals complemented by bioinformatic approaches, including...

  7. Coronary artery disease: medical therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    one in three for women.1 Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease begins in childhood and the risk factors influence the development of atherosclerosis throughout one's lifetime.2. A standardised case-control study of acute myocardial infarction in 52 countries, representing every inhabited continent, demonstrated that nine ...

  8. Coronary Artery Disease | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Coronary Artery Disease Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents David ... up inside your arteries. One atherosclerosis-related disease, coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common heart disease and ...

  9. Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a residual risk factor associated with long-term clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with stable coronary artery disease who achieve optimal control of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shinya; Kurata, Takeshi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is recognized an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality. Clinical trials have shown that statins significantly reduce cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. However, residual cardiovascular risk persists despite the achievement of target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels with statin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established coronary risk factor that is independent of LDL-C levels. We evaluated the impact of HDL-C on long-term mortality in diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieved optimal LDL-C. We enrolled 438 consecutive diabetic patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention between 2004 and 2007 at our institution. We identified 165 patients who achieved target LDL-C coronary syndrome, and target lesion revascularization were evaluated between the two groups. The median follow-up period was 946 days. The rate of MACE was significantly higher in diabetic patients with low-HDL-C who achieved optimal LDL-C (6.9 vs 17.9 %, log-rank P = 0.030). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HDL-C is significantly associated with clinical outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio for MACE 1.33, 95 % confidence interval 1.01-1.75, P = 0.042). Low HDL-C is a residual risk factor that is significantly associated with long-term clinical outcomes among diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieve optimal LDL-C levels.

  10. Prevalence of Carotid Artery Disease among Ambulatory Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazum, Shirit; Eisen, Alon; Lev, Eli I; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Solodky, Alejandro; Hasdai, David; Kornowski, Ran; Mager, Aviv

    2016-02-01

    Concomitant carotid artery disease (CaAD) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with worse cardiac and neurologic outcomes. The reported prevalence and risk factors for concomitant CaAD in CAD patients varied among previous studies. To examine these factors in ambulatory patients with CAD and well-documented cholesterol levels treated with cholesterol-lowering medications. We retrospectively analyzed prospectively collected data from 325 unselected patients with CAD (89 women, mean age 68.8 ± 9.9 years) undergoing routine evaluation at the coronary clinic of our hospital. The low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) was < 100 mg/dl in 292 patients (90%). Age at onset of CAD symptoms was 59.4 ± 10.8 years. Carotid stenosis ≥ 50% was seen in 83 patients (25.5%) and between 30% and 49% in 55 patients (17%) (duplex method). Carotid stenosis was significantly associated with hypertension (P = 0.032), peripheral arterial disease (P = 0.002) and number of coronary arteries with ≥ 50% stenosis (P = 0.002), and showed a borderline association with age at CAD onset (P = 0.062) and diabetes mellitus (P = 0.053). On linear regression analysis, independent predictors of CaAD were peripheral vascular disease (OR 3.186, 95% CI 1.403-7.236, P = 0.006), number of coronary arteries with ≥ 50% stenosis (OR 1.543, 95% CI 1.136-2.095, P = 0.005), and age at CAD onset (OR 1.028, 95% CI 1.002-1.054, P = 0.003). None of the variables studied predicted freedom from CaAD. Carotid atherosclerosis is very common in stable ambulatory patients with CAD regularly taking statins. The risk is higher in patients with peripheral arterial disease, a greater number of involved coronary arteries, and older age at onset of CAD.

  11. High serum YKL-40 concentration is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens; Johansen, Julia S; Winkel, Per

    2009-01-01

    , interquartile range 0.23 year), 270 patients among the 4298 patients with stable CAD in the CLARICOR trial suffered myocardial infarction (MI) and 377 died (187 classified as cardiovascular death). Serum YKL-40 transformed as Y=log[max(82, serum YKL-40/microg/L)] was significantly associated with cardiovascular...... death [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.88, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.54-2.31, P HR = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.75-2.31, P HR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.13-1.68, P = 0.002). Following multivariable adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, previous MI, smoking...

  12. Liraglutide effects on beta-cell, insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness in patients with stable coronary artery disease and newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anholm, Christian; Kumarathurai, Preman; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm

    2017-01-01

    (CAD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial in patients with stable CAD and newly diagnosed well-controlled T2DM. Patients were treated with liraglutide/metformin vs. placebo/metformin for a 12 + 12-week......: HbA1c 47 mmol/mol (SD 6), BMI 31.6 kg/m(2) (SD 4.8), fasting plasma-glucose 6.9 mmol/l (IQR 6.1;7.4) and HOMA-IR 4.9 (IQR 3.0;7.5). Liraglutide treatment improved AIRg by 3-fold; 497 mU×l(-1)  × min (IQR 342;626, p weight...... loss of -2.7 kg (-6.7;-0.6) during liraglutide treatment we found no improvement in HOMA-IR, Si or Sg. Weight loss during liraglutide therapy did not cause a carry-over effect. CONCLUSION: Liraglutide as add-on to metformin induces a clinical significant improvement in beta-cell function in overweight...

  13. [Peripheral arterial disease and diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malý, R; Chovanec, V

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a disease characterised by narrowing and blockade of peripheral arteries, usually based on underlying obliterating atherosclerosis. According to the results of large epidemiological studies, the risk of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is fourfold higher compared to non-diabetic population. Patients with DM and PAD have a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Diabetes worsens the prognosis of patients with PAD; the onset of PAD in diabetics occurs at an earlier age, the course is faster than in non-diabetic patients and the disease is often diagnosed at its advanced stages. All these factors reduce the likelihood of revascularisation in DM patients with PAD. A range of factors (higher age, arterial hypertension, smoking, obesity, hyperfibrinogenaemia, insulin resistance etc.) contribute to the development of PAD in DM. Diabetes control is an independent risk factor of PAD as every 1% increase of hemoglobin A1C is associated with 28% increase of PAD. There are different clinical signs of PAD in diabetic and non-diabetic patients. In addition to the history of claudications, PAD diagnostic criteria include the presence of murmur over the large arteries, signs of chronic ischemia on the skin and distal ulcerations and gangrene. Among the imaging techniques, non-invasive investigations including Doppler pressure measurement, ankle brachial pressure index, color duplex ultrasonography, plethysmography, transcutaneous tension measurement, MR and CT angiography are preferred. Ankle brachial pressure index measurement is the easiest and the main investigation technique. The key principles of PAD treatment in diabetic patients include modification of risk factors, pharmacotherapy and revascularisation interventions aimed at improving clinical signs and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Antiplatelet treatment may prevent PAD progression and reduce cardiovascular events in DM patients. Early

  14. Ivabradine for patients with stable coronary artery disease and left-ventricular systolic dysfunction (BEAUTIFUL): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, P Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    .9) beats per minute (bpm). Median follow-up was 19 months (IQR 16-24). Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 6 bpm (SE 0.2) at 12 months, corrected for placebo. Most (87%) patients were receiving beta blockers in addition to study drugs, and no safety concerns were identified. Ivabradine did not affect...... the primary composite endpoint (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.1, p=0.94). 1233 (22.5%) patients in the ivabradine group had serious adverse events, compared with 1239 (22.8%) controls (p=0.70). In a prespecified subgroup of patients with heart rate of 70 bpm or greater, ivabradine treatment did not affect...... disease outcomes in a subgroup of patients who have heart rates of 70 bpm or greater....

  15. Peripheral arterial stenosis and coronary artery disease coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ghasemi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic slow-developing condition affecting medium-size and large blood vessels. It is the principal underlying pathology of coronary heart disease and stroke. In some countries, coronary artery disease (CAD is the cause of nearly half (48% of the deaths and, loss of productivity life. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is defined as atherosclerosis in peripheral arteries instead of coronary arteries. CAD and PAD have same risk factors and underlying pathophysiological processes. Therefore, patient with CAD should be considered for PAD. Ankle brachial index (ABI, duplex sonography, and some other non-invasive techniques are recommended for PAD diagnosis in patients with the history of CAD. Pharmacotherapy, endovascular interventions, and surgical management could be chosen according to the patient’s situation. Cardiologists and general practitioners should consider PAD in a patient with CAD or DM as a strong correlated disease.      

  16. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke B

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  17. Stable ischemic heart disease in women: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad F

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fatima Samad,1 Anushree Agarwal,2 Zainab Samad3 1Aurora Cardiovascular Services, Aurora Sinai/Aurora St Luke’s Medical Centers, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 2Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 3Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women accounting for 1 in every 4 female deaths. Pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease in women includes epicardial coronary artery, endothelial dysfunction, coronary vasospasm, plaque erosion and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. Angina is the most common presentation of stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD in women. Risk factors for SIHD include traditional risks such as older age, obesity (body mass index [BMI] >25 kg/m2, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, cerebrovascular and peripheral vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, family history of premature coronary artery disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus, and nontraditional risk factors, such as gestational diabetes, insulin resistance/polycystic ovarian disease, pregnancy-induced hypertension, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, menopause, mental stress and autoimmune diseases. Diagnostic testing can be used effectively to risk stratify women. Guidelines-directed medical therapy including aspirin, statins, beta-blocker therapy, calcium channel blockers and ranolazine should be instituted for symptom and ischemia management. Despite robust evidence regarding the adverse outcomes seen in women with ischemic heart disease, knowledge gaps exist in several areas. Future research needs to be directed toward a greater understanding of the role of nontraditional risk factors for SIHD in women, gaining deeper insights into the sex differences in therapeutic effects and formulating a sex-specific algorithm for the

  18. Impact of diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome on acute and chronic on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity in patients with stable coronary artery disease undergoing drug-eluting stent placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Laurent; Tubach, Florence; Juliard, Jean-Michel; Himbert, Dominique; Ducrocq, Grégory; Sorbets, Emmanuel; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Kerner, Arthur; Abergel, Hélène; Huisse, Marie-Geneviève; Roussel, Ronan; Esposito-Farèse, Marina; Steg, Philippe Gabriel; Ajzenberg, Nadine

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies, which compared the prevalence of high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HCPR) in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) versus non-T2DM and obese versus nonobese patients provided conflicting results. We compared the prevalence of HCPR in patients with T2DM, metabolic syndrome (MS), or neither T2DM nor MS undergoing drug-eluting stent implantation for stable coronary artery disease. Platelet functions were measured after a 600-mg clopidogrel loading dose and after 4 months on clopidogrel 75 mg/d. The prevalence of HCPR was significantly higher in 63 T2DM and 50 MS patients than in 43 patients with neither T2DM nor MS (46.0% and 52.0% vs 20.9%) after clopidogrel loading dose, whereas, at 4 months, only T2DM patients had a significantly higher prevalence of HCPR (50.8% and 31.3% vs 23.8%). By multivariable analysis, T2DM (odds ratio [OR] 3.62, 95% CI, 1.34-9.80, P = .011), MS (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.39-11.46, P = .010), and previous chronic treatment with clopidogrel (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.09-0.49; P < .001) were the main independent predictors of HCPR after clopidogrel loading dose, whereas only T2DM (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.20-7.41, P = .017) was an important independent predictor of HCPR at 4 months. Both MS and T2DM were independent predictors of HCPR after clopidogrel loading dose. On clopidogrel maintenance therapy, only T2DM remained an independent predictor. This observation may be clinically relevant in the current era of antiplatelet therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Relative clinical and economic impact of exercise echocardiography vs. exercise electrocardiography, as first line investigation in patients without known coronary artery disease and new stable angina: a randomized prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Konstantinos; Ahmed, Asrar; Shah, Benoy N; Gurunathan, Sothinathan; Young, Grace; Acosta, Dionisio; Senior, Roxy

    2017-02-01

    Exercise electrocardiography (ExECG) is widely used in suspected stable angina (SA) as the initial test for the evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that exercise stress echo (ESE) would be efficacious with cost advantage over ExECG when utilized as the initial test. Consecutive patients with suspected SA, without known CAD were randomized into ExECG or ESE. Patients with positive tests were offered coronary angiography (CA) and with inconclusive tests were referred for further investigations. All patients were followed-up for cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, and unplanned revascularization). Cost to diagnosis of CAD was calculated by adding the cost of all investigations, up to and including CA. In the 194 and 191 patients in the ExECG vs. ESE groups, respectively, pre-test probability of CAD was similar (34 ± 23 vs. 35 ± 25%, P = 0.6). Results of ExECG were: 108 (55.7%) negative, 14 (7.2%) positive, 72 (37.1%) inconclusive and of ESE were 181 (94.8%) negative, 9 (4.7%) positive, 1 (0.5%) inconclusive, respectively. Patients with obstructive CAD following positive ESE vs. Ex ECG were 9/9 vs. 9/14, respectively (P = 0.04). Cost to diagnosis of CAD was £266 for ESE vs. £327 for ExECG (P = 0.005). Over a mean follow-up period of 21 ± 5 months, event rates were similar between the two groups. In this first randomized study, ESE was more efficacious and demonstrated superior cost-saving, compared with ExECG when used as the initial investigation for the evaluation of CAD in patients with new-onset suspected SA without known CAD. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Tissue Doppler echocardiography improves the diagnosis of coronary artery stenosis in stable angina pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Soren; Jensen, Jan Skov; Iversen, Allan Zeeberg

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine if colour tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) performed at rest in patients with suspected stable angina pectoris (SAP) is able to predict the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD). METHODS AND RESULTS: This study comprises 296 consecutive patients with clinically...... performed at rest is an independent predictor of significant CAD, and colour TDI improves the diagnostic performance of exercise ECG....... suspected SAP, no previous cardiac history, and a normal ejection fraction. All patients were examined by colour TDI, exercise electrocardiogram (ECG), and coronary angiography (CAG). Regional longitudinal systolic (s'), early diastolic (e'), and late diastolic (a') myocardial velocities were measured...

  1. Ischemic stroke: carotid and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilela, P.; Goulao, A. [Hospital Garcia de Orta, Servico de Neurorradiologia, Almada (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    Ischemic strokes may have distinct aetiologies, including several different intrinsic arterial pathological disorders. The diagnosis and understanding of these arterial diseases is critical for the correct management of stroke as different treatment approaches are undertaken according to the aetiology. Atherosclerosis is by far the most common arterial disease among adults, and other pathological processes include arterial dissection, small vessel disease, inflammatory and non-inflammatory vasculopathy and vasomotor disorders. In children, there are several vasculopathies responsible for vaso-occlusive disease such as sickle-cell anemia, acute regressive angiopathy and Moya-Moya disease, neurofibromatosis, dissections, vasculitis associated with intracranial and systemic infections. An overview of the major carotid and vertebral pathological diseases responsible for ischemic stroke in adults and children, highlighting the accuracy of the different imaging modalities for its diagnosis and the imaging appearance of these diseases, is given. (orig.)

  2. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease.......To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease....

  3. Arterial hypertension and chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S

    2005-01-01

    , calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This provides an effective (although relative) counterbalance to raised arterial blood pressure. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during...... the development of chronic liver disease, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in those with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial......This review looks at the alterations in the systemic haemodynamics of patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of renal origin. Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic...

  4. Preventive aspects in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Loomba, Rohit Seth; Arora, Rohit

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of peripheral artery disease is steadily increasing and is associated with significant morbidity, including a significant percentage of amputations. Peripheral artery disease often goes undiagnosed, making its prevention increasingly important. Patients with peripheral arterial disease are at increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes which makes prevention even more important. Several risk factors have been identified in the pathophysiology of peripheral artery disease which should be modified to decrease risk. Smoking, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes are among proven risk factors for the development of peripheral artery disease, thus smoking cessation, lipid control, blood pressure control, and glucose control have been tried and shown to be effective in preventing the morbidity associated with this disease. Pharmacologic agents such as aspirin and clopidogrel alone or in combination have been shown to be effective, though risk of bleeding might be increased with the combination. Anticoagulation use is recommended only for acute embolic cases. Other treatment modalities that have been tried or are under investigation are estrogen replacement, naftidrofuryl, pentoxifylline, hyperbaric oxygen, therapeutic angiogenesis, and advanced glycation inhibitors. The treatment for concomitant vascular diseases does not change in the presence of peripheral artery disease, but aggressive management of risk factors should be undertaken in such cases.

  5. Living with Carotid Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  6. Arterial and Peripheral Sympathectomy for Vasospastic Disease

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Arterial and Peripheral Sympathectomy for Vasospastic Disease Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Prediabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Faghihimani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Peripheral arterial disease is common in asymptomatic diabetes and prediabetes patients. Management of hypertensive prediabetes patients and early detection of PAD in this group as well as in asymptomatic patients is important.

  8. Dual antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Degrauwe, Sophie; Pilgrim, Thomas; Aminian, Adel; Noble, Stephane; Meier, Pascal; Iglesias, Juan F

    2017-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) combining aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor has been consistently shown to reduce recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with aspirin monotherapy, but at the expense of an increased risk of major bleeding. Nevertheless, the optimal duration of DAPT for secondary prevention of CAD remains unce...

  9. [Arterial obliterative disease and physical activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Anna; Jassó, István

    2007-06-10

    Regular physical exercise represents an essential element in treating patients with second-stage peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is a characteristic clinical manifestation of atherothrombotic processes. Its prevalence is 2-3%, consequently, it is estimated to be 200,000-300,000 patients in Hungary. Coronary artery disease and atherothrombosis of the carotid artery system may frequently coexist with peripheral arterial obliterative disease. Treatment of peripheral arterial obliterative disease influences their prevalence and prognosis as well. The main aim of regular physical exercise is to improve the quality of life of patients by increasing the functional capacity of the lower limbs. During exercise beneficial vascular changes occur like haemodynamic changes consisting of increasing pressure-gradient of stenotic artery and opening of collateral vessels, as well as improvement of the endothelial dysfunction. It favourably influences lipid profile by decreasing LDL cholesterol and increasing HDL cholesterol. Physical exercise beneficially affects blood rheology as well. It also brings about structural changes in the skeletal muscles, increases the enzyme levels in the oxidative metabolic processes and enhances the density of capillaries in the skeletal muscle fibres. According to the data published so far, patients with peripheral arterial obliterative disease are recommended to take part in supervised treadmill walking at least 3 days per week for 30-60 minutes each session containing 5-5 minute warm-up and cool-down periods. The training should be of intermittent intensity at the pain-free threshold. The physiological benefits are optimised at 3-6 months. The home-based training programme is also remarkably useful.

  10. Carotid Artery Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and high blood pressure.  High Blood Pressure: Excess pressure on the arteries can cause them to weaken and become more prone to damage.  High Cholesterol: Having a high LDL and low HDL can increase fat in the blood stream.  ...

  11. Peripheral arterial disease, gender, and depression in the Heart and Soul Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grenon, S. Marlene; Cohen, Beth E.; Smolderen, Kim; Vittinghoff, Eric; Whooley, Mary A.; Hiramoto, Jade

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the high prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in women, risk factors for PAD in women are not well understood. Methods Gender-specific risk factors for PAD were examined in a prospective cohort study of 1024 patients (184 women and 840 men) with stable coronary artery

  12. Microvascular coronary artery spasm presents distinctive clinical features with endothelial dysfunction as nonobstructive coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Seigo; Sumida, Hitoshi; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Matsubara, Junichi; Matsuzawa, Yasushi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Maeda, Hirofumi; Sugamura, Koichi; Nagayoshi, Yasuhiro; Morihisa, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Tayama, Shinji; Hokimoto, Seiji; Matsui, Kunihiko; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Hisao

    2012-10-01

    Angina without significant stenosis, or nonobstructive coronary artery disease, attracts clinical attention. Microvascular coronary artery spasm (microvascular CAS) can cause nonobstructive coronary artery disease. We investigated the clinical features of microvascular CAS and the therapeutic efficacy of calcium channel blockers. Three hundred seventy consecutive, stable patients with suspected angina presenting nonobstructive coronary arteries (coronary angiography were investigated with the intracoronary acetylcholine provocation test, with simultaneous measurements of transcardiac lactate production and of changes in the quantitative coronary blood flow. We diagnosed microvascular CAS according to lactate production and a decrease in coronary blood flow without epicardial vasospasm during the acetylcholine provocation test. We prospectively followed up the patients with calcium channel blockers for microvascular coronary artery disease. We identified 50 patients with microvascular CAS who demonstrated significant impairment of the endothelium-dependent vascular response, which was assessed by coronary blood flow during the acetylcholine provocation test. Administration of isosorbide dinitrate normalized the abnormal coronary flow pattern in the patients with microvascular CAS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that female sex, a lower body mass index, minor-borderline ischemic electrocardiogram findings at rest, limited-baseline diastolic-to-systolic velocity ratio, and attenuated adenosine triphosphate-induced coronary flow reserve were independently correlated with the presence of microvascular CAS. Receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis revealed that the aforementioned 5-variable model showed good correlation with the presence of microvascular CAS (area under the curve: 0.820). No patients with microvascular CAS treated with calcium channel blockers developed cardiovascular events over 47.8±27.5 months. Microvascular CAS causes

  13. Moyamoya disease associated with an anterior inferior cerebellar artery arising from a persistent trigeminal artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, A.; Sawada, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S. [Department of Radiology, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan); Koizumi, T. [Department of Neurosurgery, Saga Medical School, 5-1-1, Nabeshima, Saga, 849-8501 (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The authors present a case of moyamoya disease associated with a persistent trigeminal artery from which the anterior inferior cerebellar artery arose. We reviewed previously reported cases of moyamoya disease associated with persistent carotid-basilar arterial anastomosis and investigated the embryology of this rare arterial variation. (orig.)

  14. Advances in peripheral arterial disease endovascular revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Ambrose; Jafferani, Asif; Shah, Falak; Dieter, Robert S

    2015-02-01

    Significant advances have been made in the endovascular treatment of lower extremity arterial occlusive disease. Since the 2011 update, technologies has developed and allowed for the revascularization of complex vascular lesions. Although this technical success is encouraging, these technologies must provide measurable long-term clinical success at a reasonable cost. Large, randomized, controlled trials need to be designed to focus on clinical outcomes and success rates for treatment. These future studies will serve as the guide by which clinicians can provide the most successful clinical and cost effect care in treating patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Evaluating the quality of research into a single prognostic biomarker: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 83 studies of C-reactive protein in stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Harry; Philipson, Peter; Chen, Ruoling; Fitzpatrick, Natalie K; Damant, Jacqueline; Shipley, Martin; Abrams, Keith R; Moreno, Santiago; McAllister, Kate S L; Palmer, Stephen; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Timmis, Adam D; Hingorani, Aroon D

    2010-06-01

    Systematic evaluations of the quality of research on a single prognostic biomarker are rare. We sought to evaluate the quality of prognostic research evidence for the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) with fatal and nonfatal events among patients with stable coronary disease. We searched MEDLINE (1966 to 2009) and EMBASE (1980 to 2009) and selected prospective studies of patients with stable coronary disease, reporting a relative risk for the association of CRP with death and nonfatal cardiovascular events. We included 83 studies, reporting 61,684 patients and 6,485 outcome events. No study reported a prespecified statistical analysis protocol; only two studies reported the time elapsed (in months or years) between initial presentation of symptomatic coronary disease and inclusion in the study. Studies reported a median of seven items (of 17) from the REMARK reporting guidelines, with no evidence of change over time. The pooled relative risk for the top versus bottom third of CRP distribution was 1.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78-2.17), with substantial heterogeneity (I(2) = 79.5). Only 13 studies adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, obesity, diabetes, and low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol) and these had a relative risk of 1.65 (95% CI 1.39-1.96), I(2) = 33.7. Studies reported ten different ways of comparing CRP values, with weaker relative risks for those based on continuous measures. Adjusting for publication bias (for which there was strong evidence, Egger's p<0.001) using a validated method reduced the relative risk to 1.19 (95% CI 1.13-1.25). Only two studies reported a measure of discrimination (c-statistic). In 20 studies the detection rate for subsequent events could be calculated and was 31% for a 10% false positive rate, and the calculated pooled c-statistic was 0.61 (0.57-0.66). Multiple types of reporting bias, and publication bias, make the magnitude of any independent association between CRP and prognosis

  16. Evaluating the quality of research into a single prognostic biomarker: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 83 studies of C-reactive protein in stable coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Hemingway

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Systematic evaluations of the quality of research on a single prognostic biomarker are rare. We sought to evaluate the quality of prognostic research evidence for the association of C-reactive protein (CRP with fatal and nonfatal events among patients with stable coronary disease.We searched MEDLINE (1966 to 2009 and EMBASE (1980 to 2009 and selected prospective studies of patients with stable coronary disease, reporting a relative risk for the association of CRP with death and nonfatal cardiovascular events. We included 83 studies, reporting 61,684 patients and 6,485 outcome events. No study reported a prespecified statistical analysis protocol; only two studies reported the time elapsed (in months or years between initial presentation of symptomatic coronary disease and inclusion in the study. Studies reported a median of seven items (of 17 from the REMARK reporting guidelines, with no evidence of change over time. The pooled relative risk for the top versus bottom third of CRP distribution was 1.97 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78-2.17, with substantial heterogeneity (I(2 = 79.5. Only 13 studies adjusted for conventional risk factors (age, sex, smoking, obesity, diabetes, and low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol and these had a relative risk of 1.65 (95% CI 1.39-1.96, I(2 = 33.7. Studies reported ten different ways of comparing CRP values, with weaker relative risks for those based on continuous measures. Adjusting for publication bias (for which there was strong evidence, Egger's p<0.001 using a validated method reduced the relative risk to 1.19 (95% CI 1.13-1.25. Only two studies reported a measure of discrimination (c-statistic. In 20 studies the detection rate for subsequent events could be calculated and was 31% for a 10% false positive rate, and the calculated pooled c-statistic was 0.61 (0.57-0.66.Multiple types of reporting bias, and publication bias, make the magnitude of any independent association between CRP and prognosis

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) is associated with total and cardiovascular mortality in individuals with or without stable coronary artery disease--results from the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study (LURIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepper, Philipp M; Kleber, Marcus E; Grammer, Tanja B; Hoffmann, Kristina; Dietz, Simone; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Boehm, Bernhard O; März, Winfried

    2011-11-01

    Atherosclerosis of coronary arteries is hallmarked by non-specific local inflammatory processes accompanied by a systemic response. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has been suggested to be associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in a previous study without follow-up. LBP plasma levels were measured in 2959 participants of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health (LURIC) cohort study referred to coronary angiography at baseline between 1997 and 2000. Median follow-up time was 8.0 years. Primary and secondary end points were cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, respectively. Multivariable adjusted logistic regression analyses were conducted to investigate the role of LBP. Serum LBP concentration was significantly increased in 2298 patients with angiographically confirmed CAD compared to 661 individuals without coronary atherosclerosis (6.78 μg/mL (5.46-8.84) vs. 6.13 μg/mL (5.05-7.74), respectively; pcardiovascular risk factors and markers of systemic inflammation, LBP was a significant and independent predictor of total and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio (HR) for all cause mortality: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.06-1.94, p=0.024; HR for cardiovascular mortality in the 4th quartile of LBP: 1.55, 95% CI: 1.06-2.27, p=0.025). The present results add information on LBP in CAD. The data underscore the potential importance of innate immune mechanisms for atherosclerosis. Further studies are needed to clarify the pathways between innate immune system activation and atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Serum YKL-40 predicts long-term mortality in patients with stable coronary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harutyunyan, Marina; Gøtze, Jens P; Winkel, Per

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether the inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 could improve the long-term prediction of death made by common risk factors plus high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and N-terminal-pro-B natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  19. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability.

  20. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability to exercise, using this ...

  1. Homocysteine in coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Franciscus Florimondus

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we review epidemiological evidence of the relationship between homocysteine and cardiovascular disease with an introduction to homocysteine metabolism in relation to the genetics of hyperhomocysteinemia and the impact of homocysteine for atherosclerosis and endothelial function.

  2. Correlations between geriatric nutritional risk index and peripheral artery disease in elderly coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamiya, Toshiki; Suzuki, Susumu; Ishii, Hideki; Hirayama, Kenshi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Shibata, Yohei; Tatami, Yosuke; Harata, Shingo; Kawashima, Kazuhiro; Kunimura, Ayako; Takayama, Yohei; Shimbo, Yusaku; Osugi, Naohiro; Yamamoto, Dai; Ota, Tomoyuki; Kono, Chikao; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-07-01

    Malnutrition is associated with the development of atherosclerosis and an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality in elderly patients. The present study aimed to investigate the association between the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI), a simple nutritional assessment tool, and the prevalence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in elderly coronary artery disease patients. We evaluated 228 elderly coronary artery disease patients (mean age 74.0 ± 5.7 years). Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements were routinely carried out to investigate the prevalence of lower extremity PAD. Patients showing ABI risk of having PAD than those with high GNRI and low C-reactive protein levels. GNRI values showed a strong relationship with PAD in elderly coronary artery disease patients. These data reinforce the utility of GNRI as a screening tool in clinical practice. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1057-1062. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  3. Emerging genomic applications in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damani, Samir B; Topol, Eric J

    2011-05-01

    Over the last 4 years, an unprecedented number of studies illuminating the genomic underpinnings of common "polygenic" diseases including coronary artery disease have been published. Notably, these studies have established numerous deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) variants within or near chromosome 9p21.3, the LPA, CXADR, and APOE genes, to name a few, as key coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death susceptibility markers. Most importantly, many of these DNA variants confer over a 2-fold increase in risk for coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and ventricular fibrillation. Additionally, loss-of-function variants in the hepatic cytochrome 2C19 system have now been found to be the predominant genetic mediators of clopidogrel antiplatelet response, with variant carriers having a >3-fold increase in risk for stent thrombosis. In the near future, many additional rare polymorphisms, structural variants, and tissue-specific epigenetic features of the human genome including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin state will emerge as significant contributors to disease pathogenesis and drug response. In aggregate, these findings will have the potential to radically change the practice of cardiovascular medicine. However, only the individual clinician can ultimately enable the translation of these important discoveries to systematic implementation in clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Plurivascular Lesions in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelemen Piroska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Occlusive arterial disease, regardless of etiology, is a progressive chronic disease with multiple vessel involvement. The importance of obstructive arterial disease is that it leads to an increased mortality and morbidity of other cardiovascular disorders. Therefore, the presence of a lesion on a certain artery should lead to the identification of other lesions on the carotid and coronary arteries. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency and severity of lesions in peripheral arterial disease of different etiologies, and also to study its association with multivessel lesions at the level of the coronary tree and the carotid arteries.

  5. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other risk factors. Overweight and obese adults with risk factors for cardiovascular disease such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, ... lead to clinically meaningful reductions in some risk factors, larger weight ... of developing cardiovascular disease. Even when glucose levels are under control, ...

  6. Updates in management of coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Heon; Chae, Shung Chull [Kyungpook National University Medical School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been increasing during the last decade and is the one of major causes of death. The management of patients with coronary artery disease has evolved considerably. There are two main strategies in the management of CAD, complementary, not competitive, each other; the pharmacologic therapy to prevent and treat CAD and the percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to restore coronary flow. Antiplatelet drugs and cholesterol lowering drugs have central roles in pharmacotherapy. Drug eluting stent (DES) bring about revolutional changes in PCL in the management of patients with ST segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (AMI), there has been a debate on the better strategy for the restoration of coronary flow. Thrombolytic therapy is widely available and easy to administer, whereas primary PCI is less available and more complex, but more complete. Recently published evidences in the pharmacologic therapy including antiplatelet and statin, and PCI including DES and reperfusion therapy in patients with ST segment elevation AMI were reviewed.

  7. Coronary Artery Disease and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Japanese Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naomi Mitsuhashi; Tomio Onuma; Sayaka Kubo; Naoko Takayanagi; Motoe Honda; Ryuzo Kawamori

    2002-01-01

    Coronary Artery Disease and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Japanese Type 2 Diabetic Patients Naomi Mitsuhashi , MD , Tomio Onuma , MD , Sayaka Kubo , MD , Naoko Takayanagi , MD , Motoe Honda...

  8. Peripheral arterial disease in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbert S Aronow

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilbert S AronowCardiology Division, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, New YorkAbstract: Smoking should be stopped and hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and hypothyroidism treated in elderly patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD of the lower extremities. Statins reduce the incidence of intermittent claudication and improve exercise duration until the onset of intermittent claudication in patients with PAD and hypercholesterolemia. Antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel, especially clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins should be given to all elderly patients with PAD without contraindications to these drugs. Beta blockers should be given if coronary artery disease is present. Exercise rehabilitation programs and cilostazol increase exercise time until intermittent claudication develops. Chelation therapy should be avoided. Indications for lower extremity percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or bypass surgery are (1 incapacitating claudication in patients interfering with work or lifestyle; (2 limb salvage in patients with limb-threatening ischemia as manifested by rest pain, non-healing ulcers, and/or infection or gangrene; and (3 vasculogenic impotence.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, intermittent claudication, antiplatelet drugs, statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, cilostazol, exercise rehabilitation, revascularization

  9. Impact of Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation on the Presentation of Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Hei Chan

    Full Text Available Little is known about whether atrial fibrillation is a presentation of coronary disease. There is a paucity of knowledge about their causal relationship and also the impact of different antithrombotic strategies on the subsequent presentation of symptomatic coronary disease.We studied 7,526 Chinese patients diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and no documented history of coronary artery disease. The primary endpoint was the new occurrence of coronary artery disease--either stable coronary artery disease or acute coronary syndrome. After a mean follow-up of 3.2±3.5 years (24,071 patient-years, a primary endpoint occurred in 987 patients (13.1%. The overall annual incidence of coronary artery disease was 4.10%/year. No significant differences in age, sex, and mean CHA2DS2-VASc score were observed between patients with and without the primary endpoint. When stratified according to the antithrombotic strategies applied for stroke prevention, the annual incidence of coronary artery disease was 5.49%/year, 4.45%/year and 2.16%/year respectively in those prescribed no antithrombotic therapy, aspirin, and warfarin. Similar trends were observed in patients with acute coronary syndromes. Diabetes mellitus, smoking history and renal failure requiring dialysis were predictors for primary endpoint in all antithrombotic therapies.In patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation, there is a modest association with coronary artery disease. Patients prescribed warfarin had the lowest risk of new onset coronary artery disease.

  10. Echocardiographic evaluation of coronary arteries in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Grace; Miller, Michelle S

    2015-12-01

    Among populations of patients with the congenital heart disease, there is considerable diversity in the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Understanding these anatomical differences is vitally important in directing interventions and surgical repair. In this report, the authors describe the echocardiographic evaluation of the variants of coronary artery anatomy in the following lesions: transposition of the great arteries, congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, double-inlet left ventricle, common arterial trunk, tetralogy of Fallot, and double-outlet right ventricle.

  11. [Central arterial pressure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gel'tser, B I; Brodskaia, T A

    2008-01-01

    To study central (aortic) arterial pressure (CAP) and aortic stiffness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) of different severity. Non-invasive arteriography with Tensio Climo TL1 arteriograph (TensioMed, Hungary) was made to measure aortic stiffness and systolic pressure (SAP) in 54 COPD patients and 25 healthy controls. The difference between the central and peripheral SAP (delta SAP) and central/ peripheral pressure correspondence index (CI) were estimated. Indirect arteriography has found that patients with moderate and severe COPD have stable elevated central SAP which is close to brachial SAP while in healthy controls the difference between central and peripheral SAP is 10.2 +/- 2.1 mmHg. With progression of COPD severity, deltaSAP diminishes while CI rises showing growing disproportion between central and peripheral blood pressure. In severe COPD physiological difference between them disappears. In COPD increased CAP is associated with impaired mechanical properties of the arterial bed and myocardial contractility proved by significant links between CAP and left ventricular ejection fraction index and key parameters of arterial stiffness. Aortic CAP, delta SAP and CI are additional informative criteria of COPD severity and high cardiovascular risk as shown by their close correlation with hypoxemia, severity and duration of the disease.

  12. Relationship between carotid artery stenosis and ischemic ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the relationship between carotid artery stenosis and ischemic ocular diseases.METHODS: The clinical data of 30 cases(37 eyesof patients with ischemic eye diseases were collected from November 2010 to May 2014, and they were accepted the fundus fluorescein angiography(FFA, transcranial Doppler(TCDultrasonic blood vessels of the eye, neck vascular color Doppler flow imaging(CDFI, the neck CT angiography(CTAand carotid artery digital subtraction angiography(DSAexamination, and then the ischemic eye disease patients with ocular symptoms were analyzed. The peak systolic velocity(PSVand resistance index(RIof ophthalmic artery and central retinal artery were compared. Correlation between the internal carotid artery intima-media thickness(IMTand ophthalmic artery, central retinal artery PSV and RI correlation risk; ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and ophthalmic artery PSV and RI; PSV and RI associated ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and central retinal artery were analyzed. RESULTS: Eye symptoms: a black dim, reduced vision, the eyes flash, and around the eye pain were 75.7%, 83.8%, 51.4% and 32.4%; The eye signs: the dilatation of retinal vein, retinal hemorrhage, arterial stenosis and cotton spot and the contralateral side were regarded as main signs. Ophthalmic artery PSV and RI value of the differences were statistically significant(PPP>0.05; The ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and ophthalmic artery PSV had no correlation with RI values(P>0.05; PSV and RI and the ipsilateral internal carotid artery plaque and central retinal artery had no correlation(P>0.05.CONCLUSION: The incidence of ischemic eye diseases and internal carotid artery stenosis is associated with very close, the clinical can regard the degree of internal carotid artery stenosis as an important basis for diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases.

  13. Arterial Wall Properties and Womersley Flow in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriadis Emilios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting in the cellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide particularly globotriaosylceramide. The disease is characterized by a dilated vasculopathy with arterial ectasia in muscular arteries and arterioles. Previous venous plethysomographic studies suggest enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Fabry disease indicating a functional abnormality of resistance vessels. Methods We examined the mechanical properties of the radial artery in Fabry disease, a typical fibro-muscular artery. Eight control subjects and seven patients with Fabry disease had a right brachial arterial line placed allowing real time recording of intra-arterial blood pressure. Real time B-mode ultrasound recordings of the right radial artery were obtained simultaneously allowing calculation of the vessel wall internal and external diameter, the incremental Young's modulus and arterial wall thickness. By simultaneously measurement of the distal index finger-pulse oximetry the pulse wave speed was calculated. From the wave speed and the internal radial artery diameter the volume flow was calculated by Womersley analysis following truncation of the late diastolic phase. Results No significant difference was found between Fabry patients and controls for internal or external arterial diameters, the incremental Young's modulus, the arterial wall thickness, the pulse wave speed and the basal radial artery blood flow. Further, no significant difference was found for the radial artery blood flow in response to intra-arterial acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Both drugs however, elevated the mean arterial flow. Conclusions The current study suggests that no structural or mechanical abnormality exists in the vessel wall of fibro-muscular arteries in Fabry disease. This may indicate that a functional abnormality downstream to the conductance vessels is the dominant feature in

  14. Peripheral Arteries May Be Reliable Indicators of Coronary Vascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehmann, Christopher L; Futterman, Bennett; Beatty, Brian Lee

    2017-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a stronger predictor for ischemic cardiovascular events than traditional risk factors such as race, age, sex, history, and metabolic profile. Previous research had primarily used ultrasound; however, we performed a study using histopathology to more accurately grade atherosclerosis development using the American Heart Association's grading scale. We cross-sectioned 13 different arteries from 48 cadavers and placed them into three separate groups based on anatomic location: central arteries, peripheral arteries, and carotid arteries. The central artery group included arteries that are non-palpable and commonly lead to ischemic diseases when occluded. The peripheral artery group included arteries that are accessible to palpation. The carotid artery group included branches of the carotid artery. We investigated whether a centrally located atherosclerotic vessel was associated with atherosclerosis of a specific peripheral artery. We hypothesized a correlation between carotid, peripheral and central arteries that may point to specific arteries that are more effective to analyze clinically when assessing cardiovascular risk. We observed a correlation between pathology in the left coronary artery and bifurcation of the carotid artery (r = 0.37 P ≤ 0.016), two arteries known to be implicated in ischemic stroke and ischemic heart disease. Importantly, our study demonstrates that the radial artery, a peripheral vessel, exhibited a positive correlation between both the pathologic left coronary (r = 0.33 P ≤ 0.041) and bifurcation of the carotid arteries (r = 0.34 P ≤ 0.025). Therefore, we propose investigating the radial artery as a clinically accessible location to monitor with ultrasound when assessing a patient's risk for ischemic cardiovascular disease. Anat Rec, 300:1230-1239, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Coronary artery bypass grafting following simultaneous treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm and peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temizkan, Veysel; Ugur, Murat; Alp, Ibrahim; Ucak, Alper; Yedekci, Erturk; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis might affect all arterial segments of the vascular system, thus peripheral arterial disease (PAD) accompanying coronary artery disease (CAD) is not uncommon. In addition to this coexistence, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is frequently associated with CAD. Although treatment strategies of CAD and PAD or CAD and AAA has been reported previously, treatment of these three pathologies has not been reported. The management of a therapeutic strategy is important for avoiding perioperative mortality and morbidity in CAD associated with AAA and PAD. We are reporting our simultaneous treatment strategy of three pathologies with endovascular AAA repair, stent implantation into the superficial femoral artery (SFA) and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG).

  16. [Physical activity and peripheral arterial obstructive disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calanca, Luca; Pellegrin, Maxime; Mazzolai, Lucia

    2010-02-10

    Intermittent claudication (IC) is the most common clinical manifestation of atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. Exercise training plays a major role in treating patients with IC. Regular exercise increases functional walking capacity, reduces cardiovascular mortality and improves quality of life. This seems to be achieved by: favorable effect on cardiovascular risk factors, anti-inflammatory effect, increased collateral blood flux, improved rheology profile, endothelial function, fibrinolysis, and muscular metabolism. However, exact mechanisms underlying beneficial effect of exercise remain largely unknown. Exercise modalities will be discussed in this article.

  17. Haemostatic function in coronary artery disease (CAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Sikka, M; Madan, N; Dwidedi, S; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1997-04-01

    Tests to evaluate haemostatic function bleeding time (BT), prothrombin time (PT) partial thromboplastin time with kaolin (PTTK), thrombin time (TT), platelet count, platelet function tests (platelet adhesiveness and microthrombus index) and plasma fibrinogen levels were performed in 30 patients of coronary artery disease (14 myocardial infarction, 16 angina pectoris) and 20 age and sex matched controls. There was no statistically significant difference in platelet adhesiveness and mean microthrombus index in patients and controls. The BT, PT, PTTK and TT were normal in all patients and controls. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that plasma fibrinogen was an independent risk factor in the production of CAD.

  18. Evaluation of Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease by Ankle-brachial Index in Patients with Concomitant Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Vakili

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peripheral arterial disease is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. As such, it is found that screening for peripheral arterial disease (PAD improves risk assessment. Thus, intensive risk factor modification and medical treatment in these patients are necessary. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease in patients with concomitant coronary arterial disease. Methods: Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease was investigated in 400 patients (60% males, 40% females, aged 59.7± 11.3 with a documented coronary arterial disease. Results: Among patients with documented CAD, 12% had asymptomatic PAD with the ABI ratio of less than 0.9. Conclusions: It is advisable to screen for PAD not only as a disease but also as a risk assessment method for atherosclerosis.

  19. Artery ligation in the treatment of hemorrhoidal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study the working principle in relation to the outcome of the artery ligation procedure; a treatment for hemorrhoidal disease. Hemorrhoidal artery ligation, known as HAL (hemorrhoidal artery ligation) or THD (transanal hemorrhoidal dearterialization) procedure, is a

  20. Extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, Chantal M; Loyer, Xavier; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Amabile, Nicolas

    2017-05-01

    Membrane vesicles released in the extracellular space are composed of a lipid bilayer enclosing soluble cytosolic material and nuclear components. Extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, exosomes, and microvesicles (also known previously as microparticles). Originating from different subcellular compartments, the role of extracellular vesicles as regulators of transfer of biological information, acting locally and remotely, is now acknowledged. Circulating vesicles released from platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells contain potential valuable biological information for biomarker discovery in primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Extracellular vesicles also accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaques, where they affect major biological pathways, including inflammation, proliferation, thrombosis, calcification, and vasoactive responses. Extracellular vesicles also recapitulate the beneficial effect of stem cells to treat cardiac consequences of acute myocardial infarction, and now emerge as an attractive alternative to cell therapy, opening new avenues to vectorize biological information to target tissues. Although interest in microvesicles in the cardiovascular field emerged about 2 decades ago, that for extracellular vesicles, in particular exosomes, started to unfold a decade ago, opening new research and therapeutic avenues. This Review summarizes current knowledge on the role of extracellular vesicles in coronary artery disease, and their emerging potential as biomarkers and therapeutic agents.

  1. Incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score for the prediction of coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.S.S. Genders (Tessa); F. Pugliese (Francesca); N.R.A. Mollet (Nico); W.B. Meijboom (Willem Bob); A.C. Weustink (Annick); C.A.G. van Mieghem (Carlos); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:: To validate published prediction models for the presence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with new onset stable typical or atypical angina pectoris and to assess the incremental value of the CT coronary calcium score (CTCS). Methods:: We searched the

  2. Low prevalence of significant carotid artery disease in Iranian patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery bypass grafting ranks as one of the most frequent operations worldwide. The presence of carotid artery stenosis may increase the stroke rate in the perioperative period. Routine preoperative noninvasive assessment of the carotid arteries are recommended in many institutions to reduce the stroke rate. Methods 271 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Shaheed Madani hospital of Tabriz, Iran (age, 58.5 Y; 73.1% male underwent preoperative ultrasonography for assessment of carotid artery wall thickness. Results Plaque in right common, left common, right internal and left internal carotid arteries was detected in 4.8%, 7.4%, 43.2% and 42.1% of patients respectively. 5 patients (1.8% had significant ( Conclusion Consecutive Iranian patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery show a very low prevalence of significant carotid artery disease.

  3. Premature coronary artery disease in Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Sharma

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Meenakshi Sharma, Nirmal Kumar GangulyIndian Council of Medical Research, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, IndiaAbstract: Of particular concern to India is not only the high burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs, but also the effects of these diseases on the productive workforce aged 35–65 years. Heart diseases are rising in Asian Indians 5–10 years earlier than in other populations around the world. The mean age for first presentation of acute myocardial infarction in Indians is 53 years. Coronary artery disease (CAD that manifests at a younger age can have devastating consequences for an individual, the family, and society. Prevention of these deaths in young people is a nation’s moral responsibility. A strategy involving prevention of CVDs long before their onset will be more cost-effective than providing interventions at a stage when the disease is well established. We review the rising trends in CAD with particular emphasis on prevalence of premature CAD and the associated risk factors in young Indian CAD patients. Action strategies to reduce the risk are suggested.Keywords: premature CAD, prevalence, risk factors

  4. Coronary artery disease and its association with Vitamin D deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Aggarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD has become the latest scourge of humankind and referred to in this article as CAD, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of coronary arteries that supply the myocardium, a process also known as atherosclerosis and manifests mostly in the form of chronic stable angina or acute coronary syndrome. Vitamin D has attracted considerable interest recently due to its role in a number of extraskeletal disease processes including multiple sclerosis, malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and CAD. It is also known as sunshine vitamin due to its production in the body following exposure to ultraviolet rays, and it is a unique vitamin as it acts like a hormone with its receptor present in a wide range of tissues including endothelium, which is the important mediator of atherosclerosis and subsequent CAD. A large number of studies conducted in the past have provided the basic scientific framework and this article attempts to explore the role of Vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of CAD and stresses the need for further research to fill up gap in our knowledge.

  5. Estimation of arterial arrival time and cerebral blood flow from QUASAR arterial spin labeling using stable spline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellaro, Marco; Peruzzo, Denis; Mehndiratta, Amit; Pillonetto, Gianluigi; Petersen, Esben Thade; Golay, Xavier; Chappell, Michael A; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2015-12-01

    QUASAR arterial spin labeling (ASL) permits the application of deconvolution approaches for the absolute quantification of cerebral perfusion. Currently, oscillation index regularized singular value decomposition (oSVD) combined with edge-detection (ED) is the most commonly used method. Its major drawbacks are nonphysiological oscillations in the impulse response function and underestimation of perfusion. The aim of this work is to introduce a novel method to overcome these limitations. A system identification method, stable spline (SS), was extended to address ASL peculiarities such as the delay in arrival of the arterial blood in the tissue. The proposed framework was compared with oSVD + ED in both simulated and real data. SS was used to investigate the validity of using a voxel-wise tissue T1 value instead of using a single global value (of blood T1 ). SS outperformed oSVD + ED in 79.9% of simulations. When applied to real data, SS exhibited a physiologically realistic range for perfusion and a higher mean value with respect to oSVD + ED (55.5 ± 9.5 SS, 34.9 ± 5.2 oSVD + ED mL/100 g/min). SS can represent an alternative to oSVD + ED for the quantification of QUASAR ASL data. Analysis of the retrieved impulse response function revealed that using a voxel wise tissue T1 might be suboptimal. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Soluble ST2 and interleukin-33 levels in coronary artery disease: relation to disease activity and adverse outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demyanets, Svitlana; Speidl, Walter S; Tentzeris, Ioannis; Jarai, Rudolf; Katsaros, Katharina M; Farhan, Serdar; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Wonnerth, Anna; Weiss, Thomas W; Huber, Kurt; Wojta, Johann

    2014-01-01

    ST2 is a receptor for interleukin (IL)-33. We investigated an association of soluble ST2 (sST2) and IL-33 serum levels with different clinical stages of coronary artery disease. We assessed the predictive value of sST2 and IL-33 in patients with stable angina, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We included 373 patients of whom 178 had stable angina, 97 had NSTEMI, and 98 had STEMI. Patients were followed for a mean of 43 months. The control group consisted of 65 individuals without significant stenosis on coronary angiography. Serum levels of sST2 and IL-33 were measured by ELISAs. sST2 levels were significantly increased in patients with STEMI as compared to patients with NSTEMI and stable angina as well as with controls. IL-33 levels did not differ between the four groups. During follow-up, 37 (10%) patients died and the combined endpoint (all cause death, MI and rehospitalisation for cardiac causes) occurred in 66 (17.6%) patients. sST2 serum levels significantly predicted mortality in the total cohort. When patients were stratified according to their clinical presentation, the highest quintile of sST2 significantly predicted mortality in patients with STEMI, but not with NSTEMI or stable coronary artery disease. sST2 was a significant predictor for the combined endpoint in STEMI patients and in patients with stable angina. Serum levels of IL-33 were not associated with clinical outcome in the total cohort, but the highest quintile of IL-33 predicted mortality in patients with STEMI. Serum levels of sST2 are increased in patients with acute coronary syndromes as compared to levels in patients with stable coronary artery disease and in individuals without coronary artery disease. sST2 and IL-33 were associated with mortality in patients with STEMI but not in patients with NSTEMI or stable angina.

  7. Skin microcirculation in peripheral arterial obliterative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M; Carpi, A

    2004-10-01

    The important role of microcirculation in the pathophysiology and symptoms of peripheral arterial obliterative disease (PAOD) has been progressively emphasized during the past twenty years, thanks to the use of different non-invasive methods, such as capillaroscopy, laser Doppler (LD) fluxmetry and transcutaneous measurement of oxygen tension (tcPO2). Basally, in the diseased leg of stage II PAOD patients, leg skin perfusion recorded by means of LD fluxmetry is quantitatively normal. However, spectral analysis of skin LD tracing shows an abnormal flowmotion, with increased amplitude of the flowmotion waves related to endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic activities, suggesting a relatively early skin microcirculatory adaptation in this PAOD stage. Following ischemia, an impaired total skin LD hyperemia and a reduced skin capillary nutritional blood flow at capillaroscopy, concomitantly with a reduced increase of flowmotion waves related to endothelial, myogenic and sympathetic activities, have been observed in the diseased leg of stage II PAOD patients. In critical limb ischemia (CLI), a more advanced cutaneous microcirculatory deterioration has been clarified, with a more severely impaired post-ischemic hyperemia, a reduced tcPO2 and a severely perturbed skin flowmotion in the diseased leg. This integrated skin microcirculatory diagnostic approach can be used for a better management of PAOD patients.

  8. Serum amyloid P (SAP) is associated with impaired brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in chronically HIV-1 infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zungsontiporn, Nath; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Mitchell, Brooks I; Stein, James H; Kallianpur, Kalpana J; Nakamoto, Beau; Keating, Sheila M; Norris, Philip J; Souza, Scott A; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Chow, Dominic C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial dysfunction (ED), as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD). We conducted a cross-sectional analysis utilizing baseline data of 135 participants with HIV infection on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the Hawaii Aging with HIV-Cardiovascular (HAHC-CVD) study who had available baseline inflammatory biomarkers and brachial artery FMD measurements. We observed significant associations between brachial artery FMD and baseline brachial artery diameter, age, male gender, traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors such as BMI, waist to hip ratio, hypertension, systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and LDL cholesterol, and 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS). Of all biomarkers tested, higher level of C-reactive protein (CRP) (beta =  - 0.695, P = 0.030) and serum amyloid P (SAP) (beta =  - 1.318, P = 0.021) were significantly associated with lower brachial artery FMD in univariable regression analysis. After adjusting for baseline brachial artery diameter, age, and selected traditional CVD risk factors in multivariable model, SAP remained significantly associated with brachial artery FMD (beta =  - 1.094, P = 0.030), while CRP was not (beta =  - 0.391, P = 0.181). Serum amyloid P was independently associated with impaired brachial artery FMD and may potentially relate to ED and increased CVD risk in HIV-infected patients on stable ART.

  9. Carotid artery intima-media thickness, but not coronary artery calcium, predicts vascular resistance in patients evaluated for coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danad, I.; Raijmakers, P.G.; Kamali, P.; Harms, H.J.; de Haan, S.; Lubberink, J.M.; van Kuijk, C.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Smulders, Y.M.; Heijmans, M.W.; Tulevski, I.I.; van Rossum, A.C.; Knaapen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: There is growing evidence that coronary artery disease (CAD) affects not only the conduit epicardial coronary arteries, but also the microvascular coronary bed. Moreover, coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMVD) often precedes the stage of clinically overt epicardial CAD. Coronary artery

  10. Functional Information in Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Sørgaard, Mathias H; Linde, Jesper J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review methodological and logistical aspects of CT myocardial perfusion, current clinical evidence and possible future directions, with specific focus on use in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). RECENT FINDINGS: CT myocardial perfusion imaging may be performed...... as an add-on to standard coronary CT angiography (CCTA), to identify regions of myocardial hypoperfusion, at rest and during adenosine stress. The principle of measurement is well-validated in animal experimental models, and CT myocardial perfusion imaging has a high degree of concordance with already...... clinically available perfusion imaging methods. Combining CCTA and CT myocardial perfusion imaging increases the diagnostic accuracy to identify patients with CAD associated with ischemia. In patients suspected of CAD, CCTA frequently detects coronary atherosclerotic lesions, in which revascularization could...

  11. [Arterial rigidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoli, N A; Dolishniaia, G R; Rebrov, A P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this open study was to estimate arterial rigidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It included 105 patients above 40 years of age. Exclusion criteria were clinical signs of CHD, peripheral atherosclerosis, and other severe chronic diseases in the exacerbation phase. The control group was comprised of 27 practically healthy volunteers. The arterial fluid was detected using a Tensioclinic arteriograph (Tensiomed, Hungary). Arterial rigidity was estimated in patients of two age groups (below and above 60 years) with COPD of different severity The results suggest the development of arterial wall lesions in proportion to the patients' age and COPD severity. It was shown that excessive arterial rigidity and accelerated pulse wave reflection (increased speed of pulse wave propagation and augmentation index) exert significant influence on the elevation of central arterial pressure. Enhanced rigidity of the arterial wall being a cardiovascular risk factor further prospective studies are needed.

  12. [Is coronary artery disease different in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Florence

    2010-02-01

    Coronary disease is the leading cause of death in women, responsible for 2-4 times more deaths than breast cancer. The clinical picture of coronary heart disease in women is often different than that in men, evidence of a particular pathophysiology: it is most often identified when acute, as non-ST-elevated acute coronary syndrome, and involves a higher frequency than among men of normal coronary arteries, microvascular damage, and endothelial dysfunction. The risk factors for woman are also distinctive: a higher risk profile, older age, and higher frequency of lack of exercise and its consequences (abdominal obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes). Smoking is a major risk factor in young women. Stress tests are less useful for diagnosis in women than in men, essentially because of the higher rate of false positives. On the other hand, the diagnostic value of myocardial scintigraphy and stress ultrasound testing differs little from that in men. Coronary revascularization by angioplasty or bypass classically yields poorer results in women than men, probably because of their smaller arteries. These differences are nonetheless fading as techniques improve. The impact of active stents in women remains to be determined. The prognosis of myocardial infarction in women remains poorer than in men, but appropriate and early management, especially by angioplasty, seems to be smoothing out this difference in recent studies. Women on the whole receive less good treatment than men (delayed management and less frequent drug and interventional treatment), which contributes to their poorer prognosis. Simple means of prevention have proved effective in women: regular physical activity thus reduces the risk of infarction by 50% (and also reduces the incidence of diabetes); the effect of aspirin as primary prevention remains controversial. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Psoriasis and ischemic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahiques-Santos, L; Soriano-Navarro, C J; Perez-Pastor, G; Tomas-Cabedo, G; Pitarch-Bort, G; Valcuende-Cavero, F

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an increased risk of ischemic coronary artery disease (CAD) in some populations. We aimed to determine the association between these 2 diseases in our geographic area. We performed a cross-sectional study of patient records between 2005 and 2012 in the database (Abucacis, Datamart) that contains all medical case histories in the province of Castellón, Spain. Patients diagnosed with psoriasis were compared with a control group of patients diagnosed with melanocytic nevus. The prevalence of CAD and the presence or absence of the main cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in each group. A total of 9181 patients with psoriasis and 21925 with melanocytic nevus were studied. Univariate logistic regression analysis showed that CAD was significantly associated with psoriasis, age (in years), sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and obesity (P<.05). On adjustment for age, sex, and the other cardiovascular risk factors, multivariate regression analysis established that psoriasis was independently associated with CAD (P<.029). Our findings in a large sample of patients in a Mediterranean area support the hypothesis that patients in this population have an increased risk of ischemic CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Musings on genome medicine: cholesterol and coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan, David G.; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol levels and not inflammatory markers are the major variables that pose a risk of coronary artery disease. Diabetes greatly increases the risk at any cholesterol level. Coronary artery disease and cancer are linked by a common protein - an apoptotic protein that also functions as a regulator of insulin secretion.

  15. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  16. Peripheral arterial disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecci, R; De La Fuente Aguado, J; Sanjurjo Rivo, A B; Sanchez Conde, P; Corbacho Abelaira, M

    2012-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CV) is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with cardiovascular disease, and its risk factors are common to other atherosclerotic diseases. The objective is to determine the prevalence of PAD in a population of patients with COPD using the ankle / brachial index (ABI) and to investigate the relationship between PAD and lung disease severity. In a prospective cross-sectional study, 246 patients with COPD were recruited. Patients were enrolled consecutively according to their admission to Povisa hospital from September 1, 2008, until March 1, 2010, and were assessed by clinical history, spirometry and ABI. The COPD severity was graded by GOLD criteria in spirometry. Overall, 84 patients (36.8%) had abnormal ABI results and 59 (70.2%) were asymptomatic for PAD. COPD patients with PAD had a higher prevalence of moderate to severe COPD (61.9% vs. 41.7%, P=0.004), lower mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) values (46.7% ± 15 vs. 52.3±14%, P=0.001) and a higher prevalence of hypertension (69% vs. 54.3%, P=0.03) and previous cardiovascular disease (34.5% vs. 21.3%, P=0.03). There was a high prevalence of asymptomatic PAD in the COPD patients we examined. Abnormal ABI results were associated with a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and more severe lung disease. The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease in COPD is important because this is an entity that limits the patient's physical activity and impairs their quality of life in addition to turn it into a high cardiovascular risk patient that requiring additional therapeutic measures.

  17. Prevalence of significant carotid artery stenosis in Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghabili K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abolhassan Shakeri Bavil1, Kamyar Ghabili2, Seyed Ebrahim Daneshmand3, Masoud Nemati3, Moslem Shakeri Bavil4, Hossein Namdar5, Sheyda Shaafi61Tuberculosis and Lung Disease Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 2Medical Philosophy and History Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3Department of Radiology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 5Department of Cardiology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 6Neuroscience Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: Generalized screening for carotid artery stenosis with carotid duplex ultrasonography in patients with peripheral arterial disease is controversial.Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of significant internal carotid artery (ICA stenosis in a group of Iranian patients with peripheral arterial disease.Methods: We prospectively screened 120 patients with a known diagnosis of peripheral vascular disease for carotid artery stenosis. Based on the angiographic assessment of abdominal aorta and arteries of the lower extremities, patients with stenosis greater than 70% in the lower extremity arteries were included. A group of healthy individuals aged ≥50 years was recruited as a control. Risk factors for atherosclerosis including smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease were recorded. Common carotid arteries (CCAs and the origins of the internal and external arteries were scanned with B-mode ultrasonogaphy. Significant ICA stenosis, >70% ICA stenosis but less than near occlusion of the ICA, was diagnosed when the ICA/CCA peak systolic velocity ratio was ≥3.5.Results: Ninety-five patients, with a mean age of 58.52 ± 11.04 years, were studied. Twenty-five patients had a history of smoking, six

  18. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruhashi, Tatsuya; Kajikawa, Masato; Nakashima, Ayumu; Iwamoto, Yumiko; Iwamoto, Akimichi; Oda, Nozomu; Kishimoto, Shinji; Matsui, Shogo; Higaki, Tadanao; Shimonaga, Takashi; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kihara, Yasuki; Chayama, Kazuaki; Goto, Chikara; Aibara, Yoshiki; Noma, Kensuke; Higashi, Yukihito

    2016-09-15

    Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation, an index of endothelium-independent vasodilation, is measured for the assessment of vascular smooth muscle cell function or alterations of vascular structure. Both coronary and brachial artery responses to nitroglycerine have been demonstrated to be independent prognostic markers of cardiovascular events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in the same patients. We measured nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in coronary and brachial arteries in 30 subjects with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent coronary angiography (19 men and 11 women; mean age, 69.0±8.8years; age range, 42-85years). The mean values of nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery, left anterior descending coronary artery, and left circumflex coronary artery were 12.6±5.2%, 11.6±10.3%, and 11.9±11.0%, respectively. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery correlated significantly with that in the left anterior descending coronary artery (r=0.43, P=0.02) and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.49, P=0.006). There was also a significant correlation between nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the left anterior descending coronary artery and that in the left circumflex coronary artery (r=0.72, Parteries and that in coronary arteries are simultaneously present. Nitroglycerine-induced vasodilation in the brachial artery could be used as a surrogate for that in a coronary artery and as a prognostic marker for cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Association between nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Uğur; Türkoğlu, Sedat; Balcioğlu, Serhat; Tavil, Yusuf; Karakan, Tarkan; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-09-01

    To demonstrate whether there is a relationship between the presence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the presence and extent of coronary artery disease (CAD). Ninety-two consecutive patients who planned to undergo coronary angiographies (CAG) without known CAD, other than findings of acute coronary syndrome, were enrolled in this study. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed before the CAG to detect NAFLD. CAD was defined as a stenosis of at least 50% in at least one major coronary artery. The extent of CAD was measured according to the number of major coronary artery/arteries affected by CAD. All the risk factors for CAD were included in a binary logistic regression model. Forward, backward, or step-wise selections were not used. P<0.05 was accepted as being significant. Sixty-five of the 92 patients (70.7%) were detected, by abdominal ultrasonography, to have fatty liver and 43 patients out of 92 (46.7%) were detected, by CAG, to have significant CAD. According to the results of logistic regression analysis, the presence of NAFLD independently increased the risk for CAD, as seen in CAG [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 6.73 (1.14-39.61); P=0.035]; this was despite factoring in the other risk factors for CAD and the components of metabolic syndrome. NAFLD was more commonly found in patients as the extent of CAD increased (P=0.001). The presence of NAFLD is independently associated with the presence and extent of CAD. Future studies are needed to explain the mechanisms of this relationship.

  20. Metabolic syndrome and mortality in stable coronary heart disease: relation to gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Køber, Lars; Faber, Jens

    2007-01-01

    is unknown. METHODS: 1041 patients with stable coronary heart disease, referred for elective coronary angiography were included in this study. At baseline, history of hypertension, body mass index, lipids, fasting plasma glucose, and insulin were recorded. All-cause mortality was determined after a median...... follow-up of 9.2 years. RESULTS: At follow-up 296 (28%) patients had died. 315 (30%) patients had MS based on the definition by the World Health Organization. Patients with MS more frequently had diabetes and three-vessel disease of the coronary arteries. Men had a more severe risk profile than women...

  1. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  2. Trans fatty acids and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyne R Benatar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyne R BenatarGreen Lane Cardiovascular Service, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New ZealandAbstract: There has been a significant increased consumption of trans fats in the developed world as we have embraced processed and take away foods in our diet in the last 40 years. These fatty acids are not essential for human nutrition and are hazardous to health. They increase the risk of cardiovascular disease more than any other macronutrient including saturated fat, through multiple mechanisms including adverse effects on lipids, endothelial function and inflammation. They are readily incorporated into cell structures such as cell membranes and the Golgi apparatus, resulting in unintended effects on multiple biological pathways. The majority of trans fats in our diet are artificially manufactured by a process of partial hydrogenation of vegetable oil with little coming from natural sources. It should be possible to replace these harmful fats in the food chain at source with concerted efforts from food manufacturers and legislators.Keywords: trans fats, coronary artery disease, hydrogenated vegetable oils

  3. Mendelian randomization studies in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Henning; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-08-01

    Epidemiological research over the last 50 years has discovered a plethora of biomarkers (including molecules, traits or other diseases) that associate with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk. Even the strongest association detected in such observational research precludes drawing conclusions about the causality underlying the relationship between biomarker and disease. Mendelian randomization (MR) studies can shed light on the causality of associations, i.e whether, on the one hand, the biomarker contributes to the development of disease or, on the other hand, the observed association is confounded by unrecognized exogenous factors or due to reverse causation, i.e. due to the fact that prevalent disease affects the level of the biomarker. However, conclusions from a MR study are based on a number of important assumptions. A prerequisite for such studies is that the genetic variant employed affects significantly the biomarker under investigation but has no effect on other phenotypes that might confound the association between the biomarker and disease. If this biomarker is a true causal risk factor for CAD, genotypes of the variant should associate with CAD risk in the direction predicted by the association of the biomarker with CAD. Given a random distribution of exogenous factors in individuals carrying respective genotypes, groups represented by the genotypes are highly similar except for the biomarker of interest. Thus, the genetic variant converts into an unconfounded surrogate of the respective biomarker. This scenario is nicely exemplified for LDL cholesterol. Almost every genotype found to increase LDL cholesterol level by a sufficient amount has also been found to increase CAD risk. Pending a number of conditions that needed to be fulfilled by the genetic variant under investigation (e.g. no pleiotropic effects) and the experimental set-up of the study, LDL cholesterol can be assumed to act as the functional component that links genotypes and CAD risk and

  4. Percutaneous coronary intervention versus coronary-artery bypass grafting for severe coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M-C. Morice (Marie-Claude); A.P. Kappetein (Arie Pieter); A. Colombo (Antonio); D.R. Holmes Jr (David); M.J. Mack (Michael); E. Stahle (Elisabeth); T.E. Feldman (Ted); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); E.J. Bass (Eric); N. van Dyck (Nic); K. Leadly (Katrin); K.D. Dawkins (Keith); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) involving drug-eluting stents is increasingly used to treat complex coronary artery disease, although coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG) has been the treatment of choice historically. Our trial compared PCI and CABG for treating

  5. Allicin improves carotid artery intima-media thickness in coronary artery disease patients with hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De-Shan; Wang, Shu-Li; Li, Jun-Mei; Liang, Er-Shun; Yan, Ming-Zhong; Gao, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an important and independent risk factor for atherosclerotic diseases, such as coronary artery disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Increased carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) is a non-invasive marker of systemic atherosclerosis. Allicin treatment may decrease serum Hcy levels and improve impaired endothelial function in rats with hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy). The present study hypothesized that allicin has an anti-atherosclerotic effect in coronary heart disease and tested the effects of allicin treatment on carotid artery IMT and plasma Hcy levels in coronary heart disease patients with HHcy. Sixty-two coronary heart disease patients with HHcy were randomly divided into an allicin group and a control group. All patients underwent diagnostic assessment, plasma Hcy assay, blood lipid measurement and B-mode ultrasound of the carotid artery prior to and after treatment. Plasma Hcy levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. Carotid artery IMT was calculated using an automated algorithm based on a validated edge-detection technique. After 12 weeks, significant decreases in carotid artery IMT, plasma Hcy levels, total cholesterol and triglycerides were observed in the allicin group (all Pallicin group were significantly greater than those in the control group (all PAllicin was able to decrease Hcy levels, total cholesterol and triglycerides as well as carotid artery IMT.

  6. [Arterial stiffness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    To estimate arterial stiffness (AS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A total of 112 COPD patients over 40 years of age entered a population-based trial. The patients with coronary heart diseases, peripheral vascular atherosclerosis, other severe chronic diseases in exacerbation were withdrawn. The control group consisted of 26 healthy volunteers matched by gender and age. AS was measured at arteriograph "Tensioclinic" ("Tensiomed", Hungary). COPD patients, first of all elderly ones, had abnormal properties of arterial wall. Increased arterial rigidity and pulse wave reflection (accelerated pulse wave velocity and high index of augmentation) are strongly associated with elevation of central arterial pressure. High arterial wall stiffness in COPD patients suggests an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases that necessitates examination in prospective studies.

  7. Risk of coronary artery involvement in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ramos, María; Martínez-Del Val, Elena; Negreira Cepeda, Sagrario; González-Tomé, María I; Cedena Romero, Pilar; Fernández-Cooke, Elisa; Albert de la Torre, Leticia; Blázquez-Gamero, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Kawasaki disease refers to systemic vasculitis with risk of coronary artery disease. Our objective is to identify risk factors associated with coronary artery disease in patients with complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Descriptive, retrospective study conducted in patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease in a tertiary-care hospital between 2008 and 2014. The American Heart Association diagnostic criteria were used to define complete and incomplete Kawasaki disease. Thirty-one children were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease; 24 met the criteria for the complete form, and 7, for the incomplete form of this condition. Five had coronary artery disease. One of them had incomplete Kawasaki disease (1/7= 14.3%), and the remaining four had the complete form (4/24= 16.7%). No significant differences were found between both groups (p= 1.0). Patients with coronary artery involvement had a higher C-reactive protein level (median: 16.2 mg/dL versus 8.4 mg/dL, p= 0.047) and lower albuminemia (median: 3.2 mg/dL versus 3.99 mg/dL, p= 0.002). The risk of coronary artery involvement in incomplete Kawasaki disease is similar to that in complete Kawasaki disease; therefore, in patients with the incomplete form, immunoglobulin therapy should not be delayed. In our population, C-reactive protein and albumin levels were related to a higher risk of coronary artery involvement. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  8. Clinical impact of exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Marko; Jug, Borut; Lenasi, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Increasing prevalence, high morbidity and mortality, and decreased health-related quality of life are hallmarks of peripheral arterial disease. About one-third of peripheral arterial disease patients have intermittent claudication with deleterious effects on everyday activities, such as walking. Exercise training improves peripheral arterial disease symptoms and is recommended as first line therapy for peripheral arterial disease. This review examines the effects of exercise training beyond improvements in walking distance, namely on vascular function, parameters of inflammation, activated hemostasis and oxidative stress, and quality of life. Exercise training not only increases walking distance and physiologic parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease, but also improves the cardiovascular risk profile by helping patients achieve better control of hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity and dyslipidemia, thus further reducing cardiovascular risk and the prevalence of coexistent atherosclerotic diseases. American guidelines suggest supervised exercise training, performed for a minimum of 30-45 min, at least three times per week, for at least 12 weeks. Walking is the most studied exercise modality and its efficacy in improving cardiovascular parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease has been extensively proven. As studies have shown that supervised exercise training improves walking performance, cardiovascular parameters and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease, it should be encouraged and more often prescribed.

  9. CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN INDIAN WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Umar Farooque

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women regardless of race or ethnicity accounting for deaths of 1 in 3 women. The aim of the study is to identify the important risk factors contributing to the coronary artery disease in Indian women. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study conducted on 120 women patients of age >40 yrs. visiting a female outpatient department of Jawahar Lal Nehru Medical College, Bhagalpur, who presented with complaints related to CAD cases diagnosed from the electrocardiogram findings, clinical features and biochemical marker as per World Health Organization guidelines. RESULTS 50-59 years age group is most effected group in study with 44.2%. Most of the women are of postmenopausal age group. The maximum number of cases was seen in upper lower socioeconomic status (37.5% followed by lower (19.2%. CAD incidence was minimum in upper class. Chest pain was the main complaint in patients, next in frequency was sweating and followed by breathlessness. The major risk factors in the study group were hypertension (74.1, diabetes (63.3, sedentary habits (49.1, stress (34.2, family history (29.2 and tobacco consumption (21.8. 25 patients had obesity and 54 peoples were overweight. In our study, 48 patients had 3 children, 19 had more than 3 children. 61.7% of the patients are with hypercholesterolaemia, which most of the patients found with 2 vessel block is most common blocks observed. CONCLUSION Despite this delay in onset, mortality from coronary heart disease is increasing more rapidly among women than men.

  10. The contribution of arterial calcification to peripheral arterial disease in pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Leftheriotis

    Full Text Available The contribution of arterial calcification (AC in peripheral arterial disease (PAD and arterial wall compressibility is a matter of debate. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, an inherited metabolic disease due to ABCC6 gene mutations, combines elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft tissues including the arterial wall. Since AC is associated with PAD, a frequent complication of PXE, we sought to determine the role of AC in PAD and arterial wall compressibility in this group of patients.Arterial compressibility and patency were determined by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI in a cohort of 71 PXE patients (mean age 48 ± SD 14 yrs, 45 women and compared to 30 controls without PAD. Lower limb arterial calcification (LLAC was determined by non-contrast enhanced helicoidal CT-scan. A calcification score (Ca-score was computed for the femoral, popliteal and sub-popliteal artery segments of both legs. Forty patients with PXE had an ABI1.40. LLAC increased with age, significantly more in PXE subjects than controls. A negative association was found between LLAC and ABI (r = -0.363, p = 0.002. The LLAC was independently associated with PXE and age, and ABI was not linked to cardiovascular risk factors.The presence of AC was associated with PAD and PXE without affecting arterial compressibility. PAD in PXE patients is probably due to proximal obstructive lesions developing independently from cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. The contribution of arterial calcification to peripheral arterial disease in pseudoxanthoma elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leftheriotis, Georges; Kauffenstein, Gilles; Hamel, Jean François; Abraham, Pierre; Le Saux, Olivier; Willoteaux, Serge; Henrion, Daniel; Martin, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of arterial calcification (AC) in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and arterial wall compressibility is a matter of debate. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an inherited metabolic disease due to ABCC6 gene mutations, combines elastic fiber fragmentation and calcification in various soft tissues including the arterial wall. Since AC is associated with PAD, a frequent complication of PXE, we sought to determine the role of AC in PAD and arterial wall compressibility in this group of patients. Arterial compressibility and patency were determined by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) in a cohort of 71 PXE patients (mean age 48 ± SD 14 yrs, 45 women) and compared to 30 controls without PAD. Lower limb arterial calcification (LLAC) was determined by non-contrast enhanced helicoidal CT-scan. A calcification score (Ca-score) was computed for the femoral, popliteal and sub-popliteal artery segments of both legs. Forty patients with PXE had an ABI1.40. LLAC increased with age, significantly more in PXE subjects than controls. A negative association was found between LLAC and ABI (r = -0.363, p = 0.002). The LLAC was independently associated with PXE and age, and ABI was not linked to cardiovascular risk factors. The presence of AC was associated with PAD and PXE without affecting arterial compressibility. PAD in PXE patients is probably due to proximal obstructive lesions developing independently from cardiovascular risk factors.

  12. [Aftermaths of lesions of coronary arteries in Kawasaki disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vostokova, A A; Grunina, E A; Klemenov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease, also known as cutaneous-mucous-glandular mucocutaneous glandular syndrome, is acute systemic vasculitis of small-to-medium calibre arteries, frequently involving coronary arteries, affect almost exceptionally children, with reports concerning cases of Kawasaki syndrome in 20-to-30-year-old adults being extremely rare. The most serious manifestation of Kawasaki disease is coronaritis and formation of coronary artery aneurysms. The dynamics of the formed coronary aneurysms and, consequently, the fate of patients may be different. Thrombosis of an aneurysm in the early period of the disease and stenosing of the affected coronary artery later on present possible complications of Kawasaki disease and potential causes of myocardial infection in young adults. Increased risk of coronary artery thromboses in Kawasaki disease is conditioned by a decrease in velocity of blood flow and its turbulent pattern in the aneurysms, endothelial dysfunction due to currently existing or endured coronaritis and thrombocytosis typical of this pathology. Predisposing factors of coronary artery stenosing are unfavourable haemodynamic conditions appearing at the sites of the "entry" and "exit" of the aneurysm. Described herein are two case reports of myocardial infarction, one of which being a complication of an acute case of Kawasaki disease in a 29-year-old patient, with the second one being a consequence of coronary artery stenosing in a 25-year-old patient who had endured Kawasaki disease in his childhood.

  13. Moyamoya Disease with Peripheral Pulmonary Artery Stenoses and Coronary Artery Fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Reardon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya is a progressive disorder of the cerebral vasculature. Our report describes a rare case of Moyamoya disease with distal peripheral pulmonary artery stenoses and coronary fistulae in a 12-year-old Caucasian female patient.

  14. Genetically determined height and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Christopher P; Hamby, Stephen E; Saleheen, Danish; Hopewell, Jenna C; Zeng, Lingyao; Assimes, Themistocles L; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Burgess, Stephen; Amouyel, Phillipe; Anand, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boehm, Bernhard O; Clarke, Robert J; Collins, Rory; Dedoussis, George; Farrall, Martin; Franks, Paul W; Groop, Leif; Hall, Alistair S; Hamsten, Anders; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hovingh, G Kees; Ingelsson, Erik; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; König, Inke R; Kooner, Jaspal; Lehtimäki, Terho; März, Winifred; McPherson, Ruth; Metspalu, Andres; Nieminen, Markku S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Palmer, Colin N A; Peters, Annette; Perola, Markus; Reilly, Muredach P; Ripatti, Samuli; Roberts, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; Shah, Svati H; Schreiber, Stefan; Siegbahn, Agneta; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Veronesi, Giovani; Wareham, Nicholas; Willer, Cristen J; Zalloua, Pierre A; Erdmann, Jeanette; Deloukas, Panos; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Danesh, John; Thompson, John R; Samani, Nilesh J

    2015-04-23

    The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested the association between a change in genetically determined height of 1 SD (6.5 cm) with the risk of CAD in 65,066 cases and 128,383 controls. Using individual-level genotype data from 18,249 persons, we also examined the risk of CAD associated with the presence of various numbers of height-associated alleles. To identify putative mechanisms, we analyzed whether genetically determined height was associated with known cardiovascular risk factors and performed a pathway analysis of the height-associated genes. We observed a relative increase of 13.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4 to 22.1; Pheight. There was a graded relationship between the presence of an increased number of height-raising variants and a reduced risk of CAD (odds ratio for height quartile 4 versus quartile 1, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.84; Pheight and an increased risk of CAD, a link that is partly explained by the association between shorter height and an adverse lipid profile. Shared biologic processes that determine achieved height and the development of atherosclerosis may explain some of the association. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.).

  15. [Is coronary artery disease different in women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, François; Chopard, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the primary cause of death in women. Although acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is relatively infrequent in young women, failure to recognize ACS in this population can incur a major risk and registry data show that there is still plenty of room for improvement in this area. Women may suffer from "classical" CAD with development of atherosclerosis with a delay of about 10 years as compared to men, reflecting hormonal protection in women. Besides this classical presentation, angina in women often corresponds to impaired microcirculation, a syndrome known to associate typical angina, demonstrable myocardial ischemia, but no lesions on the coronary angiography. Finally, spasm, spontaneous dissection or coronary thrombosis through endothelial rupture are more frequent in women. The influence of risk factors on the development of CAD is comparable in both women and men. Recent registry studies show that in France, in particular, diabetes, obesity, and smoking are all risk factors that are on the rise in women. In addition, certain other risk factors are more specific to women, namely psycho-social stress. The methods to evaluate risk and detect CAD were mainly developed in male study populations, and these tools thus perform less well in female patients. In case of ACS, women benefit just as much from invasive management, but are at greater risk of iatrogenic complications, particularly with anti-thrombotic therapy or during revascularization procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. "Obesity paradox" in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Ibrahim; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2015-10-26

    Obesity used to be among the more neglected public health problems, but has unfolded as a growing medical and socioeconomic burden of epidemic proportions. Morbid obesity is linked to traditional cardiovascular risk factors like, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes, and suspected to incur increased morbidity and mortality in the Western and even third world populations. This patient cohort is also at greater risk to develop coronary artery disease. Recent population-based registries revealed that 43% and 24% of all cases of coronary revascularization were carried out in overweight and obese patients, respectively. However, despite evidence of a positive correlation between obesity and increased cardiovascular morbidity, some authors have described a better clinical outcome in overweight and obese patients, a phenomenon they coined "obesity paradoxon". Thus, there is an ongoing debate in light of conflicting data and the possibility of confounding bias causing misconception and challenging the "obesity paradox". In this review article we present the current evidence and throughly discuss the validity of the "obesity paradoxon" in a variety of clinical settings.

  17. Inflammatory Markers for Arterial Stiffness in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Mozos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness predicts an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Inflammation plays a major role in large arteries stiffening, related to atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, smooth muscle cell migration, vascular calcification, increased activity of metalloproteinases, extracellular matrix degradation, oxidative stress, elastolysis, and degradation of collagen. The present paper reviews main mechanisms explaining the crosstalk between inflammation and arterial stiffness and the most common inflammatory markers associated with increased arterial stiffness, considering the most recent clinical and experimental studies. Diverse studies revealed significant correlations between the severity of arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers, such as white blood cell count, neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio, adhesion molecules, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, cytokines, microRNAs, and cyclooxygenase-2, in patients with a broad variety of diseases, such as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, coronary heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, malignant and rheumatic disorders, polycystic kidney disease, renal transplant, familial Mediterranean fever, and oral infections, and in women with preeclampsia or after menopause. There is strong evidence that inflammation plays an important and, at least, partly reversible role in the development of arterial stiffness, and inflammatory markers may be useful additional tools in the assessment of the cardiovascular risk in clinical practice. Combined assessment of arterial stiffness and inflammatory markers may improve non-invasive assessment of cardiovascular risk, enabling selection of high-risk patients for prophylactic treatment or more regular medical examination. Development of future destiffening therapies may target pro-inflammatory mechanisms.

  18. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) screening in the asymptomatic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Falk, Erling

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of ankle-brachial index (ABI) was developed to assess peripheral artery disease (PAD) in patients with symptoms of peripheral ischemia being present at rest or only functionally dependent (intermittent claudication). Reduced ABI is caused by arterial obstruction between the aortic arch...

  19. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN STABLE ANGINA AND MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION COMBINED WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Popova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to determine the state of endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasodilatation in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD.Material and methods. In the cross-sectional study included 122 patients with CHD associated with COPD: 68 people of them are patients with stable angina without acute coronary events in history and 54 patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI. Comparison group comprised 53 patients with stable angina and 51 patients after STEMI without concomitant COPD. Patients were included if they met the following inclusion criteria: male, age <60 years, verified forms of CHD (stable angina, STEMI, documented with COPD without exacerbation and forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 30% in the groups with CHD and COPD. Arterial endothelial function was tested with high-resolution ultrasonography: brachial artery diameter was measured at rest, after flow increase (which causes endothelium-dependent dilatation, and after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin (an endothelium-independent dilator.Results. We found that endothelial dysfunction in patients with acute and chronic forms of CHD in combination with COPD are more pronounced than in isolated CHD.Conclusion. Expressed depression functional vascular reserve in patients with CHD associated with COPD, should be taken into account when conducting individualized therapy of these patients.

  20. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Differential imaging features of pulmonary artery dissection from other intraluminal diseases of pulmonary artery: Two cases report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Joo Ho; Shin, Hyun Woong; Sohn, Kung Rak; Lee, Yil Gi [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Pulmonary artery dissection is rarer than other intraluminal diseases of pulmonary artery such as pulmonary thromboembolism or pulmonary artery sarcoma. We report two cases of pulmonary artery dissection mimicking pulmonary artery sarcoma. Computed tomography (CT) showed no enhancement of intrapulmonary arterial lesion or expansion of involved pulmonary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed low-signal intensity intimal flap on T1- and T2-weighted images. There was no fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)-CT. In this case report, we describe the imaging features of pulmonary artery dissection on CT, MRI, and PET-CT.

  2. Feasibility and Safety of Routine Transpedal Arterial Access for Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Tak W; Shah, Sooraj; Amoroso, Nicholas; Diwan, Ravi; Makker, Parth; Ratcliffe, Justin A; Lala, Moinakhtar; Huang, Yili; Nanjundappa, Aravinda; Daggubati, Ramesh; Pancholy, Samir; Patel, Tejas

    2015-07-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility and safety of transpedal arterial access for lower-extremity angiography and intervention. Traditionally, the femoral artery is chosen for the initial access site in symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD), but this approach carries a substantial portion of the entire procedural complication risk. 80 patients were prospectively evaluated for the treatment of PAD between May and July 2014. All patients underwent peripheral angiography, and intervention if necessary. A pedal artery was the initial access site for all patients. Under ultrasound guidance, one of the pedal arteries was visualized and accessed, and a 4 Fr Glidesheath was inserted. Retrograde orbital atherectomy and balloon angioplasty were performed with a 4 Fr sheath or upsizing to a 6 Fr Glidesheath Slender (Terumo) for stenting as needed. Clinical and ultrasound assessment of the pedal arteries were performed before the procedure and at 1-month follow-up. Diagnostic transpedal peripheral angiography was performed in all 80 patients. 43 out of 51 patients (84%) who required intervention were successful using a pedal artery as the sole access site. No immediate or delayed access-site complications were detected. Clinical follow-up was achieved in 77 patients (96%) and access artery patency was demonstrated by ultrasound at 1 month in 100% of patients. The routine use of a transpedal approach for the treatment of PAD may be feasible and safe. Pedal artery access may also avoid many of the complications associated with the traditional femoral approach, but further study is needed.

  3. Functional impairment of precerebral arteries in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobal, Jan; Cankar, Ksenija; Pretnar, Janja; Zaletel, Marjan; Kobal, Lucijan; Teran, Natasa; Melik, Ziva

    2017-01-15

    Cardiovascular pathology of Huntington disease (HD) appears to be complex; while microvascular dysfunction seems to appear early, deaths from cardiomyopathy and stroke might occur in the late phase of HD. Our study evaluated global risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), structure and function of precerebral arteries in 41 HD subjects and 41 matched controls. HD subjects were divided into groups by the United Huntington disease rating scale (presymptomatic-PHD, early-EHD, midstage-MHD and late-LHD). CHD risk factors assessment and Doppler examination of precerebral arteries were performed, including measurements of the carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), and parameters indicating local carotid artery distensibility (stiffness index β, pulse wave velocity, pressure strain elasticity module and carotid artery compliance). In the HD and controls we identified a comparable number of non-obstructive plaques (50% lumen narrowing) were found. There was significantly increased IMT in MHD. In PHD and EHD the parameters of arterial stiffness were significantly higher and the carotid artery compliance was significantly lower. Our results reveal functional vascular pathology in PHD, EHD, and MHD. Precerebral arteries dysfunction in HD therefore appears to be mostly functional and in agreement with recently described autonomic nervous system changes in HD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  5. How Is Carotid Artery Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  6. How Can Carotid Artery Disease Be Prevented?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arteries and highlights them on x-ray pictures. Magnetic Resonance Angiography Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) uses a large magnet and ... symptoms start (do not drive yourself to the hospital). For more detailed information about the warning signs ...

  7. Occlusion of Internal Carotid Artery in Kimura's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a unique case of Kimura's disease in which cerebral infarction was caused by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. A 25-year-old man with Kimura's disease was admitted to our hospital because of left hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed infarction in the right frontal and temporal lobes. Cerebral angiography demonstrated right internal carotid artery occlusion affecting the C1 segment, with moyamoya-like collateral vessels arising from the right opthalamic artery. Kimura's disease is a chronic disease characterized by the clinical triad of slowly enlarging subcutaneous masses with lymphoid hyperplasia in the head and neck. It often occurs in young Asian men. In our patient, the pathogenesis of internal carotid artery occlusion was unknown. There have only been a few case reports in which occlusion of the internal carotid artery was associated with autoimmune disease, and no previous cases of internal carotid occlusion associated with Kimura's disease have been reported. We suspected that occlusion of this patient's internal carotid artery may be caused by the autoimmune mechanism that underlies Kimura's disease.

  8. Renal artery stenosis in patients with established coronary artery disease: Prevalence and predicting factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Khatami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between renal artery stenosis (RAS and other atherosclerotic diseases (particularly coronary artery diseases is well known. In general, the risk factors for atherosclerosis have been clarified, but whether these risk factors operate equally in all forms of atherosclerotic diseases is not known. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of RAS in patients with established coronary artery diseases and then to define the most important risk factors that may help to predict the RAS in this population. In this cross-sectional study, 146 patients with established coronary artery stenosis by angiography simultaneously underwent renal angiography; RAS >50% was considered significant. We found that 25.3% of patients with coronary artery diseases had RAS. The prevalence of significant stenosis was 17.1%. Females were more vulnerable to this disorder than males (47.1% vs. 13.7%, P = 0.001. There was no relationship between the severity and number of stenosed coronary arteries and those of stenosed renal arteries (P = 0.716. Multi-variate logistic regression analysis revealed that among the risk factors for atherosclerosis, female sex (P = 0.001, duration of hypertension (P = 0.032, age (P = 0.046 and serum creatinine (P = 0.018 were strong predictors of the presence of RAS. We concluded that RAS is a common finding in patients with coronary artery disease. We suggest that all older females with deteriorating renal function and long-standing hypertension should be carefully evaluated for early detection of the RAS.

  9. Symptoms of angina pectoris increase the probability of disability pension and premature exit from the workforce even in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lasse; Abildstrøm, Steen Z; Hvelplund, Anders

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate probabilities of disability pension (DP) and premature exit from the workforce (PEW) in patients with stable angina symptoms and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) at angiography compared with obstructive CAD and asymptomatic reference individuals.......To evaluate probabilities of disability pension (DP) and premature exit from the workforce (PEW) in patients with stable angina symptoms and no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) at angiography compared with obstructive CAD and asymptomatic reference individuals....

  10. Diabetic retinopathy: A predictor of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzia El Demerdash

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diabetic retinopathy is a good predictor of coronary artery disease that exceeds the conventional risk factors. Diabetics with retinopathy would benefit from early coronary angiography and diabetic retinocoronary clinics are warranted.

  11. Peripheral arterial disease: application of the chronic care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Marge; Myers, Kathryn; Forbes, Thomas L; Dresser, George; Weiss, Ed

    2011-12-01

    Management of chronic diseases is one of the greatest challenges facing health care professionals globally. With the aging population increasing worldwide, the number of patients afflicted with chronic diseases will increase. Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is a common, chronic atherosclerotic vascular disease that is associated with a high risk of stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. The objective of this study was to determine if a multidisciplinary Vascular Risk Management Clinic (VRMC) would improve risk factor management and health outcomes for patients with PAD with poorly-controlled risk factors. A multidisciplinary VRMC was established utilizing a novel application of the Chronic Care Model to meet the needs of PAD patients. Interventions included optimization of medical therapy, investigations for undiagnosed atherosclerosis in other vascular distributions, smoking cessation therapy, dietary assessment and counseling, and active involvement of patients in evaluating progress towards their risk factor target goals. Assessment of risk factor control was done at each clinic visit and included measures of symptom severity, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar (FBS), lipid profile, body mass index (BMI), and smoking status. Analysis of risk factors was performed for the first 103 patients followed in the clinic. Average follow-up time was 528 days, and statistically significant improvements were seen in blood pressure, LDL, HDL, total cholesterol (TC), and TC/HDL ratio, while BMI, FBS, and triglycerides remained stable. Participation in a specialized vascular risk management clinic resulted in significant improvement in risk factors for disease progression compared to baseline status. Copyright © 2011 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [A case of stable microvascular angina with normal coronary arteries: certainties and doubts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, A

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia is caused in most cases by the obstruction of epicardial coronary vessels. Several studies, however, have shown that abnormalities in the coronary microcirculation can also contribute to myocardial ischemia. Microvascular dysfuntion is defined as primary microvascular angina (MVA) to distinguish it from other forms of secondary microvascular angina due to such diseases as arterial hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, myocardial disease, metabolic syndrome and collagen diseases. We present the case report of a 48-year-old male patient who coronarographically showed coronary slow flow with delayed distal vessel opacification in the absence of coronary stenosis. Whilst this phenomenon is still not completely understood, strong evidence suggests that the primary alteration is caused by a dysfunction of small coronary vessels.

  13. The resonance theory of coronary arterial wall stress as an explanation for the distribution of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Lindsay C H

    2010-05-01

    The coronary arteries are unique within the arterial system in being subject to a continuous oscillatory displacement. It is hypothesised that oscillatory resonance of the coronary arteries occurs when the heart rate is the same as the arteries' Natural Frequency of oscillation. If resonance were to occur then standing waves would exist along the coronary arteries. The sites of the anti-nodes of such standing waves would be the sites of increased wall stress and therefore be expected to be predisposed to disease. Coronary artery resonance would explain the observed increased incidence of disease in the proximal segments of the arteries. It is proposed that coronary artery resonance is a previously unrecognised aetiological factor for coronary artery disease that contributes to its location. If the hypothesis is true then there are potential important consequences for the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  14. Gender disparities in disease-specific health status in postoperative patients with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, M H; Hoeks, S E; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate gender disparities in disease-specific health status (HS), 3- and 5-year post-intervention in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients.......To investigate gender disparities in disease-specific health status (HS), 3- and 5-year post-intervention in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients....

  15. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelboom, John W.; Connolly, Stuart J.; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R.; Hart, Robert G.; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M.; Anand, Sonia S.; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S.; Branch, Kelley R. H.; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Parkhomenko, Alexander N.; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L.; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J.; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J.; Verhamme, Peter B.; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M.; Lewis, Basil S.; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P. Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P.; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim; Aboyans, V.; Ha, J.; Keltai, K.; Lamy, A.; Liu, L.; Moayyedi, P.; Sharma, M.; Stoerk, S.; Varigos, J.; Bhagirath, V.; Bogaty, P.; Botto, F.; Catanese, L.; Donato Magno, J.; Fabbri, G.; Gabizon, I.; Gosselin, G.; Halon, D.; Heldmann, M.; Lamelas, P.; Lauw, M.; Leong, Y.; Liang, D.; Lutay, Y.; Maly, M.; Mikulik, R.; Nayar, S.; Ng, K.; Perera, K.; Pirvu, O.; Ronner, E.; Sato, S.; Smyth, A.; Sokolova, E.; Wiendl, M.; Winkelmann, B.; Yang, X.; Yufereva, Y.; Cairns, J.; Sleight, P.; deMets, D.; Momomura, S. I.; Prins, M. [=Martin H.; Ramsay, T.; Goto, S.; Rouleau, J. L.; Schumi, J.; Thabane, L.; Casanova, A.; Bangdiwala, S.; Deng, E.; Dyal, L.; Khatun, R.; Marsden, T.; Pogue, J.; Tang, C.; Wong, G.; Yuan, F.; Aman, S.; Ariz, A.; Ashton, H.; Belanger, J.; Belanger, M.; Brettell, K.; Chandra, J.; Choppick, C.; Cisternino, D.; Cuncins-Hearn, A.; Di Marino, M.; Diao, L.; Dwomoh, S.; Dykstra, A.; Galatsis, E.; Gasic, T.; Gutierrez, J.; Hamilton, L.; Irwin, L.; Lapensee, C.; Li, A.; Lu, X.; MacRae, L.; Malik, S.; Malvestiti, A.; Mastrangelo, J.; Maystrenko, A.; O'Donnell, L.; Reeh, K.; Szymkow, P.; Thomas, S.; Thrasher, D.; Tyrwhitt, J.; White, L.; Bastone, R.; Berkowitz, S.; Dias, A.; Ho, K.; Keller, L.; Lanius, V.; Lister, K.; Merten, C.; Muehlhofer, E.; Schmidt, K.; Tasto, C.; Tsihlias, E.; Woroniecka-Osio, A.; Orlandini, A.; Niemann, G.; Pascual, A.; Toscanelli, S.; Cabezón, M.; Debaveye, B.; Meeusen, K.; Luys, C.; Broos, K.; Vandenberghe, K.; Luyten, A.; Oliveira, G. B. F.; Vila Nova, D. C.; Konishi, M. Y. N.; Lonn, A.; Turbide, G.; Cayer, M.; Rovito, C.; Standen, D.; Li, J.; Lopez Pico, M.; Dusek, R.; Buzalka, V.; Larsen, J.; Paucar, M. J.; Saarinen, M.; Simon, T.; Bezault, M.; Le Lay, M.; Epstein, L.; Fajardo-Moser, M.; Röser, C.; Putz-Todd, G.; Scheidemantel, F.; Poehler, D.; Renner, J.; Hargitai, A.; Doherty, A. O.; Duffy, N.; Roarty, C.; Nolan, A.; Power, A.; Yuval, R.; Ben Ari, M.; Greenblatt, S.; Marmor, Y.; Lucci, D.; Ceseri, M.; Baldini, E.; Cipressa, L.; Miccoli, M.; Goto, M.; Yamasowa, H.; Kajiwara, M.; Takase, D.; Ikeguchi, K.; Matsumoto, M.; Ishii, M.; Asai, J.; Nozaki, D.; Akatsuka, T.; Yoshida, T.; Shahadan, S.; Md Nasir, N.; Schut, Astrid; Vinck, Leonie; van Leeuwen, Marjelle; Sanchez, J.; Aquino, M. R.; Mararac, T.; Benedyk, K.; Iordache, A.; Ciobanu, A.; Rimbas, R.; Dragoi Galrinho, R.; Magda, S.; Mihaila, S.; Mincu, R.; Suran, B.; Cotoban, A.; Matei, L.; Kursakov, A.; Rusnak, P.; Zakharova, A.; Demidova, E.; Commerford, A.; Lee, S.; Ju, I.; Gunolf, M.; Lorimer, A.; Parkhomenko, L.; Johnson, J.; Anderson, J.; Norby-Slycord., C.; Sala, J.; Sicer, M.; Rasmussen, M.; Luciani, C.; Cartasegna, L.; Beltrano, C.; Medek, G.; Vico, M.; Lanchiotti, P.; Martella, C.; Hominal, M.; Castoldi, M.; Casali, W.; Raimondi, S.; Hasbani, E.; Prado, A.; Paterlini, G.; Waisman, F.; Leonard, M.; Caccavo, A.; Alarcon, V.; Zaidman, C.; Guerlloy, F.; Vogel, D.; Imposti, H.; Dominguez, A.; Hrabar, A.; Fernandez, A.; Schygiel, P.; Sokn, F.; Cuneo, C.; Gutierrez Carrillo, N.; Martinez, G.; Luquez, H.; Costantino, M.; Ruiz, M.; Beccetti, N.; Mackinnon, I.; Cluigt, N.; Ahuad Guerrero, R.; Fanuele, M.; Campisi, V.; Costabel, J.; Romanelli, M.; Bartolacci, I.; Echeverria, M.; Pedrotti, M.; Montaña, O.; Camino, A.; Crespo, C.; Barbieri, M.; Lopez Santi, R.; Tonin, H.; Heffes, R.; Gomez Vilamajo, O.; Vanesio, F.; Allegrini, E.; Garcia Duran, R.; Garcia, C.; Garcia Duran, L.; Schiavi, L.; Mana, M.; Bordonava, A.; Rodriguez, M.; Gutierrez, M.; Garrido, M.; Rodriguez, C.; Ingaramo, A.; Costamagna, O.; Almagro, S.; Gerbaudo, C.; Pelagagge, M.; Bustamante Labarta, M.; Novaretto, L.; Maldini, A.; Lopez, L.; Albisu Di Gennero, J.; Ibanez Saggia, L.; Garcia Vilkas, A.; Alvarez, M.; Stoermann, W.; Vita, N.; Vottero, E.; Macin, S.; Cocco, M.; Onocko, M.; Dran, R.; Gimenez, C.; Cardona, M.; Guzman, L.; Guzman, P.; Martinez, D.; Sarjanovich, R.; Huerta, C.; Scaro, G.; Cuadrado, J.; Rodriguez, G.; Nani, S.; Guardiani, F.; Litvak Bruno, M.; Ceconi, G.; Chacon, C.; Casado, M.; Fernandez Moutin, M.; Maffei, L.; Sassone, S.; Yantorno, M.; Grinfeld, D.; Vensentini, N.; Rolandi, F.; Fallabrino, L.; Majul, C.; Paez, O.; Visser, M.; Luciardi, H.; Mansilla, V.; Gonzalez Colaso, P.; Ferre Pacora, F.; Jure, H.; Parody, M.; Espeche, E.; Whelan, A.; Boyle, A.; Collins, N.; Roberts-Thomson, P.; Rogers, J.; Caroll, P.; Colquhoun, D.; Williams, L.; Shaw, J.; Blombery, P.; Amerena, J.; Lee, C.; Hii, C.; Royse, A.; Royse, C.; Singh, B.; Selvanayagam, J.; Jansen, S.; Thompson, P.; Lo, W.; Hammett, C.; Poulter, R.; Graves, S.; Narasimhan, S.; van den Heuvel, P.; Wollaert, B.; Sinnaeve, P.; Fourneau, I.; Meuris, B.; Vanassche, T.; Ector, B.; Janssens, L.; Debonnaire, P.; Vandekerckhove, Y.; van de Borne, P.; Wautrecht, J.; Motte, S.; Leroy, J.; Schroë, H.; Vrolix, M.; Ferdinande, B.; Vranckx, P.; Benit, E.; Elegeert, I.; Lerut, P.; Wallaert, P.; Hoffer, E.; Borgoens, P.; Dujardin, K.; Brasil, C. K. O. I.; del Monaco, M. I.; Uint, L.; Pavanello, R.; Precoma, D. B.; Vianna, H. S.; Abrantes, J.; Morelli, J.; Manenti, E.; Jaeger, C.; Reis, G.; Giorgeto, F. E.; França, C. C. B.; Quadros, T. F. S.; Saraiva, J.; Costa, M.; de Camargo, O.; Marson Lopes, M.; Silva, J.; Maia, L. N.; Nakazone, M. A.; Mouco, O. M. C. C.; Lemos, M. A. B. T.; Hernandes, M. E.; Pântano, G. S.; de Castro, J. C. M.; Rossi, P. R. F.; Guedes, A. A. M.; Dos Santos, L. B.; dos Santos, F. R.; Vidotti, M. H.; Zimmermann, S. L.; Rech, R.; Nunes, C.; Abib, E.; Oliveira, K. L. C.; Leaes, P. E.; Botelho, R. V.; Navarro, A. L. C.; Silva, R. A.; Arantes, F. B. B.; Dutra, O.; Vaz, R.; Souza, W. K. S. B.; Souza, A. S. B.; Queiroz, W. C. B.; Braile, M.; Ferreira, V.; Izukawa, N. M.; Prakasan, A. K.; Nicolau, J. C.; Dalçóquio, T. F.; Tanajura, L. F. L.; Serrano, C. V.; Hueb, W. A.; Minelli, C.; Borsetti Neto, F. A.; Nasi, L. A.; Martins, S. C. O.; Oliveira, L. F. A.; Silva, M. A. V.; Ferreira, J. O.; de Carvalho Cantarelli, M. J.; Tytus, R.; Pasyk, E.; Pandey, A. S.; Rowe, A.; Cha, J.; Vizel, S.; Babapulle, M.; Semelhago, L.; Saunders, K.; Haligowski, D.; Berlingieri, J.; Nisker, W.; Kiaii, B.; Romsa, J.; Chu, M.; Nagpal, D.; Guo, R.; Mckenzie, N.; Quantz, M.; Bhargava, R.; Bhargava, M.; Mehta, P.; Hill, L.; Heslop, W.; Fell, D.; Hess, A.; Zadra, R.; Zeman, P.; Srivamadevan, M.; Lam, A.; Tai, S.; Al-Qoofi, F.; Spence, F.; Anderson, T.; Kieser, T.; Kidd, W.; Fedak, P.; Smith, E.; Har, B.; Brown, C.; Forgie, R.; Hassan, A.; Pelletier, M.; Searles, G.; Marr, D.; Bessoudo, R.; Douglas, G.; Legare, J.; Petrella, R.; Pavlosky, W.; Ricci, J.; Galiwango, P.; Janmohamed, A.; Kassam, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Vijayaraghavan, R.; Burstein, J.; D'Mello, N.; Glanz, A.; Noiseux, N.; Stevens, L. M.; Basile, F.; Prieto, I.; Normandin, L.; Helou, J.; Do, Q. B.; Bainey, K.; Tymchak, W.; Welsh, R.; Merali, F.; Pandith, V.; Heffernan, M.; Orfi, J.; Mcconachie, D.; Jedrzkiewicz, S.; Della Siega, A.; Robinson, S.; Nadra, I.; Poirier, P.; Dagenais, F.; Voisine, P.; Mohammadi, S.; Doyle, D.; Baillot, R.; Charbonneau, E.; Dumont, E.; Kalavrouziotis, D.; Perron, J.; Jacques, F.; Laflamme, M.; Brulotte, S.; Crete, M.; Degrâce, M.; Delage, F.; Grondin, F.; Lemieux, A.; Michaud, N.; Saulnier, D.; Ross, M. K.; Nguyen, M.; Harvey, R.; Daneault, B.; Hartleib, M.; Guzman, R.; Nguyen, T.; Singal, R.; Bourgeois, R.; Landry, D.; Kamel, S.; Rupka, D.; Kuritzky, R.; Khaykin, Y.; Phaneuf, D. C.; Desjardins, V.; Coll, X.; Huynh, T.; Pilon, C.; Mansour, S.; Lemire, F.; Kokis, A.; Potvin, J.; Campeau, J.; Audet, M.; Boulianne, M.; Dupuis, R.; Lauzon, C.; Pruneau, G.; Senay, B.; Pichette, F.; Cieza, T.; Breton, R.; Belisle, P.; Barabas, M.; Diaz, A.; Costa, R.; Absi, F.; Garand, M.; Rheault, A.; Lemay, C.; Gisbert, A.; Raymond, A.; Barrero, M.; Gagne, C. E.; Rheault, P.; Pepin-Dubois, Y.; Johnston, J.; Mundi, A.; Cohen, G.; Shukle, P.; Baskett, R.; Hirsch, G.; Ali, I.; Stewart, K.; Fenton, J.; Pudupakkam, S.; Willoughby, R.; Czarnecki, W.; Roy, A.; Montigny, M.; Descarries, L.; Mayrand, H.; Comtois, H.; Essiambre, R.; Ringuette, G.; Boutros, G.; Gendreau, R.; Pham, L.; Nguyen, V.; Nguyen-Thanh, H. K.; Ben-Yedder, N.; Nawaz, S.; Fremes, S.; Moussa, F.; Shukla, D.; Labonte., R.; Jano, G.; Bobadilla, B.; Saavedra, J.; Bahamondes, J.; Cobos, J.; Grunberg, E.; Corbalan, R.; Verdejo, H.; Medina, M.; Vega, M.; Nahuelpan, L.; Castañia, F.; Raffo, C.; Vargas, A.; Reyes, T.; Vargas, D.; Perez, L.; Arriagada, G.; Potthoff, S.; Godoy, J.; Stockins, B.; Larenas, G.; Quiñinao, F.; Sepulveda, P.; Trucco, V.; Pincetti, C.; Saavedra, S.; Silva, P.; Vejar, M.; Rodríguez, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Tian, H.; Zhang, J.; Meng, Y.; Wu, X.; Wu, Q.; Wang, Q.; Mu, Y.; Yang, J.; Wang, F.; Zhang, W.; Ke, Y.; Jiang, H.; Yin, P.; Jia, K.; Chen, C.; Wang, Z.; Qi, B.; Yu, L.; Feng, G.; Li, L.; Jiang, L.; Wu, S.; Yu, H.; Wu, Z.; Ding, R.; Liu, S.; Xu, H.; Cao, H.; Bai, X.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, Z.; Sun, H.; Yang, P.; Li, B.; Feng, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, Z.; Wu, W.; Meng, Q.; Ge, J.; Dai, Y.; Yang, H.; Chen, X.; Tian, X.; Shi, Y.; Hu, T.; Zhang, R.; Zhao, Q.; Quan, W.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, C.; Wang, R.; Tao, L.; Hu, D.; Wang, Y.; Fan, F.; Huang, W.; Xia, X.; Fu, G.; Jiang, D.; Wang, M.; Li, C.; Xu, K.; Dong, Y.; Chen, Y.; Wu, D.; Wang, C.; Sun, X.; Lu, S.; Zhou, X.; Kong, Y.; Zhang, B.; Sotomayor, A.; Suarez, M.; Ripoll, D.; Herrera, O.; Accini Mendoza, J.; Saad Cure, C.; Reyes, M.; Vidal, T.; Donado Beltran, P.; Hernandez Jaimes, E.; Castillo, H.; Rocha, C.; Forero, L.; Zarate Bernal, D.; Vanstrrahle Gonzalez, L.; Urina Triana, M.; Quintero, A.; Ramirez, N.; Balaguera Mendoza, J.; Aroca Martinez, G.; Cotes, C.; Mercado, A.; Lastra Percy, X.; Perez Mayorga, M.; Rodriguez, N.; Molina de Salazar, D.; Perez Agudelo, J.; Lopez Villegas, L.; Agudelo Ramos, L.; Melo Polo, M.; Esparza Albornoz, A.; Forero Gomez, J.; Sanchez Vallejo, G.; Aristizabal, J.; Gallego, A.; Contreras, C.; Yepez, J.; Angel Escobar, J.; Manzur J, F.; Cohen, L.; Boneu, D.; Garcia Lozada, H.; Barrios, L.; Celemin, C.; Diego, M.; Garcia Ortiz, L.; Montoya, C.; Ramirez, E.; Arcos Palma, E.; Ceron, J.; Acosta, G.; Gomez Mesa, J.; Velasquez, J.; Barreto, D.; Trujillo Dada, F.; Trujillo Accini, F.; Cano, R.; Corredor de La Cruz, K.; Maria, V.; Palmera, J.; Vesga, B.; Hernandez, H.; Moreno Silgado, G.; Aruachan Vesga, S.; Burgos Martinez, E.; Quintero Villareal, G.; Solano Ayazo, F.; Porto Valiente, J.; Zidkova, E.; Krupicka, P.; Bultas, J.; Mandysova, E.; Lubanda, J.; Horak, J.; Belohlavek, J.; Kovarnik, T.; Gorican, K.; Rucka, D.; Smid, O.; Dostalova, G.; Skalicka, H.; Karetova, D.; Pavlinak, V.; Kuchynkova, S.; Marek, J.; Rob, D.; Ravlykova, K.; Prochazka, P.; Siranec, M.; Urbanec, T.; Vareka, T.; Nesvadbova, P.; Kaletova, M.; Indrakova, J.; Kryza, R.; Heczko, M.; Hanak, P.; Jancar, R.; Kocurkova, L.; Marcinek, G.; Cermak, O.; Drasnar, T.; Richter, M.; Kaspar, J.; Spinar, J.; Parenica, J.; Parenicova, I.; Schildberger, J.; Toman, O.; Ludka, O.; Poloczek, M.; Musil, V.; Miklik, R.; Labrova, R.; Lokaj, P.; Felsoci, M.; Bocek, O.; Kanovsky, J.; Zatocil, T.; Jerabek, P.; Matuska, J.; Jankovic, M.; Jankovicova, H.; Tesak, M.; Sulc, D.; Svacinova, H.; Radvan, M.; Bednar, J.; Motovska, Z.; Petr, R.; Fischerova, M.; Branny, M.; Vodzinska, A.; Cerny, J.; Indrak, J.; Sknouril, L.; Maly, J.; Vacek, T.; Prazak, O.; Broulikova, K.; Hajsl, M.; Jarkovsky, P.; Kamenik, L.; Kotik, I.; Krcova, E.; Sedlon, P.; Skvaril, J.; Cernohous, M.; Kohoutek, J.; Levcik, M.; Holek, M.; Hajdusek, P.; Foltynova Caisova, L.; Novak, V.; Kladivkova, M.; Slaby, J.; Houra, M.; Vojtisek, P.; Novotny, V.; Lazarak, T.; Pliva, M.; Pirk, J.; Barciakova, L.; Jandova, R.; Adamkova, V.; Galovcova, M.; Peterkova, L.; Turek, D.; Prochazka, J.; Belohoubek, J.; Spinarova, L.; Panovsky, R.; Novotny, P.; Krejci, J.; Hude, P.; Ozabalova, E.; Godava, J.; Honek, T.; Kincl, V.; Benesova, M.; Buckova, J.; Canadyova, J.; Mokracek, A.; Homza, M.; Stverka, P.; Florian, J.; Lukac, B.; Polasek, R.; Kucera, P.; Seiner, J.; Karasek, J.; Coufal, Z.; Stastny, J.; Cernicek, V.; Skalnikova, V.; Jiresova, E.; Brat, R.; Sieja, J.; Gloger, J.; Berger, P.; Prochazkova, I.; Samlik, J.; Brtko, M.; Tuna, M.; Polansky, P.; Omran, N.; Myjavec, A.; Hrdinova, M.; Jansky, P.; Kratochvilova, R.; Burkert, J.; Koubek, F.; Fiala, R.; Paulasova Schwabova, J.; Lindner, J.; Hlubocky, J.; Spacek, M.; Marcian, P.; Hanak, V.; Pozdisek, Z.; Lonsky, V.; Santavy, P.; Troubil, M.; Straka, Z.; Budera, P.; Fojt, R.; Talavera, D.; Tretina, M.; Nemec, P.; Orban, M.; Bedanova, H.; Wiggers, H.; Tougaard, R.; Larsen, A.; Nielsen, H.; Mattsson, N.; Gunnar, G.; Bruun, N.; Folke, F.; Soendergaard, K.; Koeber, L.; Frydland, M.; Fuchs, A.; Bang, L.; Houlind, K.; Olsen, M.; Soerensen, V.; Overgaard Andersen, U.; Dixen, U.; Refsgaard, J.; Moeller, D.; Zeuthen, E.; Lund, J.; Soegaard, P.; Jensen, S.; Duarte, Y.; Duarte, W.; Cáceres, S.; Pow Chon Long, F.; Peñaherrera, C.; Anzules, N.; Sánchez, M.; Zuleta, I.; López, J.; Villota, M.; Sánchez, H.; Perugachi, C.; Gómez, S.; Morejón, P.; Mármol, R.; Guamán, S.; Trujillo, F.; Escobar, M.; Carrera, F.; Ponce, F.; Terán, P.; Carrasco, S.; Tuomilehto, J.; Humaloja, K.; Lindberg, L.; Tuomilehto, H.; Tuominen, M.-L.; Kantola, I.; Juliard, J.; Feldman, L.; Ducrocq, G.; Boulogne, C.; Petitalot, V.; Leclercq, F.; Roubille, F.; Agullo, A.; Ferrari, E.; Chiche, O.; Moceri, P.; Boccara, F.; Charbonnier, M.; Azeddine, B.; Ederhy, S.; Soulat Dufour, L.; Cohen, A.; Etienney, A.; Messas, E.; Calvalido, A.; Galloula, A.; Zarka, S.; Courtois, M.-C.; Mismetti, P.; Accassat, S.; Buchmuller, A.; Moulin, N.; Bertoletti, L.; Seffert, B.; Sevestre, M.; Samy Modeliar Remond, S.; Dupas, S.; Mardyla, J.; Le Gloan, S.; Cayla, G.; Cornillet, L.; Schmutz, L.; Motreff, P.; Souteyrand, G.; Amonchot, A.; Barber-Charmoux, N.; Combaret, N.; Malcles, G.; Brenner, S.; Christa, M.; Duengen, H.; Krackhardt, F.; Bobenko, A.; Hashemi, D.; Stellbrink, C.; Stellbrink, E.; Köster, C.; Guerocak, O.; Bourhaial, H.; Oumbe Tiam, S.; Kemala, E.; Froemke, J.; Kadel, C.; Moellinger, H.; Friedrich, K.; Rafoud, K.; Braun-Dullaeus, R.; Herold, J.; Ganzer, M.; Jeserich, M.; Kimmel, S.; Haggenmiller, S.; Schoengart, H.; Voehringer, H.; Opitz, C.; Appel, K.; Appel, S.; Utech, A.; Finger, C.; Duersch, M.; Dorsel, T.; Wistorf, N.; Grude, M.; Nikol, S.; Ueberschaer, D.; Kast, P.; Darius, H.; Sommer, S.; Girke, F.; Oeztuerk, C.; Ranft, J.; Mikalo, A.; Schellong, S.; Voigts, B.; Mueller, C.; Jungmair, W.; Davierwala, P.; Misfeld, M.; Bomke, K.; Akhavuz, O.; Haensig, M.; Vorpahl, M.; Blem, A.; Langer, G.; Nover, I.; Koehler, T.; Bajnok, L.; Marton, Z.; Laszlo, Z.; Noori, E.; Veress, G.; Fogarassy, G.; Aradi, D.; Kelemen, B.; Vertes, A.; Davidovits, Z.; Zsary, A.; Kis, E.; Hepp, T.; Koranyi, L.; Peterfai, E.; Bezzegh, K.; Bakai, J.; Agardi, I.; Boda, Z.; Razso, K.; Poor, F.; Varallyay, Z.; Jarai, Z.; Sallai, L.; Dudas, M.; Barton, J.; Mahmood, K.; Makki, H.; McAdam, B.; Salim, T.; Murphy, A.; Crean, P.; Liddy, A. M.; Mahon, N.; Khan, I.; Hassan, S.; Curtin, R.; McFadden, E.; MacNeill, B.; Kyvelou, S.; Canavan, M.; Veerasingam, D.; Dinneen, S.; Halabi, M.; Rosenfeld, I.; Levinas, T.; Goldberg, A.; Khateeb, A.; Zimlichman, R.; Ben-Aharon, J.; Beniashvili, A.; Betsalel, A.; Zeltser, D.; Rogowski, O.; Mardi, T.; Rozenbaum, Z.; Turgeman, Y.; Or, T.; Rabkin, Y.; Klainman, E.; Halabi, S.; Halon, D. A.; Katz, A.; Plaev, T.; Drogenikov, T.; Atar, S.; Kilimnik, M.; Wishniak, A.; Merei, M.; Zvi, Y.; Nikolsky, E.; Zukermann, R.; Petcherski, S.; Bosi, S.; Gaitani, S.; Naldi, M.; Barbieri, A.; Faggiano, P.; Guidetti, F.; Adamo, M.; D’Aloia, A.; Magatelli, M.; Robba, D.; Mos, L.; Vriz, O.; Sinagra, G.; Maras, P.; Doimo, S.; Cosmi, F.; D'Orazio, S.; Oltrona Visconti, L.; Leonardi, S.; Vullo, E.; Sbaffi, A.; Azzara, G.; Mauri, S.; Gianni, U.; de Matteis, C.; Campidonico, U.; Di Pasquale, G.; Di Niro, M.; Riva, L.; Filippini, E.; Di Biase, M.; Ieva, R.; Martone, A.; Mandorla, S.; Regni, O.; Capponi, E. 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Yuba, K.; Miyajima, H.; Tobetto, Y.; Yoneda, K.; Ogura, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Takamura, T.; Enkou, K.; Ochi, Y.; Yamada, D.; Kuramochi, T.; Misumi, K.; Iiduka, D.; Hirose, M.; Tone, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ebihara, T.; Makino, M.; Yokota, M.; Nitta, M.; Udo, A.; Shimizu, S.; Fujii, K.; Iwakura, K.; Okamura, A.; Inoue, K.; Nagai, H.; Hirao, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, N.; Yamasaki, T.; Oka, T.; Iwamoto, M.; Tanaka, T.; Nakamaru, R.; Okada, M.; Takayasu, K.; Sumiyoshi, A.; Inoue, H.; Kitagaki, R.; Ninomiya, Y.; Mizutomi, K.; Koizumi, I.; Funada, A.; Tagawa, S.; Kamide, S.; Saku, K.; Ideishi, M.; Ogawa, M.; Uehara, Y.; Iwata, A.; Nishikawa, H.; Ike, A.; Sugihara, M.; Imaizumi, S.; Fujimi, K.; Kawamura, A.; Sako, H.; Morito, N.; Morii, J.; Fukuda, Y.; Yahiro, E.; Matsunaga, A.; Matsumoto, N.; Noda, K.; Shiga, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Kimura, K.; Ebina, T.; Hibi, K.; Iwahashi, N.; Maejima, N.; Konishi, M.; Matsushita, K.; Minamimoto, Y.; Kawashima, C.; Nakahashi, H.; Kimura, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Matsuzawa, Y.; Kirigaya, J.; Sato, R.; Kikuchi, S.; Ogino, Y.; Kirigaya, H.; Kashiwase, K.; Hirata, A.; Takeda, Y.; Amiya, R.; Higuchi, Y.; Sakaguchi, T.; Nakano, T.; Matsusaki, N.; Suzuki, S.; Hayashi, T.; Nakatani, S.; Koide, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Hamanaka, Y.; Makino, N.; Sotomi, Y.; Abe, M.; Fujieda, H.; Hashimoto, K.; Teratani, Y.; Abe, Y.; Yokoyama, Y.; Higashino, H.; Okuda, H.; Yamazato, M.; Noda, T.; Arai, M.; Ono, K.; Hirose, T.; Iwama, M.; Warita, S.; Goto, Y.; Abe, S.; Kojima, T.; Yoshizane, T.; Tanihata, S.; Fujii, T.; Yagasaki, H.; Miwa, H.; Ishiguro, M.; Kato, T.; Watanabe, R.; Horio, S.; Mita, T.; Hirayama, A.; Watanabe, I.; Hiro, T.; Nakai, T.; Takayama, T.; Yoda, S.; Yajima, Y.; Okubo, K.; Okumura, Y.; Kato, M.; Fukamachi, D.; Aizawa, Y.; Sonoda, K.; Iida, K.; Sasaki, N.; Iso, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kougo, T.; Haruta, H.; Kurokawa, S.; Mano, H.; Nagashima, K.; Onaka, H.; Doi, H.; Hirano, N.; Okamoto, F.; Mori, K.; Ri, G.; Zushi, R.; Otsuka, K.; Inoko, M.; Haruna, T.; Nakane, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Izumi, T.; Honjo, S.; Ikeda, H.; Wada, Y.; Funasako, M.; Hayashi, H.; Hamasaki, A.; Sasaki, K.; Seko, Y.; Nakasone, K.; Hanyu, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwasaki, K.; Ayano, S.; Hirokami, M.; Omoto, Y.; Sasaki, H.; Sato, H.; Yuda, S.; Okubo, M.; Matsuo, H.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kawase, Y.; Miyake, T.; Kondo, H.; Hattori, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Okamoto, S.; Hirata, T.; Kawamura, I.; Ota, H.; Omori, H.; Tanigaki, T.; Kamiya, H.; Sobue, Y.; Komoda, T.; Akatsuka, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Isegawa, K.; Takanezawa, M.; Kataoka, C.; Imamaki, M.; Shibata, Y.; Yasuda, K.; Shimano, M.; Ozaki, R.; Morishita, Y.; Okabe, K.; Kondo, K.; Miura, A.; Manita, M.; Tabata, K.; Asahi, T.; Mashidori, T.; Higa, N.; Nakata, M.; Himi, T.; Matsudo, Y.; Sekine, T.; Hou, K.; Tonoike, N.; Hama, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Ge, B.; Takahara, M.; Ishimura, M.; Shikada, T.; Ueno, H.; Amemiya, H.; Hisamatsu, Y.; Sada, K.; Sato, T.; Harada, K.; Nakamura, T.; Ako, J.; Tojo, T.; Shimohama, T.; Kishihara, J.; Ishii, S.; Fukaya, H.; Meguro, K.; Nishino, Y.; Inoue, M.; Matsui, Y.; Omura, Y.; Kawakami, H.; Matsuoka, H.; Oshita, A.; Seike, F.; Kondo, N.; Miyoshi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Uchiya, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Koretsune, Y.; Abe, H.; Shinouchi, K.; Nishida, H.; Yasumura, K.; Date, M.; Ueda, Y.; Iida, Y.; Idemoto, A.; Toriyama, C.; Yokoi, K.; Mishima, T.; Yamada, T.; Fukunami, M.; Morita, T.; Furukawa, Y.; Kawasaki, M.; Kikuchi, A.; Tamaki, S.; Seo, M.; Shirakawa, Y.; Ikeda, I.; Fukuhara, E.; Kawai, T.; Kayama, K.; Kawahira, M.; Tanabe, K.; Nakamura, J.; Shimomura, H.; Kudo, T.; Morisaki, S.; Ogura, Y.; Chazono, N.; Onoue, Y.; Matsumuro, Y.; Shirakawa, T.; Nishi, M.; Kinoshita, N.; Nakamura, R.; Miyai, N.; Ohta, K.; Sawanishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Hada, T.; Nakajima, S.; Taniguchi, N.; Mizuguchi, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Hashimoto, S.; Machida, M.; Hirabayashi, K.; Morimoto, S.; Higashino, Y.; Otsuji, S.; Takiuchi, S.; Yabuki, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Shishikura, D.; Ibuki, M.; Ishibuchi, K.; Nagayama, S.; Ishii, R.; Tamaru, H.; Yamamoto, W.; Utsu, N.; Miyakoshi, K.; Nakashima, D.; Tsukuda, K.; Ueda, K.; Nakano, A.; Fukuda, T.; Ikeda, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Toshima, S.; Tateno, R.; Ishikubo, T.; Suguta, M.; Nakamura, S.; Funatsu, A.; Mizobuchi, M.; Tanaka, M.; Nagai, T.; Hirano, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Doi, T.; Shirasaka, A.; Takeda, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Ohya, H.; Hosokawa, A.; Nishina, N.; Koki, B.; Ando, K.; Hiramori, S.; Soga, Y.; Tomoi, Y.; Tohoku, S.; Shirai, S.; Hyodo, M.; Isotani, A.; Domei, T.; Kuramitsu, S.; Morinaga, T.; Hayashi, M.; Hiromasa, T.; Nagae, A.; Yamaji, Y.; Nakao, K.; Sakamoto, T.; Taguchi, E.; Tsurugi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Suzuyama, H.; Koyama, J.; Nagano, M.; Okamatsu, H.; Kodama, K.; Nakamura, M.; Horibata, Y.; Sone, M.; Tsunemori, M.; Bando, M.; Nakayama, T.; Tanigaito, Y.; Nomoto, M.; Sawamura, T.; Unoki, T.; Lim, C. W.; Zainal Rashid, R.; Najme Khir, R.; Ibrahim, K. S.; Wan Azman, W. A.; Sridhar, G. S.; Watson, T.; Abu Kassim, Z.; Mahmood Zuhdi, A. S.; Abdul Hafidz, M. I.; Abu Hassan, M. R.; Wan Rahimi Shah, W. F.; Karthikesan, D.; Mohd Suan, M. A.; Md Ali, S. M.; Kasim, S.; Mohd Arshad, M. K.; Ismail, J. R.; Ibrahim, Z. O.; Chua, N. Y. L.; Abdul Rahim, A. A.; Rusani, B. I.; Yap, L. B.; Zamrin, D. M.; Amir, M. A.; Ismail, N. I.; Mohammad Razi, A. A.; Prins, F.; Bendermacher, P.; Burg, M.; Lok, D.; van der Sluis, A.; Martens, F.; Badings, E.; Milhous, J.; van Rossum, P.; Viergever, E.; van Hessen, M.; Willems, F.; Tjon Joe Gin, R.; Swart, H.; Oomen, A.; Kromhout, S.; Lauwerijssen, I.; Daalmans, M.; Breedveld, R.; de Vries, K.; Feenema Aardema, M.; Hofma, S.; van der Borgh, R.; van Nes, E.; Göbel, E.; Oei, F.; Dorman, H.; Bos, R.; Zoet-Nugteren, S.; Emans, M.; Kragten, H.; Lenderink, T.; Feld, R.; Herrman, J.; van Bergen, P.; Gosselink, M.; Elvan, A.; Hoekstra, E.; The, S.; de Vries, R.; Zegers, E.; Oude Ophuis, T.; Remmen, J.; Bech, J.; Kooistra, J.; den Hartog, F.; Oosterhof, T.; Bartels, G.; Posma, J.; Nierop, P.; Liem, A.; van der Zwaan, C.; Asselman, M.; van Eck, J.; Gevers, R.; van Gorselen, E.; van Hal, J.; Terpstra, W.; Groenemeijer, B.; Jerzewski, A.; Hoogslag, P.; Geertman, J.; de Groot, M.; Dijkstra, B.; Loyola, A.; Sulit, D.; Mercado, M. J.; Rey, N.; Evangelista, L.; Abola, M.; Padua, L.; Morales, D.; Palomares, E.; Abat, M.; Santos, R.; Rogelio, G.; Chua, P.; Baello, R.; del Pilar, J.; Alianza, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alcaraz, L.; Ebo, G.; Guido-Saliot, I.; Tirador, L.; Estoce, E.; Ygpuara, M.; Cruz, J.; Anonuevo, J.; Pitargue, A.; Janion, M.; Drewniak, Z.; Guzik, B.; Nowak, M.; Nosal, M.; Niewiara, Ł; Gajos, G.; Bury, K.; Czubek, U.; Misztal, M.; Grzybczak, R.; Zalewski, J.; Kruszelnicka-Kwiatkowska, O.; Żabówka, M.; Rynkiewicz, A.; Grzybowski, A.; Szałkowski, P.; Broncel, M.; Gorzelak, P.; Możdżan, M.; Olszewska Banaszczyk, M.; Szuba, A.; Tabin, M.; Chachaj, A.; Czarnecka, D.; Terlecki, M.; Klocek, M.; Maga, P.; Coman, I.; Tarlea, M.; Ghionea, M.; Gavrila, C.; Dimulescu, D.; Popescu, A.; Stoicescu, C.; Vintila, V.; Florescu, M.; Baghilovici Cretu, D.; Suran, M.; Mihalcea, D.; Lungeanu Juravle, L.; Cinteza, M.; Calin, I.; Bicescu, G.; Vasile Toma, N.; Udroiu, C.; Gherghinescu, C.; Darabont, R.; Patrascu, N.; Constantinescu, C.; Popescu, I.; Sinescu, C.; Andrei, C.; Axente, L.; Arsenescu, C.; Statescu, C.; Ardeleanu, I.; Anghel, L.; Benedek, I.; Benedek, T.; Kinga, P.; Banga, D. K.; Bobescu, E.; Doka, B.; Dobreanu, D.; Sirbu, V.; Rudzik, R.; Kantor, K.; Sus, I.; Gaita, D.; Maximov, D.; Brie, D.; Mosteoru, S.; Olariu, I.; Iancu, A.; Marc, M.; Hagiu, R.; Manole, V.; Molnar, A.; Dregoesc, I.; Iliesiu, A.; Armean, P.; Parvu, I.; Deleanu, A.; Lighezan, D.; Buzas, R.; Petrescu, L.; Nicola, R.; Dan, R.; Crisan, S.; Trasca, L.; Teodorescu, I.; Zara, O.; Tiron, T.; Tesloianu, D.; Spiridon, M.; Vintila, M.; Baluta, M.; Chioncel, O.; Stoica, E.; Kulcsar, I.; Antohi, L.; Strazhesko, I.; Tkacheva, O.; Sharashkina, N.; Pykhtina, V.; Vasyuk, Y.; Shkolnik, E.; Khadzegova, A.; Sadulaeva, I.; Ivanova, S.; Nesterova, E.; Nesvetov, V.; Shupenina, E.; Shcherbak, M.; Sizova, Z.; Beloborodova, A.; Pozdnyakov, Y.; Tarasov, A.; Shvedov, I.; Zabashta, S.; Ryzhikova, I.; Barbarash, O.; Pecherina, T.; Vatutin, M.; Inozemceva, A.; Kazachek, Y.; Mineeva, E.; Kupriyanova, T.; Voevoda, M.; Gafarov, V.; Gromova, E.; Panov, D.; Voevoda, E.; Kovalkova, N.; Ragino, Y.; Poponina, T.; Poponina, Y.; Garganeeva, N.; Repin, A.; Vershinina, E.; Borodina, E.; Kalashnikova, T.; Safyanova, O.; Osipova, I.; Antropova, O.; Pyrikova, N.; Polyakova, I.; Efremushkina, A.; Guryanova, N.; Kiseleva, E.; Lomteva, E.; Shtyrova, T.; Novikova, N.; Parfenov, D.; Volovchenko, A.; Averkov, O.; Pavlikova, E.; Vaulina, L.; Pletnikova, I.; Mishchenko, L.; Saranin, S.; Tsupko, I.; Kuznetsova, N.; Zateyshchikov, D.; Dankovtseva, E.; Vlazneva, Y.; Tolokonnikova, N.; Zhurina, M.; Zubova, E.; Aseycheva, O.; Sigalovich, E.; Vertkin, A.; Rodiukova, I.; Komissarov, S.; Sokolova, R.; Ausheva, A.; Salbieva, A.; Yusubova, A.; Isakova, S.; Hranai, M.; Obona, P.; Cisar, P.; Semetko, J.; Vanova, P.; Ferencikova, Z.; Vykoukalova, T.; Gaspar, L.; Caprnda, M.; Bendzala, M.; Pella, D.; Fedacko, J.; Hatalova, K.; Drozdakova, E.; Peter, O.; Ntsekhe, M.; de Andrade, M.; Seedat, S.; Gani, M.; van Zyl, L.; Naude, M.; Cronje, T.; van Zyl, F.; Engelbrecht, J.; Jansen, J.; Roos, J.; Makotoko, E.; Pretorius, C.; Mirna, S.; Nell, H.; Pretorius, M.; Basson, M.; Njovane, X.; Mohamed, Z.; Pillay, T.; Dawood, S.; Horak, A.; Lloyd, E.; Hitzeroth, J.; Mabin, T.; Abelson, M.; Klug, E.; Gebka, M.; Hellig, F.; Alison, M.; Bae, J.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.; Joo, S.; Park, C.; Kim, Y.; Jarnert, C.; Rydén, L.; Mooe, T.; Binsell-Gerdin, E.; Dellborg, M.; Torstensson, I.; Albertsson, P.; Hiller, M.; Perers, E.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J. H.; Al-Khalili, F.; Almroth, H.; Andersson, T.; Eriksson Östman, M.; Pantev, E.; Utter, F.; Tengmark, B. O.; Olsson, Å; Liu, B.; Rasmanis, G.; Wahlgren, C. M.; Thott, O.; Moccetti, T.; Rossi, M. 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M.; Tremblay, H.; Bergeron, A.; Dumont, J.; Keilani, S.; Landry, P.; Deneufbourg, I.; Breton, C.; Bilodeau, N.; Côté, M.; Dumont, F.; Dufort, L.; Marcoux, D.; David, M.; Otis, R.; Parks, J.; Cepidoza, C.; Janz, W.; Weighell, W.; Yaworski, S.; Boyd, K.; Lambert, J.; Shea-Landry, G.; Reid, K.; Thiessen, S.; Nemtean, D.; Futers, S.; Drouin, K.; Masson, C.; Arseneault, M. C.; Lachance, N.; Bergeron, C.; Boudreault, C.; Perkins, L.; Barnett, A.; Fortin, J.; Duclos, R.; Vallières, C.; Bouchard-Pilote, C.; Ouimet, F.; Roberge, B.; Couture, M. L.; Deshaies, D.; Bastien, A.; Chartrand, M. J.; Gagné, N. L.; Desbiens, K.; Alarie, P.; Cassan, J.; Ducharme, Y.; Roy D Tapps, I.; Bolduc, H.; Laliberté, J.; Hickey, L.; Spero, M.; Bernstein, M.; Clement, J.; Pawluch, A.; Ricci-Bonzey, M.; Richer, J.; Vaillancourt, J.; Ward, B.; Mostafai Rad, P.; Oleski, L.; Karkhanis, R.; Hartleib, V.; Poirier, R.; Hidalgo, J.; Hernandez, C.; Obreque, C.; Quilapi, D.; Villa, F.; Iturriaga, C.; Ferrada, M.; Navarrete, S.; Becerra, E.; Vargas, C.; Roque, C.; Alarcon, J.; Diaz, D.; Sepulveda, M.; Villan, C.; Garcia, N.; Lara, C.; Lezana, B.; Basso, N.; Torres, G.; Pasmino, C.; Gonzalez, S.; Medina, D.; Rodriguez, T.; Guo, T.; Chen, S.; Han, W.; Shi, D.; Zhang, Q.; Li, W.; Cui, L.; Huang, Z.; Gong, X.; Liu, D.; Tan, S.; Caicedo, L.; Rodriguez, A.; Mejia, I.; Escalante Ruiz, J.; Camera Ochoa, C.; Conrrado Ortega, Y.; Accini Diaz, A.; Rodriguez, B.; Lopez-Lopez, J.; Di Stefano, K.; Florez, L.; Manco, T.; Rodriguez, D.; Urina, A.; de La Hoz, L.; Almendrales, L.; Bello, O.; Urrea Valencia, H.; Correa Rivera, P.; Perdomo, I.; Alzate, J.; Rivera, E.; Jimenez, N. 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L.; Savoldi, D.; Fiorini, M.; Ramani, F.; Mariottoni, B.; Rizzotti, D.; Di Matteo, C.; Musio, S.; Pieroni Minciaroli, S.; Serani, S.; Aloisi, A.; Attanasio, C.; Tricoli, M.; Giordano, V.; Andrioli, V.; Biundo, V.; Tullio, L.; Schiff, D.; Trovarelli, P.; Chiodi, R.; Sampaolesi, S.; Cina, M. T.; Abatello, M.; de Tora, M.; Pietrucci, F.; Pezzetta, S.; Chiminelli, E.; Dall’Asta, A.; Bennati, M.; Elia, A.; Bizzoco, M.; Iaquaniello, A.; Spigarelli, R.; Cremonesi, C.; Gagliardi, M.; Torricelli, L.; Ijichi, N.; Shiraiwa, K.; Murakami, M.; Takeshita, K.; Sato, M.; Shiratori, A.; Kinjo, K.; Tomita, K.; Mizuno, M.; Kurihara, F.; Tachibana, M.; Nitta, Y.; Unno, K.; Hiramatsu, H.; Sano, A.; Nanatsumura, M.; Tanikawa, I.; Uesugi, K.; Banno, S.; Miyata, T.; Kujuji, A.; Kawai, K.; Maegawa, A.; Koseki, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Aoki, S.; Maesawa, M.; Suzuki, A.; Itose, Y.; Konishi, K.; Fujieda, K.; Nakade, S.; Minami, M.; Yoneda, J.; Akiyama, R.; Sakai, S.; Nakatani, K.; Yamazaki, A.; Funama, M.; Kaneko, E.; Morii, S.; Onishi, M.; Sone, A.; Sagawa, N.; Iwai, F.; Kawahara, A.; Hasimoto, C.; Ueki, M.; Kamiji, M.; Ando, M.; Yokoo, M.; Okada, Y.; Yamada, H.; Matsushige, N.; Nagato, A.; Matsumoto, R.; Nishikawa, M.; Oka, I.; Kitou, S.; Tachiuchi, M.; Nakagawa, M.; Yoneda, S.; Iwasa, K.; Matsuda, J.; Oda, A.; Tokudome, S.; Kaneyuki, Y.; Higaki, M.; Yoneda, H.; Kajita, C.; Suwa, K.; Sato, E.; Nagata, T.; Kubo, Y.; Umesu, A.; Ohashi, K.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, I.; Nobehara, T.; Yamano, R.; Yumiba, A.; Hamada, M.; Nishihata, T.; Ohashi, Y.; Morita, M.; Endo, M.; Matsugi, M.; Tateishi, H.; Nakamori, R.; Yamashita, Y.; Okabe, M.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, T.; Shigeyama, Y.; Ichiyanagi, M.; Sugimori, K.; Ohmura, C.; Igarashi, M.; Aotsuka, S.; Komoda, N.; Watanabe, M.; Enomoto, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kawaguchi, A.; Kasahara, A.; Koide, A.; Sakatani, T.; Kurihara, T.; Yokota, S.; Futagi, R.; Amemiya, Y.; Ono, E.; Maeda, A.; Kadono, K.; Ishiguchi, Y.; Kikuchi, R.; Kuramatsu, M.; Nakamura, E.; Chiba, S.; Higa, A.; Kitahashi, M.; Tanaka, H.; Ito, T.; Oba, M.; Tsubouchi, M.; Toshima, M.; Morishita, M.; Miyano, A.; Kondo, M.; Watanabe, K.; Shibata, R.; Tosaki, Y.; Ito, Y.; Saoda, M.; Yamasaki, E.; Kadosaki, S.; Motooka, S.; Akiyoshi, H.; Morio, S.; Nemoto, H.; Yoshizawa, S.; Okabe, N.; Semba, K.; Yoshida, A.; Lee, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Iwashita, Y.; Takeda, A.; Maezato, M.; Kawahira, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Okamoto, N.; Nishimura, M.; Matsuura, K.; Fukunaga, M.; Fukai, K.; Osakabe, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Koike, M.; Shibuya, S.; Shiramata, M.; Ono, Y.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Tadokoro, T.; Morishita, N.; Matsuo, Y.; Yumoto, I.; Sakazaki, S.; Atarashi, A.; Nabata, Y.; Okuda, N.; Fujita, A.; Matsuo, A.; Ishizawa, Y.; Shibata, H.; Ootsuka, M.; Taimatsu, R.; Takeuchi, A.; Sumi, Y.; Yamamoto, F.; Araki, Y.; Tanaka, A.; Kuroda, S.; Sakata, R.; Okada, N.; Sawada, Y.; Miyata, M.; Asayama, H.; Koga, N.; Miki, T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Hashimoto, A.; Fukuike, C.; Kubo, A.; Yamasaki, M.; Mori, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Takenaka, S.; Mashima, M.; Katsuta, H.; Matsumura, T.; Yanagida, S.; Watanabe, N.; Kodama, S.; Kusano, M.; Yamamoto, N.; Kamada, R.; Suzuki, K.; Itami, K.; Hasebe, Y.; Fujita, N.; Kubota, S.; Usuki, A.; Okamoto, M.; Uno, S.; Chikuma, A.; Kishikawa, H.; Yano K Nakano, C.; Otaguro, M.; Kayashima, Y.; Shinoda, M.; Jaafar, S. M.; Baharuddin, S.; Gembor, J.; Ahmad, H.; Syed Mansor, S. M.; Abdullah, W. M.; Shafie, Z.; Muhamad Yunus, S.; Alwi, S. M.; Hussin, N.; Basri, N. A.; Ling Ling, L.; Naem, N. S.; Rutten, R.; Rademaker, H.; van Buijsen, M.; Scholten, M.; Stuij, S.; van Zeijst, M.; van Houwelingen, K.; Engelen, W.; Kramer, H.; Maassen, E.; Verhoeven, P.; Awater, J.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, C.; Meijlis, P.; Blom, L.; Bos, M.; van der Wal, M.; van Laerhoven, G.; Jacobs, T.; Tan-Urgert, B.; van de Gaag, J.; den Boer, P.; Verlek, E.; Lardinois, R.; Coenjaerds, C.; Hendrick, R.; Schoep, J.; Froma, E.; van Nes, C.; Beuving, D.; Krikken, J.; Drent, I.; Geerlings, F.; Buvelot, S.; Wissenburg, A.; Dijkshoorn, A.; van Setten van der Meer, L.; Singerling, M.; van Wijk, D.; Bor, A.; Aukema-Wouda, Z.; Hendriks-van Woerden, M.; Kort, I.; Danse, I.; van der Knaap, M.; de Jong, C.; Temminck, M.; Schaefer, T.; van der Ven, N.; Drost, I.; Mulder, R.; de Vos, A.; de Hoop, M.; Post, G.; Wielandt, D.; Edorot, N.; de Castro, K.; Flotildes, M.; Mulingtapang, T.; Vasquez, S.; Facundo, S.; Peralta, M.; Jose, M.; Bandiez, J.; Sulit, P.; Joaquin, F.; Arbis, M. G.; Silva, C.; Delgado, D.; de Leon, R.; Maglasang, P.; Sian, A.; Alagban, C.; Alcorano, J.; Marcelo, M. J.; Dela Pena, C.; Hyra, I.; Malkiewicz, B.; Mosakowska, K.; Cana, I.; Dobrin, I.; Lautaru, A.; Manescu, G.; Samoila, N.; Lacatus, M.; Apostoie, A.; Prunoiu, M.; Tilinca, M.; Budeanu, A.; Nedelcu, C.; Dumitrache, N.; Boeru, L.; Zhuravleva, E.; Gundova, M.; Hoffmannova, J.; Svitkova, M.; Pekarova, T.; Ujacka, K.; Zsoriova, T.; Kubincova, K.; Jankovicova, Z.; Talliard, C.; Tyumbu, N.; Mngoma, N.; Kannemeyer, M.; Mostert, J.; Page, A.; Krahenbuhl, C.; Tredoux, C.; Hendricks, L.; Oliver, S.; Le Grange, M.; Naidoo, V.; Bae, Y.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Yu, N.; An, S.; Kim, E.; Yang, K.; Woo, J.; Kim, S.; Rasck, J.; Smetana, S.; Ajax, K.; Bylander, L.; Lindberg, A.; Dellborg, H.; Hultsberg-Olsson, G.; Harsmar, K.; Knutsson, A.; Håkansson, L.; Kåveryd-Holmström, M.; Lundmark, L. M.; Norrfors, B.; Löf, P.; Skoglund, K.; Torgersruud, M.; Johansson, K.; Mattsson, A.; Quist, M.; Haglund, P.; Lundell, L.; Gunvasdotter, S.; Rangman, B.; Liu, R.; Shi, J.; Förstedt, G.; Nylund, L.; Welin-Berger, B.; Nilsson, O.; Garcia-Värlid, A.; Forlenza, R.; Kaminska, K.; Nagorna, T.; Cottam, V.; Harper, R.; Gilchrist, M.; Musanhu, R.; Mackin, A.; Turner, A.; Willetts, S.; Cadd, A.; Evans, J.; Young, G.; Sevillano, A.; Brodie, K.; Eccles, A.; Kelly, S.; Doughty, A.; Gray, J.; Gibson, M.; Finlayson, M.; Domingo, D.; Brazee, L.; Renaud, K.; Doman, A.; Meyer, R.; Beatty, J.; Morgan, T.; Rodas, E.; Campbell, D.; Mcquarrie, M.; Battistelli, E.; Eisenbraun, P.; Farley, R.; Park, H.; Dwyer, J.; Adams, K.; Schneider, W.; Barbour, C.; Whyne, E.; Budzinski, S.; Craig, M.; Gilley Elmore, J.; Scott, D.; Bellini, S.; Pepper, M.; Gunderson, K.; Stipek, I.; Schwarz, L.; Watkins, K.; Moore, V.; Palao, A.; Keane-Richmond, P.; Franklin, L.; Ward, L.; Kostedt, G.; Bailey, S.; Hollenweger, L.; Solomon, A.; Johnson, D.; Gloer, K.; Meyer, M.; Boleyn, M.; Nieters, D.; Humphrey, K.; Bohn, A.; Mueller, G.; Mckenzie, H.; Edwards, T.; Velky, J.; Cole, C.; Diederick, M.; Burg, S.; Coulson, T.; Karunaratne, K.; Gunasekera, R.; Cook, S.; Fisher, S.; Garrison, K.; Passey, L.; Kuykendall, K.; Luck, K.; Ramia, L.; Joan, H.; Reynoso, F.; Farley, M.; Shuman, S.; Santana-Fernandes, E.; Ventimiglia, A.; Steele, V.; Gers, L.; Brown, P.; Wilson, J.; Freebersyser, J.; Reno, M.; Buettner, N.; McGovern, M.; Hubbard, T.; Elmore, H.; Payne, D.; Mccann, M.; Decker, S.; Sharp, A.; Forgey, E.; Broussard, E.; Juett, U.; Siddiqui, A.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg

  16. The Role of Hyperlipidaemia in Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Drexel H

    2003-01-01

    A recent report from the Physicians' Health Study proved elevated plasma cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and low HDL-cholesterol predictive of the incidence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The strongest predictor was the cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol ratio. In contrast, new risk factors, eg lipoprotein (a), homocysteine and apolipoproteins A and B did not have additional predictive power for peripheral arterial occlusive disease, whereas C-reactive protein and fibrinogen were in...

  17. Atrophic gastritis is associated with coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Senmaru, Takafumi; Fukui, Michiaki; Tanaka, Muhei; Kuroda, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Oda, Yohei; Naito, Yuji; Hasegawa, Goji; Toda, Hitoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Nakamura, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis is characterized by chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori infection and other factors. Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to coronary artery disease. To our knowledge, however, no reports are available on the relationship between atrophic gastritis and coronary artery disease. In this study, we investigated the relationship between atrophic gastritis, which is diagnosed based on serum pepsinogen levels (pepsinogen I ≤ 70 ng/mL and pepsinog...

  18. COMPARISON BETAXOLOL AND METOPROLOL TARTRATE THERAPIES IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATED WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Anderzhanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive, antianginal and antiischemic efficacy of β1-selective adrenoblockers (betaxolol and metoprolol tartrate in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree associated with stable angina class II.Material and methods. 100 patients (aged 23-66 y.o. with HT associated with stable angina or without angina were involved in the study. Patients were randomized into 2 groups (G1 and G2. G1 patients were treated with betaxolol, and G2 patients – with metoprolol tartrate. Ambulatory BP and electrocardiogram monitoring, exercise stress-test, echocardiography, evaluating of respiratory function, blood analysis was performed initially and in 30 and 90 days of treatment.Results. Target BP level was reached in 44 (88% patients treated with betaxolol (average daily dose 10±4 mg. 34 patients of G1 took 10 mg daily. Target BP level was reached in 41 (82% patients treated with metoprolol tartrate (average daily dose 150±27 mg. 30 patients of G2 took 150 mg daily. Exercise tolerance increased and a number of ischemic ST segment depressions reduced significantly in both groups. There were no significant differences in antihypertensive, antianginal, and antiischemic efficacy between groups.Conclusion. Betaxolol advantage is an ability to maintain target BP level more than 24 hours. A possibility to take betaxolol once a day raises patient’s compliance with therapy.

  19. COMPARISON BETAXOLOL AND METOPROLOL TARTRATE THERAPIES IN PATIENTS WITH ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION ASSOCIATED WITH STABLE ANGINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Anderzhanova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare antihypertensive, antianginal and antiischemic efficacy of β1-selective adrenoblockers (betaxolol and metoprolol tartrate in patients with arterial hypertension (HT of 1-2 degree associated with stable angina class II.Material and methods. 100 patients (aged 23-66 y.o. with HT associated with stable angina or without angina were involved in the study. Patients were randomized into 2 groups (G1 and G2. G1 patients were treated with betaxolol, and G2 patients – with metoprolol tartrate. Ambulatory BP and electrocardiogram monitoring, exercise stress-test, echocardiography, evaluating of respiratory function, blood analysis was performed initially and in 30 and 90 days of treatment.Results. Target BP level was reached in 44 (88% patients treated with betaxolol (average daily dose 10±4 mg. 34 patients of G1 took 10 mg daily. Target BP level was reached in 41 (82% patients treated with metoprolol tartrate (average daily dose 150±27 mg. 30 patients of G2 took 150 mg daily. Exercise tolerance increased and a number of ischemic ST segment depressions reduced significantly in both groups. There were no significant differences in antihypertensive, antianginal, and antiischemic efficacy between groups.Conclusion. Betaxolol advantage is an ability to maintain target BP level more than 24 hours. A possibility to take betaxolol once a day raises patient’s compliance with therapy.

  20. Lower limb movement variability in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Robert G; Spinks, Warwick L; Leicht, Anthony S; Quigley, Frank; Golledge, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    Peripheral arterial disease is a chronic obstructive disease of the arteries of the lower limb caused by atherosclerosis. The resultant decrease in blood flow can result in symptoms of pain in the lower limb on exercise known as intermittent claudication. Exercise induced pain is experienced in the calves, thigh or buttocks restricting activities of daily living and thus reducing quality of life. This study investigated lower limb movement variability in individuals with peripheral arterial disease-intermittent claudication (n=28) compared to individuals without peripheral arterial disease-intermittent claudication (control, n=25). A further aim was to examine the efficacy of various techniques used to describe single joint movement variability. All participants underwent two-dimensional angular kinematics analysis of the lower limb during normal walking. Single joint movement variability was measured using linear (spanning set and coefficient of variation) techniques. Between group differences were examined by one-way ANOVA. The peripheral arterial disease-intermittent claudication participants displayed significantly higher levels of lower limb movement variability in all joints when assessed using the coefficient of variation technique. There were no significant between group differences using the spanning set technique. Individuals with peripheral arterial disease-intermittent claudication have higher levels of lower limb movement variability and reduced walking speed compared to healthy age and mass matched controls. This variability may be an adaptation to the gradual onset of ischaemic pain in this population.

  1. Circulating irisin levels are lower in patients with either stable coronary artery disease (CAD) or myocardial infarction (MI) versus healthy controls, whereas follistatin and activin A levels are higher and can discriminate MI from CAD with similar to CK-MB accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasilakis, Athanasios D; Koulaxis, Dimitrios; Kefala, Nikoleta; Polyzos, Stergios A; Upadhyay, Jagriti; Pagkalidou, Eirini; Economou, Fotios; Anastasilakis, Chrysostomos D; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2017-08-01

    Several myokines are produced by cardiac muscle. We investigated changes in myokine levels at the time of acute myocardial infarction (MI) and following reperfusion in relation to controls. Patients with MI (MI Group, n=31) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were compared to patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) subjected to scheduled PCI (CAD Group, n=40) and controls with symptoms mimicking CAD without stenosis in angiography (Control Group, n=43). The number and degree of stenosis were recorded. Irisin, follistatin, follistatin-like 3, activin A and B, ALT, AST, CK and CK-MB were measured at baseline and 6 or 24h after the intervention. MI and CAD patients had lower irisin than controls (pCAD patients and controls (all p≤0.001). None of the myokines changed following reperfusion. Circulating irisin was associated with the degree of stenosis in all patients (p=0.05). Irisin was not inferior to CK-MB in predicting MI while folistatin and activin A could discriminate MI from CAD patients with similar to CK-MB accuracy. None of these myokines was altered following PCI in contrast to CK-MB. Irisin levels are lower in MI and CAD implying that their production may depend on myocadial blood supply. Follistatin and activin A are higher in MI than in CAD suggesting increased release due to myocardial necrosis. They can predict MI with accuracy similar to CK-MB and their role in the diagnosis of MI remains to be confirmed by prospective large clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Carotid versus coronary atherosclerosis burdens in acute compared with chronic symptomatic coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Stéphanie; Bibeau, Karine; Bertrand, Olivier F; Lévesque, Valérie; Deschênes St-Pierre, Béatrice; Pibarot, Philippe; Després, Jean-Pierre; Larose, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Prediction of coronary events remains elusive. Carotid atherosclerosis may be a surrogate for coronary risk, as carotid and coronary diseases occur simultaneously - albeit at times with a weak association - depending on clinical presentation. We investigated carotid and coronary atherosclerosis in men with new-onset unstable coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) vs. long-standing severe chronic stable angina (CSA). Bilateral carotid artery and 3-vessel coronary artery atherosclerosis burdens were measured within 1 month, respectively, by 3D-volumetric carotid magnetic resonance imaging and coronary angiography-derived modified CASS-50 score. Men with STEMI (n = 50) and long-standing CSA (n = 50), matched for age, were enrolled (58.6 ± 8.8 years). All of them had carotid atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis burden was greater in the carotid arteries of STEMI vs. CSA (wall volume: 196.2 ± 44.4 vs. 169.2 ± 38.0 mm3/4 mm, p = 0.002), but greater in the coronary arteries of CSA vs. STEMI (modified CASS-50 score: 3 vs. 1, p < 0.0001). Normalized wall index (NWI) of internal carotid was associated with modified CASS-50 score in STEMI (ρ = 0.40, p = 0.022) and in CSA (ρ = -0.39, p = 0.031). Carotid atherosclerosis was observed in all CAD patients, and atherosclerosis burden in carotid and in coronary arteries varied according to clinical presentation.

  3. Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Metabolism in Peripheral Artery Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Jason D; Giordano, Tony; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) represents a burgeoning form of cardiovascular disease associated with significant clinical morbidity and increased 5 year cardiovascular disease mortality. It is characterized by impaired blood flow to the lower extremities, claudication pain and severe exercise intolerance. Pathophysiological factors contributing to PAD include atherosclerosis, endothelial cell dysfunction, and defective nitric oxide metabolite physiology and biochemistry that collectively le...

  4. Isolated Unilateral Absent Branch Pulmonary Artery with Peripheral Pulmonary Stenosis and Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Abhishek B

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Isolated Unilateral Absent Pulmonary Artery (UAPA is a rare congenital anomaly. It is usually associated with congenital heart defects. A 45 year old male patient presented with complaints of fever with cough and expectoration for 15 days and retrosternal chest discomfort for the previous 2 days. ECG showed diffuse ST segment depression with T wave inversion in the inferior and lateral leads. Coronary Angiogram done through the right femoral approach revealed diffusely diseased Left Anterior Descending (LAD artery that was totally cut off at the mid segment. The Left Circumflex (LCx artery was providing blood supply to the right middle and lower lung areas. There was another collateral arising from the Left Subclavian Artery supplying the right middle and lower lung areas. The left pulmonary artery was normal, but branches supplying the middle and lower lobes of the right lung were absent and the upper lobe branch had pulmonary stenosis. UAPA is a rare clinical entity; collaterals from coronaries are extremely rare in this condition and till now there has not been any case report of unilateral absent branch pulmonary artery with peripheral stenosis of other branches, on the affected side and associated coronary artery disease.

  5. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: Optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema Praveen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative β-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  6. Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in presence of coronary artery disease: optimization of myocardial stress by controlled phlebotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neema, Praveen Kumar; Vijayakumar, Arun; Manikandan, S; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2009-01-01

    The repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the presence of significant coronary artery disease (CAD) carries a high-risk of adverse peri-operative cardiac event. The options to reduce cardiac risk include perioperative beta-blockade, preoperative optimization by myocardial revascularization and simultaneous (combined) coronary artery bypass grafting and aneurysm repair. We describe intra-operative controlled phlebotomy to optimize myocardial stress during repair of infrarenal AAA in a patient with significant stable CAD.

  7. Peripheral arterial occlusive disease: role of MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzi, M; Amorico, M G; Colopi, S; Favali, M; Gallo, E; Torricelli, P; Polverini, I; Gargiulo, M

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) has recently become instrumental in the diagnosis of arterial disease in various body districts and is gaining an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral vascularisation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of MRA using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. Between November 2003 and August 2004, 30 patients with known peripheral arterial disease were studied by MRA and DSA. MRA was performed with a Philips Intera 1.5 T, with acquisitions from the coeliac trunk to the feet. For acquisitions of the feet and ankles we used unenhanced time-of-flight (TOF) sequences with a head coil. The angiographic sequence was acquired in three volumes of 40-45 cm after administration of paramagnetic contrast material. In the patients with peripheral arterial disease, the technique provided a precise evaluation of the stenosis (mild, moderate, severe) or obstruction of the peripheral district as well as the detection of other diseases, such as stenosis of the renal arteries or aneurysms. Total-body three-dimensional (3D) MRA allows a fast, safe, and accurate assessment of the arterial system in patients with arteriosclerosis and can be considered an alternative to DSA in the management of patients with steno-obstructive disease of the peripheral arteries.

  8. Circulating Progenitor Cells Identify Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Salim S.; MacNamara, James; Tahhan, Ayman; Awad, Mosaab; Yadalam, Adithya; Ko, Yi-An; Healy, Sean; Hesaroieh, Iraj; Ahmed, Hina; Gray, Brandon; Sher, Salman S.; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Patel, Riyaz; Kim, Jinhee; Waller, Edmund K.; Quyyumi, Arshed

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of extra-coronary atherosclerosis. Despite sharing the same risk factors, only 20–30% of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) develop PAD. Declines in the number of bone-marrow derived circulating progenitor cells (PCs) is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Whether specific changes in PCs differentiate patients with both PAD and CAD from those with CAD alone is unknown. Objective Determine whether differences exist in PCs counts of CAD patients with and without known PAD. Methods and Results 1497 patients (mean age 65, 62% male) with known CAD were identified in the Emory Cardiovascular Biobank. Presence of PAD (n=308) was determined by history, review of medical records or imaging, and was classified as carotid (53%), lower extremity (41%), upper extremity (3%) and aortic disease (33%). Circulating PCs were enumerated by flow cytometry. Patients with CAD and PAD had significantly lower PC counts compared to those with only CAD. In multivariable analysis, a 50% decrease in CD34+ or CD34+/VEGFR2+ counts were associated with a 31% (P=0.032) and 183% (P=0.002) increase in the odds of having PAD, respectively. CD34+ and CD34+/VEGFR2+ counts significantly improved risk prediction metrics for prevalent PAD. Low CD34+/VEGFR2+ counts were associated with a 1.40-fold (95%CI, 1.03, 1.91) and a 1.64-fold (95%CI 1.07, 2.50) increase in the risk of mortality and PAD-related events, respectively. Conclusions PAD is associated with low CD34+ and CD34+/VEGFR2+ PC counts. Whether low PC counts are useful in screening for PAD needs to be investigated. PMID:27267067

  9. Early results of coronary artery bypass grafting with coronary endarterectomy for severe coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toischer Karl

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the existence of controversial debates on the efficiency of coronary endarterectomy (CE, it is still used as an adjunct to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. This is particularly true in patients with endstage coronary artery disease. Given the improvements in cardiac surgery and postoperative care, as well as the rising number of elderly patient with numerous co-morbidities, re-evaluating the pros and cons of this technique is needed. Methods Patient demographic information, operative details and outcome data of 104 patients with diffuse calcified coronary artery disease were retrospectively analyzed with respect to functional capacity (NYHA, angina pectoris (CCS and mortality. Actuarial survival was reported using a Kaplan-Meyer analysis. Results Between August 2001 and March 2005, 104 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG with adjunctive coronary endarterectomy (CE in the Department of Thoracic-, Cardiac- and Vascular Surgery, University of Goettingen. Four patients were lost during follow-up. Data were gained from 88 male and 12 female patients; mean age was 65.5 ± 9 years. A total of 396 vessels were bypassed (4 ± 0.9 vessels per patient. In 98% left internal thoracic artery (LITA was used as arterial bypass graft and a total of 114 vessels were endarterectomized. CE was performed on right coronary artery (RCA (n = 55, on left anterior descending artery (LAD (n = 52 and circumflex artery (RCX (n = 7. Ninety-five patients suffered from 3-vessel-disease, 3 from 2-vessel- and 2 from 1-vessel-disease. Closed technique was used in 18%, open technique in 79% and in 3% a combination of both. The most frequent endarterectomized localization was right coronary artery (RCA = 55%. Despite the severity of endstage atherosclerosis, hospital mortality was only 5% (n = 5. During follow-up (24.5 ± 13.4 months, which is 96% complete (4 patients were lost caused by unknown address 8 patients died (cardiac

  10. Soluble ST2 and Interleukin-33 Levels in Coronary Artery Disease: Relation to Disease Activity and Adverse Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Svitlana Demyanets; Speidl, Walter S.; Ioannis Tentzeris; Rudolf Jarai; Katsaros, Katharina M.; Serdar Farhan; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Anna Wonnerth; Weiss, Thomas W.; Kurt Huber; Johann Wojta

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: ST2 is a receptor for interleukin (IL)-33. We investigated an association of soluble ST2 (sST2) and IL-33 serum levels with different clinical stages of coronary artery disease. We assessed the predictive value of sST2 and IL-33 in patients with stable angina, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). METHODS: We included 373 patients of whom 178 had stable angina, 97 had NSTEMI, and 98 had STEMI. Patients were followed for a m...

  11. Mechanisms of arterial remodeling: lessons from genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard eVan Varik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular disease is still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world, and the primary cause of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemia. The biology of vascular disease is complex and still poorly understood in terms of causes and consequences. Vascular function is determined by structural and functional properties of the arterial vascular wall. Arterial stiffness, that is a pathological alteration of the vascular wall, ultimately results in target-organ damage and increased mortality. Arterial remodeling is accelerated under conditions that adversely affect the balance between arterial function and structure such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory disease, lifestyle aspects (smoking, drugs (vitamin K antagonists and genetic abnormalities (e.g. pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Marfan’s disease. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the complex mechanisms and different factors that underlie arterial remodeling, learning from single gene defect diseases like PXE, and PXE-like, Marfan’s disease and Keutel syndrome in vascular remodeling.

  12. Haemodynamic evaluation of carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H; Schroeder, T

    1989-01-01

    Cerebral ischaemia in the region of an internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis may be caused by embolism or cerebral hypoperfusion. A severe ICA stenosis may be well compensated by collateral blood supply, however, in some patients the capacity of the collateral blood supply is insufficient. Studi...

  13. Activation products of the haemostatic system in coronary, cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bom, J G; Bots, M L; Haverkate, F; Meijer, P; Hofman, A; Kluft, C; Grobbee, D E

    2001-02-01

    To determine the presence of a 'hypercoagulable state' as assessed by indices of thrombin and plasmin generation and of the amount of fibrin that is lysed, in patients with stable coronary, cerebral and peripheral arterial disease a population-based cross-sectional study was performed. From a population-based cohort comprising 7983 men and women aged 55 years and over, we randomly selected 127 subjects with a history of myocardial infarction, 124 with a history of stroke and/or transient ischemic attack, 131 patients with peripheral arterial disease and 263 control subjects in the same age group without arterial disease. Subjects using anticoagulant drugs were not selected. F1+2, TAT, and PAP were not associated with a history of cardiovascular events, nor with peripheral arterial disease. In contrast, positive associations were found for D-Dimer. Mean D-Dimer level was 40 microg/l (95% CI 35, 44) in control subjects; 53 microg/l (47, 61) in those with a history of myocardial infarction and 51 microg/l (45, 58) in those with a history of stroke and or transient ischemic attack. D-Dimer increased gradually with increasing severity of peripheral atherosclerosis; a decrease in ankle/arm systolic blood pressure ratio of 0.1 was associated with an increase in D-Dimer of 3.9 microg/l (p<0.01). This was more pronounced in subjects with higher F1+2, TAT and PAP concentration. In conclusion, the markers of onset of coagulation F1+2, TAT and PAP are not associated with the presence of arterial disease, but increased levels of these markers are necessary for the positive association between D-Dimer and arterial disease.

  14. Antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2012-09-01

    of aspirin were evaluated in healthy individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. Pharmaco-specific metabolites were measured in urine and serum to investigate the pharmacodynamic effect of aspirin and to enable the comparison with the more global tests of platelet function. Based on repeated duplicate measurements, we evaluated the reproducibility of each test. We found that reproducibility of the classical reference method was not impressive and that the newer, so-called point-of-care tests differed markedly on reproducibility. With coefficients of variation of about 3%, the VerifyNow Aspirin test was clearly the most reproducible test - even after correction of the official scale, which begins at about 350 aspirin reaction units and, therefore, results in artificially low coefficients of variation. Among the platelet function tests investigated, Multiplate was most sensitive for aspirin treatment. In study 2 we performed the hitherto largest study of newly released, immature platelets as a marker of platelet turnover. The study population included healthy individuals, patients with stable coronary artery disease, and patients with acute coronary syndromes. The main finding was an increased fraction of immature platelets in patients with ST-segment myocardial infarction, indicating an increased platelet turnover. Smoking and type 2 diabetes were identified as independent determinants of platelet turnover. In study 3 we explored the relationship between platelet turnover and the antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with stable coronary artery disease. The study results support the hypothesis that an increased platelet turnover reduces the antiplatelet effect of aspirin. The main findings were: 1) platelet turnover correlated with platelet aggregation measured by Multiplate and with sP-selectin, a marker of platelet activation. 2) Patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 had reduced antiplatelet effect of aspirin compared with patients without diabetes

  15. Evaluation of arterial stiffness in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodanapu Mastanvalli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing problem worldwide. Clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown that structural and functional changes that occur in major arteries are a major contributing factor to the high mortality in uremic patients. Recent studies have shown a stepwise increase of the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV from CKD Stage 1 to Stage 5. We evaluated the cfPWV and augmentation index (AIx, as indirect markers of arterial stiffness in patients with nondiabetic CKD and compared the values with normal population; we also evaluated the relationship between various stages of CKD and arterial stiffness markers. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Nephrology for a duration of two years from January 15, 2012, to January 14, 2014. Fifty patients with nondiabetic CKD were studied along with 50 healthy volunteers who did not have CKD, who served as controls. Assessment of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, PWV, heart rate, aortic augmentation pressure, and AIx was performed using the PeriScope device. PWV positively correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean aortic arterial pressure, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate. Arterial stiffness increased as CKD stage increased and was higher in nondiabetic CKD group than in the general population. Arterial stiffness progressed gradually from CKD Stage 2 to 5, and then abruptly, in dialysis patients. Measures to decrease the arterial stiffness and its influence on decreasing cardiovascular events need further evaluation.

  16. Soluble ST2 and interleukin-33 levels in coronary artery disease: relation to disease activity and adverse outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Demyanets

    Full Text Available ST2 is a receptor for interleukin (IL-33. We investigated an association of soluble ST2 (sST2 and IL-33 serum levels with different clinical stages of coronary artery disease. We assessed the predictive value of sST2 and IL-33 in patients with stable angina, non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI and ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI.We included 373 patients of whom 178 had stable angina, 97 had NSTEMI, and 98 had STEMI. Patients were followed for a mean of 43 months. The control group consisted of 65 individuals without significant stenosis on coronary angiography. Serum levels of sST2 and IL-33 were measured by ELISAs.sST2 levels were significantly increased in patients with STEMI as compared to patients with NSTEMI and stable angina as well as with controls. IL-33 levels did not differ between the four groups. During follow-up, 37 (10% patients died and the combined endpoint (all cause death, MI and rehospitalisation for cardiac causes occurred in 66 (17.6% patients. sST2 serum levels significantly predicted mortality in the total cohort. When patients were stratified according to their clinical presentation, the highest quintile of sST2 significantly predicted mortality in patients with STEMI, but not with NSTEMI or stable coronary artery disease. sST2 was a significant predictor for the combined endpoint in STEMI patients and in patients with stable angina. Serum levels of IL-33 were not associated with clinical outcome in the total cohort, but the highest quintile of IL-33 predicted mortality in patients with STEMI.Serum levels of sST2 are increased in patients with acute coronary syndromes as compared to levels in patients with stable coronary artery disease and in individuals without coronary artery disease. sST2 and IL-33 were associated with mortality in patients with STEMI but not in patients with NSTEMI or stable angina.

  17. Endovascular embolization of thyroid arteries with grave’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Arzykulov Zh.A.; Zhuraev Sh. Sh.; Shokebayev A.A.; Ormanov B.K.; Lee A.I.; Imammyrzayev N.E.; Aliev A.K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to improve the results of treatment of patients with Graves’ disease by applying Roentgen endovascular embolization (REE) thyroid arteries. Materials and methods: REE thyroid arteries, we used as an independent method of treatment GD. Following this procedure the treatment of 27 patients received for the period from 2012 to July 2014 y. All patients hospitalized with a confirmed diagnosis. Among the 27 patients had 5 (18.5%) men and 22 (81.5%) of women...

  18. Duplex ultrasound scanning of peripheral arterial disease of the lower limb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, Jonas Peter; Rasmussen, John Bøje Grønvall; Hansen, Marc Allan

    2010-01-01

    To assess the reliability and applicability of duplex ultrasound scanning (DUS) of lower limb arteries, compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA), in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD)....

  19. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness, Volume, and Nutritional Status in Stable Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewski, Lukasz; Wyzgal, Janusz; Czyzewska, Emilia; Kurowski, Andrzej; Sierdzinski, Janusz; Truszewski, Zenon; Szarpak, Lukasz

    2016-02-01

    Reduction of cardiovascular death might have a significant effect on the long-term survival rates of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). The aim of the study was to assess the relation between arterial stiffness and graft function, adipose tissue content, and hydration status in patients after kidney transplantation (KTx).The study included 83 RTR patients (mean age: 55 ± 13 years) who had been admitted to a nephrology-transplantation outpatient clinic 0.5 to 24 years after KTx. Clinical and laboratory data were analyzed and eGFR was calculated with the CKD-EPI formula. Arterial stiffness was assessed in all RTRs with pulse wave propagation velocity (PWV) with the use of a complior device. In addition, fluid and nutritional status was assessed with a Tanita BC 418 body composition analyzer. The control group consisted of 31 hospital workers who received no medication and had no history of cardiovascular disease.Multivariable linear regression analysis, with PWV as a dependent variable, retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model: red blood cell distribution width (RDW) (B = 0.323; P = 0.004), age (B = 0.297; P = 0.005), tacrolimus therapy (B = -0.286; P = 0.004), and central DBP (B = 0.185; P = 0.041). Multivariable linear regression analysis with eGFR as a dependent variable retained the following independent predictors in the final regression model; creatinine concentration (B = -0.632; P = 0.000), hemoglobin (B = 0.280; P = 0.000), CRP (B = -0.172; P = 0.011), tacrolimus therapy (B = 0.142; P = 0.039), and triglycerides (B = -0.142; P = 0.035).Our data indicates that: kidney transplant recipients can present modifiable CVD risk factors linked to increased arterial stiffness, DBP, waist circumference, SCr, time on dialysis, CyA therapy, and visceral fat mass; RDW is a parameter associated with arterial stiffness; and parameters such as CyA therapy, time on

  20. Duplex ultrasound in the assessment of peripheral arterial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Sayed A. A. F.

    Arteriography plays a central role in the assessment of peripheral arterial disease. Arteriography is associated with the risk of damage to the artery, peripheral embolisation, hazards of intra-arterial injection and exposure to ionising radiation. Arteriography provides an anatomical assessment of arterial stenosis but does not measure the functional results of the stenosis. Modern high resolution ultrasound imaging technology enables non-invasive assessment of vascular diseases and allows functional assessment of blood flow. This investigation is of proven value in studying carotid disease. The aim of the study was to determine the accuracy of duplex ultrasonography (DUS) in assessment of lower limb arterial disease in comparison with arteriography (IA DSA). A technical comparison has been made between the description of arterial lesion as indicated by DUS and IA DSA. In addition, the sensitivity of DUS in assessing multisegmental arterial disease has been determined. The clinical decision has been investigated in a further study in which five surgeons were asked to determine patient management based on IA DSA and DUS data in the same patient group. Concordance between management strategies was assessed. DUS was used as the primary method of investigation in further series of patients. Criteria were established to determine which patients would require angiography. The computer-assisted image analysis was used to study the ultrasound images of arterial stenosis and a method of analysing such images objectively was established. Two studies have been included in this section. These assess the technical accuracy of ultrasound image analysis compared with histological examination of plaque. The reproducibility of the image analysis has also been tested. I have developed a classification for peripheral arterial disease to be used to facilitate the communication between vascular laboratory staff who perform the duplex ultrasonography and surgeons who use this

  1. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Maria Nery

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results: The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard.

  2. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Diabetes has long been known to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) would have important public health importance by allowing the distribution of limited resources to be directed on those who ...

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...... disease (CAD)....

  4. GST polymorphisms and early-onset coronary artery disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) detoxify environmental agents which influence the onset and progression of disease. Dysfunctional detoxification enzymes are responsible for prolonged exposure to reactive molecules and can contribute to endothelial damage, an underlying factor in coronary artery disease ...

  5. Adherence of Sudanese Coronary Artery Disease Patients to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD), worldwide, is the most common type of heart disease. Adherence to the evidence-based medications for secondary prevention is associated with further improvement in the outcomes. Objectives: To identify level of adherence towards secondary prevention medications among ...

  6. Knowledge about coronary artery disease among patients admitted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Our cardiac patients have poor knowledge about their disease and improvement on this level of education is needed. Keywords: Coronary artery disease, Knowledge, Acute coronary syndrome. Résumé Introduction: La maladie d'artère coronaire est une maladie meurtère grave partout dans le monde entire.

  7. Haptoglobin phenotypes as a risk factor for coronary artery disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gehan Hamdy

    2014-04-22

    Apr 22, 2014 ... Abstract Objective: Diabetes has long been known to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Recognition of diabetic individuals at greatest risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD) would have important public health importance by allowing the distribution of limited resources to ...

  8. Relation between bone mineral density and coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoome Tohodi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease are the two important life threatening factors that cause morbidity and mortality. Previous studies had showed that bone mineral density is decreased with progression of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease is more common in the osteoporotic patients. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between bone mineral density and coronary artery stenosis in patients who underwent coronary angiography . Materials and Methods: In this study 197 patients (111female and 86 male that underwent coronary angiography and bone mineral densitometry were evaluated. According to angiographic data ,patients were divided to two group :first group had coronary stenosis in ≥50% in one or more major coronary arteries and second group with normal coronary artery or stenosis -1 as normal , T-score -1 to -2.5 as osteopenia, and T-score <-2.5 as osteoporosis were described. Finally the relationship between coronary artery stenosis and bone mineral density was evaluated by SPSS statistical software version 15 with using suitable statistical test. Results: The mean age of sample was 57±11.32. 33% of patients had osteoporosis in lumbar spine and 24.2% of them in femoral neck.Significant coronary artery stenosis were seen in 67.9% of patients. There were no significant difference between lumbar and hip bone mineral density in patients with significant coronary disease and subjects without coronary artery disease. Conclusion: There were no associations between coronary artery disease and osteoporosis. Further studies are recommended for confirmation of this relationship.

  9. Metabolic coronary-flow regulation and exogenous nitric oxide in human coronary artery disease: assessment by intravenous administration of nitroglycerin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kal, J. E.; van Wezel, H. B.; Porsius, M.; Vergroesen, I.; Spaan, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the effect of intravenous administration of the nitric oxide--donor substance nitroglycerin (NTG) on metabolic coronary-flow regulation in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In 12 patients with stable CAD, we measured coronary sinus blood flow and myocardial oxygen

  10. Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Scaffolds for Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen G; Kereiakes, Dean J; Metzger, D Christopher; Caputo, Ronald P; Rizik, David G; Teirstein, Paul S; Litt, Marc R; Kini, Annapoorna; Kabour, Ameer; Marx, Steven O; Popma, Jeffrey J; McGreevy, Robert; Zhang, Zhen; Simonton, Charles; Stone, Gregg W

    2015-11-12

    In patients with coronary artery disease who receive metallic drug-eluting coronary stents, adverse events such as late target-lesion failure may be related in part to the persistent presence of the metallic stent frame in the coronary-vessel wall. Bioresorbable vascular scaffolds have been developed to attempt to improve long-term outcomes. In this large, multicenter, randomized trial, 2008 patients with stable or unstable angina were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular (Absorb) scaffold (1322 patients) or an everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium (Xience) stent (686 patients). The primary end point, which was tested for both noninferiority (margin, 4.5 percentage points for the risk difference) and superiority, was target-lesion failure (cardiac death, target-vessel myocardial infarction, or ischemia-driven target-lesion revascularization) at 1 year. Target-lesion failure at 1 year occurred in 7.8% of patients in the Absorb group and in 6.1% of patients in the Xience group (difference, 1.7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, -0.5 to 3.9; P=0.007 for noninferiority and P=0.16 for superiority). There was no significant difference between the Absorb group and the Xience group in rates of cardiac death (0.6% and 0.1%, respectively; P=0.29), target-vessel myocardial infarction (6.0% and 4.6%, respectively; P=0.18), or ischemia-driven target-lesion revascularization (3.0% and 2.5%, respectively; P=0.50). Device thrombosis within 1 year occurred in 1.5% of patients in the Absorb group and in 0.7% of patients in the Xience group (P=0.13). In this large-scale, randomized trial, treatment of noncomplex obstructive coronary artery disease with an everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold, as compared with an everolimus-eluting cobalt-chromium stent, was within the prespecified margin for noninferiority with respect to target-lesion failure at 1 year. (Funded by Abbott Vascular; ABSORB III Clinical

  11. Cardioscopic observation of subendocardial microvessels in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yasuto; Kanai, Masahito; Maezawa, Yuko; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Shirai, Seiichiro; Nakagawa, Osamu; Uchida, Yasumi

    2011-01-01

    Coronary microvessels play a direct and critical role in determining the extent and severity of myocardial ischemia and cardiac function. However, because direct observation has never been performed in vivo, the functional properties of the individual microvesssels in patients with coronary artery disease remain unknown. Subendocardial coronary microvessels were observed by cardioscopy in 149 successive patients with coronary artery disease (81 with stable angina and 68 with old myocardial infarction). Twenty-four arterial microvessels (AMs) and 27 venous microvessels (VMs) were observed in the left ventricular subendocardium. All 12 AMs and 13 of 14 VMs that were located in normokinetic-to-hypokinetic left ventricular wall segments were filled with blood during diastole and were collapsed during systole. In contrast, 8 of 12 AMs and 9 of 13 VMs that were located in akinetic-to-dyskinetic wall segments were filled with blood during systole and were collapsed during diastole. There were no significant correlations between the timing of blood filling and the severity of coronary stenosis and collateral development. In patients with coronary artery disease, the timing of blood filling of AMs and VMs was dependent on the regional left ventricular contractile state; during diastole when contraction was preserved and during systole when it was not. It remains to be elucidated whether and how blood filling is disturbed in other categories of heart disease.

  12. Relationship of daily arterial blood pressure monitoring readings and arterial stiffness profile in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease combined with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoli N.A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine correlation between arterial blood pressure daily rhythm and daily profile of arterial stiffness in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and arterial hypertension. Materials et methods: Prospective investigation comprised 45 male patients with COPD and arterial hypertension. Individuals of 40 years younger and 80 years elder, patients with diabetes, stroke, angina pectoris, or heart infarction, vascular diseases, and exacerbation of chronic disease, bronchial and pulmonary diseases of other etiology were excluded from the analyses. Comparison group included 47 patients with essential arterial hypertension and without chronic respiratory diseases closely similar on general parameters with patients from main clinical series. Twenty-four-hour arterial blood pressure monitoring (ABPM and daily arterial stiffness monitoring were performed using BPLab® MnSDP-2 apparatus (Petr Telegin, Russian Federation. Results: Patients with COPD combined with arterial hypertension with raised arterial stiffness measures prevail over individuals in essential hypertension group. There is pathological alteration of the ABPM circadian rhythm and raised «Pressure load» values in raised arterial stiffness group. Conclusion: We found ABPM raised parameters in patients with COPD and arterial hypertension. It confirms necessity of ABPM in daily arterial stiffness assessment in patients with COPD.

  13. Characteristics and Fate of Systemic Artery Aneurysm after Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Shinsuke; Tsuda, Etsuko; Yamada, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    To determine the long-term outcome of systemic artery aneurysms (SAAs) after Kawasaki disease (KD). We investigated the characteristics and the fate of SAAs in 20 patients using medical records and angiograms. The age of onset of KD ranged from 1 month to 20 months. The interval from the onset of KD to the latest angiogram ranged from 16 months to 24 years. The regression rate of peripheral artery aneurysm and the frequency of stenotic lesions were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method in 11 patients who had undergone initial angiography within 4 months. The mean duration of fever was 24 ± 12 days. All 20 patients had at least 1 symmetric pair of aneurysms in bilateral peripheral arteries, and 16 patients had multiple SAAs. The distributions of SAAs was as follows: brachial artery, 30; common iliac artery, 20; internal iliac artery, 21; abdominal aortic aneurysm, 7; and others, 29. The frequencies of regression of SAA and of the occurrence of stenotic lesions at 20 years after the onset of KD were 51% and 25%, respectively (n = 42). The diameter of all SAAs in the acute phase leading to stenotic lesions in the late period was >10 mm. SAAs occurred symmetrically and were multiple in younger infants and those with severe acute vasculitis. The fate of SAAs resembles that of coronary artery aneurysms, and depends on the diameter during the acute phase. Larger SAAs can lead to stenotic lesions in the late period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarteifio, E., E-mail: erick.amarteifio@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wormsbecher, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, M. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Konstanz (Germany); Demirel, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, S. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, S. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, D. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.-U. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, M.-A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time-CEUS-intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (t{sub max}), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUC{sub post}), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p < 0.014). In PAD, t{sub max} was delayed (31.2 {+-} 13.6 vs. 16.7 {+-} 8.5 s, p < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with ankle-brachial-index (r = -0.65). m was decreased in PAD (4.3 {+-} 4.6 mL/s vs. 13.1 {+-} 8.4 mL/s, p < 0.0001) and had highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity/specificity, 75%/93%) for detection of diminished muscular micro-perfusion in PAD (cut-off value, m < 5{approx}mL/s). Discriminant analysis and ROC curves revealed m, and AUC{sub post} as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  15. Association of alcohol consumption with coronary artery disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, Patricia; Mazocco, Leticia; Piccoli, Jacqueline da Costa Escobar; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Badimon, Lina; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo Avancini; Pellanda, Lucia; Gomes, Irênio; Schwanke, Carla Helena Augustin

    2017-08-01

    The ingestion of small to moderate alcohol consumption amounts has been associated to cardiovascular protection. This study aimed to evaluate the association between alcohol consumption and coronary artery disease severity. Cross-sectional Study with patients undergoing coronary angiography. Age, cardiovascular risk factors (smoking, systemic arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes) and alcohol drinking habit were investigated. Alcohol consumption was divided in three categories: nondrinker, moderate alcohol consumption (less than 15 g ethanol/day for women or 30 g ethanol/day for men) and heavy alcohol consumption. Coronary artery disease severity was assessed through the Friesinger Score (FS) in the coronary angiography, by interventional cardiologists blinded to alcohol consumption. The final sample included 363 adults; of those, 228 were men (62.81%). Mean age was 60.5 ± 10.9 y. Unadjusted analyses identified sex, age, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and alcohol consumption as the main covariates associated with the Friesinger score. Lower Friesinger scores were also observed in moderate alcohol consumption when comparing to those who do not drink (RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.79-0.95). Among patients with suspected coronary artery disease undergoing coronary angiography, moderate alcohol consumption is associated to a lower coronary artery disease severity than heavy drinking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....

  17. Intradialytic Muscle Cramp and its Association with Peripheral Arterial Disease in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Ghimire

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease were common occurrence in end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis patients, however there was no association between the presence of intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease. Keywords: end stage renal disease; intradialytic muscle cramps; peripheral arterial disease.

  18. Association of Endodontic Lesions with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljestrand, J M; Mäntylä, P; Paju, S; Buhlin, K; Kopra, K A E; Persson, G R; Hernandez, M; Nieminen, M S; Sinisalo, J; Tjäderhane, L; Pussinen, P J

    2016-11-01

    An endodontic lesion (EL) is a common manifestation of endodontic infection where Porphyromonas endodontalis is frequently encountered. EL may associate with increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) via similar pathways as marginal periodontitis. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to delineate the associations between EL and CAD. Subgingival P. endodontalis, its immune response, and serum lipopolysaccharide were examined as potential mediators between these 2 diseases. The Finnish Parogene study consists of 508 patients (mean age, 62 y) who underwent coronary angiography and extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. The cardiovascular outcomes included no significant CAD ( n = 123), stable CAD ( n = 184), and acute coronary syndrome (ACS; n = 169). EL was determined from a panoramic tomography. We combined data of widened periapical spaces (WPSs) and apical rarefactions to a score of EL: 1, no EL ( n = 210); 2, ≥1 WPS per 1 apical rarefaction ( n = 222); 3, ≥2 apical rarefactions ( n = 76). Subgingival P. endodontalis was defined by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization analysis, and corresponding serum antibodies were determined by ELISA. In our population, 50.4% had WPSs, and 22.8% apical rarefactions. A total of 51.2% of all teeth with apical rarefactions had received endodontic procedures. Subgingival P. endodontalis levels and serum immunoglobulin G were associated with a higher EL score. In the multiadjusted model (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, body mass index, alveolar bone loss, and number of teeth), having WPSs associated with stable CAD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.94, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.13 to 3.32, P = 0.016) and highest EL score were associated with ACS (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.09 to 5.54, P = 0.030). This association was especially notable in subjects with untreated teeth with apical rarefactions ( n = 59, OR = 2.72, 95% CI = 1.16 to 6.40, P = 0.022). Our findings support the hypothesis that ELs are independently

  19. Arterial Disease in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, James H.; Currier, Judith S.; HSUE, Priscilla Y

    2014-01-01

    With advances in antiretroviral therapy, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are living longer and increasingly die of non-HIV related diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Several observational studies suggest that HIV-infected patients on ART are at increased CVD risk; however, the precise mechanisms underlying the association between HIV infection and CVD risk are uncertain. Atherosclerosis and arterial disease in HIV-infected individuals is a multifactor...

  20. Lumbar and iliac artery aneurysms in Menkes' disease: endovascular cover stent treatment of the lumbar artery aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adaletli, Ibrahim; Omeroglu, Alp; Kurugoglu, Sebuh; Cantasdemir, Murat; Numan, Furuzan [Istanbul University, Department of Radiology, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey); Elicevik, Mehmet [Istanbul University, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2005-10-01

    We report lumbar and iliac artery aneurysms in a 3-month-old boy with Menkes' disease. The iliac artery aneurysm thrombosed spontaneously, documented by follow-up colour Doppler sonography. The lumbar artery aneurysm was successfully treated using a cover stent. There was no filling of the lumbar artery aneurysm and no stenosis of the cover stent during the 9-month follow-up. (orig.)

  1. Fifteen new risk loci for coronary artery disease highlight arterial-wall-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M. M.; Zhao, Wei; Barnes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although 58 genomic regions have been associated with CAD thus far, most of the heritability is unexplained, indicating that additional susceptibility loci await identification. An efficient discovery strategy ...... and inflammation (PROCR, rs867186 (p.Ser219Gly)) and vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation (LMOD1, rs2820315). Correlation of these regions with cell-type-specific gene expression and plasma protein levels sheds light on potential disease mechanisms....

  2. Automatic prediction of coronary artery disease from clinical narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Kevin; Filannino, Michele; Uzuner, Özlem

    2017-08-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is not only the most common form of heart disease, but also the leading cause of death in both men and women (Coronary Artery Disease: MedlinePlus, 2015). We present a system that is able to automatically predict whether patients develop coronary artery disease based on their narrative medical histories, i.e., clinical free text. Although the free text in medical records has been used in several studies for identifying risk factors of coronary artery disease, to the best of our knowledge our work marks the first attempt at automatically predicting development of CAD. We tackle this task on a small corpus of diabetic patients. The size of this corpus makes it important to limit the number of features in order to avoid overfitting. We propose an ontology-guided approach to feature extraction, and compare it with two classic feature selection techniques. Our system achieves state-of-the-art performance of 77.4% F1 score. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. [Impact of periodontal disease on arterial pressure in diabetic mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Baque, V; Kémoun, P; Loubieres, P; Roumieux, M; Heymes, C; Serino, M; Sixou, M; Burcelin, R

    2012-06-01

    Diabetes-driven cardiovascular diseases represent a high challenge for developed countries. Periodontal disease is strictly linked to the aforementioned diseases, due to its Gram negative-driven inflammation. Thus, we investigated the effects of periodontal disease on arterial pressure during the development of diabetes in mice. To this aim, C57BL/6 female mice were colonized with pathogens of periodontal tissue (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Fusobacterium nucleatum) for 1month, whereas another group of mice did not undergo the colonization. Subsequently, all mice were fed a high-fat carbohydrate-free diet for 3months. Then, arterial pressure was measured in vivo and a tomodensitometric analysis of mandibles was realized as well. Our results show increased mandibular bone-loss induced by colonization with periopathogens. In addition, periodontal infection augmented glucose-intolerance and systolic and diastolic arterial pressure, parameters already known to be affected by a fat-diet. In conclusion, we show here that periodontal disease amplifies metabolic troubles and deregulates arterial pressure, emerging as a new axis of metabolic investigation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence and predictors of coronary artery disease in adults with Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jalaj; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Paudel, Rajiv; Chatterjee, Saurav; Ahmad, Hasan; Snyder, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in patients with Kawasaki disease, in conjunction with coronary artery aneurysm and stenosis that characterise this disease, are potential risk factors for developing coronary artery disease in young adults. We aimed to determine the prevalence and predictors of coronary artery disease in adult patients with Kawasaki disease. All patients aged 18-55 years of age diagnosed with Kawasaki disease were sampled from Nationwide Inpatient Sample database using International Classification of Diseases 9th revision (ICD 9 code 446.1) from 2009 to 2010. Demographics, prevalence of coronary artery disease, and other traditional risk factors in adult patients with Kawasaki disease were analysed using ICD 9 codes. The prevalence of Kawasaki disease among adults was 0.0005% (n=215) of all in-hospital admissions in United States. The mean age was 27.3 years with women (27.6 years) older than men (27.1 years). Traditional risk factors were hypertension (21%), hyperlipidaemia (15.6%), diabetes (11.5%), tobacco use (8.8%), and obesity (8.8%), with no significant difference between men and women. Coronary artery disease (32.4%), however, was more prevalent in men (44.7%) than in women (12.1%; p=0.03). In multivariate regression analysis, after adjusting for demographics and traditional risk factors, hypertension (OR=13.2, p=0.03) was an independent risk factor of coronary artery disease. There was increased preponderance of coronary artery disease in men with Kawasaki disease. On multivariate analysis, hypertension was found to be the only independent predictor of coronary artery disease in this population after adjusting for other risk factors.

  5. Non-invasive imaging for subclinical coronary atherosclerosis in patients with peripheral artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Kjaer, Andreas; Hesse, Birger

    2014-01-01

    of subclinical coronary artery disease varies widely in patients with peripheral artery disease, it could include more than half of patients. No consensus exists to date on either the rationale for screening patients with peripheral artery disease for coronary atherosclerosis or the optimal algorithm and method......Patients with peripheral artery disease are at high risk of coronary artery disease. An increasing number of studies show that a large proportion of patients with peripheral artery disease have significant coronary atherosclerosis, even in the absence of symptoms. Although the reported prevalence...

  6. A large left atrial lipoma combined with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Zheng, Xiaomei; Du, Yu; Zhu, Zhicheng; Wang, Tiance; Xu, Rihao; Li, Dan; Liu, Kexiang

    2017-08-22

    Primary benign tumors of the heart are extremely rare and usually difficult to diagnose for their asymptomatic signs. A 66-year-old woman was admitted for shortness of breath caused by a large left atrial lipoma combined with coronary artery disease. Next, we successfully performed simultaneous curative surgery for the large cardiac lipoma and coronary artery bypass grafting with a "starfish" and no cardiopulmonary bypass was used.The patient was discharged on the eighth postoperative day in a good condition, and has remained asymptomatic at the 5-month follow-up. Lipomas are rare and difficult to diagnose, while computed tomography and computed tomography angiography can give us very important clues. Surgery is necessary. We can introduce a "starfish"to the operationand the cardiopulmonary bypass is unnecessary for the left lipoma with coronary artery disease.

  7. Importance of diastolic velocities in the detection of celiac and mesenteric artery disease by duplex ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perko, M J; Just, S; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease.......To assess the predictive value of ultrasound duplex scanning in the detection of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and celiac artery (CA) occlusive disease....

  8. Giant aneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery in a pediatric patient with Behcet's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Amanda L; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly; Williams, Derek A; Hines, Michael H

    2010-07-01

    Behcet's disease is a rare autoimmune vasculitis characterized by oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, and ocular and cutaneous lesions. Vascular involvement usually affects the veins more commonly than the arteries, and coronary arterial involvement is extremely rare. We report an adolescent with Behcet's disease who developed a large pseudoaneurysm of the left anterior descending coronary artery requiring a coronary arterial bypass graft.

  9. Invasive angiography and revascularization in patients with stable angina following prior coronary artery bypass grafting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Francis R; Biasco, Luigi; Pedersen, Frants

    2017-01-01

    . Follow-up data were available for all patients, by means of records linked to each Danish social security number. RESULTS: In patients with prior CABG and stable angina (n = 2,309), diagnostic angiography led to revascularization in 574 (24.9%) cases. Chronic kidney disease (HR 1.93 [1.08-3.44], P = 0.......027), significant angina (HR 1.49 [1.18-1.88], P = 0.006 for angina class ≥ II, and HR 2.04 [1.61-2.58], P revascularization. Stress testing was, however, used less frequently...... than in patients without prior CABG (17.2% vs. 24.2%, P revascularization were 47.8%, 51.4%, and 66.9% for exercise ECG, stress echocardiography, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Invasive angiography leads...

  10. Transcatheter stenting of arterial duct in duct-dependent congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Milan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Critical congenital heart diseases (CHD are mostly duct-dependent and require stable systemic-pulmonary communication. In order to maintain patency of the ductus arteriosus (DA, the first line treatment is Prostaglandin E1 and the second step is the surgical creation of aortic-pulmonary shunt. To reduce surgical risk in neonates with the critical CHD, transcatheter stenting of DA can be performed in selected cases. Case Outline. A four-month old infant was diagnosed with the pulmonary artery atresia with ventricular septal defect (PAA/VSD. The left pulmonary artery was perfused from DA, and the right lung through three major aortopulmonary collaterals (MAPCAs. A coronary stent was placed in the long and critically stenotic DA, with final arterial duct diameter of 3.5 mm, and significantly increased blood supply to the left lung. After the procedure, the infant’s status was improved with regard to arterial oxygen saturation, feeding and weight gain. During the follow-up, one year later, aortography revealed in-stent stenosis. The left pulmonary artery, as well as the branches, was well-developed and the decision was made to proceed with further surgical correction. Conclusion. Stenting of DA can be an effective alternative to primary surgical correction in selected patients with duct-dependent CHD.

  11. Transcatheter stenting of arterial duct in duct-dependent congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić, Milan; Ilisić, Tamara; Stefanović, Igor; Gradinac, Marija; Vulićević, Irena; Parezanović, Vojislav; Jovanović, Ida

    2013-01-01

    Critical congenital heart diseases (CHD) are mostly duct-dependent and require stable systemic-pulmonary communication. In order to maintain patency of the ductus arteriosus (DA), the first line treatment is Prostaglandin E1 and the second step is the surgical creation of aortic-pulmonary shunt. To reduce surgical risk in neonates with the critical CHD, transcatheter stenting of DA can be performed in selected cases. A four-month old infant was diagnosed with the pulmonary artery atresia with ventricular septal defect (PAA/VSD). The left pulmonary artery was perfused from DA, and the right lung through three major aortopulmonary collaterals (MAPCAs). A coronary stent was placed in the long and critically stenotic DA, with final arterial duct diameter of 3.5 mm, and significantly increased blood supply to the left lung. After the procedure, the infant's status was improved with regard to arterial oxygen saturation, feeding and weight gain. During the follow-up, one year later, aortography revealed in-stent stenosis. The left pulmonary artery, as well as the branches, was well-developed and the decision was made to proceed with further surgical correction. Stenting of DA can be an effective alternative to primary surgical correction in selected patients with duct-dependent CHD.

  12. Relationship between the arterial calcification detected in mammography and coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topal, Ugur [Department of Radiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)], E-mail: utopal@uludag.edu.tr; Kaderli, Aysel [Department of Cardiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Topal, Naile Bolca [Department of Radiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Ozdemir, Buelent; Yesilbursa, Dilek; Cordan, Jale [Department of Cardiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Ediz, Buelent [Department of Statistics, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey); Aydinlar, Ali [Department of Cardiology, Uludag University, Medical School, Goeruekle Campus, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2007-09-15

    Objective: Arterial calcification is frequently encountered in mammography. The frequency of breast arterial calcification (BAC) increases with increasing age. Studies have shown that BAC is seen more frequently among the people who are under the risk of coronary artery diseases (CAD) such as diabetes and hypertension. The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship between the arterial calcification detected in mammography and the CAD. Material and methods: Screening mammography was performed in 123 women above the age of 40 years who had been examined with coronary angiography for the evaluation of CAD. The presence of BAC, number of affected vessels, and the distribution of calcification in the vessel wall were evaluated in the mammography. Subjects were questioned in terms of the cardiovasculary risk factors. The severity of CAD was evaluated according to the Gensini scoring. In addition, the number of blood vessels with stenosis of more than 50% was used as the vascular score. The correlation between Gensini and the vascular scores, and BAC was statistically evaluated using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Eighty (65%) of 123 patients had CAD. BAC was detected in the mammography of 49 (39.8%) subjects. The ages and duration of menopause of the cases with BAC were significantly higher than those without BAC (p < 0.001). There was an almost significant correlation between the BAC and Gensini scores (p = 0.059). There was a significant increase in the frequency of BAC among subjects with more than two vessels with stenosis (p = 0.033). Conclusion: Frequency of BAC increases with increasing age. BAC is also frequently seen in subjects having severe coronary artery disease. Although increasing age may be a factor increasing the frequency of BAC, BAC may also be an indicator of CAD. Therefore, the mentioning of arterial calcification in mammography reports may be important in warning the clinician in terms of CAD.

  13. Screening for anxiety disorders in patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunevicius, A.; Staniute, M.; Brozaitiene, J.; Pop, V.J.M.; Neverauskas, J.; Bunevicius, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are prevalent and associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, studies examining screening of anxiety disorders in CAD patients are lacking. In the present study we evaluated the prevalence of anxiety disorders in patients with

  14. Peripheral arterial disease - high prevalence in rural black South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) worldwide has been estimated at between 4.5% and 29%. PAD has been associated with male gender, advanced age, diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and smoking. Clinical experience with amputations at Mthatha General Hospital, a district ...

  15. Peripheral arterial disease in rheumatoid arthritis patients at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the magnitude of the rosclerotic arterial disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis(RA) patients at Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: hospital based cross-sectional study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital Rheumatology outpatient clinic. Subjects: Rheumatoid Arthritis patients. Results: We obtained ABI ...

  16. Changing demographics of pulmonary arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Without early surgical repair, around one-third of paediatric CHD patients develop significant PAH. Recent data from the Netherlands suggest that >4% of adult CHD patients have PAH, with higher rates

  17. Genetic contribution of the leukotriene pathway to coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the genetic contribution of the leukotriene (LT) pathway to risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 4,512 Caucasian and African American subjects ascertained through elective cardiac evaluation. Of the three previously associated variants, the shorter "3" and "4" alleles of a promoter ...

  18. Factors Influencing Smoking Cessation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Kryss; Higgins, Helen

    1997-01-01

    Ten sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics considered predictors of difficulty with smoking cessation in patients with coronary artery disease are reviewed. The compounding effects of nicotine addiction are discussed. Consideration of these factors may result in individualized programs for smoking cessation. A brief overview…

  19. Childhood Antecedents to Adult Coronary Artery Diseases. Special Reference Briefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winick, Myron

    This reference brief deals with the childhood antecedents to atherosclerosis and hypertension. While diet is related to the development of coronary artery diseases, there is some disagreement about what dietary changes are necessary or desirable in children to prevent their development, and at what age such changes should be made. Fifty-five…

  20. Comparison of modifiable coronary artery disease risk factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the incidence of the following coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors in urban (westernised) Black and White females: physical inactivity, hypertension, cigarette smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, obesity and multiple risk factors. Subjects: Subjects for this study were ...

  1. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Molecular mechanism underlying the patho-physiology of coronary artery disease (CAD) is complex. We used global expression profiling combined with analysis of biological network to dissect out potential genes and pathways associated with CAD in a representative case–control Asian Indian cohort. We initially ...

  2. Patients with coronary artery disease – Maintaining planned lifestyle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe how patients with coronary artery disease, who have had one or more cardiac interventions, were maintaining their planned lifestyle adaptations at four months after the intervention. Furthermore, the study aimed to develop guidelines to further assist patients in maintaining lifestyle ...

  3. Genetic epidemiology of coronary artery disease: an Asian Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings on the role of genetic factors in the aetiopathology of CAD have implicated novel genes and variants in addition to those involved in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. However, our present knowledge is ...

  4. Spontaneous Superficial Femoral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in Behcet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Ugurlucan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease is an autoimmune multisystemic disorder on vasculitis base. Cardiovascular involvement is the most important predictor of morbidity and mortality. The treatment should be planned carefully for pathologies requiring interventions. In our report, we present a 45-year-old patient with spontaneous superficial femoral artery pseudoaneurysm, our treatment strategy, and circumstances we faced.

  5. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease in Southern Punjab, Pakistan. ... History of hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM) or its treatment was recorded after observing their medical reports. Results: The proportion of females and males was 65.53 and 34.46 %, respectively. Of the 200 patients, the mean age of ...

  6. The burden and characteristics of peripheral arterial disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SUMMARY. Background: To determine the prevalence of Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) and associated risk factors in pa- tients undergoing amputation at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH), Accra, Ghana. Objectives: A cross- sectional study of all patients undergoing lower extremity amputation at the Department of.

  7. Dual antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrauwe, Sophie; Pilgrim, Thomas; Aminian, Adel; Noble, Stephane; Meier, Pascal; Iglesias, Juan F

    2017-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) combining aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor has been consistently shown to reduce recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with aspirin monotherapy, but at the expense of an increased risk of major bleeding. Nevertheless, the optimal duration of DAPT for secondary prevention of CAD remains uncertain, owing to the conflicting results of several large randomised trials. Among patients with stable CAD undergoing PCI with drug-eluting stents (DES), shorter durations of DAPT (3–6 months) were shown non-inferior to 12 or 24 months duration with respect to MACE, but reduced the rates of major bleeding. Contrariwise, prolonged DAPT durations (18–48 months) reduced the incidence of myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis, but at a cost of an increased risk of major bleeding and all-cause mortality. Until more evidence becomes available, the choice of optimal DAPT regimen and duration for patients with CAD requires a tailored approach based on the patient clinical presentation, baseline risk profile and management strategy. Future studies are however needed to identify patients who may derive benefit from shortened or extended DAPT courses for secondary prevention of CAD based on their individual ischaemic and bleeding risk. Based on limited evidence, 12 months duration of DAPT is currently recommended in patients with ACS irrespective of their management strategy, but large ongoing randomised trials are currently assessing the efficacy and safety of a short-term DAPT strategy (3–6 months) for patients with ACS undergoing PCI with newer generation DES. Finally, several ongoing, large-scale, randomised trials are challenging the current concept of DAPT by investigating P2Y12 receptor inhibitors as single antiplatelet therapy and may potentially shift the paradigm of

  8. Dual antiplatelet therapy for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrauwe, Sophie; Pilgrim, Thomas; Aminian, Adel; Noble, Stephane; Meier, Pascal; Iglesias, Juan F

    2017-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) combining aspirin and a P2Y 12 receptor inhibitor has been consistently shown to reduce recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with aspirin monotherapy, but at the expense of an increased risk of major bleeding. Nevertheless, the optimal duration of DAPT for secondary prevention of CAD remains uncertain, owing to the conflicting results of several large randomised trials. Among patients with stable CAD undergoing PCI with drug-eluting stents (DES), shorter durations of DAPT (3-6 months) were shown non-inferior to 12 or 24 months duration with respect to MACE, but reduced the rates of major bleeding. Contrariwise, prolonged DAPT durations (18-48 months) reduced the incidence of myocardial infarction and stent thrombosis, but at a cost of an increased risk of major bleeding and all-cause mortality. Until more evidence becomes available, the choice of optimal DAPT regimen and duration for patients with CAD requires a tailored approach based on the patient clinical presentation, baseline risk profile and management strategy. Future studies are however needed to identify patients who may derive benefit from shortened or extended DAPT courses for secondary prevention of CAD based on their individual ischaemic and bleeding risk. Based on limited evidence, 12 months duration of DAPT is currently recommended in patients with ACS irrespective of their management strategy, but large ongoing randomised trials are currently assessing the efficacy and safety of a short-term DAPT strategy (3-6 months) for patients with ACS undergoing PCI with newer generation DES. Finally, several ongoing, large-scale, randomised trials are challenging the current concept of DAPT by investigating P2Y 12 receptor inhibitors as single antiplatelet therapy and may potentially shift the paradigm of

  9. Vascular remodeling in coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. di Mario (Carlo); P.N. Ruygrok (Peter); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractTraditionally, the diagnosis of significant coronary atherosclerotic disease has relied on angiographic techniques. Both histologic analyses and, more recently, intravascular ultrasonography techniques have revealed that a significant atherosclerotic plaque load may be present in

  10. Coronary microvascular dysfunction equivalent to left main coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panç, Cafer; Kocaağa, Mehmet; Erdoğan, Onur; Sarıkaya, Remzi; Umman, Sabahattin

    2017-04-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction, also known as cardiac syndrome X, is a clinical syndrome presenting with typical angina and evidence of myocardial ischemia in the absence of flow-limiting stenosis on coronary angiography. Of patients undergoing coronary angiography due to suspected myocardial ischemia, 50% are found to have normal or near-normal coronary arteries. Described in this case report is a patient who developed hypotension and ST segment depressions during treadmill exercise test. Left main coronary artery or multivessel disease was suspected. Coronary angiography was normal, but coronary flow reserve measurement revealed severe microvascular dysfunction.

  11. Coronary Artery Aneurysmal Disease and Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Ostwani MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a 70-year-old male with no other atherogenic risk factors who presented with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS of unstable angina subsequently complicated by a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI. The patient’s presentation posed 3 unique features: (1 cardiac catheterization demonstrated nonobstructive 3-vessel multi-aneurysmal coronary artery disease with sluggish antegrade coronary flow; (2 a nonobstructive aneurysmal dissection flap based on contrast staining of the mid left anterior descending artery, which may have led to in situ nonocclusive thrombosis and distal microvascular embolization; and (3 successful conservative medical therapy of coronary artery aneurysmal disease (CAAD complicated with ACS. CAAD has an incidence of 1.5% to 4.9% in adults. The most common etiology of CAAD is atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. There are no guidelines for the management of CAAD complicated by ACS, and controversies exist as to whether conservative, catheter-based, or surgical management should be pursued.

  12. Coronary flow reserve and relative flow reserve measured by N-13 ammonia PET for characterization of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Geon; Park, Ki Seong; Kim, Jahae; Kang, Sae-Ryung; Song, Ho-Chun; Kim, Ju Han; Cho, Jae Yeong; Hong, Young Joon; Jabin, Zeenat; Park, Hee Jeong; Jeong, Geum-Cheol; Kwon, Seong Young; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Hyeon Sik; Min, Jung-Joon; Garcia, Ernest V; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the relationships between coronary flow reserve (CFR) and relative flow reserve (RFR) measured by N-13 ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) for characterization of epicardial coronary artery disease (CAD). Sixty-nine consecutive stable angina patients underwent N-13 ammonia PET, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and if necessary, invasive coronary angiography (CAG) within 2 weeks. Myocardial blood flow (MBF), CFR, RFR, and coronary vascular resistance of the reference arterial territory (CVR ref ) were measured by N-13 ammonia PET. The presence of significant stenosis (SS) and diffuse atherosclerosis (DA) was evaluated on CCTA and CAG. Functional parameters measured by PET were compared among arteries with and without SS and DA. Arteries with SS and those with DA showed significantly lower stress MBF, as compared to those without. RFR was significantly lower in arteries with SS as compared to those without, while CFR was not. CFR was significantly lower in arteries with DA as compared to those without, while RFR was not. Among arteries without SS, CFR was significantly lower in those with DA as compared to those without. However, among arteries with SS, CFR was similar between those with and without DA. In contrast, RFR was significantly lower in arteries with SS, regardless of the presence of DA. CFR and RFR showed a weak positive correlation (r = 0.269) with discordance in 24 cases (35%). Among the arteries with CFR-RFR discordance, the prevalence of DA was significantly higher in those with low CFR but preserved RFR, as compared to those with preserved CFR but low RFR (75 vs 25%, p = 0.028). CVR ref was significantly higher in arteries with DA, implicating a correlation of DA with underlying microvascular disease. CFR and RFR measured by myocardial perfusion PET could provide a comprehensive information for characterization of epicardial CAD.

  13. Relationship between epicardial adipose tissue and subclinical coronary artery disease in patients with extra-cardiac arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Dekker, M A M; Takashima, R; van den Heuvel, E R; van den Dungen, J J A M; Tio, R A; Oudkerk, M; Vliegenthart, R

    2014-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) are linked to coronary artery disease (CAD). The association between EAT, MAT, and severity of CAD in known extra-cardiac arterial disease was investigated. Sixty-five cardiac asymptomatic patients (mean age 65 ± 8 years, 69% male) with peripheral arterial disease, carotid stenosis, or aortic aneurysm underwent coronary computed tomography angiography. Patients were divided into non-significant (cardiovascular risk factors. Median EAT was 99.5, 98.0, and 112.0 cm(3) (P = 0.38) and median MAT was 66.0, 90.0, and 81.0 cm(3) (P = 0.53) for non-significant, single vessel, and multi-vessel CAD, respectively. In age- and gender-adjusted analysis, only EAT was significantly associated with CAD (odds ratio [OR] 1.12 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.25] per 10 cm(3) increase in EAT; P = 0.04). This remained in multivariate-adjusted analysis (OR 1.21 [1.04-1.39]; P = 0.01). In patients with known extra-cardiac arterial disease, CAD is correlated with EAT, but not with MAT. These results suggest that EAT has a local effect on coronary atherosclerosis, apart from the endocrine effect of visceral fat. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  14. Diagnosis & Treatment | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Diagnosis & Treatment Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Diagnosis Your healthcare provider diagnoses coronary artery disease (atherosclerosis) based on your medical and family histories, ...

  15. What You Need to Know If You Have Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What You Need to Know If You Have Coronary Artery Disease Joseph S. Alpert Download PDF https://doi.org/10. ... your doctor has told you that you have coronary artery disease, or if your doctor has told you that ...

  16. Changing blood flow in peripheral artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Borne, P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death globally and it is predicted this will remain to increase throughout 2030 to an estimated 23,3 million patients per year. This trend is accompanied by a steep increase in healthcare costs, making it a great health and socio-economic burden.

  17. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery If plaque continues to build up, the space inside the artery narrows. The artery walls become ... Plaque forms within the artery walls, narrowing the space inside and sometimes blocking blood flow. This process ...

  18. Pathophysiology of Intermittent Claudication in Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, Naomi M; Creager, Mark A

    2017-02-24

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects more than 200 million adults worldwide. Patients with lower extremity PAD have a heightened risk for cardiovascular events because of the systemic nature of atherosclerosis, and benefit from treatment with risk factor-modifying therapies. Limb symptoms in PAD include intermittent claudication and diminished walking ability. Arterial obstruction from atherosclerotic lesions initiates limb ischemia; however, decreased perfusion incompletely determines the clinical expression of PAD and its response to therapy. Potential mechanistic drivers of claudication in addition to arterial obstruction include inflammation, vascular dysfunction, reduced microvascular flow, impaired angiogenesis, and altered skeletal muscle function. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology of limb symptoms has the potential to accelerate development of novel therapeutic strategies to increase functional capacity in patients with PAD.

  19. ABO Blood Group and Risk of Thromboembolic and Arterial Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ABO blood groups have been shown to be associated with increased risks of venous thromboembolic and arterial disease. However, the reported magnitude of this association is inconsistent and is based on evidence from small-scale studies. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the SCANDAT2...... (Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions) database of blood donors linked with other nationwide health data registers to investigate the association between ABO blood groups and the incidence of first and recurrent venous thromboembolic and arterial events. Blood donors in Denmark and Sweden between 1987......-up. Compared with blood group O, non-O blood groups were associated with higher incidence of both venous and arterial thromboembolic events. The highest rate ratios were observed for pregnancy-related venous thromboembolism (incidence rate ratio, 2.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-2.79), deep vein thrombosis...

  20. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  1. Depression and Coronary Artery Disease: The Association, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Khawaja, Imran Shuja; Westermeyer, Joseph J.; Gajwani, Prashant; Feinstein, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a comprehensive review of the literature to determine whether or not a relationship between depression and coronary artery disease exists. Our literature search supports the following: Depression and coronary artery disease have a bidirectional relationship, i.e., coronary artery disease can cause depression and depression is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease and its complications; depression may contribute to sudden cardiac death and increase all causes of c...

  2. Peripheral artery disease: potential role of ACE-inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Coppola

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Coppola, Giuseppe Romano, Egle Corrado, Rosa Maria Grisanti, Salvatore NovoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular and Nephro-Urological Diseases, Chair of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Palermo, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Subjects with peripheral arterial disease (PAD of the lower limbs are at high risk for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and the prevalence of coronary artery disease in such patients is elevated. Recent studies have shown that regular use of cardiovascular medications, such as therapeutic and preventive agents for PAD patients, seems to be promising in reducing long-term mortality and morbidity. The angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE system plays an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, and ACE-inhibitors (ACE-I seem to have vasculoprotective and antiproliferative effects as well as a direct antiatherogenic effect. ACE-I also promote the degradation of bradykinin and the release of nitric oxide, a potent vasodilator; further, thay have shown important implications for vascular oxidative stress. Other studies have suggested that ACE-I may also improve endothelial dysfunction. ACE-I are useful for reducing the risk of cardiovascular events in clinical and subclinical PAD. Particularly, one agent of the class (ie, ramipril has shown in many studies to able to significantly reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with PAD.Keywords: atherosclerosis, peripheral arterial disease, endothelial dysfunction, ACE-inhibitors

  3. Silent disease progression in clinically stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Hani N

    2017-04-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is a progressive disorder whereby cardiac structure and function continue to deteriorate, often despite the absence of clinically apparent signs and symptoms of a worsening disease state. This silent yet progressive nature of HFrEF can contribute to the increased risk of death-even in patients who are 'clinically stable', or who are asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic-because it often goes undetected and/or undertreated. Current therapies are aimed at improving clinical symptoms, and several agents more directly target the underlying causes of disease; however, new therapies are needed that can more fully address factors responsible for underlying progressive cardiac dysfunction. In this review, mechanisms that drive HFrEF, including ongoing cardiomyocyte loss, mitochondrial abnormalities, impaired calcium cycling, elevated LV wall stress, reactive interstitial fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, are discussed. Additionally, limitations of current HF therapies are reviewed, with a focus on how these therapies are designed to counteract the deleterious effects of compensatory neurohumoral activation but do not fully prevent disease progression. Finally, new investigational therapies that may improve the underlying molecular, cellular, and structural abnormalities associated with HF progression are reviewed. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  4. Updates in the management of stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsingam, Saiprasad; Bozarth, Andrew L; Abdeljalil, Asem

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable disease state characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory process. It is increasingly recognized as a major public health problem, affecting more than 20 million adults in the US. It is also recognized as a leading cause of hospitalizations and is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. The Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) operates to promote evidence-based management of COPD, increase awareness and encourage research. In 2011, GOLD published a consensus report detailing evidence-based management strategies for COPD, which were last updated in 2015. In recent years, newer strategies and a growing number of new pharmacologic agents to treat symptoms of COPD have also been introduced and show promise in improving the management of COPD. We aim to provide an evidence-based review of the available and upcoming pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment options for stable COPD, with continued emphasis on evidence-based management.

  5. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in stable cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. METHODS: In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive...... rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after...... a mean follow-up of 23 months. RESULTS: The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; P

  6. Rivaroxaban with or without Aspirin in Stable Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, John W; Connolly, Stuart J; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R; Hart, Robert G; Shestakovska, Olga; Diaz, Rafael; Alings, Marco; Lonn, Eva M; Anand, Sonia S; Widimsky, Petr; Hori, Masatsugu; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S; Branch, Kelley R H; Probstfield, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Deepak L; Zhu, Jun; Liang, Yan; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio; O'Donnell, Martin; Kakkar, Ajay K; Fox, Keith A A; Parkhomenko, Alexander N; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Keltai, Matyas; Ryden, Lars; Pogosova, Nana; Dans, Antonio L; Lanas, Fernando; Commerford, Patrick J; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Guzik, Tomek J; Verhamme, Peter B; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Tonkin, Andrew M; Lewis, Basil S; Felix, Camilo; Yusoff, Khalid; Steg, P Gabriel; Metsarinne, Kaj P; Cook Bruns, Nancy; Misselwitz, Frank; Chen, Edmond; Leong, Darryl; Yusuf, Salim

    2017-10-05

    We evaluated whether rivaroxaban alone or in combination with aspirin would be more effective than aspirin alone for secondary cardiovascular prevention. In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 27,395 participants with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease to receive rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin (100 mg once daily), rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily), or aspirin (100 mg once daily). The primary outcome was a composite of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. The study was stopped for superiority of the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group after a mean follow-up of 23 months. The primary outcome occurred in fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-plus-aspirin group than in the aspirin-alone group (379 patients [4.1%] vs. 496 patients [5.4%]; hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 0.86; Paspirin group (288 patients [3.1%] vs. 170 patients [1.9%]; hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.40 to 2.05; Paspirin group as compared with 378 (4.1%) in the aspirin-alone group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.96; P=0.01; threshold P value for significance, 0.0025). The primary outcome did not occur in significantly fewer patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group than in the aspirin-alone group, but major bleeding events occurred in more patients in the rivaroxaban-alone group. Among patients with stable atherosclerotic vascular disease, those assigned to rivaroxaban (2.5 mg twice daily) plus aspirin had better cardiovascular outcomes and more major bleeding events than those assigned to aspirin alone. Rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) alone did not result in better cardiovascular outcomes than aspirin alone and resulted in more major bleeding events. (Funded by Bayer; COMPASS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01776424 .).

  7. Plasma viscosity increase with progression of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poredos, P; Zizek, B

    1996-03-01

    Increased blood and plasma viscosity has been described in patients with coronary and peripheral arterial disease. However, the relation of viscosity to the extent of arterial wall deterioration--the most important determinant of clinical manifestation and prognosis of the disease--is not well known. Therefore, the authors studied plasma viscosity as one of the major determinants of blood viscosity in patients with different stages of arterial disease of lower limbs (according to Fontaine) and its relation to the presence of some risk factors of atherosclerosis. The study encompassed four groups of subjects: 19 healthy volunteers (group A), 18 patients with intermittent claudication up to 200 m (stage II; group B), 15 patients with critical ischemia of lower limbs (stage III and IV; group C), and 16 patients with recanalization procedures on peripheral arteries. Venous blood samples were collected from an antecubital vein without stasis for the determination of plasma viscosity (with a rotational capillary microviscometer, PAAR), fibrinogen, total cholesterol, alpha-2-macroglobulin, and glucose concentrations. In patients with recanalization procedure local plasma viscosity was also determined from blood samples taken from a vein on the dorsum of the foot. Plasma viscosity was most significantly elevated in the patients with critical ischemia (1.78 mPa.sec) and was significantly higher than in the claudicants (1.68 mPa.sec), and the claudicants also had significantly higher viscosity than the controls (1.58 mPa.sec). In patients in whom a recanalization procedure was performed, no differences in systemic and local plasma viscosity were detected, neither before nor after recanalization of the diseased artery. In all groups plasma viscosity was correlated with fibrinogen concentration (r=0.70, P < 0.01) and total cholesterol concentration (r=0.24, P < 0.05), but in group C (critical ischemia) plasma viscosity was most closely linked to the concentration of alpha-2

  8. Elevated Levels of Plasma Superoxide Dismutases 1 and 2 in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ren Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To measure plasma levels of superoxide dismutases 1, 2, and 3 (SOD1, 2, 3 and determine whether SODs can function as biomarkers for coronary artery disease (CAD. Patients & Methods. Patient groups were as follows: patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP, n=33, patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS, n=49, and controls (n=42. Protein quantification was done using ELISA. Results. The concentrations of plasma SOD1 and SOD2 were higher in CAD than in healthy controls. No difference in SOD3 levels between CAD and control groups was found. Limited correlations were found between SODs and gender, age, and severity of coronary artery stenosis. Conclusions. Plasma levels of SOD1 and SOD2 were elevated in patients with CAD and might serve as surrogate biomarkers for CAD.

  9. Coronary artery disease and lunar catecholamine cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, William J

    2017-03-15

    Show how lunar catecholamine cardiomyopathy alone, exemplified by Neil Armstrong's single space walk, prior to exposure to inhalation of fine particulate matter, can trigger " Neil Armstrong Syndrome" or by Irwin with coronary, possibly hypertensive heart disease, and catecholamine cardiomyopathy. With space flight, invariably magnesium ion deficits, catecholamine elevations, vicious cycles. Design Use lunar heart rates while configuring rover to show severe tachycardia component of the syndrome. Use Irwin's stress test-" cyanotic fingernails" to support Apollo 15 Space Syndrome. Use Irwin's autobiography to compensate for often incomplete data. Results Paper shows that both Irwin as well as Armstrong meet criteria of my 2nd. Space Syndrome: severe thirst, severe shortness of breath, severe tachycardia, the latter, corrected by replenishing plasma volume. Conclusions Irwin, with a history of hypertension prior to the Apollo 15 mission and classical angina during Earth reentry, may have had coronary as well as hypertensive heart disease whereas there was no evidence that Armstrong had these conditions prior or during his mission. However both, on return to Earth, had abnormal stress tests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of peripheral arterial and cardiovascular diseases in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Santos, Raul D

    2014-08-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  11. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c. Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Objective: This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD, such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods: The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations, mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results: The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049. Conclusion: Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  12. Steal phenomenon through the anterior communicating artery in Moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Mee [Ewha Womans University, Department of Radiology, Mok-dong Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Chae, Eun Jin; Kim, Min Yeong; Kim, Sang Joon; Choi, Choong Gon; Pyun, Hae Wook; Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jae Kyun [Seoul Veterans Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Ahn, Jae Sung; Ra, Young-Shin [University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Jong-Uk; Hahm, Kyung Don [University of Ulsan, Asan Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-01-15

    Branch occlusion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) is regarded as a part of Moyamoya disease. The purpose of this study is to define the ACA steal phenomenon (SP) in Moyamoya disease and to evaluate temporal changes according to the disease progression. From 139 Moyamoya patients we defined ACASP as narrowing of the ipsilateral A1-2 junction while preserving the anterior communicating artery and supplying the contralateral ACA cortical branches with the development of leptomeningeal collaterals by the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery into the hypoperfused ipsilateral ACA territory. Direction of the steal related to the stage in both hemispheres by Suzuki classification was statistically analyzed using the binomial test based on binomial distribution. Follow-ups of ACASP were evaluated in five patients. We identified ACASP in 13 (9%) patients (male:female=7:6, mean age 18 years, range: 2-58 years) of the 139 study patients. The presenting pattern was ischemic in 12 and hemorrhagic in one. The direction of SP occurred from the hemisphere in the lower to the higher stage of Suzuki classification (two-tail P value=0.0002). After revascularization surgery, ACASP disappeared or diminished. ACASP may occur in bilaterally different stages of Moyamoya disease as a transient self-adaptive process. It regresses after revascularization surgery. (orig.)

  13. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carolina [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Miname, Marcio [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Makdisse, Marcia [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Kalil, Roberto Filho [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Raul D., E-mail: rdsf@cardiol.br [Instituto do Coração HCFMUSP, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients.

  14. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  15. Validation of a questionnaire to detect kinesiophobia (fear of movement) in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Maria; Jansson, Bengt; Cider, Asa; Herlitz, Johan; Lundberg, Mari

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the validity and reliability of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia Heart (TSK-SV Heart), a brief questionnaire to detect kinesiophobia (fear of movement) in patients with coronary artery disease. Methodological research (cross-sectional study). A total of 332 patients, mean age 65 years (standard deviation 9.1) diagnosed with coronary artery disease at a university hospital were included in the study. The psychometric properties of the TSK-SV Heart were tested. The tests of validity comprised face, content, and construct validity. The reliability tests included composite reliability, internal consistency and stability over time. In terms of reliability, the TSK-SV Heart was found to be stable over time (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.83) and internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha 0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis provided acceptable fit for a hypothesized 4-factor model with inclusion of a method factor. These results provide support for the reliability of the TSK-SV Heart. The questionnaire appears to be valid for use in patients with coronary artery disease. However, some items require further investigation due to low influence on some sub-dimensions of the test. The sub-dimensions of kinesiophobia require future research concerning their implications for the target group.

  16. Arterial aging and arterial disease : interplay between central hemodynamics, cardiac work, and organ flow-implications for CKD and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, Gerard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Wiecek, Andrzej; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Ortiz, Alberto; Massy, Ziad; Lindholm, Bengt; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto; Fliser, Danilo; Agarwal, Rajiv; Jager, Kitty J.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Zoccali, Carmine

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All epidemiological studies have clearly shown that accelerated arterial and cardiac aging is characteristic of these populations. Arterial

  17. [Intermittent thrombolytic treatment. Results during severe, chronic arterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiessinger, J N; Aiach, M; Lagneau, P; Cormier, J M; Housset, E

    1975-04-20

    38 patients with severe chronic arteritis of the lower limbs were treated with streptokinase intermittently. All had been refused for surgical operation. One patient died, 4 others had early interruption of treatment. Eleven of the 38 patients had efficient thrombolysis confirmed by arteriography. The facts confirm the possibility of thrombolysis during chronic arterial disease. The fact that the aggravation was recent was favourable factor in prognosis. The eleven patients improved, had severe aggravation of symptomes for less than 2 months. Thus thrombolytic treatment has a place of choice in the treatment of severe arterial disease where surgery is impossible, or dangerous, owing to the uncertain state of the vascular bed below the lesion. Efficacious, it permits reconstructive surgery in cases where it had been at first refused. The use of intermittent treatment, apart from advantages of confort and cost, seems to increase the efficacy of treatment.

  18. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -blind placebo-controlled trials could not confirm the initial high efficacy of either the growth factor protein or the gene therapy approaches observed in earlier small trials. The clinical studies so far have all been without any gene-related serious adverse events. Future trials will focus on whether...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  19. Nutritional status and coronary artery disease: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Behrooz; Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghadrdoost, Behshid; Bakhshandeh, Hooman

    2014-03-01

    Nutrition is among the most important factors influencing coronary artery disease. Here we aimed to study the nutritional status of patients with and without coronary artery disease (CAD). We performed a cross-sectional study on 600 patients referred to a cardiology clinic with the signs of ACS. The patients were then classified in to two groups (CAD group and the normal group) based on angiographic findings. The amount of nutritional profile was questioned from all participants. Men were more often diagnosed with CAD compared to women (198/362 vs. 102/238; P nutritional factors predicting CAD. White mean and type of tea were the most important predictors of CAD. Dietary prevention strategies from childhood could prevent early CAD.

  20. Functional MRI in peripheral arterial disease: arterial peak flow versus ankle-brachial index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare the success rate of successful arterial peak flow (APF and ankle-brachial index (ABI measurements in patients with suspected or known peripheral arterial disease (PAD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 183 patients with varying degrees of PAD were included. All subjects underwent ABI measurements and MR imaging of the popliteal artery to determine APF. Proportions of patients with successful APF and ABI measurements were compared and the discriminative capability was evaluated. RESULTS: APF was successfully measured in 91% of the patients, whereas the ABI could be determined in 71% of the patients (p<0.01. Success rates of APF and ABI were significantly higher in patients with intermittent claudication (95% and 80%, respectively than in patients with critical ischemia (87% and 62%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to the assessment of PAD severity with ABI, the success rate of MRI-based APF measurements in patients with a clinical indication for MRA is 20% higher, with similar discriminatory capacity for disease severity. Therefore, APF is an especially convenient and valuable measure to assess severity in PAD patients scheduled to undergo MR angiography to obtain additional functional information concerning the vascular status.

  1. Coronary artery thrombus resulting in sudden cardiac death in an infant with Kawasaki disease and giant coronary artery aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umakumaran Ponniah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a six-month-old Hispanic male infant who had Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysms on echocardiography. He died suddenly five months later in spite of aggressive medical therapy. Autopsy showed extensive coronary artery thrombosis. Giant coronary artery aneurysms need diligent follow up as they pose significant risks including risk of thrombus, myocardial infarction and sudden death.

  2. Regadenoson in the detection of coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Christiane Buhr; Mario Gössl; Raimund Erbel; Holger Eggebrecht

    2008-01-01

    Christiane Buhr1, Mario Gössl2, Raimund Erbel1, Holger Eggebrecht11Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USAAbstract: Myocardial perfusion studies use either physical exercise or pharmacologic vasodilator stress to induce maximum myocardial hyperemia. Adenosine and dipyridamole are the most commonly used agents to induce coronary arterial v...

  3. Challenges associated with peripheral arterial disease in women

    OpenAIRE

    Barochiner, Jessica; Aparicio, Lucas S; Waisman, Gabriel D

    2014-01-01

    Jessica Barochiner, Lucas S Aparicio, Gabriel D Waisman Hypertension Section, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina Abstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an increasingly recognized disorder that is associated with functional impairment, quality-of-life deterioration, increased risk of cardiovascular ischemic events, and increased risk of total and cardiovascular mortality. Although earlier studies suggested that PAD was more common ...

  4. Estrogens and Coronary Artery Disease: New Clinical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M R; Barton, M

    2016-01-01

    In premenopausal women, endogenous estrogens are associated with reduced prevalence of arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Clinical trials conducted in the 1990s such as HERS, WHI, and WISDOM have shown that postmenopausal treatment with horse hormone mixtures (so-called conjugated equine estrogens) and synthetic progestins adversely affects female cardiovascular health. Our understanding of rapid (nongenomic) and chronic (genomic) estrogen signaling has since advanced considerably, including identification of a new G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), which like the "classical" receptors ERα and ERβ is highly abundant in the cardiovascular system. Here, we discuss the role of estrogen receptors in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and review natural and synthetic ligands of estrogen receptors as well as their effects in physiology, on cardiovascular risk factors, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Data from preclinical and clinical studies using nonselective compounds activating GPER, which include selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen or raloxifene, selective estrogen receptor downregulators such as Faslodex™ (fulvestrant/ICI 182,780), vitamin B3 (niacin), green tea catechins, and soy flavonoids such as genistein or resveratrol, strongly suggest that activation of GPER may afford therapeutic benefit for primary and secondary prevention in patients with or at risk for coronary artery disease. Evidence from preclinical studies suggest similar efficacy profiles for selective small molecule GPER agonists such as G-1 which are devoid of uterotrophic activity. Further clinical research in this area is warranted to provide opportunities for future cardiovascular drug development. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Surgical management of coronary arterial disease in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmer, E A; Aronow, W S

    1998-01-01

    Coronary artery angioplasty or bypass is being performed for increasing numbers of patients in their seventh, eighth, ninth and even tenth decades of life. Because of the cost involved, justification for performing these procedures in the elderly has become a topic of daily discussion among those responsible for funding healthcare. Both silent and overt coronary artery disease (CAD) are more common in the population over 65 years of age. Because CAD in the elderly often presents in an atypical manner, diagnosis of the disease is frequently delayed. Partly because of the delayed diagnosis and partly because of cost considerations, coronary arterial bypass (CABG) is more often performed as an emergency procedure in the elderly with the results that both operative mortality and costs are increased over those observed in a younger population. Nevertheless, it is clear that performance of coronary revascularization procedures in the elderly can both prolong life and improve the quality of life beyond what can be achieved using alternative methods of treatment. Greater efforts directed toward detection of ischemic heart disease in the these patients and earlier, elective surgery could significantly reduce both the mortality and disability associated with CAD in the elderly.

  6. CCR2 and coronary artery disease: a woscops substudy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Ian C

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several lines of evidence support a role for CCL2 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and its receptor CCR2 in the development of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the association of the CCR2 Val64Ile polymorphism with the development of coronary artery disease in the WOSCOPS study sample set. Findings A total of 443 cases and 1003 controls from the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study (WOSCOPS were genotyped for the Val64Ile polymorphism in the CCR2 gene. Genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls. The CCR2 Val64Ile polymorphism was found not to be associated with coronary events in this study population (odds ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.82-1.61, p = 0.41. Conclusions This case-control study does not support an association of the CCR2 Val64Ile polymorphism with coronary artery disease in the WOSCOPS sample set and does not confirm a possible protective role for CCR2 Val64Ile in the development of coronary artery disease.

  7. A Structured Review of Antithrombotic Therapy in Peripheral Artery Disease With a Focus on Revascularization: A TASC (InterSociety Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Artery Disease) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Connie N; Norgren, Lars; Ansel, Gary M; Capell, Warren H; Fletcher, John P; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Gottsäter, Anders; Hitos, Kerry; Jaff, Michael R; Nordanstig, Joakim; Hiatt, William R

    2017-06-20

    Peripheral artery disease affects >200 million people worldwide and is associated with significant limb and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Limb revascularization is recommended to improve function and quality of life for symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease with intermittent claudication who have not responded to medical treatment. For patients with critical limb ischemia, the goals of revascularization are to relieve pain, help wound healing, and prevent limb loss. The baseline risk of cardiovascular and limb-related events demonstrated among patients with stable peripheral artery disease is elevated after revascularization and related to atherothrombosis and restenosis. Both of these processes involve platelet activation and the coagulation cascade, forming the basis for the use of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies to optimize procedural success and reduce postprocedural cardiovascular risk. Unfortunately, few high-quality, randomized data to support use of these therapies after peripheral artery disease revascularization exist, and much of the rationale for the use of antiplatelet agents after endovascular peripheral revascularization is extrapolated from percutaneous coronary intervention literature. Consequently, guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy after lower limb revascularization are inconsistent and not always evidence-based. In this context, the purpose of this structured review is to assess the available randomized data for antithrombotic therapy after peripheral arterial revascularization, with a focus on clinical trial design issues that may affect interpretation of study results, and highlight areas that require further investigation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Intra-arterial infusion of prostaglandin E1 in normal subjects and patients with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Nielsen, S L; Holstein, P

    1976-01-01

    Acute vasodilatation was produced by infusion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in the femoral artery in 6 patients with occlusive arterial disease of the legs and in 3 normal subjects. The effect on blood flow and on blood pressure was measured at different segments of the leg with the strain gauge...

  9. Serum Galectin-9 Levels Are Associated with Coronary Artery Disease in Chinese Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ruirui; Liu, Cheng; Tang, Hongxia; Zeng, Qiutang; Wang, Xiang; Zhu, Zhengfeng; Liu, Yuzhou; Mao, Xiaobo; Zhong, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Background. Recently, several studies suggest that galectin-9 (Gal-9) might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. However, the exact role of Gal-9 in atherosclerosis remains to be elucidated. Methods. Serum Gal-9, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interferon- (IFN-) γ, interleukin- (IL-) 4, IL-17, and transforming growth factor- (TGF-) β1 were measured. The effect of Gal-9 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was investigated in patients with normal coronary artery (NCA). Results. The lowest level of Gal-9 was found in the ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) group, followed by the non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTEACS), the NCA, and the stable angina pectoris (SAP) groups, respectively. Additionally, Gal-9 was found to be independently associated with hs-CRP, lipoprotein(a), and creatinine. Notably, Gal-9 was also noted to be an independent predictor of the Gensini score. Moreover, Gal-9 suppressed T-helper 17 (Th17) and expanded regulatory T cells (Tregs), resulting in decreased IL-17 production and increased secretion of TGF-β1. Conclusions. Serum Gal-9 is associated with not only coronary artery disease (CAD), but also the severity of coronary arteries stenosis. Gal-9 can expand Tregs and suppress Th17 development in activated PBMC, implying that Gal-9 has the potential to dampen the development of atherosclerosis and may be a new therapy for CAD. PMID:26663989

  10. Serum Galectin-9 Levels Are Associated with Coronary Artery Disease in Chinese Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruirui Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recently, several studies suggest that galectin-9 (Gal-9 might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. However, the exact role of Gal-9 in atherosclerosis remains to be elucidated. Methods. Serum Gal-9, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, interferon- (IFN- γ, interleukin- (IL- 4, IL-17, and transforming growth factor- (TGF- β1 were measured. The effect of Gal-9 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was investigated in patients with normal coronary artery (NCA. Results. The lowest level of Gal-9 was found in the ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI group, followed by the non-ST-segment elevation ACS (NSTEACS, the NCA, and the stable angina pectoris (SAP groups, respectively. Additionally, Gal-9 was found to be independently associated with hs-CRP, lipoprotein(a, and creatinine. Notably, Gal-9 was also noted to be an independent predictor of the Gensini score. Moreover, Gal-9 suppressed T-helper 17 (Th17 and expanded regulatory T cells (Tregs, resulting in decreased IL-17 production and increased secretion of TGF-β1. Conclusions. Serum Gal-9 is associated with not only coronary artery disease (CAD, but also the severity of coronary arteries stenosis. Gal-9 can expand Tregs and suppress Th17 development in activated PBMC, implying that Gal-9 has the potential to dampen the development of atherosclerosis and may be a new therapy for CAD.

  11. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Igari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, serum amyloid P (SAP, and pentraxin 3 (PTX3, has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI, and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p=0.019. Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD.

  12. Depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Maria Mendonça da Cunha

    Full Text Available Objective.To assess the presence of depressive symptoms in patients with coronary artery disease in the preoperative period for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil. Methods. A cross-sectional study with 63 hospitalized patients prior to CABG. Two instruments were used for data collection; one for the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and the other to evaluate the presence of depressive symptoms, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI. Results. The mean age was 58 years; most were male (60.3%; with a partner (81% low educational level (71.4% attended school through elementary school. Among the patients, 36.5% were classified with dysphoria, and 25.4% had some degree of depression (6.3% mild, 17.5% moderate, and 1.6% severe. The group of patients with lower educational level presented higher depressive symptoms. Conclusion. Six of every ten patients with coronary artery disease showed dysphoria or some degree of depression. The results of this study can support the planning of nursing care for patients before and after CABG, as well as the development of public health policies to ensure complete, quality care for these patients, understanding depression as a variable that can interfere with recovery after cardiac surgery.

  13. Non-Invasive Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcial, José M; Pérez, Reynerio; Vargas, Pedro; Franqui-Rivera, Hilton

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, like the cessation of the use of tobacco as well as a modification of dietary and exercise habits, can be the most cost-effective interventions in patients with PAD. Smocking cessation is the most important intervention, since it increases survival in these patients. Antiplatelet therapy is an essential component in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. In addition to delaying arterial obstructive progression, these agents are most usefull in reducing adverse cardiovascular events such as non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and vascular death. Mainstay of treatment continues to be aspirin monotherapy (75-325mg daily). Current treatment for lower extremity PAD is directed towards the relief of symptoms and improvement in QoL. The two agents which have consistently been found to be most efficient in achieving these goals are cilostazol and naftidrofuryl oxalate. Naftidrofuryl oxalate may emerge as the most efficient and cost-effective treatment for symptom relief.

  14. The Prognosis of Patients With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease Versus Normal Arteries Determined by Invasive Coronary Angiography or Computed Tomography Coronary Angiography: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fang-Yang; Huang, Bao-Tao; Lv, Wen-Yu; Liu, Wei; Peng, Yong; Xia, Tian-Li; Wang, Peng-Ju; Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Liu, Rui-Shuang; Zhang, Chen; Gui, Yi-Yue; Liao, Yan-Biao; Chen, Mao; Zhu, Ye

    2016-03-01

    Limited data exist regarding the outcomes of patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) detected by computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) or invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Our aim was to compare the prognosis of patients with nonobstructive coronary artery plaques with that of patients with entirely normal arteries. The MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Embase databases were searched. Studies comparing the prognosis of individuals with nonobstructive CAD versus normal coronary arteries detected by CTCA or ICA were included. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiac events (MACE) including cardiac death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization due to unstable angina or revascularization. A fixed effects model was chosen to pool the estimates of odds ratios (ORs). Forty-eight studies with 64,905 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Patients in the nonobstructive CAD arm had a significantly higher risk of MACE compared to their counterparts in the normal artery arm (pooled OR, 3.17, 95% confidence interval, 2.77-3.63). When excluding revascularization as an endpoint, hard cardiac composite outcomes were also more frequent among patients with nonobstructive CAD (pooled OR, 2.10; 95%CI, 1.79-2.45). All subgroups (age, sex, follow-up duration, different outcomes, diagnostic modality, and CAD risk factor) consistently showed a poorer prognosis with nonobstructive CAD than with normal arteries. When dividing the studies into a CTCA and ICA group for further analysis based on the indications for diagnostic tests, we also found nonobstructive CAD to be associated with a higher risk of MACE in both stable and acute chest pain. Patients with nonobstructive CAD had a poorer prognosis compared with their counterparts with normal arteries.

  15. Peripheral arterial disease: an underestimated aetiology of exercise intolerance in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Olivier; Boussuges, Alain; Nussbaum, Eric; Marqueste, Louis; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2008-06-01

    To assess the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and its implications for exercise limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. One hundred and fifty-one moderate-to-severe COPD patients (forced expiratory volume in 1 s: 37+/-6 SD% predicted) and 73 healthy age-matched control individuals (divided into 31 smokers and 42 nonsmokers) participated in this study. All COPD patients were either exsmokers or current smokers and their tobacco-smoking history was similar to that of healthy smokers. To evaluate the existence of arterial disease, lower limb perfusion pressure impairment was assessed using the ankle brachial index, whereas arterial stiffness was assessed by the pulse wave velocity (PWV). The definition of peripheral arterial disease required an ankle brachial index value of 0.90 or less, whereas the PWV increment was considered to be a direct witness of arterial stiffness increase. A 6-min walk test was performed to assess physical exercise capacity. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease was higher in COPD patients than in healthy participants (81+/-3 SD; 49+/-5 SD and 9+/-2 SD%, respectively, in COPD, healthy smokers and nonsmokers). PWV mean values were significantly higher in COPD patients compared with healthy smokers and nonsmokers (10.3+/-2.1 SD m/s; 9.2+/-1.3 SD m/s and 8.7+/-2.2 SD m/s, respectively). The distance covered during the 6-min-walk test was associated positively with the degree of peripheral arterial disease (r=0.78; P=0.05) and negatively with the PWV values (r=-0.74; P=0.05). Not only tobacco-smoking history but also COPD severity was shown to influence these associations. The effect of peripheral arterial disease on exercise intolerance in COPD seems to be considerable. Therefore, COPD patients participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme should profit from a systematic search for arterial disease. Arterial dysfunction has to be taken into account in the multidisciplinary treatment of these

  16. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of identifying aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arterial disease with angiography or duplex scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coffi, S. B.; Ubbink, D. Th; Dijkgraaf, M. G. W.; Reekers, J. A.; Legemate, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cost-effectiveness analysis of three diagnostic imaging strategies for the assessment of aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The strategies were: angiography as the reference strategy, duplex scanning (DS) plus supplementary

  18. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel D. Torok MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare and highly fatal disease that has been reported in 8 patients with glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI. We describe an additional case of an acute presentation of PAH in a 14-year-old patient with GSDI, which was successfully treated with inhaled nitric oxide and sildenafil. We investigated the incidence of PAH in 28 patients with GSDI on routine echocardiography and found no evidence of PAH and no significant cardiac abnormalities. This study highlights that PAH is a rare disease overall, but our case report and those previously described suggest an increased incidence in patients with GSDI. Should cardiopulmonary symptoms develop, clinicians caring for patients with GSDI should have a high degree of suspicion for acute PAH and recognize that prompt intervention can lead to survival in this otherwise highly fatal disease.

  19. Major Artery Occlusion: a Rare Complication of Sickle Cell Disease

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    Adnan Agha

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Sickle cell disease is hereditary hemoglobinopathy which causes haemolytic anemia, vaso-occlusive crisis, ischemic injuries and many other morbidities like cerebral infarction.  In this report, we describe a case of a young patient with sickle cell disease presenting with right-sided weakness and slurring of speech with examination confirming right-sided hemiparesis with motor aphasia. On further investigation, she was found to have frontotemporal infarction.  On magnetic resonance imaging with angiography, she was found to have absent circulation in left internal carotid artery probably secondary to sickle cell disease.  Major vessel occlusion is rare complication of sickle cell disease that one must bear in mind.

  20. Hybrid revascularization for multivessel coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsior, Mariusz; Zembala, Michael Oscar; Tajstra, Mateusz; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Gierlotka, Marek; Hrapkowicz, Tomasz; Hawranek, Michał; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of hybrid coronary revascularization (HCR) in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (MVCAD) referred for standard coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Conventional CABG is still the treatment of choice in patients with MVCAD. However, the limitations of standard CABG and the unsatisfactory long-term patency of saphenous grafts are commonly known. A total of 200 patients with MVCAD involving the left anterior descending artery (LAD) and a critical (>70%) lesion in at least 1 major epicardial vessel (except the LAD) amenable to both PCI and CABG and referred for conventional surgical revascularization were randomly assigned to undergo HCR or CABG (in a 1:1 ratio). The primary endpoint was the evaluation of the safety of HCR. The feasibility was defined by the percent of patients with a complete HCR procedure and the percent of patients with conversions to standard CABG. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac events such as death, myocardial infarction, stroke, repeated revascularization, and major bleeding within the 12-month period after randomization was also assessed. Most of the pre-procedural characteristics were similar in the 2 groups. Of the patients in the hybrid group, 93.9% had complete HCR and 6.1% patients were converted to standard CABG. At 12 months, the rates of death (2.0% vs. 2.9 %, p = NS), myocardial infarction (6.1% vs. 3.9%, p = NS), major bleeding (2% vs. 2%, p = NS), and repeat revascularization (2% vs. 0%, p = NS) were similar in the 2 groups. In both groups, no cerebrovascular incidents were observed. HCR is feasible in select patients with MVCAD referred for conventional CABG. (Safety and Efficacy Study of Hybrid Revascularization in Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease [POL-MIDES]; NCT01035567). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Low-grade inflammation can partly explain the association between the metabolic syndrome and either coronary artery disease or severity of peripheral arterial disease: the CODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.; Greevenbroek, M.M.; Kallen, C.J.; Ferreira, I.; Blaak, E.E.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Jansen, E.H.; Schalkwijk, C.G.; Stehouwer, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Low-grade inflammation has been hypothesized to underlie the coronary artery disease (CAD) risk associated with the metabolic syndrome, but the evidence is not conclusive. For peripheral arterial disease (PAD; as measured by the ankle-arm index), this association has not been studied

  2. Hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease in the survivors of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, S Lucy; Silversides, Candice K

    2013-07-01

    Obesity, hypertension, and coronary artery disease are prevalent in the general population and well recognized as contributors to cardiac morbidity and mortality. With surgical and medical advances, there is a growing and aging population with congenital heart disease who are also at risk of developing these comorbidities. In addition, some congenital cardiac lesions predispose patients to conditions such as hypertension or coronary artery disease. The effect of these comorbidities on the structurally abnormal heart is not well understood, but might be very important, especially in those with residual abnormalities. Thus, in addition to surveillance for and treatment of late complications it is important for the congenital cardiologist to consider and aggressively manage acquired comorbidities. In this review we explore the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and coronary artery disease, discuss congenital lesions that predispose to these conditions and review management strategies for this unique population. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Stents versus coronary-artery bypass grafting for left main coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Duk-Woo; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Cheol Whan; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Park, Seong-Wook; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Jeong, Myung-Ho; Jang, Yangsoo; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Kim, Pum Joon; Seong, In-Whan; Park, Hun Sik; Ahn, Taehoon; Chae, In-Ho; Tahk, Seung-Jea; Chung, Wook-Sung; Park, Seung-Jung

    2008-04-24

    Several studies have compared the treatment effects of coronary stenting and coronary-artery bypass grafting (CABG). However, there are limited data regarding the long-term outcomes of these two interventions for patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease. We evaluated 1102 patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease who underwent stent implantation and 1138 patients who underwent CABG in Korea between January 2000 and June 2006. We compared adverse outcomes (death; a composite outcome of death, Q-wave myocardial infarction, or stroke; and target-vessel revascularization) with the use of propensity-score matching in the overall cohort and in separate subgroups according to type of stent. In the overall matched cohort, there was no significant difference between the stenting and CABG groups in the risk of death (hazard ratio for the stenting group, 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77 to 1.80) or the risk of the composite outcome (hazard ratio for the stenting group, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.62). The rates of target-vessel revascularization were significantly higher in the group that received stents than in the group that underwent CABG (hazard ratio, 4.76; 95% CI, 2.80 to 8.11). Comparisons of the group that received bare-metal stents with the group that underwent CABG and of the group that received drug-eluting stents with the group that underwent CABG produced similar results, although there was a trend toward higher rates of death and the composite end point in the group that received drug-eluting stents. In a cohort of patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease, we found no significant difference in rates of death or of the composite end point of death, Q-wave myocardial infarction, or stroke between patients receiving stents and those undergoing CABG. However, stenting, even with drug-eluting stents, was associated with higher rates of target-vessel revascularization than was CABG. Copyright 2008

  4. Relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and subclinical coronary artery disease in long-term smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas; Køber, Lars; Pedersen, Jesper Holst

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular conditions are reported to be the most frequent cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unsettled whether severity of COPD per se is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) independent of traditional cardiovascular risk...

  5. Abdominal fat and risk of coronary heart disease in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Beate G.; Visseren, Frank L. J.; Stolk, Ronald P.; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    Objective: We investigated whether the presence of concomitant coronary heart disease (CHD) in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be explained by intra-abdominal fat accumulation and compared different measures of adiposity as predictors of CHD in patients with PAD. Research Methods

  6. The management of combined coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cassar (Andrew); D. Poldermans (Don); C.S. Rihal (Charanjit); B.J. Gersh (Bernard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCoronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) remain highly prevalent in the population due to population ageing, smoking, diabetes, unhealthy lifestyles, and the epidemic of obesity, and frequently coexist. The management of combined CAD and PVD is a common

  7. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Danish...

  8. Cerebral Arterial Variations Associated with Moyamoya Disease Diagnosed by MR Angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Takahashi, Masahiro; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2014-12-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare progressive cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease associated with different variations of the cerebral arteries. We evaluated the types and prevalence of such variations among patients with moyamoya disease. In our institution during the past seven years, we diagnosed 72 patients (24 male, 48 female; aged 6 to 75 years, mean, 42 years) with moyamoya disease by magnetic resonance (MR) angiography using either a 3-Tesla or one of two 1.5-T imagers and a standard time-of-flight technique without contrast media. An experienced neuroradiologist retrospectively reviewed the images. There were 15 cerebral arterial variations in 13 of 72 patients with moyamoya disease (18.1%), including four basilar artery fenestrations, three ophthalmic arteries arising from the middle meningeal artery, two intracranial vertebral artery fenestrations, two persistent first cervical intersegmental arteries, two persistent trigeminal arteries, one extracranial origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and one persistent stapedial artery. Although our number of patients was small, moyamoya disease was frequently associated with variations of the cerebral arteries, especially fenestrations in the vertebrobasilar system and persistent trigeminal artery.

  9. Review of aspirin and clopidogrel resistance in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Mina; Thompson, Peter; Jansen, Shirley

    2017-11-01

    Aspirin resistance (AR) and clopidogrel resistance (CR) are terms used to describe a reduction in the medication's efficacy in inhibiting platelet aggregation despite regular dosing. This review gives context to the clinical role and implications of antiplatelet resistance in peripheral arterial disease (PAD). A review of English-language literature on AR and CR in PAD involving human subjects using PubMed and MEDLINE databases was performed in April 2017. A total of 2075 patients in 22 relevant studies were identified. To give this issue context, a review of the larger, more established literature on antiplatelet resistance in coronary disease was undertaken, identifying significant research associating resistance to major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs). Studies in the coronary arterial disease literature have strongly associated antiplatelet resistance with increased MACE. Prevalence of AR or CR in coronary disease appears to be >55% for each in some studies. Meta-analyses of >50 studies revealed that AR and CR are significantly associated with MACE (relative risk of 2.09 and 2.8, respectively). This adds further weight to the literature reporting antiplatelet resistance as an independent predictor of and a threefold risk factor for major adverse cardiovascular events. The prevalence of resistance in PAD in this review was comparable to that in the coronary disease literature, with AR and CR prevalence up to 60% and 65%, respectively. There is evidence that the adverse effects of antiplatelet resistance are significant in PAD. In fact, research directly studying stent thrombosis populations with either coronary arterial disease or PAD revealed more significantly impaired platelet responsiveness to clopidogrel and aspirin in PAD compared with similar individuals with coronary disease. AR in PAD was found in studies to be a significant risk factor for iliofemoral stent reocclusion (P = .0093) and stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid disease (P

  10. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vertebral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocker, Laurens J.L. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kliniek Sint-Jan Radiologie, Brussels (Belgium); Compter, A.; Kappelle, L.J.; Worp, H.B. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, Utrecht (Netherlands); Luijten, P.R.; Hendrikse, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are a newly recognised entity associated with atherothromboembolic cerebrovascular disease and worse physical functioning. We aimed to investigate the relationship of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia and with vascular risk factors. We evaluated the MR images of 46 patients with a recent vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke and a symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis ≥50 % from the Vertebral Artery Stenting Trial (VAST) for the presence of cerebellar cortical infarct cavities ≤1.5 cm. At inclusion in VAST, data were obtained on age, sex, history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, and vascular risk factors. Adjusted risk ratios were calculated with Poisson regression analyses for the relation between cerebellar cortical infarct cavities and vascular risk factors. Sixteen out of 46 (35 %) patients showed cerebellar cortical infarct cavities on the initial MRI, and only one of these 16 patients was known with a previous vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke. In patients with symptomatic vertebrobasilar ischaemia, risk factor profiles of patients with cerebellar cortical infarct cavities were not different from patients without these cavities. Cerebellar cortical infarct cavities are seen on MRI in as much as one third of patients with recently symptomatic vertebral artery stenosis. Since patients usually have no prior history of vertebrobasilar TIA or stroke, cerebellar cortical infarct cavities should be added to the spectrum of common incidental brain infarcts visible on routine MRI. (orig.)

  11. THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS OF GENETIC RISK VARIANTS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar Srivastava

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This review covers therapeutic implication of genetic risk variant responsible for coronary artery disease by utilising the highdensity single-nucleotide microarrays to screen the entire human genome. The sequence of the human genome provides the blueprint for life. Approximately, 99.5% of the human genome Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA sequence is identical among humans with 0.5% of the genome sequence (15 million bps accounting for all individual differences. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new technology of the computerised chip array of millions of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs as Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA markers makes it possible to study and detect genetic predisposition to common polygenic disorders such as Coronary Artery Disease (CAD. The sample sizes required for these studies are massive and large; worldwide consortiums such as Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM study have been formed to accommodate this requirement. After the identification of 9p21 progress to detect genetic predisposition has been remarkable. RESULTS There are currently a total of 50 genetic risk variants predisposing to CAD of genome-wide significance with confirmation in independent populations. Rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency, MAF <5% will require direct sequencing to detect genetic predisposition. CONCLUSION We can develop new biomarkers for detecting early CAD as well as unique targets for novel therapy. The challenge for the future will be to identify the molecular mechanisms mediating the risk of those genetic risk variants that act through nonconventional risk factors. The ultimate objective for the future is the sequencing and functional analysis of the causative polymorphisms for its therapeutic implications.

  12. IGF-I and IGFBP2 in peripheral artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbonaviciene, Grazina; Frystyk, Jan; Urbonavicius, Sigitas

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The search for novel risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has provided valuable clinical data concerning underlying mechanism of disease. Increasing evidence indicates a possible involvement of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and its binding protein 2 (IGFBP......-2) in the pathogenesis of CVD disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-2 with all-cause and CVD mortality in a prospective study of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD). METHODS AND MATERIAL: Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-2...... levels were obtained in 440 patients (257 males) with symptomatic PAD. Patients were followed for a median of 6.1 (IQ 5.1-7.2) years. The relationship between times to lethal outcome and baseline serum IGF-I and IFGBP-2 levels were examined by Cox proportional hazard analysis. The role of IFGBP-2...

  13. Clinical Utility of a Precision Medicine Test Evaluating Outpatients with Suspected Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Budoff, Matt; Sharp, David; Zapien, Michael; Huang, Lin; Maniet, Bruce; Herman, Lee; Monane, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Identifying patients with obstructive coronary artery disease can be challenging for primary care physicians. Advances in precision medicine may help augment clinical tools and redefine the paradigm for evaluating coronary artery disease in the outpatient setting. A blood-based age/sex/gene expression score (ASGES) incorporating key features of precision medicine has shown clinical validity with a 96% negative predictive value and 89% sensitivity in estimating a symptomatic patient's current likelihood of obstructive coronary artery disease. To better characterize the clinical utility of the ASGES and measure its impact on clinician decision-making, a community-based registry was established. The prospective PRESET Registry (NCT01677156) enrolled stable, nonacute adult patients presenting with typical or atypical symptoms suggestive of obstructive coronary artery disease from 21 US primary care practices from August 2012 to August 2014. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and ASGES results (predefined as low [ASGES ≤15] or elevated [ASGES >15]) were collected, as were referrals to Cardiology or further functional/anatomic cardiac testing after ASGES testing. Patients were followed for 1 year post ASGES testing. Among the 566-patient cohort (median age 56 years), clinicians referred 26/252 (10%) of patients with low scores vs 137/314 (44%) of patients with elevated scores to Cardiology or advanced cardiac testing for further evaluation (unadjusted odds ratio 0.15, P clinical covariates = 0.18, P advanced cardiac testing showed abnormal findings in 0 of 13 (0%) low ASGES and 10 of 71 (14%) elevated ASGES patients. Major adverse cardiovascular events and revascularization were noted in 3/252 (1.2%) patients with low ASGES and 14/314 (4.5%) patients with elevated ASGES score (P clinical utility in the evaluation of patients with suspected obstructive coronary artery disease. Low-score patients were less likely to undergo cardiac referral, were unlikely to have

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Patients on Hemodialysis With Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Ryota; Aoyama, Naoyoshi; Yoshida, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Patients on hemodialysis (HD; n = 210) were examined for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) using ankle-brachial index (ABI) and toe-brachial index (TBI). The prevalence of PAD was 38.1%. Among patients with PAD, 87.5% were newly diagnosed with PAD, 42.5% were diagnosed with TBI <0.6 despite ABI ≥ 0.9, and 68.7% had no lower limb symptoms. In patients with PAD, the prevalence rate of cerebrovascular disease was 36.3%, coronary artery disease was 42.5%, spinal stenosis was 33.2%, and vertebral fracture 15.0% and was significantly higher than those of the non-PAD patients. Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was the most important biomarker among patients with PAD. PAD has been underdiagnosed and untreated in patients on HD because most patients do not have symptoms that could be due to diabetic neuropathy or have insufficient daily activity to experience exertional leg symptoms. Screening for PAD using the ABI and TBI increased diagnostic efficiency in patients on HD and may lead to effective early treatments, including pharmacotherapy, revascularization therapy, and exercise rehabilitation to avoid the worst possible scenario such as lower limb amputation, cardiovascular event, and death. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Lipid and other management to improve arterial disease and survival in end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmitt, Simon B; Martin, Jennifer H

    2017-03-01

    Arterial disease is common in advancing renal failure, culminating in myocardial infarction with cardiac failure, strokes and peripheral and renal artery disease. Attention to cardiac and arterial disease may slow deterioration of renal function. Management of risk factors can reduce these sequelae. Areas covered: Modifiable risk factors for arterial disease and relevant pharmacotherapies. Expert opinion: Cardiovascular disease is the biggest killer in renal failure. Statins are viewed as essential in symptomatic coronary disease and have been shown in non-renal patients to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Cochrane recommends statins in renal failure but not in end stage renal disease or transplant patients. Large well powered clinical trials focussed specifically on renal patients failed to demonstrate cardiovascular outcome or mortality benefits of statins when compared to placebo. Other lipid lowering pharmacotherapies are weaker and adverse effects may account for the absence of net clinical benefit in non-renal patients in published clinical trials. Patients should be started on a statin after myocardial infarction, regardless of lipid levels, but the risk of adverse effects in advanced renal failure with its comorbidities predicates employing only essential doses. Optimal antihypertensive and antithrombotic pharmacotherapy are also priorities.

  16. Circulating levels of adiponectin and extent of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing elective coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Souza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Adiponectin (APN, an adipose tissue-released adipokine with demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic properties, is encoded by a gene whose polymorphisms are associated with presence of coronary artery disease (CAD. Serum APN levels are inversely related with presence and complexity of CAD. Within this context, we sought to compare levels of total APN and its high molecular weight form (HMW APN according to clinical presentation and extent of CAD in patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization. From March 2008 to June 2010, clinical data and blood samples for APN and HMW APN measurements were collected from 415 subjects undergoing cardiac catheterization at two tertiary centers. CAD extent was estimated by the number of coronary arteries with significant stenosis (≥70% obstruction in a major coronary artery and by Duke Jeopardy Score (DJS. Serum APN levels were similar between groups with stable or unstable CAD (APN 9.20±5.88 vs 9.47±6.23 μg/mL, P=0.738, and HMW APN 5.31±3.72 vs 5.91±4.16 μg/mL, P=0.255, even after stratification by the number of arteries involved (single-vessel vs multivessel disease: APN 9.39±5.76 vs 9.26±6.27 μg/mL, P=0.871; HMW APN 5.29±3.79 vs 5.83±4.04 μg/mL, P=0.306 and DJS score (APN, P=0.718; HMW APN, P=0.276. We conclude that APN and HMW APN serum levels are similar across clinical presentations and different extents of CAD, despite being significantly lower in the presence of obstructive CAD.

  17. The history of surgical treatment for occlusive carotid artery diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-biao ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the history of surgical treatment for occlusive carotid artery diseases is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that, after the results of large cohort, multicenter, randomized clinical trials, including North American Symptomatic Carotid Endarterectomy Trial (NASCET and European Carotid Surgery Trial (ECST, were reported in 1991, the important role of carotid endarterectomy (CEA for the surgical treatment of carotid atherosclerosis had already been confirmed. Although it has a late start in China, CEA has a bright and promising future.

  18. Genetic contribution of the leukotriene pathway to coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hartiala, Jaana; Li, Dalin; Conti, David V; VIKMAN, Susanna; Patel, Yesha; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Brennan, Marie-Louise; Newman, John W.; Stephensen, Charles B.; Armstrong, Patrice; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the genetic contribution of the leukotriene (LT) pathway to risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in 4,512 Caucasian and African American subjects ascertained through elective cardiac evaluation. Of the three previously associated variants, the shorter “3” and “4” alleles of a promoter repeat polymorphism in ALOX5 increased risk of CAD in African Americans (OR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.0–1.9; p = 0.04), whereas a haplotype of LTA4H (HapK) was associated with CAD in Caucasians (OR = 1.2, 95...

  19. Nitric Oxide Manipulation: A Therapeutic Target for Peripheral Arterial Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Risk factor modification and endovascular and surgical revascularisation are the main treatment options at present. However, a significant number of patients still require major amputation. There is evidence that nitric oxide (NO and its endogenous inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA play significant roles in the pathophysiology of PAD. This paper reviews experimental work implicating the ADMA-DDAH-NO pathway in PAD, focussing on both the vascular dysfunction and effects within the ischaemic muscle, and examines the potential of manipulating this pathway as a novel adjunct therapy in PAD.

  20. Current Nonpharmacologic Management of Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on External Counterpulsation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, C Richard

    2005-05-01

    The basic principle of enhanced external counterpulsation (EECP) is diastolic augmentation of arterial pressure, lowering of systolic arterial pressure along with increasing venous return. EECP is a noninvasive procedure involving sequential inflation and rapid deflation of compressive cuffs wrapped around the patient's calves, thighs, and lower abdomen, timed to the cardiac cycle using the electrocardiogram. Theoretically, this should result in decreased myocardial oxygen demand and an increased coronary blood flow. Long-term benefits may be the result of the opening of dormant coronary collateral circulation, but this is theory and not proven. Extracardiac factors, such as peripheral arterial stiffness, endothelial dysfunction, and elevated myocardial oxygen demand, are also the therapeutic targets for EECP. There is some evidence that long-term benefits may be the result of a training effect due to 35 1-hour diastolic inflations at 300 mm Hg and systolic deflations of the compressive cuffs. To date, the extracardiac effects of EECP have received little attention and peripheral vascular adaptations to EECP have not been investigated. EECP, by promoting lower-extremity arterial "run-off" and intermittent reactive hyperemia in the legs with each inflation/deflation cycle of the compressive cuffs, may improve peripheral vascular function, thus inducing changes in peripheral vascular biology that will reduce ventricular work and myocardial oxygen demand in patients with coronary artery disease similar to that of exercise. At the University of Florida, this therapy is used for patients with chronic stable angina who are refractory to medical therapy and are not candidates for a revascularization procedure. The treatment does take time (35 once-a-day 1-hour treatments), and not all patients are candidates for the procedure. For example, patients with severe peripheral vascular disease, severe hypertension, thrombophlebitis, markedly irregular heart rhythm, and severe

  1. Severity of peripheral arterial disease is associated with aortic pressure augmentation and subendocardial viability ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosimann, Kathrin; Jacomella, Vincenzo; Thalhammer, Christoph; Meier, Thomas O; Kohler, Malcolm; Amann-Vesti, Beatrice; Husmann, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality that correlates with peripheral perfusion impairment as assessed by the ankle-brachial arterial pressure index (ABI). Furthermore, PAD is associated with arterial stiffness and elevated aortic augmentation index (AIx). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ABI impairment correlates with AIx and subendocardial viability ratio (SEVR), a measure of cardiac perfusion during diastole. AIx and SEVR were assessed by radial applanation tonometry in 65 patients with stable PAD (Rutherford stage I-III) at a tertiary referral center. AIx corrected for heart rate and SEVR were tested in a multivariate linear and logistic regression model to determine the association with ABI. Mean ABI was 0.8±0.2, AIx 31%±7%, and SEVR 141%±26%. Multiple linear regression with AIx as a dependent variable revealed that AIx was significantly negatively associated with ABI (β=-11.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], -18.6 to -4.5; P=.002). Other variables that were associated with AIx were diastolic blood pressure (β=0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.4; Psubendocardial viability ratio. This may be a potential pathophysiologic link that impacts cardiac prognosis in patients with PAD. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Sixty-four slice spiral CT angiography does not predict the functional relevance of coronary artery stenoses in patients with stable angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Marcus; Hack, Nicolas; Hahn, Klaus; Tiling, Reinhold [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Jakobs, Tobias; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Becker, Christoph; Reiser, Maximilian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ziegler, Franz von; Knez, Andreas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Cardiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Koenig, Andreas; Klauss, Volker [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Cardiology, Medizinische Poliklinik-Innenstadt, Munich (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate spiral multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography using 64-slice technique in the detection of functionally relevant coronary artery stenoses (CAS). Thirty-eight patients (62{+-}11 years, 28 men) with stable angina (26 with suspected and 12 with known coronary artery disease) were investigated using 64-slice MDCT angiography and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (gated SPECT); a subgroup of 30 patients had additional invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Stenoses with luminal narrowing of {>=}50% were defined as ''significant'' in MDCT angiography and ICA. MDCT angiography was compared with gated SPECT and the combination of gated SPECT plus ICA with respect to the detection of functionally relevant CAS. The sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values of MDCT angiography in detecting reversible perfusion defects on gated SPECT were 63%, 80%, 94% and 32%, respectively, in vessel-based analysis and 71%, 62%, 72% and 60%, respectively, in patient-based analysis. If only reversible perfusion defects on gated SPECT with CAS {>=}50% on ICA were considered, the sensitivity, specificity and negative and positive predictive values were, respectively, 85%, 79%, 98% and 33% for vessel-based analysis and 85%, 59%, 83% and 61% for patient-based analysis. Sixty-four slice MDCT angiography failed to predict the functional relevance of CAS, but had a high negative predictive value in the exclusion of functionally relevant CAS in symptomatic patients. (orig.)

  3. Fractional flow reserve derived from coronary CT angiography in stable coronary disease: a new standard in non-invasive testing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noergaard, B.L.; Jensen, J.M. [Aarhus University Hospital Skejby, Department of Cardiology B, Aarhus N (Denmark); Leipsic, J. [St. Paul' s Hospital, Department Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) measured during invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for lesion-specific decisions on coronary revascularization in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Current guidelines recommend non-invasive functional or anatomic testing as a gatekeeper to the catheterization laboratory. However, the ''holy grail'' in non-invasive testing of CAD is to establish a single test that quantifies both coronary lesion severity and the associated ischemia. Most evidence to date of such a test is based on the addition of computational analysis of FFR to the anatomic information obtained from standard-acquired coronary CTA data sets at rest (FFR{sub CT}). This review summarizes the clinical evidence for the use of FFR{sub CT} in stable CAD in context to the diagnostic performance of other non-invasive testing modalities. (orig.)

  4. Depressed mood, positive affect, and heart rate variability in patients with suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mimi R; Whitehead, Daisy L; Rakhit, Roby; Steptoe, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    To test associations between heart rate variability (HRV), depressed mood, and positive affect in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Depression is associated with impaired HRV post acute cardiac events, but evidence in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is inconsistent. Seventy-six patients (52 men, 24 women; mean age = 61.1 years) being investigated for suspected CAD on the basis of symptomatology and positive noninvasive tests, completed 24-hour electrocardiograms. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered, and positive and depressed affect was measured over the study period with the Day Reconstruction Method (DRM). A total of 46 (60.5%) patients were later found to have definite CAD. HRV was analyzed, using spectral analysis. Typical diurnal profiles of HRV were observed, with greater normalized high frequency (HF) and lower normalized low frequency (LF) power in the night compared with the day. BDI depression scores were not consistently associated with HRV. But positive affect was associated with greater normalized HF power (p = .039) and reduced normalized LF power (p = .007) independently of age, gender, medication with beta blockers, CAD status, body mass index, smoking, and habitual physical activity level. In patients with definite CAD, depressed affect assessed using the DRM was associated with reduced normalized HF power and heightened normalized LF power (p = .007) independently of covariates. Relationships between depression and HRV in patients with CAD may depend on affective experience over the monitoring period. Enhanced parasympathetic cardiac control may be a process through which positive affect protects against cardiovascular disease.

  5. Moderators of Coronary Vasomotion during Mental Stress in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: Stress Reactivity, Serum Lipoproteins, and Severity of Atherosclerosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howell, Robert H

    1996-01-01

    Impaired coronary artery vasomotion in response to behavioral triggers such as mental stress may be an important pathophysiological process involved in acute manifestations of coronary artery disease...

  6. Very high coronary artery calcium score with normal myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is associated with a moderate incidence of severe coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuoness, Salem A.; Goha, Ahmed M.; Romsa, Jonathan G.; Akincioglu, Cigdem; Warrington, James C.; Datta, Sudip; Gambhir, Sanjay; Urbain, Jean-Luc C.; Vezina, William C. [London Health Sciences Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London, ON (Canada); Massel, David R. [London Health Sciences Centre, Division of Cardiology, London, ON (Canada); Martell, Rafael [Private Practice, London, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) has limitations in the presence of balanced multivessel disease (MVD) and left main (LM) coronary artery disease, occasionally resulting in false-normal results despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with this condition. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of severe coronary artery disease (CAD) in the presence of a very high Agatston coronary artery calcium (CAC) score (>1,000) in stable symptomatic patients without known CAD but with normal MPI results. A total of 2,659 prospectively acquired consecutive patients were referred for MPI and evaluation of CAC score by CT. Of this patient population, 8 % (222/2,659) had ischemia without myocardial infarction (MI) on MPI and 11 % (298/2,659) had abnormal MPI (MI and/or ischemia). On presentation 1 % of the patients (26/2,659) were symptomatic, had a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI results. The definition of normal MPI was strict and included a normal hemodynamic response without ischemic ECG changes and normal imaging, particularly absence of transient ischemic dilation. All of these 26 patients with a CAC score >1,000 and normal MPI findings underwent cardiac catheterization. Of these 26 patients, 58 % (15/26) had severe disease (≥70 % stenosis) leading to revascularization. Of this group, 47 % (7/15) underwent percutaneous intervention, and 53 % (8/15) underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. All of these 15 patients had either MVD (14/15) or LM coronary artery disease (1/15), and represented 0.6 % (15/2,659) of all referred patients (95 % CI 0.3 - 0.9 %). The majority, 90 % (8/9), had severe CAD with typical chest pain. A very high CAC score (>1,000) with normal MPI in a small subset of symptomatically stable patients was associated with a moderate incidence of severe CAD (95 % CI 37 - 77 %). Larger studies and/or a meta-analysis of small studies are needed to more precisely estimate the incidence of CAD in this population. This study also supports

  7. Arterial spin labelling reveals prolonged arterial arrival time in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bachari, Sarah; Parkes, Laura M; Vidyasagar, Rishma; Hanby, Martha F; Tharaken, Vivek; Leroi, Iracema; Emsley, Hedley C A

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, yet effective disease modifying treatments are still lacking. Neurodegeneration involves multiple interacting pathological pathways. The extent to which neurovascular mechanisms are involved is not well defined in IPD. We aimed to determine whether novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, including arterial spin labelling (ASL) quantification of cerebral perfusion, can reveal altered neurovascular status (NVS) in IPD. Fourteen participants with IPD (mean ± SD age 65.1 ± 5.9 years) and 14 age and cardiovascular risk factor matched control participants (mean ± SD age 64.6 ± 4.2 years) underwent a 3T MRI scan protocol. ASL images were collected before, during and after a 6 minute hypercapnic challenge. FLAIR images were used to determine white matter lesion score. Quantitative images of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and arterial arrival time (AAT) were calculated from the ASL data both at rest and during hypercapnia. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) images were calculated, depicting the change in CBF and AAT relative to the change in end-tidal CO2. A significant (p = 0.005) increase in whole brain averaged baseline AAT was observed in IPD participants (mean ± SD age 1532 ± 138 ms) compared to controls (mean ± SD age 1335 ± 165 ms). Voxel-wise analysis revealed this to be widespread across the brain. However, there were no statistically significant differences in white matter lesion score, CBF, or CVR between patients and controls. Regional CBF, but not AAT, in the IPD group was found to correlate positively with Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA) scores. These findings provide further evidence of alterations in NVS in IPD.

  8. Association of coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease in Lebanese population

    OpenAIRE

    Milane, Aline; Khazen, Georges; Zeineddine, Nabil; Amro, Mazen; Masri, Leila; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Youhanna, Sonia; Salloum, Angelique K.; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E.; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Othman, Raed; Kabbani, Samer; Sbeite, Hana; Chami, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Background: More evidence is emerging on the strong association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease. We assessed the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD) and renal dysfunction level (RDL) in a group of Lebanese patients. Methods: A total of 1268 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were sequentially enrolled in a multicenter cross sectional study. Angiograms were reviewed and CAD severity scores (CADSS) were determined. Estimated glomerular fil...

  9. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Mosadegh; Kazemi Jahromi, Mitra; Bahar, Nasime; Yousefi-Far, Elham Sadat; Arabi, Mohsen; Asefi, Nastaran; Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2012-11-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI), measurement of carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), and assessment of the thickness of interventricular septum (IVS), are noninvasive methods used to predict subclinical atherosclerosis in hemodialysis patients. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease and to assess the correlations between ABI, CIMT, the thickness of IVS, and blood parameters in hemodialysis patients. The ABI, CIMT, and the thickness of IVS were measured in 50 patients on hemodialysis. Data were collected regarding the levels of calcium, urine nitrogen, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, cholesterol, creatinine, albumin in serum, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Results. Ten percent of the patients showed a reduced ABI (< 0.9). The mean values for ABI, CIMT, and IVS were 1.09 ± 0.13, 0.68 ± 0.11 mm, and 9.83 ± 1.65 mm, respectively. The levels of calcium, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride in the serum of the patients with normal ABI were significantly higher than in patients with reduced ABI. There was a negative correlation between ABI and levels of serum LDLC (r = -0.29, P = .04) and triglyceride (r = -0.32, P = .02). Conclusions. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in the patients with CRF was 10% and it was correlated with several classical risk factors for atherosclerosis, including elevated LDL and cholesterol levels. CIMT and the thickness of IVS showed no apparent association with ABI.

  10. Relation of anthropometric variables to coronary artery disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra C Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Anthropometric variables and their relation to conventional coronary artery disease (CAD risk factors in railway employees have been inadequately studied in India. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Solapur division of the Central railway in the year 2004, to assess the anthropometric variables in railway employees and their relation to conventional CAD risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 995 railway employees, with 872 males and 123 females participated in this cross-sectional study. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, fasting lipid profile, and blood sugar level. Various anthropometric indices were calculated for body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, and abdominal volume index (AVI. Statistical analysis was done by EPI Info 6 statistical software. Results: Compared to all other obesity indices, WHtR was most prevalent in both genders. High WHtR was present in 699 (80.16% males and 103 (83.73% females. Age ≥45 years, high systolic BP, high diastolic BP, low HDL, high triglyceride, and diabetes mellitus were positively correlated with high BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI. High BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI were negatively associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions: Over all, anthropometric variables in both genders were significantly deranged in subjects with coronary risk factors. Compared to all other anthropometric variables, WHtR was statistically significantly associated with a majority of coronary artery risk factors. Hence we recommend inclusion of WHtR as a parameter of obesity to predict coronary artery disease risk factor along with WC, WHR, and BMI in epidemiologic studies.

  11. Peripheral obstructive arterial disease and carotid artery stenosis in end stage renal disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilancini, S; Lucchi, M; Mangiafico, R A; Medolla, A; Ferazzoli, F; Bianchi, C; Salvatori, E

    2008-12-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the predominance of carotid stenosis and peripheral obstructive arterial disease (POAD) in a group of patients subject to dialysis compared with a control group. It is a control-case study performed on patients at different hemodialysis facilities; the exams were carried out in ambulatory care. Two groups of patients were examined, the first group was made up of 40 dialysis patients (46.6% men, average age 58.8), the second was the control group made up of 58 subjects matched by age, sex, arterial pressure, presence of diabetes and smoking habits. All patients underwent an Eco-Color Doppler exam on the over aortal trunks and lower extremities and had their Ankle-Brakial-Index (ABI) measured. Carotid stenosis was considered only if equal or over 50%. Twenty percent of dialysis patients showed carotid stenosis (CS) versus 12% in the control group, with an OR of 7.9 (CI 95% 1.3-47.7) adjusted to sex, age and hypertension. The ultrasound picture of the lesions showed large amounts of calcium deposits. Predominance of POAD in dialysis patients was 20% versus 9% in the control group. In dialysis patients the OR adjusted to age, sex and arterial pressure was 6.3 (CI 95%, 1.2-32.6). The ultrasound picture of the lesions showed mainly underpopliteal lesions with ''rosary bead'' calcifications. In diabetic dialysis patients the OR was 7.6 (CI 95% 1.4-46.3).

  12. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and long-term mortality in stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Charlotte; Grønning, Bjørn; Køber, Lars

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The level of the inactive N-terminal fragment of pro-brain (B-type) natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a strong predictor of mortality among patients with acute coronary syndromes and may be a strong prognostic marker in patients with chronic coronary heart disease as well. We assessed...... the relationship between N-terminal pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) levels and long-term mortality from all causes in a large cohort of patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS: NT-pro-BNP was measured in baseline serum samples from 1034 patients referred for angiography because of symptoms or signs of coronary...... of myocardial infarction, angina, hypertension, diabetes, or chronic heart failure; creatinine clearance rate; body-mass index; smoking status; plasma lipid levels; LVEF; and the presence or absence of clinically significant coronary artery disease on angiography. CONCLUSIONS: NT-pro-BNP is a marker of long...

  13. Disease location is associated with survival in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Smith, Carin Y; Bailey, Kent R; Wennberg, Paul W; Kullo, Iftikhar J

    2013-10-21

    We investigated whether disease location influences survival in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Patients (n = 12,731; mean age, 67.5 ± 12.7 years; 57.4% male) who underwent outpatient noninvasive lower extremity arterial evaluation were followed up for 5.9 ± 3.1 years for all-cause mortality. Peripheral arterial disease (n = 8930) was defined as a resting or postexercise ankle-brachial index (ABI) ≤ 0.90, and normal ABI (n = 3,801) was defined as a resting and postexercise ABI of 1.00 to 1.30. Presence or absence of disease at the proximal location or distal location was determined on the basis of Doppler signals in leg arteries; 42% had no PD or DD, 45% had proximal (14% postexercise PD only), 30% had distal disease, 17% had both proximal and distal disease, 28% had proximal only and 14% had distal only. We performed multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with disease location, and Cox proportional hazard regression to assess the respective effects of proximal or distal disease on survival. Older age, male sex, diabetes, heart failure, and critical limb ischemia were associated with distal disease, whereas female sex, smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and critical limb ischemia were associated with proximal disease. Over a mean follow-up of 5.9 ± 3.1 years, 3039 patients (23.9%) died. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard ratios (HRs) of death associated with PD only and DD only were 1.3 (1.3 to 1.4) and 1.5 (1.4 to 1.6), respectively. After additional adjustment for resting ABI, there was no significant association between proximal disease and death, whereas the association of distal disease with death remained significant (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 1.3). In patients with peripheral arterial disease, proximal and distal disease locations were associated with distinctive risk factor and comorbidity profiles. Distal

  14. Coronary Artery Disease in Asymptomatic Young Adults: Its Prevalence According to Coronary Artery Disease Risk Stratification and the CT Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Eun Ju; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Cheung, Joo Yeon; Shim, Sung Shine [Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We aimed at evaluating the prevalence and CT characteristics of occult coronary artery disease (CAD) in young Korean adults under 40 years of age by performing coronary CT angiography (CCTA). We retrospectively enrolled 112 consecutive asymptomatic subjects (90 men, mean age: 35.6 {+-} 3.7 years) who underwent CCTA as part of a general health evaluation. We classified the subjects into three National Cholesterol Education Program risk categories and we assessed the plaque characteristics on CCTA according to the number of involved vessels, the location and type of plaques and vascular remodeling. Twelve individuals had CAD (11%, 11 men). The prevalence of CAD was significantly higher in the subgroups with moderate (22%) or high (25%) risk than that in the low risk subgroup (5%) (p < 0.05). Nine patients had single-vessel disease and three patients had two-vessel disease. The most common location for plaque was the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (60%). All the patients had non-significant stenosis and plaque, including the non-calcified (27%), mixed (47%) and calcified (27%) types. Positive vascular remodeling was identified in all the patients with non-calcified or mixed plaques. The prevalence of occult CAD was not negligible in the asymptomatic young adults with moderate to high risk, and this suggests the importance of management and risk factor modification in this population. All the patients had non-significant stenosis, and one fourth of the plaques did not show calcification

  15. Burden of Hospital Admission and Repeat Angiography in Angina Pectoris Patients with and without Coronary Artery Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lasse; Abildstrom, Steen Z; Hvelplund, Anders

    2014-01-01

    -, and 3-vessel disease, respectively (all Prepeat CAG with multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for patients with angiographically normal coronary arteries being 2.3(1.9-2.9), for angiographically diffuse non-obstructive CAD 5.5(4.4-6.8) and for obstructive CAD...... 6.6-9.4(range)(all Pnon-obstructive CAD suffer from considerably greater CVD burdens in terms of hospitalization for CVD and repeat CAG compared with asymptomatic reference......AIMS: To evaluate risk of hospitalization due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and repeat coronary angiography (CAG) in stable angina pectoris (SAP) with no obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) versus obstructive CAD, and asymptomatic reference individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: We followed 11...

  16. Cross-Tissue Regulatory Gene Networks in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Ermel, Raili; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Kidd, Brian A; Readhead, Ben; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C; Ivert, Torbjörn; Dudley, Joel T; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Schadt, Eric E; Skogsberg, Josefin; Michoel, Tom; Björkegren, Johan L M

    2016-03-23

    Inferring molecular networks can reveal how genetic perturbations interact with environmental factors to cause common complex diseases. We analyzed genetic and gene expression data from seven tissues relevant to coronary artery disease (CAD) and identified regulatory gene networks (RGNs) and their key drivers. By integrating data from genome-wide association studies, we identified 30 CAD-causal RGNs interconnected in vascular and metabolic tissues, and we validated them with corresponding data from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. As proof of concept, by targeting the key drivers AIP, DRAP1, POLR2I, and PQBP1 in a cross-species-validated, arterial-wall RGN involving RNA-processing genes, we re-identified this RGN in THP-1 foam cells and independent data from CAD macrophages and carotid lesions. This characterization of the molecular landscape in CAD will help better define the regulation of CAD candidate genes identified by genome-wide association studies and is a first step toward achieving the goals of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L.N. Dalepiane

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the pathology underlying the majority of coronary artery disease (CAD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that polymorphic variation in the MMP genes influences the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We analyzed functional polymorphisms in the promoter of the MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-12 genes in 183 Brazilian Caucasian individuals submitted to coronary angiography, of which 67 (37% had normal coronary arteries (control group and 116 (63% had CAD (CAD patient group. The -1607 1G/2G MMP-1, -1171 5A/6A MMP-3, -1562 C/T MMP-9, -82 A/G MMP-12 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR followed by restriction digestion. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between the CAD patients and controls. Haplotype analysis showed no differences between the CAD patients and controls. There was a significant difference in the severity of CAD, as assessed by the number of diseased vessels, in MMP-1 1G/1G homozygous individuals and in those homozygous for the 6A allele of the MMP-3 polymorphism. However, multivariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus was the only variable independently associated with CAD severity. Our findings indicated that MMP polymorphisms have no significant impact on the risk and severity of CAD.

  18. Lack of MEF2A mutations in coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Li; Kavaslar, Nihan; Ustaszewska, Anna; Doelle, Heather; Schackwitz, Wendy; Hebert, Sybil; Cohen, Jonathan; McPherson, Ruth; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2004-12-01

    Mutations in MEF2A have been implicated in an autosomal dominant form of coronary artery disease (adCAD1). In this study we sought to determine whether severe mutations in MEF2A might also explain sporadic cases of coronary artery disease (CAD). To do this, we resequenced the coding sequence and splice sites of MEF2A in {approx}300 patients with premature CAD and failed to find causative mutations in the CAD cohort. However, we did identify the 21 base pair (bp) MEF2A coding sequence deletion originally implicated in adCAD1 in one of 300 elderly control subjects without CAD. Further screening of an additional {approx}1,500 non-CAD patients revealed two more subjects with the MEF2A 21 bp deletion. Genotyping of 19 family members of the three probands with the 21 bp deletion in MEF2A revealed that the mutation did not co-segregate with early CAD. These studies demonstrate that MEF2A mutations are not a common cause of CAD and cast serious doubt on the role of the MEF2A 21 bp deletion in adCAD1.

  19. Nanotechnology in diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mahdi; Zare, Hossein; Bakhshian Nik, Amirala; Yazdani, Narges; Hamrang, Mohammad; Mohamed, Elmira; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Bakhtiari, Leila; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology could provide a new complementary approach to treat coronary artery disease (CAD) which is now one of the biggest killers in the Western world. The course of events, which leads to atherosclerosis and CAD, involves many biological factors and cellular disease processes which may be mitigated by therapeutic methods enhanced by nanotechnology. Nanoparticles can provide a variety of delivery systems for cargoes such as drugs and genes that can address many problems within the arteries. In order to improve the performance of current stents, nanotechnology provides different nanomaterial coatings, in addition to controlled-release nanocarriers, to prevent in-stent restenosis. Nanotechnology can increase the efficiency of drugs, improve local and systematic delivery to atherosclerotic plaques and reduce the inflammatory or angiogenic response after intravascular intervention. Nanocarriers have potential for delivery of imaging and diagnostic agents to precisely targeted destinations. This review paper will cover the current applications and future outlook of nanotechnology, as well as the main diagnostic methods, in the treatment of CAD.

  20. Exercise in the primary prevention of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, T

    2001-02-01

    Since the 1950s there has been a steady accumulation of data from observational studies and clinical trials identifying a lack of physical activity, either in the industrial or leisure setting, as an independent major risk factor for coronary artery disease, with a similar relative risk as smoking, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. More recently, poor cardiorespiratory fitness has also been shown to increase the risk of cardiovascular mortality significantly. Regular exercise is now known to have beneficial effects on peripheral and central circulation, skeletal muscle and myocardium, as well as lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Individuals who become active in later life, for example, by way of a moderate intensity walking program, and who make only modest gains in fitness, nevertheless share in many of these health benefits and reduce their coronary artery disease risk. It is estimated that 60% of Canadians are physically inactive, a higher prevalence than for the other major risk factors. Consequently, efforts to encourage a more active lifestyle can have a significant impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with a marked reduction in costs to the health care system.

  1. Classification of peripheral occlusive arterial diseases based on symptoms, signs and distal blood pressure measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, K H; Noer, Ivan; Paaske, William

    1980-01-01

    Systolic blood pressures at toe and ankle were measured in 459 consecutive patients with occlusive arterial disease. Fifty-eight per cent had intermittent claudication with arterial disease of all degrees of severity. Seventeen per cent complained of rest pain having toe systolic pressures below 30...... occlusive arterial disease which was located distally on the legs. A classification in three groups is suggested: (1) ischemia only during exercise; (2) ischemia at rest with or without ulcerations: and (3) diabetics with chronic ulcerations....

  2. Stress Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2009, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding different cardiac imaging modalities to ensure that appropriate technologies are accessed by patients suspected of having CAD. This project came about when the Health Services Branch at the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care asked MAS to provide an evidentiary platform on effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities. After an initial review of the strategy and consultation with experts, MAS identified five key non-invasive cardiac imaging technologies for the diagnosis of CAD. Evidence-based analyses have been prepared for each of these five imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, 64-slice computed tomographic angiography, stress echocardiography, and stress echocardiography with contrast. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed (where appropriate). A summary decision analytic model was then developed to encapsulate the data from each of these reports (available on the OHTAC and MAS website). The Non-Invasive Cardiac Imaging Technologies for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: www.health.gov.on.ca/mas"> www.health.gov.on.ca/mas or at www.health.gov.on.ca/english/providers/program/mas/mas_about.html Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis Stress Echocardiography with Contrast for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence-Based Analysis 64-Slice Computed Tomographic Angiography for the Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Disease: An Evidence

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a multifactorial disease with environmental and genetic determinants. The genetic determinants of CAD have previously been explored by the candidate gene approach. Recently, the data from the International HapMap Project and the development of dense genotyping chips have enabled us to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS on a large number of subjects without bias towards any particular candidate genes. In 2007, three chip-based GWAS simultaneously revealed the significant association between common variants on chromosome 9p21 and CAD. This association was replicated among other ethnic groups and also in a meta-analysis. Further investigations have detected several other candidate loci associated with CAD. The chip-based GWAS approach has identified novel and unbiased genetic determinants of CAD and these insights provide the important direction to better understand the pathogenesis of CAD and to develop new and improved preventive measures and treatments for CAD.

  4. Telomere length as a potential biomarker of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyeeta Bhattacharyya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a multifactorial disease whose prevalence remains unabated especially in developing countries. Both lifestyle factors and genetic predisposition contribute to this disorder. Though notable achievements have been made in the medical, interventional and surgical management of CAD, the need for its prevention is more important. Among other modalities, this calls for defining evidence-based new biomarkers, which on their own or in combination with other known biomarkers may predict the risk of CAD to enable institution of appropriate preventive strategies. In the present communication, we have discussed the usefulness of shortening of telomeres as a potential biomarker of CAD. Clinical research evidence in favour of telomere shortening in CAD is well documented in different ethnic populations of the world. Establishing a well-standardized and accurate method of evaluating telomere length is essential before its routine use in preventive cardiology.

  5. Statin use in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Sheena K; Roos, Matt G; Landry, Gregory J

    2016-12-01

    Statins are recommended for use in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. However, much of the data regarding benefits of statins stem from the cardiovascular literature. Here, we review the literature regarding statin use specifically in patients with PAD regarding its effects on cardiovascular events and mortality, limb-related outcomes, statin use after endovascular interventions, statin dosing, and concerns about statins. We performed a literature review using PubMed for literature after the year 2000. Search terms included "statins," "peripheral arterial disease," "peripheral vascular disease," "lipid-lowering medication," and "cardiovascular disease." There is good evidence of statins lowering cardiovascular events and cardiovascular-related mortality in patients with PAD. Though revascularization rates were reduced with statins, amputation rates and amputation-free survival did not improve. Small randomized controlled trials show that patients taking statins can slightly improve pain-free walking distance or pain-free walking time, although the extent of the effect on quality of life is unclear. Statin use for patients undergoing endovascular interventions is recommended because of the reduction of postoperative cardiovascular events. Not enough data exist to support local effects of systemic statin therapy, such as prevention of restenosis. For statin dosing, there is little increased benefit to intense therapy compared with the adverse effects, whereas moderate-dose therapy has significant benefits with very few adverse effects. Adverse effects of moderate-dose statin therapy are rare and mild and are greatly outweighed by the cardiovascular benefits. There is strong evidence to support use of statins in patients with PAD to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. Use in patients undergoing open and endovascular interventions is also recommended. Statin use may reduce the need for

  6. Correlation Between Aortic Valve Sclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease: A Cross - Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Fazlinezhad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aortic valve sclerosisis considered as a manifestation of coronary atherosclerosis. Recent studies demonstrated an association between aortic valve sclerosis and obstructive coronary artery disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluatethe correlation betweenaortic valve sclerosis andobstructive coronary artery disease and the extent of coronary artery disease in patients hospitalized for chest pain. Materials and Methods: A total of 230 consecutive patients were referred to the coronary angiography of GhaemMedical Center and were subjected to transthorasic echocardiography for screening of aortic valve sclerosis and coronary risk assessment. The diagnostic value of obstructive coronary artery disease for aortic valve sclerosis was calculated. Results: The patients with obstructive coronary artery disease had a higher prevalence of aortic valve sclerosis compared to those with no coronary artery disease (P< 0.05. Aortic valve sclerosis was an independent predictor for obstructive coronary artery disease by multivariate analysis (P< 0.05. Aortic valve sclerosis had sensitivity of 47% and specificity of 79% and positive predictor value of 92%. Conclusions: Aortic valve sclerosis was an independent predictor for obstructive coronary artery disease in patients with chest pain and was strongly interrelated with the extent of coronary artery disease in these patients.

  7. Non-arterial assessment of blood gas status in patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Elborn, J. S.; Finch, M. B.; Stanford, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Assessment of blood gas status is important in the management of patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Arterial puncture is often painful and may damage the arterial wall. Measurement of oxygen saturation by transcutaneous oximetry offers a non-invasive alternative to arterial methods but does not allow assessment of partial pressure of carbon dioxide. We have examined the value of oximetry and dorsal hand venous carbon dioxide as an alternative to arterial puncture. Transcutaneous oxygen ...

  8. Elastic properties of pulmonary artery in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ya. Dotsenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Today chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the most common diseases with specific pulmonary vascular changes. The aim – to evaluate elastic properties of pulmonary artery (PA and pathogenic mechanisms of disorders in COPD. Materials and methods. Participants were 50 patients with COPD stages 1–3 without comorbidities (32 men and 18 women, average age was 49.8 ± 1.0 years. Control group included 30 healthy people (19 men and 11 women, aged 50.1 ± 1.2 years. PA elastic properties was researched by ultrasound method. Statistical analysis was performed by means of the Statistica® 6.0 for Windows (StatSoft Inc. software using parametric and nonparametric methods. Results. Study data showed that pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP and PA elastic properties were significantly different between subjects with COPD and control group. Thus, pulsatility, compliance and distensibility in CORD were decreased (39.23 ± 1.6 %, 6.4 ± 0.4 mm 2/mmHg and 1.71 ± 0.10 %/mmHg versus 51.4 ± 1.9 %, 11.1 ± 0.5 mm 2/mmHg and 3.30 ± 0.12 %/mmHg in control group, respectively, p < 0.05, and elastic modulus and index stiffness B were increased (65.7 ± 3.7 mmHg and 2.91 ± 0.17 to 31.6 ± 1.2 mmHg and 2.05 ± 0.08, versus 31.6 ± 1.2 mm Hg and 2.05 ± 0.08 in control group, respectively, p < 0.05. Analysis in groups divided by severity of COPD showed that PA elastic properties was not different significantly between subjects with COPD stage-1 and control group. However, several significant differences in PAP and PA elastic properties between subjects with COPD stage-2, COPD stage-3 and control group were found (p < 0.05. Pearson correlation analysis was showed significant relationships between indexes of PA elastic properties and FEV1, indexes of PAP. Conclusions. The changes of PA elastic properties in COPD are accompany by increasing stiffness, thus reduce pulsatility, compliance and elasticity of vascular wall. Detected changes of PA elastic

  9. Evaluation of cytochrome P450-derived eicosanoids in humans with stable atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theken, Katherine N; Schuck, Robert N; Edin, Matthew L; Tran, Bryant; Ellis, Kyle; Bass, Almasa; Lih, Fred B; Tomer, Kenneth B; Poloyac, Samuel M; Wu, Michael C; Hinderliter, Alan L; Zeldin, Darryl C; Stouffer, George A; Lee, Craig R

    2012-06-01

    Preclinical and genetic epidemiologic studies suggest that modulating cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolism may have therapeutic utility in the management of coronary artery disease (CAD). However, predictors of inter-individual variation in CYP-derived eicosanoid metabolites in CAD patients have not been evaluated to date. Therefore, the primary objective was to identify clinical factors that influence CYP epoxygenase, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), and CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolism in patients with established CAD. Plasma levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) were quantified by HPLC-MS/MS in a population of patients with stable, angiographically confirmed CAD (N=82) and healthy volunteers from the local community (N=36). Predictors of CYP epoxygenase, sEH, and CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolic function were evaluated by regression. Obesity was significantly associated with low plasma EET levels and 14,15-EET:14,15-DHET ratios. Age, diabetes, and cigarette smoking also were significantly associated with CYP epoxygenase and sEH metabolic activity, while only renin-angiotensin system inhibitor use was associated with CYP ω-hydroxylase metabolic activity. Compared to healthy volunteers, both obese and non-obese CAD patients had significantly higher plasma EETs (Ppatients, and demonstrate that biomarkers of CYP epoxygenase and sEH, but not CYP ω-hydroxylase, metabolism are altered in stable CAD patients relative to healthy individuals. Future studies are necessary to determine the therapeutic utility of modulating these pathways in patients with CAD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevalence of Subclinical Coronary Artery Disease in Masters Endurance Athletes With a Low Atherosclerotic Risk Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghani, Ahmed; Maestrini, Viviana; Rosmini, Stefania; Cox, Andrew T; Dhutia, Harshil; Bastiaenan, Rachel; David, Sarojini; Yeo, Tee Joo; Narain, Rajay; Malhotra, Aneil; Papadakis, Michael; Wilson, Mathew G; Tome, Maite; AlFakih, Khaled; Moon, James C; Sharma, Sanjay

    2017-07-11

    Studies in middle-age and older (masters) athletes with atherosclerotic risk factors for coronary artery disease report higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores compared with sedentary individuals. Few studies have assessed the prevalence of coronary artery disease in masters athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile. We assessed 152 masters athletes 54.4±8.5 years of age (70% male) and 92 controls of similar age, sex, and low Framingham 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores with an echocardiogram, exercise stress test, computerized tomographic coronary angiogram, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging with late gadolinium enhancement and a 24-hour Holter. Athletes had participated in endurance exercise for an average of 31±12.6 years. The majority (77%) were runners, with a median of 13 marathon runs per athlete. Most athletes (60%) and controls (63%) had a normal CAC score. Male athletes had a higher prevalence of atherosclerotic plaques of any luminal irregularity (44.3% versus 22.2%; P=0.009) compared with sedentary males, and only male athletes showed a CAC ≥300 Agatston units (11.3%) and a luminal stenosis ≥50% (7.5%). Male athletes demonstrated predominantly calcific plaques (72.7%), whereas sedentary males showed predominantly mixed morphology plaques (61.5%). The number of years of training was the only independent variable associated with increased risk of CAC >70th percentile for age or luminal stenosis ≥50% in male athletes (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.15; P=0.016); 15 (14%) male athletes but none of the controls revealed late gadolinium enhancement on cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging. Of these athletes, 7 had a pattern consistent with previous myocardial infarction, including 3(42%) with a luminal stenosis ≥50% in the corresponding artery. Most lifelong masters endurance athletes with a low atherosclerotic risk profile have normal CAC scores. Male athletes are more likely to have a CAC

  11. Increased arterial stiffness in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Reiner, Barbara; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Objective Central systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a measure of arterial stiffness and strongly associated with atherosclerosis and end-organ damage. It is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality than peripheral SBP. In particular, for children with congenital heart disease, a higher central SBP might impose a greater threat of cardiac damage. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare central SBP in children with congenital heart disease and in healthy counterparts. Patients and methods Central SBP was measured using an oscillometric method in 417 children (38.9% girls, 13.0 ± 3.2 years) with various congenital heart diseases between July 2014 and February 2017. The test results were compared with a recent healthy reference cohort of 1466 children (49.5% girls, 12.9 ± 2.5 years). Results After correction for several covariates in a general linear model, central SBP of children with congenital heart disease was significantly increased (congenital heart disease: 102.1 ± 10.2 vs. healthy reference cohort: 100.4 ± 8.6, p heart disease subgroups revealed higher central SBP in children with left heart obstructions (mean difference: 3.6 mmHg, p hearts after total cavopulmonary connection (mean difference: 2.1 mmHg, p = .015) compared with the reference. Conclusion Children with congenital heart disease have significantly higher central SBP compared with healthy peers, predisposing them to premature heart failure. Screening and long-term observations of central SBP in children with congenital heart disease seems warranted in order to evaluate the need for treatment.

  12. Serum paraoxonase-3 concentration is associated with insulin sensitivity in peripheral artery disease and with inflammation in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rull, Anna; García, Raúl; Fernández-Sender, Laura; García-Heredia, Anabel; Aragonès, Gerard; Beltrán-Debón, Raúl; Marsillach, Judit; Alegret, Josep M; Martín-Paredero, Vicente; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Michael; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2012-02-01

    There are no data on the relationship between serum paraoxonase-3 (PON3) concentration and atherosclerosis in humans. Our aim was to investigate possible associations, using recently developed methods, in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) or coronary artery disease (CAD). We studied 118 PAD and 72 CAD patients and 175 healthy volunteers. Serum PON3 was determined by in-house ELISA using polyclonal antibodies generated against a synthetic peptide with a sequence specific to PON3. Polymorphisms of the PON3 promoter were analysed by the Iplex Gold MassArray™ method. There was a significant increase in serum PON3 concentration in both groups of patients with respect to the control group. In PAD patients, we observed significant positive correlations between PON3, insulin levels and HOMA index. These associations were not observed in CAD. There were significant positive associations between serum PON3 and β-2-microglobulin, CCL2 and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in CAD patients, but not in PAD. We did not find any significant differences in PON3 gene promoter polymorphisms and their haplotypes between patients and controls, indicating that associations were not genetically determined. In both atherosclerotic phenotypes, serum PON3 concentration was increased, but this was associated with decreased insulin sensitivity in PAD and with inflammation in CAD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiologic evaluation of coronary artery disease in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, David M; Ordovas, Karen G

    2016-01-01

    Improved surgical and medical therapy have prolonged survival in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) such that general medical conditions like coronary artery disease (CAD) are now the main determinants of mortality. A summary of the association of CAD with CHD, as well as a discussion of the radiologic evaluation of the coronary arteries in adults with CHD is described herein. Cross sectional imaging to evaluate CAD in adults with CHD should follow the same appropriateness criteria as gender and aged matched patients without CHD. Coronary CT imaging may be particularly valuable in evaluating the coronary arteries in this patient population as invasive coronary angiography may prove challenging secondary to complicated or unconventional anatomy of the coronary arteries. Further, typical methods for evaluating CAD such as stress or echocardiography may be impractical in adults with CHD. Finally, delineating the anatomic relationship of the coronary arteries and their relationship with the sternum, chest wall, conduits, grafts, and valves is highly recommended in patients with CHD prior to reintervention to avoid iatrogenic complications.

  14. Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery: an autopsied sudden death case with severe atherosclerotic disease of the left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Mukai, T; Takahashi, S; Takada, A; Saito, K; Harada, K; Mori, S; Abe, N

    2014-03-01

    Anomalous origin of the right coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ARCAPA) is a rare anomaly. It may contribute to myocardial ischemia or sudden death, although the lesion is usually asymptomatic. We report a sudden death case of a 58-year-old man with ARCAPA coexisting with severe atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. He had been healthy until he complained of chest pain, several days before death, despite the discovery of heart murmur in childhood and suspicion of valvular heart disease. The autopsy revealed not only typical findings of the right coronary anomaly with well-developed collateral circulations but also severe atherosclerotic lesions of the left coronary artery, and ischemic change of the myocardium in the left and right coronary arterial perfusion territory. In addition to the "coronary steal" phenomenon primarily caused by ARCAPA, the reduced flow of both coronary arteries and further increase of "coronary steal" due to atherosclerotic obstructive coronary disease might have contributed to the patient's death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Challenges associated with peripheral arterial disease in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barochiner J

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Barochiner, Lucas S Aparicio, Gabriel D Waisman Hypertension Section, Internal Medicine Department, Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina Abstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is an increasingly recognized disorder that is associated with functional impairment, quality-of-life deterioration, increased risk of cardiovascular ischemic events, and increased risk of total and cardiovascular mortality. Although earlier studies suggested that PAD was more common in men, recent reports based on more sensitive tests have shown that the prevalence of PAD in women is at least the same as in men, if not higher. PAD tends to present itself asymptomatically or with atypical symptoms more frequently in women than in men, and is associated with comorbidities or situations particularly or exclusively found in the female sex, such as osteoporosis, hypothyroidism, the use of oral contraceptives, and a history of complications during pregnancy. Fat-distribution patterns and differential vascular characteristics in women may influence the interpretation of diagnostic methods, whereas sex-related vulnerability to drugs typically used in subjects with PAD, differences in risk-factor distribution among sexes, and distinct responses to revascularization procedures in men and women must be taken into account for proper disease management. All these issues pose important challenges associated with PAD in women. Of note, this group has classically been underrepresented in research studies. As a consequence, several sex-related challenges regarding diagnosis and management issues should be acknowledged, and research gaps should be addressed in order to successfully deal with this major health issue. Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, women, diagnosis, management

  16. Patients with coronary artery disease – maintaining planned lifestyle adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Jacobs

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe how patients with coronary artery disease, who have had one or more cardiac interventions, were maintaining their planned lifestyle adaptations at four months after the intervention. Furthermore, the study aimed to develop guidelines to further assist patients in maintaining lifestyle adaptations. A descriptive study was undertaken using the survey method. The population consisted of 65 participants (42 males, 23 females from five private hospitals in Gauteng. The questions for a questionnaire were derived from a conceptual framework. The participants first completed the questionnaire immediately before they were discharged, and again over the telephone four months after the intervention. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data obtained. The results showed that patients suffering from coronary artery disease do adapt their lifestyle after interventions, but most patients find it problematic to stop smoking. It is essential for patients with coronary artery disease to maintain lifestyle adaptations to ensure further health and prevention of recurrence of the same problems. These adaptations should be a lifelong commitment. Opsomming Die doel van die studie was om te beskryf hoe pasiënte met koronêre vatsiektes wat een of meer kardiale prosedures ondergaan het, die beplande verandering aan hulle lewenstyl op vier maande na die prosedures handhaaf. Verder het die studie gepoog om riglyne daar te stel wat pasiënte kan help om lewenstylaanpassings vol te hou. ’n Opnamemetode is gebruik om ’n beskrywende studie uit te voer. Die populasie het uit 65 deelnemers (42 mans en 23 vroue van vyf privaat hospitale in Gauteng bestaan. ’n Vraelys is vanuit ’n konseptuele raamwerk saamgestel. Die vraelys is net voor ontslag aan die deelnemers gegee om te voltooi, en weer telefonies vier maande na ontslag. Beskrywende statistiek is gebruik om die data te ontleed. Die resultate toon dat pasi

  17. Obesity and coronary artery disease: evaluation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Labbé, David; Ruka, Emmeline; Bertrand, Olivier F; Voisine, Pierre; Costerousse, Olivier; Poirier, Paul

    2015-02-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity, clinicians are now facing a growing population of patients with specific features of clinical presentation, diagnostic challenges, and interventional, medical, and surgical management. After briefly discussing the effect of obesity on atherosclerotic burden in this review, we will focus on strategies clinicians might use to ensure better outcomes when performing revascularization in obese and severely obese patients. These patients tend to present comorbidities at a younger age, and their anthropometric features might limit the use of traditional cardiovascular risk stratification approaches for ischemic disease. Alternative techniques have emerged, especially in nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography might be the diagnostic imaging technique of choice. When revascularization is considered, features associated with obesity must be considered to guide therapeutic strategies. In percutaneous coronary intervention, a radial approach should be favoured, and adequate antiplatelet therapy with new and more potent agents should be initiated. Weight-based anticoagulation should be contemplated if needed, with the use of drug-eluting stents. An "off-pump" approach for coronary artery bypass grafting might be preferable to the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. For patients who undergo bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting, harvesting using skeletonization might prevent deep sternal wound infections. In contrast to percutaneous coronary intervention, lower surgical bleeding has been observed when lean body mass is used for perioperative heparin dose determination. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coronary artery disease: new insights and their implications for radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc; Kivelitz, Dietmar; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Hamm, Bernd [Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Freie Universitaet und Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Schumannstrasse 20/21, P.O. Box 10098, 10117, Berlin (Germany); Borges, Adrian C.; Baumann, Gert [Division of Cardiology, Angiology and Pneumology, Medical Department and Outpatient Centre, Charite Medical School, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) diminishes local, regional, or global blood supply to the heart and is most commonly caused by coronary atherosclerosis. New insights into the etiology of atherosclerosis suggest that CAD is an inflammatory disorder that responds well to modulation rather than an unchangeable chronic process. Since 75% of all acute coronary syndromes result from rupture of atherosclerotic plaques, factors causing rupture have a crucial role. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT have the potential to visualize the composition of coronary artery plaques and thus to identify plaques at risk. Considering the new insights into stunning and hibernation, myocardial late enhancement on MRI might provide pivotal information for therapeutic decision making among lysis therapy, catheter intervention, and bypass surgery. Exercise electrocardiography without or with right precordial leads, stress echocardiography, and stress scintigraphy are simple clinical procedures to identify CAD with high sensitivities of 67, 92, 76, and 88%, respectively. The MRI and CT have to be compared with these good results. Nevertheless, we are expecting that MRI and CT will replace the conventional diagnostic modalities, gain a central role in diagnosing patients with suspected CAD, and prove to be cost-effective in this regard. (orig.)

  19. An endovascular model of ischemic myopathy from peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chandler A; Timmins, Lucas H; Koutakis, Panagiotis; Goodchild, Traci T; Lefer, David J; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Casale, George P; Brewster, Luke P

    2017-09-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant age-related medical condition with limited pharmacologic options. Severe PAD, termed critical limb ischemia, can lead to amputation. Skeletal muscle is the end organ most affected by PAD, leading to ischemic myopathy and debility of the patient. Currently, there are not any therapeutics to treat ischemic myopathy, and proposed biologic agents have not been optimized owing to a lack of preclinical models of PAD. Because a large animal model of ischemic myopathy may be useful in defining the optimal dosing and delivery regimens, the objective was to create and to characterize a swine model of ischemic myopathy that mimics patients with severe PAD. Yorkshire swine (N = 8) underwent acute right hindlimb ischemia by endovascular occlusion of the external iliac artery. The effect of ischemia on limb function, perfusion, and degree of ischemic myopathy was quantified by weekly gait analysis, arteriography, hindlimb blood pressures, femoral artery duplex ultrasound scans, and histologic examination. Animals were terminated at 5 (n = 5) and 6 (n = 3) weeks postoperatively. Ossabaw swine (N = 8) fed a high-fat diet were used as a model of metabolic syndrome for comparison of arteriogenic recovery and validation of ischemic myopathy. There was persistent ischemia in the right hindlimb, and occlusion pressures were significantly depressed compared with the untreated left hindlimb out to 6 weeks (systolic blood pressure, 31 ± 21 vs 83 ± 15 mm Hg, respectively; P = .0007). The blood pressure reduction resulted in a significant increase of ischemic myopathy in the gastrocnemius muscle in the treated limb. Gait analysis revealed a functional deficit of the right hindlimb immediately after occlusion that improved rapidly during the first 2 weeks. Peak systolic velocity values in the right common femoral artery were severely diminished throughout the entire study (P ischemic limb underwent significant arteriogenic

  20. Budd-chiari syndrome and renal arterial neurysms due to Behcet disease: a rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batur, Abdussamet; Dorum, Meltem; Yüksekkaya, Hasan Ali; Koc, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease is a multisystemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with a chronic relapsing course. Vasculitis in Behcet's disease with predominant vascular involvement is the only vasculitis that affects both arteries and veins of any size. Involvement of the renal artery and inferior vena cava is rare among the arteries and veins, respectively. When disease affect the veins, it is in the form of thrombosis. Arterial complications include aneurysms, stenosis and occlusions. Both rupture of arterial aneurysm and occlusion of suprahepatic veins, causing Budd-Chiari syndrome, are associated with a high mortality rate. Vascular involvement is more common in male patients than in female patients. Men and patients with a younger age of onset present with a more severe prognosis. In this case report, we describe a very rare cause of intrarenal arterial aneurysm's rupture with previous Budd-Chiari syndrome due to Behcet's disease and successful angiographic embolization of actively bleeding aneurysm.

  1. Atherosclerotic burden in coronary and peripheral arteries in patients with first clinical manifestation of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjec, Igor

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the atherosclerotic burden in patients with the first symptoms of coronary artery disease (CAD). The study population consisted of 100 consecutive patients (new-onset severe angina or myocardial infarction) and 70 age and sex matched asymptomatic volunteers. Functional and morphologic atherosclerotic markers were sought in carotid, brachial and femoral arteries of all individuals by means of high-resolution ultrasonography, whereas coronary arteriography was performed in the CAD patients only. A total of 347 coronary lesions [230 (66%) obstructive] were discovered in the CAD patients as well as 105 peripheral plaques [26 (25%) obstructive]. The mean percentage diameter stenosis of the culprit coronary lesion was 83.8 ± 15.8%, the mean vessel score 1.7 (range 0-3), the mean stenosis score 19.8 (range 1.5-89.0), and the mean extent score 49.1% (range 10-65%). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as assessed by the brachial flow-mediated response (FMR), was reduced by 50% in the CAD patients (P peripheral arteries of the CAD patients (P arteries of the CAD patients by 43%, in brachial arteries by 20% and in femoral arteries by 57% (P peripheral arteries of our patients with the first clinical presentation of CAD.

  2. Prevention of the Rerupture of Collateral Artery Aneurysms on the Ventricular Wall by Early Surgical Revascularization in Moyamoya Disease: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Fumiaki; Takasu, Syuntaro; Ota, Shinji; Seki, Yukio

    2018-01-01

    Collateral artery aneurysms are a source of intracranial hemorrhage in moyamoya disease. Several reports have shown that surgical revascularization leads to the obliteration of collateral artery aneurysms. However, its effect on the prevention of rebleeding has not been established, and the optimal timing of the operation remains unclear. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of surgical revascularization and to investigate the optimal operation timing in patients with moyamoya disease who have ruptured collateral artery aneurysms on the ventricular wall. Two patients with moyamoya disease who presented with intraventricular hemorrhage caused by rupture of collateral artery aneurysms on the wall of the lateral ventricle are presented here. In both cases, the aneurysms reruptured approximately 1 month after the initial hemorrhage. Both patients successfully underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery anastomosis combined with indirect bypass in the subacute stage. The aneurysms decreased with the development of collateral circulation through the direct bypasses, and rebleeding did not occur after the surgery. Because ruptured collateral artery aneurysms on the wall of the lateral ventricle in moyamoya disease are prone to rerupture within 1 month, surgical revascularization may be recommended as soon as the patients are stable and able to withstand the operation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hemodynamic effect of hydralazine in advanced, stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with cor pulmonale. Immediate and short-term evaluation at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi-Herrera, E; Seoane, M; Verdejo, J

    1984-02-01

    Hydralazine was administered to eight patients (mean age, 69 +/- 2 years) who had stable, advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary arterial hypertension (mean pulmonary arterial pressure, 31 +/- 3 mm Hg), and cor pulmonale. All of the patients were studied at rest and during exercise. After intravenous administration of hydralazine at rest, there were statistically significant increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (p less than 0.05), cardiac index (p less than 0.005), arterial oxygen saturation (p less than 0.01), and mixed venous saturation (SvO2) (p less than 0.005). Pulmonary vascular resistance did not change, and systemic resistance decreased (p less than 0.005). During exercise, pulmonary arterial pressure increased in all patients, and this increase was not blunted by hydralazine; however, cardiac index (p less than 0.005), arterial oxygen pressure (p less than 0.005), and SvO2 (p less than 0.001) increased further during exercise. The increase in pulmonary vascular resistance was significantly blunted by hydralazine (p less than 0.005). Therapy with the drug was continued orally in seven patients because one patient showed a deleterious response in pulmonary hemodynamics. After seven days of oral hydralazine, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance were not statistically different from control. There were statistically significant increases in cardiac index (p less than 0.005) and SvO2 (p less than 0.05), systemic resistance decreased (p less than 0.01). The same condition was found during exercise; however, only two patients showed pulmonary gas exchange and pulmonary hemodynamic benefit at rest and during exercise with hydralazine therapy. Our results suggest that it is unlikely that vasodilator therapy with hydralazine will be useful in patients with advanced stable COPD and cor pulmonale who seem to have fixed pulmonary vascular disease.

  4. Is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with increased arterial stiffness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janner, Julie H; McAllister, David A; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesize that airflow limitation is associated with increasing arterial stiffness and that having COPD increases a non-invasive measure of arterial stiffness - the aortic augmentation index (AIx) - independently of other CVD risk factors....

  5. Non-arterial assessment of blood gas status in patients with chronic pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elborn, J S; Finch, M B; Stanford, C F

    1991-10-01

    Assessment of blood gas status is important in the management of patients with chronic pulmonary disease. Arterial puncture is often painful and may damage the arterial wall. Measurement of oxygen saturation by transcutaneous oximetry offers a non-invasive alternative to arterial methods but does not allow assessment of partial pressure of carbon dioxide. We have examined the value of oximetry and dorsal hand venous carbon dioxide as an alternative to arterial puncture. Transcutaneous oxygen saturation correlated with arterial oxygen saturation (r = 0.76, p less than 0.001) with an error of 2.1% and dorsal hand venous carbon dioxide tension correlated with the arterial tension (r = 0.84, p less than 0.001) with an error of 8%. Changes in oximetric oxygen saturation and venous carbon dioxide tension following oxygen therapy reflected arterial values. Assessment of blood gas status using oximetry and dorsal hand venous carbon dioxide tension is a useful alternative to arterial puncture.

  6. Prevalence of lower extremity arterial disease among elderly people in the community.

    OpenAIRE

    Coni, N; Tennison, B.; Troup, M

    1992-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of lower extremity arterial disease, all patients aged over 65 years registered with a rural general practice near Cambridge were invited to attend for examination of the circulation to the lower extremities; 265 subjects (80%) accepted. Three methods were used to investigate the presence of lower extremity arterial disease - enquiring about symptoms of intermittent claudication; clinical examination (and particularly the detection of arterial bruits); and pressure ...

  7. Psychoeducational rehabilitation for health behavior change in coronary artery disease: a systematic review of controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldcroft, Sheryl A; Taylor, Nicholas F; Blackstock, Felicity C; O'Halloran, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Psychoeducation is a recommended component of cardiac rehabilitation, but to date, evidence from high quality trials examining behavior change has not been synthesized. The primary aim of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of psychoeducation on behavior change in adults with coronary artery disease participating in cardiac rehabilitation; and to identify if changes in health behavior had an effect on modifiable physiological risk factors. A search of electronic databases was conducted for randomized controlled trials involving adults with a primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, percutaneous coronary intervention, stable angina, or coronary artery disease defined by angiography. Trials comparing psychoeducational programs to exercise only, standard cardiac rehabilitation or medical care were included. Primary outcomes were smoking status, physical activity, dietary habits, supplemental oxygen, or medication use. Included trials were assessed for quality with the PEDro scale, and data synthesized descriptively or with meta-analysis. Six randomized controlled trials and 1 quasiexperimental trial were included, a total of 536 participants. A meta-analysis from 213 participants showed psychoeducational interventions produced a significant positive effect on physical activity levels over the medium term (6-12 months) when compared with exercise and risk factor education, (δ = .62, 95% CI 0.3-0.94). However, there was limited positive evidence for change in smoking and dietary behavior. No effect was found on physiological risk factors. Psychoeducational interventions produce a significant positive effect on physical activity levels and potentially on dietary habits and smoking. Strategies such as goal setting, problem solving, self-monitoring, and role modeling appear to be influential in this change.

  8. Association of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism with Coronary Artery Disease in Patients on Regular Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar BARADARAN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the association of parathormone excess due to secondary hyperparathyroidism and hyperphosphatemia with coronary artery disease, a study was designed on a group of stable hemodialysis (HD patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out on patients undergoing maintenance HD. Blood samples were collected after overnight fasting for serum calcium, phosphorus, and intact serum parathormone (iPTH. The presence of cardiac chest pain was confirmed through the complaint of heart burn or epigastric pain, retrosternal discomfort and chest compression was confirmed by symmetrical depressed T wave at that time on a 12-lead ECG by means of a 12-channel and also reliving the pain after taking sublingual Trinitroglycerine pearls (TNG. Results: A sample of 36 stable HD patients was investigated. The mean age of patients was 46.5±17 years. The length of the time patients have been on hemodialysis were 32± 36 months (Median = 19 months. About 21% of patients had chest pain. Mean±SD of intact PTH of patients was 434±455 pg/ml (Median = 309 pg/ml. In this study, there was a significant difference of hemodialysis duration (p = 0.009, hemodialysis amount (p = 0.029 and also serum phosphorus (p = 0.013 between patients with and without cardiac chest pain. There was also a significant difference of iPTH (p = 0.026 between male hemodialysis patients with and without cardiac chest pain. Conclusion: Our data supported the importance of better control of serum phosphorus and also treatment of parathormone excess as the responsible factors promoting the coronary artery disease in hemodialysis patients.

  9. Remodelling of the microarchitecture of resistance arteries in cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Leurgans, Thomas

    and cardiac valve replacement surgery). Using the intrinsic properties of the live tissue, that is the autofluorescence of elastin and smooth muscle/endothelial cells and the second harmonic generation from collagen fibers, the quantity, distribution and orientation of elastin structures, collagen fibers......, and endothelial and smooth muscle cells will be determined in relation to a range of distending pressures (50, 100, 150, 200 mmHg) and in relation to the frequently determined M:L. We present here our initial results from (pig) pericardial biopsies where we describe the microarchitecture of the tissue...... in comparison to other well-studied microvascular beds (e.g. rat mesentery). In the future we aim to compare the microarchitecture of small resistance arteries from parietal pericardial biopsies between patients with and without (treated) hypertension, diabetes and/or ischemic heart disease. 1. Buus, N.H., et...

  10. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Youl Rhee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral arterial disease (PAD in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM exhibits broad clinical characteristics and various consequences and is known as one of the major macrovascular complications of T2DM. Atherosclerosis is recognized as the most direct and important cause of PAD, but acute or chronic limb ischemia may be the result of various risk factors. In light of the increasing number of patients who undergo peripheral vascular procedures, the number of subjects who are exposed to the risks for PAD and related complications is increasing. In this review, we will discuss the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of PAD, as well as the clinical significance of PAD in T2DM subjects.

  11. Pathophysiology of peripheral arterial disease in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shao-Ling; Zhu, Lv-Yun; Han, Rui; Sun, Lei-Lei; Li, Jun-Xia; Dou, Jing-Tao

    2017-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) increases the risk of lower extremity amputation. It is also an independent predictor of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events, affecting both the quality and expectancy of life. Many studies have demonstrated that the prevalence of PAD in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) is higher than in non-diabetic patients. In diabetic patients, PAD occurs early with rapid progression, and is frequently asymptomatic. Multiple metabolic aberrations in DM, such as advanced glycation end-products, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and abnormal oxidative stress, have been shown to worsen PAD. However, the role of DM in PAD is not completely understood. The purpose of the present article is to review and discuss the pathophysiology of PAD in DM. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Current Perspective on Hemodialysis Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Shin; Iida, Osamu; Mano, Toshiaki

    2017-06-25

    The prevalence of peripheral artery disease is substantially higher in patients on chronic hemodialysis than in the general population. The presence of calcified lesions characteristic of hemodialysis patients has an adverse influence on the initial success and long-term outcomes of both surgical bypass and endovascular therapy. Although the selection of revascularization strategy depends on whether an autologous vein is available and if the patient has a life expectancy of at least two years, it is difficult to predict the life expectancy in a real-world clinical situation. Endovascular therapy may be appropriate for many hemodialysis patients with poor general condition because of the high risk of perioperative complications and the poor long-term prognosis. Deciding which treatment option is more appropriate should be done on a case-by-case basis, especially in hemodialysis patients with critical limb ischemia.

  13. Prevention, Detection and Management of Coronary Artery Disease in Minority Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Palmer, Renée P

    2015-11-05

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women living in the United States; this dise